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Sample records for fluorescence in situ hybridization

  1. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Fluorescent in situ hybridization protocols in Drosophila embryos and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lécuyer, Eric; Parthasarathy, Neela; Krause, Henry M

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization is the standard method for visualizing the spatial distribution of RNA. Although traditional histochemical RNA detection methods suffered from limitations in resolution or sensitivity, the recent development of peroxidase-mediated tyramide signal amplification provides strikingly enhanced sensitivity and subcellular resolution. In this chapter, we describe optimized fluorescent in situ hybridization protocols for Drosophila embryos and tissues utilizing tyramide signal amplification, either for single genes or in a high-throughput format, which greatly increases the sensitivity, consistency, economy, and throughput of the procedure. We also describe variations of the method for RNA-RNA and RNA-protein codetection.

  3. FISH-ing for Genes: Modeling Fluorescence "in situ" Hybridization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck

    2006-01-01

    Teaching methods of genetic analysis such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be an important part of instructional units in biology, microbiology, and biotechnology. Experience, however, indicates that these topics are difficult for many students. The authors of this article describe how they created an activity that effectively…

  4. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probe Preparation.

    PubMed

    Tolomeo, Doron; Stanyon, Roscoe R; Rocchi, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    The public human genome sequencing project utilized a hierarchical approach. A large number of BAC/PAC clones, with an insert size approximate from 50 kb to 300 kb, were identified and finely mapped with respect to the Sequence Tagged Site (STS) physical map and with respect to each other. A "golden path" of BACs, covering the entire human genome, was then selected and each clone was fully sequenced. The large number of remaining BACs was not fully sequenced, but the availability of the end sequence (~800-1000 bp) at each end allowed them to be very precisely mapped on the human genome.The search for copy number variations of the human genome used several strategies. One of these approaches took advantage of the fact that fosmid clones, contrary to BAC/PAC clones, have a fixed insert size (~40 kb) (Kidd et al., Nature 453: 56-64, 2008). In this context, the ends of ~7 million fosmid clones were sequenced, and therefore it was possible to precisely map these clones on the human genome.In summary, a large number of genomic clones (GC) are available for FISH experiments. They usually yield bright FISH signals and are extremely precious for molecular cytogenetics, and in particular cancer cytogenetics. The already-labeled probes available commercially are usually based on a combination of such GCs. The present chapter summarizes the protocols for extracting, labeling, and hybridization onto slides of DNA obtained from GC.

  5. Detection of prokaryotic cells with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes is nowadays one of the core techniques in microbial ecology, allowing the identification and quantification of microbial cells in environmental samples in situ. Next to the classic FISH protocol, which uses fluorescently monolabelled probes, the more sensitive CARD-FISH (also known as TSA-FISH), which involves an enzyme catalyzed signal amplification step, is becoming increasingly popular. This chapter describes protocols for both methods. While classic FISH has the advantage of being relatively cheap and easy to do on morphologically diverse samples, CARD-FISH offers a significantly higher sensitivity, allowing the detection of slow growing or metabolically inactive cells, which are below the detection limit of classic FISH. The drawback here is the considerably higher price for the probes and advanced cell fixation and permeabilization requirements that have to be optimized for different target cells.

  6. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  7. 10p Duplication characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktor, A.; Feldman, G.L.; Van Dyke, D.L.; Kratkoczki, P.; Ditmars, D.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a patient with severe failure to thrive, mild-moderate developmental delay, cleft lip and palate, and other anomalies. Routine cytogenetic analysis documented a de novo chromosome rearrangement involving chromosome 4, but the origin of the derived material was unknown. Using chromosome specific painting probes, the karyotype was defined as 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(q35;p11.23). Characterization of the dup(10p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis provides another example of the usefulness of this technology in identifying small deletions, duplications, or supernumerary marker chromosomes. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Genetic analysis of human milk by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Densmore, Lezlie; Pflueger, Solveig

    2006-01-15

    Ductal lavage is a technique for early breast cancer detection in high-risk women. During this procedure, exfoliated epithelial cells are flushed out of the milk ducts of nonlactating women and the collected cells are analyzed for cellular changes associated with breast cancer. A recently developed protocol uses interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) to detect specific chromosomal aneusomies known to be associated with breast cancer. The ability to perform I-FISH on breast milk will prove to be valuable to lactating women who are at high risk for breast cancer or who develop symptoms while breastfeeding. Using established protocols for analyzing peripheral blood lymphocytes, amniocytes, and epithelial cells in urine and breast duct lavage samples as a guide, a protocol for I-FISH of human breast milk has been developed. Cell isolation, fixation, pretreatment, denaturation, hybridization, and washings were optimized to produce slides of high quality, sensitivity, and specificity.

  9. Detection and Differentiation of Chlamydiae by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Poppert, Sven; Essig, Andreas; Marre, Reinhard; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiae are important pathogens of humans and animals but diagnosis of chlamydial infections is still hampered by inadequate detection methods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes is widely used for the investigation of uncultured bacteria in complex microbial communities and has recently also been shown to be a valuable tool for the rapid detection of various bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens. Here we report on the development and evaluation of a hierarchic probe set for the specific detection and differentiation of chlamydiae, particularly C. pneumoniae, C. trachomatis, C. psittaci, and the recently described chlamydia-like bacteria comprising the novel genera Neochlamydia and Parachlamydia. The specificity of the nine newly developed probes was successfully demonstrated by in situ hybridization of experimentally infected amoebae and HeLa 229 cells, including HeLa 229 cells coinfected with C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. FISH reliably stained chlamydial inclusions as early as 12 h postinfection. The sensitivity of FISH was further confirmed by combination with direct fluorescence antibody staining. In contrast to previously established detection methods for chlamydiae, FISH was not susceptible to false-positive results and allows the detection of all recognized chlamydiae in one single step. PMID:12147510

  10. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  11. Pallister-Killian syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Dev, V.G.

    1995-07-03

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a rare cytogenetic condition first described in 1977 by Pallister et al. in 3 adults; the first affected child was reported in 1981. This syndrome (also known as Pallister mosaic aneuploidy syndrome or isochromosome 12p mosaicism) is characterized by postnatal growth retardation, seizures, hypotonia, deafness, profound mental retardation, minimal speech development, and a distinctive facial appearance (high prominent forehead, ocular hypertelorism, sparse anterior scalp hair, prominent lower lip, large ears with thick protruding lobules, cupid-bow shaped upper lip, and a long philtrum). A chromosome 12 abnormality (tetrasomy 12p) has been reported in skin biopsies from these patients but this chromosome anomaly is usually not found (or in only a small proportion, e.g., <0.5%, of blood cells) in peripheral blood. We report on an additional patient with Pallister-Killian syndrome confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using an alpha satellite DNA probe for chromosome 12. This report further illustrates the application of FISH in identifying the source of chromosomal markers of unknown origin in infants with multiple congenital anomalies specifically before the natural history of a condition allows for definitive diagnosis based on clinical findings. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Mapping neurofibromatosis 1 homologous loci by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Viskochil, D.; Breidenbach, H.H.; Cawthon, R.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 maps to chromosome band 17q11.2 and the NF1 gene is comprised of 59 exons that span approximately 335 kb of genomic DNA. In order to further analyze the structure of NF1 from exons 2 through 27b, we isolated a number of cosmid and bacteriophage P-1 genomic clones using NF1-exon probes under high-stringency hybridization conditions. Using tagged, intron-based primers and DNA from various clones as a template, we PCR-amplified and sequenced individual NF1 exons. The exon sequences in PCR products from several genomic clones differed from the exon sequence derived from cloned NF1 cDNAs. Clones with variant sequences were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization under high-stringency conditions. Three clones mapped to chromosome band 15q11.2, one mapped to 14q11.2, one mapped to both 2q14.1-14.3 and 14q11.2, one mapped to 2q33-34, and one mapped to both 18q11.2 and 21q21. Even though some PCR-product sequences retained proper splice junctions and open reading frames, we have yet to identify cDNAs that correspond to the variant exon sequences. We are now sequencing clones that map to NF1-homologous loci in order to develop discriminating primer pairs for the exclusive amplification of NF1-specific sequences in our efforts to develop a comprehensive NF1 mutation screen using genomic DNA as template. The role of NF1-homologous sequences may play in neurofibromatosis 1 is not clear.

  13. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  14. A simple protocol for attenuating the auto-fluorescence of cyanobacteria for optimized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Perrine; Ploux, Olivier; Méjean, Annick

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria contain pigments, which generate auto-fluorescence that interferes with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging of cyanobacteria. We describe simple chemical treatments using CuSO4 or H2O2 that significantly reduce the auto-fluorescence of Microcystis strains. These protocols were successfully applied in FISH experiments using 16S rRNA specific probes and filamentous cyanobacteria.

  15. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization in different ploidy levels cross-breeding of lily.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid 'Freya' had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true.

  16. Chromosome Replicating Timing Combined with Fluorescent In situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along chromosomes at different times during S phase, following a temporal replication program. The specification of replication timing is thought to be a dynamic process regulated by tissue-specific and developmental cues that are responsive to epigenetic modifications. However, the mechanisms regulating where and when DNA replication initiates along chromosomes remains poorly understood. Homologous chromosomes usually replicate synchronously, however there are notable exceptions to this rule. For example, in female mammalian cells one of the two X chromosomes becomes late replicating through a process known as X inactivation1. Along with this delay in replication timing, estimated to be 2-3 hr, the majority of genes become transcriptionally silenced on one X chromosome. In addition, a discrete cis-acting locus, known as the X inactivation center, regulates this X inactivation process, including the induction of delayed replication timing on the entire inactive X chromosome. In addition, certain chromosome rearrangements found in cancer cells and in cells exposed to ionizing radiation display a significant delay in replication timing of >3 hours that affects the entire chromosome2,3. Recent work from our lab indicates that disruption of discrete cis-acting autosomal loci result in an extremely late replicating phenotype that affects the entire chromosome4. Additional 'chromosome engineering' studies indicate that certain chromosome rearrangements affecting many different chromosomes result in this abnormal replication-timing phenotype, suggesting that all mammalian chromosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control proper replication timing of individual chromosomes5. Here, we present a method for the quantitative analysis of chromosome replication timing combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization. This method allows for a direct comparison of replication timing between homologous chromosomes within

  17. Role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in sequencing the tomato genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosomes at various stages of the cell cycle can be used for localization of DNA probes via Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While mitotic metaphase chromosomes are demonstrably too short and compact for this purpose, long pachytene chromosomes are ideal. BACs that hybridize to euchrom...

  18. The Application of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Different Ploidy Levels Cross-Breeding of Lily

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid ‘Freya’ had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true. PMID:26010356

  19. De Novo nonreciprocal translocation 1;8 confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.E.; Stout, C.; Palmer, S.M.

    1995-07-17

    Constitutional nonreciprocal translocations are extremely rare, and even their existence is controversial. We report on a newborn infant with a de novo nonreciprocal translocation between chromosomes 1 and 8 resulting in 1q42.3 deletion syndrome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome paints confirmed the conventional cytogenetic diagnosis. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  1. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  2. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  3. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  5. Mapping pachytene chromosomes of coffee using a modified protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Iacia, Ana Amélia Sanchez; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most direct method for physically mapping DNA sequences on chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of meiotic chromosomes during the pachytene stage is an important tool in plant cytogenetics, because it provides high-resolution measurements of physical distances. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of coffee pachytene chromosomes offers significant advantages compared with FISH mapping of somatic chromosomes, because pachytene chromosomes are 30 times longer and provide additional cytological markers. However, the application of this technique to pachytene chromosomes has been complicated by problems in making preparations of meiotic chromosomes and by difficulties in the application of standard FISH protocols. We have been able to overcome most of these obstacles in applying the FISH technique to the pachytene chromosomes of coffee plants. Digesting the external callose layer surrounding the pollen mother cells (PMCs) in conjunction with other procedures permitted suitable pachytene chromosomes to be obtained by increasing cell permeability, which allowed the probe sequences to enter the cells. For the first time, hybridization signals were registered on coffee pachytene chromosomes using the FISH technique with a repetitive sequence as a probe. We obtained slides on which 80 % of the PMCs had hybridization signals, resulting in FISH labelling with high efficiency. The procedure does not seem to be dependent on the genotype, because hybridization signals were detected in genetically different coffee plants. These findings enhance the possibilities for high-resolution physical mapping of coffee chromosomes. PMID:24244840

  6. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error-Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH).

    PubMed

    Moffitt, J R; Zhuang, X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH)-an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context-provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here, we describe multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves.

  7. Identification of mosaicism in Prader-Willi syndrome using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Hanchett, J.M.

    1996-12-30

    We report on our findings of 4 patients with mosaicism for a deletion of chromosome 15, most commonly associated with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We examined a series of typical and atypical PWS patients in order to identify cytogenetically undetected deletions, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 4 of the patients analyzed we detected a deletion in 14-60% of peripheral blood leukocytes, using four commercially available probes. Our results indicate that mosaicism may play a role in the etiology of some PWS cases. These findings may be especially useful in patients who display discrepancies between clinical phenotype and established diagnostic criteria. Methylation and microsatellite polymorphism analyses of 2 patients with low-level mosaicism failed to identify the deletion. We propose that fluorescence in situ hybridization is the most effective method for detecting somatic mosaicism, since a large number of cells can be individually examined for the presence or absence of a specific deletion. 47 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Cytodiagnosis of Extraskeletal Ewing’s Sarcoma and its Confirmation by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashish Ranjan; Barwad, Adarsh; Dange, Prasad; Siddaraju, Neelaiah

    2016-01-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma is an aggressive malignant small round cell tumour usually occuring in children and adolescents. It needs to be differentiated from other malignant small round cell tumours and immunohistochemistry plays a pivotal role in establishing the diagnosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization or real time-polymerase chain reaction helps in confirming the diagnosis by demonstration of EWS-FLI1 translocation, which is found in approximately 85% of the cases. We report a case of extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma in a10-year-old male, who presented with a right gluteal region mass. Fine needle aspiration and cell block preparation followed by a panel of immunohistochemical markers were performed. Immunohistochemistry for CD99 and FLI1 was positive. EWS-FLI1 translocation was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:27656453

  9. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization to Detect Transgene Integration into Plant Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    Fluorescent chromosome analysis technologies have advanced our understanding of genome organization during the last 30 years and have enabled the investigation of DNA organization and structure as well as the evolution of chromosomes. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized, characterized by their composition and morphology, and counted. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, breeding lines, and individuals, including changes occurring during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols. Fluorescent in situ hybridization correlates molecular information of a DNA sequence with its physical location on chromosomes and genomes. It thus allows determination of the physical position of sequences and often is the only means to determine the abundance and distribution of DNA sequences that are difficult to map with any other molecular method or would require segregation analysis, in particular multicopy or repetitive DNA. Equally, it is often the best way to establish the incorporation of transgenes, their numbers, and physical organization along chromosomes. This chapter presents protocols for probe and chromosome preparation, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromosome staining, and the analysis of results.

  10. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with arbitrarily amplified DNA fragments differentiates carrot (Daucus carota L.) chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Anna; Grzebelus, Ewa; Grzebelus, Dariusz

    2012-03-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) chromosomes are small and poorly differentiated in size and morphology. Here we demonstrate that fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) signals derived from arbitrary PCR probes can be used for chromosome identification in carrot. To prepare probes, we searched for nonpolymorphic products abundantly amplified with arbitrary decamer primers in a group of accessions representing carrot genetic diversity. As a result, 13 fragments ranging in size from 517 to 1758 bp were selected, sequenced, and used as probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization. Four of these probes produced clear and reproducible hybridization signals. The sequences showed similarity to a number of carrot BAC-end sequences, indicating their repetitive character. Three of them were similar to internal portions of gypsy and copia LTR retrotransposons previously identified in plants. Hybridization signals for the four probes were observed as dotted tracks on chromosomes, differing in distribution and intensity. Generally, they were present in pericentromeric and (or) interstitial localizations on chromosome arms. The use of the four probes allowed discrimination of chromosome pairs and construction of more detailed karyotypes and idiograms of carrot.

  11. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) significantly decreases the hybridization efficiency of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Kuo, P L; Guo, H R

    2001-05-01

    Fetal cells were enriched from maternal blood using density gradient centrifugation of Histopaque followed by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) to select CD71-positive cells. For each specimen, cells partially purified by Histopaque were split into equal portions, and each portion was subjected to purification by MACS in parallel. Cells before and after MACS were subjected to dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with X- and Y-chromosome-specific probes. We found that the hybridization rates were decreased by approximately 10% after MACS based on duplicated analysis for each sample.

  12. [Atypical cat eye syndrome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes].

    PubMed

    Bartsch, O; Aksu, F; Fenner, A; Schwinger, E

    1992-08-01

    In 1983, a chromosome analysis was carried out in a newborn preterm infant with minor anomalies (preauricular skin tag, maldescensus testis). All analysed metaphases showed a small extra chromosome, which was symmetric, dicentric and bi-satellited. In spite of in depth analysis, its origin remained obscure. Recent re-evaluation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) led to the diagnosis of a dicentric chromosome 22. The FISH technique is an important new tool in chromosome diagnostics. The phenotype of this infant only vaguely resembles the cat eye syndrome. The syndrome should be diagnosed clinically and not only based on the results of chromosome analysis.

  13. PNA-based fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of bacteria in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Mustafa; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with PNA probes (PNA-FISH) that target specific bacterial ribosomal RNA sequences is a powerful and rapid tool for identification of bacteria in clinical samples. PNA can diffuse readily through the bacterial cell wall due to its uncharged backbone, and PNA-FISH can be performed with high specificity due to the extraordinary thermal stability of RNA-PNA hybrid complexes. We describe a PNA-FISH procedure and provide examples of the application of PNA-FISH for the identification of bacteria in chronic wounds, cystic fibrosis lungs, and soft tissue fillers. In all these cases, bacteria can be identified in biofilm aggregates, which may explain their recalcitrance to antibiotic treatment.

  14. Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections.

  15. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  16. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Silvia; Silvia, Fontenete; Barros, Joana; Joana, Barros; Madureira, Pedro; Pedro, Madureira; Figueiredo, Céu; Céu, Figueiredo; Wengel, Jesper; Jesper, Wengel; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Filipe, Azevedo Nuno

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years, several researchers have focused their attention on nucleic acid mimics due to the increasing necessity of developing a more robust recognition of DNA or RNA sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an example of a method where the use of these novel nucleic acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears to be improved using locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in comparison to LNA/DNA, LNA/UNA, or DNA probes. Further, the use of LNA modifications together with 2'OMe monomers allowed the use of shorter fluorescent probes and increased the range of hybridization temperatures at which FISH would work.

  17. Fluorescence In situ Hybridization: Cell-Based Genetic Diagnostic and Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chenghua; Shu, Wei; Li, Peining

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a macromolecule recognition technology based on the complementary nature of DNA or DNA/RNA double strands. Selected DNA strands incorporated with fluorophore-coupled nucleotides can be used as probes to hybridize onto the complementary sequences in tested cells and tissues and then visualized through a fluorescence microscope or an imaging system. This technology was initially developed as a physical mapping tool to delineate genes within chromosomes. Its high analytical resolution to a single gene level and high sensitivity and specificity enabled an immediate application for genetic diagnosis of constitutional common aneuploidies, microdeletion/microduplication syndromes, and subtelomeric rearrangements. FISH tests using panels of gene-specific probes for somatic recurrent losses, gains, and translocations have been routinely applied for hematologic and solid tumors and are one of the fastest-growing areas in cancer diagnosis. FISH has also been used to detect infectious microbias and parasites like malaria in human blood cells. Recent advances in FISH technology involve various methods for improving probe labeling efficiency and the use of super resolution imaging systems for direct visualization of intra-nuclear chromosomal organization and profiling of RNA transcription in single cells. Cas9-mediated FISH (CASFISH) allowed in situ labeling of repetitive sequences and single-copy sequences without the disruption of nuclear genomic organization in fixed or living cells. Using oligopaint-FISH and super-resolution imaging enabled in situ visualization of chromosome haplotypes from differentially specified single-nucleotide polymorphism loci. Single molecule RNA FISH (smRNA-FISH) using combinatorial labeling or sequential barcoding by multiple round of hybridization were applied to measure mRNA expression of multiple genes within single cells. Research applications of these single molecule single cells DNA and RNA FISH

  18. Exploring the origin of the D genome of oat by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomei; Zhang, Haiqin; Kang, Houyang; Fan, Xing; Wang, Yi; Sha, Lina; Zhou, Yonghong

    2014-09-01

    Further understanding of the origin of cultivated oat would accelerate its genetic improvement. In particular, it would be useful to clarify which diploid progenitor contributed the D genome of this allohexaploid species. In this study, we demonstrate that the landmarks produced by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of species of Avena using probes derived from Avena sativa can be used to explore the origin of the D genome. Selected sets of probes were hybridized in several sequential experiments performed on exactly the same chromosome spreads, with multiple probes of cytological preparations. Probes pITS and A3-19 showed there might be a similar distribution of pITS between the Ac and D genomes. These results indicated that the Ac genome is closely related to the D genome, and that Avena canariensis (AcAc) could be the D-genome donor of cultivated oat.

  19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry.

  20. Detection of a complex translocation using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B.A.; Abuelo, D.N.; Mark, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the detection of a complex 3-way translocation in a patient with multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. The patient was a 10-year-old girl with mental retardation, seizures, repaired cleft palate, esotropia, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, upward slanting palpebral fissures, single transverse palmar crease, brachydactyly, hypoplastic nails, ectrodactyly between the third and fourth right toes, and hypoplasia of the left third toe. Chromosome analysis performed at birth was reported as normal. We performed high resolution banding analysis which revealed an apparently balanced translocation between chromosomes 2 and 9. However, because of her multiple abnormalities, further studies were ordered. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome painting probes revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,t(2;8;9) (2pter{yields}q31::8q21.2{yields}8qter; 8pter{yields}q21.2::2q31{yields}q34::9q34{yields}qter; 9pter{yields}q34::2q34{yields}qter). The 3-way translocation appears to be de novo, as neither parent is a translocation carrier. This case illustrates the importance of using FISH to further investigate cases of apparently balanced translocations in the presence of phenotypic abnormalities and/or mental retardation.

  1. Combined RNA/DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries.

    PubMed

    Shpiz, Sergey; Lavrov, Sergey; Kalmykova, Alla

    2014-01-01

    DNA FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) analysis reveals the chromosomal location of the gene of interest. RNA in situ hybridization is used to examine the amounts and cell location of transcripts. This method is commonly used to describe the localization of processed transcripts in different tissues or cell lines. Gene activation studies are often aimed at determining the mechanism of this activation (transcriptional or posttranscriptional). Elucidation of the mechanism of piRNA-mediated silencing of genomic repeats is at the cutting edge of small RNA research. The RNA/DNA FISH technique is a powerful method for assessing transcriptional changes at any particular genomic locus. Colocalization of the RNA and DNA FISH signals allows a determination of the accumulation of nascent transcripts at the transcribed genomic locus. This would be suggest that this gene is activated at the transcriptional (or co-transcriptional) level. Moreover, this method allows for the identification of transcriptional derepression of a distinct copy (copies) among a genomic repeat family. Here, a RNA/DNA FISH protocol is presented for the simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA in situ on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries using tyramide signal amplification. With subsequent immunostaining of chromatin components, this protocol can be easily extended for studying the interdependence between chromatin changes at genomic loci and their transcriptional activity.

  2. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in raw bovine milk by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Apostolos S; Tirodimos, Ilias; Bobos, Mattheos; Kalamaki, Mary S; Papageorgiou, Demetrios K; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia

    2011-12-02

    The transmission pathways of Helicobacter pylori in humans have not been fully elucidated. Research in the last decade has proposed that foodborne transmission, among others, may be a plausible route of human infection. Owing to the organism's fastidious growth characteristics and its ability to convert to viable, yet unculturable states upon exposure to stress conditions, the detection of H. pylori in foods via culture-dependent methods has been proven to be laborious, difficult and in most cases unsuccessful. Hence, nucleic acid-based methods have been proposed as alternative methods but, to date, only PCR-based methods have been reported in the literature. In the current study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for the detection of H. pylori in raw, bulk-tank bovine milk. After repeated milk centrifugation and washing steps, the bacterial flora of raw milk was subjected to fixation and permeabilization and H. pylori detection was conducted by FISH after hybridization with an H. pylori-specific 16S rRNA-directed fluorescent oligonucleotide probe. Using this protocol, H. pylori was detected in four out of the twenty (20%) raw milk samples examined. The data presented in this manuscript indicate that FISH can serve as an alternative molecular method for screening raw bovine milk for the presence of H. pylori.

  3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses of human oocytes in trisomy 18 and 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.Y.; Chen, Y.J.; Gartler, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The commonly accepted view of synapsis is that only 2 homologues can synapse at any one site and that this restriction applies to polyploids as well. However, triple synapsis has been observed is some triploid plants and in triploid chicken. In humans, triple synapsis of the long arm of chromosome 21 was detected in sperm of a trisomic 21 individual. More recently, studies of oocytes from trisomic 21 and 18 fetuses also indicated extensive triple synapsis along the entire length of the chromosomes. To further investigate this question, we undertook an evaluation of trivalent synapsis in fetal oocytes from 2 trisomic 21 and 2 trisomic 18 fetuses using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes. Oocytes were hybridized with whole chromosome probes obtained from ONCOR, Inc. after fixation with methanol and acetic acid. Slides were scored for the distribution of prophase stages, hybridization efficiency, and hybridization characteristics of chromosomes 18 and 21 in the trisomic 18 and 21 fetuses respectively. Fifty-eight per cent (379/650) of pachytenes analyzed for chromosome 18 contained a conspicous trivalent and 319 (48%) of these nuclei contained a single, thick, continuous fluorescent signal consistent with complete triple synapsis along the entire length of all 3 chromosomes. Sixteen per cent (104/650) of pachytene contained 2 signals consistent with a bivalent and a univalent, and 9 cells contained 3 thin signals consistent with asynapsis of all 3 chromosomes. The remaining 158 pachytenes had unusual pairing configurations that we could not classify, but they most likely represent trivalents with partial pairing between different homologues. In the 2 trisomic 21 fetuses, the majority (143/232) of pachytenes also contained one signal while only 52 cells contained a bivalent and univalent. Five cells contained 3 separate signals. These results confirm the existence of triple synapsis in human meiosis.

  4. Comparison of immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization assessment of HER-2 status in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Michelle; Snover, Dale

    2005-05-01

    Because HER-2 expression in invasive carcinoma of the breast has well-documented ramifications for treatment and prognosis, accurate assessment of HER-2 status is critical. Comparative studies have shown high concordance rates between immunohistochemical analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in cases with immunohistochemical scores of 0 or 1+ (negative) and 3+ (strongly positive) and low concordance rates among cases with immunohistochemical scores of 2+. The present study was performed to determine concordance rates in a setting more representative of routine clinical practice, in which multiple pathologists submit specimens to a single cytogenetics referral laboratory. We found a higher rate of discordance between immunohistochemical analysis and FISH (approximately 92%) in the groups with immunohistochemical scores of 2+ than reported in other studies. These results strongly support the practice of performing FISH in all cases with immunohistochemical scores of 2+, particularly in routine practice, in which interobserver variability in immunohistochemical scoring among multiple pathologists is likely to be high.

  5. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms.

  6. Chromogenic in situ hybridization: a practical alternative for fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect HER-2/neu oncogene amplification in archival breast cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Tanner, M; Gancberg, D; Di Leo, A; Larsimont, D; Rouas, G; Piccart, M J; Isola, J

    2000-11-01

    Determination of HER-2/neu oncogene amplification has become necessary for selection of breast cancer patients for trastuzumab (Herceptin) therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is currently regarded as a gold standard method for detecting HER-2/neu amplification, but it is not very practical for routine histopathological laboratories. We evaluated a new modification of in situ hybridization, the chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), which enables detection of HER-2/neu gene copies with conventional peroxidase reaction. Archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue sections were pretreated (by heating in a microwave oven and using enzyme digestion) and hybridized with a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe. The probe was detected with anti-digoxigenin fluorescein, anti-fluorescein peroxidase, and diaminobenzidine. Gene copies visualized by CISH could be easily distinguished with a x40 objective in hematoxylin-stained tissue sections. HER-2/neu amplification typically appeared as large peroxidase-positive intranuclear gene copy clusters. CISH and FISH (according to Vysis, made from frozen pulverized tumor samples) correlated well in a series of 157 breast cancers (kappa coefficient, 0.81). The few different classifications were mostly because of low-level amplifications by FISH that were negative by CISH and immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibody CB-11. We conclude that CISH, using conventional bright-field microscopy in evaluation, is a useful alternative for determination of HER-2/neu amplification in paraffin-embedded tumor samples, especially for confirming the immunohistochemical staining results.

  7. DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) in buccal cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; Fernández, J L; López-Fernández, C; Gosálvez, J

    2012-12-28

    DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) is a recently developed technique that allows cell-by-cell detection and quantification of DNA breakage in the whole genome or within specific DNA sequences. The present investigation was conducted to adapt the methodology of DBD-FISH to the visualization and evaluation of DNA damage in buccal epithelial cells. DBD-FISH revealed that DNA damage increased significantly according to H2O2 concentration (r2=0.91). In conclusion, the DBD-FISH technique is easy to apply in buccal cells and provides prompt results that are easy to interpret. Future studies are needed to investigate the potential applicability of a buccal cell DBD-FISH model to human biomonitoring and nutritional work.

  8. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  9. Chromosome orientation fluorescence in situ hybridization (CO-FISH) to study sister chromatid segregation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, Ester; Chavez, Elizabeth; Henderson, Alexander; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, assays for sister chromatid segregation patterns relied on incorporation of BrdU and indirect methods to infer segregation patterns after two cell divisions. Here we describe a method to differentially label sister chromatids of murine cells and directly assay sister chromatid segregation patterns following one cell division in vitro and in vivo by adaptation of the well-established CO-FISH (chromosome orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization) technique. 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is incorporated into newly-formed DNA strands, followed by photolysis and exonuclease digestion to create single-stranded sister chromatids containing parental template DNA only. Such single-stranded sister chromatids are differentially labeled using unidirectional probes to major satellite sequences coupled to fluorescent markers. Differentially-labeled sister chromatids in post-mitotic cells are visualized using fluorescence microscopy and sister chromatid segregation patterns can be directly assayed after one cell division. This procedure requires four days for in vivo mouse tissues, and two days for in vitro cultured cells. PMID:20595964

  10. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure, the melting temperature is used as a reference, together with corrections for certain compounds that are used during FISH. However, the quantitative relation between melting and experimental FISH temperatures is poorly described. In this review, various models used to predict the melting temperature for rRNA targets, for DNA oligonucleotides and for nucleic acid mimics (chemically modified oligonucleotides), will be addressed in detail, together with a critical assessment of how this information should be used in FISH.

  11. Chromogenic in situ hybridization is a reliable alternative to fluorescence in situ hybridization for diagnostic testing of 1p and 19q loss in paraffin-embedded gliomas.

    PubMed

    Lass, Ulrike; Hartmann, Christian; Capper, David; Herold-Mende, Christel; von Deimling, Andreas; Meiboom, Maren; Mueller, Wolf

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies imply the importance of rapid and reliable diagnostic assessment of 1p/19q status in oligodendroglial tumors. To date, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most commonly applied technique. FISH, however, has several technical shortcomings that are suboptimal for diagnostic applications: results must be viewed in a fluorescence microscope, results are usually evaluated by a single investigator only, and signal fading excludes physical archiving. Also, in gliomas, the distinction of diffusely infiltrating tumor cells from reactively altered normal tissue may be challenging in fluorescence microscopy. Dual-color chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) has started to replace FISH in some diagnostic tests performed in pathology. Here, we present the first single institute experience with a side-by-side analysis of 1p/19q FISH and CISH in a series of 42 consecutive gliomas. FISH and CISH produced identical results for 1p and 19q in 93% of cases (n = 39/42). Discrepant results were reevaluated by repeated FISH and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based microsatellite marker analysis for loss of heterozygosity. Reevaluation confirmed CISH data in all three cases. We conclude that CISH is a reliable alternative in 1p/19q testing in paraffin-embedded tissues likely to be more sensitive to detect 1p/19q status than FISH analysis.

  12. Detection of airborne Legionella while showering using liquid impingement and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Ha, Thi-Lan; Robine, Enric; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Mathieu, Laurence

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols of water contaminated with Legionella bacteria constitute the only mode of exposure for humans. However, the prevention strategy against this pathogenic bacteria risk is managed through the survey of water contamination. No relationship linked the Legionella bacteria water concentration and their airborne abundance. Therefore, new approaches in the field of the metrological aspects of Legionella bioaerosols are required. This study was aimed at testing the main principles for bioaerosol collection (solid impaction, liquid impingement and filtration) and the in situ hybridization (FISH) method, both in laboratory and field assays, with the intention of applying such methodologies for airborne Legionella bacteria detection while showering. An aerosolization chamber was developed to generate controlled and reproducible L. pneumophila aerosols. This tool allowed the identification of the liquid impingement method as the most appropriate one for collecting airborne Legionella bacteria. The culturable fraction of airborne L. pneumophila recovered with the liquid impingement principle was 4 and 700 times higher compared to the impaction and filtration techniques, respectively. Moreover, the concentrations of airborne L. pneumophila in the impinger fluid were on average 7.0 x 10(5) FISH-cells m(-3) air with the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method versus 9.0 x 10(4) CFU m(-3) air with the culture method. These results, recorded under well-controlled conditions, were confirmed during the field experiments performed on aerosols generated by hot water showers in health institutions. This new approach may provide a more accurate characterization of aerobiocontamination by Legionella bacteria.

  13. Identification of supernumerary ring chromosome 1 mosaicism using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Tuck-Muller, C.M.; Wertelecki, W.

    1995-03-27

    We report on a 15-year-old black boy with severe mental retardation, multiple congenital anomalies, and a supernumerary ring chromosome mosaicism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a chromosome 1 painting probe (pBS1) identified the ring as derived from chromosome 1. The karyotype was 46,XY/47,XY,+r(1)(p13q23). A review showed 8 reports of ring chromosome 1. In 5 cases, the patients had a non-supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in partial monosomies of the short and/or long arm of chromosome 1. In 3 cases, the presence of a supernumerary ring resulted in partial trisomy of different segments of chromosome 1. In one of these cases of the supernumerary ring was composed primarily of the centromere and the heterochromatic region of chromosome 1, resulting in normal phenotype. Our patient represents the third report of a supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in abnormal phenotype. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) as a tool for visualization and enumeration of Campylobacter in broiler ceca

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food-borne human pathogens are typically detected and enumerated by either cultural methods or PCR-based approaches. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) is a standard microscopy tool for microbial ecology but has not been widely used for food safety applications despite important advantages o...

  15. Chromosome translocations measured by fluorescence in-situ hybridization: A promising biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.

    1995-10-01

    A biomarker for exposure and risk assessment would be most useful if it employs an endpoint that is highly quantitative, is stable with time, and is relevant to human risk. Recent advances in chromosome staining using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) facilitate fast and reliable measurement of reciprocal translocations, a kind of DNA damage linked to both prior exposure and risk. In contrast to other biomarkers available, the frequency of reciprocal translocations in individuals exposed to whole-body radiation is stable with time post exposure, has a rather small inter-individual variability, and can be measured accurately at the low levels. Here, the authors discuss results from their studies demonstrating that chromosome painting can be used to reconstruct radiation dose for workers exposed within the dose limits, for individuals exposed a long time ago, and even for those who have been diagnosed with leukemia but not yet undergone therapy.

  16. Same-day prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal aneuploidies using microfluidics-fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sherry S Y; Chua, Cuiwen; Gole, Leena; Biswas, Arijit; Koay, Evelyn; Choolani, Mahesh

    2012-04-01

    Rapid molecular prenatal diagnostic methods, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), quantitative fluorescence-PCR, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, can detect common fetal aneuploidies within 24 to 48 h. However, specific diagnosis or aneuploidy exclusion should be ideally available within the same day as fetal sampling to alleviate parental anxiety. Microfluidic technologies integrate different steps into a microchip, saving time and costs. We have developed a cost-effective, same-day prenatal diagnostic FISH assay using microfluidics. Amniotic fluids (1-4 mL from 40 pregnant women at 15-22 weeks of gestation) were fixed with Carnoy's before loading into the microchannels of a microfluidic FISH-integrated nanostructured device. The glass slides were coated with nanostructured titanium dioxide to facilitate cell adhesion. Pretreatment and hybridization were performed within the microchannels. Fifty nuclei were counted by two independent analysts, and all results were validated with their respective karyotypes. Of the 40 samples, we found three cases of fetal aneuploidies (trisomies 13, 18, and 21), whereas the remaining 37 cases were normal. Results were concordant with their karyotypes and ready to be released within 3 h of sample receipt. Microfluidic FISH, using 20-fold less than the recommended amount of probe, is a cost-effective method to diagnose common fetal aneuploidies within the same day of fetal sampling.

  17. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  18. The design of a microscopic system for typical fluorescent in-situ hybridization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Xie, Shaochuan

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a modern molecular biology technique used for the detection of genetic abnormalities in terms of the number and structure of chromosomes and genes. The FISH technique is typically employed for prenatal diagnosis of congenital dementia in the Obstetrics and Genecology department. It is also routinely used to pick up qualifying breast cancer patients that are known to be highly curable by the prescription of Her2 targeted therapy. During the microscopic observation phase, the technician needs to count typically green probe dots and red probe dots contained in a single nucleus and calculate their ratio. This procedure need to be done to over hundreds of nuclei. Successful implementation of FISH tests critically depends on a suitable fluorescent microscope which is primarily imported from overseas due to the complexity of such a system beyond the maturity of the domestic optoelectrical industry. In this paper, the typical requirements of a fluorescent microscope that is suitable for FISH applications are first reviewed. The focus of this paper is on the system design and computational methods of an automatic florescent microscopy with high magnification APO objectives, a fast spinning automatic filter wheel, an automatic shutter, a cooled CCD camera used as a photo-detector, and a software platform for image acquisition, registration, pseudo-color generation, multi-channel fusing and multi-focus fusion. Preliminary results from FISH experiments indicate that this system satisfies routine FISH microscopic observation tasks.

  19. Partial trisomy 13q identified by sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Carpenter, N.J.; Gucsavas, M.

    1995-07-31

    We report on a 19-month-old boy with partial trisomy 13q resulting from a probable balanced translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 13. The infant presented with omphalocele, malrotation, microcephaly with overriding skull bones, micrognathia, apparently low-set ears, rocker-bottom feet, and congenital heart disease, findings suggestive of trisomy 13. Karyotypic studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes documented an unbalanced karyotype 46,XY,-1,+der. The mother`s chromosomes were normal, and the father was not available. Conventional cytogenetic techniques were unable to identify the extra material on the terminal 1q. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the GTL-banded metaphases, the extra material on 1q was identified as the terminal long arm of 13, thus resulting in partial trisomy 13 (q32-qter). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Determination of the ruminant origin of bone particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Lecrenier, M. C.; Ledoux, Q.; Berben, G.; Fumière, O.; Saegerman, C.; Baeten, V.; Veys, P.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques such as PCR constitute powerful tools for the determination of the taxonomic origin of bones. DNA degradation and contamination by exogenous DNA, however, jeopardise bone identification. Despite the vast array of techniques used to decontaminate bone fragments, the isolation and determination of bone DNA content are still problematic. Within the framework of the eradication of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (including BSE, commonly known as “mad cow disease”), a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was developed. Results from the described study showed that this method can be applied directly to bones without a demineralisation step and that it allows the identification of bovine and ruminant bones even after severe processing. The results also showed that the method is independent of exogenous contamination and that it is therefore entirely appropriate for this application. PMID:25034259

  1. Analysis of Single-cell Gene Transcription by RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C.; Joergensen, Louise; Jensen, Anja T. R.; Arnot, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) to human endothelial receptors during malaria infections is mediated by expression of PfEMP1 protein variants encoded by the var genes. The haploid P. falciparum genome harbors approximately 60 different var genes of which only one has been believed to be transcribed per cell at a time during the blood stage of the infection. How such mutually exclusive regulation of var gene transcription is achieved is unclear, as is the identification of individual var genes or sub-groups of var genes associated with different receptors and the consequence of differential binding on the clinical outcome of P. falciparum infections. Recently, the mutually exclusive transcription paradigm has been called into doubt by transcription assays based on individual P. falciparum transcript identification in single infected erythrocytic cells using RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE1. Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. The method is based on the use of digoxigenin- and biotin- labeled antisense RNA probes using the TSA Plus Fluorescence Palette System2 (Perkin Elmer), microscopic analyses and freshly selected P. falciparum IE. The in situ hybridization method can be used to monitor transcription and regulation of a variety of genes expressed during the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle and is adaptable to other malaria parasite species and other organisms and cell types. PMID:23070076

  2. Analysis of single-cell gene transcription by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Joergensen, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Arnot, David E

    2012-10-07

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) to human endothelial receptors during malaria infections is mediated by expression of PfEMP1 protein variants encoded by the var genes. The haploid P. falciparum genome harbors approximately 60 different var genes of which only one has been believed to be transcribed per cell at a time during the blood stage of the infection. How such mutually exclusive regulation of var gene transcription is achieved is unclear, as is the identification of individual var genes or sub-groups of var genes associated with different receptors and the consequence of differential binding on the clinical outcome of P. falciparum infections. Recently, the mutually exclusive transcription paradigm has been called into doubt by transcription assays based on individual P. falciparum transcript identification in single infected erythrocytic cells using RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE(1). Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. The method is based on the use of digoxigenin- and biotin- labeled antisense RNA probes using the TSA Plus Fluorescence Palette System(2) (Perkin Elmer), microscopic analyses and freshly selected P. falciparum IE. The in situ hybridization method can be used to monitor transcription and regulation of a variety of genes expressed during the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle and is adaptable to other malaria parasite species and other organisms and cell types.

  3. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors.

  4. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Allows Rapid Identification of Microorganisms in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients. PMID:10655393

  5. The role of fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies in molecular diagnostics and disease management.

    PubMed

    King, W; Proffitt, J; Morrison, L; Piper, J; Lane, D; Seelig, S

    2000-12-01

    Large genomic changes, such as aneuploidy, deletions, and other chromosomal rearrangements, have long been associated with pregnancy loss, congenital abnormalities, and malignancy. These genomic changes are quantitative, unambiguous, and fundamental in the transition of normal cells to abnormal ones. Detection of these large genetic changes has an increasingly important role in determining patient diagnosis and care, including therapeutic selection. We have developed two major product platforms that assess genomic changes at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques and the related technology of array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) allow detection of genesized or larger alterations in the genome. FISH is a robust DNA probe technology that can measure both balanced and unbalanced genomic changes on a cell-by-cell basis. In most instances, it is not dependent on metaphase chromosomes, and it is widely used in clinical diagnostics. Array-based CGH has much greater multiplexing capabilities than FISH. This technology has the potential to examine many regions of the genome simultaneously for changes in DNA copy number and identify complex patterns of gains and losses within the genome. In this article, we review several of the current medical applications of FISH and discuss such advanced techniques as CGH and array-based CGH.

  6. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  7. Simple Method for Fluorescence DNA In Situ Hybridization to Squashed Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Larracuente, Amanda M.; Ferree, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH. PMID:25591075

  8. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assessment of chromosome copy number in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, M.; Sigman, M.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 15% of all recognized pregnancies end in spontaneous abortions. The overall frequency of chromosome abnormalities in spontaneous abortions is approximately 50%. Thus aneuploidy is a significant cause of fetal wastage. In addition, structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes can also lead to birth defects, developmental delay, mental retardation and infertility. Conventional cytogenetic analysis via GTG- and other banding techniques is a powerful tool in the elucidation of the nature of chromosomal abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) enables detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities, especially trisomies, in intact cells. Using FISH and commercially available biotin-labeled probes, we have initiated a prospective study to assess specific chromosome copy number of preparations of unstained smears from men referred for a male infertility evaluation as well as smears from normal control males chosen randomly from the sample of sperm donors. A total of approximately 19,000 sperm nuclei have been examined thus far. Of those suitable for analysis, 7382 (38.75%) were normal possessing one copy of chromosome 8, 155 (0.81%) were disomic, and 15 (0.079%) had more than two copies of chromosome 8. Comparisons with data available in the literature will be discussed. Work is ongoing to increase the efficiency of hybridization using both reported and previously untried pretreatment and fixation protocols. We have also initiated studies using multicolor FISH with various chromosome enumeration probes. The assay described here is a potentially powerful tool for detecting rare events such as spontaneous germ cell aneuploidy, aneuploidy detected in semen from men with carcinoma in situ of the testis and aneuploidy induced by potential environmental genotoxicants. It can also be utilized for segregation analysis and for correlating chromosome copy number with germ cell morphology.

  9. FISHIS: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Suspension and Chromosome Flow Sorting Made Easy

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Debora; Farina, Anna; Grosso, Valentina; Gennaro, Andrea; Ceoloni, Carla; Lucretti, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The large size and complex polyploid nature of many genomes has often hampered genomics development, as is the case for several plants of high agronomic value. Isolating single chromosomes or chromosome arms via flow sorting offers a clue to resolve such complexity by focusing sequencing to a discrete and self-consistent part of the whole genome. The occurrence of sufficient differences in the size and or base-pair composition of the individual chromosomes, which is uncommon in plants, is critical for the success of flow sorting. We overcome this limitation by developing a robust method for labeling isolated chromosomes, named Fluorescent In situ Hybridization In suspension (FISHIS). FISHIS employs fluorescently labeled synthetic repetitive DNA probes, which are hybridized, in a wash-less procedure, to chromosomes in suspension following DNA alkaline denaturation. All typical A, B and D genomes of wheat, as well as individual chromosomes from pasta (T. durum L.) and bread (T. aestivum L.) wheat, were flow-sorted, after FISHIS, at high purity. For the first time in eukaryotes, each individual chromosome of a diploid organism, Dasypyrum villosum (L.) Candargy, was flow-sorted regardless of its size or base-pair related content. FISHIS-based chromosome sorting is a powerful and innovative flow cytogenetic tool which can develop new genomic resources from each plant species, where microsatellite DNA probes are available and high quality chromosome suspensions could be produced. The joining of FISHIS labeling and flow sorting with the Next Generation Sequencing methodology will enforce genomics for more species, and by this mightier chromosome approach it will be possible to increase our knowledge about structure, evolution and function of plant genome to be used for crop improvement. It is also anticipated that this technique could contribute to analyze and sort animal chromosomes with peculiar cytogenetic abnormalities, such as copy number variations or cytogenetic

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Wirths, Beate; Poppert, Sven

    2006-09-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is frequently isolated from the respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, but identification with biochemical tests is unreliable. We describe fluorescence in situ hybridization assays for the rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis. Both assays showed high sensitivities and high specificities with a collection of 155 nonfermenters from CF patients.

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of hindgut bacteria associated with the development of equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Milinovich, Gabriel J; Trott, Darren J; Burrell, Paul C; Croser, Emma L; Al Jassim, Rafat A M; Morton, John M; van Eps, Andrew W; Pollitt, Christopher C

    2007-08-01

    Carbohydrate-induced laminitis in horses is characterized by marked changes in the composition of the hindgut microbiota, from a predominantly Gram-negative population to one dominated by Gram-positive bacteria. The objective of this study was to monitor changes in the relative abundance of selected hindgut bacteria that have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of equine laminitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Caecal cannulae were surgically implanted in five Standardbred horses and laminitis induced by oral administration of a bolus dose of oligofructose. Caecal fluid and faecal specimens were collected over a 48 h period at 2 to 4 h intervals post-oligofructose administration and subjected to FISH using probes specific for nine bacterial groups to determine changes in their relative abundance compared with total bacteria hybridizing to the generic EUBMIX probe. Additionally, hoof biopsies were taken over the course of the experiment at 6 h intervals and evaluated for histopathological changes consistent with laminitis, allowing changes in hindgut microbiota to be correlated with the onset of lesions in the foot. Of the microorganisms specifically targeted, streptococci of the Streptococcus bovis/equinus complex were the only bacteria that consistently proliferated in both caecal fluid and faeces immediately before the onset of histological signs of laminitis. Furthermore, lactobacilli, Enterobacteriaceae, Allisonella histaminiformans, enterococci, Bacteroides fragilis, Mitsuokella jalaludinii and Clostridium difficile did not establish significant populations in the hindgut before the onset of equine laminitis.

  12. Faster identification of pathogens in positive blood cultures by fluorescence in situ hybridization in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Remco P H; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Simoons-Smit, Alberdina M; Danner, Sven A; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms in blood cultures is required to optimize empirical treatment at an early stage. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can reduce the time to identification of microorganisms in growth-positive blood cultures. In this study, we evaluated the performance, time to identification, and potential clinical benefits of FISH compared to those of conventional culture methods in routine practice. After Gram staining, blood culture fluids were simultaneously further identified with FISH and with conventional culture methods. Results and points in time of FISH and culture identification (provisional and final identifications) were collected and compared. For 91% of microorganisms, the genus or family name was identified, and for 79%, the species name could be attributed. The sensitivity and specificity of the individual probes exceeded 95%, except for the Enterobacteriaceae probe (sensitivity, 89%). Cross-hybridization was obtained with the Klebsiella pneumoniae probe for Klebsiella oxytoca. The time gains of FISH and final culture identification were more than 18 h for bacteria and 42 h for yeasts. With FISH, Staphylococcus aureus was differentiated from coagulase-negative staphylococci 1.4 h faster than by provisional identification (P < 0.001). In conclusion, FISH allows rapid and reliable identification of the majority of microorganisms in growth-positive blood cultures. The substantial time gain of identification with FISH may allow same-day adjustment of antimicrobial therapy, and FISH is especially useful if no provisional identification is obtained. With further extension of the number of probes and a reduction in turnaround time, FISH will become a very useful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of bloodstream infections.

  13. Micro fluorescence in situ hybridization (μFISH) for spatially multiplexed analysis of a cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Autebert, J; Kaigala, G V

    2016-04-01

    We here present a micrometer-scale implementation of fluorescence in situ hybridization that we term μFISH. This μFISH implementation makes use of a non-contact scanning probe technology, namely, a microfluidic probe (MFP) that hydrodynamically shapes nanoliter volumes of liquid on a surface with micrometer resolution. By confining FISH probes at the tip of this microfabricated scanning probe, we locally exposed approximately 1000 selected MCF-7 cells of a monolayer to perform incubation of probes - the rate-limiting step in conventional FISH. This method is compatible with the standard workflow of conventional FISH, allows re-budgeting of the sample for various tests, and results in a ~ 15-fold reduction in probe consumption. The continuous flow of probes and shaping liquid on these selected cells resulted in a 120-fold reduction of the hybridization time compared with the standard protocol (3 min vs. 6 h) and efficient rinsing, thereby shortening the total FISH assay time for centromeric probes. We further demonstrated spatially multiplexed μFISH, enabling the use of spectrally equivalent probes for detailed and real-time analysis of a cell monolayer, which paves the way towards rapid and automated multiplexed FISH on standard cytological supports.

  14. Recurrent gene amplifications in human type I endometrial adenocarcinoma detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Emma; Levan, Kristina; Adamovic, Tatjana; Levan, Göran; Horvath, György

    2008-02-01

    Determining what genes are actively involved in tumor development is important, because they may provide targets for directed therapy. Human tumors are greatly heterogeneous with respect to etiology and genetic background, which complicates the identification of common genetic aberrations. In contrast, genetic and environmental variation can be in part controlled in experimental animals, which facilitates identification of the important changes. In inbred BDII rats, which are genetically predisposed to endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC), certain chromosome regions exhibit recurrent amplification in the tumors. Previous CGH analysis had shown that a subset of human EAC tumors exhibited increased copy numbers in the homologous chromosomal regions, located in human 2p21 approximately p25 and 7q21 approximately q31. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on imprints from 13 human EAC tumors, we determined the average copy numbers of each of 15 probes derived from cancer-related genes situated in these chromosome regions. Among the genes analyzed, those most often targeted by amplification were SDC1 and CYP1B1 in 2p21 approximately p25 and CDK6 and MET in 7q21 approximately q31, but all of the 15 genes tested were found to be amplified in at least two tumors.

  15. Correlations between arsenic in Maine groundwater and microbial populations as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Jennifer M; MacRae, Jean D

    2006-04-01

    Arsenic is known to cause serious health effects when consumed in drinking water. In the state of Maine, approximately half of the population relies on private groundwater wells for their drinking water. Of those wells, as many as 13% may contain arsenic levels above the current EPA maximum contaminant level of 10 microgl(-1). Microorganisms can potentially contribute to arsenic release into groundwater through several mechanisms. Some can reduce arsenate to arsenite, which is more toxic and may be more mobile. Sulfurospirillum species NP4, which was isolated from well water, respires arsenate and could act in this way. Microorganisms can also act indirectly by reducing bedrock surface coatings, such as iron oxyhydroxides, that adsorb arsenic in the groundwater environment. The genus Geobacter contains many species that are capable of iron reduction that could play a role in the indirect release of arsenic into groundwater. Water samples from Northport, ME and the Branch Lake region of Ellsworth, ME, which both have elevated groundwater arsenic levels, have been probed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to determine the percentage of the population that is NP4 and the percentage that are Geobacter species. Geobacter abundance correlates well with the total arsenic concentration indicating that indirect mechanisms could be important in releasing arsenic. NP4 appears to be reducing arsenate since its prevalence correlates well with arsenite, the end product of arsenate respiration.

  16. Quantum-dot-labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the microorganism Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Peng, Jun; Lu, Zhe-Xue; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2006-05-12

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as a kind of nonisotopic biological labeling material have many unique fluorescent properties relative to conventional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, such as composition- and size-dependent absorption and emission, a broad absorption spectrum, photostability, and single-dot sensitivity. These properties make them a promising stable and sensitive label, which can be used for long-term fluorescent tracking and subcellular location of genes and proteins. Here, a simple approach for the construction of QD-labeled DNA probes was developed by attaching thiol-ssDNA to QDs via a metal-thiol bond. The as-prepared QD-labeled DNA probes had high dispersivity, bioactivity, and specificity for hybridization. Based on such a kind of probe with a sequence complementary to multiple clone sites in plasmid pUC18, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the tiny bacterium Escherichia coli has been realized for the first time.

  17. Yeasts identification in microfluidic devices using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, André M; Cruz-Moreira, Daniela; Cerqueira, Laura; Miranda, João M; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2017-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) is a highly specific molecular method widely used for microbial identification. Nonetheless, and due to the detection limit of this technique, a time-consuming pre-enrichment step is typically required before identification. In here we have developed a lab-on-a-chip device to concentrate cell suspensions and speed up the identification process in yeasts. The PNA-FISH protocol was optimized to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common yeast that is very relevant for several types of food industries. Then, several coin-sized microfluidic devices with different geometries were developed. Using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we modeled the hydrodynamics inside the microchannels and selected the most promising options. SU-8 structures were fabricated based on the selected designs and used to produce polydimethylsiloxane-based microchips by soft lithography. As a result, an integrated approach combining microfluidics and PNA-FISH for the rapid identification of S. cerevisiae was achieved. To improve fluid flow inside microchannels and the PNA-FISH labeling, oxygen plasma treatment was applied to the microfluidic devices and a new methodology to introduce the cell suspension and solutions into the microchannels was devised. A strong PNA-FISH signal was observed in cells trapped inside the microchannels, proving that the proposed methodology works as intended. The microfluidic designs and PNA-FISH procedure described in here should be easily adaptable for detection of other microorganisms of similar size.

  18. Gonadoblastomas in 45,X/46,XY mosaicism: analysis of Y chromosome distribution by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Iezzoni, J C; Von Kap-Herr, C; Golden, W L; Gaffey, M J

    1997-08-01

    Gonadoblastomas are composed of nests of neoplastic germ cells and sex cord derivatives surrounded by ovarian-type stroma. These tumors are found almost exclusively in persons with gonadal dysgenesis associated with a Y chromosome or Y chromosome fragment, and accordingly, the Y chromosome has been implicated in gonadoblastoma oncogenesis. To evaluate this association, we used two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific probes to determine the distribution of the X and Y chromosomes in the tumor nests and surrounding stromal cells in paraffin tissue sections of three gonadoblastomas in two patients with gonadal dysgenesis and 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. Statistical analysis of the data from the fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that in all three gonadoblastomas, the proportion of nuclei with a Y chromosome signal was significantly higher in the tumor cells than in the nontumoral cells of the surrounding stroma (P<.001). These results suggest that Y chromosome material participates in gonadoblastoma tumorigenesis.

  19. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) to detect HER2 gene amplification in breast and gastric cancer: comparison with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Kiyose, Shinichiro; Igarashi, Hisaki; Nagura, Kiyoko; Kamo, Takaharu; Kawane, Kazunori; Mori, Hiroki; Ozawa, Takachika; Maeda, Matsuyoshi; Konno, Keisuke; Hoshino, Hideaki; Konno, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Shinmura, Kazuya; Hattori, Naohiko; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2012-11-01

    The chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assay, designed to detect the amplification of the HER2 gene in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer (BC) and gastric cancer (GC) tissue specimens, was evaluated in 125 FFPE BC cases and 198 FFPE GC cases for which the HER2 status had been predetermined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In the 125 BC cases and the 198 gastric cases, we found a very good concordance (98.4% and 99.0%, respectively) between CISH and FISH. In particular, we evaluated the polysomy cases, as these cases often have ambiguous treatment options in clinical practice. The polysomy of chromosome 17 was defined as the presence of three or more CEP17 signals in at least 10% of the tumor cells. In the 50 BC cases and 54 GC cases displaying chromosome 17 polysomy, the concordance between FISH and CISH was 98.0% and 98.1%, respectively. These results indicate that CISH could provide an accurate and practical alternative to FISH for the clinical diagnosis of HER2 gene amplification in FFPE BC and FFPE GC samples.

  20. Ecophysiological Analysis of Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems by Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Extracellular Staining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Ecophysiological analysis and functions of single cells in complex microbial systems can be examined by simple combinations of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification with various staining techniques targeting functional phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe methods and protocols optimized for the study of extracellular enzymes, surface hydrophobicity and specific surface structures. Although primarily applied to the study of microbes in wastewater treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), the methods may also be used with minor modifications in several other ecosystems.

  1. The importance of using fluorescence in situ hybridization for the diagnosis of Smith-Magenis syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Juyal, R.C.; Greenberg, F.; Lupski, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. Quality metaphase preparations are required for unambiguous detection of the deletion. We and others have reported cases of SMS due to mosaicism for del(17)(p11.2). Examination of peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of a patient with the SMS phenotype at 850 band level of resolution revealed a low level mosaicism (11%) for the deletion. Examination of fibroblasts at relatively low resolution revealed the deletion in all cells. In a second study, we reported molecular evidence for mosaicism in the unaffected mother of an SMS patient who demonstrated mosaicism (55%) for the deletion at a resolution level of < 500 bands. We now report a different SMS patient who was initially diagnosed as mosaic del(17)(p11.2) in two different cytogenetic laboratories. A third blinded cytogenetic study yielded a questionable diagnosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) conducted in two different laboratories with two different markers shown to be within the deletion region and a control marker from chromosome 17 demonstrated a deletion in 20/20 and 25/25 metaphases scored, respectively. It appears the latter patient may harbor a very small deletion and that FISH is a more reliable test for the Smith-Magenis deletion. Furthermore, FISH should be used to confirm or refute mosaicism seen in routine cytogenetics studies.

  2. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000–10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia. PMID:28018437

  3. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim; Yu, Jeesuk

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000-10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia.

  4. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of human sperm – diagnostics, indications, and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Besada, Stefan; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    Male factor infertility is a relatively common condition, affecting at least 6% of men of reproductive age. Typically men with unknown genetic abnormalities resort to using assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to achieve their reproductive goals. Infertile men who father biological children using ART could have a higher incidence of aneuploidy, which is a deviation from the normal haploid or diploid chromosomal state. Aneuploidy can be evaluated using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a cytogenetic assay that gives an estimate of the frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities. The chromosomes that are generally analyzed in FISH are associated with aneuploidies that are compatible with life, that is, chr.13, 18, 21, X, and Y. The technique is indicated for a variety of reasons, but most importantly in the following: 1) men who despite normal semen parameters suffer recurrent pregnancy loss and 2) men with normal semen parameters, undergoing IVF, but still experiencing recurrent implantation failure. It may be used as a screening tool to help in reproductive and genetic counseling of affected couples, or those who have previously experienced failure of ART. A qualitative analysis of FISH study results allows them to make informed reproductive choices. Given its increasing clinical use in various infertility diagnoses and the development of novel adjunct technologies, one can expect much progress in the areas of preimplantation genetic screening, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25439797

  5. Potential clinical impact of three-dimensional visualization for fluorescent in situ hybridization image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Shibo; Bin, Zheng; Zhang, Roy; Li, Yuhua; Tian, Huimin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation is strong indication of cancers. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can effectively detect this translocation and achieve high accuracy in disease diagnosis and prognosis assessment. For this purpose, whole chromosome paint probes are utilized to image the configuration of DNA fragments. Although two-dimensional (2-D) microscopic images are typically used in FISH signal analysis, we present a case where the translocation occurs in the depth direction where two probed FISH signals are overlapped in the projected image plane. Thus, the translocation cannot be identified. However, when imaging the whole specimen with a confocal microscope at 27 focal planes with 0.5-μm step interval, the translocation can be clearly identified due to the free rotation capability by the three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. Such a translocation detection error of using 2-D images might be critical in detecting and diagnosing early or subtle disease cases where detecting a small number of abnormal cells can make diagnostic difference. Hence, the underlying implication of this report suggests that utilizing 3-D visualization may improve the overall accuracy of FISH analysis for some clinical cases. However, the clinical efficiency and cost of using 3-D versus 2-D imaging methods are also to be assessed carefully.

  6. A new approach to screen transgenic offspring using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Swiger, R.R.; Tucker, J.D.; Heddle, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    In order to identify the presence of vector, specifically Lacl or LacZ, in putative transgenic mice rapidly and reliably, we developed a new method which utilizes fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Transgenic mouse models are being used with increasing frequency for mutational and toxicological studies. By applying our method, an investigator can reliably determine the presence and the number of integration sites of a transgenic vector in numerous samples with less effort compared to conventional methods. This approach involves gazing a tail with a scalpel to obtain a blood smear on a microscope slide. After fixing the slide in 3:1 methanol: acetic acid, typical FISH analysis using biotinylated lambda DNA as the probe in performed. Our method eliminates the need for DNA extraction, blotting, and PCR, and yields results from a large number of individually identifiable cells from each animal. This assay is more accurate, reliable and easier to perform than conventional schemes presently used for screening transgenic animals. A particular advantage of this assay is the ability to discriminate between animals that are heterozygous and homozygous, something that eludes the PCR-based methods and Southern blotting. We have successfully analyzed over 95 samples with this method. Based on these results, we believe our system is more sensitive and accurate than conventional means of screening.

  7. Ribosomal DNA location in the scarab beetle Thorectes intermedius (Costa) (Coleoptera: Geotrupidae) using banding and fluorescent in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Vitturi, R; Colomba, M S; Barbieri, R; Zunino, M

    1999-01-01

    Mitotic metaphase chromosomes of the scarab beetle Thorectes intermedius (Costa) (Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea: Geotrupidae) were analyzed using various banding methods and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) with a ribosomal probe. The results obtained indicate that silver and CMA3 staining are unable to localize the chromosome sites of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). Such an inadequacy is a consequence of the extensive silver and CMA3 stainability of both constitutive heterochromatin and heterochromatin associated to the NORs.

  8. Estimate of true incomplete exchanges using fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomere probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the frequency of true incomplete exchanges in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human lymphocytes were exposed to 2 Gy and 5 Gy of gamma-rays. Chromosome aberrations were studied using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome-specific probes, together with human telomere probes. Chromosomes 2 and 4 were chosen in the present study. RESULTS: The percentage of incomplete exchanges was 27% when telomere signals were not considered. After excluding false incomplete exchanges identified by the telomere signals, the percentage of incomplete exchanges decreased to 11%. Since telomere signals appear on about 82% of the telomeres, the percentage of true incomplete exchanges should be even lower and was estimated to be 3%. This percentage was similar for chromosomes 2 and 4 and for doses of both 2 Gy and 5 Gy. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of true incomplete exchanges is significantly lower in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes than the frequencies reported in the literature.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the DiGeorge syndrome region using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A. Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London ); Halford, S.; Wadey, R.; Scambler, P.J. ); Baldini, A. )

    1993-08-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect characterized by cardiac defects, facial dysmorphism, and mental retardation. Several studies have described a critical region for DGS at 22q11, within which the majority of DGS patients have deletions. The authors have isolated nine cosmid and three YAC clones using previously described and newly isolated probes that have been shown to be deleted in many DGS patients. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and digital imaging, they have mapped and ordered these clones relative to the breakpoints of two balanced translocations at 22q11 (one in a DGS patient and one in the unaffected parent of a DGS child). The data indicate that the breakpoint in the unaffected individual distally limits the DGS critical region (defined as the smallest region of overlap), while proximally the region is limited by repeat-rich DNA. The critical region includes the balanced translocation breakpoint of the DGS patient that presumably disrupts the gene causing this syndrome.

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) to mitotic heterochromatin of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Maria Carmela; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2010-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic chromosomes into euchromatin and heterochromatin represents an enigmatic aspect of genome evolution. Constitutive heterochromatin is a basic, yet still poorly understood component of eukaryotic genomes and its molecular characterization by means of standard genomic approaches is intrinsically difficult. Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes do not seem to be particularly useful to map heterochromatin sequences because the typical features of heterochromatin, organized as it is into a chromocenter, limit cytogenetic analysis. In contrast, constitutive heterochromatin has been well-defined at the cytological level in mitotic chromosomes of neuroblasts and has been subdivided into several bands with differential staining properties. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC) probes that carry large genomic portions defined by sequence annotation has yielded a "revolution" in the field of cytogenetics because it has allowed the mapping of multiple genes at once, thus rendering constitutive heterochromatin amenable to easy and fast cytogenetics analyses. Indeed, BAC-based FISH approaches on Drosophila mitotic chromosomes have made it possible to correlate genomic sequences to their cytogenetic location, aiming to build an integrated map of the pericentric heterochromatin. This chapter presents our standard protocols for BAC-based FISH, aimed at mapping large chromosomal regions of mitotic heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  12. Does polyomavirus infection interfere with bladder cancer fluorescence in situ hybridization?

    PubMed

    Hossain, Deloar; Hull, David; Kalantarpour, Fatemeh; Maitlen, Rebecca; Qian, Junqi; Bostwick, David G

    2014-03-01

    Urine cytology is a proven and widely used screening tool for the detection of urothelial carcinoma. However, morphologic features of polyomavirus infected cells, characterized by nuclear inclusions (decoy cells) are a known source of diagnostic confusion with malignancy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now routinely used to support the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and monitor for recurrence. We sought to determine whether polyomavirus infection could result in positive FISH results (aneuploidy). This study deals with retrospective study of 100 polyomavirus-infected urine samples from patients with no history of urothelial carcinoma or organ transplantation. All cases were stained with Papanicolaou and acid hematoxylin stain. One slide from each sample was de-stained and FISH was performed using chromosome enumeration probes 3, 7, 17, and locus-specific probe 9p21. Adequate cells for FISH analysis (25 cells) were present in 81 cases; 19 cases were insufficient due to loss of cells during de-staining and FISH preparation process. All polyomavirus-infected cells (decoy cells) exhibited a normal chromosome pattern. Four cases were FISH positive, but there were no positive decoy cells. Decoy cells did not exhibit aneuploidy by FISH. The presence of decoy cells does not exclude the possibility of concurrent urothelial carcinoma. Acid hematoxylin stain appeared to supplement the Papanicolou stain in identifying and confirming the presence of polyomavirus infection.

  13. Rapid and accurate identification of Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Waite, D W; Griffin, R; Taylor, R; George, S

    2016-11-01

    Citrus canker is an economically important disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc). This organism targets a wide range of citrus plants, including sweet orange, grapefruit, lemon and lime. As Xcc is spread by environmental factors such as wind and rain, it is difficult to control its movement once the disease has established. In order to facilitate monitoring of citrus canker we sought to design a novel diagnostic protocol based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification of bacterial cells directly from canker pustules without cultivation or DNA extraction. This method was validated for specificity against a range of Xanthomonas species and strains. We show that our assay is extremely rapid (typically requiring between 2 and 3 h), and possesses a similar specificity to existing PCR diagnostic tools. The sensitivity of the assay is comparable to that of an existing PCR-based technique and sufficient for identifying Xcc in symptomatic plant material. The method is easily transferable to diagnosticians without prior experience using FISH.

  14. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Optical Mapping to Correct Scaffold Arrangement in the Tomato Genome

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Lindsay A.; Anderson, Lorinda K.; de Jong, Hans; Smit, Sandra; Goicoechea, José Luis; Roe, Bruce A.; Hua, Axin; Giovannoni, James J.; Stack, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The order and orientation (arrangement) of all 91 sequenced scaffolds in the 12 pseudomolecules of the recently published tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, 2n = 2x = 24) genome sequence were positioned based on marker order in a high-density linkage map. Here, we report the arrangement of these scaffolds determined by two independent physical methods, bacterial artificial chromosome–fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH) and optical mapping. By localizing BACs at the ends of scaffolds to spreads of tomato synaptonemal complexes (pachytene chromosomes), we showed that 45 scaffolds, representing one-third of the tomato genome, were arranged differently than predicted by the linkage map. These scaffolds occur mostly in pericentric heterochromatin where 77% of the tomato genome is located and where linkage mapping is less accurate due to reduced crossing over. Although useful for only part of the genome, optical mapping results were in complete agreement with scaffold arrangement by FISH but often disagreed with scaffold arrangement based on the linkage map. The scaffold arrangement based on FISH and optical mapping changes the positions of hundreds of markers in the linkage map, especially in heterochromatin. These results suggest that similar errors exist in pseudomolecules from other large genomes that have been assembled using only linkage maps to predict scaffold arrangement, and these errors can be corrected using FISH and/or optical mapping. Of note, BAC-FISH also permits estimates of the sizes of gaps between scaffolds, and unanchored BACs are often visualized by FISH in gaps between scaffolds and thus represent starting points for filling these gaps. PMID:24879607

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and optical mapping to correct scaffold arrangement in the tomato genome.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Lindsay A; Anderson, Lorinda K; de Jong, Hans; Smit, Sandra; Goicoechea, José Luis; Roe, Bruce A; Hua, Axin; Giovannoni, James J; Stack, Stephen M

    2014-05-30

    The order and orientation (arrangement) of all 91 sequenced scaffolds in the 12 pseudomolecules of the recently published tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, 2n = 2x = 24) genome sequence were positioned based on marker order in a high-density linkage map. Here, we report the arrangement of these scaffolds determined by two independent physical methods, bacterial artificial chromosome-fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH) and optical mapping. By localizing BACs at the ends of scaffolds to spreads of tomato synaptonemal complexes (pachytene chromosomes), we showed that 45 scaffolds, representing one-third of the tomato genome, were arranged differently than predicted by the linkage map. These scaffolds occur mostly in pericentric heterochromatin where 77% of the tomato genome is located and where linkage mapping is less accurate due to reduced crossing over. Although useful for only part of the genome, optical mapping results were in complete agreement with scaffold arrangement by FISH but often disagreed with scaffold arrangement based on the linkage map. The scaffold arrangement based on FISH and optical mapping changes the positions of hundreds of markers in the linkage map, especially in heterochromatin. These results suggest that similar errors exist in pseudomolecules from other large genomes that have been assembled using only linkage maps to predict scaffold arrangement, and these errors can be corrected using FISH and/or optical mapping. Of note, BAC-FISH also permits estimates of the sizes of gaps between scaffolds, and unanchored BACs are often visualized by FISH in gaps between scaffolds and thus represent starting points for filling these gaps.

  17. Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization Detects Increased Sperm Aneuploidy in Men with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Scovell, Jason M.; Kovac, Jason R.; Cook, Peter J.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate, in men presenting with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), the prevalence of sperm autosome and sex chromosome aneuploidy. Design Retrospective Study. Setting Male infertility clinic at a tertiary referral center. Patients 140 men with recurrent pregnancy loss provided semen samples and five normozoospermic controls provided 140 semen samples for comparison. RPL, documented in the female partners, was defined as a prior miscarriage and/or recurrent IVF/ICSI failure. Interventions Fluorescent In situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect numerical abnormalities in sex chromosomes (X,Y) and autosomes (13, 18, 21) in ejaculated sperm. Main Outcome Measures Sperm aneuploidy in men with RPL and normozoospermic controls. Results Men with RPL had a greater percentage of sperm aneuploidy within the sex chromosomes, chromosomes 18 and 13/21 (1.04% vs. 0.38%; 0.18% vs. 0.03%; 0.26% vs. 0.08%). In total, 40% of men with normal sperm density and motility had abnormal sperm aneuploidy in the all the chromosomes analyzed. Men with abnormal sperm density and motility had a higher proportion of sperm sex chromosome aneuploidy than men with normal density/motility (62% vs. 45%). Men with normal strict morphology (>4%) had lower rates of sex chromosome and sperm aneuploidy than men with abnormal strict morphology (28% vs. 57%). There was no association between sperm DNA fragmentation and sperm aneuploidy. Conclusions Men with RPL have increased sperm aneuploidy compared to controls. A total of 40% of men with RPL and normal sperm density/motility had abnormal sperm aneuploidy. Men with oligoasthenozoospermia and abnormal strict morphology had greater percentage of sperm aneuploidy compared to men with normal semen parameters. PMID:25707335

  18. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH.

  19. Localization of the human OB gene (OBS) to chromosome 7q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Geffroy, S.; Duban, B.; Martinville, B. de

    1995-08-10

    An important gene involved in the pathogenesis of obesity is the product of the human homologue of the murine obese gene (gene symbol OBS). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have localized the human OB gene to human chromosome 7, specifically to region 7q32.1. The FISH data of human OBS provide a gene-associated marker for genetic mapping. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Fluorescence in situ hybridization investigation of potentially pathogenic bacteria involved in neonatal porcine diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal diarrhea is a multifactorial condition commonly present on pig farms and leads to economic losses due to increased morbidity and mortality of piglets. Immature immune system and lack of fully established microbiota at birth predispose neonatal piglets to infection with enteric pathogens. The microorganisms that for decades have been associated with enteritis and diarrhea in suckling piglets are: rotavirus A, coronavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens type C, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., Cystoisospora suis and Strongyloides ransomi. However, in recent years, the pig industry has experienced an increased number of neonatal diarrhea cases in which the above mentioned pathogens are no longer detected. Potentially pathogenic bacteria have recently received focus in the research on the possible etiology of neonatal diarrhea not caused by common pathogens. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of E. coli, Enterococcus spp., C. perfringens and C. difficile in the pathogenesis of neonatal porcine diarrhea with no established casual agents. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes was applied on the fixed intestinal tissue samples from 51 diarrheic and 50 non-diarrheic piglets collected from four Danish farms during outbreaks of neonatal diarrhea not caused by well-known enteric pathogens. Furthermore, an association between the presence of these bacteria and histological lesions was evaluated. Results The prevalence of fluorescence signals specific for E. coli, C. perfringens and C. difficile was similar in both groups of piglets. However, Enterococcus spp. was primarily detected in the diarrheic piglets. Furthermore, adherent bacteria were detected in 37 % diarrheic and 14 % non-diarrheic piglets. These bacteria were identified as E. coli and Enterococcus spp. and their presence in the intestinal mucosa was associated with histopathological changes. Conclusions The

  1. Melanocytic nevi with an atypical epithelioid cell component: clinical, histopathologic, and fluorescence in situ hybridization findings.

    PubMed

    Pouryazdanparast, Pedram; Haghighat, Zahra; Beilfuss, Beth Ann; Guitart, Joan; Gerami, Pedram

    2011-09-01

    Combined melanocytic nevi can contain a phenotypically distinct population of large atypical epithelioid cells in a background of smaller banal-appearing melanocytes. On the basis of the pattern of proliferation and degree of pigmentation, nevi with this pattern have been referred to as nevi with an atypical epithelioid cell component (N-AECC). When N-AECC display sheet-like or an expansile nodular growth pattern, notable cytologic atypia, and any level of mitotic activity, they can be difficult to distinguish from melanoma. The clinical history and appearance of these lesions may similarly raise concern for melanoma. In view of this diagnostic problem, we present 28 cases of N-AECC from our dermatopathology consultation and in-house practice. All 28 cases were found to be negative on the basis of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for imbalanced chromosomal aberrations commonly found in melanoma. The clinical outcomes showed a benign clinical course for all cases for which the outcome information was available. FISH analysis also revealed that, in 4 of 28 cases (14%), the AECC of the lesion demonstrated polyploidy localized to the large epithelioid cell component. This is likely more common among cases of N-AECC that have an atypical spitzoid epithelioid cell component, particularly those with obvious senescent nuclear changes. Care must be taken to avoid the pitfall of misinterpreting these FISH findings as changes consistent with melanoma. The use of ancillary testing methods including FISH may be beneficial in improving the diagnostic accuracy involved in making the distinction of N-AECC from melanoma. Further, we report a novel finding of polyploidy seen in certain cases of benign N-AECC.

  2. Identification of Dekkera bruxellensis (Brettanomyces) from Wine by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Henrik; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Sørensen, Ditte; Broomer, Adam; Oliveira, Kenneth; Perry-O'Keefe, Heather; Sage, Andrew; Young, Barbara; Coull, James

    2001-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Brettanomyces is described. The test is based on fluorescein-labeled PNA probes targeting a species-specific sequence of the rRNA of Dekkera bruxellensis. The PNA probes were applied to smears of colonies, and results were interpreted by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained from testing 127 different yeast strains, including 78 Brettanomyces isolates from wine, show that the spoilage organism Brettanomyces belongs to the species D. bruxellensis and that the new method is able to identify Brettanomyces (D. bruxellensis) with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PMID:11157265

  3. Use of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Definitive, Rapid Identification of Five Common Candida Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Mallonee, Amanda B.; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P.; Merz, William G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a 2.5-h peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay with five Candida species-specific probes to identify Candida colonies and compared it to standard 2-h to 5-day phenotypic identification methods. Suspensions were made and slides were prepared and read for fluorescence per the manufacturer's instructions. Sensitivity was 99% (109/110), and specificity was 99% (129/130). PNA-FISH can rapidly identify those Candida species isolated most frequently. PMID:17804657

  4. ESHRE PGD consortium best practice guidelines for fluorescence in situ hybridization-based PGD.

    PubMed

    Harton, G L; Harper, J C; Coonen, E; Pehlivan, T; Vesela, K; Wilton, L

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) PGD Consortium published a set of Guidelines for Best Practice PGD to give information, support and guidance to potential, existing and fledgling PGD programmes. The subsequent years have seen the introduction of new technologies as well as evolution of current techniques. Additionally, in light of recent advice from ESHRE on how practice guidelines should be written and formulated, the Consortium believed it was timely to revise and update the PGD guidelines. Rather than one document that covers all of PGD, the new guidelines are separated into four new documents that apply to different aspects of a PGD programme, i.e. organization of a PGD centre, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based testing, amplification-based testing and polar body and embryo biopsy for PGD/preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Here, we have updated the sections that pertain to FISH-based PGD. PGS has become a highly controversial technique. Opinions of laboratory specialists and clinicians interested in PGD and PGS have been taken into account here. Whereas some believe that PGS does not have a place in clinical medicine, others disagree; therefore, PGS has been included. This document should assist everyone interested in PGD/PGS in developing the best laboratory and clinical practice possible. Topics covered in this guideline include inclusion/exclusion criteria for FISH-based PGD testing, referrals and genetic counselling, preclinical validation of tests, FISH-based testing methods, spreading of cells for analysis, set-up of local IVF centre and transport PGD centres, quality control/ quality assurance and diagnostic confirmation of untransferred embryos.

  5. A pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars based on fluorescence in situ hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Bou, Gerelchimeg; Sun, Mingju; Lv, Ming; Zhu, Jiang; Li, Hui; Wang, Juan; Li, Lu; Liu, Zhongfeng; Zheng, Zhong; He, Wenteng; Kong, Qingran; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-08-01

    For efficient transgenic herd expansion, only the transgenic animals that possess the ability to transmit transgene into next generation are considered for breeding. However, for transgenic pig, practically lacking a pre-breeding screening program, time, labor and money is always wasted to maintain non-transgenic pigs, low or null transgenic transmission pigs and the related fruitless gestations. Developing a pre-breeding screening program would make the transgenic herd expansion more economical and efficient. In this technical report, we proposed a three-step pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars simply through combining the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay with the common pre-breeding screening workflow. In the first step of screening, combined with general transgenic phenotype analysis, FISH is used to identify transgenic boars. In the second step of screening, combined with conventional semen test, FISH is used to detect transgenic sperm, thus to identify the individuals producing high quality semen and transgenic sperm. In the third step of screening, FISH is used to assess the in vitro fertilization embryos, thus finally to identify the individuals with the ability to produce transgenic embryos. By this three-step screening, the non-transgenic boars and boars with no ability to produce transgenic sperm or transgenic embryos would be eliminated; therefore only those boars could produce transgenic offspring are maintained and used for breeding and herd expansion. It is the first time a systematic pre-breeding screening program is proposed for transgenic pigs. This program might also be applied in other transgenic large animals, and provide an economical and efficient strategy for herd expansion.

  6. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization: A New Tool for the Direct Identification and Detection of F. psychrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Strepparava, Nicole; Wahli, Thomas; Segner, Helmut; Polli, Bruno; Petrini, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    F. psychrophilum is the causative agent of Bacterial Cold Water Disease (BCW) and Rainbow Trout Fry Syndrome (RTFS). To date, diagnosis relies mainly on direct microscopy or cultural methods. Direct microscopy is fast but not very reliable, whereas cultural methods are reliable but time-consuming and labor-intensive. So far fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has not been used in the diagnosis of flavobacteriosis but it has the potential to rapidly and specifically detect F. psychrophilum in infected tissues. Outbreaks in fish farms, caused by pathogenic strains of Flavobacterium species, are increasingly frequent and there is a need for reliable and cost-effective techniques to rapidly diagnose flavobacterioses. This study is aimed at developing a FISH that could be used for the diagnosis of F. psychrophilum infections in fish. We constructed a generic probe for the genus Flavobacterium (“Pan-Flavo”) and two specific probes targeting F. psychrophilum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. We tested their specificity and sensitivity on pure cultures of different Flavobacterium and other aquatic bacterial species. After assessing their sensitivity and specificity, we established their limit of detection and tested the probes on infected fresh tissues (spleen and skin) and on paraffin-embedded tissues. The results showed high sensitivity and specificity of the probes (100% and 91% for the Pan-Flavo probe and 100% and 97% for the F. psychrophilum probe, respectively). FISH was able to detect F. psychrophilum in infected fish tissues, thus the findings from this study indicate this technique is suitable as a fast and reliable method for the detection of Flavobacterium spp. and F. psychrophilum. PMID:23152887

  7. LINE-1 elements: analysis by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Waters, Paul D; Dobigny, Gauthier; Waddell, Peter J; Robinson, Terence J

    2008-01-01

    Long-interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) is a non-terminal repeat transposon that constitutes a major component of the mammalian genome. LINE-1 has a dynamic evolutionary history characterized by the rise, fall, and replacement of subfamilies. The distribution of LINE-1 elements can be viewed from a chromosomal perspective using fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), as well as at the sequence level. We have designed LINE-1 primers from regions conserved among mouse, rat, rabbit, and human L1, which were able to amplify part of ORF2 from all eutherian (placental) mammals tested thus far. The product generated can be used as a FISH painting probe to examine the genomic distribution of L1 in different species. It can also be cloned and sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. Although FISH patterns resulting from LINE-1 chromosome painting and bioinformatic analyses have shown that this element accumulates in AT-rich regions of the genomes of mouse and human, our PCR amplified LINE-1 probe suggests that this is not a universal phenomenon, and that the patterns displayed in laurasiatherian, afrotherian and xenarthran species are less prominent. The "banding" like distribution of LINE-1 observed in human and mouse, therefore, appears to reflect aspects of genome architecture unique to Euarchontoglires (Supraprimates), the superordinal clade to which they belong. By sequencing the cloned amplicons used for FISH experiments and supplementing these with L1 sequences obtained from public databases, analysis by parsimony, distance-based, maximum likelihood, and "hierarchical Bayesian" or "marginal likelihood" methods provides a powerful adjunct to the FISH data. Using this approach, relatively intact LINE-1 from most placental orders tend to reflect accepted eutherian evolutionary relationships. This suggests that there were often only closely related copies active near branch points in the tree, that inactive copies tended to become extinct quite readily, and that for

  8. Identification of a centromeric exchange of acrocentric chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.W.; Immken, L.; Curry, C.J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Exchanges of the peri-centromeric area of acrocentric chromosomes are difficult to identify using the conventional cytogenetic techniques. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides a new way for precisely identifying such rearrangements. Here we report a case of centromeric rearrangement in an amniotic fluid specimen with an extra marker chromosome. M.G., a 41-year-old G1, was referred for advanced maternal age. Chromosome studies revealed a 47,XX +mar karyotype. The marker appeared to be bi-satallited with a single C band. Chromosome studies from the parents were normal. The parents elected to terminate the pregnancy. Anatomical examination of the abortus revealed a very short neck, posteriorly rotated ears, high set cecum, absent hepatic lobation and low abdominal kidneys with short ureters. FISH studies with alpha-satellite probes of 13/21, 14/22, and 15, and the DiGeorge probe, indicated that there is a translocation of 21 alpha-satellite to the 22, and that the marker chromosome probably consists of 14/22 alpha-satellite material. FISH analysis of the parents chromosome revealed that father had the translocation of 21 alpha-satellite to the 22 as well. Exchanges of centromeric material among the acrocentric chromosomes may not be an uncommon event in humans. Although it probably has no clinical significance, it may result in non-disjunction or marker chromosome formation from an uncommon satellite association. With the use of FISH techniques, exchanges involving the centromeric regions of acrocentric chromosomes can be identified.

  9. Karyotype analysis, banding, and fluorescent in situ hybridization in the scarab beetle Gymnopleurus sturmi McLeay (Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea : Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Colomba, M S; Vitturi, R; Zunino, M

    2000-01-01

    Conventional staining, differential banding, and in situ hybridization with both ribosomal and telomeric probes to mitotic chromosomes of Gymnopleurus sturmi (Scarabaeoidea : Scarabaeidae) are described. The karyotype is distinguished by a pericentric inversion polymorphism in chromosome 3, which is either acrocentric or subtelocentric. Silver staining (Ag-NOR) and chromomycin A3 (CMA3), failed to study the detection of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), due to the extensive silver and CMA3 stainability of all GC-rich heterochromatin. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata) rDNA probe mapped the ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). FISH with the all-human telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n revealed a lack of homology between the telomeric probe and the telomeres of G. sturmi. This suggests that the telomeric hesanucleotide (TTAGGG)n is not so conserved within eukaryotes as it has been hypothesized.

  10. High-throughput single-cell gene-expression profiling with multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Hao, Junjie; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Kok Hao; Babcock, Hazen P; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-09-27

    Image-based approaches to single-cell transcriptomics, in which RNA species are identified and counted in situ via imaging, have emerged as a powerful complement to single-cell methods based on RNA sequencing of dissociated cells. These image-based approaches naturally preserve the native spatial context of RNAs within a cell and the organization of cells within tissue, which are important for addressing many biological questions. However, the throughput of these image-based approaches is relatively low. Here we report advances that lead to a drastic increase in the measurement throughput of multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), an image-based approach to single-cell transcriptomics. In MERFISH, RNAs are identified via a combinatorial labeling approach that encodes RNA species with error-robust barcodes followed by sequential rounds of single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to read out these barcodes. Here we increase the throughput of MERFISH by two orders of magnitude through a combination of improvements, including using chemical cleavage instead of photobleaching to remove fluorescent signals between consecutive rounds of smFISH imaging, increasing the imaging field of view, and using multicolor imaging. With these improvements, we performed RNA profiling in more than 100,000 human cells, with as many as 40,000 cells measured in a single 18-h measurement. This throughput should substantially extend the range of biological questions that can be addressed by MERFISH.

  11. High-throughput single-cell gene-expression profiling with multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Hao, Junjie; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Kok Hao

    2016-01-01

    Image-based approaches to single-cell transcriptomics, in which RNA species are identified and counted in situ via imaging, have emerged as a powerful complement to single-cell methods based on RNA sequencing of dissociated cells. These image-based approaches naturally preserve the native spatial context of RNAs within a cell and the organization of cells within tissue, which are important for addressing many biological questions. However, the throughput of these image-based approaches is relatively low. Here we report advances that lead to a drastic increase in the measurement throughput of multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), an image-based approach to single-cell transcriptomics. In MERFISH, RNAs are identified via a combinatorial labeling approach that encodes RNA species with error-robust barcodes followed by sequential rounds of single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to read out these barcodes. Here we increase the throughput of MERFISH by two orders of magnitude through a combination of improvements, including using chemical cleavage instead of photobleaching to remove fluorescent signals between consecutive rounds of smFISH imaging, increasing the imaging field of view, and using multicolor imaging. With these improvements, we performed RNA profiling in more than 100,000 human cells, with as many as 40,000 cells measured in a single 18-h measurement. This throughput should substantially extend the range of biological questions that can be addressed by MERFISH. PMID:27625426

  12. Potential actionable targets in appendiceal cancer detected by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and mutational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Millis, Sherri Z.; Kimbrough, Jeffery; Doll, Nancy; Von Hoff, Daniel; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Appendiceal cancers are rare and consist of carcinoid, mucocele, pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP), goblet cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma histologies. Current treatment involves surgical resection or debulking, but no standard exists for adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for metastatic disease. Methods Samples were identified from approximately 60,000 global tumors analyzed at a referral molecular profiling CLIA-certified laboratory. A total of 588 samples with appendix primary tumor sites were identified (male/female ratio of 2:3; mean age =55). Sixty-two percent of samples were adenocarcinomas (used for analysis); the rest consisted of 9% goblet cell, 15% mucinous; 6% pseudomyxoma, and less than 5% carcinoids and 2% neuroendocrine. Tests included sequencing [Sanger, next generation sequencing (NGS)], protein expression/immunohistochemistry (IHC), and gene amplification [fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or CISH]. Results Profiling across all appendiceal cancer histological subtypes for IHC revealed: 97% BRCP, 81% MRP1, 81% COX-2, 71% MGMT, 56% TOPO1, 5% PTEN, 52% EGFR, 40% ERCC1, 38% SPARC, 35% PDGFR, 35% TOPO2A, 25% RRM1, 21% TS, 16% cKIT, and 12% for TLE3. NGS revealed mutations in the following genes: 50.4% KRAS, 21.9% P53, 17.6% GNAS, 16.5% SMAD4, 10% APC, 7.5% ATM, 5.5% PIK3CA, 5.0% FBXW7, and 1.8% BRAF. Conclusions Appendiceal cancers show considerable heterogeneity with high levels of drug resistance proteins (BCRP and MRP1), which highlight the difficulty in treating these tumors and suggest an individualized approach to treatment. The incidence of low TS (79%) could be used as a backbone of therapy (using inhibitors such as 5FU/capecitabine or newer agents). Therapeutic options includeTOPO1 inhibitors (irinotecan/topotecan), EGFR inhibitors (erlotinib, cetuximab), PDGFR antagonists (regorafenib, axitinib), MGMT (temozolomide). Clinical trials targeting pathways involving KRAS, p53, GNAS, SMAD4, APC, ATM, PIK3CA, FBXW7, and

  13. Rapid Ovary Mass-Isolation (ROMi) to Obtain Large Quantities of Drosophila Egg Chambers for Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jambor, Helena; Mejstrik, Pavel; Tomancak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of large quantities of tissue from organisms is essential for many techniques such as genome-wide screens and biochemistry. However, obtaining large quantities of tissues or cells is often the rate-limiting step when working in vivo. Here, we present a rapid method that allows the isolation of intact, single egg chambers at various developmental stages from ovaries of adult female Drosophila flies. The isolated egg chambers are amenable for a variety of procedures such as fluorescent in situ hybridization, RNA isolation, extract preparation, or immunostaining. Isolation of egg chambers from adult flies can be completed in 5 min and results, depending on the input amount of flies, in several milliliters of material. The isolated egg chambers are then further processed depending on the exact requirements of the subsequent application. We describe high-throughput in situ hybridization in 96-well plates as example application for the mass-isolated egg chambers.

  14. Differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Kenneth; Haase, Gerhard; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens Jo/rgen; Stender, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The recent discovery of Candida dubliniensis as a separate species that traditionally has been identified as Candida albicans has led to the development of a variety of biochemical and molecular methods for the differentiation of these two pathogenic yeasts. rRNA sequences are well-established phylogenetic markers, and probes targeting species-specific rRNA sequences have been used in diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of microorganisms. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic with improved hybridization characteristics, and the neutral backbone of PNA probes offers significant advantages in whole-cell in situ hybridization assays. In this study, we developed PNA probes targeting the rRNAs of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and applied them to a fluorescence in situ hybridization method (PNA FISH) for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. Liquid cultures were smeared onto microscope slides, heat fixed, and then hybridized for 30 min. Unhybridized PNA probe was removed by washing, and smears were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of the PNA FISH method using smears of 79 C. dubliniensis and 70 C. albicans strains showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for both PNA probes. We concluded that PNA FISH is a powerful tool for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11682542

  15. Direct visualization of the novel pathogen, Spiroplasma eriocheiris, in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z F; Xia, S Y; Xue, H; Tang, J Q; Ren, Q; Gu, W; Meng, Q G; Wang, W

    2015-09-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is the first spiroplasma strain known to be pathogenic to freshwater crustaceans. It has caused considerable economic losses both in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) and in some other crustaceans. The monitoring of the pathogen in crustacean populations and study of its behaviour in the laboratory require the development of reliable diagnostic tools. In this article, we improved microscopic identification of S. eriocheiris by combining in situ hybridization with specific fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes. The established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed simultaneous visualization, identification and localization of S. eriocheiris in the tissues of diseased crayfish P. clarkii and exhibited low background autofluorescence and ideal signal-to-noise ratio. With the advantages of better tissue penetration, potentially more specific and stable, we designed three species-specific oligonucleotide probes utilizing the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of S. eriocheiris. Positive hybridization signals were visualized in haemocytes and connective tissues of hepatopancreas, cardiac muscle and gill from diseased crayfish. This unique distribution pattern matched the pathological changes when diagnosed by H&E staining and indicated that S. eriocheiris probably spread throughout the tissues in P. clarkii by hemokinesis. This assay will facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis of S. eriocheiris and enhance the early diagnosis of the novel pathogen.

  16. Identification of Cannabis sativa L. using the 1-kbTHCA synthase-fluorescence in situ hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Jeangkhwoa, Pattraporn; Bandhaya, Achirapa; Umpunjun, Puangpaka; Chuenboonngarm, Ngarmnij; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2017-03-01

    This study reports a successful application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in the identification of Cannabis sativa L. cells recovered from fresh and dried powdered plant materials. Two biotin-16-dUTP-labeled FISH probes were designed from the Cannabis-specific tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) gene and the ITS region of the 45S rRNA gene. Specificity of probe-target hybridization was tested against the target and 4 non-target plant species, i.e., Humulus lupulus, Mitragyna speciosa, Papaver sp., and Nicotiana tabacum. The 1-kb THCA synthase hybridization probe gave Cannabis-specific hybridization signals, unlike the 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probe. Probe-target hybridization was also confirmed against 20 individual Cannabis plant samples. The 1-kb THCA synthase and 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probes clearly showed 2 hybridization signals per cell with reproducibility. The 1-kb THCA synthase probe did not give any FISH signal when tested against H. lupulus, its closely related member of the Canabaceae family. It was also showed that 1-kb THCA synthase FISH probe can be applied to identify small amount of dried powdered Cannabis material with an addition of rehydration step prior to the experimental process. This study provided an alternative identification method for Cannabis trace.

  17. High concordance between immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization testing for HER2 status in breast cancer requires a normalized IHC scoring system.

    PubMed

    Gown, Allen M; Goldstein, Lynn C; Barry, Todd S; Kussick, Steven J; Kandalaft, Patricia L; Kim, Patricia M; Tse, Christopher C

    2008-10-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncologists and College of American Pathologists have recently released new guidelines for laboratory testing of HER2 status in breast cancer, which require high levels (95%) of concordance between immunohistochemistry positive (3+) and fluorescence in situ hybridization-amplified cases, and between immunohistochemistry negative (0/1+) and fluorescence in situ hybridization-nonamplified cases; these required levels of concordance are significantly higher than those found in most published studies. We tested the hypothesis that a modification of the HER2 immunohistochemistry scoring system could significantly improve immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization concordance. A total of 6604 breast cancer specimens were evaluated for HER2 status by both immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization using standard methodologies. Results were compared when the standard immunohistochemistry scoring system was replaced by a normalized scoring system in which the HER2 score was derived by subtracting the score on the non-neoplastic breast epithelium from that on the tumor cells. Among the 6604 tumors, using a non-normalized immunohistochemistry scoring system, 267/872 (30.6%) of the immunohistochemistry 3+ cases proved to be fluorescence in situ hybridization nonamplified, whereas using the normalized scoring system only 30/562 (5.3%) of immunohistochemistry 3+ cases proved to be 'false positive'. The concordance rate between immunohistochemistry 3+ and fluorescence in situ hybridization-amplified cases using the normalized scoring method was 94.7%, whereas the concordance using the non-normalized method was only 69.4%. Extremely high concordance between immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization assessment of HER2 status in breast cancer is achievable, but to attain this high level of concordance, modification of the FDA-approved immunohistochemistry scoring system is required.

  18. Whole-mount fluorescent in situ hybridization staining of the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Langenbacher, Adam D; Rodriguez, Delany; Di Maio, Alessandro; De Tomaso, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial ascidian with characteristics that make it an attractive model for studying immunology, stem cell biology, evolutionary biology, and regeneration. Transcriptome sequencing and the recent completion of a draft genome sequence for B. schlosseri have revealed a large number of genes, both with and without vertebrate homologs, but analyzing the spatial and temporal expression of these genes in situ has remained a challenge. Here, we report a robust protocol for in situ hybridization that enables the simultaneous detection of multiple transcripts in whole adult B. schlosseri using Tyramide Signal Amplification in conjunction with digoxigenin- and dinitrophenol-labeled RNA probes. Using this protocol, we have identified a number of genes that can serve as markers for developing and mature structures in B. schlosseri, permitting analysis of phenotypes induced in loss-of-function experiments.

  19. Enumeration of respiring Pseudomonas spp. in milk within 6 hours by fluorescence in situ hybridization following formazan reduction.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2005-05-01

    Respiring Pseudomonas spp. in milk were quantified within 6 h by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with vital staining. FISH with an oligonucleotide probe based on 16S rRNA sequences was used for the specific detection of Pseudomonas spp. at the single cell level. 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) was used to estimate bacterial respiratory activity. The numbers of respiring Pseudomonas cells as determined by FISH with CTC staining (CTC-FISH) were almost the same or higher than the numbers of CFU as determined by the conventional culture method.

  20. Breakpoints in Robertsonian translocations are localized to satellite III DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gravholt, C.H.; Friedrich, U.; Caprani, M.; Jorgensen, A.L. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors characterized 21 t(13;14) and 3 t(14;21) Robertsonian translocations for the presence of DNA derived from the short arms of the translocated acrocentric chromosomes and identified their centromeres. Nineteen of these 24 translocation carriers were unrelated. Using centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA as chromosome-specific probe, they found by in situ hybridization that all 24 translocation chromosomes were dicentric. The chromatin between the two centromeres did not stain with silver, and no hybridization signal was detected with probes for rDNA or [beta]-satellite DNA that flank the distal and proximal ends of the rDNA region on the short arm of the acrocentrics. By contrast, all 24 translocation chromosomes gave a distinct hybridization signal when satellite III DNA was used as probe. This result strongly suggests that the chromosomal rearrangements leading to Robertsonian translocations occur preferentially in satellite III DNA. The authors hypothesize that guanine-rich satellite III repeats may promote chromosomal recombination by formation of tetraplex structures. The findings localize satellite III DNA to the short arm of the acrocentric chromosomes distal to centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA and proximal to [beta]-satellite DNA. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Statistical treatment of fluorescence in situ hybridization validation data to generate normal reference ranges using Excel functions.

    PubMed

    Ciolino, Allison L; Tang, Mary E; Bryant, Ron

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization has become an essential tool for diagnosing and monitoring hematological disease. Testing for minimal residual disease requires precise and accurate normal cut-offs. There is no consensus in the field on the correct method of establishing a normal reference range. We discuss and compare several proposed statistical methods to calculate normal reference ranges, including Gaussian statistics, the beta inverse function, and a binomial treatment of the data. We demonstrate that a binomial treatment of the data is an accurate and simple method to calculate a normal reference range.

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of the derivative chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Reeser, S L; Donnenfeld, A E; Miller, R C; Sellinger, B S; Emanuel, B S; Driscoll, D A

    1994-11-01

    Cytogenetic studies of cultured amniocytes demonstrated a karyotype of 46,XX/47,XX, +mar. A bisatellited, dicentric, distamycin-DAPI negative, NOR-positive marker was present in 76 per cent of the metaphases examined. Similar markers have been associated with cat eye syndrome (CES). We report on the utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 14/22 alpha-satellite probe and a chromosome 22-specific cosmid for locus D22S9 to determine the origin of the prenatally detected supernumerary marker chromosome. FISH studies demonstrated that the marker is a derivative of chromosome 22 and enabled us to provide the family with additional prognostic information.

  3. Using respirometric techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization to evaluate the heterotrophic active biomass in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Wentzel, M C; Bux, F

    2007-10-15

    The separation and accurate quantification of active biomass components in activated sludge is of paramount importance in models, used for the management and design of waste water (WW) treatment plants. Accurate estimates of microbial population concentrations and the direct, in situ determination of kinetic parameters could improve the calibration and validation of existing models of biological nutrient removal activated sludge systems. The aim of this study was to obtain correlations between heterotrophic active biomass (Z(BH)) concentrations predicted by mathematical models and quantitative information obtained by Fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH). Respirometric batch test were applied to mixed liquors drawn from a well-defined parent anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system to quantify the Z(BH) concentrations. Similarly fluorescent labeled, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes specific for ammonia and nitrite oxidizers were used in combination with DAPI staining to validate the Z(BH) active biomass component in activate sludge respirometric batch tests. For the direct enumeration and simultaneous in situ analysis of the distribution of nitrifying bacteria, in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes were used. Probes (NSO 1225, NSR 1156, and NIT3) were used to target the nitrifiers and the universal probe (EUB MIX) was used to target all Eubacteria. Deducting the lithoautotrophic population from the total bacteria population revealed the Z(BH) population. A conversion factor of 8.49 x 10(-11) mg VSS/cell was applied to express the Z(BH) in terms of COD concentration. Z(BH) values obtained by molecular probing correlated closely with values obtained from the modified batch test. However, the trend of consistently poor correspondence of measured and theoretical concentrations were evident. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate alternative technology, such as FISH to validate or replace kinetic parameters which are invariably

  4. A novel fluorescence detection method for in situ hybridization, based on the alkaline phosphatase-fast red reaction.

    PubMed

    Speel, E J; Schutte, B; Wiegant, J; Ramaekers, F C; Hopman, A H

    1992-09-01

    We have used naphthol-ASMX-phosphate and Fast Red TR in combination with alkaline phosphatase (APase) to produce fluorescent precipitated reaction products in a non-radioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) method. To obtain optimal and discrete localization of the strongly red fluorescent ISH signals, the enzyme precipitation procedure was optimized. The optimal reaction time and the concentrations of substrate and capture agent were determined. Furthermore, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction mixture and thus to reduce diffusion of the reaction product. Our results show that the APase-Fast Red detection method has at least the same sensitivity as currently observed in other immunofluorescent detection systems. A single copy DNA sequence of 15.8 KB could be localized with high efficiency in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei. Double labeling procedures, in which the FITC- and azo-dye fluorescence are combined, are also feasible. The red fluorescent ISH signals showed hardly any fading as compared with FITC fluorescence on exposure to either light from the mercury-arc lamp or laser light. Therefore, these red fluorescent signals with a virtually permanent character allow a better analysis and three-dimensional localization of such cytochemically detected genomic fractions by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy as compared with the use of FITC, TRITC, or Texas Red as label.

  5. A simple and rapid fluorescence in situ hybridization microwave protocol for reliable dicentric chromosome analysis.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Ian M; Genet, Matthew D; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence in situhybridization (FISH) is an extremely effective and sensitive approach to analyzing chromosome aberrations. Until recently, this procedure has taken multiple days to complete. The introduction of telomeric and centromeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes has reduced the procedure's duration to several hours, but the protocols still call for a high temperature (80-90°C) step followed by 1-3 h of hybridization. The newest method to speed up the FISH protocol is the use of a microwave to shorten the heating element to less than a minute; however this protocol still calls for a 1-h hybridization period. We have utilized PNA centromere/telomere probes in conjunction with a microwave oven to show telomere and centromere staining in as little as 30 s. We have optimized the hybridization conditions to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of the new protocol and can effectively stain chromosomes in 2 min and 30 s of incubation. We have found that our new approach to FISH produces extremely clear and distinct signals. Radiation-induced dicentric formation in mouse and human fibroblast cells was analyzed by two individual scorers and the observed dicentrics matched very well.

  6. Segmental duplications within the Glycine max genome revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization of bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Janice; Walling, Jason G; Young, Nevin D; Shoemaker, Randy C; Jackson, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is presumed to be an ancient polyploid based on chromosome number and multiple RFLP fragments in genetic mapping. Direct cytogenetic observation of duplicated regions within the soybean genome has not heretofore been reported. Employing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of genetically anchored bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) in soybean, we were able to observe that the distal ends of molecular linkage group E had duplicated regions on linkage groups A2 and B2. Further, using fiber-FISH, it was possible to measure the molecular size and organization of one of the duplicated regions. As FISH did not require repetitive DNA for blocking fluorescence signals, we assume that the 200-kb genome region is relatively low in repetitive sequences. This observation, along with the observation that the BACs are located in distal euchromatin regions, has implications for genome structure/evolution and the approach used to sequence the soybean genome.

  7. High-resolution physical mapping in Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato by fluorescence in situ hybridization to extended DNA fibres.

    PubMed

    Fransz, P F; Alonso-Blanco, C; Liharska, T B; Peeters, A J; Zabel, P; de Jong, J H

    1996-03-01

    A technique to detect DNA sequences on extended DNA fibres (EDF) prepared from interphase nuclei from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is described. Three nuclear lysis procedures have been tested for their ability to decondense chromatin and to generate highly extended intact DNA fibres on microscopic slides. DNA probes of various sizes have been used in FISH experiments to EDFs to establish the resolution and sensitivity of the technique. The fluorescent signals of a 5S rDNA probe hybridized to tomato EDFs revealed continuous strings of about 200 microns, that corresponded to a molecular size of about 660 kb. In A. thaliana, a contig of three cosmids spanning a genomic region with a total length of about 89 kb was analysed. By means of multicolour hybridization the physical positions of the cosmids were visualized as red and green fluorescence strings with overlapping regions in yellow. Comparison of the length of the fluorescent signals with the molecular data revealed a stretching degree of the DNA fibres at 3.27 kb microns-1, which is close to the Watson-Crick DNA length estimate of 2.9 kb microns-1. Other experiments on small size molecular probes with both lambda clones (13.5-17 kb insert sizes) and plasmids (4.2 and 5 kb) in a contig of A. thaliana, and the 5S rDNA region in tomato showed close agreement with molecular data. The lower limit of the detection, which was established in a hybridization experiment with two DNA probes from the 45S ribosomal gene on extended fibres of tomato, was about 0.7 kb. Consistent patterns of alternating fluorescent red and green spots were obtained reflecting the tandemly repeated arrangement of the 18S and 25S ribosomal sequences. On the basis of the microscopic distance between these hybridization spots the size of the ribosomal unit was estimated at 8.2 kb. This implies a drastic improvement of high-resolution physical mapping of DNA sequences

  8. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  9. Distribution of 45S rDNA in Modern Rose Cultivars (Rosa hybrida), Rosa rugosa, and Their Interspecific Hybrids Revealed by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Liu; Xu, Ting-Liang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Le; Yu, Chao; Dong, Gui-Min; Pan, Hui-Tang; Zhang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of the location and number of rDNA loci in the process of polyploidization in the genus Rosa, we examined 45S rDNA sites in the chromosomes of 6 modern rose cultivars (R. hybrida), 5 R. rugosa cultivars, and 20 hybrid progenies by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Variation in the number of rDNA sites in parents and their interspecific hybrids was detected. As expected, 4 rDNA sites were observed in the genomes of 4 modern rose cultivars, while 3 hybridization sites were observed in the 2 others. Two expected rDNA sites were found in 2 R. rugosa cultivars, while in the other 3 R. rugosa cultivars 4 sites were present. Among the 20 R. hybrida × R. rugosa offspring, 13 carried the expected number of rDNA sites, and 1 had 6 hybridization sites, which exceeded the expected number by far. The other 6 offspring had either 2 or 3 hybridization sites, which was less than expected. Differences in the number of rDNA loci were observed in interspecific offspring, indicating that rDNA loci exhibit instability after distant hybridization events. Abnormal chromosome pairing may be the main factor explaining the variation in rDNA sites during polyploidization.

  10. Permeabilization of mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes for in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, S J; O'Donnell, A G; Embley, T M

    1994-10-01

    The application of whole-cell hybridization using labelled oligonucleotide probes in microbial systematics and ecology is limited by difficulties in permeabilizing many Gram-positive organisms. In this investigation paraformaldehyde treatment, acid methanolysis and acid hydrolysis were evaluated as a means of permeabilizing mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes prior to hybridization with a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probe designed to bind to a conserved sequence of bacterial 16S rRNA. Methods were evaluated on stationary-phase cultures of Gordona bronchialis, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Nocardia asteroides, N. brasiliensis, Rhodococcus equi, R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous and Tsukamurella paurometabola, none of which could be probed following 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde fixation. For comparison and to test the general applicability of mild acid pretreatments, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida were also studied. The data showed that most of the mycolic-acid-containing organisms were successfully permeabilized by mild acid hydrolysis in 1 M HCl at 37 degrees C. Cells were treated for different lengths of time. In general, the mycolic-acid-containing organisms required between 30 and 50 min hydrolysis, whereas B. subtilis, E. coli and P. putida were rendered permeable in only 10 min. Interestingly, L. plantarum could not be permeabilized using acid hydrolysis even after 60 min exposure to 1 M HCl.

  11. Subcellular localization of low-abundance human immunodeficiency virus nucleic acid sequences visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.B.; Marselle, L.M.; Byron, K.S.; Johnson, C.V.; Sullivan, J.L.; Singer, R.H. )

    1990-07-01

    Detection and subcellular localization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were investigated using sensitive high-resolution in situ hybridization methodology. Lymphocytes infected with HIV in vitro or in vivo were detected by fluorescence after hybridization with either biotin or digoxigenin-labeled probes. At 12 hr after infection in vitro, a single intense signal appeared in the nuclei of individual cells. Later in infection, when cytoplasmic fluorescence became intense, multiple nuclear foci frequently appeared. The nuclear focus consisted of newly synthesized HIV RNA as shown by hybridization in the absence of denaturation and by susceptibility to RNase and actinomycin D. Virus was detected in patient lymphocytes and it was shown that a singular nuclear focus also characterizes cells infected in vivo. The cell line 8E5/LAV containing one defective integrated provirus revealed a similar focus of nuclear RNA, and the single integrated HIV genome was unequivocally visualized on a D-group chromosome. This demonstrates an extremely sensitive single-cell assay for the presence of a single site of HIV transcription in vitro and in vivo and suggests that it derives from one (or very few) viral genomes per cell. In contrast, productive Epstein-Barr virus infection exhibited many foci of nuclear RNA per cell.

  12. Detection of aneuploidy in sperm of an ataxia telangiectasia patient using three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, X.R.; Baulch, J.E.; Arnheim, N.

    1994-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an inherited, recessive, cancer-prone disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA probes specific for three chromosomes was applied to sperm of an A-T patient to determine if there may be an increased germinal risk for aneuploidy. Air-dried sperm smears were treated with proteinase K and were decondensed with DTT and LIS. The slides were then hybridized with fluorescently labeled repetitive DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y and 8, and a total of 11,825 sperm cells were scored. The ratio of sperm bearing X-8 and Y-8 was 1:1, as predicted. The frequencies of hyperhaploidy were 3.9, 1.0, 17.6 and 7.8 per 10,000 cells for categories X-X-8, Y-Y-8, X-Y-8 and 8-8-(X or Y), respectively, In addition, the frequency of diploidy (X-Y-8-8) was 18.6 and auto-diploidies (X-X-8-8 and Y-Y-8-8) were 1.0 and 2.0, respectively. These frequencies were not significantly different when compared with levels in healthy men (p > 0.1). Our finding suggests that chromosome X, Y and 8 aneuploidies are not elevated in the sperm of A-T patients, but studies with additional patients and chromosomes are needed.

  13. Sensitive mRNA detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization using horseradish peroxidase-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides and tyramide signal amplification.

    PubMed

    van de Corput, M P; Dirks, R W; van Gijlswijk, R P; van Binnendijk, E; Hattinger, C M; de Paus, R A; Landegent, J E; Raap, A K

    1998-11-01

    With the ongoing progress in human genome projects, many genes are discovered whose function and/or expression pattern are not known. Most of these genes are expressed in relatively low abundance compared to housekeeping genes such as elongation factor-1alpha and beta-actin. Gene expression is studied by Northern blot assays or by semiquantitative PCR methods. Another method is the visualization of transcripts in tissue or cell cultures by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). However, for low-abundance RNA detection, this method is hampered by its limited detection sensitivity and by the interference of background signals with specific hybridization signals. Background signals are introduced by nonspecific hybridization of probe sequences or nonspecific binding of antibodies used for visualization. To eliminate background signals derived from both sources and to benefit from the peroxidase-driven tyramide signal amplification (TSA), we directly conjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and used these probes to study in the bladder cancer cell line 5637 the expression of various cytokine genes which, according to Northern hybridization and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, are expressed at levels up to 10,000-fold less than abundantly expressed housekeeping genes. The results show that reduction of probe complexity and the limited use of immunocytochemical detection layers strongly reduces noise signals derived from nonspecific binding of nucleic acid probe and antibodies. The use of the HRP-ODNs in combination with TSA allowed detection of low-abundance cytokine mRNAs by FISH.

  14. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: Single center experience in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Sumanovic-Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  15. Specific Detection of Arcobacter and Campylobacter Strains in Water and Sewage by PCR and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Yolanda; Botella, Salut; Alonso, José Luis; Ferrús, María A.; Hernández, Manuel; Hernández, Javier

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for detecting Arcobacter and Campylobacter strains in river water and wastewater samples. Both 16S and 23S rRNA sequence data were used to design specific primers and oligonucleotide probes for PCR and FISH analyses, respectively. In order to assess the suitability of the methods, the assays were performed on naturally and artificially contaminated samples and compared with the isolation of cells on selective media. The detection range of PCR and FISH assays varied between 1 cell/ml (after enrichment) to 103 cells/ml (without enrichment). According to our results, both rRNA-based techniques have the potential to be used as quick and sensitive methods for detection of campylobacters in environmental samples. PMID:12571045

  16. Pallister-Killian syndrome: A mild case diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Review of the literature and expansion of the phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Bielanska, M.M.; Khalifa, M.M.; Duncan, A.M.V.

    1996-10-16

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare disorder characterized by a specific combination of anomalies, mental retardation and mosaic presence of a supernumerary isochromosome 12p which is tissue-limited. We report an atypical case of PKS with a mild phenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to demonstrate that the supernumerary marker chromosome identified in the patient`s fibroblasts was an isochromosome 12p. This study broadens the spectrum of PKS phenotype. It also illustrates the usefulness of fluorescence in situ hybridization in diagnosis of patients with chromosomal abnormalities and mild or atypical clinical findings. 40 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in-situ hybridization for identification of Vibrio spp. in aquatic products and environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Ke; Wu, Shan; Shuai, Jiangbing; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-08-03

    A peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method was developed for specific detection of the Vibrio genus. In silico analysis by BLAST and ProbeCheck showed that the designed PNA probe targeting the 16S rRNAs was suitable for specific identification of Vibrio. Specificity and sensitivity of the probe Vib-16S-1 were experimentally verified by its reactivity against 18 strains of 9 Vibrio species and 14 non-Vibrio strains of 14 representative species. The PNA-FISH assay was able to identify 47 Vibrio positive samples from selectively enriched cultures of 510 samples of aquatic products and environments, comparable with the results obtained by biochemical identification and real-time PCR. We conclude that PNA-FISH can be an alternative method for rapid identification of Vibrio species in a broad spectrum of seafood or related samples.

  18. Rapid sex determination on buccal smears using DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, R.A.; Harris, C.

    1994-09-01

    Hybridization of dual-labeled DNA probes for the repetitive sequences on the X and Y chromosomes allows a fast, non-invasive, more reliable method for sex determination that current cytogenetic Barr body and Y chromatin assays. Scrapes of squamous epithelial cells were collected from the oral cavity of 14 subjects (5{male}, 9{female}) and smeared onto silanized slides. The smears were allowed to air dry. Samples were blinded and then fixed in 50% methanol/50% glacial acetic acid for 10 minutes, and allowed to dry. The slides were incubated in a pretreatment solution containing 30% sodium bisulfite at 45{degrees}C for 10 minutes. They were rinsed in 2XSSC pH 7.0 and then dehydrated through a series of 70%, 85%, and 100% ethanols at room temperature and allowed to air dry. A probe mixture (30 {mu}L containing 10 ng/{mu}L biotin-labeled DXZ1 and digoxigenin-labeled DYZ1/DYZ3 in 70% Formamide/2XSSC) was aliquoted onto each slide, coverslipped, and sealed with rubber cement. Probe and target DNA were simultaneously denatured at 72{degrees}C on a slide warmer for 6 minutes. Probe was allowed to hybridize overnight in a humidified chamber at 37{degrees}C. Slides were postwashed at 72{degrees}C in 0.5xSSC pH 7.0 for 5 minutes, then soaked at room temperature 1XPBD for 2 minutes, and detected with rhodamine/anti-digoxigenin-FITC/avidin for 15 minutes at 37{degrees}C. Slides were soaked 3X in 1XPBD and then counterstained with 15 {mu}L 0.05 {mu}g/mL DAP1/Antifade. 200 nuclei were scored for the presence of one green (X), two green (XX), one green and one red (XY), or a single red (Y) signal, using a fluorescent microscope equipped with a triple band pass filter. Greater than 90% of the hybridized nuclei from each of the 14 cases studied conformed to the sex chromosome pattern. The modal number in 9 cases showed two green signals (XX), and a green and a red signal (XY) in the other 5 cases; this was in complete agreement with the cytogenetic results.

  19. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  20. Visualization and quantification of archaeal and bacterial metabolically active cells in soil using fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Stepanov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The method of in situ hybridization using fluorescent labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (FISH - fluorescence in situ hybridization) combines identification and quantification of groups of microorganisms at different phylogenetic levels, from domain to species. The FISH method enables to study the soil microbial community in situ, avoiding plating on nutrient media, and allows to identify and quantify living, metabolically active cells of Bacteria and Archaea. The full procedure consists of the following steps: desorption of the cells from the soil particles, fixation of cells, coating a fixed sample on the glass slide, hybridization with the specific probes and, finally, microscopic observation and cell counting. For the FISH analysis of Bacteria and Archaea, the paraformaldehyde-fixed samples were hybridized with Cy3-labeled Archaea-specific probe(Arc915) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled Bacteria-specific probe(EUB338). When a molecular probe is incorporated into a cell, it can hybridize solely with a complementary rRNA sequence. The hybridization can be visualized under the fluorescent microscope and counted. The application of FISH will be demonstrated by the abundance of metabolically active cells of Archaea and Bacteria depending on soil properties, depth and land use. The research was carried out at field and natural ecosystems of European part of Russia. Samples were collected within the soil profiles (3-6 horizons) of Chernozem and Kastanozem with distinct land use. Quantification of metabolically active cells in virgin and arable Chernozem revealed that the abundance of Archaea in topsoil of virgin Chernozem was doubled as compared with arable soil, but it leveled off in the deeper horizons. Plowing of Chernozem decreased an amount of archaeal and bacterial active cells simultaneously, however, Bacteria were more resistant to agrogenic impact than Archaea. In Kastanozem, a significant change in the abundance of metabolically active

  1. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  2. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Clinical experience with 4,500 specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.E.; Gersen, S.L.; Carelli, M.P.; McGuire, N.M.; Dackowski, W.R.; Klinger, K.W. ); Weinstein, M. ); Sandlin, C. ); Klinger, K.W. )

    1993-05-01

    Detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes is possible using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The authors herein describe the results of the first clinical program which utilized FISH for the rapid detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes. FISH was performed on physician request, as an adjunct to cytogenetics in 4,500 patients. Region-specific DNA probes to chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y were used to determine ploidy by analysis of signal number in hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be euploid when all autosomal probes generated two hybridization signals and when a normal sex chromosome pattern was observed in greater than or equal to 80% of hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be aneuploid when greater than or equal to 70% of hybridized nuclei displayed the same abnormal hybridization pattern for a specific probe. Of the attempted analyses, 90.2% met these criteria and were reported as informative to referring physicians within 2 d of receipt. Based on these reporting parameters, the overall detection rate for aneuploidies was 73.3% (107/146), with an accuracy of informative results for aneuploidies of 93.9% (107/114). Compared to cytogenetics, the accuracy of all informative FISH results, euploid and aneuploid, was 99.8%, and the specificity was 99.9%. In those pregnancies where fetal abnormalities had been observed by ultrasound, referring physicians requested FISH plus cytogenetics at a significantly higher rate than they requested cytogenetics alone. The current prenatal FISH protocol is not designed to detect all chromosome abnormalities and should only be utilized as an adjunctive test to cytogenetics. This experience demonstrates that FISH can provide a rapid and accurate clinical method for prenatal identification of chromosome aneuploidies. 40 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.,

  3. Visualization of sporopollenin-containing pathogenic green micro-alga Prototheca wickerhamii by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei

    2009-04-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using taxon-specific, rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes is one of the most powerful tools for the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms. However, eukaryotic algal cells do not always allow FISH probes to permeate over their cell walls. Members of the pathogenic micro-algal genus Prototheca are characterized by their distinctive cell-wall component, sporopollenin, an extremely tough biopolymer that resists acid and alkaline hydrolysis, enzyme attack, and acetolysis. To our knowledge, there has been no report of the successful permeation by the oligonucleotide probes over the cell walls of unicellular green micro-algae, which contain sporopollenin. The DNA probes passed through the cell wall of Prototheca wickerhamii after treating the algal cells with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Most cells in the middle logarithmic growth phase culture fluoresced when hybridized with the rRNA-targeted universal probe for eukaryotes, though individual cells included in this culture differed in the level of cell-wall vulnerability to attack by the polysaccharide-degrading enzyme, thus reflecting the different stages of the life cycle. This is the first report regarding the visualization of sporopollenin-containing, green micro-algal cells by FISH.

  4. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  5. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  6. Molecular cytogenetics: unraveling of the genetic composition of individual cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and digital imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanke, H J; Florijn, R J; Vrolijk, J; Raap, A K

    1995-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques allow the unraveling of the genetic alterations that cause or accompany malignant disease. Since tumors are often heterogeneous, biochemical analysis of tissue homogenates is of limited diagnostic value. This paper gives examples of methods that are presently operational to analyze the genetic composition of individual cells. They are based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. First, the current status of indirect and direct FISH staining methods with respect to probe labeling, detection sensitivity, multiplicity, and DNA resolution is summarized. Microscope hardware as well as charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras required for FISH analysis are then described. Applications potentially important for the analysis of urological malignancies, such as the automated enumeration of chromosomal abnormalities (counting of dots in interphase cells) and high-resolution DNA mapping on highly extended chromatin, are described in detail. Finally, the limitations of the present methodology and its future prospects are discussed.

  7. Microfluidic extraction and stretching of chromosomal DNA from single cell nuclei for DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Takebayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Bernardin, Evans; Gilbert, David M; Chella, Ravindran; Guan, Jingjiao

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a novel method for genetic characterization of single cells by integrating microfluidic stretching of chromosomal DNA and fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this method, individually isolated cell nuclei were immobilized in a microchannel. Chromosomal DNA was released from the nuclei and stretched by a pressure-driven flow. We analyzed and optimized flow conditions to generate a millimeter-long band of stretched DNA from each nucleus. Telomere fiber FISH was successfully performed on the stretched chromosomal DNA. Individual telomere fiber FISH signals from single cells could be resolved and their lengths measured, demonstrating the ability of the method to quantify genetic features at the level of single cells.

  8. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay.

    PubMed

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency.

  9. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency. PMID:23536543

  10. Quantifying Substrate Uptake by Individual Cells of Marine Bacterioplankton by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Combined with Microautoradiography▿

    PubMed Central

    Sintes, Eva; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2006-01-01

    Catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography (MICRO-CARD-FISH) is increasingly being used to obtain qualitative information on substrate uptake by individual members of specific prokaryotic communities. Here we evaluated the potential for using this approach quantitatively by relating the measured silver grain area around cells taking up 3H-labeled leucine to bulk leucine uptake measurements. The increase in the silver grain area over time around leucine-assimilating cells of coastal bacterial assemblages was linear during 4 to 6 h of incubation. By establishing standardized conditions for specific activity levels and concomitantly performing uptake measurements with the bulk community, MICRO-CARD-FISH can be used quantitatively to determine uptake rates on a single-cell level. Therefore, this approach allows comparisons of single-cell activities for bacterial communities obtained from different sites or growing under different ecological conditions. PMID:16950912

  11. Capture antibody targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (CAT-FISH): dual labeling allows for increased specificity in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Stroot, Joyce M; Leach, Kelly M; Stroot, Peter G; Lim, Daniel V

    2012-02-01

    Pathogen detection using biosensors is commonly limited due to the need for sensitivity and specificity in detecting targets within mixed populations. These issues were addressed through development of a dual labeling method that allows for both liquid-phase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and capture antibody targeted detection (CAT-FISH). CAT-FISH was developed using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus as representative bacteria, and processing techniques were evaluated with regard to FISH intensities and antibody recognition. The alternative fixative solution, methacarn, proved to be superior to standard solid-phase paraformaldehyde fixation procedures, allowing both FISH labeling and antibody recognition. CAT-FISH treated cells were successfully labeled with FISH probes, captured by immunomagnetic separation using fluorescent cytometric array beads, and detected using a cytometric array biosensor. CAT-FISH treated cells were detectable with LODs comparable to the standard antibody-based technique, (~10(3)cells/ml in PBS), and the technique was also successfully applied to two complex matrices. Although immunomagnetic capture and detection using cytometric arrays were demonstrated, CAT-FISH is readily applicable to any antibody-based fluorescence detection platform, and further optimization for sensitivity is possible via inclusion of fluorescently tagged antibodies. Since the confidence level needed for positive identification of a detected target is often paramount, CAT-FISH was developed to allow two separate levels of specificity, namely nucleic acid and protein signatures. With proper selection of FISH probes and capture antibodies, CAT-FISH may be used to provide rapid detection of target pathogens from within complex matrices with high levels of confidence.

  12. Automated detection and analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization spots depicted in digital microscopic images of Pap-smear specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology has been widely recognized as a promising molecular and biomedical optical imaging tool to screen and diagnose cervical cancer. However, manual FISH analysis is time-consuming and may introduce large inter-reader variability. In this study, a computerized scheme is developed and tested. It automatically detects and analyzes FISH spots depicted on microscopic fluorescence images. The scheme includes two stages: (1) a feature-based classification rule to detect useful interphase cells, and (2) a knowledge-based expert classifier to identify splitting FISH spots and improve the accuracy of counting independent FISH spots. The scheme then classifies detected analyzable cells as normal or abnormal. In this study, 150 FISH images were acquired from Pap-smear specimens and examined by both an experienced cytogeneticist and the scheme. The results showed that (1) the agreement between the cytogeneticist and the scheme was 96.9% in classifying between analyzable and unanalyzable cells (Kappa=0.917), and (2) agreements in detecting normal and abnormal cells based on FISH spots were 90.5% and 95.8% with Kappa=0.867. This study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH analysis, which may potentially improve detection efficiency and produce more accurate and consistent results than manual FISH analysis.

  13. Cytogenetic follow-up by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization: implications for monitoring patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q treated with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Büsche, Guntram; Hofmann, Winfried; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Fenaux, Pierre; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Schlegelberger, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    In patients with low and intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q (del(5q)) treated with lenalidomide, monitoring of cytogenetic response is mandatory, since patients without cytogenetic response have a significantly increased risk of progression. Therefore, we have reviewed cytogenetic data of 302 patients. Patients were analyzed by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 85 patients, del(5q) was only detected by karyotyping. In 8 patients undergoing karyotypic evolution, the del(5q) and additional chromosomal aberrations were only detected by karyotyping. In 3 patients, del(5q) was only detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization, but not by karyotyping due to a low number of metaphases. Karyotyping was significantly more sensitive than fluorescence in situ hybridization in detecting the del(5q) clone. In conclusion, to optimize therapy control of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with del(5q) treated with lenalidomide and to identify cytogenetic non-response or progression as early as possible, fluorescence in situ hybridization alone is inadequate for evaluation. Karyotyping must be performed to optimally evaluate response. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01099267 and NCT00179621) PMID:21109690

  14. Use of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization To Track Gene Expression by Both Partners during Initiation of Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakakis, K.; Lehnert, E.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of a productive symbiosis between Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian bobtail squid, and its luminous bacterial symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is mediated by transcriptional changes in both partners. A key challenge to unraveling the steps required to successfully initiate this and many other symbiotic associations is characterization of the timing and location of these changes. We report on the adaptation of hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) to simultaneously probe the spatiotemporal regulation of targeted genes in both E. scolopes and V. fischeri. This method revealed localized, transcriptionally coregulated epithelial cells within the light organ that responded directly to the presence of bacterial cells while, at the same time, provided a sensitive means to directly show regulated gene expression within the symbiont population. Thus, HCR-FISH provides a new approach for characterizing habitat transition in bacteria and for discovering host tissue responses to colonization. PMID:25956763

  15. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Retrieval of four adaptive lineages in duiker antelope: evidence from mitochondrial DNA sequences and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, B J; Robinson, T J

    2001-09-01

    Independent molecular markers (mitochondrial DNA sequences from two genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization with satellite DNA sequences as hybridization probes) were employed to investigate phylogenetic relationships among duiker antelope. When analyzed singly or taken together, the molecular and cytogenetic data allowed for the delimitation of four adaptive groups: the conservative dwarfs which are basal, a savanna specialist which groups apart from the forest duikers, the giant duikers, and the red duikers. Within the latter, a further subdivision comprising an east African and a west African red duiker clade is evident. The placement of the endangered zebra duiker and Aders' duiker remains problematic. Several of the nomenclatural divisions in current use are questioned by our results. These include the recognition of Philantomba as genus name for the blue and Maxwell's duiker and that Harvey's duiker be relegated to a subspecies of the Natal red duiker. We place our results in a biogeographic context and argue that duiker speciation has been driven predominantly by habitat fragmentation which probably led to the disruption of gene flow between geographic populations.

  17. Reliability of aneuploidy estimates in human sperm: Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using two different scoring criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H. |; Rademaker, A.

    1994-09-01

    Aneuploidy estimates for individual chromosomes in human sperm have varied more than 10-fold in different laboratories using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These laboratories use different scoring criteria in the assessment of a disomic sperm. In order to determine reliable estimates of aneuploidy, we have investigated whether scoring criteria affect the aneuploidy frequency in human sperm. Aneuploidy estimates for chromosomes 1(pUC1.77), 12(pBR12), X(XC) and Y(DYZ3Z) were obtained in human sperm from five donors using multicolor FISH analysis to provide an internal control to differentiate between nullisomy and lack of hybridization and between disomy and diploidy. Disomy frequencies were obtained by scoring a minimum of 10,000 sperm for each chromosome probe per donor. This analysis was replicated for two scoring criteria: one scoring criterion used one-half a signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals to be counted as two and thus disomic; the other scoring criterion set one signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals. A total of 120,870 sperm were assessed using one half domain as the scoring criterion and 113,478 were scored using one domain as the criterion. The mean percent disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, X, Y and XY was .18, .16, .15, .19, .25 respectively using the one-half domain criterion and .08, .17, .07, .12, .16 respectively using the one domain criterion. The percent disomy decreased significantly with use of one domain as the minimum distance for signal separation for all chromosomes except chromosome number 12. These lower disomy frequencies correlated well with frequencies derived from human sperm karyotypes analyzed in our laboratory. This suggests that the fluorescent signals for chromosomes 1, X and Y split into more than one domain in decondensed interphase sperm and use of the one-half domain criterion leads to an overestimate of aneuploidy frequencies.

  18. Localization of the DCTN1 gene encoding p150{sup Glued} to human chromosome 2p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbaur, E.L.F.; Tokito, M.K.

    1996-02-01

    This report discusses the genetic mapping of the DCTN1 gene to human chromosome 2p13 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This gene encodes the largest polypeptide of the dynactin complex, which is one of two microtubule-based biological motor protein complexes. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Midkine gene (MDK), a gene for prenatal differentiation and neuroregulation, maps to band 11p11. 2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaname, Tadashi; Uehara, Kazuyoshi; Muramatsu, Taskashi ); Kuwano, Akira; Murano, Ichiro; Kajii, Tadashi )

    1993-08-01

    Midkine (MDK) is a retinoic acid-responsive gene concerned with prenatal development and neurite growth. The authors mapped the gene to band p11.2 of chromosome 11 through fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and using a 4.5-kb fragment of its human genomic DNA. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Chromosomal localization of the human natural killer cell class I receptor family genes to 19q13.4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; yabe, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the localization of the human natural killer cell I receptor family genes to human chromosome 19q13.4 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. These genes mediate the inhibition of the cytotoxicity of subsets of natural killer cells. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  2. Detection of Inter-chromosomal Stable Aberrations by Multiple Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (mFISH) and Spectral Karyotyping (SKY) in Irradiated Mice.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rupak; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2017-01-11

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces numerous stable and unstable chromosomal aberrations. Unstable aberrations, where chromosome morphology is substantially compromised, can easily be identified by conventional chromosome staining techniques. However, detection of stable aberrations, which involve exchange or translocation of genetic materials without considerable modification in the chromosome morphology, requires sophisticated chromosome painting techniques that rely on in situ hybridization of fluorescently labeled DNA probes, a chromosome painting technique popularly known as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH probes can be specific for whole chromosome/s or precise sub-region on chromosome/s. The method not only allows visualization of stable aberrations, but it can also allow detection of the chromosome/s or specific DNA sequence/s involved in a particular aberration formation. A variety of chromosome painting techniques are available in cytogenetics; here two highly sensitive methods, multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) and spectral karyotyping (SKY), are discussed to identify inter-chromosomal stable aberrations that form in the bone marrow cells of mice after exposure to total body irradiation. Although both techniques rely on fluorescent labeled DNA probes, the method of detection and the process of image acquisition of the fluorescent signals are different. These two techniques have been used in various research areas, such as radiation biology, cancer cytogenetics, retrospective radiation biodosimetry, clinical cytogenetics, evolutionary cytogenetics, and comparative cytogenetics.

  3. Development of a flow-fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol for the analysis of microbial communities in anaerobic fermentation liquor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The production of bio-methane from renewable raw material is of high interest because of the increasing scarcity of fossil fuels. The process of biomethanation is based on the inter- and intraspecific metabolic activity of a highly diverse and dynamic microbial community. The community structure of the microbial biocenosis varies between different biogas reactors and the knowledge about these microbial communities is still fragmentary. However, up to now no approaches are available allowing a fast and reliable access to the microbial community structure. Hence, the aim of this study was to originate a Flow-FISH protocol, namely a combination of flow cytometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization, for the analysis of the metabolically active microorganisms in biogas reactor samples. With respect to the heterogenic texture of biogas reactor samples and to collect all cells including those of cell aggregates and biofilms the development of a preceding purification procedure was indispensable. Results Six different purification procedures with in total 29 modifications were tested. The optimized purification procedure combines the use of the detergent sodium hexametaphosphate with ultrasonic treatment and a final filtration step. By this treatment, the detachment of microbial cells from particles as well as the disbandment of cell aggregates was obtained at minimized cell loss. A Flow-FISH protocol was developed avoiding dehydration and minimizing centrifugation steps. In the exemplary application of this protocol on pure cultures as well as biogas reactor samples high hybridization rates were achieved for commonly established domain specific oligonucleotide probes enabling the specific detection of metabolically active bacteria and archaea. Cross hybridization and autofluorescence effects could be excluded by the use of a nonsense probe and negative controls, respectively. Conclusions The approach described in this study enables for the first time the

  4. Detection of the AML translocation (8;21) by two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Magnani, I.; Kearney, L.

    1994-09-01

    In the translocation (8;21)(q22;q22) associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), part of the long arm of chromosome 8 is reciprocally translocated onto chromosome 21. At the molecular level the translocation results in the fusion of the 5{prime} region of the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 and almost the entire CDR gene (also ETO or MTG8) on chromosome 8. To detection the translocation at the single cell level, we used two probes, a cosmid clone containing the first five exons of AML1 and a P1 clone containing the entire CDR gene. Hybridization of the two probes to the distal and proximal sides of the translocation breakpoint was expected to highlight the derivative 8q-chromosome in an interphase cell. To demonstrate the ability to identify the translocation in interphase cells using two-color FISH, these two probes were hybridized simultaneously to a cell line containing the 8;21 translocation, Kasumi-1. Each probe was detected with a different color so that their relationship in the sample could be determined within the same interphase cell. Simultaneous hybridization of the CDR and AML1 probes to interphase Kasumi-1 cells resulted in one orange and one green hybridization signal randomly located in the cell, from the hybridization to the normal 8 and 21 chromosomes, and one orange-green pair of signals from the close hybridization of the two probes to the fusion gene on the derivative 8q-chromosome, indicating the translocation. The translocation was identified by an abnormal pairing of the two differently colored signals in the same interphase cell. This technique allows for the detection of the translocation in all cells, not just those arrested in metaphase, and also permits the analysis of a small number of cells. Therefore, useful information can still be obtained from samples not suited for RT-PCR analysis and conventional cytogenetic techniques.

  5. Spatial organization of bacterial flora in normal and inflamed intestine: A fluorescence in situ hybridization study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Lochs, Herbert; Hale, Laura P.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: The spatial organization of intestinal flora was investigated in normal mice and in two models of murine colitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization. RESULTS: The murine small intestine was nearly bacteria-free. The normal colonic flora was organized in three distinct compartments (crypt, interlaced, and fecal), each with different bacterial compositions. Crypt bacteria were present in the cecum and proximal colon. The fecal compartment was composed of homogeneously mixed bacterial groups that directly contacted the colonic wall in the cecum but were separated from the proximal colonic wall by a dense interlaced layer. Beginning in the middle colon, a mucus gap of growing thickness physically separated all intestinal bacteria from contact with the epithelium. Colonic inflammation was accompanied with a depletion of bacteria within the fecal compartment, a reduced surface area in which feces had direct contact with the colonic wall, increased thickness and spread of the mucus gap, and massive increases of bacterial concentrations in the crypt and interlaced compartments. Adhesive and infiltrative bacteria were observed in inflamed colon only, with dominant Bacteroides species. CONCLUSION: The proximal and distal colons are functionally different organs with respect to the intestinal flora, representing a bioreactor and a segregation device. The highly organized structure of the colonic flora, its specific arrangement in different colonic segments, and its specialized response to inflammatory stimuli indicate that the intestinal flora is an innate part of host immunity that is under complex control. PMID:15754393

  6. Locked Nucleic Acid and Flow Cytometry-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for the Detection of Bacterial Small Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development and testing of a high-throughput method that enables the detection of small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) from single bacterial cells using locked nucleic acid probes (LNA) and flow cytometry-fluorescence in situ hybridization (flow-FISH). The LNA flow-FISH method and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to monitor the expression of three ncRNAs (6S, CsrB, and TPP-2) in Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 cultures during lag phase, mid-log phase, and stationary phase. Both LNA flow-FISH and qRT-PCR revealed that CsrB and TPP-2 were highly expressed during lag phase but markedly reduced in mid-log phase and stationary phase, whereas 6S demonstrated no to little expression during lag phase but increased thereafter. Importantly, while LNA flow-FISH and qRT-PCR demonstrated similar overall expression trends, only LNA flow-FISH, which enabled the detection of ncRNAs in individual cells as opposed to the lysate-based ensemble measurements generated by qRT-PCR, was able to capture the cell-to-cell heterogeneity in ncRNA expression. As such, this study demonstrates a new method that simultaneously enables the in situ detection of ncRNAs and the determination of gene expression heterogeneity within an isogenic bacterial population. PMID:22057868

  7. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Shan; Li, Ke; Shuai, Jiangbing; Dong, Qiang; Fang, Weihuan

    2012-07-02

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method in conjunction with fluorescin-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes (PNA-FISH) for detection of Listeria species was developed. In silico analysis showed that three PNA probes Lis-16S-1, Lm-16S-2 and Liv-16S-5 were suitable for specific identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii, respectively. These probes were experimentally verified by their reactivity against 19 strains of six Listeria species (excluding newly described species Listeria marthii and Listeria rocourtiae) and eight other bacterial species. The PNA-FISH method was optimized as 30 min of hybridization with 0.2% Triton X-100 in the solution and used to identify 85 Listeria strains from individual putative Listeria colonies on PALCAM agar plates streaked from selectively enriched cultures of 780 food or food-related samples. Of the 85 Listeria strains, thirty-seven were identified as L. monocytogenes with the probe Lm-16S-2 and two as L. ivanovii with the probe Liv-16S-5 which was in agreement with the results obtained by the API LISTERIA method. Thus, the PNA-FISH protocol has the potential for identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. from food or food-related samples.

  8. Rapid detection of viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 encapsulated spores using novel propidium monoazide-linked fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Bidyut R; La Duc, Myron T

    2012-07-01

    The survival of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores to standard industrial clean room sterilization practices necessitates the development of rapid molecular diagnostic tool(s) for detection and enumeration of viable bacterial spores in industrial clean room environments. This is of importance to maintaining the sterility of clean room processing products. This paper describes the effect of propidium monoazide (PMA) on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for detecting and enumerating B. pumilus SAFR-032 viable spores having been artificially encapsulated within poly(methylmethacrylate) (Lucite, Plexiglas) and released via an organic solvent (PolyGone-500). The results of the PMA-FISH experiments discussed herein indicate that PMA was able to permeate only the compromised coat layers of non-viable spores, identifying PMA treatment of bacterial spores prior to FISH analysis as a novel method for selecting out the fraction of the spore population that is non-viable from fluorescence detection. The ability of novel PMA-FISH to selectively distinguish and enumerate only the living spores present in a sample is of potential significance for development of improved strategies to minimize spore-specific microbial burden in a given environment.

  9. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to identify small phytoplankton by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, N; LeBot, N; Marie, D; Partensky, F; Vaulot, D

    1995-01-01

    Because of their tiny size (0.2 to 2 microns), oceanic picophytoplanktonic cells (either cultured strains or natural communities) are difficult to identify, and some basic questions concerning their taxonomy, physiology, and ecology are still largely unanswered. The present study was designed to test the suitability of in situ hybridization with rRNA fluorescent probes detected by flow cytometry for the identification of small photosynthetic eukaryotes. Oligonucleotide probes targeted against regions of the 18S rRNAs of Chlorophyta lineage (CHLO probe) and of non-Chlorophyta (NCHLO probe) algal species were designed. The CHLO and NCHLO probes, which differed by a single nucleotide, allowed discrimination of chlorophyte from nonchlorophyte cultured strains. The sensitivity of each probe was dependent upon the size of the cells and upon their growth stage. The mean fluorescence was 8 to 80 times higher for specifically labeled than for nonspecifically labeled cells in exponential growth phase, but it decreased sharply in stationary phase. Such taxon-specific probes should increase the applicability of flow cytometry for the rapid identification of cultured pico- and nanoplanktonic strains, especially those that lack taxonomically useful morphological features. PMID:7618862

  10. The human sorbitol dehydrogenase gene: cDNA cloning, sequence determination, and mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F.K.; Chung, S. ); Cheung, M.C. )

    1994-05-15

    The cDNA for human sorbitol dehydrogenase (SORD) has been cloned and sequenced. It translates into a peptide of 356 amino acid residues, one more than the sequence previously reported from peptide analysis. An extra alanine was found at the acetyl-blocked N-terminal, between positions 1 and 4. This matches the rat cDNA, which also has 356 amino acids, with an extra proline at position 3. Four other mismatches were also observed, but these are all amino acid substitutions that occur outside proposed functionally important regions. Further work must be performed to determine whether these discrepancies represent polymorphic forms of the enzyme. The SORD gene was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization and found to occupy a single site on chromosome 15q15, indicating that it is a single-copy gene. This was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. SORD is thought to be involved in the etiology of diabetic complications, and its deficiency has been linked to congenital cataracts. The cloned gene could be used as a probe to study the role of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of these diseases. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Detection of sex chromosomal aneuploidies X-X, Y-Y, and X-Y in human sperm using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Robbins, W.A. |; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H.U.; Mehraein, Y. |

    1994-10-15

    Sex chromosome aneuploidy is the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality in humans at birth and a substantial portion of these abnormalities involve paternal chromosomes. An efficient method is presented for using air-dried smears of human semen to detect the number of X and Y chromosomes in sperm chromatin using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. Air-dried semen smears were pre-treated with dithiothreitol and 3,4-diiodosalicylate salt to decondense the sperm chromatin and then were hybridized with repetitive sequence DNA probes that had been generated by PCR and differentially labeled. Hybridizations with X and Y specific probes showed the expected ratio of 50%X:50%Y bearing sperm. Sperm carrying extra fluorescence domains representing disomy for the X or Y chromosomes occurred at frequencies of {approximately} 4 per 10,000 sperm each. Cells carrying both X and Y fluorescence domains occurred at a frequency of {approximately} 6/10,000. Thus, the overall frequency of sperm that carried an extra sex chromosome was 1.4/1,000. The frequencies of sperm carrying sex chromosome aneuploidies determined by hybridization did not differ statistically from those reported from the same laboratory using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique. Multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm is a promising method for assessing sex-ratio alterations in human semen and for determining the fraction of sperm carrying sex or other chromosome aneuploidies which may be transmissible to offspring. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Assignment of the human aggrecan gene (AGC1) to 15q26 using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Doege, K.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1993-05-01

    The large aggregating proteoglycan aggrecan is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage. Recent cDNA cloning of the human aggrecan gene (AGC1) reveals a core protein of at least 2316 amino acids characterized by several distinct structural domains. Two globular domains, termed G1 and G2, are present at the amino terminus of the molecule and a third, termed G3, is present at the carboxy terminus. The G1 domain is homologous in structure to the cartilage link protein and accounts for the aggregating potential of aggrecan through its ability to interact with hyaluronic acid. The aggrecan gene is known to consist of 15 exons, with each exon encoding a distinct functional region of the mature protein. However, while the link protein gene is known to reside on chromosome 5 in the human, the location of the aggrecan gene is currently undetermined in any species. The probe (pAGG2) for the aggrecan gene was mapped on chromosome band 15q26, most likely in the subregion of 15q26.1, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clear signals were noted on both chromatids of chromosome band 15q26 in over 80% of the 300 metaphase cells examined in three independent experiments using pAGG2. No other sites of hybridization were noted on both chromatids of any other chromosome band. The precise band location was identified by using chromsomes of about 650 bands and employing fluorescence reverse banding with chromomycin A3 and distamycin. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Aneuploidy detection for chromosomes 1, X and Y by fluorescence in situ hybridization in human sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, M.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Acosta, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    Oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males (n=15) were investigated for infertility as compared with proven fertile donors. The oligoasthenoteratozoospermic population showed a mean sperm concentration of 9.7 x 10{sup 6}/ml (Range 4.2-19.7), mean motility of 38.5% (Range 10.6-76.8) and morphology (measured by the percentage of normal forms evaluated by strict criteria) with a mean of 3.49% (Range 1.5-5.0). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using satellite DNA probes specific for chromosomes 1 (puc 1.77), X (alpha satellite), and Y (satellite-III at Yqh) was performed on human interphase sperm nuclei. DNA probes were either directly labelled with rhodamine-dUTP, FITC-dUTP, or biotinylated by nick translation. Hybridization and signal detection were done by routine laboratory protocols. Microscopic analysis was performed using a cooled CCD camera attached to an epi-fluorescent microscope. After hybridization, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 0.96% (n=12) nullisomic, 98.5% (n=1231) monosomic and 0.96% (n=12) disomic for chromosome 1, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 16% (n=600) nullisomic, 74.5% (n=2792) monosomic and 9.9% (n=370) disomic. In addition, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 45.7% (n=633) monosomic and 0.7% (n=11) disomic for chromosome X, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 38.7% (n=760) monosomic and 0.8% (n=13) disomic. Chromosome Y frequencies for fertile donors showed 44.6% (n=614) monosomic and 0.6% (n=2) disomic, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 33.2% (n=701) monosomic and 0.8% (n=15) disomic. This suggests that the frequency of nullisomy for chromosome 1 is significantly higher (p<0.001) in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic makes versus sperm from our fertile donors. We conclude that FISH is a powerful tool to determine the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients.

  14. Paternal-age effects on sperm aneuploidy investigated in mice and humans by three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Lowe, X.; Holland, N.T.

    1994-09-01

    We conducted a cross-species comparison of the effects of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy in mice and humans. A new murine assay was developed to detect sperm hyperhaploidy and polyploidy for chromosomes X, Y, and 8 using fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes, to serve as a direct corollate to the three-chromosome method developed early for human sperm. Sperm aneuploidy was evaluated in eight male B6C3F1 male mice (aged 22.5-30.5 mo) and compared to young controls (2.4 mo). The aged group showed significant ({approximately}2.0-fold) increases in hyperhaploidies involving chromosomes X, Y and 8, with the greatest effects seen in the oldest animals. Sperm aneuploidy was also evaluated in two groups of healthy men who differed in mean age [46.8{plus_minus}3.1 (n=4) vs. 28.5{plus_minus}5.0 (n=10) yrs], using the three-chromosome method. The older group showed a statistically significant increase in hyperhaploid sperm for both sex chromosomes. Additional controlled human studies are planned. Taken together, the murine and human data are consistent with a positive effect of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy. In both species, the strongest age effect was observed for hyperhaploidies of chromosome Y. Future studies are needed to investigate the shape of the age-effect curve and to evaluate chromosomal differences, especially for humans in their late reproductive years.

  15. Feasibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect early gene changes in sputum cells from uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Neft, R.E.; Rogers, J.L.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that combined exposure to radon progeny and tobacco smoke produce a greater than additive or synergistic increase in lung cancer risk. Lung cancer results from multiple genetic changes over a long period of time. An early change that occurs in lung cancer is trisomy 7 which is found in 50% of non-small cell lung cancer and in the far margins of resected lung tumors. The 80% mortality associated with lung cancer is in part related to the high proportion of patients who present with an advanced, unresectable tumor. Therefore, early detection of patients at risk for tumor development is critical to improve treatment of this disease. Currently, it is difficult to detect lung cancer early while it is still amendable by surgery. Saccomanno, G. has shown that premalignant cytologic changes in sputum cells collected from uranium miners can be detected by a skilled, highly trained cytopathologist. A more objective alternative for identifying premalignant cells in sputum may be to determine whether an early genetic change such as trisomy 7 is present in these cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to identify cells with trisomy 7. The results of this investigation indicate that FISH may prove to be an accurate, efficient method to test at-risk individuals for genetic alterations in bronchial epithelial cells from sputum.

  16. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization analysis of chromosomal constitution in spermatozoa from a mosaic 47,XYY/46,XY male.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Samura, O; Zhen, D K; Cowan, J M; Cardone, V; Summers, M; Bianchi, D W

    2000-07-01

    Sex-chromosome mosaicism in spermatozoa from a mosaic 47,XYY[20%]/46, XY[80%] male with fertility problems was assessed using triple-probe fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Chromosome-specific probes for X, Y and 18 were used, and the possible outcomes were deduced. In normal haploid spermatozoa of the patient and a normal 46,XY male control, the X:Y ratio was close to 1:1. There was a significant difference in the total incidence of karyotypically abnormal spermatozoa between the patient and the 46, XY male control (2.31% versus 1.46%, P < 0.0001). The incidence of some types of disomic spermatozoa X+Y+18 (24,XY) and X+18+18 (24,X, +18), or diploid X+Y+18+18 (46,XY) spermatozoa was significantly increased in the patient's semen sample. There was, however, no significant difference in the incidence of disomic Y+Y+18 (24,YY) spermatozoa. Because the majority of the patient's spermatozoa was karyotypically normal, the aetiology of his fertility problems was unclear. These results add to the growing body of information regarding chromosome abnormalities in spermatozoa from men who are mosaic for sex chromosome abnormalities. In these men, FISH analysis of spermatozoa may be warranted to determine the relative percentages of abnormal cells, and to determine if in-vitro fertilization with preimplantation genetic diagnosis may increase the likelihood of a successful pregnancy.

  17. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization for the identification of bacterial species in archival heart valve sections of canine bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, B G; Craven, M; McDonough, S P; Nydam, D V; Scorza, V; Assarasakorn, S; Lappin, M; Simpson, K W

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial endocarditis (BE) is defined as inflammation of cardiac valve structures and/or the endocardium secondary to bacterial infection. Canine valvular BE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and ante-mortem diagnosis and post-mortem identification of causative organisms is problematic. Identification of bacteria in canine BE has traditionally relied on visualization of organisms on histological sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin (HE), Gram and modified Steiner's stains. Each of these staining techniques has limitations with respect to identification of bacterial species in cases of BE. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) has been introduced recently as a technique to identify bacteria in biological specimens. To our knowledge, FISH has not been used previously to identify bacteria in archival samples of heart valves from dogs with naturally occurring BE. We sought to determine whether FISH could detect the presence and species of bacteria in archival heart valve sections from dogs with BE, and to compare FISH to histochemical stains in the identification of bacteria. FISH detected bacteria in seven of 17 cases of canine BE and showed near perfect agreement with modified Steiner's stain for the detection of bacteria. FISH identified Streptococcus spp. and/or Staphylococcus spp. in all of these cases, but Bartonella spp. were not identified.

  18. HER-2 and cancer antigen 125 evaluation in ovarian borderline tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, J K R; Böttcher-Luiz, F; Andrade, L L A; Davidson, S; Bonds, L; Stephens, J; Varella-Garcia, M

    2004-01-01

    The study determined the expression of cancer antigen (CA) 125 and HER-2 in 45 borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) and investigated the correlation of these biologic markers with histologic type, clinical stage, and outcome. The level of CA 125 protein was assessed using DAKO's M-11 clone antibody in immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays (Carpinteria, CA). The HER-2 protein expression was assessed in IHC assays using the HercepTest (DAKO), and the HER-2 gene copy number per cell was investigated through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays using VYSIS' PathVysion DNA Probe (Downers Grove, IL). Expression of the CA 125 protein was detected in 49% of the samples (22 out of 45 tumors) and significantly associated with the serous histologic type. However, CA 125 expression did not associate with clinical stage or outcome. Protein overexpression or gene amplification of HER-2 was not found. However, abnormal FISH results were detected in 16% (seven out of 45 patients) of specimens comprising extranumerary copies of HER-2 and/or chromosome 17 per cell. Abnormal FISH results were found to be independent of CA 125 expression and histologic type whereas they positively associate with advanced clinical stage. Our data show that HER-2 is not altered in BOTs, and the presence of aneusomy for chromosome 17 and HER-2 may predict tumor progression.

  19. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Nicomrat, D.; Dick, W.A.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    2006-07-15

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant.

  20. Cytogenetic characterization of complex karyotypes in seven established melanoma cell lines by multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization and DAPI banding.

    PubMed

    Schulten, Hans Jürgen; Gunawan, Bastian; Otto, Friedrich; Hassmann, René; Hallermann, Christian; Noebel, Albrecht; Füzesi, László

    2002-03-01

    We report the use of multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) to resolve chromosomal aberrations in seven established melanoma cell lines with hypotriploid to hypertetraploid complex karyotypes. By simultaneous identification of all human chromosomes in single FISH experiments using a set of 52 directly labeled, whole chromosome painting probes, cryptic chromosomal translocations and the origin of unclear chromosomal material in structural rearranged and marker chromosomes could be identified, refining the tumor karyotypes in all seven cell lines. The number of structural aberrations in each cell line assigned with combined M-FISH and DAPI banding analysis ranged from 15 to 45. Altogether, 275 breakpoints could be assigned to defined chromosomal regions or bands. The chromosome arms 1p, 6q, 7p, 9p, and 11q which are known to be nonrandomly associated with melanoma tumorigenesis, were frequently involved in chromosomal breaks and/or copy number changes. This study also demonstrated the practical usefulness of combining M-FISH with conventional cytogenetic banding techniques for the characterization of complex tumor karyotypes with massive genomic alterations.

  1. The utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of bladder urothelial carcinoma in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyung Won; Kim, Sun Hee; Lee, Hyun Moo

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the ability of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in detecting bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC), FISH and cytology were compared for the evaluation of 308 consecutive urine samples from patients suspected of having BUC. All patients underwent cystoscopy for identification of bladder lesions. The FISH results were compared with the cytology assessment. In all, 122 patients had confirmed BUC. Among them, 68 (55.7%) were FISH-positive, while only 33 (27%) were positive on cytology. According to disease stage (superficial vs. invasive) and grade (low vs. high), the sensitivities of FISH were also significantly higher than those of cytology in all categories. Moreover, in 36 patients who had no visible tumor with flat, erythematous mucosa (suspicious lesion), FISH was more sensitive than cytology for the detection of BUC (83.3% vs. 33.3%, P=0.002). The FISH was negative in 168 (90.3%) of 186 patients with no histological evidence of BUC or negative cystoscopy findings. The sensitivity of FISH for detecting BUC was superior to that of cytology, regardless of tumor stage and grade. FISH is a significant additional and complementary method for detection of BUC in patients who have suspicious lesions on cystoscopy.

  2. Specific detection of viable Listeria monocytogenes in Spanish wastewater treatment plants by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Yolanda; Ballesteros, Lorena; García-Hernández, Jorge; Santiago, Paula; González, Ana; Ferrús, M Antonia

    2011-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes detection in wastewater can be difficult because of the large amount of background microbiota and the presence of viable but non-culturable forms in this environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate a Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) assay combined with Direct Viable Count (DVC) method for detecting viable L. monocytogenes in wastewater samples, as an alternative to conventional culture methods. 16S rRNA sequence data were used to design a specific oligonucleotide probe. In order to assess the suitability of the method, the assays were performed on naturally (n=87) and artificially (n=14) contaminated samples and results were compared to those obtained with the isolation of cells on selective media and with a PCR method. The detection limit of FISH and PCR assays was 10(4) cells/mL without enrichment and 10 cells/mL after enrichment. A total of 47 samples, including 3 samples from effluent sites, yielded FISH positive results for L. monocytogenes. Using DVC-FISH technique, the presence of viable L. monocytogenes cells was detected in 23 out of these 47 FISH positive wastewater samples. PCR and culture methods yielded 27 and 23 positive results, respectively. According to these results, FISH technique has the potential to be used as a sensitive method for the detection and enumeration of L. monocytogenes in environmental wastewater samples.

  3. Monitoring of chimerism using fluorescence in situ hybridization in a child with severe combined immune deficiency following bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Chen, X.O.; Katz, A.J. |

    1994-09-01

    A boy with severe combined immunodeficiency received a bone marrow transplant from his sister when he was approximately 3 years of age. His peripheral blood karyotype at age 3 and 4 years was 46,XX (20 cells analyzed). Because of a decline in antibody production at 19 years of age, the patient`s peripheral blood was analyzed again for suspected chimerism. His karyotype in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated culture was 46,XX in 49 cells and 46,XY in one cell. Both metaphase and interphase cells were examined for sex chromosome constitution using X and Y dual-color alpha-satellite probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results for metaphase cells showed 1/50 XY cells, but 38% of interphase cells showed the presence of both X and Y centromere. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures grew poorly and were therefore analyzed using FISH only: 81% of interphase cells were 46,XX. The discrepancy between metaphase and interphase in the PHA-stimulated cultures most likely represents a failure of this boy`s own XY T-cells to be stimulated.

  4. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Nicomrat, Duongruitai; Dick, Warren A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2006-01-01

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant. Heterotrophs in the Acidiphilium genus totaled 20% of the bacterial population. Leptospirillum ferrooxidans was below the level of detection in the bacterial community. The results from the FISH technique from this field study are consistent with results from other experiments involving enumeration by most probable number, dot-blot hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses and with the geochemistry of the site.

  5. Physical mapping of immune-related genes in Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis) using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zujing; Li, Xuan; Liao, Huan; Hu, Liping; Zhang, Zhengrui; Zhao, Bosong; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The innate immune system plays a pivotal role in defending invasion of microorganisms for scallops. Previous studies on immune-related genes in the Yesso scallop, Patinopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1857) have mainly focused on characterization and expression pattern in response to bacterial challenge, no research has been carried out on the cytogenetic level yet. In the present study, eight fosmid clones containing the sequences of key immune-related genes (PyNFkB, PyTRAF2, PyTRAF4, PyTRAF7, PyMyd88-1, PyMyd88-3, PyMKK-7 and PyTNFR) were isolated and seven of them were successfully mapped on chromosomes of Patinopecten yessoensis utilizing fluorescence in situ hybridization. Wherein, PyMyd88-1, PyMyd88-3 and PyMKK-7 located on the same chromosome pair with adjacent positions and the other genes were mapped on four non-homologous chromosome pairs, showing a similar distribution to another five model species. The isolation and mapping of such genes of the Yesso scallop will lay a foundation for studies such as assignment of interested genes to chromosomes, construction cytogenetic maps and so on. PMID:28123676

  6. Application of a direct fluorescence-based live/dead staining combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for assessment of survival rate of Bacteroides spp. in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Savichtcheva, Olga; Okayama, Noriko; Ito, Tsukasa; Okabe, Satoshi

    2005-11-05

    To evaluate the viability and survival ability of fecal Bacteroides spp. in environmental waters, a fluorescence-based live/dead staining method using ViaGram Red+ Bacterial gram stain and viability kit was combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe (referred as LDS-FISH). The proposed LDS-FISH was a direct and reliable method to detect fecal Bacteroides cells and their viability at single-cell level in complex microbial communities. The pure culture of Bacteroides fragilis and whole human feces were dispersed in aerobic drinking water and incubated at different water temperatures (4 degrees C, 13 degrees C, 18 degrees C, and 24 degrees C), and then the viability of B. fragilis and fecal Bacteroides spp. were determined by applying the LDS-FISH. The results revealed that temperature and the presence of oxygen have significant effects on the survival ability. Increasing the temperature resulted in a rapid decrease in the viability of both pure cultured B. fragilis cells and fecal Bacteroides spp. The live pure cultured B. fragilis cells could be found at the level of detection in drinking water for 48 h of incubation at 24 degrees C, whereas live fecal Bacteroides spp. could be detected for only 4 h of incubation at 24 degrees C. The proposed LDS-FISH method should provide useful quantitative information on the presence and viability of Bacteroides spp., a potential alternative fecal indicator, in environmental waters.

  7. Quick Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Protocol for Xist RNA Combined with Immunofluorescence of Histone Modification in X-chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Norishige; Ogawa, Akiyo; Ogawa, Yuya

    2014-01-01

    Combining RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with immunofluorescence (immuno-FISH) creates a technique that can be employed at the single cell level to detect the spatial dynamics of RNA localization with simultaneous insight into the localization of proteins, epigenetic modifications and other details which can be highlighted by immunofluorescence. X-chromosome inactivation is a paradigm for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)-mediated gene silencing. X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) lncRNA accumulation (called an Xist cloud) on one of the two X-chromosomes in mammalian females is a critical step to initiate X-chromosome inactivation. Xist RNA directly or indirectly interacts with various chromatin-modifying enzymes and introduces distinct epigenetic landscapes to the inactive X-chromosome (Xi). One known epigenetic hallmark of the Xi is the Histone H3 trimethyl-lysine 27 (H3K27me3) modification. Here, we describe a simple and quick immuno-FISH protocol for detecting Xist RNA using RNA FISH with multiple oligonucleotide probes coupled with immunofluorescence of H3K27me3 to examine the localization of Xist RNA and associated epigenetic modifications. Using oligonucleotide probes results in a shorter incubation time and more sensitive detection of Xist RNA compared to in vitro transcribed RNA probes (riboprobes). This protocol provides a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of lncRNAs and its associated epigenetic modification, chromatin structure, nuclear organization and transcriptional regulation. PMID:25489864

  8. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of microbial consortia from a biogenic gas field in Alaska's Cook Inlet basin.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Katherine S; Strąpoć, Dariusz; Huizinga, Brad; Lidstrom, Ulrika; Ashby, Matt; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2012-05-01

    Filter-collected production water samples from a methane-rich gas field in the Cook Inlet basin of Alaska were investigated using whole-cell rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing. Both techniques were consistent in determining the microbial community composition, including the archaeal or bacterial dominance of samples. The archaeal community is dominated by the obligate methylotrophic methanogen genus Methanolobus as well as the nutritional generalist methanogen genus Methanosarcina, which is capable of utilizing acetate, CO(2), and methyl-bearing compounds. The most-abundant bacterial groups are Firmicutes, notably of the Acetobacterium genus, and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides species (CFBs) affiliated with the order Bacteroidales. We observed spatial variation among samples in both the percentage of members of Archaea compared to that of members of Bacteria and the dominant members of the bacterial community, differences which could not be explained with the available geochemical data. Based upon the microbial community composition and the isotopic signature of methane associated with the Cook Inlet basin site, we propose a simplified reaction network beginning with the breakdown of coal macromolecules, followed by fermentation and methylotrophic and acetoclastic methane production.

  9. Quick fluorescent in situ hybridization protocol for Xist RNA combined with immunofluorescence of histone modification in X-chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Minghui; Charles Richard, John Lalith; Yamada, Norishige; Ogawa, Akiyo; Ogawa, Yuya

    2014-11-26

    Combining RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with immunofluorescence (immuno-FISH) creates a technique that can be employed at the single cell level to detect the spatial dynamics of RNA localization with simultaneous insight into the localization of proteins, epigenetic modifications and other details which can be highlighted by immunofluorescence. X-chromosome inactivation is a paradigm for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)-mediated gene silencing. X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) lncRNA accumulation (called an Xist cloud) on one of the two X-chromosomes in mammalian females is a critical step to initiate X-chromosome inactivation. Xist RNA directly or indirectly interacts with various chromatin-modifying enzymes and introduces distinct epigenetic landscapes to the inactive X-chromosome (Xi). One known epigenetic hallmark of the Xi is the Histone H3 trimethyl-lysine 27 (H3K27me3) modification. Here, we describe a simple and quick immuno-FISH protocol for detecting Xist RNA using RNA FISH with multiple oligonucleotide probes coupled with immunofluorescence of H3K27me3 to examine the localization of Xist RNA and associated epigenetic modifications. Using oligonucleotide probes results in a shorter incubation time and more sensitive detection of Xist RNA compared to in vitro transcribed RNA probes (riboprobes). This protocol provides a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of lncRNAs and its associated epigenetic modification, chromatin structure, nuclear organization and transcriptional regulation.

  10. Abundance and phylogenetic affiliation of iron reducers in activated sludge as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and microautoradiography.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Juretschko, Stefan; Wagner, Michael; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2002-09-01

    Microautoradiography (MAR) was used to enumerate acetate-consuming bacteria under Fe(III)-reducing conditions in activated sludge. This population is believed to consist of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, because the applied incubation conditions and the use of specific inhibitors excluded consumption of radiolabeled acetate by other physiological groups such as sulfate reducers. By use of this approach, dissimilatory iron reducers were found in a concentration of 1.1 x 10(8) cells per ml, corresponding to approximately 3% of the total cell count as determined by DAPI (4',6'-diamino-2-phenylindoledihydrochloride-dilactate) staining. The MAR enumeration method was compared to the traditional most-probable-number (MPN) method (FeOOH-MPN) and a modified MPN method, which contains Ferrozine directly within the MPN dilutions to determine the production of small amounts of ferrous iron (Ferrozine-MPN). The Ferrozine-MPN method yielded values 6 to 10 times higher than those obtained by the FeOOH-MPN method. Nevertheless, the MAR approach yielded counts that were 100 to 1,000 times higher than those obtained by the Ferrozine-MPN method. Specific in situ Fe(III) reduction rates per cell (enumerated by the MAR method) were calculated and found to be comparable to the respective rates for pure cultures of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, suggesting that the new MAR method is most reliable. A combination of MAR and fluorescence in situ hybridization was used for phylogenetic characterization of the putative iron-reducing bacteria. All activated-sludge cells able to consume acetate under iron-reducing conditions were targeted by the bacterial oligonucleotide probe EUB338. Around 20% were identified as gamma Proteobacteria, and 10% were assigned to the delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  11. Analysis of methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor: use of fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Montero, B; García-Morales, J L; Sales, D; Solera, R

    2009-03-01

    Methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor was determined by comparing the amount of methane generated for each of the organic loading rates with the size of the total and specific methanogenic population, as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. A high correlation was evident between the total methanogenic activity and retention time [-0.6988Ln(x)+2.667] (R(2) 0.8866). The total methanogenic activity increased from 0.04x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) to 0.38x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) while the retention time decreased, augmenting the organic loading rates. The specific methanogenic activities of H(2)-utilizing methanogens and acetate-utilizing methanogens increased until they stabilised at 0.64x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) and 0.33x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1), respectively. The methanogenic activity of H(2)-utilizing methanogens was higher than acetate-utilizing methanogens, indicating that maintaining a low partial pressure of hydrogen does not inhibit the acetoclastic methanogenesis or the anaerobic process.

  12. Contribution of fluorescence in situ hybridization to immunohistochemistry for the evaluation of HER-2 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cianciulli, Anna M; Botti, Claudio; Coletta, Angela M; Buglioni, Simonetta; Marzano, Raffaella; Benevolo, Maria; Cione, Antonio; Mottolese, Marcella

    2002-02-01

    The main focus of the present study was to assess the efficacy of interphase cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as a valid alternative to immunohistochemistry (IHC) in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and/or the efficacy of the combination of the two methods, while, at the same time, aiming to provide additional information on the use of the two methods. For this study, selected breast cancer patients (n=66) were tested for HER-2 gene amplification by FISH. The probe contains DNA sequences specific for the HER-2 human gene locus and hybridizes to the 17q11.2 through q12 region of human chromosome 17. The same samples were tested previously for HER-2 overexpression by two monoclonal antibodies (300G9 and CB11), recognizing an extracellular and an internal domain of gp185(Her-2), respectively. HER-2 overexpression also was evaluated using the HerceptTest Kit (Dako, Milan, Italy). The HerceptTest was performed according to the manufacturer's standard procedures, and results were scored on a 0 to 3+ scale. A total of 34 (51%) of 66 breast tumors enrolled in this study were positive by FISH. Of the 34 cases amplified by FISH, 9 were negative by IHC using both monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 300G9 and MoAb CB11, with a concordance rate from 80.3% to 83.3%. A higher concordance was verified (92.4%) when we used the HerceptTest Kit. Of the 32 cases found negative with the HerceptTest, FISH analysis identified HER-2 gene amplification in more than 10%. Our results indicate that with the combined use of both methods, several amplified samples classified negative by IHC can be used thus improving therapeutic planning for specific therapy with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab.

  13. Fully automated fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) staining and digital analysis of HER2 in breast cancer: a validation study.

    PubMed

    van der Logt, Elise M J; Kuperus, Deborah A J; van Setten, Jan W; van den Heuvel, Marius C; Boers, James E; Schuuring, Ed; Kibbelaar, Robby E

    2015-01-01

    HER2 assessment is routinely used to select patients with invasive breast cancer that might benefit from HER2-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to validate a fully automated in situ hybridization (ISH) procedure that combines the automated Leica HER2 fluorescent ISH system for Bond with supervised automated analysis with the Visia imaging D-Sight digital imaging platform. HER2 assessment was performed on 328 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded invasive breast cancer tumors on tissue microarrays (TMA) and 100 (50 selected IHC 2+ and 50 random IHC scores) full-sized slides of resections/biopsies obtained for diagnostic purposes previously. For digital analysis slides were pre-screened at 20x and 100x magnification for all fluorescent signals and supervised-automated scoring was performed on at least two pictures (in total at least 20 nuclei were counted) with the D-Sight HER2 FISH analysis module by two observers independently. Results were compared to data obtained previously with the manual Abbott FISH test. The overall agreement with Abbott FISH data among TMA samples and 50 selected IHC 2+ cases was 98.8% (κ = 0.94) and 93.8% (κ = 0.88), respectively. The results of 50 additionally tested unselected IHC cases were concordant with previously obtained IHC and/or FISH data. The combination of the Leica FISH system with the D-Sight digital imaging platform is a feasible method for HER2 assessment in routine clinical practice for patients with invasive breast cancer.

  14. Detection of aneuploid human sperm by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Evidence for a donor difference in frequency of sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, W.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Segraves, R.; Pinkel, D. ); Wyrobek, A.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with repetitive-sequence DNA probes was used to detect human sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y in three healthy men. Data on these same men had been obtained previously, using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique, providing a cytogenetic reference for validating sperm hybridization measurements. Air-dried smears were prepared from semen samples and treated with DTT and lithium diiodosalicylate to expand sperm chromatin. Hybridization with fluorescently tagged DNA probes for chromosomes 1 (pUC177) or Y (pY3.4) yielded average frequencies of sperm with two fluorescent domains of 14.2[+-]2.4/10,000 and 5.6[+-]1.6/10,000 sperm, respectively. These frequencies did not differ statistically from frequencies of hyperploidy observed for these chromosomes with the hamster technique. In addition, frequencies of disomic sperm from one donor were elevated [approximately]2.5-fold above those of other donors, for both chromosomes 1 (P = .045) and Y (P = .01), consistent with a trend found with the hamster technique. The authors conclude that fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm chromosomes provides a valid and promising measure of the frequency of disomic human sperm. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Identification of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) chromosomes using a fluorescence in situ hybridization system reveals multiple hybridization events during tetraploid peanut formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laining; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tian, Li; Chen, Lei; Yu, Weichang

    2016-09-01

    The cultivated peanut Arachis hypogaea (AABB) is thought to have originated from the hybridization of Arachis duranensis (AA) and Arachis ipaënsis (BB) followed by spontaneous chromosome doubling. In this study, we cloned and analyzed chromosome markers from cultivated peanut and its wild relatives. A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping cocktail was developed with which to study the karyotypes and chromosome evolution of peanut and its wild relatives. Karyotypes were constructed in cultivated peanut and its two putative progenitors using our FISH-based karyotyping system. Comparative karyotyping analysis revealed that chromosome organization was highly conserved in cultivated peanut and its two putative progenitors, especially in the B genome chromosomes. However, variations existed between A. duranensis and the A genome chromosomes in cultivated peanut, especially for the distribution of the interstitial telomere repeats (ITRs). A search of additional A. duranensis varieties from different geographic regions revealed both numeric and positional variations of ITRs, which were similar to the variations in tetraploid peanut varieties. The results provide evidence for the origin of cultivated peanut from the two diploid ancestors, and also suggest that multiple hybridization events of A. ipaënsis with different varieties of A. duranensis may have occurred during the origination of peanut.

  16. Chromosome 17 aneusomy detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in vulvar squamous cell carcinomas and synchronous vulvar skin.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Healy, K; Tran, T A; Malfetano, J; Wilson, V L; Rohwedder, A; Ross, J S

    2000-09-01

    Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) affects a spectrum of women with granulomatous vulvar diseases, human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and chronic inflammatory vulvar dermatoses. To determine whether there is evidence of chromosomal instability occurring in synchronous skin surrounding vulvar SCCs, we investigated abnormalities in chromosome 17 copy number. Samples of SCC, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), and surrounding vulvar skin were obtained from all vulvar excisions performed for squamous neoplasia at Albany Medical College from 1996 to 1997. Histological categorization, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the alpha satellite region of chromosome 17, DNA content by image analysis, and Ki-67 labeling were evaluated. Controls of normal vulvar skin not associated with cancer were used for comparison. One hundred ten specimens were obtained from 33 patients with either SCC or VIN 3 and consisted of 49 neoplastic, 52 nonneoplastic, and 9 histologically normal vulvar skin samples. The majority of SCCs (88%) and a minority (18%) of VIN 3 excisions were associated with lichen sclerosus. Normal vulvar skin controls did not exhibit chromosome 17 polysomy (cells with more than four FISH signals), whereas 56% of normal vulvar skin associated with cancer did. Moreover, the frequency of polysomy significantly increased as the histological classification progressed from normal to inflammatory to neoplastic lesions. The largest mean value and variance for chromosome 17 copy number was identified in SCCs (2.4 +/- 1.0) with intermediate values identified, in decreasing order, for SCC in situ (2.1 +/- 1.0), VIN 2 (2.1 +/- 0.8), lichen sclerosus (2.0 +/- 0.5), lichen simplex chronicus (1.9 +/- 0.4), and normal skin associated with SCC (1.8 +/- 0.4) compared with control vulvar skin (1.5 +/- 0. 05). Concordance of chromosome 17 aneusomy between cancers and synchronous skin lesions was found in 48% of patients. Loss of chromosome 17 was identified 5% of all

  17. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this proposal is to create a cDNA map of the human genome. Mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach will generate 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  18. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B.

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a diagnostic aid for synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shipley, J.; Crew, J.; Birdsall, S.; Gill, S.; Clark, J.; Fisher, C.; Kelsey, A.; Nojima, T.; Sonobe, H.; Cooper, C.; Gusterson, B.

    1996-01-01

    Identification of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) that is associated with a high proportion of synovial sarcoma can be a useful diagnostic aid. The translocation results in fusion of the SYT gene on chromosome 18 to either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene, two homologous genes within Xp11.2. Two-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were assessed as approaches to identify the rearrangement in well characterized cases. The presence of the translocation, and the specific chromosome X gene disrupted, were inferred from the configuration of signals from chromosome-specific centromere probes, paints, and markers flanking each gene in preparations of interphase nuclei. Rearrangement was found in two cell lines and eight of nine tumor samples, including analysis of five touch imprints. This was consistent with cytogenetic data in four cases and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis using primers known to amplify both SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2 transcripts. The transcripts were distinguished by restriction with LspI and SmaI. Contrary to previous suggestions, there was no obvious correlation between histological subtype and involvement of the SSX1 or SSX2 gene. These approaches could also be applied to the identification of tumor-free margins and metastatic disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8579118

  20. Effects of fixative and fixation protocols on assessment of Her-2/neu oncogene amplification status by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Willmore-Payne, Carlynn; Metzger, Ken; Layfield, Lester J

    2007-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine amplification status of the Her-2/neu gene in specimens of newly diagnosed breast carcinoma. The Vysis kit for FISH analysis stipulates that the tissue be formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. Concerns regarding carcinogenicity of formalin and environmental effects of formalin waste have led to the development of formalin replacement products. An increasing number of breast biopsy specimens are being fixed in these substitutes. We tested 6 non-formalin-based fixatives to determine their impact on FISH testing for Her-2/neu gene amplification status by comparison with formalin-fixed control specimens from the same neoplasm. Specimens fixed in Pen-Fix, Prefer, Histochoice, UniFix, and GTF were associated with absent or technically compromised staining in at least one of the 3 neoplasms tested for each fixative when compared to the formalin-fixed control. O-Fix did not seem to compromise staining quality in 3 paired specimens tested.

  1. Detection and identification of Candida species in experimentally infected tissue and human blood by rRNA-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Lischewski, A; Kretschmar, M; Hof, H; Amann, R; Hacker, J; Morschhäuser, J

    1997-01-01

    Two 18S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes specific for Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis were used to detect and identify by fluorescent in situ hybridization these medically important Candida species in deep organs of mice after experimental systemic infection. The C. albicans-specific probe detected fungal cells in kidney, spleen, and brain sections of a mouse infected with C. albicans but not in a mouse infected with the closely related species C. parapsilosis. Conversely, the C. parapsilosis-specific probe detected fungal cells in the deep organs of a mouse infected with C. parapsilosis but not in the deep organs of a C. albicans-infected mouse. In addition, the C. albicans-specific probe was used to detect this species in human blood spiked with yeast cells by a lysis-filtration assay and subsequent fluorescent in situ hybridization. By this assay, as few as three yeast cells per 0.5 ml of blood were consistently detected. Our results demonstrate that fluorescent in situ hybridization with species-specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes provides a novel, culture-independent method for the sensitive detection and identification of Candida species in clinically relevant material. PMID:9350764

  2. Application of rRNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid detection of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianghai; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang; Yu, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum is often associated with harmful algal blooms (HABs). This species consists of many strains that differ in their ability to produce toxins but have similar morphology, making identification difficult. In this study, species-specific rRNA probes were designed for whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to distinguish A. minutum from two phylogenetic clades. We acquired the complete SSU to LSU rDNA sequences (GenBank accession numbers JF906989-JF906999) of 11 Alexandrium strains and used these to design rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. Three ribotype-specific probes, M-GC-1, M-PC-2, and M-PC-3, were designed. The former is specific for the GC clade ("Global clade") of A. minutum, the majority of which have been found non-toxic, and the latter two are specific for the PSP (paralytic shellfish poisoning)-producing PC clade ("Pacific clade"). The specificity of these three probes was confirmed by FISH. All cells in observed fields of view were fluorescently labeled when probes and target species were incubated under optimized FISH conditions. However, the accessibility of rRNA molecules in ribosomes varied among the probe binding positions. Thus, there was variation in the distribution of positive signals in labeled cells within nucleolus and cytosol (M-GC-1, M-PC-3), or just nucleolus (M-PC-2). Our results provide a methodological basis for studying the biogeography and population dynamics of A. minutum, and providing an early warning of toxic HABs.

  3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and high resolution karyotype analysis reveal a novel inversion duplication of 10q

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, P.; Dyke, D.L. Van; Dowling, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    A white male born with dysmorphic features, including upslanting palpebral fissures, bilateral simian creases, posteriorly rotated ears, bitemporal narrowing, frontal bossing, camptodactyly and head circumference and weight less than the 5th percentile was found to have a de novo add(10)(q26.1). High resolution karyotype analysis revealed a novel chromosomal abnormality: 46,XY,inv dup(10)(q26.3-q25.1). Fluorescent in situ hybridization using a chromosome 10-specific painting probe (Oncor, Inc.) confirmed that the extra material was derived from chromosome 10. Duplication of 10q24 or 10q25 is associated with characteristic craniofacial malformations, minor malformations of the hands and feet, major malformations of the heart, skeleton, and kidneys and severe mental retardation. Our patient, currently 7 months old, has many of the skeletal and craniofacial manifestations of other patients, but is developmentally normal at this early age. This is the first FISH confirmation of a 10q duplication and demonstrates the utility of this technology in addition to karyotype analysis. Molecular studies to determine the parental origin and extent of the duplication are in progress, since the apparent lack of developmental delay was unexpected. Identification of the origin of duplicated material will help assist in genetic counseling by further delineating new genetic syndromes.

  4. Evaluation of fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect encapsulated Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores released from poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Bidyut R; La Duc, Myron T

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores originally isolated from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory spacecraft assembly facility clean room are extremely resistant to UV radiation, H(2)O(2), desiccation, chemical disinfection and starvation compared to spores of other Bacillus species. The resistance of B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores to standard industrial clean room sterilization practices is not only a major concern for medical, pharmaceutical and food industries, but also a threat to the extraterrestrial environment during search for life via spacecraft. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential of Alexa-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization with Alexa Fluor® 488 labeled oligonucleotide) method as a molecular diagnostic tool for enumeration of multiple sterilant-resistant B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores artificially encapsulated in, and released via organic solvent from, a model polymeric material: poly(methylmethacrylate) (Lucite, Plexiglas). Plexiglas is used extensively in various aerospace applications and in medical, pharmaceutical and food industries. Alexa-FISH signals were not detected from spores via standard methods for vegetative bacterial cells. Optimization of a spore permeabilization protocol capitalizing on the synergistic action of proteinase-K, lysozyme, mutanolysin and Triton X-100 facilitated efficient spore detection by Alexa-FISH microscopy. Neither of the Alexa-probes tested gave rise to considerable levels of Lucite- or solvent-associated background autofluorescence, demonstrating the immense potential of Alexa-FISH for rapid quantification of encapsulated B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores released from poly(methylmethacrylate).

  5. Validation of break-apart and fusion MYC probes using a digital fluorescence in situ hybridization capture and imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Michael; Rowe, Leslie; Clement, Parker W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Salama, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Detection of MYC translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is important in the evaluation of lymphomas, in particular, Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our aim was to validate a digital FISH capture and imaging system for the detection of MYC 8q24 translocations using LSI-MYC (a break-apart probe) and MYC 8;14 translocation using IGH-MYC (a fusion probe). Materials and Methods: LSI-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from 35 patients. IGH-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from forty patients. Sections were processed for FISH and analyzed using traditional methods. FISH slides were then analyzed using the GenASIs capture and analysis system. Results: Results for LSI-MYC had a high degree of correlation between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Results for IGH-MYC had a 100% concordance between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Conclusion: Annotated whole slide images of H and E and FISH sections can be digitally aligned, so that areas of tumor within a section can be matched and evaluated with a greater degree of accuracy. Images can be archived permanently, providing a means for examining the results retrospectively. Digital FISH imaging of the MYC translocations provides a better diagnostic tool compared to traditional methods for evaluating lymphomas. PMID:27217970

  6. Smith-Magenis syndrome deletion: A case with equivocal cytogenetic findings resolved by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Juyal, R.C.; Patel, P.I.; Greenberg, F.

    1995-09-11

    The availability of markers for the 17p11.2 region has enabled the diagnosis of Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). SMS is typically associated with a discernible deletion of band 17p11.2 upon cytogenetic analysis at a resolution of 400-550 bands. We present a case that illustrates the importance of using FISH to confirm a cytogenetic diagnosis of del(17)(p11.2). Four independent cytogenetic analyses were performed with different conclusions. Results of low resolution analyses of amniocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes were apparently normal, while high resolution analyses of peripheral blood samples in two laboratories indicated mosaicism for del(17)(p11.2). FISH clearly demonstrated a 17p deletion on one chromosome of all peripheral blood cells analyzed and ruled out mosaicism unambiguously. The deletion was undetectable by flow cytometric quantitation of chromosomal DNA content, suggesting that it is less than 2 Mb. We conclude that FISH should be used to detect the SMS deletion when routine chromosome analysis fails to detect it and to verify mosaicism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet.

  8. The impact of pre-analytical processing on staining quality for H&E, dual hapten, dual color in situ hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Babic, Andrea; Loftin, Isabell R; Stanislaw, Stacey; Wang, Maria; Miller, Rachel; Warren, Stephanie M; Zhang, Wenjun; Lau, Alexandria; Miller, Melanie; Wu, Ping; Padilla, Mary; Grogan, Thomas M; Pestic-Dragovich, Lidija; McElhinny, Abigail S

    2010-12-01

    With the advent of personalized medicine, anatomic pathology-based molecular assays, including in situ hybridization (ISH) and mRNA detection tests, are performed routinely in many laboratories and have increased in their clinical importance and complexity. These assays require appropriately fixed tissue samples that preserve both nucleic acid targets and histomorphology to ensure reliable test results for determining patient treatment options. However, all aspects of tissue processing, including time until tissue fixation, type of fixative, duration of fixation, post-fixation treatments, and sectioning of the sample, impact the staining results. ASCO/CAP has issued pre-analytical guidelines to standardize tissue processing for HER2 testing in breast carcinoma specimens: 10% neutral-buffered formalin (NBF) with a fixation time from at least 6 to 48h [1]. Often, this recommendation is not followed to the detriment of staining results [2]. In this paper, we used a human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF7) generated as xenograft tumors as a model system to analyze the effects of different pre-analytical conditions on ISH staining. We performed H&E, FISH and dual colorimetric HER2 ISH assays using specimens fixed across a range of times in six different commonly used fixatives. Additionally, we investigated the effects of varying tissue section thickness, which also impacted the quality of ISH staining. Finally, we evaluated the effects of three different decalcifying solutions on human breast specimens, typically a treatment that occurs post-fixation for evaluating metastases to bone. The results indicate that time and type of fixation treatment, as well as appropriate tissue thickness and post-fixation treatment, all contribute to the quality of ISH staining results. Our data support the ASCO/CAP recommendations for standardized tissue processing (at least 6h in formalin-based fixatives and 4μm section thickness) and indicate that certain fixatives and post

  9. Comet fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in colon cancer relevant genes.

    PubMed

    Glei, Michael; Schaeferhenrich, Anja; Claussen, Uwe; Kuechler, Alma; Liehr, Thomas; Weise, Anja; Marian, Brigitte; Sendt, Wolfgang; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L

    2007-04-01

    Our objective was to study whether products of oxidative stress, such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), trans-2-hexenal, and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), cause DNA damage in genes, relevant for human colon cancer. For this, total DNA damage was measured in primary human colon cells and colon adenoma cells (LT97) using the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, known as "Comet Assay." APC, KRAS, and TP53 were marked in the comet images using fluorescence in situ hybridization (Comet FISH). The migration of APC, KRAS, or TP53 signals into the comet tails was quantified and compared to total DNA damage. All three substances were clearly genotoxic for APC, KRAS, and TP53 genes and total DNA in both types of cells. In primary colon cells, TP53 gene was more sensitive toward H(2)O(2), trans-2-hexenal, and HNE than total DNA was. In LT97 cells, the TP53 gene was more sensitive only toward trans-2-hexenal and HNE. APC and KRAS genes were more susceptible than total DNA to both lipid peroxidation products but only in primary colon cells. This suggests genotoxic effects of lipid peroxidation products in APC, KRAS, and TP53 genes. In LT97 cells, TP53 was more susceptible than APC and KRAS toward HNE. Based on the reported gatekeeper properties of TP53, which in colon adenoma is frequently altered to yield carcinoma, this implies that HNE is likely to contribute to cancer progression. This new experimental approach facilitates studies on effects of nutrition-related carcinogens in relevant target genes.

  10. 6q deletion detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using bacterial artificial chromosome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dalsass, Alessia; Mestichelli, Francesca; Ruggieri, Miriana; Gaspari, Paola; Pezzoni, Valerio; Vagnoni, Davide; Angelini, Mario; Angelini, Stefano; Bigazzi, Catia; Falcioni, Sadia; Troiani, Emanuela; Alesiani, Francesco; Catarini, Massimo; Attolico, Immacolata; Scortechini, Ilaria; Discepoli, Giancarlo; Galieni, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are known to occur at relatively low frequency (3-6%) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and they are more frequently observed in 6q21. Few data have been reported regarding other bands on 6q involved by cytogenetic alterations in CLL. The cytogenetic study was performed in nuclei and metaphases obtained after stimulation with a combination of CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 and interleukin-2. Four bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones mapping regions in bands 6q16, 6q23, 6q25, 6q27 were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization in 107 CLL cases in order to analyze the occurrence and localization of 6q aberrations. We identified 11 cases (10.2%) with 6q deletion of 107 patients studied with CLL. The trends of survival curves and the treatment-free intervals (TFI) of patients with deletion suggest a better outcome than the other cytogenetic risk groups. We observed two subgroups with 6q deletion as the sole anomaly: two cases with 6q16 deletion, and three cases with 6q25.2-27 deletion. There were differences of age, stage, and TFI between both subgroups. By using BAC probes, we observed that 6q deletion has a higher frequency in CLL and is linked with a good prognosis. In addition, it was observed that the deletion in 6q16 appears to be the most frequent and, if present as the only abnormality, it could be associated with a most widespread disease.

  11. microFIND(®) approach to fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Andrea; Barborini, Emanuele; Carbone, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    FISH technology has gained increasing attention in the management of cancer disease, either for predictive or prognostic indications. Molecular cytogenetics has greatly improved diagnostic capability of classical cytogenetics analysis of metaphase-based chromosome for the identification of genetic aberrations. The availability of a large number of fluorescent probes, each specific for different genetic lesions, together with a robust protocol for interphase FISH, provide the pathologist with the essential tools for an accurate evaluation of patient's disease. Hemato-oncological and many of the solid tumors have been comprehensively characterized by peculiar genetic defects and are now routinely evaluated by interphase FISH. Despite the reliability of the method, which has undergone only minor changes since the 1970s, FISH assay is still hampered by reagents cost, preventing its adoption in large-scale oncological screening. In this chapter we describe a major improvement of interphase FISH assay for cytological samples through the description of the miniaturized device microFIND(®) that offers, besides reduction of cost per assay, a completely novel vision to the FISH technology, thanks to the perspective of full automation of FISH assay using a dedicated robotic platform for microFIND(®) handling, (not presently described in the chapter).

  12. Locked Nucleic Acid Flow Cytometry-fluorescence in situ Hybridization (LNA flow-FISH): A Method for Bacterial Small RNA Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-10

    Friedrich, U. & Lenke, J. Improved Enumeration of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Mesophilic Dairy Starter Cultures by Using Multiplex Quantitative Real...messenger RNA using locked nucleic acid probes. Anal. Biochem. 390, 109-114 (2009). 13. Waters, L. & Storz, G. Regulatory RNAs in bacteria . Cell. 136, 615...Video Article Locked Nucleic Acid Flow Cytometry-fluorescence in situ Hybridization (LNA flow-FISH): a Method for Bacterial Small RNA Detection Kelly

  13. Assessment of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of infertile men using sperm karyotyping and multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moosani, N.; Martin, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    Individuals with male factor infertility resulting from idiopathic oligo-, astheno- or teratozoospermia are frequently offered IVF in an attempt to increase their chances of having a child. A concern remains whether these infertile males have an elevated risk of transmitting chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Sperm chromosomal complements from these men were assayed using the human sperm/hamster oocyte fusion system and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm nuclei. For each of 5 infertile patients, 100 sperm karyotypes were analyzed and multicolour FISH analysis was performed on a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each chromosome-specific DNA probe for chromosomes 1 (pUC1.77), 12 (D12Z3), X (XC) and Y (DYZ3). As a group, the infertile patients showed increased frequencies of both numerical ({chi}{sup 2}=17.26, {proportional_to} <0.001) and total abnormalities ({chi}{sup 2}=7.78, {proportional_to} <0.01) relative to control donors when assessed by sperm karyotypes. Analysis of sperm nuclei by FISH indicated a significant increase in the frequency of disomy for chromosome 1 in three of the five patients as compared to control donors ({chi}{sup 2}>8.35, {proportional_to} <0.005). In addition, the frequency of XY disomy was significantly higher in four of the five patients studied by FISH ({chi}{sup 2}>10.58, {proportional_to}<0.005), suggesting that mis-segregation caused by the failure of the XY bivalent to pair may play a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  14. Identification of intracellular bacteria in adenoid and tonsil tissue specimens: the efficiency of culture versus fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Stępińska, M; Olszewska-Sosińska, O; Lau-Dworak, M; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, B; Trafny, E A

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophage cells from human nasopharyngeal lymphoid tissue can be a source of bacteria responsible for human chronic and recurrent upper respiratory tract infection. Detection and characterization of pathogens surviving intracellularly could be a key element in bacteriological diagnosis of the infections as well as in the study on interactions between bacteria and their host. The present study was undertaken to assess the possibility of isolation of viable bacteria from the cells expressing monocyte/macrophage marker CD14 in nasopharyngeal lymphoid tissue. Overall, 74 adenotonsillectomy specimens (adenoids and tonsils) from 37 children with adenoid hypertrophy and recurrent infections as well as 15 specimens from nine children with adenoid hypertrophy, which do not suffer from upper respiratory tract infections (the control group), were studied. The suitability of immunomagnetic separation for extraction of CD14(+) cells from lymphoid tissue and for further isolation of the intracellular pathogens has been shown. The coexistence of living pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes with the bacteria representing normal nasopharyngeal microbiota inside CD14(+) cells was demonstrated. Twenty-four strains of these pathogens from 32.4 % of the lysates of CD14(+) cells were isolated. Concurrently, the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a universal EUB388, and the species-specific probes demonstrated twice more often the persistence of these bacterial species in the lysates of CD14(+) cells than conventional culture. Although the FISH technique appears to be more sensitive than traditional culture in the intracellular bacteria identification, the doubts on whether the bacteria are alive, and therefore, pathogenic would still exist without the strain cultivation.

  15. Novel repeated DNA sequences in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) (Asteraceae): cloning, sequencing, and physical mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Raina, S N; Sharma, S; Sasakuma, T; Kishii, M; Vaishnavi, S

    2005-01-01

    Two novel repetitive DNA sequences, pCtKpnI-1 and pCtKpnI-2, were isolated from Carthamus tinctorius (2n = 2x = 24) and cloned. Both represent tandemly repeated sequences. The pCtKpnI-1 and pCtKpnI-2 clones constitute repeat units of 343-345 bp and 367 bp, respectively, with 63% sequence heterogeneity between the two. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed on metaphase chromosomes of C. tinctorius using, simultaneously, pCtKpnI-1 and pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequences. The pCtKpnI-1 sequence was found to be exclusively localized at subtelomeric regions on most of the chromosomes. On the other hand, sequence of the pCtKpnI-2 clone was distributed on two nucleolar and one nonnucleolar chromosome pairs. The satellite, and the intervening chromosome segment between the primary and secondary constrictions, in the two nucleolar chromosome pairs were wholly constituted by pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequence. The pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequence, showing partial homology to intergenic spacer (IGS) of 18S-25S ribosomal RNA genes of an Asteraceae taxon (Centaurea stoebe), and the 18S-25S rRNA gene clusters were located at independent, but juxtaposed sites in the nucleolar chromosomes. Variability in the number, size, and location of the two repeated sequences provided identification of most of the chromosomes in the otherwise not too distinctive homologues within the complement. This article reports the start of a molecular cytogenetics program targeting the genome of safflower, a major world oil crop about whose genetics very little is known.

  16. Practical use and utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization in the pathological diagnosis of soft tissue and bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Tadashi

    2017-03-05

    During routine pathological examination, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) plays a significant role in the genetic analysis of samples. FISH can detect genetic abnormalities such as chromosomal translocations, gene amplifications, and deletions in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. Due to its practical advantages, FISH is already used in many pathology laboratories. It is especially useful for the diagnosis of translocation-related sarcomas (TRSs), which comprise about 25% of soft tissue sarcomas. Because TRSs have specific chimeric genes derived from characteristic chromosomal translocations, their diagnosis would not be possible without FISH. FISH significantly contributes to the genetic confirmation of TRS. Analysis using next-generation sequencing (NGS), the latest powerful method for comprehensive genomic analysis, has recently revealed many kinds of chromosomal translocations in various TRSs. We often use experimental results to create custom probes for FISH and have applied NOCA2 split probes and CIC split, CIC-FOXO4 fusion probes to the pathological diagnosis of soft tissue angiofibroma and CIC-rearranged sarcoma, respectively. Some chimeric fusions detected by NGS induce the expression of related proteins and their detection using immunohistochemistry is beneficial for pathological diagnosis. We previously identified characteristic FOSB expression in pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma (PHE) with a specific SERPINE1-FOSB fusion, revealing the usefulness of FOSB immunohistochemistry in the differential diagnosis of PHE and its mimics. Finally, we participated in a central review of a clinical trial of trabectedin monotherapy. We guaranteed an accurate diagnosis by using FISH and genetic confirmation to select appropriate TRS patients and thereby confirm the accuracy of the patient enrollment of the clinical trial. FISH is an essential tool for the pathological diagnosis of soft tissue and bone tumors. It can detect various genetic

  17. The mouse Mcmd gene for DNA replication protein P1MCM3 maps to bands A3-A5 on chromosome 1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ikuya; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takagi, Nobuo

    1996-03-05

    This report describes the localization of the mouse Mcmd gene for DNA replication to mouse chromosome 1, bands A3-A5 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This finding supports the recent mapping of the human MCM3 gene to human chromosome 6p12, which shows synteny with mouse chromosome 1. The mouse Mcmd gene encodes the protein P1MCM3 which is essential for DNA replication. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Microwaves for chromogenic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Leong, Anthony S-Y; Haffajee, Zenobia

    2011-01-01

    In situ hybridization can be employed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections (FFPT) and allows direct visualization of amplified genes and chromosomes in individual cell nuclei. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most widely employed method, but the fluorescence preparations suffer from the main disadvantages of fading over time and poor visualization, the latter making it difficult to accurately separate invasive from in situ cancer cells. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) is a viable alternative to FISH in FFPT as it employs a peroxidase reaction to visualize the chromogen thus allowing the convenience of bright field microscopy and the correlation of the visualized gene amplification with cytomorphology. It is relatively less expensive and allows a permanent record, with several studies attesting to its validity. As with FISH, heat pretreatment and enzyme digestion are two critical components of the protocol. We describe a protocol for CISH in which a microwave-induced target retrieval step is introduced as a replacement for heat pretreatment. The same procedure is performed following enzyme digestion to produce consistent signals in amplified and nonamplified cells that are both larger in size and numbers when compared with those produced by the conventional protocol.

  19. Optimization of a peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method for the detection of bacteria and disclosure of a formamide effect.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rita S; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2014-10-10

    Despite the fact that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a well-established technique to identify microorganisms, there is a lack of understanding concerning the interaction of the different factors affecting the obtained fluorescence. In here, we used flow cytometry to study the influence of three essential factors in hybridization - temperature, time and formamide concentration - in an effort to optimize the performance of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probe targeting bacteria (EUB338). The PNA-FISH optimization was performed with bacteria representing different families employing response surface methodology. Surprisingly, the optimum concentration of formamide varied according to the bacterium tested. While hybridization on the bacteria possessing the thickest peptidoglycan was more successful at nearly 50% (v/v) formamide, hybridization on all other microorganisms appeared to improve with much lower formamide concentrations. Gram staining and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to confirm that the overall effect of formamide concentration on the fluorescence intensity is a balance between a harmful effect on the bacterial cell envelope, affecting cellular integrity, and the beneficial denaturant effect in the hybridization process. We also conclude that microorganisms belonging to different families will require different hybridization parameters for the same FISH probe, meaning that an optimum universal PNA-FISH procedure is non-existent for these situations.

  20. Identification of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) homologous loci by direct sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and PCR amplification of somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Purandare, S.M.; Neil, S.M.; Brothman, A. |

    1995-12-10

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have identified seven NF1-related loci, two separate loci on chromosome 2, at bands 2q21 and 2q33-q34, and one locus each on five other chromosomes at bands 14q11.2, 15q11.2, 18p11.2, 21q11.2-q21, and 22q11.2. Application of PCR using NF1 primer pairs and genomic DNA from somatic cell hybrids confirmed the above loci, identified additional loci on chromosomes 12 and 15, and showed that the various loci do not share homology beyond NF1 exon 27b. Sequenced PCR products representing segments corresponding to NF1 exons from these loci demonstrated greater than 95% sequence identity with the NF1 locus. We used sequence differences between bona fide NF1 and NF1-homologous loci to strategically design primer sets to specifically amplify 30 of 36 exons within the 5{prime} end of the NF1 gene. These developments have facilitated mutation analysis at the NF1 locus using genomic DNA as template. 41 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Preparations of Meiotic Pachytene Chromosomes and Extended DNA Fibers from Cotton Suitable for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  2. Rapid differentiation of Francisella species and subspecies by fluorescent in situ hybridization targeting the 23S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Francisella (F.) tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Due to its low infectious dose, ease of dissemination and high case fatality rate, F. tularensis was the subject in diverse biological weapons programs and is among the top six agents with high potential if misused in bioterrorism. Microbiological diagnosis is cumbersome and time-consuming. Methods for the direct detection of the pathogen (immunofluorescence, PCR) have been developed but are restricted to reference laboratories. Results The complete 23S rRNA genes of representative strains of F. philomiragia and all subspecies of F. tularensis were sequenced. Single nucleotide polymorphisms on species and subspecies level were confirmed by partial amplification and sequencing of 24 additional strains. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) assays were established using species- and subspecies-specific probes. Different FISH protocols allowed the positive identification of all 4 F. philomiragia strains, and more than 40 F. tularensis strains tested. By combination of different probes, it was possible to differentiate the F. tularensis subspecies holarctica, tularensis, mediasiatica and novicida. No cross reactivity with strains of 71 clinically relevant bacterial species was observed. FISH was also successfully applied to detect different F. tularensis strains in infected cells or tissue samples. In blood culture systems spiked with F. tularensis, bacterial cells of different subspecies could be separated within single samples. Conclusion We could show that FISH targeting the 23S rRNA gene is a rapid and versatile method for the identification and differentiation of F. tularensis isolates from both laboratory cultures and clinical samples. PMID:20205957

  3. Localization of single- and low-copy sequences on tomato synaptonemal complex spreads using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, D G; Lapitan, N L; Stack, S M

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful means by which single- and low-copy DNA sequences can be localized on chromosomes. Compared to the mitotic metaphase chromosomes that are normally used in FISH, synaptonemal complex (SC) spreads (hypotonically spread pachytene chromosomes) have several advantages. SC spreads (1) are comparatively free of debris that can interfere with probe penetration, (2) have relatively decondensed chromatin that is highly accessible to probes, and (3) are about ten times longer than their metaphase counterparts, which permits FISH mapping at higher resolution. To investigate the use of plant SC spreads as substrates for single-copy FISH, we probed spreads of tomato SCs with two single-copy sequences and one low-copy sequence (ca. 14 kb each) that are associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers on SC 11. Individual SCs were identified on the basis of relative length, arm ratio, and differential staining patterns after combined propidium iodide (PI) and 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. In this first report of single-copy FISH to SC spreads, the probe sequences were unambiguously mapped on the long arm of tomato SC 11. Coupled with data from earlier studies, we determined the distance in micrometers, the number of base pairs, and the rates of crossing over between these three FISH markers. We also observed that the order of two of the FISH markers is reversed in relation to their order on the molecular linkage map. SC-FISH mapping permits superimposition of markers from molecular linkage maps directly on pachytene chromosomes and thereby contributes to our understanding of the relationship between chromosome structure, gene activity, and recombination. PMID:10224272

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

  5. Spot counting on fluorescence in situ hybridization in suspension images using Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sijia; Sa, Ruhan; Maguire, Orla; Minderman, Hans; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2015-03-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are important diagnostic and prognostic criteria for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A flow cytometry-based imaging approach for FISH in suspension (FISH-IS) was established that enables the automated analysis of several log-magnitude higher number of cells compared to the microscopy-based approaches. The rotational positioning can occur leading to discordance between spot count. As a solution of counting error from overlapping spots, in this study, a Gaussian Mixture Model based classification method is proposed. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) of GMM are used as global image features of this classification method. Via Random Forest classifier, the result shows that the proposed method is able to detect closely overlapping spots which cannot be separated by existing image segmentation based spot detection methods. The experiment results show that by the proposed method we can obtain a significant improvement in spot counting accuracy.

  6. Strong HER-2/neu protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry often does not predict oncogene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hammock, Lauren; Lewis, Melinda; Phillips, Carol; Cohen, Cynthia

    2003-10-01

    Breast cancer patients with HER-2/neu oncogene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have been shown to have a better response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) therapy than those showing HER-2/neu protein overexpression only. Many centers currently perform FISH only on tumors showing 2+ HER-2/neu positivity by immunohistochemistry (IHC), with the assumption that 3+ positivity virtually equates with amplification. Results of FISH performed on 102 breast cancer cases over a 12-month period were correlated with HER-2/neu IHC results. FISH was performed using a ratio of HER-2/neu and chromosome 17 centromere signal counts (PathVysion; Vysis, Downers Grove, IL). Immunohistochemical expression of HER-2/neu was evaluated according to the published scoring guidelines of the HercepTest (Dako, Carpinteria, CA). Only 22 of 45 tumors with 3+ positivity (49%) showed amplification by FISH. Only 2 of 25 cases with 2+ staining by IHC (6%) showed gene amplification, and 1 of 25 cases with negative IHC staining (4%) showed weak amplification. Of the 25 cases showing oncogene amplification, 22 (88%) showed 3+ IHC positivity, 2 (8%) showed 2+ positivity, and 1 (4%) was negative by IHC. More than 50% of breast tumors showing strong 3+ HER-2/neu staining do not show oncogene amplification by FISH. Most tumors with 2+ and negative IHC also fail to amplify. In our experience, FISH studies should be performed on all 3+ and 2+ staining tumors to avoid inappropriate and toxic treatment. The decision to perform FISH on IHC-negative tumors should be guided by additional parameters, including tumor grade and estrogen receptor status.

  7. Trisomy 10p resulting from an inv dup of 10p defined by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, S.J.; Easterling, T.R.; Leppig, K.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo cases of trisomy for the entire short arm of chromosome 10 are infrequently reported and are most commonly the result of translocation of 10p to an acrocentric chromosome. Most reported cases of trisomy 10p are not trisomy for the complete short arm of chromosome 10, but are duplication, deficiency syndromes that result from either inheritance of an unbalanced translocation from a parent possessing a balanced reciprocal translocation, or from a recombinant chromosome derived from a parental pericentric inversion of chromosome 10. Here, we report a case of a de novo trisomy 10p that resulted from an inverted duplication of the entire short arm of chromosome 10. A 42 year old G7,P5,SAB1 woman was referred for amniocentesis because of advanced maternal age. Ultrasound examination at 17 weeks demonstrated a fetus of normal size with no apparent anatomic abnormalities. Cytogenetic evaluation demonstrated one homologue of chromosome 10 had a tandem inverted duplication of the short arm. The fetal karyotype was interpreted to be 46,XX,inv dup (10) (peter-cen::cen-p15::q11-pter). Parental karyotype are normal. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a chromosome 10 paint, chromosome 10 centromere, and all telomere probe, confirmed the inverted duplication involved the entire short arm of chromosome 10. Termination of pregnancy was performed at 20 weeks gestation. Autopsy revealed multiple anomalies including low-set posteriorly rotated ears, cleft of the soft palate, ocular hypertelorism, small upturned nose, agenesis of the gallbladder, sacral hemivertebrae, and abnormal flexion of the thumbs. The fetal karyotype was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis in lung and kidney. This is the second reported case of a de novo tandem duplication of 10p of which we are aware, and the first using FISH technology to characterize the abnormality.

  8. Age-related aneuploidy analysis of human blood cells in vivo by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A B; Alejandro, J; Payne, S; Thomas, S

    1996-09-18

    All prior studies on human age-related chromosomal analysis were done using only metaphase figures derived from lymphocyte cultures in vitro. However, we believe that this procedure may provide only partial information, since the chromosomal abnormalities probably hidden in non-dividing and/or terminally differentiated leukocytes will not be detected by this method. We, therefore, have attempted to analyze the nature and extent of chromosome-specific aneuploidy at interphase by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in differentiated myeloid cells in vivo derived from various age-group people. Our data from an analysis of 30,032 cells derived from 12 healthy donors indicate that there is an increase in the mean percentages of myeloid cells with chromosome-specific aneuploidy in the older groups as opposed to that of the younger groups. This increase is applicable to all the three cell types examined (promyelocytes, metamyelocytes and polymorphs). In both the younger and older females, the relatively higher mean frequencies of cells with aneuploidy were noted for chromosome nos. 4, 6 and the X, whereas the lowest mean frequencies of cells with aneuploidy were consistently observed for chromosome no. 3. In the younger and older male donors, similar to the female donors except the X chromosome the higher percentages of aneuploid cells were observed for chromosome nos. 4 and 6 whereas the lowest mean frequencies of aneuploid cells were noted for chromosome no. 3. Among the five autosomes studied, chromosome no. 3 consistently yielded the lowest frequency of aneuploidy in all the three cell types derived from both the younger and older groups of males and females. This could presumably mean that the maintenance of a very high frequency of cells with disomy for chromosome no. 3 might be more beneficial for the process of survival and/or differentiation of myeloid cells as compared to that of other autosomes such as chromosome nos. 4 and 6. Among the five autosomes

  9. MYC amplification and overexpression in primary cutaneous angiosarcoma: a fluorescence in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Shon, Wonwoo; Sukov, William R; Jenkins, Sarah M; Folpe, Andrew L

    2014-04-01

    MYC, a proto-oncogene located on chromosome 8q24, is involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation. Previous studies have documented high-level MYC gene amplification and MYC overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in post-irradiation angiosarcomas, but not in primary cutaneous angiosarcoma (AS-C) or in other radiation-associated vascular proliferations, such as atypical vascular lesions. Prompted by our recent finding of MYC amplification in a primary hepatic AS, we analyzed a large number of well-characterized AS-C for MYC amplification and protein overexpression. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 38 AS-C were retrieved from our archives and were examined by IHC analysis and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), using a commercially available antibody and probe. For FISH analysis, the number of copies of MYC was compared with the control gene, CEN8 (MYC/CEN8 ratio). All cases occurred on sun-exposed skin; no patient was known to have a history of therapeutic irradiation. Possible associations between survival and a wide variety of clinicopathological variables were evaluated using the log-rank test. By IHC analysis, MYC overexpression was present in 9/38 (24%) AS-C (2-3+: 6 cases, 16%; 1+: 3 cases, 8%). By FISH analysis, 2/5 (40%) informative cases with 2-3+ immunostaining showed high-level gene amplification. One additional case with 3+ immunostaining showed higher level aneusomy of chromosome 8 (5-8 MYC and CEN8). Two out of fourteen (14%) IHC-negative cases also carried MYC amplification (one high level and one lower level). Low copy number gain of chromosome 8 (3-5 MYC and CEN8) was observed in AS-C with or without MYC expression. MYC amplification and MYC protein overexpression were not correlated with clinical outcome. We have shown, for the first time, MYC gene amplification and protein overexpression in primary (non-radiation-associated) AS of the skin. MYC protein overexpression in cases lacking gene

  10. Differential sensitivity of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes used for fluorescence in situ hybridization is a result of ribosomal higher order structure.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Floriani, P J; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1996-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA targeted gene probes for the direct analysis of microbial communities has revolutionized the field of microbial ecology, yet a comprehensive approach for the design of such probes does not exist. The development of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes for use with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures has been especially difficult as a result of the complex nature of the rRNA target molecule. In this study a systematic comparison of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide gene probes was conducted to determine if target location influences the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotide probes when used with in situ hybridization protocols for the detection of whole microbial cells. Five unique universal 12-mer oligonucleotide sequences, located at different regions of the 16S rRNA molecule, were identified by a computer-aided sequence analysis of over 1000 partial and complete 16S rRNA sequences. The complements of these oligomeric sequences were chemically synthesized for use as probes and end labeled with either [gamma-32P]ATP or the fluorescent molecule tetramethylrhodamine-5/-6. Hybridization sensitivity for each of the probes was determined by hybridization to heat-denatured RNA immobilized on blots or to formaldehyde fixed whole cells. All of the probes hybridized with equal efficiency to denatured RNA. However, the probes exhibited a wide range of sensitivity (from none to very strong) when hybridized with whole cells using a previously developed FISH procedure. Differential hybridization efficiencies against whole cells could not be attributed to cell wall type, since the relative probe efficiency was preserved when either Gram-negative or -positive cells were used. These studies represent one of the first attempts to systematically define criteria for 16S rRNA targeted probe design for use against whole cells and establish target site location as a critical parameter in probe design.

  11. Quantitative real-time PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches for enumerating Brevundimonas diminuta in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Robert S; Bestervelt, Lorelle L; Saha, Ratul; Bagley, Susan T

    2010-09-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta is a small Gram-negative bacterium used for validation of membranes and filters used in the pharmaceutical and drinking water treatment industries. Current assays are time consuming, nonselective, and may be subject to interference by competing indigenous microorganisms. The focus of this study is to develop rapid and specific enumeration methodologies for B. diminuta. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays were developed based on the gyrB (1,166 bp) and rpoD (829 bp) gene sequences of B. diminuta ATCC 19146. Species-specific primers and probes were designed, and a 100-200 bp segment of each gene was targeted in the qPCR studies. For both the qPCR and FISH assays, an internal 25 bp sequence was selected for use as a TaqMan probe (labeled with 6-FAM and a Black Hole Quencher). Probe specificity studies, conducted against Gram-negative and Gram-positive reference strains as well as environmental strains, revealed high specificity of the primer/probe pairs to B. diminuta. Sensitivities of the qPCR reactions using purified genomic DNA from B. diminuta were determined to be 0.89 pg for rpoD and 8.9 pg for gyrB. The feasibility of using whole-cell B. diminuta suspensions directly with the rpoD qPCR protocol was also evaluated. The greatest sensitivity observed for B. diminuta was 1 x 10(3) colony forming units (CFU) per mL when tryptic soy broth was used as the growth medium. When compared with direct microscopic enumeration using a 5' 6-FAM FISH probe, traditional plating methods showed significant underestimation of B. diminuta concentration (P = 0.01) when this organism was cultivated in saline lactose broth. The results of this investigation demonstrate that qPCR and FISH are effective methods for rapid (<4 h) enumeration of B. diminuta and may be viable alternatives to plating when validating drinking water filtration systems.

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization-based karyotyping of soybean translocation lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is a major crop species and a target of a substantial investment of genomic and genetic studies; yet, in contrast to other plant species, relatively few chromosomal aberrations have been identified and characterized in soybean. This is due in part to the difficulty ...

  13. Rapid method for measuring clastogenic fingerprints using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for determining a clastogenic signature of a sample of chromosomes by quantifying a frequency of a first type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; quantifying a frequency of a second, different type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; and comparing the frequency of the first type of chromosome aberration to the frequency of the second type of chromosome aberration. A method is also provided for using that clastogenic signature to identify a clastogenic agent or dosage to which the cells were exposed.

  14. Identification of Prader-Willi Syndrome mosaicism by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Hanchett, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a microdeletion syndrome involving an interstitial deletion of region q11-q13 on the paternal chromosome 15. We report 2 cases of PWS that were analyzed using FISH and were found to be mosaic for a normal cell line and a deleted cell line. Case 1 was diagnosed as an atypical PWS who was cytogenetically normal. She is a 38 y.o. white female displaying some but not all of the features of PWS. Case 2 is a 23 y.o. white male with a classical deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13. He displays very typical features of PWS. He was also noted to be albino. FISH analysis was performed on PHA stimulated lymphocytes. We examined four loci: D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3. The number of cells examined for each locus ranged from 46 to 75. Case 1 was deleted at 3 of the 4 loci (D15S11, SNRPN and GABRB3) in 30% of her cells. The D15S10 locus was not deleted. This may account for the atypical features displayed by this patient. It also suggests that this chromosome is rearranged resulting in the retention of the interstitial locus. The exact nature of the rearrangement needs to be determined. Case 2 was deleted at all four loci in 60% of the cells analyzed. This result was unexpected because his deletion was identified cytogenetically, but mosaicism was not detected. These are the first reported cases of mosaic PWS diagnosed using FISH. The use of cytogenetics alone requires high resolution banding to accurately identify the deletion. This makes the detection of small deletions in every cell difficult and the determination of mosaicism almost impossible. Our results suggest that mosaicism may be occurring more frequently than previously thought and may account for some of the atypical cases. Studies are in progress to determine the effect of mosaicism on methylation at genes located within this region which are imprinted and are thought to be involved in the etiology of Prader-Willi Syndroms.

  15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and spectral imaging analysisof human oocytes and first polar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Weier, Jingly F.; Oter Renom, Maria; Zheng,Xuezhong; Colls, Pere; Nureddin, Aida; Pham, Chau D.; Chu, Lisa W.; Racowsky, Catherine; Munne, Santiago

    2004-10-06

    We investigated the frequencies of abnormalities involving either chromosome 1, 16, 18 or 21 in failed-fertilized human oocytes.While abnormalities involving chromosome 16 showed an age-dependant increase, results for the other chromosomes did not show statistically significant differences between the three age groups <35 yrs, 35-39 yrs, and >39 yrs. The scoring of four chromosomes is likely to underestimate the true rate of aneuploid cells. Thus, for a pilot study investigating a more comprehensive analysis of oocytes and their corresponding first polar bodies (1PBs), we developed a novel 8-probe chromosome enumeration scheme using FISH and SIm.

  16. Characterization of HER2 status by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC).

    PubMed

    Press, Oliver A; Guzman, Roberta; Cervantes, Monica; Santiago, Angela; Press, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    The use of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) gene amplification and overexpression as a molecular predictive marker has become critically important for proper selection of breast cancer patients for treatment with targeted therapeutic agents such as trastuzumab, lapatinib, pertuzumab, and T-DM1. A high level of sensitivity and specificity of molecular tests for this alteration is desirable. The American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathology have jointly established consensus guidelines to standardize characterization of this alteration in breast cancers. This chapter provides a brief overview of pre-analytic and analytical processing of breast specimens as well as subsequent molecular evaluation for HER2 status.

  17. Physical mapping of 18S-25S rDNA and 5S rDNA in Lupinus via fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Naganowska, Barbara; Zielińska, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Double-target fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine the genomic distribution of ribosomal RNA genes in five Lupinus species: L. cosentinii (2n=32), L. pilosus (2n=42), L. angustifolius (2n=40), L. luteus (2n=52) and L. mutabilis (2n=48). 18S-25S rDNA and 5S rDNA were used as probes. Some interspecific variation was observed in the number and size of the 18S-25S rDNA loci. All the studied species had one chromosome pair carrying 5S rDNA.

  18. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and quantitative microscopy with a charge coupled device camera improve detection of human papillomavirus DNA revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lizard, G; Chignol, M C; Souchier, C; Schmitt, D; Chardonnet, Y

    1994-04-01

    Epithelial cervical CaSki, SiHa and HeLa cells containing respectively 600 copies of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA type 16, 1-2 copies of HPV DNA type 16 and 10-50 copies of HPV DNA type 18 were used as model to detect different quantities of integrated HPV genome. The HPV DNA was identified on cell deposits with specific biotinylated DNA probes either by enzymatic in situ hybridization (EISH) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) involving successively a rabbit anti-biotin antibody, a biotinylated goat anti-rabbit antibody and streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase complex or streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate complex. With brightfield microscopy and EISH, hybridization spots were observed in CaSki and HeLa cells but hardly any in SiHa cells. With fluorescence microscopy and FISH, hybridization spots were clearly seen only on CaSki cell nuclei. In an attempt to improve the detection of low quantities of HPV DNA signals revealed by FISH, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and quantitative microscopy with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera were used. With both LSCM and quantitative microscopy, as few as 1-2 copies of HPV DNA were detected and found to be confined to cell nuclei counterstained with propidium iodide. Under Nomarski phase contrast, a good preservation of the cell structure was observed. With quantitative microscopy, differences in the number, size, total area and integrated fluorescence intensity of hybridization spots per nucleus were revealed between CaSki, SiHa and HeLa cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence in situ hybridization-based investigations of individual doses for persons living at Metlino in the upper reaches of the Techa River.

    PubMed

    Degteva, Marina O; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Akleyev, Alexander V; Jacob, Peter; Ivanov, Denis V; Wieser, Albrecht; Vorobiova, Marina I; Shishkina, Elena A; Shved, Valentina A; Vozilova, Alexandra; Bayankin, Sergey N; Napier, Bruce A

    2005-02-01

    Waterborne releases to the Techa River from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949-1956 resulted in significant doses to persons living downstream; the most contaminated village was Metlino, about 7 km from the site of release. Internal and external doses have been estimated for these residents using the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000); the primary purpose is to support epidemiological studies of the members of the Extended Techa River Cohort. Efforts to validate the calculations of external and internal dose are considered essential. One validation study of the TRDS-2000 system has been performed by the comparison of calculated doses to quartz from bricks in old buildings at Metlino with those measured by luminescence dosimetry. Two additional methods of validation considered here are electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. For electron paramagnetic resonance, 36 measurements on 26 teeth from 16 donors from Metlino were made at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health (16 measurements) and the Institute of Metal Physics (20 measurements); the correlation among measurements made at the two laboratories has been found to be 0.99. Background measurements were also made on 218 teeth (63 molars, 128 premolars, and 27 incisors). Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were made for 31 residents of Metlino. These measurements were handicapped by the analysis of a limited number of cells; for several individuals no stable translocations were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were also made for 39 individuals believed to be unexposed. The EPR- and FISH-based estimates agreed well for permanent residents of Metlino: 0.67 +/- 0.21 Gy and 0.48 +/- 0.18 Gy (mean +/- standard error of the mean), respectively. Results of the two experimental methods also agreed well

  20. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization-Based Investigations of Individual Doses for Persons Living at Metlino in the Upper Reaches of the Techa River

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Akleyev, A V.; Jacob, Peter; Ivanov, Denis V.; Wieser, Albrecht; Vorobiova, M I.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Shved, Valentina A.; Vozilova, Alexandra; Bayankin, Sergey N.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2005-02-01

    Waterborne releases to the Techa River from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949-1956 resulted in significant doses to persons living downstream; the most contaminated village was Metlino, about 7 km from the site of release. Internal and external doses have been estimated for these residents using the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000); the primary purpose is to support epidemiological studies of the members of the Extended Techa River Cohort. Efforts to validate the calculations of external and internal dose are considered essential. One validation study of the TRDS-2000 system has been performed by the comparison of calculated doses to quartz from bricks in old buildings at Metlino with those measured by luminescence dosimetry. Two additional methods of validation considered here are electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. For electron paramagnetic resonance, 36 measurements on 26 teeth from 16 donors from Metlino were made at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health (16 measurements) and the Institute of Metal Physics (20 measurements); the correlation among measurements made at the two laboratories has been found to be 0.99. Background measurements were also made on 218 teeth (63 molars, 128 premolars, and 27 incisors). Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were made for 31 residents of Metlino. These measurements were handicapped by the analysis of a limited number of cells; for several individuals no stable translocations were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were also made for 39 individuals believed to be unexposed. The EPR- and FISH-based estimates agreed well for permanent residents of Metlino: 0.67 +/- 0.21 Gy and 0.48 +/- 0.18 Gy (mean +/- standard error of the mean), respectively. Results of the two experimental methods also agreed well

  1. Novel karyotype in the Ullrich-Turner syndrome - 45,X/46,X,r(X)/46,X,dic(X) - investigated with fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, L.; Jackson, J.; Cowell, C.; Sillence, D.; Smith, A.

    1994-04-15

    A 10-year-old girl with Ullrich-Turner syndrome was found to have the novel karyotype 45,X/46,X,r(X)(p11q11)/46,X,dic(X)(p11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the {alpha} satellite X centromere probe established the origin of the small ring chromosome. Scanning a large number of cells by interphase FISH showed that the dicentric (X) was the least prevalent cell line. The common breakpoint of Xp11 suggests a sequence of errors as the mechanism whereby these 3 distinct cell lines have arisen. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Fluorescent nanodiamond and lanthanide labelled in situ hybridization for the identification of RNA transcripts in fixed and CLARITY-cleared central nervous system tissues (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Lindsay M.; Staikopoulos, Vicky; Cordina, Nicole M.; Sayyadi, Nima; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advancement in the methodology used to conjugate, incorporate and visualize fluorescent molecules at the cellular and tissue levels, biomedical imaging predominantly relies on the limitations of established fluorescent molecules such as fluorescein, cyanine and AlexaFluor dyes or genetic incorporation of fluorescent proteins by viral or other means. These fluorescent dyes and conjugates are highly susceptible to photobleaching and compete with cellular autofluorescence, making biomedical imaging unreliable, difficult and time consuming in many cases. In addition, some proteins have low copy numbers and/or poor antibody recognition, further making detection and imaging difficult. We are developing better methods for imaging central nervous system neuroinflammatory markers using targeted mRNA transcripts labelled with fluorescent nanodiamonds or lanthanide chelates. These tags have increased signal and photostability and can also discriminate against tissue/cell autofluorescence. Brains and spinal cords from BALB/c mice with a chronic constriction model of neuropathic pain (neuroinflammation group) or that have undergone sham surgeries (control group) were collected. A subset of brains and spinal cords were perfused and fixed with paraformaldehyde (n=3 sham and n=3 pain groups) prior to sectioning and in situ hybridization using nanodiamond or lanthanide chelate conjugated complementary RNA probes. Another subset of brains and spinal cords from the same cohort of animals were perfused and processed for CLARITY hydrogel based clearing prior to in situ hybridization with the same probes. We will present our findings on the photostability, sensitivity and discrimination from background tissue autofluorescence of our novel RNA probes, compared to traditional fluorophore tags.

  3. Comparison of culture, polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescent in situ hybridization for detection of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and "Brachyspira hampsonii" in pig feces.

    PubMed

    Wilberts, Bailey L; Warneke, Hallie L; Bower, Leslie P; Kinyon, Joann M; Burrough, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Swine dysentery is characterized by mucohemorrhagic diarrhea and can occur following infection by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae or "Brachyspira hampsonii ". A definitive diagnosis is often based on the isolation of strongly beta-hemolytic spirochetes from selective culture or by the application of species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays directly to feces. While culture is highly sensitive, it typically requires 6 or more days to complete, and PCR, although rapid, can be limited by fecal inhibition. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been described in formalin-fixed tissues; however, completion requires approximately 2 days. Because of the time constraints of available assays, a same-day FISH assay was developed to detect B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii " in pig feces using previously described oligonucleotide probes Hyo1210 and Hamp1210 for B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii", respectively. In situ hybridization was simultaneously compared with culture and PCR on feces spiked with progressive dilutions of spirochetes to determine the threshold of detection for each assay at 0 and 48 hr. The PCR assay on fresh feces and FISH on formalin-fixed feces had similar levels of detection. Culture was the most sensitive method, detecting the target spirochetes at least 2 log-dilutions less when compared to other assays 48 hr after sample preparation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization also effectively detected both target species in formalin-fixed feces from inoculated pigs as part of a previous experiment. Accordingly, FISH on formalin-fixed feces from clinically affected pigs can provide same-day identification and preliminary speciation of spirochetes associated with swine dysentery in North America.

  4. Analysis of chromosome 17p13 (p53 locus) alterations in gastric carcinoma cells by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Kawashima, A; Mai, M; Ooi, A

    1996-11-01

    Chromosome 17 and p53 gene locus alterations were determined on 67 gastric carcinomas by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, using probes for centromere 17 and the 17p13.1 (p53 locus). The results were compared with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 17p13.3, direct sequencing of exons 5 to 9 of p53, and nuclear overexpression of p53 protein. Deletion of p53 was found in 26 of 67 tumors (39%). All 26 also showed LOH at 17p13.3, frequently overexpressed p53 protein, and had polysomy 17. The functional loss of p53 gene in these tumors, 85% of which were of intestinal type, appears to be caused by both deletion of 17p13.1 and missense mutation of the remaining allele. There were 9 tumors that had neither deletion nor LOH but had a large proportion of cancer cells that overexpressed p53 election. Despite evidence of LOH, there was no p53 deletion in 11 tumors. Finally, 21 tumors, mostly of diffuse type, showed neither deletions, LOH, nor p53 overexpression. Our data suggest that in gastric cancer, deletion of 17p is principally responsible for the allelic loss at the p53 gene and that analysis of deletions by the dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization is a sensitive and useful approach to clarify chromosomal aberrations.

  5. A highly sensitive target-primed rolling circle amplification (TPRCA) method for fluorescent in situ hybridization detection of microRNA in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jia; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Si-Jia; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2014-02-04

    The ability to detect spatial and temporal microRNA (miRNA) distribution at the single-cell level is essential for understanding the biological roles of miRNAs and miRNA-associated gene regulatory networks. We report for the first time the development of a target-primed RCA (TPRCA) strategy for highly sensitive and selective in situ visualization of miRNA expression patterns at the single-cell level. This strategy uses a circular DNA as the probe for in situ hybridization (ISH) with the target miRNA molecules, and the free 3' terminus of miRNA then initiates an in situ RCA reaction to generate a long tandem repeated sequence with thousands of complementary segments. After hybridization with fluorescent detection probes, target miRNA molecules can be visualized with ultrahigh sensitivity. Because the RCA reaction can only be initiated by the free 3' end of target miRNA, the developed strategy offers the advantage over existing ISH methods in eliminating the interference from precursor miRNA or mRNA. This strategy is demonstrated to show high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of miR-222 expression levels in human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells and hepatocyte L02 cells. Moreover, the developed TPRCA-based ISH strategy is successfully applied to multiplexed detection using two-color fluorescent probes for two miRNAs that are differentially expressed in the two cell lines. The results reveal that the developed strategy may have great potential for in situ miRNA expression analysis for basic research and clinical diagnostics.

  6. Delineation by fluorescence in situ hybridization of a single hemizygous chromosomal region associated with aposporous embryo sac formation in Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris.

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shailendra; Chen, Zhenbang; Conner, Joann A; Akiyama, Yukio; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    Apomixis is a means of asexual reproduction by which plants produce embryos without meiosis and fertilization; thus the embryo is of clonal, maternal origin. We previously reported molecular markers showing no recombination with the trait for aposporous embryo sac development in Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris, and the collective single-dose alleles defined an apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to confirm that the ASGR is a hemizygous genomic region and to determine its chromosomal position with respect to rDNA loci and centromere repeats. We also documented chromosome transmission from P. squamulatum in several backcrosses (BCs) with P. glaucum using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). One to three complete P. squamulatum chromosomes were detected in BC(6), but only one of the three hybridized with the ASGR-linked markers. In P. squamulatum and in all BCs examined, the apospory-linked markers were located in the distal region of the short arm of a single chromosome. All alien chromosomes behaved as univalents during meiosis and segregated randomly in BC(3) and later BC generations, but presence of the ASGR-carrier chromosome alone was sufficient to confer apospory. FISH results support our hypotheses that hemizygosity, proximity to centromeric sequences, and chromosome structure may all play a role in low recombination in the ASGR. PMID:12663545

  7. The analysis of ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Paweł Adam; Ramlau, Rodryg Adam; Szumiło, Justyna; Kozielski, Jerzy; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Bryl, Maciej; Knopik-Dąbrowicz, Alina; Spychalski, Łukasz; Szczęsna, Aleksandra; Rydzik, Ewelina; Milanowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction ALK gene rearrangement is observed in a small subset (3–7%) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The efficacy of crizotinib was shown in lung cancer patients harbouring ALK rearrangement. Nowadays, the analysis of ALK gene rearrangement is added to molecular examination of predictive factors. Aim of the study The frequency of ALK gene rearrangement as well as the type of its irregularity was analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in tissue samples from NSCLC patients. Material and methods The ALK gene rearrangement was analysed in 71 samples including 53 histological and 18 cytological samples. The analysis could be performed in 56 cases (78.87%), significantly more frequently in histological than in cytological materials. The encountered problem with ALK rearrangement diagnosis resulted from the scarcity of tumour cells in cytological samples, high background fluorescence noises and fragmentation of cell nuclei. Results The normal ALK copy number without gene rearrangement was observed in 26 (36.62%) patients ALK gene polysomy without gene rearrangement was observed in 25 (35.21%) samples while in 3 (4.23%) samples ALK gene amplification was found. ALK gene rearrangement was observed in 2 (2.82%) samples from males, while in the first case the rearrangement coexisted with ALK amplification. In the second case, signet-ring tumour cells were found during histopathological examination and this patient was successfully treated with crizotinib with partial remission lasting 16 months. Conclusions FISH is a useful technique for ALK gene rearrangement analysis which allows us to specify the type of gene irregularities. ALK gene examination could be performed in histological as well as cytological (cellblocks) samples, but obtaining a reliable result in cytological samples depends on the cellularity of examined materials. PMID:24592134

  8. RNA in situ hybridization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2012-01-01

    RNA in situ hybridization using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes on tissue sections is a powerful technique for revealing microscopic spatial gene expression. Here, we describe an in situ hybridization method commonly practiced in Arabidopsis research labs. The highly stringent hybridization condition eliminates the usage of Ribonlucease A and gives highly specific signals. This also allows the use of longer probes which enhance signal strength without cross hybridization to closely related genes. In addition, using spin columns in template and riboprobe purification greatly reduces background signals.

  9. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes as a new approach to distinguish chromosome breakage from aneuploidy in interphase cells and micronuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Rupa, D.S.; Chen, H.W.; Hasegawa, L.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosomal abnormalities are believed to contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, carcinogenesis and other pathophysiological conditions. For example, approximately 15% of recognized pregnancies terminate in spontaneous abortion, and of these approximately 30% have been shown to be chromosomally abnormal. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to early embryonic and fetal death appears to decrease with gestational age, suggesting that as many as 67% of the aborted embryos in early embryonic deaths are chromosomally abnormal. Furthermore, clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities can also be found to be present in approximately 0.58 to 0.67% of live births. These figures indicate that within a given year, hundreds of thousands of chromosomally abnormal babies will be born throughout the world and additional millions of chromosomally abnormal embryos will have been spontaneously aborted. For the past several years, our research has focused on utilizing new molecular cytogenetic techniques to develop assays for detecting aneuploidy-inducing agents in mammalian cells. One approach that we have sucessfully employed involves the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes to determine the number of copies of a representative chromosome present within the nucleus following chemical exposure. DNA sequences (probes) which hybridize to blocks of repetitive centromeric DNA on specific chromosomes have been developed for most of the human chromosomes. In situ hybridization with these probes results in the staining of a compact chromosomal region which can be easily detected in interphase nuclei. The presence of 3 (or more) hybridization domains in an interphase nucleus indicates the presence of three centromeric regions and has been presumed to indicate that three copies of the entire chromosome were present in the nucleus.

  10. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) subtypes defined by common translocations: utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cindy M.; Schroeder, Jane C.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Dunphy, Cherie H.; Baric, Ralph S.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Dorsey, Kathleen C.; Dent, Georgette A.; Cerhan, James R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Blair, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays to identify t(14;18) translocations in archival paraffin-embedded tumor sections from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cases enrolled in a population-based study. t(14;18) was identified in 54% of 152 cases, including 39% of diffuse large cell lymphomas (26 of 66 cases) and 84% of follicular lymphomas (36 of 43 cases). Eighty-seven percent of t(14;18)-positive cases and 57% of t(14;18)-negative cases expressed bcl-2. FISH assays detected twice as many t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphomas as PCR assays. Overall, study findings support the use of FISH assays to detect t(14;18) in archival tumor samples for epidemiologic studies of NHL subtypes. PMID:19505720

  12. High-performance multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization in culture and tissue with matrix imprinting and clearing.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Hao, Junjie; Bambah-Mukku, Dhananjay; Lu, Tian; Dulac, Catherine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-12-13

    Highly multiplexed single-molecule FISH has emerged as a promising approach to spatially resolved single-cell transcriptomics because of its ability to directly image and profile numerous RNA species in their native cellular context. However, background-from off-target binding of FISH probes and cellular autofluorescence-can become limiting in a number of important applications, such as increasing the degree of multiplexing, imaging shorter RNAs, and imaging tissue samples. Here, we developed a sample clearing approach for FISH measurements. We identified off-target binding of FISH probes to cellular components other than RNA, such as proteins, as a major source of background. To remove this source of background, we embedded samples in polyacrylamide, anchored RNAs to this polyacrylamide matrix, and cleared cellular proteins and lipids, which are also sources of autofluorescence. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, we measured the copy number of 130 RNA species in cleared samples using multiplexed error-robust FISH (MERFISH). We observed a reduction both in the background because of off-target probe binding and in the cellular autofluorescence without detectable loss in RNA. This process led to an improved detection efficiency and detection limit of MERFISH, and an increased measurement throughput via extension of MERFISH into four color channels. We further demonstrated MERFISH measurements of complex tissue samples from the mouse brain using this matrix-imprinting and -clearing approach. We envision that this method will improve the performance of a wide range of in situ hybridization-based techniques in both cell culture and tissues.

  13. High-performance multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization in culture and tissue with matrix imprinting and clearing

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Hao, Junjie; Bambah-Mukku, Dhananjay; Lu, Tian; Dulac, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Highly multiplexed single-molecule FISH has emerged as a promising approach to spatially resolved single-cell transcriptomics because of its ability to directly image and profile numerous RNA species in their native cellular context. However, background—from off-target binding of FISH probes and cellular autofluorescence—can become limiting in a number of important applications, such as increasing the degree of multiplexing, imaging shorter RNAs, and imaging tissue samples. Here, we developed a sample clearing approach for FISH measurements. We identified off-target binding of FISH probes to cellular components other than RNA, such as proteins, as a major source of background. To remove this source of background, we embedded samples in polyacrylamide, anchored RNAs to this polyacrylamide matrix, and cleared cellular proteins and lipids, which are also sources of autofluorescence. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, we measured the copy number of 130 RNA species in cleared samples using multiplexed error-robust FISH (MERFISH). We observed a reduction both in the background because of off-target probe binding and in the cellular autofluorescence without detectable loss in RNA. This process led to an improved detection efficiency and detection limit of MERFISH, and an increased measurement throughput via extension of MERFISH into four color channels. We further demonstrated MERFISH measurements of complex tissue samples from the mouse brain using this matrix-imprinting and -clearing approach. We envision that this method will improve the performance of a wide range of in situ hybridization-based techniques in both cell culture and tissues. PMID:27911841

  14. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry as tools to evaluate the treatments for the control of slime-forming enterobacteria in paper mills.

    PubMed

    Torres, C Esperanza; Gibello, Alicia; Nande, Mar; Martin, Margarita; Blanco, Angeles

    2008-04-01

    Slime formation is a serious problem nowadays in the paper industry. Some enterobacteria are associated with the formation of slime deposits in paper and board mills. Detection and characterization of slime forming bacteria, belonging to the genus Enterobacter, Raoultella, and Klebsiella have been achieved by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using one probe based on the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence and other two rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. The effects of three kinds of antimicrobiological products (biocides, dispersants, and enzymes) on these enterobacterial cells were analyzed by flow cytometry (FC). Biocides B: utrol 1009 and 1072 were the most effective microbiocides against all enterobacterial cells analyzed, reaching 90% of dead bacteria after 24 h. However, the enzymatic treatment (Buzyme) was not equally efficient on enterobacteria and its microbiocide capacity varied depending on the type of microorganism. FISH and FC were effective tools to detect important slime forming enterobacteria and to select specific treatments to control microbial problems in the paper industry.

  15. Identification of the origin of marker chromosomes by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction in azoospermic patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, C L; Cheng, J L; Yang, W C; Li, L Y; Cheng, H C; Fu, J J

    2015-11-19

    Y chromosomal microdeletions at the azoospermia factor locus and chromosome abnormalities have been implicated as the major causes of idiopathic male infertility. A marker chromosome is a structurally abnormal chromosome in which no part can be identified by cytogenetics. In this study, to identify the origin of the marker chromosomes and to perform a genetic diagnosis of patients with azoospermia, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were carried out. The marker chromosomes for the two patients with azoospermia originated in the Y chromosome; it was ascertained that the karyotype of both patients was 46,X, ish del(Y)(q11)(DYZ3+, DXZ1-). The combination of two-color FISH and PCR techniques is an important method for the identification of the origin of marker chromosomes. Thus, genetic counseling and a clear genetic diagnosis of patients with azoospermia before intracytoplasmic sperm injection or other clinical managements are important.

  16. Dicentric chromosome aberration analysis using giemsa and centromere specific fluorescence in-situ hybridization for biological dosimetry: An inter- and intra-laboratory comparison in Indian laboratories.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, M; Tamizh Selvan, G; Kaur, Harpreet; Adhikari, J S; Vijayalakshmi, J; Venkatachalam, P; Chaudhury, N K

    2014-09-01

    To facilitate efficient handling of large samples, an attempt towards networking of laboratories in India for biological dosimetry was carried out. Human peripheral blood samples were exposed to (60)Co γ-radiation for ten different doses (0-5Gy) at a dose rate of 0.7 and 2Gy/min. The chromosomal aberrations (CA) were scored in Giemsa-stained and fluorescence in-situ hybridization with centromere-specific probes. No significant difference (p>0.05) was observed in the CA yield for given doses except 4 and 5Gy, between the laboratories, among the scorers and also staining methods adapted suggest the reliability and validates the inter-lab comparisons exercise for triage applications.

  17. Detection and quantification of Epstein-Barr virus EBER1 in EBV-infected cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was developed to detect Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells in peripheral blood. Multiple fluorescein-labeled antisense oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize to the EBER1 transcript, which is highly expressed in latently infected cells. After a rapid (30 min) hybridization, the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. EBER1 was detected in several positive control cell lines that have variable numbers of EBV genome copies. No EBER1 was detected in two known EBV-negative cell lines. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence and quantity of EBER1 transcripts in each cell line. This method was used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in peripheral blood from a patient with chronic mononucleosis. These results indicate that EBV-infected cells can be detected at the single cell level, and that this assay can be used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in clinical samples.

  18. Analysis of sex chromosome distribution in the gonadal tissue of a 45,X/47,XYY mosaic by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ragg, S; Härle, M; Scherthan, H

    1995-04-01

    45,X/47,XYY mosaicism is a rare condition with scarce information on the tissue-specific distribution of the different cell lines. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with repetitive, chromosome-specific DNA probes was applied to gain insight into the tissue-specific distribution of the two cell lines in biopsies of the streak gonad and dysgenetic testis of a 2-year-old individual exhibiting 45,X/47,XYY mosaicism. The distribution of the 45,X/47,XYY cells within different tissues was found to be nonrandom. The coelomic epithelium, the vascular endothelium, and the prepuberal germ cells exhibited predominantly a 47,XYY karyotype. In contrast, Sertoli cells exhibited both karyotypes, and the remaining tissue was predominantly composed of 45,X cells. The contribution of the two cell lines to gonadal development is discussed.

  19. Clinical and cytogenetic findings in seven cases of inverted duplication of 8p with evidence of a telomeric deletion using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wen-Jun; Callif-Daley, F.; Zapata, M.C.; Miller, M.E.

    1995-09-11

    We report on the clinical and cytogenetic findings in 7 cases of inverted duplication of region 8p11.2-p23. The phenotype of inv dup (8p) compiled from this series and the literature (N = 29) consists of severe mental retardation (100%), minor facial alterations (97%), agenesis of the corpus callosum (80%), hypotonia (66%), orthopedic abnormalities (58%), scoliosis/kyphosis (40%), and congenital heart defect (26%). A telomeric deletion of region 8p23.3-pter was confirmed in 3 of our cases studied using fluorescent in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe for 8p. Thus, these karyotypes are inv dup del(8) (qter{r_arrow} p23.1::p23.1{r_arrow}p11.2:). Our findings suggest that most cases of inv dup(8p) probably have a telomeric deletion. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Subcuticular bacteria associated with two common New Zealand echinoderms: Characterization using 16S rRNA sequence analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Scott A; O'Toole, Ronan; Taylor, Michael W; Davy, Simon K

    2010-02-01

    Many echinoderms contain subcuticular bacteria (SCB), symbionts which reside in the lumen between the host's epidermal cells and outer cuticle. This relationship is common, existing in about 60% of echinoderms studied so far, yet the function of SCB remains largely unknown. In this study, phylogenetic analysis was carried out on 16S rRNA sequences obtained from echinoderm-associated bacteria, resulting in the identification of four species of putative SCB. All four bacteria were identified from the holothurian Stichopus mollis, and two of the four were also found in the asteroid Patiriella sp. Two of these bacteria belong to the Alphaproteobacteria, and two to the Gammaproteobacteria. In addition to phylogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays were carried out on Patiriella sp., S. mollis, and the asteroid Astrostole scabra. Results showed that Patiriella sp. and S. mollis contain SCB, in agreement with the phylogenetic analysis, while SCB were not detected in A. scabra. Of the bacteria detected using FISH, more than 80% were recognized as belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria in both host species. However, in S. mollis about 20% of the detected SCB successfully hybridized with the Gammaproteobacteria-specific probe, whereas bacteria belonging to this class were never observed in Patiriella sp. This is only the second study to characterize SCB by molecular means, and is the first to identify SCB in situ using FISH.

  1. Analysis of chromosomal polymorphism in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. ssp. vulgare) and between H. vulgare and H. chilense using three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Szakács, É; Kruppa, K; Molnár-Láng, M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study chromosomal polymorphism within cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) using three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The physical distribution of the most frequently used, highly repetitive DNA sequences (GAA)7 specific for pericentromeric heterochromatic regions, the ribosomal DNA clone pTa71, specific for the 45S rDNA, and the barley-specific telomere-associated sequence HvT01, was investigated to reveal genetic diversity in metaphase spreads of ten barley genotypes with diverse geographical origin, growth habit and row number. A wild relative of barley, Hordeum chilense was also studied in order to compare the polymorphism between and within Hordeum species. Significant differences in the hybridization patterns of all three DNA probes could be detected between the two related species, but only probes pTa71 and HvT01 showed variation in the intensity and/or position of hybridization sites among genotypes of H. vulgare ssp. vulgare. The extent of polymorphism was less than that earlier reported for molecular markers and was restricted to the long chromosome arms, with differences between the chromosomes. 1H and 3H proved to be the most variable chromosomes and 4H and 6H the most conserved.

  2. [Early diagnostics of bladder cancer recurrence with fluorescence in situ hybridization method in the first 24 months after a transurethral resection of a bladder in old and elderly persons].

    PubMed

    Pushkin, A S; Ryzhak, G A

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of experience of application of a technique fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in early diagnostics of relapses of a superficial bladder cancer in 103 middle-aged, old and senile persons who had transurethral resection of the bladder.

  3. Impact of updated HER2 testing guidelines in breast cancer--re-evaluation of HERA trial fluorescence in situ hybridization data.

    PubMed

    Stoss, Oliver C; Scheel, Andreas; Nagelmeier, Iris; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Henkel, Thomas; Viale, Giuseppe; Jasani, Bharat; Untch, Michael; Rüschoff, Josef

    2015-12-01

    Recently the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists have updated their clinical practice guidelines for HER2 testing in breast cancer. In order to evaluate these new recommendations, we have re-assessed the HER2 status of 6018 breast cancer cases of the screening population for the HERceptin adjuvant (HERA) trial that were originally centrally tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization based on the FDA-released test guidelines. According to the most recent 2013 ASCO/CAP recommendations, 3380 (56.2%) cases were classified as HER2 positive compared with 3359 (55.8%) applying the HERA/FDA scheme and 3339 (55.5%) applying the 2007 ASCO/CAP guidelines. Twenty-one cases switched from negative (HERA/FDA scheme) to positive (2013 ASCO/CAP guidelines). This group is characterized by a mean HER2 gene copy number of ≥6.0, polysomy or co-amplification of CEP17 with an average CEP17 count of 5, and with HER2 receptor overexpression in 75% of cases. On the basis of the HER2 gene copy number alone, we observe 494 cases (8.2%) that are in the equivocal range. Most of these cases (>80%) were also nondecisive by immunohistochemistry (score 2+) irrespective of whether ratio was <2.0>. The number of equivocal cases that would require HER2 reflex testing decreases to 113 (1.9%) if in addition to the HER2 gene copy number also the ratio of HER2 and CEP17 copy numbers is considered via dual-color in situ hybridization. The combination of applying the HER2 mean gene copy number as well as the HER2/CEP17 ratio to define equivocal test decisions by fluorescence in situ hybridization as proposed by the current ASCO/CAP guidelines appears to be a more optimum approach to adopt in order to avoid or minimize reporting of false negative results. Using the mean HER2 gene copy number alone for decision making results in a significant increase of equivocal cases.

  4. Mosaic vs. nonmosaic trisomy 9: Report of a liveborn infant evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, E.S.; Eicher, D.J.; Shashidhar Pai, G.; Donahue, C.J.; Harley, R.A.

    1996-04-24

    We report on a newborn infant with multiple congenital anomalies and apparent nonmosaic trisomy 9 in the blood (by conventional cytogenetic studies) who died shortly after birth. Clinical observations at birth and autopsy are compared with phenotypes of mosaic and nonmosaic trisomy 9 cases reported previously. Unlike the initial cytogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of metaphase and interphase blood cells and skin fibroblasts detected the presence of euploid and trisomy 9 cells. These results suggest that earlier reports of trisomy 9, which relied on conventional chromosome analysis of a few metaphase cells and/or only one tissue type, may not have excluded mosaicism, and that trisomy 9 may be viable only in the mosaic state. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. In situ hybridization of suprachiasmatic nucleus slices.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2007-01-01

    The progress in the understanding of the molecular machinery of mammalian circadian clocks, in combination with the well-established role of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) as a master circadian clock, has provided an invaluable system for the study of the molecular basis of circadian rhythmicity. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques that label specific clock-gene mRNAs within the SCN, researchers can now elucidate the core molecular oscillatory mechanisms underlying specific circadian physiological and behavioral phenotypes. In this chapter, two methods for ISH within the SCN are described. The first method is based on the fluorescent labeling of mRNA and is suitable for confocal microscopy analysis and double labeling techniques. The second method is based on the radioactive labeling of mRNA and is more sensitive and more adequate for the relative quantification of mRNA species.

  6. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  7. Nitrifying bacterial communities in an aquaculture wastewater treatment system using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), 16S rRNA gene cloning, and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Paungfoo, Chanyarat; Prasertsan, Poonsuk; Burrell, Paul C; Intrasungkha, Nugul; Blackall, Linda L

    2007-07-01

    Aquaculture, especially shrimp farming, has played a major role in the growth of Thailand's economy in recent years, as well as in many South East Asian countries. However, the nutrient discharges from these activities have caused adverse impacts on the quality of the receiving waterways. In particular nitrogenous compounds, which may accumulate in aquaculture ponds, can be toxic to aquatic animals and cause environmental problems such as eutrophication. The mineralization process is well known, but certain aspects of the microbial ecology of nitrifiers, the microorganisms that convert ammonia to nitrate, are poorly understood. A previously reported enrichment of nitrifying bacteria (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB)) from a shrimp farm inoculated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was studied by molecular methods. The initial identification and partial quantification of the nitrifying bacteria (AOB and NOB) were carried out by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using previously published 16S rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probes. The two dominant bacterial groups detected by FISH were from the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides and Proteobacteria (beta subdivision) phyla. Published FISH probes for Nitrobacter and Nitrospira did not hybridize to any of the bacterial cells. Therefore it is likely that new communities of NOBs, differing from previously reported ones, exist in the enrichments. Molecular genetic techniques (cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis) targeting the 16S rRNA genes from the nitrifying enrichments were performed to identify putative AOBs and NOBs.

  8. Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Identification of Clinically Relevant Mycobacteria in Clinical Specimens and Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Lefmann, Michael; Schweickert, Birgitta; Buchholz, Petra; Göbel, Ulf B.; Ulrichs, Timo; Seiler, Peter; Theegarten, Dirk; Moter, Annette

    2006-01-01

    With fluorescently labeled PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes targeting 16S rRNA, we established a 3-h fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for specific visualization of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. leprae, M. avium, and M. kansasii. Probe specificity was tested against a panel of 25 Mycobacterium spp. and 10 gram-positive organisms. After validation, probes were used to identify 52 mycobacterial culture isolates. Results were compared to conventional genotypic identification with amplification-based methods. All isolates (M. tuberculosis complex, n = 24; M. avium, n = 7; M. kansasii, n = 1) were correctly identified by FISH. In addition, the technique was used successfully for visualization of mycobacteria in biopsies from infected humans or animals. In conclusion, PNA-FISH is a fast and accurate tool for species-specific identification of culture-grown mycobacteria and for direct visualization of these organisms in tissue sections. It may be used successfully for both research and clinical microbiology. PMID:17021106

  9. Mapping of low-frequency chimeric yeast artificial chromosome libraries from human chromosomes 16 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Campbell, E.W.; Anzick, S.L.; Shera, K.; Campbell, M.; Yoshida, T.M.; McCormick, M.K.; Deaven, L. )

    1994-05-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from low-frequency chimeric libraries of human chromosomes 16 and 21 were mapped onto human diploid fibroblast metaphase chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. YACs mapped onto chromosome 21 were selected to provide subregional location and ordering of known and unknown markers on the long arm of chromosome 21, particularly in the Down syndrome region (q22). YACs mapped onto chromosome 16 were selected to overlap regions spanning chromosome 16 cosmid maps. YAC clones were indirectly labeled with fluorescein, and the total DNA of the chromosome was counterstained with propidium iodide. A single image containing both the FISH signal and the whole chromosome was acquired for each chromosome of interest containing the fluorescent probe signal in a metaphase spread. From the digitized image, the fluorescence intensity profile through the long axis of the chromosome gave the total chromosome length and the probe position. The map position of the probe was expressed as the fractional length (FL) of the total chromosome relative to the end of the short arm (Flpter). From each clone hybridized, 20-40 chromosome images were analyzed. Thirty-eight YACs were mapped onto chromosome 16, and their FLs were distributed along the short and long arms. On chromosome 21, 47 YACs were mapped, including 12 containing known markers. To confirm the order of a dense population of YACs within the Down syndrome region, a two-color mapping strategy was used in which an anonymous YAC was located relative to one or two known markers on the metaphase chromosome. The chromosome FL maps have a 1- to 2-Mb resolution, and the FL measurement of each probe has a typical standard error of 0.5-1 Mb. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Altered interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization profiles of chromosomes 4, 8q24, and 9q34 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are associated with a poorer patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, María L; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; Sarasquete, María E; Hernández-Mejía, David G; Abad, María del Mar; Bengoechea, Oscar; Corchete, Luis; González-González, María; García-García, Jacinto; Gonzalez, Marcos; Mota, Ines; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagues, José M

    2014-11-01

    Most patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) die within 6 months of diagnosis. However, 20% to 25% patients undergoing total tumor resection remain alive and disease-free 5 years after diagnostic surgery. Few studies on tumor markers have predicted patient prognosis and/or survival. We evaluated the effect of tumor cytogenetic copy number changes detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on overall survival (OS) of 55 PDAC patients. The prognostic value of copy number changes showing an effect on OS was validated in an external cohort of 44 surgically resected PDAC patients by comparative genomic hybridization arrays, and the genes coded in altered chromosomes with prognostic value were identified by high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays in 20 cases. Copy number changes of chromosomes 4 and 9q34 with gains of 8q24 were independently associated with shorter OS. On the basis of these three chromosomal alterations, a score is proposed that identifies patients with significantly different (P < 0.001) 5-year OS rates: 60% ± 20%, 16% ± 8%, and 0% ± 0%, respectively. Our results show an association between tumor cytogenetics and OS of PDAC patients and provide the basis for further prognostic stratification of patients undergoing complete tumor resection. Further studies to identify specific genes coded in these chromosomes and their functional consequences are necessary to understand the clinical effect of these changes.

  11. Chromosomal localization of 5S and 18S-5.8S-25S ribosomal DNA sites in five Asian pines using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-L; Zhang, D; Hong, D-Y; Wang, X-R

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed on mitotic metaphase chromosome preparations of five Asian Pinus species: Pinus tabuliformis, Pinus yunnanensis, Pinus densata, Pinus massoniana and Pinus merkusii, using simultaneously DNA probes of the 18S rRNA gene and the 5S rRNA gene including the non-transcribed spacer sequences. The number and location of 18S rDNA sites varied markedly (5-10 pairs of strong signals) among the five pines. A maximum of 20 major 18S rDNA sites was observed in the diploid genome (2n = 24) of P. massoniana. The 5S rDNA FISH pattern was less variable, with one major site and one minor site commonly observed in each species. The differentiation of rDNA sites on chromosomes among the five pines correlates well with their phylogenic positions in Pinus as reconstructed from other molecular data. P. densata, a species of hybrid origin, resembles its parents ( P. tabuliformis and P. yunnanensis), including some components characteristic of each parent in its pattern. However, the species is unique, showing new features resulting possibly from recombination and genome reorganization.

  12. Chromosomal mapping of the gene (INPP5A) encoding the 43-kDa membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase to 10q26.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.A.; Speed, C.J.; Nicholl, J.; Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the localization of a membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase gene to human chromosome 10q26.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This 43-kDa 5-phosphatase does not map to the same location as any other 5-phosphatase enzymes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  13. mRNA-targeted Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization (FISH) of Gram-negative Bacteria Without Template Amplification or Tyramide Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, James R.; Culley, David E.; Chrisler, William B.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2007-12-01

    Technologies are needed to study gene expression at the level of individual cells within a population or microbial community. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) supplies high-resolution spatial information and has been widely applied to study microbial communities at the rRNA level. While mRNA-targeted FISH has been popular for studying gene expression in eukaryotic cells, very little success has been achieved with prokaryotes. At present, detection of specific mRNAs in individual prokaryotic cells requires the use of in situ-RT-PCR or tyramide signal amplification (TSA). In this study we used DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a single near-infrared dye in FISH assays to detect multicopy plasmid-based and endogenous mRNA molecules in Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We took advantage of the fact there is much less background signal produced by biological materials and support matrices in the near-infrared spectrum and thus long camera exposure times could be used. In addition, we demonstrate that a combination of probes targeting both rRNA and mRNA could be successfully employed within the same FISH assay. These results, as well as ongoing R&D improvements in NIR and infrared dyes, indicate the FISH approach we demonstrated could be applied in certain environmental settings to monitor gene expression in mixed populations.

  14. Monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina) populations during alcoholic fermentation by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Mas, Albert

    2014-11-17

    Various molecular approaches have been applied as culture-independent techniques to monitor wine fermentations over the last decade. Among them, those based on RNA detection have been widely used for yeast cell detection, assuming that RNA only exists in live cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting intracellular rRNA is considered a promising technique for the investigation of wine ecology. For the present study, we applied the FISH technique in combination with epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to directly quantify populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Starmerella bacillaris during alcoholic fermentations. A new specific probe that hybridizes with eight species of Hanseniaspora genus and a second probe specific for Starm. bacillaris were designed, and the conditions for their application to pure cultures, mixed cultures, and wine samples were optimized. Single and mixed fermentations were performed with natural, concentrated must at two different temperatures, 15 °C and 25 °C. The population dynamics revealed that the Sacch. cerevisiae population increased to 10(7)-10(8)cells/ml during all fermentations, whereas H. uvarum and Starm. bacillaris tended to increase in single fermentations but remained at levels similar to their inoculations at 10(6)cells/ml in mixed fermentations. Temperature mainly affected the fermentation duration (slower at the lower temperature) but did not affect the population sizes of the different species. The use of these probes in natural wine fermentations has been validated.

  15. Assignment of the human diacylglycerol kinase gene (DAGK) to 12q13.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Champagne, C.

    1994-07-01

    A 1-kb cDNA probe specific for the human DAGK gene was prepared by polymerase chain reaction and used to assign it to human chromosome 12 using a human x hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel. To determine the chromosomal sublocalization of DAGK, used the 1-kg DAGK cDNA probe to isolate a DAGK-specific phage clone from a human chromosome 12 library by Southern blot techniques. This clone (phEDCDAGK) contained a 17-kb human genomic insert in the phage Charon 40 that hybridized to the 1-kb DAGK cDNA previously characterized.

  16. A physical map of 15 loci on human chromosome 5q23-q33 by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Saltman, D.L.; Dolganov, G.M. ); Warrington, J.A.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Lovett, M. )

    1993-06-01

    The q23-q33 region of human chromosome 5 encodes a large number of growth factors, growth factor receptors, and hormone/neurotransmitter receptors. This is also the general region into which several disease genes have been mapped, including diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, hereditary startle disease, the myeloid disorders that are associated with the 5q-syndrome, autosomal-dominant forms of hereditary deafness, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The authors have developed a framework physical map of this region using cosmid clones isolated from the Los Alamos arrayed chromosome 5-specific library. Entry points into this library included 14 probes to genes within this interval and one anonymous polymorphic marker locus. A physical map has been constructed using fluorescence in situ hybridization of these cosmids on metaphase and interphase chromosomes, and this is in good agreement with the radiation hybrid map of the region. The derived order of loci across the region is cen-IL4-IL5-IRF1-IL3-IL9-EGR1-CD14-FGFA-GRL-D5S207-ADRB2-SPARC-RPS14-CSF1R-ADRA1, and the total distance spanned by these loci is approximately 15 Mb. The framework map, genomic clones, and contig expansion within 5q23-q33 should provide valuable resources for the eventual isolation of the clinically relevant loci that reside in this region. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. High-resolution cytogenetic mapping of 342 new cosmid markers including 43 RFLP markers on human chromosome 17 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Inazawa, Johji; Ariyama, Takeshi; Abe, Tatsuo ); Saito, Hiroko; Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have constructed a high-resolution cytogenetic map of human chromosome 17 with 342 cosmid markers, each newly isolated from a cosmid library constructed from a human-mouse hybrid cell line containing a single human chromosome 17. Direct mapping on R- and/or G-banded (pro)metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization localized these markers throughout the chromosome, although density was highest in the R-band-dominant regions of 17p13, 17p11.2, 17q11.2-q12, 17q21.3, 17q23, and 17q25. By screening some of the cosmid clones, they identified 71 polymorphic systems with 43 markers; 11 of these are VNTRs. As the high-resolution cytogenetic map contains a large number of markers, it can provide useful landmarks for a contig map of chromosome 17. Furthermore, the map will contribute to positional cloning of aberrant genes responsible for inherited diseases such as Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), and familial early-onset breast cancer, as well as putative tumor suppressor genes on this chromosome. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Homoeologous chromosome pairing in the distant hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora and the genome composition of its backcross derivatives determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with species-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Ramanna, M S; de Jeu, M J; Kuipers, A G; Jacobsen, E

    1999-01-01

    A distant hybrid between two diploid species (2n = 2x = 16), Alstroemeria aurea and A. inodora, was investigated for homoeologous chromosome pairing, crossability with A. inodora and chromosome transmission to its BC1 offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with two species-specific probes, A001-I (A. aurea specific) and D32-13 (A. inodora specific), was used to analyse chromosome pairing in the hybrid and the genome constitution of its BC1 progeny plants. High frequencies of associated chromosomes were observed in both genotypes of the F1 hybrid, A1P2-2 and A1P4. In the former, both univalents and bivalents were found at metaphase I, whereas the latter plant also showed tri- and quadrivalents. Based on the hybridization sites of DNA probes on the chromosomes of both parental species, it was established that hybrid A1P4 contains a reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 8 of A. inodora. Despite regular homoeologous chromosome pairing in 30% of the pollen mother cells, both hybrids were highly sterile. They were backcrossed reciprocally with one of the parental species, A. inodora. Two days after pollination, embryo rescue was applied and, eventually, six BC1 progeny plants were obtained. Among these, two were aneuploids (2n = 2x + 1 = 17) and four were triploids (2n = 3x = 24). The aneuploid plants had originated when the interspecific hybrid was used as a female parent, indicating that n eggs were functional in the hybrid. In addition, 2n gametes were also functional in the hybrid, resulting in the four triploid BC1 plants. Of these four plants, three had received 2n pollen grains from the hybrid and one a 2n egg. Using FISH, homoeologous crossing over between the chromosomes of the two parental species in the hybrid was clearly detected in all BC1 plants. The relevance of these results for the process of introgression and the origin of n and 2n gametes are discussed.

  19. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  20. Comparison of vertical distributions of prokaryotic assemblages in the anoxic Cariaco Basin and Black Sea by use of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xueju; Wakeham, Stuart G; Putnam, Isabell F; Astor, Yrene M; Scranton, Mary I; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y; Taylor, Gordon T

    2006-04-01

    Individual prokaryotic cells from two major anoxic basins, the Cariaco Basin and the Black Sea, were enumerated throughout their water columns using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the fluorochrome Cy3 or horseradish peroxidase-modified oligonucleotide probes. For both basins, significant differences in total prokaryotic abundance and phylogenetic composition were observed among oxic, anoxic, and transitional (redoxcline) waters. Epsilon-proteobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota were more prevalent in the redoxclines, where previous studies reported high rates of chemoautotrophic production relative to those in waters above and below the redoxclines. Relative abundances of Archaea in both systems varied between 1% and 28% of total prokaryotes, depending on depth. The prokaryotic community composition varied between the two anoxic basins, consistent with distinct geochemical and physical conditions. In the Black Sea, the relative contributions of group I Crenarchaeota (median, 5.5%) to prokaryotic communities were significantly higher (P < 0.001; n = 20) than those of group II Euryarchaeota (median, 2.9%). In contrast, their proportions were nearly equivalent in the Cariaco Basin. Beta-proteobacteria were unexpectedly common throughout the Cariaco Basin's water column, accounting for an average of 47% of 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cells. This group was below the detection limit (<1%) in the Black Sea samples. Compositional differences between basins may reflect temporal variability in microbial populations and/or systematic differences in environmental conditions and the populations for which they select.

  1. Detection of ETV6 and RUNX1 gene rearrangements using fluorescence in situ hybridization in Mexican patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Montero-Ruiz, Oreth; Frías, Sara; Ulloa-Avilés, Verónica; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocío; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Rivera-Luna, Roberto; Carnevale, Alessandra

    2005-10-15

    The t(12;21) produces the gene fusion ETV6/RUNX1 and is a frequent rearrangement in childhood ALL, associated with a good prognosis. In Mexico its prevalence has not been reported. This study evaluated a group of consecutive Mexican children with newly diagnosed ALL, to detect the fusion using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Seventy-one bone marrow samples were analyzed with FISH, using ETV6/RUNX1 DNA probes. Abnormalities of ETV6, RUNX1, or both were found in 31 of the 71 (44%) patients. Six showed ETV6/RUNX1 fusion and 17, with extra RUNX1 copies, presented an additional chromosome 21 or dup(21)(q22). Five patients had structural changes in ETV6, and three patients showed extra copies of ETV6 and RUNX1 from polysomy of chromosomes 12 and 21. Our results revealed a fusion in 8.5% of the 71 cases analyzed. This frequency is lower than that observed in other populations (9.5-32%). The structural rearrangements resulting in RUNX1 extra copies were found in 9.8% of patients, which is close to the range reported (1.5-9.7%) by other authors. Due to the prevalence of RUNX1 overrepresentation in our population and its unknown prognostic significance, further studies should be conducted in consecutive children with ALL, to correlate this abnormality with the patients' follow-up.

  2. Analysis of gene rearrangements using a fluorescence in situ hybridization method in Mexican patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Salas, Consuelo; Montero-Ruiz, Oreth; Frías, Sara; Dehesa, Gloria; Jarquín, Berenice; Rivera-Luna, Roberto

    2008-07-15

    We evaluated the prevalence of BCR/ABL, MLL, and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements as well as CDKN2A (alias p16) deletion in a group of Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to determine whether the changes coexist, and to compare the incidences found with other reports in the literature. To increase the detection of these abnormalities, we combined conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Bone marrow samples were obtained from 59 consecutive children with ALL. FISH detected a total of 63 abnormalities with the selected probes, 34 of which were related to the conventional cytogenetic results. The most common abnormality was the p16 deletion (22.8%), followed by MLL and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements (8.7%), and the BCR/ABL fusion was the least frequent (2.7%). The coexistence of two recurrent abnormalities with specific prognostic significance in the same patient was not found. A lesser proportion of the p16 deletion in T-ALL patients was observed, probably related to the low prevalence of this subtype in our population. In addition, we confirmed the low frequency of the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion observed in Hispanics. Due to the different prevalence of these abnormalities in the Mexican population, similar studies should be conducted analyzing new rearrangements, to improve the adequate classification of the abnormalities and the stratification in prognostic groups.

  3. The origin of in situ hybridization - A personal history.

    PubMed

    Gall, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    In situ hybridization is the technique by which specific RNA or DNA molecules are detected in cytological preparations. Basically it involves formation of a hybrid molecule between an endogenous single-stranded RNA or DNA in the cell and a complementary single-stranded RNA or DNA probe. In its original form the probe was labeled with (3)H and the hybrid was detected by autoradiography. The first successful experiments in 1968 involved detection of the highly amplified ribosomal DNA in oocytes of the frog Xenopus, followed soon after by the reiterated "satellite DNA" in mouse and Drosophila chromosomes. Fluorescent probes were developed about ten years later.

  4. Combining fluorescent in situ hybridization data with ISS staging improves risk assessment in myeloma: an International Myeloma Working Group collaborative project

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Loiseau, H; Durie, BGM; Cavo, M; Attal, M; Gutierrez, N; Haessler, J; Goldschmidt, H; Hajek, R; Lee, JH; Sezer, O; Barlogie, B; Crowley, J; Fonseca, R; Testoni, N; Ross, F; Rajkumar, SV; Sonneveld, P; Lahuerta, J; Moreau, P; Morgan, G

    2014-01-01

    The combination of serum β2-microglobulin and albumin levels has been shown to be highly prognostic in myeloma as the International Staging System (ISS). The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of ISS stage and cytogenetic abnormalities in predicting outcomes. A retrospective analysis of international studies looking at both ISS and cytogenetic abnormalities was performed in order to assess the potential role of combining ISS stage and cytogenetics to predict survival. This international effort used the International Myeloma Working Group database of 12 137 patients treated worldwide for myeloma at diagnosis, of whom 2309 had cytogenetic studies and 5387 had analyses by fluorescent in situ hybridization (iFISH). Comprehensive analyses used 2642 patients with sufficient iFISH data available. Using the comprehensive iFISH data, combining both t(4;14) and deletion (17p), along with ISS stage, significantly improved the prognostic assessment in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival. The additional impact of patient age and use of high-dose therapy was also demonstrated. In conclusion, the combination of iFISH data with ISS staging significantly improves risk assessment in myeloma. PMID:23032723

  5. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A.; Hanna, Wayne W.; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen. PMID:27031857

  6. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A; Hanna, Wayne W; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen.

  7. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C. Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. PMID:26865698

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of a small supernumerary, XIST-negative, mosaic ring X chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in an abnormal male fetus.

    PubMed

    Le Caignec, C; Boceno, M; Joubert, M; Winer, N; Aubron, F; Fallet-Bianco, C; Rival, J M

    2003-02-01

    Marker or ring X [r(X)] chromosomes of varying size are often found in patients with Turner syndrome. Patients with very small r(X) chromosomes that did not include the X-inactivation locus (XIST) have been described with a more severe phenotype. Small r(X) chromosomes are rare in males and there are only five previous reports of such cases. We report the identification of a small supernumerary X chromosome in an abnormal male fetus. Cytogenetic analysis from chorionic villus sampling was performed because of fetal nuchal translucency thickness and it showed mosaicism 46,XY/47,XY,+r(X)/48,XY,+r(X),+r(X). Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) showed the marker to be of X-chromosome origin and not to contain the XIST locus. Additional specific probes showed that the r(X) included a euchromatic region in proximal Xq. At 20 weeks gestation, a second ultrasound examination revealed cerebral abnormalities. After genetic counselling, the pregnancy was terminated. The fetus we describe is the first male with a mosaic XIST-negative r(X) chromosome identified at prenatal diagnosis. The phenotype we observed was probably the result of functional disomy of the genes in the r(X) chromosome, secondary to loss of the XIST locus.

  9. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  10. Genomic arrays in chronic lymphocytic leukemia routine clinical practice: are we ready to substitute conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques?

    PubMed

    Puiggros, Anna; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Salido, Marta; Ferrer, Ana; Abella, Eugènia; Gimeno, Eva; Nonell, Lara; Herranz, María José; Galván, Ana Belén; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Melero, Carme; Pairet, Silvia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Serrano, Sergi; Florensa, Lourdes; Solé, Francesc; Espinet, Blanca

    2013-05-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Del(11q) and del(17p), routinely studied by conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CGC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have been related to progression and shorter overall survival. Recently, array-based karyotyping has gained acceptance as a high-resolution new tool for detecting genomic imbalances. The aim of the present study was to compare genomic arrays with CGC and FISH to ascertain whether the current techniques could be substituted in routine procedures. We analyzed 70 patients with CLL using the Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7M Array and CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix), CGC and FISH with the classical CLL panel. Whereas 31.4% and 68.6% of patients presented abnormalities when studied by CGC and FISH, respectively, these rates increased when arrays were also analyzed (78.6% and 80%). Although abnormality detection is higher when arrays are applied, one case with del(11q) and three with del(17p) were missed by genomic arrays due to their limited sensitivity. We consider that the complete substitution of CGC and FISH by genomic arrays in routine laboratories could negatively affect the management of some patients harboring 11q or 17p deletions. In conclusion, genomic arrays are valid to detect known and novel genomic imbalances in CLL, but should be maintained as a complementary tool to the current techniques.

  11. Diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement in cytological samples through a fluorescence in situ hybridization-based assay: Cytological smears versus cell blocks.

    PubMed

    Zito Marino, Federica; Rossi, Giulio; Brunelli, Matteo; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Liguori, Giuseppina; Bogina, Giuseppe; Morabito, Alessandro; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2017-02-14

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) status analysis of lung cytological specimens should be successfully encouraged in routine practice because biopsy specimens are not always available. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as diagnostic tests for identifying ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with crizotinib. Although ALK IHC is an optimal diagnostic tool, FISH becomes mandatory in equivocal cases. ALK FISH of paraffin-embedded tissue material is still the gold standard, whereas the cytological specimen assay has not yet been completely standardized. Many controversial data have been reported on the adequacy of cytology cell blocks (CBs) versus conventional smears for FISH testing. This review discusses some critical issues related to ALK FISH of cytological samples, including the triaging of collected specimens to optimize the material, the use of CBs versus conventional smears, and alternative methods for an ALK rearrangement diagnosis. Conventional smears have the advantages of an immediate evaluation, no probe tissue-related artifactual loss, no fixation-related alterations, and usually sufficient material for an analytic preparation. On the other hand, CBs have several advantages, including the appropriate conservation of the tissue architecture, an absence of problems related to cell overlapping, and the ability to evaluate neoplastic cells in a dark field. Cancer Cytopathol 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Mapping the Distribution of Cysts from the Toxic Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides in Bloom-Prone Estuaries by a Novel Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay.

    PubMed

    Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K; Zhen, Yu; Wallace, Ryan B; Tang, Ying-Zhong; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-12-04

    Cochlodinium polykrikoides is a cosmopolitan dinoflagellate that is notorious for causing fish-killing harmful algal blooms (HABs) across North America and Asia. While recent laboratory and ecosystem studies have definitively demonstrated that Cochlodinium forms resting cysts that may play a key role in the dynamics of its HABs, uncertainties regarding cyst morphology and detection have prohibited even a rudimentary understanding of the distribution of C. polykrikoides cysts in coastal ecosystems. Here, we report on the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay using oligonucleotide probes specific for the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of C. polykrikoides. The LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was used with epifluorescence microscopy and was iteratively refined to maximize the fluorescent reaction with C. polykrikoides and minimize cross-reactivity. The final LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was found to quantitatively recover cysts made by North American isolates of C. polykrikoides but not cysts formed by other common cyst-forming dinoflagellates. The method was then applied to identify and map C. polykrikoides cysts across bloom-prone estuaries. Annual cyst and vegetative cell surveys revealed that elevated densities of C. polykrikoides cysts (>100 cm(-3)) during the spring of a given year were spatially consistent with regions of dense blooms the prior summer. The identity of cysts in sediments was confirmed via independent amplification of C. polykrikoides rDNA. This study mapped C. polykrikoides cysts in a natural marine setting and indicates that the excystment of cysts formed by this harmful alga may play a key role in the development of HABs of this species.

  13. Responses to crizotinib in patients with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma who tested immunohistochemistry (IHC)-positive and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-negative

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Mu, Xinlin; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xinming; Li, Junling; Lin, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Although the Ventana immunohistochemistry (IHC) platform for detecting anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) (D5F3) expression was recently approved by the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is still the “gold-standard” method recommended by the US National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline for NSCLC. We evaluated 6 ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients who tested Ventana IHC-positive and FISH-negative and assessed their clinical responses to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Histologic and cytologic specimens from the 6 patients were stained with Ventana anti-ALK(D5F3) rabbit monoclonal primary antibody using the OptiView™ DAB IHC detection kit and OptiView™ amplification kit on a Ventana BenchMark XT processor. In addition, they were also tested by FISH, qRT-PCR, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and RNAscope ISH analysis. All patients received crizotinib treatment and their follow-up clinical data were recorded. The objective response rate achieved with crizotinib therapy was 66.7% (4/6 partial responses and 2/6 stable disease). One patient in whom a new fusion type (EML4->EXOC6B->ALK fusion) was identified obtained a partial response. These findings indicate that patients with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma who test Ventana IHC-positive and FISH-negative may still respond to crizotinib therapy. PMID:27418132

  14. HER2 amplification in gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: correlation of two antibodies using gastric cancer scoring criteria, H score, and digital image analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Radu, Oana M; Foxwell, Tyler; Cieply, Kathleen; Navina, Sarah; Dacic, Sanja; Nason, Katie S; Davison, Jon M

    2012-04-01

    We assessed 103 resected gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas for HER2 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 2 commercial immunohistochemical assays. Of 103, 30 (29%) were FISH-amplified. Both immunohistochemical assays had greater than 95% concordance with FISH. However, as a screening test for FISH amplification, the Ventana Medical Systems (Tucson, AZ) 4B5 antibody demonstrated superior sensitivity (87%) compared with the DAKO (Carpinteria, CA) A0485 (70%). Of the cases, 28 were immunohistochemically 3+ or immunohistochemically 2+/FISH-amplified with the 4B5 assay compared with only 22 cases with the A0485 assay, representing a large potential difference in patient eligibility for anti-HER2 therapy. Cases with low-level FISH amplification (HER2/CEP17, 2.2-4.0) express lower levels of HER2 protein compared with cases with high-level amplification (HER2/CEP17, ≥4.0), raising the possibility of a differential response to anti-HER2 therapy. The H score and digital image analysis may have a limited role in improving HER2 test performance.

  15. XY sex reversal in the wood lemming is associated with deletion of Xp21-23 as revealed by chromosome microdissection and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, W S; Eriksson, L; Fredga, K

    1998-08-01

    In the wood lemming (Myopus schisticolor), XY sex reversal occurs naturally because of the presence of an X chromosome variant designated X*. The two types of X chromosome, X and X*, can be distinguished by G-banding, and analyses have demonstrated complex rearrangements of the short arm of X*. Here, chromosomal microdissection, degenerate oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques have been used to generate and map DNA probes for different parts of the X and X* chromosomes. The results showed that the region of Xp21-23 is deleted from the X* and some of the deleted DNA sequences are homologous to the mouse gamma-satellite. The deletion must be associated with the sex reversal in this species. FISH experiments with dissected probes of X and distal half of Xq provided evidence for presence of homologous sequences between large regions of the X and Y chromosomes, including euchromatic and heterochromatic parts of the sex chromosomes. The findings of this study will be of significance for further cloning of important candidate gene(s) responsible for the XY sex reversal.

  16. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Aneuploidy in 165,330 human sperm; results of two- and three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, X, and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, E.L.; Martin, R.H. |

    1994-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms that affect aneuploidy, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using chromosome-specific centromeric probes, was employed to screen a large population of human sperm for numerical errors. To determine the true rate of disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, two-color FISH was performed, and for the gonosomes, three-color FISH. The use of multiple, differently-colored probes allows one to distingish a true disomic sperm from a diploid cell. For each centromeric probe, a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each of five donors was scored, giving a total count of 165,330 sperm nuclei. The incidence of disomic sperm for the sex chromosomes was significantly increased as compared to the frequency for the autosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=232.3, p<0.001), confirming the results observed in studies of sperm karyotypes and spontaneous abortions. The disomy frequencies for autosomes 1, 12, 15, and 18 were found to be uniform. Inter-donor heterogeneity for disomy frequencies was found to exist for the sex chromosomes and for chromosomes 1 and 15, suggesting significant variation among normal men.

  18. In situ hybridization to somatic chromosomes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dernburg, Abby F

    2011-09-01

    In situ hybridization was originally developed as a technique for visualizing and physically mapping specific sequences on Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes. Hybridization techniques can also be used to localize sequences on smaller, diploid chromosomes, such as condensed mitotic chromosomes. Variations of the method also allow the hybridization of probes to chromosomes within intact cells and tissues, rather than to chromosomes isolated from their cellular context and flattened on slides. This article presents methods for hybridizing fluorescent probes to chromosomes in whole-mount Drosophila tissues. These methods allow the investigation of nuclear organization even at stages where chromosomes are decondensed (as in interphase) or, for other reasons, cannot be discriminated in the light microscope. Consequently, they are useful for addressing a variety of cell biological questions. In addition to enhancing our understanding of somatic chromosome organization, this experimental approach has also revealed interactions among meiotic chromosomes in Drosophila females, which spend much of meiosis in a compact ball called the karyosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) methods can also be used to karyotype individual nuclei using chromosome-specific markers. With appropriate fixation conditions, hybridization to chromosomal DNA can be performed in conjunction with immunostaining, allowing the colocalization of cellular or chromosomal proteins.

  19. [Antibiotic resistance rates of Helicobacter pylori isolates and the comparison of E-test and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods for the detection of clarithromycin resistant strains].

    PubMed

    Bakir Ozbey, Saliha; Ozakin, Cüneyt; Keskin, Murat

    2009-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori which is one of the commonly seen chronic bacterial infections in the world, has been demonstrated to have a relationship with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Current management of H. pylori infection involves the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and any two of amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole in combination. Antibiotic resistance which is in an increasing trend in H. pylori since the recent years, is the main cause of treatment failure. This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility of 31 H. pylori strains to several antibiotics by using E-test method (AB Biodisk, Sweden) and also to detect clarithromycin resistance by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH; SeaFAST, Hungary). The strains were isolated from the gastric biopsy specimens of patients who were admitted to Uludağ University Hospital, Bursa, Turkey with dyspeptic complaints. Clarithromycin, amoxycillin, metronidazole, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin resistance rates were as 41.9%, 3.2%, 41.9%, 3.2% and 45.2%, respectively. Resistance to single antibiotic was detected in 32.2% of the isolates whereas multiresistance was seen in 45.2%. For the hybridization process one probe specific for 16S rRNA and labeled with a fluorescein dye and the other probe specific for the mutations in 23S rRNA and labeled with Cy3 stain were used. Green signalling denoted presence of H. pylori in the specimen and red signalling was associated with clarithromycin resistance. All of the isolates yielded green signalling and the 13 isolates found to be resistant to clarithromycin by E-test, gave red signalling. No difference was detected between the two methods in terms of clarithromycin resistance determination. This was a preliminary study reporting the H. pylori resistance rates in our region, however, further larger scale studies are required for obtaining countrywide data.

  20. Improvements in visualisation and localisation of human papillomavirus DNA in CaSki cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization, laser scanning confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lizard, G; Usson, Y; Chignol, M C; Chardonnet, Y

    1994-07-01

    The visual interpretation and localisation of specific DNA sequences in three dimensions in cell nuclei was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) using CaSki cells containing 600 copies per cell of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA type 16 integrated in cellular DNA. Biotinylated DNA probes were used and DNA-DNA hybrids were revealed by a three-step reaction involving a rabbit anti-biotin antibody, a biotinylated goat anti-rabbit antibody and a streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate complex. The DNA from cell nuclei was counterstained with propidium iodide. With standard fluorescence microscopy, some dense fluorescent spots were seen in the cell nuclei. Similarly, with LSCM, some hybridization spots were observed in the cell nuclei but they were at different levels of the nuclei as shown by successive nuclear sections taken along the z axis. The visualisation of multiple hybridization spots confirmed the presence of multiple integration sites of HPV 16 DNA in CaSki cells. Association of LSCM with three-dimensional reconstructions lead to spatial images of hybridization spots obtained by stacking (x,y) images from consecutive confocal planes. Rotation of the reconstructed cell nuclei around the y axis makes it possible to distinguish closely adjacent spots. The combination of these techniques improves the detection of hybridization spots and may be of interest to further determine whether the HPV DNA is episomal or integrated in infected cells.

  1. Zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of human and Indian muntjac karyotypes (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis) reveals satellite DNA clusters at the margins of conserved syntenic segments.

    PubMed

    Frönicke, L; Scherthan, H

    1997-06-01

    Zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with human whole chromosome-specific paint probes revealed extensive homoeologies between Indian muntjac (2n=6, 7 female, male) and human karyotypes (2n=46). Forty-two conserved syntenic segments, corresponding to all human chromosomes except the Y chromosome, produced a near-complete coverage of the muntjac complement and revealed margins of interspecific segmental homoeology. To test the hypothesis that interstitial satellite DNA loci, illuminated by a Chinese muntjac C5-satellite probe in Indian muntjac chromosome arms, mark ancestral fusion points (Lin CC, Sasi R, Fan YS, Chen Z-Q (1991) New evidence for tandem chromosome fusions in the karyotypic evolution of the Asian muntjacs. Chromosoma 101: 19-24), we combined Zoo-FISH with C5 satellite mapping. Twenty-six interstitial satellite DNA loci were detected in the haploid Indian muntjac genome and were found to co-localize with the margins of conserved human/Indian muntjac syntenic segments. These results were confirmed by two-colour FISH and are in accordance with the tandem fusion hypothesis for Indian muntjac chromosomes. Furthermore, conserved syntenic segment combinations detected in pig, cattle and Indian muntjac Zoo-FISH maps reveal ancestral artiodactyl chromosomes.

  2. Sister chromatid exchange assessment by chromosome orientation-fluorescence in situ hybridization on the bovine sex chromosomes and autosomes 16 and 26.

    PubMed

    Revay, T; King, W A

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian genome replication and maintenance are intimately coupled with the mechanisms that ensure cohesion between the resultant sister chromatids and the repair of DNA breaks. Although a sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is an error-free swapping of precisely matched and identical DNA strands, repetitive elements adjacent to the break site can act as alternative template sites and an unequal sister chromatid exchange can result, leading to structural variations and copy number change. Here we test the vulnerability for SCEs of the repeat-rich bovine Y chromosome in comparison with X, 16 and 26 chromosomes, using chromosome orientation-fluorescence in situ hybridization. The mean SCE rate of the Y chromosome (0.065 ± 0.029) was similar to that of BTA16 and BTA26 (0.065, 0.055), but was only approximately half of that of the X chromosome (0.142). As the chromosomal length affects the number of SCE events, we adjusted the SCE rates of the Y, 16, and 26 chromosomes to the length of the largest chromosome X resulting in very similar adjusted SCE (SCE(adj)) rates in all categories. Our results - based on 3 independent bulls - show that, although the cattle Y chromosome is a chest full of repeated elements, their presence and the documented activity of repeats in SCE formation does not manifest in significantly higher SCE(adj) rates and suggest the importance of the structural organization of the Y chromosome and the role of alternative mitotic DNA repair mechanisms.

  3. From Environmental Sequences to Morphology: Observation and Characterisation of a Paulinellid Testate Amoeba (Micropyxidiella edaphonis gen. nov. sp. nov. Euglyphida, Paulinellidae) from Soil using Fluorescent in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Sonia-Estelle; Lara, Enrique

    2015-05-01

    High microbial diversity is revealed by environmental DNA surveys. However, nothing is known about the morphology and function of these potentially new organisms. In the course of an environmental soil diversity study, we found for the first time environmental sequences that reveal the presence of Paulinellidae (a mostly marine and marginally freshwater family of euglyphid testate amoebae) in samples of forest litter from different geographic origins. The new sequences form a basal, robust clade in the family. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect the organisms from which these sequences derived. We isolated the cells and documented them with light and scanning electron microscopy. Based on these observations, we described these organisms as Micropyxidiella edaphonis gen. nov. sp. nov. The organisms were very small testate amoebae (generally less than 10μm) with an irregular proteinaceous test. This suggests an unknown diversity in testate amoebae, and calls for extending this type of investigations to other protist groups which are known only as environmental DNA sequences.

  4. 137Cesium-induced chromosome aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization: eight years follow up of the Goiânia radiation accident victims.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A T; Santos, S J; Darroudi, F; Hadjidikova, V; Vermeulen, S; Chatterjee, S; Berg, M; Grigorova, M; Sakamoto-Hojo, E T; Granath, F; Ramalho, A T; Curado, M P

    1998-05-25

    The radiation accident in focus here occurred in a section of Goiânia (Brazil) where more than a hundred individuals were contaminated with 137Cesium on September 1987. In order to estimate the absorbed radiation doses, initial frequencies of dicentrics and rings were determined in 129 victims [A.T. Ramalho, PhD Thesis, Subsidios a tecnica de dosimetria citogenetica gerados a partir da analise de resultados obtidos com o acidente radiologico de Goiânia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1992]. We have followed some of these victims cytogenetically over the years seeking for parameters that could be used as basis for retrospective radiation dosimetry. Our data on translocation frequencies obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) could be directly compared to the baseline frequencies of dicentrics available for those same victims. Our results provided valuable information on how precise these estimates are. The frequencies of translocations observed years after the radiation exposure were two to three times lower than the initial dicentrics frequencies, the differences being larger at higher doses (>1 Gy). The accuracy of such dose estimates might be increased by scoring sufficient amount of cells. However, factors such as the persistence of translocation carrying lymphocytes, translocation levels not proportional to chromosome size, and inter-individual variation reduce the precision of these estimates.

  5. Mapping of the Gene for the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, hTERT, to Chromosome 5p15.33 by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization1

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, Lisa A; Morrison, Norma; Hoare, Stacey F; Muir, Sharon; Keith, W Nicol

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Telomerase, the enzyme that maintains the ends of chromosomes, is absent from the majority of somatic cells but is present and active in most tumours. The gene for the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase (hTERT) has recently been identified. A cDNA clone of this gene was used as a probe to identify three genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, one of which was used as a probe to map hTERT by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosome 5p15.33. This BAC probe was further used to look at copy number of the hTERT region in immortal cell lines. We found that 10/15 immortal cell lines had a modal copy number of 3 or more per cell, with one cell line (CaSki) having a modal copy number of 11. This suggests that increases in copy number of the hTERT gene region do occur, and may well be one route to upregulating telomerase levels in tumour cells. 5p15 gains and amplifications have been documented for various tumour types, including non-small cell lung carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck, and uterine cervix cancer, making hTERT a potential target. PMID:10935505

  6. Institutional quality assurance for breast cancer HER2 immunohistochemical testing: identification of outlier results and impact of simultaneous fluorescence in situ hybridization cotesting.

    PubMed

    Green, Ian F; Zynger, Debra L

    2015-12-01

    The College of American Pathologists Accreditation Checklist requires comparison of laboratory predictive results with published benchmarks but does not require analysis of individual pathologists. With the availability of targeted human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein therapy, uniform reporting of HER2 protein status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is essential. Our aim was to compare HER2 IHC results among pathologists in routine clinical practice within a single institution and assess the impact of simultaneous IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ordering. We reviewed reports from 928 consecutive breast needle biopsies from 2008 to 2012 at a tertiary academic medical center in which HER2 IHC and HER2 FISH were ordered. There was a significant association between breast pathologist and IHC result (negative, 49.8%-83.2%; positive, 8.7%-14.1%; equivocal, 5.2%-41.5%; P < .0001) but not breast pathologist and FISH result (P = .69). For 1 pathologist, IHC signed out with FISH had an equivocal rate nearly 2-fold lower than IHC results that were reported first (10.5% versus 20.9%) (P = .04). Institutions should be aware that although overall HER2 IHC reporting may be consistent with guidelines, there can be significant variation among practitioners. In addition to aggregate data, we recommend comparing the rates from individual pathologists to standards. Furthermore, routine simultaneous ordering of both IHC and FISH could impact interpretation of test results and may inappropriately encourage less confidence in IHC results among pathologists.

  7. Comparison of high resolution chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the laboratory evaluation of Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delach, J.A.; Rosengren, S.S.; Kaplan, L.; Greenstein, R.M.; Cassidy, S.B.; Benn, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    The development of probes containing segments of DNA from chromosome region 15q11-q13 provides the opportunity to confirm the diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have evaluated FISH studies and high resolution chromosome banding studies in 14 patients referred to confirm or rule out AS. In four patients (three from the PWS category and 1 from the AS group) chromosome analysis suggested that a deletion was present but FISH failed to confirm the finding. In one AS group patient, FISH identified a deletion not detectable by high resolution banding. Review of the clinical findings in the discrepant cases suggested that FISH results were correct and high resolution findings were erroneous. Studies with a chromosome 15 alpha satellite probe (D15Z) on both normal and abnormal individuals suggested that incorrect interpretation of chromosome banding may occasionally be attributable to alpha satellite polymorphism but other variation of 15q11-q13 chromosome bands also contributes to misinterpretation. We conclude that patients who have been reported to have a cytogenetic deletion of 15q11-q13 and who have clinical findings inconsistent with PWS and AS should be re-evaluated by molecular genetic techniques. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Application of ELN cosmid probes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) towards a clinical diagnostic test for Williams syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, M.; Brothman, L.; Leonard, C.

    1994-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by mental deficiency, gregarious personalities, dysmorphic facies, supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS), and idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. Expression of the phenotype is variable. Deletions including an elastin allele (ELN) are thought to be the basis of the connective tissue and vascular abnormalities in WS patients. Patients with WS are hemizygous for ELN, exhibiting a submicroscopic deletion at 7q11.23 detected by FISH. To substantiate the hemizygosity hypothesis and define molecular cytogenetics in patients with familial and sporadic WS, a series of 71 patients were evaluated. EBV-transformed lymphocytes from 48 selected patients were cultured and harvested according to cytogenetic protocol. Cosmids containing ELN were biotinylated and hybridized to metaphase cells by routine procedures. In addition, an alpha-satellite probe for chromosome 7 was included in hybridizations as an internal control. Thirty-one of these 48 patients (65%) showed a deletion in one ELN allele by FISH. Negative patients were shown to be non-affected family members or patients in the {open_quotes}uncertain{close_quotes} category (expressing some, but not all features characteristic of WS). The FISH data were consistent with molecular analyses of ELN deletions. Twenty-three additional patients were referred to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of WS. Nine patients (39%) showed a deletion of ELN by FISH. Correlations between phenotype and FISH results are in progress. These results suggest that a rapid, accurate diagnostic technique for WS using FISH can be implemented in the cytogenetics laboratory as a routine clinical service. Identification of the deletion in patients suspected of having WS will facilitate classification of these patients and improve clinical management.

  9. Frequencies of complex chromosome exchange aberrations induced by 238Pu alpha-particles and detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using single chromosome-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C S; Marsden, S J; Stevens, D L; Simpson, P; Savage, J R

    1995-04-01

    We undertook an analysis of chromosome-type exchange aberrations induced by alpha-particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome-specific probes for human chromosomes 1 or 4, together with a pan-centromeric probe. Contact-inhibited primary human fibroblasts (in G1) were irradiated with 0.41-1.00 Gy 238Pu alpha-particles and aberrations were analysed at the next mitosis following a single chromosome paint. Exchange and aberration painting patterns were classified according to Savage and Simpson (1994a). Of exchange aberrations, 38-47% were found to be complex derived, i.e. resulting from three or more breaks in two or more chromosomes, and the variation with dose was minimal. The class of complex aberrations most frequently observed were insertions, derived from a minimum of three breaks in two chromosomes. There was also an elevated frequency of rings. The high level of complex aberrations observed after alpha-particle irradiation indicates that, when chromosome domains are traversed by high linear energy transfer alpha-particle tracks, there is an enhanced probability of production of multiple localized double-strand breaks leading to more complicated interactions.

  10. Open L-lactic acid fermentation of food refuse using thermophilic Bacillus coagulans and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of microflora.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Ezaki, Yutaka

    2006-06-01

    In the production of commercially useful poly-L-lactic acid plastic from biomass wastes, a feasible fermentation process to produce optically active L-lactic acid would be required. Here, model kitchen refuse (MKR) was inoculated with Bacillus coagulans NBRC12583 under nonsterilized openculture conditions. At temperatures below 45 degrees C, a racemic mixture of D- and L-lactic acids was accumulated, whereas only L-lactic acid was selectively accumulated by incubation at 50-65 degrees C. At 45 degrees C, the results of fermentation could not be consistently reproduced. To analyze microflora in this type of mixed culture system, whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for B. coagulans, Bcoa191, and LAC722(L), a group-specific probe for a wide range of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria was applied. The dominancy of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria at lower temperatures, and that of B. coagulans at higher temperatures were confirmed. By using a saccharified liquid of collected kitchen refuse, 86 g/l of L-lactic acid was accumulated under nonsterile conditions by a 5-d incubation at 55 degrees C, pH 6.5, with 53% carbon yield and 97% optical purity. To conclude, high temperature open lactic acid fermentation is a simple and promising method for producing high-grade L-lactic acid from biomass waste, and FISH analysis of such mixed-culture systems is helpful for monitoring the microflora in these cultures.

  11. Doing more with less: fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene sequencing assays can be reliably performed on archival stained tumor tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Perrone, Federica; Tamborini, Elena; Fabbri, Alessandra; Testi, Maria Adele; Busico, Adele; Settanni, Giulio; Picciani, Benedetta; Bovio, Enrica; Sonzogni, Angelica; Valeri, Barbara; Garassino, Marina; De Braud, Filippo; Pastorino, Ugo

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about molecular testing on tumor tissue retrieved from stained sections, for which there may be a clinical need. We retrospectively analyzed 112 sections from 56 tumor patients using either fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with different probes (19 sections from 17 patients) or Sanger or targeted next generation sequencing for detection of BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, C-KIT, and TP53 mutations (93 sections from 39 patients). Tumor tissue sections had been stained by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) (42 sections) or by immunohistochemistry for cytoplasmic or nuclear/nuclear-cytoplasmic markers (70 sections) with a peroxidase (P-IHC, with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as chromogen) or alkaline phosphatase label (AP-IHC, with Warp Red™ as chromogen). For FISH analysis, the concordance rate between the original diagnosis and that obtained on H&E- or P-IHC-stained tissue sections (AP-IHC was not on record for this set of patients) was 95% (18 out of 19 tumor sections). Only one tumor sample, diffusely positive for MLH1, did not yield any nuclear hybridization signal. For sequencing analysis, the concordance rate was 100% on negative P-IHC and positive AP-IHC-stained sections, regardless of the subcellular localization of the reaction product. Mutations were detected in only 52% of cases expressing nuclear/nuclear-cytoplasmic markers, regardless of the sequencing technology used (p = 0.0002). In conclusion, stained sections may be a valuable resource for FISH or sequencing analysis, but on cases expressing nuclear markers sequencing results need to be interpreted cautiously.

  12. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  13. High concordance between HercepTest immunohistochemistry and ERBB2 fluorescence in situ hybridization before and after implementation of American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathology 2007 guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Lluri, Maria E; Moatamed, Neda A; Hong, Elizabeth; Apple, Sophia K

    2012-10-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, ERBB2) is an important critical predictive marker in patients with invasive breast cancer. It is thus imperative to ensure accuracy and precision in HER2 and ERBB2 testing. In 2007, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) proposed new guidelines for immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in-situ hybridization scoring in an effort to improve accuracy and utility of these companion diagnostic tests. The goal of the 2007 guidelines was to improve concordance rates between the diagnostic tests and decrease the number of inconclusive cases. This study examines the impact in concordance rates and number of inconclusive cases based on the recent change in guidelines in a large study cohort. HER2 immunohistochemistry and ERBB2 fluorescence in-situ hybridization were performed on all specimens from our facility from years 2003 through 2010 (n=1437). Cases from 2003-2007 (n=1016) were scored using Food and Drug Administration guidelines, with immunohistochemical 3+ cases staining >10% of tumor cells and fluorescence in-situ hybridization amplification cutoff value of 2.0. The 2007 guidelines were implemented and scored accordingly for cases from 2008-2010 (n=421), with immunohistochemical 3+ cases staining >30% of tumor cells and fluorescence in-situ hybridization amplification cutoff value of 2.2. We compared concordance rates before and after 2007 guidelines. For the 2003-2007 study population, the concordance rate between the assays was 97.6% with a corresponding kappa coefficient (k) of 0.90. For the 2008-2010 study population, concordance rate was 97.6% with a corresponding k of 0.89. There was no significant difference in number of inconclusive rates before and after 2007 guidelines. In our study, implementation of the new ASCO/CAP 2007 HER2 guidelines did not show a significant difference in concordance rates and did not decrease the number of inconclusive cases.

  14. The human gene for xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G (XPG) maps to 13q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, S.; Corlet, J.; Scherly, D.; Clarkson, S.G. ); Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D. ); Wood, R.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Recently, a human cDNA was isolated that restores normal levels of UV resistance and DNA repair synthesis when expressed in vivo in a lymphoblastoid cell line representing XP group G. The XP-G complementing gene (XPG) generates an mRNA of [approximately]4 kb and encodes a protein (XPGC) with homology to the RAD2 DNA repair protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One hundred twenty nanograms of labeled probe was mixed with 2 [mu]g of human C[sub 0]t-1 DNA as a competitor for repetitive elements. Denaturation, dehydration, hybridization, and washing were performed as described. Probe detection was achieved by incubating metaphase spreads sequentially with 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red, 5 [mu]g/ml biotinylated goat anti-avidin antibody, and 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red. R-banding was revealed after incubation with fluorescein-labeled anti-BrdU mouse monoclonal antibody. Chromosomes were counter-stained with 0.06 [mu]g/ml DAPI in Citifluor. Analysis of 40 metaphase spreads showed paired signals on both copies of chromosome 13 at band 13q33. No other paired signals were seen consistently on any other chromosome. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the ALK gene in 2,045 non-small cell lung cancer patients from North-Western Spain (Galicia).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ares, María; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José M; Vázquez-Estévez, Sergio; Lázaro-Quintela, Martín; Vázquez-Boquete, Ángel; Afonso-Afonso, Francisco J; Casal-Rubio, Joaquín; González-Piñeiro, Ana L; Rico-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Fírvida-Pérez, José L; Ruíz-Bañobre, Juan; Couso, Elena; Santomé, Lucía; Pérez-Becerra, Raquel; García-Campelo, Rosario; Amenedo, Margarita; Azpitarte-Raposeiras, Cristina; Antúnez, José; Abdulkader, Ihab

    2016-08-01

    Identification of anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements is a standard diagnostic test in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The current study describes the experience of ALK rearrangement detection of a referral center in the public health care system of Galicia in North-Western Spain. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) patterns of the ALK gene and the clinical and pathological features of these patients are reported. This study is also of interest for comparative purposes due to the relative geographical isolation of the area, which could have contributed to particular genetic features. A total of 2,045 tissue samples from NSCLC patients were collected between October 2010 and July 2015 and tested for ALK rearrangements by FISH. Examination of 1,686 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and 395 cytological samples (306 cell block preparations and 53 cytological smears) was conducted, and any associations between the FISH results and clinicopathological features were assessed. The rate of successful evaluation was marginally higher in tissue samples than in cytological samples (92.9% vs. 84.1%); this difference was not significant. ALK rearrangements were identified in 82 patients(4%): 65 (79.3%) in tissue specimens, 15 (18.3%) in cell block samples and 2 (2.4%) in cytological smears. This genetic translocation appeared to be associated with a non-smoking history, younger age, female gender, stage IV and adenocarcinoma histological type. The findings demonstrate that ALK evaluation by FISH is feasible in tissue and cytological samples. The clinical and pathological features of the ALK-positive series of patients are similar to those previously reported in the literature.

  16. Survival rate of wine-related yeasts during alcoholic fermentation assessed by direct live/dead staining combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Branco, Patrícia; Monteiro, Margarida; Moura, Patrícia; Albergaria, Helena

    2012-08-01

    Real-time detection of microorganisms involved in complex microbial process, such as wine fermentations, and evaluation of their physiological state is crucial to predict whether or not those microbial species will be able to impact the final product. In the present work we used a direct live/dead staining (LDS) procedure combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to simultaneously assess the identity and viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (Hg) during fermentations performed with single and mixed cultures. The population evolution of both yeasts was determined by plating and by LDS combined with species-specific FISH-probes labeled with Fluorescein. Since the FISH method involves the permeabilization of the cell membrane prior to hybridization and that it may influence the free diffusion of PI in and out of the cells, we optimized the concentration of this dye (0.5 μg of PI per 10(6) cells) for minimal diffusion (less than 2%). Fluorescent cells were enumerated by hemocytometry and flow cytometry. Results showed that the survival rate of Sc during mixed cultures was high throughout the entire process (60% of viable cells at the 9th day), while Hg began to die off at the 2nd day, exhibited 98% of dead cells at the 3rd day (45 g/l of ethanol) and became completely unculturable at the 4th day. However, under single culture fermentation the survival rate and culturability of Hg decreased at a much slower pace, exhibiting at the 7th day (67 g/l of ethanol) 8.7×10(4) CFU/ml and 85% of dead cells. Thus, our work demonstrated that the LDS-FISH method is able to simultaneously assess the viability and identity of these wine-related yeast species during alcoholic fermentation in a fast and reliable way. In order to validate PI-staining as a viability marker during alcoholic fermentation, we evaluated the effect of ethanol on the membrane permeability of Sc and Hg cells, as well as their capacity to recover membrane

  17. Visualization of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' cells in the vascular bundle of citrus seed coats with fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Mark E; Sims, Kenneth R; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Achor, Diann S

    2013-06-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is the bacterium implicated as a causal agent of the economically damaging disease of citrus called huanglongbing (HLB). Vertical transmission of the organism through seed to the seedling has not been demonstrated. Previous studies using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays indicated abundant bacterial 16S rRNA sequences in seed coats of citrus seed but the presence of intact bacterial cells was not demonstrated. We used microscopy to verify that intact bacterial cells were present in citrus seed coats. Bacterial cells with the morphology and physical dimensions appropriate for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' were seen in phloem sieve elements in the vascular bundle of grapefruit seed coats using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses utilizing probes complementary to the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' 16S rRNA gene revealed bacterial cells in the vascular tissue of intact seed coats of grapefruit and pummelo and in fragmented vascular bundles excised from grapefruit seed coats. The physical measurements and the morphology of individual bacterial cells were consistent with those ascribed in the literature to 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. No bacterial cells were observed in preparations of seed from fruit from noninfected trees. A small library of clones amplified from seed coats from a noninfected tree using degenerate primers targeting prokaryote 16S rRNA gene sequences contained no 'Ca. L. asiaticus' sequences, whereas 95% of the sequences in a similar library from DNA from seed coats from an infected tree were identified as 'Ca. L. asiaticus', providing molecular genetic corroboration that the bacterial cells observed by TEM and FISH in seed coats from infected trees were 'Ca. L. asiaticus'.

  18. Increased incidence of micronuclei assessed with the micronucleus assay and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in peripheral blood lymphocytes of nurses exposed to nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Lewińska, D; Stepnik, M; Krajewski, W; Arkusz, J; Stańczyk, M; Wrońska-Nofer, T

    2005-03-07

    It has been postulated that exposure to nitrous oxide and halogenated anaesthetics is associated with various adverse health effects such as neurological and reproductive abnormalities or impairment of hepatic functions. In spite of the quite well known genotoxic effects of exposure to nitrous oxide in vivo, the mechanisms of these effects are still not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of micronuclei and to identify the type of chromosomal damage (clastogenic or aneugenic) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of operating-room nurses exposed to nitrous oxide. The study group comprised 46 women working at departments where the concentration of nitrous oxide ranged from 14 to 2308 mg/m3. The control population was composed of 28 women employed in the same hospitals but in non-surgical departments. The clastogenic/aneugenic effect of nitrous oxide was evaluated in lymphocytes using the standard micronucleus (MN) assay in combination with the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with pancentromeric probes. The results show a significant increase of the MN frequency in lymphocytes of exposed nurses compared with the control group (4.36+/-2.23 versus 9.02+/-4.67). The multiple regression analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship (p=0.0009) between MN frequency and exposure status, indicating that the level of exposure was the main factor affecting chromosomal damage. As assessed by FISH analysis, the overall frequencies of centromere-positive MN in the control and exposed groups were 43 and 49%, respectively. The increase observed in the exposed group may suggest a slight, statistically insignificant pro-aneugenic effect of exposure to nitrous oxide.

  19. Comparison of HER2 gene amplification assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and HER2 protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomonori; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Hashizume, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to HER2 protein is widely used in the treatment of patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer and has also been found to exhibit antitumor activity in human gastric cancer cells that overexpress HER2. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HER2 overexpression and concordance between the results for protein expression and gene amplification in both surgical and biopsy specimens of gastric cancer as assessed with two commercial kits, one for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the other for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The specimens consisted of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of biopsy specimens and surgically resected tumors from 200 cases of invasive gastric cancer that had been treated surgically at the National Cancer Center Hospital East. The lesions were analyzed with the IHC kit, and expression was graded by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved grading system. Gene amplification was evaluated by FISH. IHC revealed HER2 overexpression in 46 of the 200 (23%) cases. The FISH assay was technically successful in 199 cases (99.5%), and gene amplification was observed in 54 cases (27.1%). The concordance rate between the results obtained by IHC and FISH was 86.9%. The concordance rate between the findings in the surgically resected tumors and the 200 pre-treatment biopsy specimens was 88.7%. HER2 expression can be assessed in gastric cancer with a commercial kit as previously reported in breast cancer. Even small biopsy specimens were found to be suitable for evaluating gastric cancer for HER2 overexpression.

  20. Detection of Y chromosome sequences in a 45,X/46,XXq - patient by Southern blot analysis of PCR-amplified DNA and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Kocova, M.; Siegel, S.F.; Wenger, S.L.

    1995-02-13

    In some cases of gonadal dysgenesis, cytogenetic analysis seems to be discordant with the phenotype of the patients. We have applied techniques such as Southern blot analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to resolve the phenotype/genotype discrepancy in a patient with ambiguous genitalia in whom the peripheral blood karotype was 45,X. Gonadectomy at age 7 months showed the gonadal tissue to be prepubertal testis on the left side and a streak gonad on the right. The karyotype obtained from the left gonad was 45,X/46,XXq- and that from the right gonad was 45,X. Three different techniques, PCR amplification, FISH, and chromosome painting for X and Y chromosomes, confirmed the presence of Y chromosome sequences. Five different tissues were evaluated. The highest percentage of Y chromosome positive cells were detected in the left gonad, followed by the peripheral blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and buccal mucosa. No Y chromosomal material could be identified in the right gonad. Since the Xq- chromosome is present in the left gonad (testis), it is likely that the Xq- contains Y chromosomal material. Sophisticated analysis in this patient showed that she has at least 2 cell lines, one of which contains Y chromosomal material. These techniques elucidated the molecular basis of the genital ambiguity for this patient. When Y chromosome sequences are present in patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome or gonadal dysgenesis, the risk for gonadal malignancy is significantly increased. Hence, molecular diagnostic methods to ascertain for the presence of Y chromosome sequences may expedite the evaluation of patients with the ambiguous genitalia. 21 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Feasibility of using tissue microarrays for the assessment of HER-2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Lal, Priti; Chen, Beiyun

    2004-12-01

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) have been commonly used to study protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, limited data exist on the validity of using TMAs to study gene amplification. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using breast carcinoma TMAs to study HER-2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, hormonal receptor status (ER and PR) and HER-2 protein overexpression by IHC were also studied, and results were compared with whole tissue sections. FISH for HER-2 was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 114 invasive breast carcinomas both on whole tissue sections and on TMAs containing the same tumors. The TMA was created using 0.6-mm tissue cores with four sampled cores per tumor from the same tissue block used for whole section FISH. The PathVysion HER-2 probe kit was used for the FISH analysis. A ratio of HER-2:Chromosome17 > or =2.0 was interpreted as positive for gene amplification. The ER or PR was interpreted as positive when nuclear staining was detected in more than 10% of tumor cells. The HER-2 IHC (HercepTest; DAKO Corp, Carpinteria, CA) results were interpreted as 0, 1+, 2+, and 3+ according to standard criteria. The FISH results in the TMA and whole sections were concordant in 99 out of 101 successfully analyzed cases (99%). The FISH scores were consistent among the two to four cores in the majority of the cases. ER and PR results were concordant between whole sections and TMA cores in 97% (107/110) and 89% (97/109) cases, respectively. The overall concordance for HER-2 status by IHC between whole sections and TMA cores was 86% (94 out of 109 cases). TMAs are a reliable approach to study HER-2 gene amplification in a high throughput manner.

  2. [Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method in the identifi cation of Candida species isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Gonca; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa Altay

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, increased number of patients who are hospitalized in intensive care units, received immunosuppressive therapy and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that can lead an increase in the incidence of systemic candidiasis. In these patients, the most common clinical manifestation is candidemia. Since the identification of Candida species isolated from blood cultures is time consuming by conventional (morphological and biochemical) methods, rapid, reliable and accurate methods are needed. For this purpose novel systems have been developed to identify the agent directly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method for the identification of Candida species by comparing with the conventional methods. A total of 50 patients who were admitted to Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospital clinics and followed with prediagnosis of systemic fungal infections whose blood cultures were positive for the yeasts between July 2011 and July 2012 were included in the study. The conventional identification of Candida isolates was performed by considering macroscopic and microscopic morphology, germ tube test, cycloheximide sensitivity, urease activity and carbohydrate assimilation patterns with API 20C AUX (bioMerieux, France) test. PNA FISH method was conducted by the use of a commercial kit namely Yeast Traffic Light(®) PNA FISH (AdvanDx, USA). According to morphological and biochemical characteristics (conventional methods), 19 (38%) out of 50 Candida isolates were identified as C.albicans, 12 (24%) as C.glabrata, five (10%) as C.parapsilosis, five (10%) as C.kefyr, four (8%) as C.krusei, two (4%) as C.guilliermondii, two (4%) as C.tropicalis and one (2%) as C.lusitaniae. On the other hand, 24 (48%) of the isolates were identified as C.albicans/C.parapsilosis (with green fluorescence), 16 (32%) as C.glabrata/C.krusei (with red fluorescence) and one (%2) as C.tropicalis (with yellow

  3. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.; Giorgi, D.

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  4. High fluorescence in situ hybridization percentage of deletion 11q in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an independent predictor of adverse outcome.

    PubMed

    Jain, Preetesh; Keating, Michael; Thompson, Phillip A; Trinh, Long; Wang, Xuemei; Wierda, William; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Estrov, Zeev; Abruzzo, Lynne; O'Brien, Susan

    2015-06-01

    We have analyzed patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia with del11q fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) abnormality (n = 196) in this study. Detection of the 11q22.3 used a multicolor FISH technique. Patients with del11q fell into two major FISH subsets-sole del11q (n = 64) and del11q with del13q (n = 132). FISH subsets were compared using the median del11q FISH% (>58%, high vs. ≤58%, low). Overall survival (OS) and time to first treatment (TTFT) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier plots (log rank). Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between FISH% of del11q and outcomes. Patients with sole del11q were similar to del11q with del13q in terms of TTFT and OS. Patients with high FISH% of del11q had significantly shorter OS and TTFT as compared with patients with low FISH%, particularly in sole del11q; this negative impact of high FISH% of del11q on OS and TTFT was diminished with coexistent del13q. In multivariate analysis, high FISH% of del11q was a significant predictor for shorter OS and TTFT. A comparison of these del11q subsets with a separate cohort of (n = 673) previously untreated patients with sole del13q showed that the high FISH% del11q cohort had a significantly shorter TTFT and OS. In addition, bulky disease by physical examination or computed tomography imaging was infrequent at presentation in patients with del11q. High FISH% of del11q can reliably discriminate higher risk patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Presence of coexistent del13q should be accounted for while prognosticating patients with del11q.

  5. High fluorescence in situ hybridization percentage of deletion 11q in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an independent predictor of adverse outcome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Preetesh; Keating, Michael; Thompson, Phillip A.; Trinh, Long; Wang, Xuemei; Wierda, William; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Estrov, Zeev; Abruzzo, Lynne; O’Brien, Susan

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia with del11q fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) abnormality (n = 196) in this study. Detection of the 11q22.3 used a multicolor FISH technique. Patients with del11q fell into two major FISH subsets—sole del11q (n = 64) and del11q with del13q (n = 132). FISH subsets were compared using the median del11q FISH% (>58%, high vs. ≤58%, low). Overall survival (OS) and time to first treatment (TTFT) were estimated using Kaplan–Meier plots (log rank). Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between FISH% of del11q and outcomes. Patients with sole del11q were similar to del11q with del13q in terms of TTFT and OS. Patients with high FISH% of del11q had significantly shorter OS and TTFT as compared with patients with low FISH%, particularly in sole del11q; this negative impact of high FISH% of del11q on OS and TTFT was diminished with coexistent del13q. In multivariate analysis, high FISH% of del11q was a significant predictor for shorter OS and TTFT. A comparison of these del11q subsets with a separate cohort of (n = 673) previously untreated patients with sole del13q showed that the high FISH% del11q cohort had a significantly shorter TTFT and OS. In addition, bulky disease by physical examination or computed tomography imaging was infrequent at presentation in patients with del11q. High FISH% of del11q can reliably discriminate higher risk patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Presence of coexistent del13q should be accounted for while prognosticating patients with del11q. PMID:25683856

  6. In prostate cancer needle biopsies, detections of PTEN loss by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) are concordant and show consistent association with upgrading.

    PubMed

    Picanço-Albuquerque, C G; Morais, C L; Carvalho, F L F; Peskoe, S B; Hicks, J L; Ludkovski, O; Vidotto, T; Fedor, H; Humphreys, E; Han, M; Platz, E A; De Marzo, A M; Berman, D M; Lotan, T L; Squire, J A

    2016-05-01

    The prognostic value of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss in prostate cancer has primarily been evaluated by either fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or immunohistochemistry (IHC). Previously, we found that PTEN loss by IHC was associated with increased risk of upgrading from biopsy (Gleason 3 + 3) to prostatectomy (Gleason 7+). Now, using an evaluable subset of 111 patients with adjacent biopsy sections, we analyzed the association between PTEN deletion in cancer and the odds of upgrading by a highly sensitive and specific four-color FISH assay. We also compared the concordance of PTEN loss by IHC and PTEN deletion by FISH. PTEN deletion was found in 27 % (12/45) of upgraded cases compared with 11 % (7/66) of controls (P = 0.03). Cancers with PTEN deletions were more likely to be upgraded than those without deletions (adjusting for age odds ratio = 3.40, 95 % confidence interval 1.14-10.11). With respect to concordance, of 93 biopsies with PTEN protein detected by IHC, 89 (96 %) had no PTEN deletion by FISH, and of 18 biopsies without PTEN protein by IHC, 15 had homozygous or hemizygous PTEN deletion by FISH. Only 4 biopsies of the 93 (4 %) with PTEN protein intact had PTEN deletion by FISH. When the regions of uncertainty in these biopsies were systematically studied by FISH, intra-tumoral variation of PTEN deletion was found, which could account for variation in immunoreactivity. Thus, FISH provides a different approach to determining PTEN loss when IHC is uncertain. Both FISH and IHC are concordant, showing consistent positive associations between PTEN loss and upgrading.

  7. A novel four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization assay for the detection of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaoyu; Randhawa, Grace; Friedman, Cynthia; O'Hara-Larrivee, Siobhan; Kroeger, Kathleen; Dumpit, Ruth; True, Larry; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Porter, Christopher; Vessella, Robert; Nelson, Peter; Fang, Min

    2013-01-01

    Since the identification of the TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement as the most common fusion event in prostate cancer, various methods have been developed to detect this rearrangement and to study its prognostic significance. We report a novel four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that detects not only the typical TMPRSS2-ERG fusion but also alternative rearrangements of the TMPRSS2 or ERG gene. We validated this assay on fresh, frozen, or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate cancer specimens, including cell lines, primary prostate cancer tissues, xenograft tissues derived from metastatic prostate cancer, and metastatic tissues from castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. When compared with either reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction or the Gen-Probe method as the technical reference, analysis using the four-color FISH assay demonstrated an analytical sensitivity of 94.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-0.99) and specificity of 100% (95% CI 0.89-1.00) for detecting the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion was detected in 41% and 43% of primary prostate cancer (n = 59) and CRPC tumors (n = 82), respectively. Rearrangements other than the typical TMPRSS2-ERG fusion were confirmed by karyotype analysis and found in 7% of primary cancer and 13% of CRPC tumors. Successful karyotype analyses are reported for the first time on four of the xenograft samples, complementing the FISH results. Analysis using the four-color FISH assay provides sensitive detection of TMPRSS2 and ERG gene rearrangements in prostate cancer.

  8. BAP1 immunohistochemistry has limited prognostic utility as a complement of CDKN2A (p16) fluorescence in situ hybridization in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    M McGregor, Stephanie; McElherne, James; Minor, Agata; Keller-Ramey, Jennifer; Dunning, Ryan; Husain, Aliya N; Vigneswaran, Wickii; Fitzpatrick, Carrie; Krausz, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    BRCA-associated protein 1 (BAP1) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and CDKN2A (p16) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have shown clinical utility in confirming the diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), but the role for using these 2 markers to guide clinical management is not yet clear. Although p16 loss is predictive of poor prognosis, there is controversy as to whether BAP1 loss is predictive of a more favorable prognosis; how these results interact with one another has not been explored. We performed CDKN2A FISH on a previously published tissue microarray on which we had performed BAP1 IHC, revealing combined BAP1/p16 status for 93 MPM cases. As expected, BAP1 IHC in combination with CDKN2A FISH resulted in high sensitivity (84%) and specificity (100%) for MPM, and p16 loss was an independent predictor of poor survival (hazard ratio, 2.2553; P = .0135). There was no association between BAP1 loss and p16 loss, as 26%, 28%, 30%, and 16% of overall cases demonstrated loss of BAP1 alone, loss of p16 alone, loss of both BAP1 and p16, or neither abnormality, respectively. Although multivariate analysis demonstrated that BAP1 IHC is not an independent predictor of prognosis, when viewed in combination with homozygous CDKN2A deletion, risk stratification was evident. More specifically, patients with CDKN2A disomy and loss of BAP1 expression had improved outcomes compared with those with CDKN2A disomy and retained BAP1 expression (hazard ratio, 0.2286; P = .0017), and this finding was notably evident among epithelioid cases. We conclude that BAP1 IHC provides prognostic information within the context of CDKN2A FISH that may have clinical utility beyond diagnosis.

  9. Identification of a microdeletion at 7q21.3 with fluorescence in situ hybridization in a patient with split hand/split foot (ectrodactyly)

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, L.; Massa, H.; Disteche, C.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF), often referred to as ectrodactyly or lobster claw deformity, is a human developmental disorder characterized by a deep median cleft of the hands and feet, missing digits, and fusion of remaining digits. This anomaly can be seen alone, frequently autosomal dominant, or in association with other abnormalities. One locus for this defect has been localized to chromosome 7q21.3-q22.1. We report a patient with SHSF plus mental retardation, short stature and dysmorphic features who was found to have a microdeletion at this locus detected only with the aid of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). T.H. is a 7 y.o. male who was referred for evaluation of foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. History was remarkable for growth retardation of postnatal onset and hypotonia. Renal ultrasound and audiology evaluation were normal. Physical exam revealed dysplastic ears, micrognathia, long philtrum, high narrow palate, and malformations of the feet consistent with SHSF. Family history was negative for limb abnormalities and mental retardation. A number of patients with SHSF and other anomalies have been found to have deletions involving chromosome 7q21-q22; therefore, high resolution chromosome analysis was performed in T.H. but was inconclusive. Cosmids and yeast artificial chromosomes which we had previously mapped to the SHSF critical region were used as FISH probes and a microdeletion was detected. We were thus able to determine the etiology of this child`s abnormalities and provide accurate genetic counseling, which would not have been possible with standard cytogenetic techniques. This technique also allowed us to further refine the SHSF critical region. This case illustrates the utility of FISH for the rapid identification of suspect microdeletions in SHSF. This approach should also be useful as an expeditious way of defining the critical regions for the location of genes which give rise to other developmental malformations.

  10. Influence of phosphate and disinfection on the composition of biofilms produced from drinking water, as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Batté, M; Mathieu, L; Laurent, P; Prévost, M

    2003-12-01

    Biofilms were grown in annular reactors supplied with drinking water enriched with 235 microg C/L. Changes in the biofilms with ageing, disinfection, and phosphate treatment were monitored using fluorescence in situ hybridization. EUB338, BET42a, GAM42a, and ALF1b probes were used to target most bacteria and the alpha (alpha), beta (beta), and gamma (gamma) subclasses of Proteobacteria, respectively. The stability of biofilm composition was checked after the onset of colonization between T = 42 days and T = 113 days. From 56.0% to 75.9% of the cells detected through total direct counts with DAPI (4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) were also detected with the EUB338 probe, which targets the 16S rRNA of most bacteria. Among these cells, 16.9%-24.7% were targeted with the BET42a probe, 1.8%-18.3% with the ALF1b probe, and <2.5% with the GAM42a probe. Phosphate treatment induced a significant enhancement to the proportion of gamma-Proteobacteria (detected with the GAM42a probe), a group that contains many health-related bacteria. Disinfection with monochloramine for 1 month or chlorine for 3 days induced a reduction in the percentage of DAPI-stained cells that hybridized with the EUB338 probe (as expressed by percentages of EUB338 counts/DAPI) and with any of the ALF1b, BET42a, and GAM42a probes. The percentage of cells detected by any of the three probes (ALF1b+BET42a+GAM42a) tended to decrease, and reached in total less than 30% of the EUB338-hybridized cells. Disinfection with chlorine for 7 days induced a reverse shift; an increase in the percentage of EUB338 counts targeted by any of these three probes was noted, which reached up to 87%. However, it should be noted that the global bacterial densities (heterotrophic plate counts and total direct counts) tended to decrease over the duration of the experiment. Therefore, those bacteria that could be considered to resist 7 days of chlorination constituted a small part of the initial biofilm community, up to the point at

  11. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of meiotic chromosome segregation in a 47,XYY male and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Martin, R H

    2000-07-03

    The frequencies of aneuploid and diploid sperm were determined in a 47,XYY male using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and compared with those from 10 control donors. A total of 30,078 sperm from the patient was scored, 15,044 by two-color FISH for chromosomes 13 and 21, and 15,034 by three-color FISH for the sex chromosomes using chromosome 1 as an internal autosomal control for diploidy and lack of hybridization. The frequencies of X-bearing (49.73%) and Y-bearing sperm (49.46%) in control males were not significantly different from the expected 50% (chi(2)-test for goodness of fit). The ratio of 24,X (50.60%) to 24, Y sperm (48.35%) in the patient, however, was significantly different from the controls (P = 0.0144, chi(2)-test for independence) and from the expected 1:1 ratio (P = 0.0055, chi(2)-test for goodness of fit). There was no significant increase in the frequency of diploid sperm when compared with the controls (chi(2)-test for independence). Significantly increased frequencies were found for 24,YY (0.07% vs. 0.02%, P = 0.0009) and 24,XY (0.44% vs. 0.29%, P = 0.0025), but not for 24,XX (0.05% vs. 0.05%, P > 0. 05), 24,+13 (0.07% vs. 0.07%, P > 0.05) or 24,+21 sperm (0.21% vs. 0. 18%, P > 0.05) in the 47,XYY male when compared with control donors (chi(2)-test for independence). Our results support the theory that loss of the extra Y chromosome occurs during spermatogenesis in most cells. In this XYY patient there was a significant increase in the frequency of sperm with sex chromosomal abnormalities but no suggestion of an inter-chromosomal effect on autosomes. All 3-color FISH studies in the literature demonstrate a significantly increased risk of gonosomal aneuploidy in XYY males, with the risk being on the order of 1%.

  12. Usefulness of p16/CDKN2A fluorescence in situ hybridization and BAP1 immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of biphasic mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Yusa, Toshikazu; Ozaki, Daisuke; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Shinji; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Sato, Ayuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Yamakawa, Hisami; Tada, Yuji; Shimada, Hideaki; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2017-02-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a highly aggressive neoplasm, and the histologic subtype is one of the most reliable prognostic factors. Some biphasic mesotheliomas are difficult to distinguish from epithelioid mesotheliomas with atypical fibrous stroma. The aim of this study was to analyze p16/CDKN2A deletions in mesotheliomas by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and BAP1 immunohistochemistry to evaluate their potential role in the diagnosis of biphasic mesothelioma. We collected 38 cases of pleural mesotheliomas. The results of this study clearly distinguished 29 cases of biphasic mesothelioma from 9 cases of epithelioid mesothelioma. The proportion of biphasic mesotheliomas with homozygous deletions of p16/CDKN2A in total was 96.6% (28/29). Homozygous deletion of p16/CDKN2A was observed in 18 (94.7%) of 19 biphasic mesotheliomas with 100% concordance of the p16/CDKN2A deletion status between the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components in each case. Homozygous deletion of the p16/CDKN2A was observed in 7 (77.8%) of 9 epithelioid mesotheliomas but not in fibrous stroma. BAP1 loss was observed in 5 (38.5%) of 13 biphasic mesotheliomas and in both epithelioid and sarcomatoid components. BAP1 loss was observed in 5 (62.5%) of 8 epithelioid mesotheliomas but not in fibrous stroma. Homozygous deletion of p16/CDKN2A is common in biphasic mesotheliomas, and the analysis of only one component of mesothelioma is sufficient to show that the tumor is malignant. However, compared with histology alone, FISH analysis of the p16/CDKN2A status and BAP1 immunohistochemistry in the spindled mesothelium provide a more objective means to differentiate between biphasic mesothelioma and epithelioid mesothelioma with atypical stromal cells.

  13. Investigation of an acetate-fed denitrifying microbial community by stable isotope probing, full-cycle rRNA analysis, and fluorescent in situ hybridization-microautoradiography.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Keller, Jürg; Blackall, Linda L

    2005-12-01

    The acetate-utilizing microbial consortium in a full-scale activated sludge process was investigated without prior enrichment using stable isotope probing (SIP). [13C]acetate was used in SIP to label the DNA of the denitrifiers. The [13C]DNA fraction that was extracted was subjected to a full-cycle rRNA analysis. The dominant 16S rRNA gene phylotypes in the 13C library were closely related to the bacterial families Comamonadaceae and Rhodocyclaceae in the class Betaproteobacteria. Seven oligonucleotide probes for use in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were designed to specifically target these clones. Application of these probes to the sludge of a continuously fed denitrifying sequencing batch reactor (CFDSBR) operated for 16 days revealed that there was a significant positive correlation between the CFDSBR denitrification rate and the relative abundance of all probe-targeted bacteria in the CFDSBR community. FISH-microautoradiography demonstrated that the DEN581 and DEN124 probe-targeted cells that dominated the CFDSBR were capable of taking up [14C]acetate under anoxic conditions. Initially, DEN444 and DEN1454 probe-targeted bacteria also dominated the CFDSBR biomass, but eventually DEN581 and DEN124 probe-targeted bacteria were the dominant bacterial groups. All probe-targeted bacteria assessed in this study were denitrifiers capable of utilizing acetate as a source of carbon. The rapid increase in the number of organisms positively correlated with the immediate increase in denitrification rates observed by plant operators when acetate is used as an external source of carbon to enhance denitrification. We suggest that the impact of bacteria on activated sludge subjected to intermittent acetate supplementation should be assessed prior to the widespread use of acetate in the wastewater industry to enhance denitrification.

  14. Skin Barrier Function Is Not Impaired and Kallikrein 7 Gene Polymorphism Is Frequently Observed in Korean X-linked Ichthyosis Patients Diagnosed by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Noo Ri; Yoon, Na Young; Jung, Minyoung; Kim, Ji-Yun; Seo, Seong Jun; Wang, Hye-Young; Lee, Hyeyoung; Sohn, Young Bae; Choi, Eung Ho

    2016-08-01

    X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a recessively inherited ichthyosis. Skin barrier function of XLI patients reported in Western countries presented minimally abnormal or normal. Here, we evaluated the skin barrier properties and a skin barrier-related gene mutation in 16 Korean XLI patients who were diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Skin barrier properties were measured, cytokine expression levels in the stratum corneum (SC) were evaluated with the tape stripped specimen from skin surface, and a genetic test was done on blood. XLI patients showed significantly lower SC hydration, but normal basal trans-epidermal water loss and skin surface pH as compared to a healthy control group. Histopathology of ichthyosis epidermis showed no acanthosis, and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the corneal layer did not differ between control and lesional/non-lesional skin of XLI patients. Among the mutations in filaggrin (FLG), kallikrein 7 (KLK7), and SPINK5 genes, the prevalence of KLK7 gene mutations was significantly higher in XLI patients (50%) than in controls (0%), whereas FLG and SPINK5 prevalence was comparable. Korean XLI patients exhibited unimpaired skin barrier function and frequent association with the KLK7 gene polymorphism, which may differentiate them from Western XLI patients.

  15. Skin Barrier Function Is Not Impaired and Kallikrein 7 Gene Polymorphism Is Frequently Observed in Korean X-linked Ichthyosis Patients Diagnosed by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a recessively inherited ichthyosis. Skin barrier function of XLI patients reported in Western countries presented minimally abnormal or normal. Here, we evaluated the skin barrier properties and a skin barrier-related gene mutation in 16 Korean XLI patients who were diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Skin barrier properties were measured, cytokine expression levels in the stratum corneum (SC) were evaluated with the tape stripped specimen from skin surface, and a genetic test was done on blood. XLI patients showed significantly lower SC hydration, but normal basal trans-epidermal water loss and skin surface pH as compared to a healthy control group. Histopathology of ichthyosis epidermis showed no acanthosis, and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the corneal layer did not differ between control and lesional/non-lesional skin of XLI patients. Among the mutations in filaggrin (FLG), kallikrein 7 (KLK7), and SPINK5 genes, the prevalence of KLK7 gene mutations was significantly higher in XLI patients (50%) than in controls (0%), whereas FLG and SPINK5 prevalence was comparable. Korean XLI patients exhibited unimpaired skin barrier function and frequent association with the KLK7 gene polymorphism, which may differentiate them from Western XLI patients. PMID:27478344

  16. Chromosomal differences between European and North American Atlantic salmon discovered by linkage mapping and supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geographical isolation has generated a distinct difference between Atlantic salmon of European and North American Atlantic origin. The European Atlantic salmon generally has 29 pairs of chromosomes and 74 chromosome arms whereas it has been reported that the North American Atlantic salmon has 27 chromosome pairs and an NF of 72. In order to predict the major chromosomal rearrangements causing these differences, we constructed a dense linkage map for Atlantic salmon of North American origin and compared it with the well-developed map for European Atlantic salmon. Results The presented male and female genetic maps for the North American subspecies of Atlantic salmon, contains 3,662 SNPs located on 27 linkage groups. The total lengths of the female and male linkage maps were 2,153 cM and 968 cM respectively, with males characteristically showing recombination only at the telomeres. We compared these maps with recently published SNP maps from European Atlantic salmon, and predicted three chromosomal reorganization events that we then tested using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. The proposed rearrangements, which define the differences in the karyotypes of the North American Atlantic salmon relative to the European Atlantic salmon, include the translocation of the p arm of ssa01 to ssa23 and polymorphic fusions: ssa26 with ssa28, and ssa08 with ssa29. Conclusions This study identified major chromosomal differences between European and North American Atlantic salmon. However, while gross structural differences were significant, the order of genetic markers at the fine-resolution scale was remarkably conserved. This is a good indication that information from the International Cooperation to Sequence the Atlantic salmon Genome, which is sequencing a European Atlantic salmon, can be transferred to Atlantic salmon from North America. PMID:22928605

  17. High resolution chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients referred for Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-08

    Laboratory testing is helpful in the evaluation of patients suspected to have either Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS) because most of the patients have recognizable cytogenetic deletions of 15q11q13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, identified by molecular genetic techniques, is found in about 20 to 25% of PWS patients. Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 is seen in 2 to 3% of AS patients. Thus, PWS and AS represent the first examples in humans of genetic imprinting or the differential expression of genetic information depending on the parental origin. Herein, I report our experience with FISH and high resolution chromosome analysis in patients referred to confirm or rule out PWS or AS. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Karyotype analysis and visualization of 45S rRNA genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization in aroids (Araceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prabhu Shankar; Van Laere, Katrijn; Eeckhaut, Tom; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis and FISH mapping using 45S rDNA sequences on 6 economically important plant species Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex André, 1877, Monstera deliciosa Liebmann, 1849, Philodendron scandens Koch & Sello, 1853, Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel, 1877, Syngonium auritum (Linnaeus, 1759) Schott, 1829 and Zantedeschia elliottiana (Knight, 1890) Engler, 1915 within the monocotyledonous family Araceae (aroids) were performed. Chromosome numbers varied between 2n=2x=24 and 2n=2x=60 and the chromosome length varied between 15.77 µm and 1.87 µm. No correlation between chromosome numbers and genome sizes was observed for the studied genera. The chromosome formulas contained only metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes, except for Philodendron scandens in which also telocentric and subtelocentric chromosomes were observed. The highest degree of compaction was calculated for Spathiphyllum wallisii (66.49Mbp/µm). B-chromosome-like structures were observed in Anthurium andraeanum. Their measured size was 1.87 times smaller than the length of the shortest chromosome. After FISH experiments, two 45S rDNA sites were observed in 5 genera. Only in Zantedeschia elliottiana, 4 sites were seen. Our results showed clear cytogenetic differences among genera within Araceae, and are the first molecular cytogenetics report for these genera. These chromosome data and molecular cytogenetic information are useful in aroid breeding programmes, systematics and evolutionary studies. PMID:26140158

  19. Karyotypic and fluorescent in situ hybridization study of the centromere of chromosome 7 in secondary myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tanizawa, Roberta Sandra da Silva; Kumeda, Cristina Aiko; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Soares; Leal, Aline de Medeiros; Ferreira, Patrícia de Barros; Velloso, Elvira Deolinda Rodrigues Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Background Secondary myeloid neoplasms comprise a group of secondary diseases following exposure to myelotoxic agents or due to congenital diseases. The improvement of anticancer agents and immunosuppressive drugs seem to be associated with an increased incidence of secondary myeloid neoplasms. Karyotyping of bone marrow is essential for diagnosis and prognosis. Previous use of alkylating agents and radiation are associated with clonal abnormalities such as recurrent unbalanced -5/5q-, -7/7q- and complex karyotypes, whereas topoisomerase-II inhibitors lead to changes such as the balanced 11q23 rearrangement, t(8;21), t(15;17) and inv(16). Objective To study the clinical and cytogenetic data of patients with secondary myeloid neoplasms who took antineoplastic and/or immunosuppressive drugs or progressed from aplastic anemia. Methods The clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of 42 patients diagnosed with secondary myeloid neoplasms in one institution were retrospectively evaluated. Of these, 25, 11 and 6 patients had had oncological diseases, aplastic anemia and other diseases, respectively. Conventional cytogenetic and FISH analyses were performed for monosomy 7. Results The cytogenetic study was conclusive in 32 cases with 84.4% of clonal abnormalities. Monosomy 7 and complex karyotypes were present in 44.4% and 37%, respectively. A high prevalence of unbalanced abnormalities (96.3%) was observed. Monosomy 7 was more prevalent in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes/myeloid neoplasms after aplastic anemia (66.6%). The median survival after diagnosis of myeloid neoplasms was only 5.7 months. Normal cytogenetics was associated to better survival (p-value = 0.03). There was a slightly worse trend of survival for patients with complex karyotypes (p-value = 0.057). Abnormal karyotype was an independent risk factor for poor survival (p-value = 0.012). Conclusion This study enhances the importance of cytogenetic analysis of patients at the time of diagnosis of

  20. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  1. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization-Based Investigations of Individual Doses for Persons Living at Metlino in the Upper Reaches of the Techa River

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Akleyev, A. V.; Jacob, Peter; Ivanov, Denis V.; Wieser, Albrecht; Vorobiova, M. I.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Shved, Valentina A.; Vozilova, Alexandra; Bayankin, Sergey N.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2005-02-01

    Waterborne releases from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949–1956 resulted in significant doses to persons living downstream; the most contaminated village was Metlino about 7 km downstream. Internal and external doses have been estimated for these residents using the Techa River Dosimetry System–2000; the primary purpose is to support epidemiological studies of the members of the Extended Techa River Cohort (ETRC). Efforts to validate the calculations of external and internal dose are considered essential. Two methods used for the validation of external dose are electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. For EPR, 36 measurements on 26 teeth from 16 donors from Metlino were made at the GSF (16 measurements) and the IMP (20 measurements); the correlation between measurements made at the two laboratories has been found to be 0.99. Background measurements were also made on 218 teeth (63 molars, 128 premolars, and 27 incisors). FISH measurements were made for 31 residents of Metlino at the GSF. These measurements were handicapped by the analysis of a limited number of cells; for several individuals no stable translocations were observed. FISH measurements were also made for 39 individuals believed to be unexposed. The majority of EPR-measurement results fell within the range of 70 to 2700 mGy (including background). The results of FISH-based measurements fell within the range of nondetectable to 2 Gy (background subtracted). The results of individual measurements using EPR and FISH methods were generally consistent with each other and with results of other assays, including thermoluminescent measurements of quartz extracted from bricks taken from old buildings. Results were also consistent with those estimated with the TRDS-2000. Thus, the limited sets of data currently available tend to validate the present

  2. Cytogenetic features of 5q deletion and 5q- syndrome in myelodysplastic syndrome in Korea; marker chromosomes proved to be chromosome 5 with interstitial deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ryun; Oh, Bora; Hong, Dae Sik; Zang, Dae Young; Yoon, Hwi-Joong; Kim, Hyeoung Joon; Kim, Inho; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Cheong, June-Won; Lee, Kyung-A; Cho, Kyung Sam; Lee, Mark Hong; Bang, Soo-Mee; Kim, Tae Young; Yun, Yeo-Min; Min, Yoo Hong; Lee, You Kyoung; Lee, Dong Soon

    2010-12-01

    We characterized the cytogenetic changes and prognostic characteristics of 133 Korean patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), focusing on 5q- syndrome and MDS with chromosome abnormalities involving 5q deletion according to World Health Organization 2008 classification. In all patients, G banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization for 5q were performed, and in MDS patients with 5q deletion, the deleted region on chromosome 5 was mapped with fluorescence in situ hybridization for EGR1, CSF1R, and PDGFRB. The frequency of isolated del(5q) syndrome and 5q deletion was 2.2% (3 of 137 patients) and 15.3% (21 of 137 patients), respectively. International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) groups were low risk (5.8%), intermediate 1 (51.1%), intermediate 2 (27.8%), and high risk (15.3%). The patients with del(5q) were significantly older (62 years) and showed an unfavorable survival compared to patients without del(5q). Half (53%) of the patients with del(5q) also had complex chromosome abnormalities, including chromosome 7 abnormalities. Of the patients with del(5q), 93.3% were deleted for all three regions on 5q, compared to 66.7% of patients with isolated del(5q). Marker chromosomes proved to be chromosome 5 with interstitial deletion of q arm by fluorescence in situ hybridization in three patients. The biological characteristics of MDS in Korea seem to be markedly different from those of Caucasians, with Koreans having a younger age, lower frequencies of 5q- syndrome, higher frequencies of complex cytogenetic abnormalities including del(5q), and poorer prognosis. We infer that additional chromosome abnormalities contribute to the adverse prognostic impact in patients with del(5q).

  3. Measuring mRNA copy-number in individual Escherichia coli cells using single-molecule fluorescent in situ hybridization (smFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Samuel O.; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A.; Xu, Heng; Golding, Ido

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the absolute number of mRNA molecules from a gene of interest in individual, chemically fixed Escherichia coli cells. A set of fluorescently-labeled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the target mRNA, so that each mRNA molecule is decorated by a known number of fluorescent dyes. Cells are then imaged using fluorescence microscopy. The number of target mRNA is estimated from the total intensity of fluorescent foci in the cell, rather than from counting discrete “spots” as in other currently available protocols. Image analysis is performed using an automated algorithm. The measured mRNA copy-number distribution obtained from many individual cells can be used to extract the parameters of stochastic gene activity, namely the frequency and size of transcription bursts from the gene of interest. The experimental procedure takes 2 days, with another 2-3 days typically required for image and data analysis. PMID:23680982

  4. Cytomolecular characterization of rRNA gene sequences among Citrullus species and subspecies using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous studies, many DNA markers showed strong preferential (non-Mendelian) segregation in F2 and BC1 genetic populations derived from crosses between wild type watermelon [C. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. et Nakai subsp. lanatus var. citroides (Bailey) Mansf. ex Greb.] (CLC) and watermelon cultivar...

  5. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Final progress report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this research is to generate and apply novel technologies to speed completion and integration of the human genome map and sequence with biomedical problems. To do this, techniques were developed and genome-wide resources generated. This includes a genome-wide Mapped and Integrated BAC/PAC Resource that has been used for gene finding, map completion and anchoring, breakpoint definition and sequencing. In the last period of the grant, the Human Mapped BAC/PAC Resource was also applied to determine regions of human variation and to develop a novel paradigm of primate evolution through to humans. Further, in order to more rapidly evaluate animal models of human disease, a BAC Map of the mouse was generated in collaboration with the MTI Genome Center, Dr. Bruce Birren.

  6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes targeting members of the phylum Candidatus Saccharibacteria falsely target Eikelboom type 1851 filaments and other Chloroflexi members.

    PubMed

    Nittami, Tadashi; Speirs, Lachlan B M; Fukuda, Junji; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Seviour, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    The FISH probe TM7-305 is thought to target the filamentous Eikelboom morphotype 0041 as a member of the Candidatus ‘Saccharibacteria’ (formerly TM7) phylum. However, with activated sludge samples in both Japan and Australia, this probe hybridized consistently with filamentous bacteria fitting the description of the morphotype 1851, which also responded positively to the CHL1851 FISH probe designed to target Chloroflexi members of this morphotype. 16S rRNA clone libraries from samples containing type 1851 TM7-305-positive filaments yielded Chloroflexi clones with high sequence similarity to Kouleothrix aurantiaca. These contained a variant TM7-305 probe target site possessing weakly destabilizing mismatches insufficient to prevent probe hybridization. Furthermore, the TM7-905 FISH probe, designed to target members of the entire Candidatus ‘Saccharibacteria’ phylum, also hybridized with the filament morphotypes 0041/0675, which responded also to the phylum level Chloroflexi probes. Many Chloroflexi sequences have only a single base mismatch to the TM7-905 probe target sequence. When competitor probes for both the TM7-305 and TM7-905 Chloroflexi non-target sites were applied, no fluorescent signal was seen in any of the filamentous organisms also hybridizing with the aforementioned Chloroflexi probes. These data indicate that these competitor probes must be included in hybridizations when both the TM7-905 and TM7-305 FISH probes are applied, to minimize potential false positive FISH results.

  7. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  8. Deletion of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) in Prader-Willi syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Two sibs with the typical phenotype without a cytogenetic deletion in chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kibe, Tetsuya; Wada, Yoshiro

    1996-04-24

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene is regarded as one of the candidates for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We describe two sibs with typical PWS presenting deletion of SNRPN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Neither a cytogenetically detectable 15q12 deletion nor a deletion for the D15S11, D15S10, and GABRB3 cosmid probes were found in either patient. This implies a smaller deletion limited to the PWS critical region. FISH with a SNRPN probe will permit analysis of PWS patients with limited deletions not detectable with other probes. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Cytogenetic characterization and fluorescence in situ hybridization of (GATA)10 repeats on established primary cell cultures from Indian water snake (Natrix piscator) and Indian mugger (Crocodylus palustris) embryos.

    PubMed

    Rao, L; Turlapati, R; Patel, M; Panda, B; Tosh, D; Mangalipalli, S; Tiwari, A; Orunganti, V P; Rose, D; Anand, A; Kulashekaran, M K; Priya, S R; Mishra, R K; Majumdar, K; Aggarwal, R K; Singh, L

    2009-01-01

    Sex determination among reptiles has continued to draw the attention of geneticists and the mechanisms involved have been extensively studied and documented in the past 3 decades. The setting up of primary cell lines of reptilian tissues is an important tool in the present study which is a unique aspect not applied in earlier studies. Establishing the cell lines from various species of reptiles would help in our understanding of the mechanisms of evolution and differentiation of sex chromosomes. Therefore, in the present study, we have established for the first time primary cell cultures from Indian water snake (Natrix piscator) and Indian mugger (Crocodylus palustris) embryos. In the preliminary growth stage, 2 types of cells, fibroblast- and epithelial-like, were found to be attached and proliferating in vitro. These fibroblast-like cell cultures were later overtaken by epithelial cells. The cell lines were grown in minimal essential medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum and subcultured for a period of 8-10 months. The morphology of cell types was kept under constant observation microscopically. Interestingly, at a subsequent passage of the cells sporadically scattered neuronal-like and beating cells were observed. The suitable temperature for growth of these cell cultures was 28-30 degrees C. Chromosome analysis was performed from the actively proliferating cells, which revealed 5 pairs of macrochromosomes and 15 pairs of microchromosomes in Natrix piscator, and 15 pairs of only macrochromosomes in Crocodylus palustris. (GATA)(n) repeats are well known to be associated with sex chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization performed with (GATA)(10) repeats delineated the W chromosome in the cells of Natrix piscator which has so far not been reported. This cell culture method has presently only been applied to water snakes and crocodile embryos in the current study, but it will be employed in other reptilian species and could go a long way to being a

  10. One-year monitoring of an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel laboratory-developed test for bladder cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Tinawi-Aljundi, Rima; King, Lauren; Knuth, Shannon T; Gildea, Michael; Ng, Carrie; Kahl, Josh; Dion, Jacqueline; Young, Chris; Schervish, Edward W; Frontera, J Rene; Hafron, Jason; Kernen, Kenneth M; Di Loreto, Robert; Aurich-Costa, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously, we had developed and manufactured an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization (OligoFISH) probe panel based on the most clinically sensitive chromosomes found in a reference set of bladder carcinoma cases. The panel was clinically validated for use as a diagnostic and monitoring assay for bladder cancer, reaching 100% correlation with the results of the UroVysion test. After 1 year of using this probe panel, we present here the comparison of cytology, cystoscopy, and pathology findings to the OligoFISH probe panel results to calculate its clinical performance. Materials and methods In order to calculate clinical performance, we compared the OligoFISH results to the cytology and cystoscopy/pathology findings for 147 initial diagnoses and 399 recurrence monitorings. Finally, we compared clinical performance to published values for the UroVysion test, including both low- and high-grade tumors. Results Chromosomes 3, 6, 7, and 20 were highly involved in bladder carcinoma aneuploidy. At the initial diagnosis, we obtained 90.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.5%–94.7%) accuracy, 96.8% sensitivity (95% CI: 91.0%–99.3%), 79.2% specificity (95% CI: 65.9%–87.8%), 89.2% positive predictive value (PPV; 95% CI: 81.5%–94.5%), and 93.3% negative predictive value (NPV; 95% CI: 81.7%–97.3%). When monitoring for recurrence, we obtained 85.2% accuracy (95% CI: 81.3%–88.5%), 82.0% sensitivity (95% CI: 76.0%–87.1%), 88.4% specificity (95% CI: 83.2%–92.5%), 87.7% PPV (95% CI: 82.1%–92.0%), and 83.0% NPV (95% CI: 77.3%–87.8%). When looking at low- and high-grade tumors, the test showed 100% sensitivity for high-grade tumors (95% CI: 92.5%–100%) and 87.5% sensitivity (95% CI: 68.8%–95.5%) for low-grade tumors. All the clinical parameters for the OligoFISH panel were higher than the UroVysion test’s published performance. We found significantly higher clinical sensitivity and NPV at initial diagnosis and significantly higher

  11. Assignment of the tyrosinase-related protein-2 gene (TYRP2) to human chromosome 13q31-q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Extended synteny with mouse chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.A. ); Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1994-05-01

    A recombinant human genomic liver DNA [lambda]-phage library was screened with the insert of the pHuTRP-2 cDNA clone to isolate a series of bacteriophage with inserts spanning the human TYRP2 gene. One of the [lambda]-phage clones ([lambda]HuT-YRP2-7) containing a 2-kb HindIII fragment with the 5[prime] exon sequence of the cDNA as determined by sequence analysis was used for the gene localization study. DNA prepared from the phage by Qiagen chromatography was nick-translated with biotin-14-dATP and hybridized in situ at a final concentration of 5 ng/[mu]l to metaphases from two normal males. The fluorescence in situ hybridization method was modified from that previously described in that chromosomes were stained before analysis with both propidium iodide as counterstain and DAPI for chromosome identification. Twenty metaphases from the first normal male were examined for fluorescent signal. All of these metaphases showed signal on one or both chromatids of chromosome 13 in the region 13q31-q33; 88% of this signal was at the interface of bands 13q31-q32. There was a total of four nonspecific background dots observed in these 20 metaphases. A similar result was obtained from hybridization of the probe to 20 metaphases from the second normal male (data not shown). This region has also been shown to contain the propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase [alpha]-chain gene by in situ hybridization. The localization of the TYRP2 locus to human chromosome 13q31-q32 extends the syntenic region of chromosome 13 with mouse chromosome 14. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  12. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of classical propionibacteria with specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes and its application to enumeration in Gruyère cheese.

    PubMed

    Babot, Jaime D; Hidalgo, Maximiliano; Argañaraz-Martínez, Eloy; Apella, María C; Perez Chaia, Adriana

    2011-01-31

    The classical or dairy propionibacteria have well-documented industrial applications and have been proposed for probiotic applications. Given their industrial importance it is necessary to employ fast and reliable techniques to monitor the growth during products elaboration, industrial fermentations or the intestinal transit. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to design oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of dairy propionibacteria and optimise the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol to detect these bacteria. Two specific probes were in silico designed to detect Propionibacterium freudenreichii and P. jensenii, named Pfr435 and Pj446 respectively. The FISH protocol was optimised for the hybridisation of propionibacteria cells with the universal probe Eub338 and the designed probes. These probes were assayed in situ for their specificity to hybridise species of propionibacteria by observation using fluorescence microscopy and results were compared with the probe Pap446 previously designed for P. acidipropionici. Probes Pap446, Pfr435 and Pj446 were also evaluated by fluorescence spectrophotometry to assess the influence of cells physiological state during growth in batch culture in the fluorescence intensity. The maximum fluorescence intensity was observed at the onset of the stationary phase of growth and was then reduced. However, changes on the cells permeability did not reduce the efficiency of 16S rRNA hybridisation with the fluorescence-labelled probes. Propionibacteria counts obtained by FISH and plate count methods were compared in a commercial Gruyère cheese. The results showed that this method can be used as a rapid technique for the enumeration of these bacteria in cheese samples.

  14. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblom, J.J.; Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  15. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) localizes to human chromosome 3p25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.F. Jr.; Clancy, T.E.; Quan, R.

    1995-04-10

    The human oxytocin receptor regulates parturition and myometrial contractility, breast milk let-down, and reproductive behaviors in the mammalian central nervous system. Kimura et al. recently identified a human oxytocin receptor cDNA by means of expression cloning from a human myometrial cDNA library. To elucidate further the molecular mechanisms that regulate oxytocin receptor gene expression and to define the expected Mendelian inheritance of possible human disease states, we must determine the number of genes, their localization, and their organization and structure. We summarize below our data indicating that the human oxytocin receptor gene is localized to 3p25 and exists as a single copy in the haploid genome. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Community Analysis of Biofilters Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Including a New Probe for the Xanthomonas Branch of the Class Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Udo; Naismith, Michèle M.; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    1999-01-01

    Domain-, class-, and subclass-specific rRNA-targeted probes were applied to investigate the microbial communities of three industrial and three laboratory-scale biofilters. The set of probes also included a new probe (named XAN818) specific for the Xanthomonas branch of the class Proteobacteria; this probe is described in this study. The members of the Xanthomonas branch do not hybridize with previously developed rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for the α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. Bacteria of the Xanthomonas branch accounted for up to 4.5% of total direct counts obtained with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. In biofilter samples, the relative abundance of these bacteria was similar to that of the γ-Proteobacteria. Actinobacteria (gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C DNA content) and α-Proteobacteria were the most dominant groups. Detection rates obtained with probe EUB338 varied between about 40 and 70%. For samples with high contents of gram-positive bacteria, these percentages were substantially improved when the calculations were corrected for the reduced permeability of gram-positive bacteria when formaldehyde was used as a fixative. The set of applied bacterial class- and subclass-specific probes yielded, on average, 58.5% (± a standard deviation of 23.0%) of the corrected eubacterial detection rates, thus indicating the necessity of additional probes for studies of biofilter communities. The Xanthomonas-specific probe presented here may serve as an efficient tool for identifying potential phytopathogens. In situ hybridization proved to be a practical tool for microbiological studies of biofiltration systems. PMID:10427047

  17. Specific detection and localization of microsporidian parasites in invertebrate hosts by using in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Smith, Judith E; Solter, Leellen; Perotti, M Alejandra; Braig, Henk R; Dunn, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    We designed fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for two distinct microsporidian clades and demonstrated their application in detecting, respectively, Nosema/Vairimorpha and Dictyoceola species. We used them to study the vertical transmission of two microsporidia infecting the amphipod Gammarus duebeni.

  18. Linking Microbial Phylogeny to Metabolic Activity at the Single-Cell Level by Using Enhanced Element Labeling-Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (EL-FISH) and NanoSIMS▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Lösekann, Tina; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K.; Ng, Wing-On; Stevenson, Bradley S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Relman, David A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    To examine phylogenetic identity and metabolic activity of individual cells in complex microbial communities, we developed a method which combines rRNA-based in situ hybridization with stable isotope imaging based on nanometer-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Fluorine or bromine atoms were introduced into cells via 16S rRNA-targeted probes, which enabled phylogenetic identification of individual cells by NanoSIMS imaging. To overcome the natural fluorine and bromine backgrounds, we modified the current catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique by using halogen-containing fluorescently labeled tyramides as substrates for the enzymatic tyramide deposition. Thereby, we obtained an enhanced element labeling of microbial cells by FISH (EL-FISH). The relative cellular abundance of fluorine or bromine after EL-FISH exceeded natural background concentrations by up to 180-fold and allowed us to distinguish target from non-target cells in NanoSIMS fluorine or bromine images. The method was optimized on single cells of axenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae cultures. EL-FISH/NanoSIMS was then applied to study interrelationships in a dual-species consortium consisting of a filamentous cyanobacterium and a heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium. We also evaluated the method on complex microbial aggregates obtained from human oral biofilms. In both samples, we found evidence for metabolic interactions by visualizing the fate of substrates labeled with 13C-carbon and 15N-nitrogen, while individual cells were identified simultaneously by halogen labeling via EL-FISH. Our novel approach will facilitate further studies of the ecophysiology of known and uncultured microorganisms in complex environments and communities. PMID:18359832

  19. Comparison of conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Listeria spp. in ground beef, turkey, and chicken breast fillets in İzmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of Listeria species in refrigerated fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef was evaluated, comparing the conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH uses hybridization of a nucleic acid sequence target of a microorganism with a specific DNA probe labeled with a fluorochrome and imaging by a fluorescence microscope. First, Listeria was inoculated in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, or ground beef, and the applicability of the FISH method was evaluated. Second, Listeria was detected in fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef by culture and FISH methods. Listeria was isolated from 27 (37.4%) of 216 samples by the standard culture method, whereas FISH detected 25 (24.7%) preenriched samples. Of these isolates, 17 (63%) were L. innocua, 6 (22%) L. welshimeri, and 4 (14.8%) L. seeligeri. Overall, the prevalences of Listeria spp. found with the conventional culture method in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef were 9.7, 6.9, and 20.8%, whereas with the FISH technique these values were 11.1, 6.9, and 16.7%, respectively. The molecular FISH technique appears to be a cheap, sensitive, and time-efficient procedure that could be used for routine detection of Listeria spp. in meat. This study showed that retail raw meats are potentially contaminated with Listeria spp. and are, thus, vehicles for transmitting diseases caused by foodborne pathogens, underlining the need for increased precautions, such as implementation of hazard analysis and critical control points and consumer food safety education.

  20. Characterization of the temporal persistence of chromosomal abnormalities in the semen of Hodkin`s disease patients after treatment with NOVP chemotherapy using multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, M.J.; Robbins, W.A.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to sperm of men with Hodgkin`s disease to measure the persistence of chromosomally abnormal sperm within the time interval of 3 to 33 months after the end of treatment. NOVP chemotherapy includes the agents novantrone, oncovin, vinblastine, and prednisone, two of which are spindle poisons expected to induce aneuploidy. Semen samples were evaluated for the frequencies of fluorescence phenotypes representing hyperhaploidy, hypohaploidy, and genomic duplications using DNA probes specific for repetitive sequences on chromosomes X,Y, and 8. Using this procedure, NOVP was previously shown to induce chromosomally abnormal sperm in treated patients. In a longitudinal assessment of 11 semen samples from 2 men, frequencies of abnormal sperm appeared to return to pre-treatment levels at {approximately}6 months after the end of treatment and remained at these levels up to 33 months after the end of treatment. However, pre-treatment frequencies of chromosomally abnormal cells in Hodgkin`s patients were elevated above those found in normal healthy men. Additional patients are being evaluated to determine how long after therapy Hodgkin`s disease patients remain at increased risk for producing chromosomally abnormal sperm.

  1. Electron Microscopy of Living Cells During in Situ Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; van Oosten Slingeland, Daan S. B.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Kruit, Pieter; Piston, David W.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach toward dynamic nanoimaging: live fluorescence of cells encapsulated in a bionanoreactor is complemented with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on an integrated microscope. This allows us to take SEM snapshots on-demand, that is, at a specific location in time, at a desired region of interest, guided by the dynamic fluorescence imaging. We show that this approach enables direct visualization, with EM resolution, of the distribution of bioconjugated quantum dots on cellular extensions during uptake and internalization. PMID:26580231

  2. A modified protocol for the detection of three different mRNAs with a new-generation in situ hybridization chain reaction on frozen sections.

    PubMed

    Sui, Qian-Qian; Zhu, Jiao; Li, Xiangnan; Knight, Gillian E; He, Cheng; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Yuan, Hongbin; Xiang, Zhenghua

    2016-12-01

    A new multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization method based on hybridization chain reaction was recently reported, enabling simultaneous mapping of multiple target mRNAs within intact zebrafish and mouse embryos. With this approach, DNA probes complementary to target mRNAs trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into fluorescent amplification polymers. The formation of the specific polymers enhances greatly the sensitivity of multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization. In this study we describe the optimal parameters (hybridization chain reaction time and temperature, hairpin and salt concentration) for multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization via amplification of hybridization chain reaction for frozen tissue sections. The combined use of fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, together with other control experiments (sense probe, neutralization and competition, RNase treatment, and anti-sense probe without initiator) confirmed the high specificity of the fluorescence in situ hybridization used in this study. Two sets of three different mRNAs for oxytocin, vasopressin and somatostatin or oxytocin, vasopressin and thyrotropin releasing hormone were successfully visualized via this new method. We believe that this modified protocol for multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization via hybridization chain reaction would allow researchers to visualize multiple target nucleic acids in the future.

  3. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Martyna O.; Nawrocka, Anna U.; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs), and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH). In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH), and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics. PMID:26068454

  4. Standardized fluorescence in situ hybridization testing based on an appropriate panel of probes more effectively identifies common cytogenetic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes than conventional cytogenetic analysis: a multicenter prospective study of 2302 patients in China.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yue-Yun; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Li, Juan; Zou, Ping; Xu, Ze-Feng; Sun, Hui; Shao, Zong-Hong; Zhou, Dao-Bin; Chen, Fang-Ping; Liu, Zhuo-Gang; Zhu, Huan-Ling; Wu, De-Pei; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Yin; Li, Yan; Hou, Ming; Du, Xin; Wang, Xin; Li, Wei; Lai, Yong-Rong; Zhou, Jin; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Fang, Mei-Yun; Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Guang-Sen; Jiang, Ming; Liang, Ying-Min; Zhang, Lian-Sheng; Chen, Xie-Qun; Bai, Hai; Lin, Jin-Ying

    2015-05-01

    In an attempt to establish the advantages of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies over conventional cytogenetic (CC) analysis, a total of 2302 de novo MDS patients from 31 Chinese institutions were prospectively selected in the present study for both CC and standardized FISH analysis for +8, -7/7q-, -5/5q-, 20q- and-Y chromosomal abnormalities. CC analysis was successful in 94.0% of the patients; of these patients, 35.9% of the cases were abnormal. FISH analysis was successful in all 2302 patients and detected at least one type of common cytogenetic abnormality in 42.7% of the cases. The incidences of +8, -7/7q-, -5/5q-, 20q- and-Y chromosomal abnormalities by FISH were 4.1% to 8.7% higher than those by CC. FISH identified abnormalities in 23.6% of the patients exhibiting normal CC results and revealed that 20.7% of the patients with adequate normal metaphases (≥20) had abnormal clones. FISH identified cytogenetic abnormalities in 50.4% of the patients with failed CC analysis. In summary, our multicenter studies emphasised and confirmed the importance of applying standardized FISH testing based on an appropriate panel of probes to detect common cytogenetic abnormalities in Chinese de novo MDS patients, particularly those with normal or failed CC results.

  5. Experimental design and quality assurance: in situ fluorescence instrumentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conmy, Robyn N.; Del Castillo, Carlos E.; Downing, Bryan D.; Chen, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Both instrument design and capabilities of fluorescence spectroscopy have greatly advanced over the last several decades. Advancements include solid-state excitation sources, integration of fiber optic technology, highly sensitive multichannel detectors, rapid-scan monochromators, sensitive spectral correction techniques, and improve data manipulation software (Christian et al., 1981, Lochmuller and Saavedra, 1986; Cabniss and Shuman, 1987; Lakowicz, 2006; Hudson et al., 2007). The cumulative effect of these improvements have pushed the limits and expanded the application of fluorescence techniques to numerous scientific research fields. One of the more powerful advancements is the ability to obtain in situ fluorescence measurements of natural waters (Moore, 1994). The development of submersible fluorescence instruments has been made possible by component miniaturization and power reduction including advances in light sources technologies (light-emitting diodes, xenon lamps, ultraviolet [UV] lasers) and the compatible integration of new optical instruments with various sampling platforms (Twardowski et at., 2005 and references therein). The development of robust field sensors skirt the need for cumbersome and or time-consuming filtration techniques, the potential artifacts associated with sample storage, and coarse sampling designs by increasing spatiotemporal resolution (Chen, 1999; Robinson and Glenn, 1999). The ability to obtain rapid, high-quality, highly sensitive measurements over steep gradients has revolutionized investigations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) optical properties, thereby enabling researchers to address novel biogeochemical questions regarding colored or chromophoric DOM (CDOM). This chapter is dedicated to the origin, design, calibration, and use of in situ field fluorometers. It will serve as a review of considerations to be accounted for during the operation of fluorescence field sensors and call attention to areas of concern when making

  6. An increased frequency of 13q deletions detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and its impact on survival in children and adolescents with Burkitt lymphoma: results from the Children's Oncology Group study CCG-5961

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Marilu; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Dave, Bhavana J.; Coccia, Peter F.; Bridge, Julia A.; Lyden, Elizabeth R.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lones, Mark A.; Harrison, Lauren; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Sanger, Warren G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Burkitt lymphoma (BL), an aggressive B-cell malignancy, is often curable with short intensive treatment regiments. Nearly all BLs contain rearrangements of the MYC/8q24 region; however, recent cytogenetic studies suggest that certain secondary chromosomal aberrations in BL correlate with an adverse prognosis. In this multi-center study, the frequency and impact on clinical outcome of del(13q) and +7 in addition to MYC rearrangements as detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in children and adolescents with intermediate and high-risk BL registered on Children's Cancer Group study CCG-5961 were investigated. Analysis with 13q14.3 and 13q34 loci specific probes demonstrated deletions of 13q in 38/90 (42%) cases. The loss of either 13q14.3 or 13q34 alone occurred in 14% and 8%, respectively, while 20% exhibited loss of both regions. Gain of chromosome 7 was observed in 7/68 (10%) cases and MYC rearrangements were detected in 84/90 (93%). Prognostic analysis controlling for known risk factors demonstrated that patients exhibiting loss of 13q, particularly 13q14.3, had a significant decrease in 5-year overall survival (77% vs. 95%, p=0.012). These observations indicate that del(13q) occurs in childhood BL at frequencies higher than previously detected by classical cytogenetics and underscores the importance of molecular cytogenetics in risk stratification. PMID:19895612

  7. In situ measurements of phytoplankton fluorescence using low cost electronics.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S; Wright, Dana L

    2013-06-19

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  8. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  9. Changes in rRNA levels during stress invalidates results from mRNA blotting: fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization permits renormalization for estimation of cellular mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M C; Nielsen, A K; Molin, S; Hammer, K; Kilstrup, M

    2001-08-01

    Regulation of gene expression can be analyzed by a number of different techniques. Some techniques monitor the level of specific mRNA directly, and others monitor indirectly by determining the level of enzymes encoded by the mRNA. Each method has its own inherent way of normalization. When results obtained by these techniques are compared between experiments in which differences in growth rates, strains, or stress treatments occur, the normalization procedure may have a significant impact on the results. In this report we present a solution to the normalization problem in RNA slot blotting experiments, in which mRNA levels routinely are normalized to a fixed amount of extracted total RNA. The cellular levels of specific mRNA species were estimated using a renormalization with the total RNA content per cell. By a combination of fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization, which estimates the relative level of rRNA per cell, and slot blotting to rRNA probes, which estimates the level of rRNA per extracted total RNA, the amount of RNA per cell was calculated in a series of heat shock experiments with the gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. It was found that the level of rRNA per cell decreased to 30% in the course of the heat shock. This lowered ribosome level led to a decrease in the total RNA content, resulting in a gradually increasing overestimation of the mRNA levels throughout the experiment. Using renormalized cellular mRNA levels, the HrcA-mediated regulation of the genes in the hrcA-grpE-dnaK operon was analyzed. The hybridization data suggested a complex heat shock regulation indicating that the mRNA levels continued to rise after 30 min, but after renormalization the calculated average cellular levels exhibited a much simpler induction pattern, eventually attaining a moderately increased value.

  10. Lifetime fluorescence spectroscopy for in situ investigation of osteogenic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Elbarbary, Amir; Zuk, Patricia; De Ugarte, Daniel A.; Benhaim, Prosper; Kurt, Hamza; Hedrick, Marc H.; Ashjian, Peter

    2003-07-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) represents a potential tool for the in-situ characterization of bioengineered tissues. In this study, we evaluate the application of TR-LIFS to non-intrusive monitoring of matrix composition during osteogenetic differentiation. Human adipose-derived stem cells, harvested from 3 patients, were induced in osteogenic media for 3, 5, and 7 weeks. Samples were subsequently collected and probed for time-resolved fluorescence emission with a pulsed nitrogen laser. Fluorescence parameters, derived from both spectral- and time-domain, were used for sample characterization. The samples were further analyzed using Western blot analysis and computer-based densitometry. A significant change in the fluorescence parameters was detected for samples beyond 3 weeks of osteogenic differentiation. The spectroscopic observations: 1) show increase of collagen I when contrasted against the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of commercially available collagens; and 2) are in agreement with Western blot analysis that demonstrated significant increase in collagen I content between 3- vs. 5-weeks and 3- vs. 7-weeks and no changes for collagens III, IV, and V. Our results suggest that TR-LIFS can be used as a non-invasive means for the detection of specific collagens in maturing connective tissues.

  11. Combined immunophenotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes allows quantification and differentiation of ex vivo generated dendritic cells, leukemia-derived dendritic cells and clonal leukemic cells in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Andreas; Kufner, Stefanie; Konhaeuser, Elke; Kroell, Tanja; Hausmann, Andreas; Tischer, Johanna; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Schmetzer, Helga

    2013-06-01

    Antileukemic T-cell responses induced by leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DC(leu)) are variable, due to varying DC/DC(leu) composition/quality. We studied DC/DC(leu) composition/quality after blast culture in four DC media by flow cytometry (FC) and combined fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunophenotyping analysis (FISH-IPA). Both methods showed that DC methods produce variable proportions of DC subtypes. FISH-IPA is an elaborate method to study clonal aberrations in blast/DC cells on slides, however without preselection of distinct cell populations for FISH analysis. FISH-IPA data proved previous FC data: not every clonal/blast cell is converted to DC(leu) (resulting in various proportions of DC(leu)) and not every detectable DC is of clonal/leukemic origin. Preselection of the best of four DC methods for "best" DC/DC(leu) generation is necessary. DC(leu) proportions correlate with the antileukemic functionality of DC/DC(leu)-stimulated T-cells, thereby proving the necessity of studying the quality of DC/DC(leu) after culture. FC is the superior method to quantify DC/DC(leu), since a blast phenotype is available in every given patient, even with low/no proportions of clonal aberrations, and can easily be used to study cellular compositions after DC culture.

  12. Liquid phase fluorescence in situ RT-PCR analysis for gene expression analysis in woody stems.

    PubMed

    Gray-Mitsumune, M; Abe, H; Takahashi, J; Sundberg, B; Mellerowicz, E J

    2004-01-01

    We explore a rapid in situ RT-PCR protocol for gene expression studies in woody stem tissues. In situ RT-PCR was performed using fluorescent dye-conjugated nucleic acid and the fluorescence signals derived from target RNAs were detected using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The signal to background ratio was greatly enhanced by performing two rounds of PCR reactions, first without the fluorescent dye and second with the dye. Using this protocol, we obtained strong gene-specific signals in secondary stem tissues. The signals were PCR-dependent, as shown by the lack of cytoplasmic signals in the tissue sections in which either DNA polymerase or primers were omitted from PCR reactions, and were RNA-dependent, as shown by great reduction of cytoplasmic signals when sections were treated with RNase before RT reactions. To verify our protocol, transcript localization of the rbcS gene was examined in secondary stems of hybrid aspen ( Populus tremula L. x tremuloides Michx.) and compared to the chlorophyll autofluorescence signal. The in situ RT-PCR signals form the rbcS gene and chlorophyll autofluorescence co-localized in the same cell types. The signal was also confirmed by Northern blot analysis of isolated RNA from the cambium and developing xylem, thus confirming the validity of the protocol. Some difficulties of in situ transcript localization and the interpretation of the signal distribution in the secondary tissues are discussed.

  13. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Visual Marker in Somatic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    OLIVARES‐FUSTER, O.; PEÑA, L.; DURAN‐VILA, N.; NAVARRO, L.

    2002-01-01

    Using a transgenic citrus plant expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a parent in somatic fusion experiments, we investigated the suitability of GFP as an in vivo marker to follow the processes of protoplast fusion, regeneration and selection of hybrid plants. A high level of GFP expression was detected in transgenic citrus protoplasts, hybrid callus, embryos and plants. It is demonstrated that GFP can be used for the continuous monitoring of the fusion process, localization of hybrid colonies and callus, and selection of somatic hybrid embryos and plants. PMID:12096810

  14. Dimethylaminostyrylmethylpyridiniumiodine (daspmi) as a fluorescent probe for mitochondria in situ.

    PubMed

    Bereiter-Hahn, J

    1976-01-15

    An investigation has been made on the properties of dimethylaminostyrylmethylpyridiniumiodine (DASPMI), its reaction with isolated pigeon heart mitochondria and its suitability as a vital strain for mitochondria in situ. DASPMI is a low toxicity specific vital stain for mitochondria in living cells. In vitro dye concentrations over 6 nmol/mg protein inhibit fast (state 3) respiration after a preincubation time of more than 5 min in the presence of substrate. No uncoupling was observed. Energization of pigeon heart mitochondria by addition of ATP or various substrated yields an average 8.5-fold increase in fluorescence intensity in relation to DASPMI-stained mitochondria that are under anoxia, substrate deficiency, or under the influence of respiratory inhibitors, or uncouplers. The alterations in fluorescence intensity are not primarily due to ion movements or pH changes. The amount of dye (2.96+/-0.8 nmol) yielding maximal fluorescence response with 1 mg mitochondrial protein remains constant during energization of mitochondria. As indicated by electron microscopic studies the observed changes in emission intensity may be related to changes in the fine structural organisation of cristae. A remarkable difference exists between isolated mitochondria and mitochondria in situ with respect to the reaction to cyanide. According to the reported results DASPMI will be a useful probe for the investigation of mitochondrial activities in living cells.

  15. Physical and genetic map of 5q31: use of fluorescence in situ hybridization data to identify errors in the CEPH database. Centre d'Etude de Polymorphisme Humain.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, C A; Le Beau, M M; Neuman, W L; Keinanen, M; Yamaoka, L H; Speer, M C; Espinosa, R; Nakamura, Y; Williamson, R; Mullan, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome 5, band q31, contains the genes responsible for a number of interesting genetic and malignant diseases, as well as many cloned genes. To prepare a high-resolution map of this region, eight anonymous DNA markers were mapped by combining genetic data derived from linkage analysis, with physical data obtained using two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Probe order was determined by FISH on metaphase cells, supplemented with interphase analysis, while genetic distance and likely order were determined by multipoint linkage analysis using genotype data from Centre d'Etude de Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) pedigrees. Discrepancies between the genetic and physical maps suggested that there was a high rate of genotyping errors in the CEPH data for these markers, and prompted a statistical analysis to identify these errors. By assuming a known physical order (as determined by FISH) it was possible to identify markers which had the greatest degree of error. The average typing error was estimated at 1.8%, but several markers had much higher error rates; a 14% error rate was predicted for one locus, which was subsequently confirmed by retyping. The analysis led to the preparation of a revised map spanning 24.5 cM of 5q31. This study illustrates the power of FISH to determine physical order over a wide genomic distance, and demonstrates how order can be used as an adjunct to linkage analysis, particularly in the identification of genotyping errors.

  16. A new classification of interphase nuclei based on spatial organizations of chromosome 8 and 21 for t(8;21) (q22;q22) acute myeloid leukemia by three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xueli; Wang, Yanfang; Zhao, Fengying; Liu, Jinlin; Yin, Jun; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Ke, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-01

    Interphase heterogenous chromosomes spatially close to each other are predominantly located near the center of nuclei and are prone to incur translocations. We screened a t(8;21) (q22;q22) acute myeloid leukemia-M2 patient during three phases (post-chemotherapy, remittent stage, and relapse) and a donor of normal karyotype as control by two-(2D) and three-dimensional (3D)-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Our classification of nuclei (normal, transitional, and malignant nuclei) by 3D-FISH analyses may provide a more precise prognosis than 2D-FISH results, especially for remittent stage sample in our study, in which 2D-FISH findings showed normal results, whereas 3D-FISH results showed extreme abnormalities (normal nuclei 27%, transitional nuclei 36%, malignant nuclei 37%). The relative radial positions (d/R) of chromosomes 8 were similar to d/R of chromosomes 21 for the relapse sample. We classified heterogenous chromosome pairs into close pairs and normal pairs based on their relative distances (d'/(2R)). The centers of close pairs were more internal than normal pairs in nuclei in all samples, and the d/R values of a given-type pairwise heterogenous chromosomes were similar among four samples. Our data demonstrate that the classification of nuclei based on spatial organization of chromosomes by 3D-FISH is reasonable and essential for evaluating acute myeloid leukemia prognosis.

  17. The Relationship between the Presence of Chromosomal Instability and Prognosis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: Fluorescence in situ Hybridization Analysis of Paraffin-embedded Tissue from 47 Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jung-Wan; Seo, Kwang Won; Jang, Se Jin; Oh, Yeon-Mock; Shim, Tae Sun; Kim, Woo Sung; Lee, Dong-Soon; Lee, Sang-Do

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic importance of chromosomal instability (CIN) in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung, the relationship between CIN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and survival in SCC patients was examined. Forty-seven surgical specimens of lung SCC were analyzed. To identify tumors with CIN, p16 and multi-target DNA FISH assays for c-myc, chromosome 6, EGFR, and chromosome 5 (LAVysion, Vysis) were performed on nuclei extracted from paraffin-embedded tumor tissues. Survival rates were compared in terms of age, T factor, N factor, CIN, and smoking status. A sample was defined as CIN-positive if at least four of the five chromosomes were positive. Among the 47 specimens, 9 (19%) were CIN-positive. The overall survival rate was 66%. Overall survival rates were estimated as 33.3% for CIN-positive patients and 76.7% for CIN-negative patients (Hazard ratio 3.47; 95% Confidence interval, 1.25-9.67; P=0.017). In multivariate analysis, the presence of CIN was a predictive factor for survival. CIN-positive based on FISH can be prognostic factor of lung SCC. PMID:20514306

  18. Establishment of stable synthetic mutualism without co-evolution between microalgae and bacteria demonstrated by mutual transfer of metabolites (NanoSIMS isotopic imaging) and persistent physical association (Fluorescent in situ hybridization)

    SciTech Connect

    de-Bashan, Luz E.; Mayali, Xavier; Bebout, Brad M.; Weber, Peter K.; Detweiler, Angela M.; Hernandez, Juan- Pablo; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bashan, Yoav

    2016-03-03

    The demonstration of a mutualistic interaction requires evidence of benefits for both partners as well as stability of the association over multiple generations. A synthetic mutualism between the freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the soil-derived plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense was created when both microorganisms were co-immobilized in alginate beads. Using stable isotope enrichment experiments followed by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of single cells, we demonstrated transfer of carbon and nitrogen compounds between the two partners. Further, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), mechanical disruption and scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated the stability of their physical association for a period of 10 days after the aggregated cells were released from the beads. The bacteria significantly enhanced the growth of the microalgae while the microalgae supported growth of the bacteria in a medium where it could not otherwise grow. In conclusion, we propose that this microalga-bacterium association is a true synthetic mutualism independent of co-evolution. (155 words).

  19. Establishment of stable synthetic mutualism without co-evolution between microalgae and bacteria demonstrated by mutual transfer of metabolites (NanoSIMS isotopic imaging) and persistent physical association (Fluorescent in situ hybridization)

    DOE PAGES

    de-Bashan, Luz E.; Mayali, Xavier; Bebout, Brad M.; ...

    2016-03-03

    The demonstration of a mutualistic interaction requires evidence of benefits for both partners as well as stability of the association over multiple generations. A synthetic mutualism between the freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the soil-derived plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense was created when both microorganisms were co-immobilized in alginate beads. Using stable isotope enrichment experiments followed by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of single cells, we demonstrated transfer of carbon and nitrogen compounds between the two partners. Further, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), mechanical disruption and scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated the stability of their physicalmore » association for a period of 10 days after the aggregated cells were released from the beads. The bacteria significantly enhanced the growth of the microalgae while the microalgae supported growth of the bacteria in a medium where it could not otherwise grow. In conclusion, we propose that this microalga-bacterium association is a true synthetic mutualism independent of co-evolution. (155 words).« less

  20. Applications of Strand-Specific in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, E.H.; Meyne, J.; Bailey, S.M.; Quigley, D.; Smith, L.; Tennyson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine the location of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. It is an effective tool in genomic mapping and is finding increasing use in medical diagnosis. A ''strand-specific'' version of FISH has been developed in the Life Sciences Division of LANL. The new procedure, named CO-FISH, reveals not only location but also the 5'-to-3'direction of a target sequence, such as the sense strand of a gene. This project was designed to investigate applications of the new technique. Strand-specific FISH was found to be useful and informative for genomic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences. The method provide a valuable new tool for investigating the mechanisms of aneuploidy inducing agents and the cytogenetic phenomena called lateral asymmetry. Finally, using strand-specific FISH, the authors were able to detect certain types of chromosome aberrations (isochromosomes, inversions and Robertsonian translocations) that can be difficult to observe with standard techniques.

  1. Fast and Non-Toxic In Situ Hybridization without Blocking of Repetitive Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Matthiesen, Steen H.; Hansen, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Formamide is the preferred solvent to lower the melting point and annealing temperature of nucleic acid strands in in situ hybridization (ISH). A key benefit of formamide is better preservation of morphology due to a lower incubation temperature. However, in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), against unique DNA targets in tissue sections, an overnight hybridization is required to obtain sufficient signal intensity. Here, we identified alternative solvents and developed a new hybridization buffer that reduces the required hybridization time to one hour (IQFISH method). Remarkably, denaturation and blocking against repetitive DNA sequences to prevent non-specific binding is not required. Furthermore, the new hybridization buffer is less hazardous than formamide containing buffers. The results demonstrate a significant increased hybridization rate at a lowered denaturation and hybridization temperature for both DNA and PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes. We anticipate that these formamide substituting solvents will become the foundation for changes in the understanding and performance of denaturation and hybridization of nucleic acids. For example, the process time for tissue-based ISH for gene aberration tests in cancer diagnostics can be reduced from days to a few hours. Furthermore, the understanding of the interactions and duplex formation of nucleic acid strands may benefit from the properties of these solvents. PMID:22911704

  2. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Determination of HER2 and p53 Mutations by Sequence Analysis Method and EGFR/Chromosome 7 Gene Status by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization for the Predilection of Targeted Therapy Modalities in Immunohistochemically Triple Negative Breast Carcinomas in Turkish Population.

    PubMed

    Pala, Emel Ebru; Bayol, Umit; Keskin, Elif Usturali; Ozguzer, Alp; Kucuk, Ulku; Ozer, Ozge; Koc, Altug

    2015-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), an agressive subtype accounts nearly 15 % of all breast carcinomas. Conventional chemotherapy is the only treatment modality thus new, effective targeted therapy methods have been investigated. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors give hope according to the recent studies results. Also therapeutic agents have been tried against aberrant p53 signal activity as TNBC show high p53 mutation rates. Our aim was to detect the incidence of mutations/amplifications identified in TNBC in our population. Here we used sequence analysis to detect HER2 (exon 18-23), p53 (exon 5-8) mutations; fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method to analyse EGFR/chromosome 7 centromere gene status in 82 immunohistochemically TNBC. Basaloid phenotype was identified in 49 (59.8 %) patients. EGFR amplification was noted in 5 cases (6.1 %). All EGFR amplified cases showed EGFR overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). p53 mutations were identified in 33 (40.2 %) cases. Almost 60 % of the basal like breast cancer cases showed p53 mutation. Only one case showed HER2 mutation (exon 20:g.36830_3). Our results showed that gene amplification is not the unique mechanism in EGFR overexpression. IHC might be used in the decision of anti-EGFR therapy in routine practice. p53 mutation rate was lower than the rates reported in the literature probably due to ethnic differences and low sensitivity of sanger sequences in general mutation screening. We also established the rarity of HER2 mutation in TNBC. In conclusion EGFR and p53 are the major targets in TNBC also for our population.

  4. Meiotic behaviour of the sex chromosomes in three patients with sex chromosome anomalies (47,XXY, mosaic 46,XY/47,XXY and 47,XYY) assessed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Blanco, J; Egozcue, J; Vidal, F

    2001-05-01

    Meiotic studies using multicolour fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and chromosome painting were carried out in three patients with sex chromosome anomalies (47,XXY; 46,XY/47,XXY and 47,XYY). In the two patients with Klinefelter syndrome, although variable percentages of XXY cells (88.5 and 28.3%) could be found in the pre-meiotic stages, none of the abnormal cells entered meiosis, and all pachytenes were XY. However, the abnormal testicular environment of these patients probably resulted in meiotic I non-disjunction, and a certain proportion of post-reductional cells were XY (18.3 and 1.7%). The fact that none of the spermatozoa were XY also suggests the existence of an arrest at the secondary spermatocyte or the spermatid level. In the XYY patient, most (95.9%) premeiotic cells were XYY. The percentage of XYY pachytenes was 57.9%. The sex chromosomes were either in close proximity (XYY) or the X chromosome was separated from the two Ys (X + YY). A high proportion (42.1%) of post-reductional germ cells were XY. However, only 0.11% of spermatozoa were disomic for the sex chromosomes. In this case, the data suggest the existence of an arrest of the abnormal cells at the primary and the secondary spermatocyte or the spermatid level, giving rise to the continuous elimination of abnormal cells in the germ-cell line along spermatogenesis. The fact that the proportion of diploid spermatozoa was only increased in one of the three cases (XXY) is also suggestive of an arrest of the abnormal cell lines in these patients. The two apparently non-mosaic patients were, in fact, germ-cell mosaics. This suggests that the cytogenetic criteria used to define non-mosaic patients may be inadequate; thus, the risk of intracytoplasmic sperm injection in apparently non-mosaics may be lower than expected.

  5. The fate of Helicobacter pylori phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerization chain reaction tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori able to express green fluorescent protein, as well as an ATCC strain, and a clinical isolate of this pathogen were evaluated for their ability to survive predation by Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Ingestion was evaluated by microscopic observation of the GFP-H. pyl...

  6. [Use of the new 2013 ASCO/CAP guidelines to study HERS status by fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Demidova, I A; Tsepenshchikova, E O; Gikalo, M B

    2015-01-01

    Несмотря на длительную историю HER2-тестирования при раке молочной железы (РМЖ), трактовка результатов исследования часто бывает неоднозначной. Внедрение новых рекомендаций ASCO/CAP 2013 направлено на дальнейшую оптимизацию HER2-тестирования с учетом новых научных данных о биологических особенностях РМЖ. Цель работы — из­учение результатов оценки HER2-статуса у больных с сомнительным уровнем экспрессии протеина при сравнительном использовании критериев ASCO/CAP 2007 и ASCO/CAP 2013. Материал и методы. Исследовали биопсийный материал 572 пациенток с установленным диагнозом РМЖ после проведения иммуногистохимического исследования, в том числе оценки статуса HER2. Всем больным выполнялось исследование методом флюоресцентной гибридизации in situ (FISH). Результаты. Использование новых критериев ASCO/CAP 2013 по оценке внутриопухолевой гетерогенности, копийности гена HER2 и так называемой полисомии 17-й хромосомы привело к статистически достоверному увеличению числа HER2-позитивных случаев по сравнению с использованием предыдущих критериев с 25 до 42,5% (ОШ=2,2178; 95% ДИ 1,8254—2,6950; р=0,0005). Заключение. Использование

  7. Assessment of HER2 Status Using Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Techniques in Mucinous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Comprehensive Comparison between ToGA Biopsy Method and ToGA Surgical Specimen Method.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wan-Ru; Lee, Ming-Yung; Ruan, Alexandra; Sheng, Huang Pin; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Han, Chih-Ping; Koo, Chiew-Loon

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare the assay performance characteristics of HER2 status in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) by ToGA (Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer) biopsy versus ToGA surgical specimen methods. Forty-nine tissue microarray (TMA) samples of mucinous EOC from Asian women were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests using ToGA trial HER2 scoring methods. The overall concordance between IHC and FISH by the ToGA surgical specimen method is 97.56% and by the ToGA biopsy specimen method is 97.14%. The agreements of HER2 IHC results under both biopsy and surgical specimen methods were nearly perfect (weighted kappa = 0.845). Additionally, the percentage of Her2 FISH amplification showed increasing trend with increasing HER2 IHC ordinals (negative, equivocal, positive) by both TOGA biopsy (P<0.001) and surgical specimen method (P<0.001). After excluding equivocal cases, the sensitivity (100%), PPV (88.89%) and NPV (100%) of HER2 IHC were unchanged under either surgical specimen method or biopsy method. However, the specificity (96.97%) and accuracy (97.56%) of HER2 IHC was slightly higher under the surgical specimen method than those (specificity 96.30%, accuracy 97.14%) under the biopsy method. Of the total 49 cases, the number (n = 14) of HER2 IHC equivocal results under the ToGA biopsy method was 1.75-fold higher than those (n = 8) under the ToGA surgical specimen method (28.57% vs. 16.32%). Therefore, compared to ToGA surgery specimen method, the ToGA biopsy method caused more equivocal IHC cases to be referred to FISH testing and did not increase the detection rates of Her2 FISH amplification.

  8. Chronic myeloid leukemia: a prospective comparison of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromosome banding analysis for the definition of complete cytogenetic response: a study of the GIMEMA CML WP.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Nicoletta; Marzocchi, Giulia; Luatti, Simona; Amabile, Marilina; Baldazzi, Carmen; Stacchini, Monica; Nanni, Mauro; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Giugliano, Emilia; Giussani, Ursula; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Kerim, Simonetta; Grimoldi, Maria Grazia; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Barbara; Carcassi, Carlo; Bernasconi, Paolo; Cuneo, Antonio; Albano, Francesco; Fugazza, Giuseppina; Zaccaria, Alfonso; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pane, Fabrizio; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2009-12-03

    In chronic myeloid leukemia, different methods are available to monitor the response to therapy: chromosome banding analysis (CBA), interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH), and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-Q-PCR). The GIMEMA CML WP (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Adulto Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Working Party) has performed a prospective study to compare CBA and I-FISH for the definition of complete cytogenetic response (CCgR). Samples (n = 664) were evaluated simultaneously by CBA and I-FISH. Of 537 cases in CCgR, the number of positive nuclei by I-FISH was less than 1% in 444 cases (82.7%). Of 451 cases with less than 1% positive nuclei by I-FISH, 444 (98.4%) were classified as CCgR by CBA. The major molecular response rate was significantly greater in cases with I-FISH less than 1% than in those with I-FISH 1% to 5% (66.8% vs 51.6%, P < .001) and in cases with CCgR and I-FISH less than 1% than in cases with CCgR and I-FISH 1% to 5% (66.1% vs 49.4%, P = .004). I-FISH is more sensitive than CBA and can be used to monitor CCgR. With appropriate probes, the cutoff value of I-FISH may be established at 1%. These trials are registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00514488 and NCT00510926.

  9. Duplication of 10q confirmed by DNA in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.P.; Sutliff, W.C.

    1994-08-15

    Partial duplication of 10q is a recognizable clinical entity. In most of the reported cases, the trisomic segment is identified by a balanced translocation state in a parent. Verification remains a problem in de novo cases. However, the recent availability of whole chromosome probes allows for confirmatory diagnosis of suspected cases. We describe a case of de novo duplication (10q) with verification using DNA is situ hybridization. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Assessing the New American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists Guidelines for HER2 Testing by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Experience of an Academic Consultation Practice.

    PubMed

    Press, Michael F; Villalobos, Ivonne; Santiago, Angela; Guzman, Roberta; Cervantes, Monica; Gasparyan, Armen; Campeau, Anaamika; Ma, Yanling; Tsao-Wei, Denice D; Groshen, Susan

    2016-04-15

    Context .- Evaluation of HER2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was changed by recent American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO-CAP) guidelines. Objective . -To determine frequencies and assess patterns of HER2 protein expression for each ASCO-CAP guideline FISH category among 7526 breast cancers accrued to our consultation practice. Design .- We retrospectively reevaluated the HER2 FISH status of breast cancers in our consultation practice according to ASCO-CAP FISH guidelines, and documented HER2 protein levels in each category. Results . -According to new guidelines, 17.7% of our consultation breast cancers were "ISH-positive" with HER2:CEP17 FISH ratios ≥2.0 and average HER2 gene copies per cell ≥4.0 (group 1); 0.4% were "ISH-positive" with ratios ≥2.0 and average copies <4.0 (group 2); 0.6% were "ISH-positive" with ratios <2.0 and average copies ≥6.0 (group 3); 4.6% were "ISH-equivocal" with ratios <2.0 and average copies ≥4.0 and <6.0 (group 4); and 76.7% were "ISH-negative" with ratios <2.0 and average copies <4.0 (group 5). However, only groups 1 (HER2 amplified) and 5 (HER2 not amplified) agreed with our previously reported status, and only these groups demonstrated the expected immunohistochemistry status, overexpression and low expression, respectively. Groups 2 and 4 breast cancers lacked overexpression, whereas group 3 was not significantly associated with either increased or decreased HER2 expression. Conclusions .- Although the status of approximately 95% of our cases (groups 1 and 5) is not affected by the new guidelines, those of the other 5% (groups 2-4) conflict with previous HER2 gene amplification status and with HER2 status by immunohistochemistry.

  11. DETECTION OF HYPERDIPLOIDY IN BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS OF RATS TREATED WITH ORTHO-PHENYLPHENOL USING FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION. (R826408)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization in the diagnosis of hidden mosaicism: apropos of three cases of sex chromosome anomalies.

    PubMed

    Maciel-Guerra, Andréa Trevas; Paulo, Juliana De; Santos, Ana Paula; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme; Andrade, Juliana Gabriel Ribeiro; Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Guerra-Júnior, Gil

    2012-11-01

    FISH has been used as a complement to classical cytogenetics in the detection of mosaicism in sex chromosome anomalies. The aim of this study is to describe three cases in which the final diagnosis could only be achieved by FISH. Case 1 was an 8-year-old 46,XY girl with normal female genitalia referred to our service because of short stature. FISH analysis of lymphocytes with probes for the X and Y centromeres identified a 45,X/46,X,idic(Y) constitution, and established the diagnosis of Turner syndrome. Case 2 was a 21-month-old 46,XY boy with genital ambiguity (penile hypospadias, right testis, and left streak gonad). FISH analysis of lymphocytes and buccal smear identified a 45,X/46,XY karyotype, leading to diagnosis of mixed gonadal dysgenesis. Case 3 was a 47,XYY 19-year-old boy with delayed neuromotor development, learning disabilities, psychological problems, tall stature, small testes, elevated gonadotropins, and azoospermia. FISH analysis of lymphocytes and buccal smear identified a 47,XYY/48,XXYY constitution. Cases 1 and 2 illustrate the phenotypic variability of the 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, and the importance of detection of the 45,X cell line for proper management and follow-up. In case 3, abnormal gonadal function could be explained by the 48,XXYY cell line. The use of FISH in clinical practice is particularly relevant when classical cytogenetic analysis yields normal or uncertain results in patients with features of sex chromosome aneuploidy.

  13. Subtelomeric rearrangements in Indian children with idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay: Frequency estimation & clinical correlation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Shruthi; Koshy, Teena; Vekatachalam, Perumal; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Yesodharan, Dhanya; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Kumar, Jeevan; Ravichandran, Latha; Joseph, Santhosh; Chandrasekaran, Anupama; Paul, Solomon F. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Subtelomeres are prone to deleterious rearrangements owing to their proximity to unique sequences on the one end and telomeric repetitive sequences, which increase their tendency to recombine, on the other end. These subtelomeric rearrangements resulting in segmental aneusomy are reported to contribute to the aetiology of idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD). We undertook this study to estimate the frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements in children with ID/DD. Methods: One hundred and twenty seven children with idiopathic ID/DD were tested for subtelomeric rearrangements using karyotyping and FISH. Blood samples were cultured, harvested, fixed and GTG-banded using the standard protocols. Results: Rearrangements involving the subtelomeres were observed in 7.8 per cent of the tested samples. Detection of rearrangements visible at the resolution of the karyotype constituted 2.3 per cent, while those rearrangements detected only with FISH constituted 5.5 per cent. Five deletions and five unbalanced translocations were detected. Analysis of parental samples wherever possible was informative regarding the inheritance of the rearrangement. Interpretation & conclusions: The frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements observed in this study was within the reported range of 0-35 per cent. All abnormal genotypes were clinically correlated. Further analysis with array technologies presents a future prospect. Our results suggest the need to test individuals with ID/DD for subtelomeric rearrangements using sensitive methods such as FISH. PMID:27934799

  14. Apparent mosaicism for del(17)(p11.2) ruled out by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a Smith-Magenis syndrome patient

    SciTech Connect

    Juyal, R.C.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lupski, J.R.; Greenberg, F.; Baldini, A.; Patel, P.I.

    1995-11-20

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome typically associated with a deletion of band p11.2 of human chromosome 17. Finucane et al. reported a 14-year-old boy with mild physical and behavior manifestations of SMS. No evidence for deletion was initially evident in 20 peripheral blood lymphocytes examined at 850 band level of resolution. Examination of metaphase chromosomes of skin fibroblasts showed a deletion of 17p11.2 in 25/25 cells examined which was consistent with the patient`s clinical manifestations of SMS. Subsequent examination of 25 cells from peripheral blood cultures indicated that 11% of cells harbored a deletion at 17p11.2, thus suggesting a mosaicism for the deletion. A third study of 20 peripheral blood lymphocytes examined at 550-850 band length resolution in a different laboratory, indicated that 13 cells had no apparent deletion, 4 cells had an apparent deletion and 3 cells were questionable. 7 refs.

  15. International, collaborative assessment of limitations of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): Analysis of expected detections in 73,000 prenatal cases

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    FISH and CSP have been proposed to reduce karyotyping need. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential efficacy of CSP-FISH using currently available probes (13, 18, 21, X, & Y) in large, prenatal diagnostic centers. Results (1990-1993) from 7 centers in 4 countries were divided by those expected to be detectable by currently available probes, and those which would be missed assuming 10% probe efficacy. 72,994 karyotypes included 699 trisomy 21`s, 352 trisomy 18`s, 136 trisomy 13`s, 358 sex chromosome aneuploidies, 70 triploidies, and 855 others (translocations, inversions, deletions, markers). Of 2,613 abnormalities, 1,745 would be detectable (66.8%). [Detroit 55.7%, Stockholm 68.3%, Boston 52.6%, Denver 61.3%, Muenster 77.0%, London 84.5%, Philadelphia 69.4%]. Centers with high proportions of referrals for ultrasound anomalies had the highest CSP-FISH positives secondary to increased T 18 & 13. We conclude: (1) 73,000 karyotypes show relatively consistent incidences of the common trisomies, sex chromosome abnormalities, and other chromosome abnormalities among the centers. (2) The proportion expected detectable by FISH-CSP technology varies from 52.6% to 84.5%, averaging 66.8%. (3) 1/3 of the karyotypic abnormalities would be missed, and therefore, replacement of complete karyotyping with FISH would have unacceptably high false-negative rates for routine evaluation. (4) FISH-CSP, while useful when positive for anomalies, is not sufficient when negative to obviate the need for a complete karyotype.

  16. Hybrid Propulsion In-Situ Resource Utilization Test Facility Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Ashley A.; Gatto, Corinne; Nakazono, Barry; Grayson, Kristian; Vaughan, David

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid propulsion could be a potential game changing technology for several Mars applications, such as Mars Sample Return (MSR) and human exploration. A flexible hybrid test facility has been built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to provide data relevant to the design of such systems. This paper presents the motivations for such a system and its design. The facility is capable of testing 5 cm diameter fuel grains with gaseous oxygen and Mars in situ propellant production simulating oxidizer (varying mixtures of GO2, CO2 and CO). All currently planned tests utilize paraffin based fuels; however, alternative hybrid fuels may be used in the future. Variable length to outer diameter (L/D) ratios may also be tested to give insight on potential packaging constraints. The goal of this research is to enable the inclusion of hybrid propulsion systems in future mission design studies by determining the empirical constants in the regression rate equation for paraffin-based fuels with space storable and/or in situ oxidizers and to investigate the effect of L/D on combustion efficiency. Test results will be reported separately.

  17. Detection of foetal cells in maternal blood and prenatal sex determination by in situ hybridization. Procedure verification.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, J; Ferrer, C; Hoffet, M; Mares, P; Bureau, J P

    1999-04-01

    We describe an enrichment of foetal cells from maternal blood with a combination of double density gradient and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (MACS) of CD71, glycophorin A (GPA), CD34 and CD36 antibodies labeled cells followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific DNA probes for determination of foetal sex.

  18. In situ hybridization for the detection of transmissible gastroenteritis virus in pigs and comparison with other methods.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, B; Chae, C

    2001-01-01

    Archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 25 pigs naturally infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were examined by in situ hybridization for TGEV nucleic acid using a nonradioactive digoxigenin-labeled cDNA probe that targeted the nucleocapsid sequence of TGEV strains. The results of in situ hybridization for the detection of TGEV were compared with virus isolation (VI), a fluorescent antibody test (FAT), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). VI, FAT, and TEM were tested over a course of time before the in situ hybridization was performed. Positive hybridization signals were detected in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal enterocytes from 21 pigs. Hybridization signals were confined to the cytoplasm. Intestinal specimens from 25 piglets were evaluated by 4 tests. Twenty-one of 25 were positive by in situ hybridization. Of these 21 samples, 5 (24%) were positive for TGEV by all 4 tests, 15 (71%) were positive by FAT, 14 (67%) were positive by VI, and 6 (29%) were positive by TEM. In situ hybridization for the detection of TGEV in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues provides a rapid means of confirmation of a histopathological diagnosis of TGEV without virus isolation, or when only formalin-fixed intestinal specimens were available. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:11227192

  19. Detection of latent pseudorabies virus by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of pseudorabies virus (PRV) nucleic acid in brain tissue sections of acutely and latently infected swine was detected by an in situ hybridization procedure using /sup 35/S-nick translated PRV DNA probes. PRV nucleic acid was detected in three of four naturally infected pigs. Tissues found to be infected with PRV were the pons/medulla region, frontal cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. In a related study, an attempt was made to increase the sensitivity and specificity of a dot blot hybridization assay with the use of synthetic oligonucleotides as probes for the detection of PRV DNA. Three 25-base-long oligonucleotides, complementary to three DNA sequences within the Sph 1 subfragment p7 of BAM H1 fragment 2, were end-labeled with gamma /sup 32/P-ATP using T/sub 4/ polynucleotide kinase. The oligonucleotide probes were hybridized to swine cellular DNA and purified PRV-DNA that had been bound to a nitrocellulose paper. Hybridizations were performed at varying temperatures and at various salt concentrations. The three oligonucleotide probes, which were rich in guanine and cytosine, hybridized to swine cellular DNA at all temperatures under varying conditions of stringency.

  20. Assignment of the human angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene (AGTR2) to chromosome Xq22-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chassagne, C.; Meloche, S.; Beatty, B.G.

    1995-01-20

    Angiotensin II (AII), the biologically active effector of the renin-angiotensin system, is a major regulator of blood pressure and electrolyte balance and a growth factor for diverse cell types. AII exerts its physiological effects by interacting with two pharmacologically distinct subtypes of receptors, designated AT{sub 1}, and AT{sub 2}. Most of the known responses to AII are mediated by the AT{sub 1} subtype, whereas the function of the AT{sub 2} receptor remains largely unknown. AT{sub 2} receptor expression is abundant in particular tissues such as adrenal medulla, specific brain regions, uterine myometrium, and ovarian granuloma cells. This specific localization in adult coupled to the demonstration that some actions of AII such as secretion of luteinizing hormone and prolactine, dilation of brain arterioles, or drinking response in rats can be inhibited in vitro by an AT{sub 2} receptor antagonist suggests that the AT{sub 2} subtype may play a role in neuronal and reproductive function. In addition, a growing amount of evidence indicates that the AT{sub 2} receptor may play a most important role in processes involving cellular growth and differentiation. It is abundantly and widely expressed in the mesenchymal tissues of the developing fetus and in the immature brain and is up-regulated in the heart and in vascular smooth muscle cells in the first days following birth. Moreover, AT{sub 2} receptor expression is enhanced in the adult in wound healing, in the neointima of injured vessels, and in pheochromocytoma. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Localization of human CREB-binding protein gene (CREBBP) to 16p13.2-p13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wydner, K.L.; Lawrence, J.B.; Bhattacharya, S.; Eckner, R.; Livingston, D.M.

    1995-11-20

    The adenovirus E1a oncoprotein targets a number of negative regulators of cellular proliferation, including the retinoblastoma gene product RB, p107, p130, p300, and the CREB-binding protein (CBP). p300 and CBP are highly homologous proteins that are thought to function as transcriptional coactivators, with roles in the regulation of the cell cycle and in cell differentiation. Like the RB protein, these proteins also may function as tumor suppressors. We have mapped the chromosomal location of the human CBP gene 3 as a first step in defining its possible involvement in human neoplasia. 11 refs.

  2. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis.

  3. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  4. Localization of the human UGP2 gene encoding the muscle isoform of UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase to 2p13-p14 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Sou-De; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You

    1997-02-01

    UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP, EC 2.7.7.9) catalyzes the transfer of a glucose moiety from Glc1P to MgUTP, forming UDPglc and MgPPi. This reaction is necessary in several tissues. In liver and muscle, UDPglc is the direct precursor of glycogen, while in lactating mammary gland it is converted to UDPgalactose and thence lactose. Liver also requires UDPglc for the formation of UDPglucuronate, which then acts as a source for the formation of soluble glucuronides of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolites destined for excretion. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Human 60-kDa SS-A/Ro ribonucleoprotein autoantigen gene (SSA2) localized to 1q31 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, E.K.L.; Tan, E.M.; Ward, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Human autoantibodies to intracellular antigens are often found in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. Our laboratory and others have reported the cloning of the cDNAs for two protein autoantigens. The 60-kDa protein is a member of the RNA binding protein family containing an RNA binding motif and has been shown to be primarily responsible for direct interaction with hY-RNAs. The assignment of the 60-kDa autoantigen gene (SSA2) to 1q31 may allow further investigation of the genetic basis of human autoimmune diseases in which ss-A/Ro antibodies are observed. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Molecular diversity, cultivation, and improved detection by fluorescent in situ hybridization of a dominant group of human gut bacteria related to Roseburia spp. or Eubacterium rectale.

    PubMed

    Aminov, Rustam I; Walker, Alan W; Duncan, Sylvia H; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Welling, Gjalt W; Flint, Harry J

    2006-09-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was used to compare 16S rRNA sequences from 19 cultured human gut strains of Roseburia and Eubacterium rectale with 356 related sequences derived from clone libraries. The cultured strains were found to represent five of the six phylotypes identified. A new oligonucleotide probe, Rrec584, and the previous group probe Rint623, when used in conjunction with a new helper oligonucleotide, each recognized an average of 7% of bacteria detected by the eubacterial probe Eub338 in feces from 10 healthy volunteers. Most of the diversity within this important group of butyrate-producing gut bacteria can apparently be retrieved through cultivation.

  7. An advanced sheep (Ovis aries, 2n = 54) cytogenetic map and assignment of 88 new autosomal loci by fluorescence in situ hybridization and R-banding

    PubMed Central

    Di Meo, G P; Perucatti, A; Floriot, S; Hayes, H; Schibler, L; Rullo, R; Incarnato, D; Ferretti, L; Cockett, N; Cribiu, E; Williams, J L; Eggen, A; Iannuzzi, L

    2007-01-01

    Presented herein is an updated sheep cytogenetic map that contains 452 loci (291 type I and 161 type II) assigned to specific chromosome bands or regions on standard R-banded ideograms. This map, which significantly extends our knowledge of the physical organization of the ovine genome, includes new assignments for 88 autosomal loci, including 74 type I loci (known genes) and 14 type II loci (SSRs/microsatellite marker/STSs), by FISH-mapping and R-banding. Comparison of the ovine map to the cattle and goat cytogenetic maps showed that common loci were located within homologous chromosomes and chromosome bands, confirming the high level of conservation of autosomes among ruminant species. Eleven loci that were FISH-mapped in sheep (B3GAT2, ASCC3, RARSL, BRD2, POLR1C, PPP2R5D, TNRC5, BAT2, BAT4, CDC5L and OLA-DRA) are unassigned in cattle and goat. Eleven other loci (D3S32, D1S86, BMS2621, SFXN5, D5S3, D5S68, CSKB1, D7S49, D9S15, D9S55 and D29S35) were assigned to specific ovine chromosome (OAR) bands but have only been assigned to chromosomes in cattle and goat. PMID:17433010

  8. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  9. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Based in Situ Hybridization Strategy for Telomere Length Assessment.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zhang, Yizhi; Cui, Yiping

    2016-02-23

    Assessing telomere length is of vital importance since telomere length is closely related with several fatal diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Here, we present a strategy to assess/measure telomere length, that is, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based in situ hybridization (SISH). The SISH method uses two kinds of SERS nanoprobes to hybridize in situ with telomeres and centromeres, respectively. The telomere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Telo-probe, while the centromere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Centro-probe. They are composed of metal nanoparticles (NPs), Raman reporter molecules and specially designed DNA strands. With longer telomeres, more Telo-probes will hybridize with them, resulting in a stronger SERS signal. To exclude possible influence of the SERS intensity by external factors (such as the nanoprobe concentration, the cell number or different batches of nanoprobes), centromeres are used as the inner control, which can be recognized by Centro-probes. Telomere length is evaluated using a redefined telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C ratio). The calculation method for T/C ratio in SISH method is more reliable than that in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, unlike FISH method, the SISH method is insensitive to autofluorescence. Moreover, SISH method can be used to analyze single telomeres. These features make SISH an excellent alternative strategy for telomere length measurement.

  10. Use of stable-isotope probing, full-cycle rRNA analysis, and fluorescence in situ hybridization-microautoradiography to study a methanol-fed denitrifying microbial community.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Hugenholtz, Philip; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael; Keller, Jürg; Blackall, Linda L

    2004-01-01

    A denitrifying microbial consortium was enriched in an anoxically operated, methanol-fed sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a mineral salts medium containing methanol as the sole carbon source and nitrate as the electron acceptor. The SBR was inoculated with sludge from a biological nutrient removal activated sludge plant exhibiting good denitrification. The SBR denitrification rate improved from less than 0.02 mg of NO(3)(-)-N mg of mixed-liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS)(-1) h(-1) to a steady-state value of 0.06 mg of NO(3)(-)-N mg of MLVSS(-1) h(-1) over a 7-month operational period. At this time, the enriched microbial community was subjected to stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [(13)C]methanol to biomark the DNA of the denitrifiers. The extracted [(13)C]DNA and [(12)C]DNA from the SIP experiment were separately subjected to full-cycle rRNA analysis. The dominant 16S rRNA gene phylotype (group A clones) in the [(13)C]DNA clone library was closely related to those of the obligate methylotrophs Methylobacillus and Methylophilus in the order Methylophilales of the Betaproteobacteria (96 to 97% sequence identities), while the most abundant clone groups in the [(12)C]DNA clone library mostly belonged to the family Saprospiraceae in the Bacteroidetes phylum. Oligonucleotide probes for use in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were designed to specifically target the group A clones and Methylophilales (probes DEN67 and MET1216, respectively) and the Saprospiraceae clones (probe SAP553). Application of these probes to the SBR biomass over the enrichment period demonstrated a strong correlation between the level of SBR denitrification and relative abundance of DEN67-targeted bacteria in the SBR community. By contrast, there was no correlation between the denitrification rate and the relative abundances of the well-known denitrifying genera Hyphomicrobium and Paracoccus or the Saprospiraceae clones visualized by FISH in the SBR biomass. FISH combined

  11. Genomic relationships between Medicago murex Willd. and Medicago lesinsii E. Small. investigated by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Falistocco, E.; Torricelli, R.; Falcinelli, M.

    2002-11-01

    Medicago murex Willd. is an annual species (2n = 14) widespread in the wild and of remarkable interest for pastures in regions with a mediterranean climate. It is considered closely related to Medicago lesinsii E. Small (2n = 16) but, up to now, there is no evidence demonstrating their genetic affinity. This research was undertaken to investigate the genomic relationships between M. murex and M. lesinsii by using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). In this study GISH experiments were performed using both species as sources of chromosomes and genomic probes. To better evaluate the results of the hybridization, the labelled DNA of each species was hybridized to chromosomes of the same species and to chromosomes of the diploid Medicago littoralis (2n = 16). Strong hybridization signals were found on chromosomes of M. murex and M. lesinsii after GISH. Differences in the hybridization strength were not observed when slides from interspecific hybridization were compared with the control preparations. These results suggest that consistent divergences of the DNA sequences did not occur after the separation of the two species. Instead very reduced cross hybridization was found on chromosome spreads of M. littoralis hybridized with the DNA of M. lesinsii or M. murex. The distribution of the ribosomal genes (rDNA) investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) appeared similar in both M. murex and M. lesinsii. The GISH technique may be a valuable approach to obtain information on evolution of the 2n = 14 species and on the origin of the polyploids Medicago rugosa (2n = 30) and Medicago scutellata (2n = 30). The first attempt to investigate the genomic composition of M. scutellata using a genomic probe is reported in this paper.

  12. Enabling in situ thermometry using transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) has been proposed for use as an assay and detection technique for nuclear security and safeguards applications because of its isotope-specific sensitivity and the penetrating capability of γ -rays. It can also be used for in situ thermometry because the absorbing resonance profile is sensitive to temperature. Using transmission NRF for thermometry could provide a new avenue for studying the ion temperature evolution of laser-induced plasmas using the upcoming ELI-NP facility. It could also be used for applications where thermometry would be otherwise infeasible, such as for determining the average fuel temperature of spent nuclear fuel, a step that would reduce the assay uncertainty using transmission NRF. In this paper, two different transmission NRF thermometry scenarios are presented and analyzed for sensitivity. This analysis demonstrated that thermometry using γ -rays is possible independent of γ -ray beam type and will be feasible with next-generation high-intensity γ -ray sources. Beyond thermometry, an application of temperature effects was found in the improvement of transmission NRF efficacy for assay and detection: using a cryogenic witness target will reduce the required measurement time by 40%.

  13. Enumeration of semen leucocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique

    PubMed Central

    Conte, R A; Luke, S; Verma, R S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To determine whether the fluorescent in situ hybridisation technique (FISH) using a total human DNA genomic probe can be used to enumerate semen leucocytes. Methods—Semen samples from five donors were subjected to a mild KC1 solution. These samples were then biotin labelled under FISH conditions using a total human DNA genomic probe and the leucocyte counts were determined. To check the accuracy of the technique a monoclonal antibody against the common leucocyte antigen CD45 [KC56(T-200)] served as a control. An isotypic control for [KC56(T-200)], the immunoglobulin [MsIgG1], served as a secondary control. Results—Semen leucocytes stained by the FISH technique were easily detected because of their distinct bright yellow colour, while the sperm cells were red. The leucocyte count ranged from 0·5 to 4·9 × 106 per ml of semen. KC56(T-200) and its isotypic control MsIgG1, which served as control for the FISH technique, accurately identified 94% and 97% of the semen leucocytes of a control donor, respectively. Conclusions—The FISH technique using a total human DNA probe can accurately and effectively enumerate the overall leucocyte population in semen. Images PMID:16696031

  14. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  15. Regulatory Pathway Analysis by High-Throughput In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Visel, Axel; Carson, James; Oldekamp, Judit; Warnecke, Marei; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Zhou, Xunlei; Shaw, Chad A; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Eichele, Gregor

    2007-01-01

    Automated in situ hybridization enables the construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. Such atlases can become Web-searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and thus offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. Towards this end, an atlas housing ∼1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the midgestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising >90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This process ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflects the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded 12 distinct groups of expression patterns. Because of the similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of each group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on the group containing Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of development. Seventeen of the 82 genes in this group showed a change of expression in the developing neocortex of Pax6-deficient embryos. Electromobility shift assays were used to test for the presence of Pax6-paired domain binding sites. This led to the identification of 12 genes not previously known as potential targets of Pax6 regulation. These findings suggest that cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by automated in situ hybridization is a novel approach for identifying components of signaling cascades. PMID:17953485

  16. In situ hybridization of superparamagnetic iron-biomolecule nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Donkor, Apraku David; Mohapatra, Mamata; Thomas, Joseph Palathinkal; Su, Zhengding; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Leung, Kam Tong

    2014-07-23

    The increase in interest in the integration of organic-inorganic nanostructures in recent years has promoted the use of hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) in medicine, energy conversion, and other applications. Conventional hybridization methods are, however, often long, complicated, and multistepped, and they involve biomolecules and discrete nanostructures as separate entities, all of which hinder the practical use of the resulting HNPs. Here, we present a novel, in situ approach to synthesizing size-specific HNPs using Fe-biomolecule complexes as the building blocks. We choose an anticancer peptide (p53p, MW 1.8 kDa) and an enzyme (GOx, MW 160 kDa) as model molecules to demonstrate the versatility of the method toward different types of molecules over a large size range. We show that electrostatic interaction for complex formation of metal hydroxide ion with the partially charged side of biomolecule in the solution is the key to hybridization of metal-biomolecule materials. Electrochemical deposition is then used to produce hybrid NPs from these complexes. These HNPs with controllable sizes ranging from 30 nm to 3.5 μm are found to exhibit superparamagnetic behavior, which is a big challenge for particles in this size regime. As an example of greatly improved properties and functionality of the new hybrid material, in vitro toxicity assessment of Fe-GOx HNPs shows no adverse effect, and the Fe-p53p HNPs are found to selectively bind to cancer cells. The superparamagnetic nature of these HNPs (superparamagnetic even above the size regime of 15-20 nm!), their biocompatibility, and the direct integration approach are fundamentally important to biomineralization and general synthesis strategy for bioinspired functional materials.

  17. In situ growth of fluorescent silicon nanocrystals in a monolithic microcapsule as a photostable, versatile platform.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guixian; Huang, Yu; Bhave, Gauri; Wang, Yuzhen; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xuewu

    2016-08-25

    A facile, one-step method was developed for the in situ formation of fluorescent silicon nanocrystals (SiNC) in a microspherical encapsulating matrix. The obtained SiNC encapsulated polymeric microcapsules (SiPM) possess uniform size (0.1-2.0 μm), strong fluorescence, and nanoporous structure. A unique two stage, time dependent reaction was developed, as the growth of SiNC was slower than the formation of polymeric microcapsules. The resulting SiPM with increasing reaction time exhibited two levels of stability, and correspondingly, the release of SiNC in aqueous media showed different behavior. With reaction time <1 h, the obtained low-density SiPM (LD-SiPM) as matrix microcapsules, would release encapsulated SiNC on demand. With >1 h reaction time, resulting high-density SiPM (HD-SiPM) became stable SiNC reservoirs. SiPM exhibit stable photoluminescence. The porous structure and fluorescence quenching effects make SiPM suitable for bioimaging, drug loading and sorption of heavy metals (Hg(2+) as shown) as an intrinsic indicator. SiPM were able to reduce metal ions, forming SiPM/metal oxide and SiPM/metal hybrids, and their applications in bio-sensing and catalysis were also demonstrated.

  18. Planar Laser Imaging of Scattering and Fluorescence of Zooplankton Feeding in Layers of Phytoplankton in situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    Planar Laser Imaging of Scattering and Fluorescence of Zooplankton Feeding in Layers of Phytoplankton in situ Peter J.S. Franks Scripps...herbivorous copepod feeding in the laboratory, and 2) to apply these methods in the field to observe the dynamics of copepod feeding in situ. In...particular we intend to test the “ feeding sorties” hypothesis vs. the “in situ feeding ” hypothesis regarding the location and timing of copepod feeding

  19. In Situ Bioorthogonal Metabolic Labeling for Fluorescence Imaging of Virus Infection In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong; Li, Wen-Jun; Yao, Xiang-Jie; Wu, Ya-Yun; Liu, Lan-Lan; He, Hua-Mei; Zhang, Ren-Li; Ma, Yi-Fan; Cai, Lin-Tao

    2017-02-20

    Optical fluorescence imaging is an important strategy to explore the mechanism of virus-host interaction. However, current fluorescent tag labeling strategies often dampen viral infectivity. The present study explores an in situ fluorescent labeling strategy in order to preserve viral infectivity and precisely monitor viral infection in vivo. In contrast to pre-labeling strategy, mice are first intranasally infected with azide-modified H5N1 pseudotype virus (N3 -H5N1p), followed by injection of dibenzocyclooctyl (DBCO)-functionalized fluorescence 6 h later. The results show that DBCO dye directly conjugated to N3 -H5N1p in lung tissues through in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry with high specificity and efficacy. More remarkably, in situ labeling rather than conventional prelabeling strategy effectively preserves viral infectivity and immunogenicity both in vitro and in vivo. Hence, in situ bioorthogonal viral labeling is a promising and reliable strategy for imaging and tracking viral infection in vivo.

  20. The Use of Whole-Mount "in Situ" Hybridization to Illustrate Gene Expression Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llamusí, Beatriz; Muñoz-Soriano, Verónica; Paricio, Nuria; Artero, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    "In situ" hybridization is a widely used technique for studying gene expression. Here, we describe two experiments addressed to postgraduate genetics students in which the effect of transcription factors on gene expression is analyzed in "Drosophila embryos of different genotypes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In one of the…

  1. Le diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par l'hybridation in situ en fluorescence (FISH): à propos des premiers tests réalisés au Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Lamzouri, Afaf; Natiq, Abdelhafid; Tajir, Mariam; Sendid, Mohamed; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Le but de cette étude était de présenter les premiers résultats de diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par la technique d'hybridation in situ en fluorescence (FISH) au Maroc et discuter son intérêt dans le diagnostic rapide de cette aneuploïdie. Méthodes Ce travail a été réalisé chez 23 femmes avec des grossesses à haut risque de trisomie 21. La moyenne d’âge des gestantes étaient de 37,43 ans avec des extrêmes de 21 et 43 ans. Toutes étaient musulmanes mariées, mariage légitimé par la Charia, dont trois mariages consanguins, sauf une originaire de la République Démocratique du Congo qui était chrétienne et concubine. La majorité des femmes étaient fonctionnaires et avaient un niveau de scolarisation moyen à élevé. Toutes les patientes ont bénéficié d'une consultation de génétique médicale au cours de laquelle il leur a été donné des informations sur la technique, son intérêt et ses limites. Il s'agit de femmes enceintes qui avaient soit un âge maternel élevé ou des signes d'appel échographiques et/ ou biochimiques. Une des patientes était porteuse d'une translocation robertsonienne t(14;21) équilibrée. Une amniocentèse a été réalisée chez toutes les gestantes et aucun avortement n'a était induit par ce geste invasif. L’âge gestationnel moyen à la première consultation était de 14 semaines d'aménorrhée (SA) et à l'amniocentèse était de 16 SA et 5 jours. L'analyse FISH a été réalisée, après consentement des couples, sur des cellules non cultivées à partir des échantillons de liquides amniotiques, en utilisant des sondes spécifiques du chromosome 21. Résultats Parmi les 23 patientes qui ont bénéficiées d'un diagnostic anténatal de l