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Sample records for fluorescence spectroscopic studies

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of DNA dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scalettar, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    Random solvent induced motions of DNA are manifest as nanosecond torsional oscillations of the helix backbone, nanosecond through millisecond bending deformations and overall rotational and translational diffusion of the polymer. Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to study this spectrum of DNA motions while ethidium monoazide was covalently bounded. The steady state fluorescence depolarization data indicate that the covalent monoazide/DNA complex exhibits internal motions characterized by an average angular amplitude of 26 degrees confirming reports of fast torsional oscillations in noncovalent ethidium bromide/DNA systems. Data obtained by use of a new polarized photobleaching recovery technique (FPR) reflect both the rotational dynamics of the polymer and the reversible photochemistry of the dye. To isolate the reorientational motion of the DNA, the FPR experiments were ran in two modes that differ only in the polarization of the bleaching light. A quotient function constructed from the data obtained in these two modes monitors only the rotational component of the FPR recovery. In specific applications those bending deformations of long DNA molecules that have characteristic relaxation times on the order of 100 microseconds have been resolved. A fluorescence correlation technique that relates fluctuations in particle number to center-of-mass motion was used to measure translational diffusion on coefficients of the plasmid PBR322 and a short oligomeric DNA. A theory that describes angular correlation in systems exhibiting cyclic, biologically directed reorientation and random Brownian rotation is developed.

  2. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic study of solvatochromic curcumin dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Digambara; Barakat, Christelle

    2011-09-01

    Curcumin, the main yellow bioactive component of turmeric, has recently acquired attention by chemists due its wide range of potential biological applications as an antioxidant, an anti-inflammatory, and an anti-carcinogenic agent. This molecule fluoresces weakly and poorly soluble in water. In this detailed study of curcumin in thirteen different solvents, both the absorption and fluorescence spectra of curcumin was found to be broad, however, a narrower and simple synchronous fluorescence spectrum of curcumin was obtained at Δ λ = 10-20 nm. Lippert-Mataga plot of curcumin in different solvents illustrated two sets of linearity which is consistent with the plot of Stokes' shift vs. the ET30. When Stokes's shift in wavenumber scale was replaced by synchronous fluorescence maximum in nanometer scale, the solvent polarity dependency measured by λSFSmax vs. Lippert-Mataga plot or ET30 values offered similar trends as measured via Stokes' shift for protic and aprotic solvents for curcumin. Better linear correlation of λSFSmax vs. π* scale of solvent polarity was found compared to λabsmax or λemmax or Stokes' shift measurements. In Stokes' shift measurement both absorption/excitation as well as emission (fluorescence) spectra are required to compute the Stokes' shift in wavenumber scale, but measurement could be done in a very fast and simple way by taking a single scan of SFS avoiding calculation and obtain information about polarity of the solvent. Curcumin decay properties in all the solvents could be fitted well to a double-exponential decay function.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopic study on the interaction of resveratrol with lipoxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, María del Carmen; Duque, Antonio Luis; Macías, Pedro

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of lipoxygenase with (E)-resveratrol was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The data obtained revealed that the quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of lipoxygenase is produced by the formation of a complex lipoxygenase-(E)-resveratrol. From the value obtained for the binding constant, according to the Stern-Volmer modified equation, was deduced the existence of static quenching mechanism and, as consequence, the existence of a strong interaction between (E)-resveratrol and lipoxygenase. The values obtained for the thermodynamic parameter Δ H (-3.58 kJ mol -1) and Δ S (87.97 J mol -1K -1) suggested the participation of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in the stabilization of the complex ligand-protein. From the static quenching we determined that only exist one independent binding site. Based on the Förster energy transfer theory, the distance between the acceptor ((E)-resveratrol) and the donor (Trp residues of lipoxygenase) was calculated to be 3.42 nm. Finally, based on the information obtained from the evaluation of synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, we deduced that the interaction of (E)-resveratrol with lipoxygenase produces micro-environmental and conformational alterations of protein in the binding region.

  4. Use of laser fluorescence in dental caries diagnosis: a fluorescence x biomolecular vibrational spectroscopic comparative study.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabíola Bastos de; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Zanin, Fátima Antonia Aparecida; Brugnera Júnior, Aldo; Silveira Júnior, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to verify the existence of correlation between Raman spectroscopy readings of phosphate apatite (~960 cm-1), fluoridated apatite (~575 cm-1) and organic matrix (~1450 cm-1) levels and Diagnodent® readings at different stages of dental caries in extracted human teeth. The mean peak value of fluorescence in the carious area was recorded and teeth were divided in enamel caries, dentin caries and sound dental structure. After fluorescence readings, Raman spectroscopy was carried out on the same sites. The results showed significant difference (ANOVA, p<0.05) between the fluorescence readings for enamel (16.4 ± 2.3) and dentin (57.6 ± 23.7) on carious teeth. Raman peaks of enamel and dentin revealed that ~575 and ~960 cm-1 peaks were more intense in enamel caries. There was significant negative correlation (p<0.05) between the ~575 and ~960 cm-1 peaks and dentin caries. It may be concluded that the higher the fluorescence detected by Diagnodent the lower the peaks of phosphate apatite and fluoridated apatite. As the early diagnosis of caries is directly related to the identification of changes in the inorganic tooth components, Raman spectroscopy was more sensitive to variations of these components than Diagnodent.

  5. [Fluorescence spectroscopic study of interaction between Fe-protoporphyrin in myoglobin and Cu(II) ions].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu-ying; Yang, Hui; Gu, Xiao-tian; Jiang, Hui-jun; Lu, Tian-hong

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction between Cu(II) ions and Fe-protoporphyrin in horse-heart myoglobin (FePP-Mb) was studied. As a result, some of the Fe(II) ions in FePP-Mb were found to be replaced by Cu(II) ions forming CuPP-Mb, by adding Cu(II) ions into the myoglobin solution. The interaction became stronger when adding more Cu(II) ions into the myoglobin solution. By studying the metal ions' interaction with myoglobin proteins as macromolecules and discussing the interaction mechanism, this work provides a theoretical basis for the further study of hazardous metal ions' interaction with the human body and its mechanism. The fluorescence spectroscopic method used in this study has higher sensitivity than the ordinary UV and CD methods.

  6. Solvation and protonation of coumarin 102 in aqueous media: a fluorescence spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Hessz, Dóra; Hégely, Bence; Kállay, Mihály; Vidóczy, Tamás; Kubinyi, Miklós

    2014-07-17

    The ground- and excited-state protonation of Coumarin 102 (C102), a fluorescent probe applied frequently in heterogeneous systems with an aqueous phase, has been studied in aqueous solutions by spectroscopic experiments and theoretical calculations. For the dissociation constant of the protonated form in the ground state, pKa = 1.61 was obtained from the absorption spectra; for the excited-state dissociation constant, pKa* = 2.19 was obtained from the fluorescence spectra. These values were closely reproduced by theoretical calculations via a thermodynamic cycle (the value of pKa* also by calculations via the Förster cycle) using an implicit–explicit solvation model (polarized continuum model + addition of a solvent molecule). The theoretical calculations indicated that (i) in the ground state, C102 occurs primarily as a hydrogen-bonded water complex, with the oxo group as the binding site, (ii) this hydrogen bond becomes stronger upon excitation, and (iii) in the ground state, the amino nitrogen atom is the protonation site, and in the excited state, the carboxy oxygen atom is the protonation site. A comprehensive analysis of fluorescence decay data yielded the values kpr = 3.27 × 10(10) M(–1) s(–1) for the rate constant of the excited-state protonation and kdpr = 2.78 × 10(8) s(–1) for the rate constant of the reverse process (kpr and kdpr were treated as independent parameters). This, considering the relatively long fluorescence lifetimes of neutral C102 (6.02 ns) and its protonated form (3.06 ns) in aqueous media, means that a quasi-equilibrium state of excited-state proton transfer is reached in strongly acidic solutions.

  7. Chromatographic and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of individual 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene--deoxyribonucleoside adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Moschel, R.C.; Pigott, M.A.; Costantino, N.; Dipple, A.

    1983-09-01

    Compared with standard Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, a newly developed high pressure liquid chromatographic separation of hydrocarbon deoxyribonucleoside adducts derived from the DNA of mouse embryo cell cultures exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) provides markedly superior resolution. Once resolved, the fluorescence spectroscopic properties of the three major DMBA--DNA adducts indicate that the fluorescence exhibited by adducts derived from a bay region syn dihydrodiol epoxide of DMBA differs subtly from that exhibited by adducts derived from the isomeric anti dihydrodiol epoxide.

  8. Infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of a phospholipid bilayer supported by a soft cationic hydrogel scaffold.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Noël, John A; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    Polarized attenuated total reflection (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy techniques were used to characterize a 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) membrane supported on porous, cationic hydrogel beads. Fluorescence microscopy images showed that the DPhPC coated the external surface of the hydrogel scaffold. In addition, a fluorescence assay of the emission intensity of the Tb(3+)/dipicolinic acid complex demonstrated that the DPhPC coating acted as a barrier to Tb(3+) efflux from the scaffolded vesicle and successfully sealed the porous hydrogel bead. Fluorescence quenching and ATR-IR spectroscopic measurements revealed that the lipid coating has a bilayer structure. The phytanoyl chains were found to exhibit significant trans-gauche isomerization, characteristic of the fluid liquid phase. However, no lipid lateral mobility was observed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements. The phosphocholine headgroup was found to be well hydrated and oriented such that the cationic choline group tucked in behind the anionic phosphate group, consistent with an electrostatic attraction between the cationic scaffold and zwitterionic lipid. The absence of lipid lateral mobility may be due to the strength of this attraction.

  9. Spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of new chalcone fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications: a theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Przemysław; Pietrzak, Marek; Janek, Tomasz; Jędrzejewska, Beata; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the newly synthesized non-centrosymmetric, 4-dimethylamino-3'-isothiocyanatochalcone (PKA) compound was presented. This compound belongs to the chalcone group, and its main purpose is to be used in biomedical imaging as a fluorescence dye. For this reason, the linear and nonlinear properties in solvents of different polarity were thoroughly studied. In accordance with the requirements for a fluorochrome, the PKA compound is characterized by strong absorption, large Stokes' shifts, relatively high fluorescence quantum yields and high nonlinear optical response. Moreover, the isothiocyanate reactive probe was conjugated with Concanavalin A. Conventional fluorescence microscopy imaging of Candida albicans cells incubated with the PKA-Concanavalin A, is presented. The results of this study show that the novel conjugate PKA-Concanavalin A could be a promising new probe for cellular labelling in biological and biomedical research. Graphical abstract Spectroscopic behavior of the PKA dye. PMID:27168200

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopic study of serum albumin-bromadiolone interaction: fluorimetric determination of bromadiolone.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Subbiah; Mishra, Ashok K

    2005-07-01

    Bromadiolone (BRD), a substituted 4-hydroxycoumarin derivative, is known to possess anti-coagulant activity with acute toxicity. In this paper, we report a study on the interaction of bromadiolone with the plasma proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA), using the intrinsic fluorescence emission properties of bromadiolone. Bromadiolone is weakly fluorescent in aqueous buffer medium, with an emission at 397 nm. Binding of bromadiolone with serum albumins (SA) leads to a marked enhancement in the fluorescence emission intensity and steady state fluorescence anisotropy (r(ss)), accompanied by a blueshift of 10 nm. In the serum albumin-bromadiolone complex, selective excitation of tryptophan (Trp) residue results in emission from bromadiolone, thereby indicating a Förster type energy transfer from Trp to BRD. This quenching of Trp fluorescence by BRD was used to estimate the binding constant of the SA-BRD complex. The binding constants for BRD with BSA and HSA were 7.5 x 10(4) and 3.7 x 10(5)L mol(-1), respectively. Based on this, a new method involving SA as fluorescence-enhancing reagent for estimation of BRD in aqueous samples has been suggested. The detection limits of bromadiolone under the optimum conditions were 0.77 and 0.19 microg mL(-1) in presence of BSA and HSA, respectively. PMID:15925260

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic study of crude petroleum oils: influence of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Alan G

    2004-05-01

    The fluorescence of crude petroleum oils is sensitive to changes in chemical composition and many different fluorescence methods have been used to characterize crude oils. The use of fluorescence lifetimes to quantitatively characterize oil composition has practical advantages over steady-state measurements, but there have been comparatively few studies in which the lifetime behavior is correlated with gross chemical compositional data. In this study, the fluorescence lifetimes for a series of 23 crude petroleum oils with American Petroleum Institute (API) gravities of between 10 and 50 were measured at several emission wavelengths (450-785 nm) using a 380 nm light emitting diode (LED) excitation source. It was found that the intensity average fluorescence lifetime (tau) at any emission wave-length does not correlate well with either API gravity or aromatic concentration. However, it was found that tau is strongly negatively correlated with both the polar and sulfur concentrations and positively correlated with the corrected alkane concentration. This indicates that the fluorescence behavior of crude petroleum oils is governed primarily by the concentration of quenching species. All the strong lifetime-concentration correlations are nonlinear and show a high degree of scatter, especially for medium to light oils with API gravities of between 25 and 40. The degree of scatter is greatest for oils where the concentrations (wt %) of the polar fraction is approximately 10 +/- 4%, the asphaltene component is approximately 1 +/- 0.5%, and sulfur is 0.5 +/- 0.4%. This large degree of scatter precludes the use of average fluorescence lifetime data obtained with 380 nm excitation for the accurate prediction of the common chemical compositional parameters of crude petroleum oils. PMID:15165340

  12. Spectroscopical study of bacteriopurpurinimide-naphthalimide conjugates for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Pavel A; Sergeeva, Antonina N; Fedorova, Olga A; Fedorov, Yuri V; Reshetnikov, Roman I; Schelkunova, Anastasiya E; Grin, Mikhail A; Mironov, Andrey F; Jonusauskas, Gediminas

    2014-04-01

    Two novel bis(chromophoric) dyads ABPI-NI1 and ABPI-NI2 containing 1,8-naphthalimide and bacteriopurpurinimide units linked by p-phenylene-methylene (ABPI-NI1) and pentamethylene (ABPI-NI2) spacers were prepared to test their ability to be used in the design of effective agents for both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescent tumor imaging. Photophysical studies revealed that the emission from the naphthalimide chromophore in both conjugates was partially quenched due to resonance energy transfer between the photoactive components. Compound ABPI-NI2 with more sterically flexible oligomethylene group demonstrated higher fluorescence intensity as compared with that for ABPI-NI1. PMID:24727406

  13. Encapsulation of serotonin in β-cyclodextrin nano-cavities: Fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sudip; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2010-06-01

    Serotonin is a physiologically important biogenic amine, deficiency of which leads to mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, infantile autism, and depression. Both β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its chemically substituted synthetic varieties (often possessing enhanced aqueous solubility and improved drug complexing abilities) are finding wide applications as drug delivery vehicles. Here we have studied the encapsulation of serotonin in β-CD and succinyl-2-hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (SHP-β-CD) by exploiting the intrinsic serotonin fluorescence. Enhanced fluorescence emission intensity (which increases by ˜18% and 34% in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) and anisotropy ( r) ( r = 0.075 and 0.1 in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) are observed in presence of the cyclodextrins. From the fluorescence data host-guest interaction with 1:1 stoichiometry is evident, the association constants ( K) being 126.06 M -1 and 461.62 M -1 for β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively. Additionally, molecular docking and semiempirical calculations have been carried out which provide, for the first time, detailed insights regarding the encapsulation process. In particular, it is evident that the indole ring is inserted within the β-CD cavity with the aliphatic amine side chain protruding towards the primary rim of the β-CD cavity. Docking calculations reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions are involved in the formation of the inclusion complex. Semiempirical calculations indicate that formation of the 1:1 inclusion complex is energetically favorable which is consistent with the fluorescence data.

  14. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of highly fluorescent β-enaminone based boron complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, Haribhau S.; Gadilohar, Balu L.; Shankarling, Ganapati S.

    2015-07-01

    The newly synthesized 1, 1, 2-trimethyl-1H benzo[e]indoline based β-enaminone boron complexes exhibited the intense fluorescence (Fmax = 522-547 nm) in solution as well as in solid state (Fmax = 570-586 nm). These complexes exhibited large stoke shift, excellent thermal and photo stability when compared to the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) colorants. Optimized geometry and orbital distribution in ground states were computed by employing density functional theory (DFT). The cyclic voltammetry study revealed the better electron transport ability of these molecules than current electroluminescent materials like tris(8-hydroxyquinoli-nato)-aluminium (Alq3) and BODIPY, which can find application in electroluminescent devices.

  15. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of highly fluorescent β-enaminone based boron complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Haribhau S; Gadilohar, Balu L; Shankarling, Ganapati S

    2015-07-01

    The newly synthesized 1, 1, 2-trimethyl-1H benzo[e]indoline based β-enaminone boron complexes exhibited the intense fluorescence (Fmax=522-547 nm) in solution as well as in solid state (F max=570-586 nm). These complexes exhibited large stoke shift, excellent thermal and photo stability when compared to the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) colorants. Optimized geometry and orbital distribution in ground states were computed by employing density functional theory (DFT). The cyclic voltammetry study revealed the better electron transport ability of these molecules than current electroluminescent materials like tris(8-hydroxyquinoli-nato)-aluminium (Alq3) and BODIPY, which can find application in electroluminescent devices. PMID:25813165

  16. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies on the Complexation of Antidiabetic Drugs with Glycosylated Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seedher, N.; Kanojia, M.

    2013-11-01

    Glycosylation decreases the association constant values and hence the binding affinity of human serum albumin (HSA) for the antidiabetic drugs under study. The percentage of HAS-bound drug at physiological temperature was only about 21-38 % as compared to 46-74 % for non-glycosylated HSA. Thus the percentage of free drug available for an antihyperglycemic effect was about double (62-79 %) compared to the values for non-glycosylated HSA. Much higher free drug concentrations available for pharmacological effect can lead to the risk of hypoglycemia. Hydrophobic interactions were predominantly involved in the binding. In the binding of gliclazide, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions were involved. Site specificity for glycosylated HSA was the same as that for non-glycosylated HSA; gliclazide and repaglinide bind only at site II whereas glimepiride and glipizide bind at both sites I and II. Glycosylation, however, caused conformational changes in albumin, and the binding region within site II was different for glycosylated and non-glycosylated albumin. Stern-Volmer analysis also indicated the conformational changes in albumin as a result of glycosylation and showed that the dynamic quenching mechanism was valid for fluorescence of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated HSA.

  17. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2008-11-03

    In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, bequerelite, clarkeite, curite, schoepite and compregnacite, and compared their spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra depend on the stoichiometry of the mineral. For the phosphate minerals the fluorescence spectra closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared with those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broadened and less resolved. The much enhanced spectra resolution at LHeT allows more accurate calculation of the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, ν1, corresponding to the average spacing of the vibronic peaks of the fluorescence spectra and the spectral origin as reflected by the position of the first vibronic band. It was found that both the average ν1 and λ1 values correlate well with the average basicity of the inorganic anion.

  18. Compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Hamdan, Khaled; Hewett, Jacqueline; Makaryceva, Juljia; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Padgett, Miles J.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for in vivo point monitoring of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence, as a non-invasive method of differentiating normal and cancerous tissue. This instrument incorporates a 405nm diode laser with a shutter to prevent exposure of tissue to harmful light doses and reduce photobleaching, a bifurcated optical fibre to allow illumination of tissue and collection of fluorescence with a single fibre, a compact grating spectrometer for collection of spectra and a PC for system control. We present spectra obtained using this system both during routine gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy for cancer detection and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) for monitoring of treatment progress. These results illustrate the potential of the system to be used for fluorescence monitoring in a variety of clinical applications.

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of fluorescent 4-aminoantipyrine analogues: Molecular docking and in vitro cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Premnath, D; Selvakumar, P Mosae; Ravichandiran, P; Selvan, G Tamil; Indiraleka, M; Vennila, J Jannet

    2016-01-15

    Two substituted aromatic carbonyl compounds (compounds 1 and 2) of 4-aminoantipyrine were synthesized by condensation of fluorine substituted benzoyl chlorides and 4-aminoantipyrine. The structures of synthesized derivatives were established on the basis of UV-Vis, IR, and Mass, (1)H, (13)C NMR and Fluorescence spectroscopy. Both compounds showed significant fluorescence emission and two broad emission bands were observed in the region at 340 nm and 450 nm on excitation at 280 nm. Theoretically to prove that the molecule has anticancer activity against cervical cancer cells, the compounds were analyzed for molecular docking interactions with HPV16-E7 target protein by Glide protocol. Furthermore, 4-aminoantipyrine derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cervical cancer cells (SiHa) by MTT assay. Compound 1 showed two fold higher activity (IC50=0.912 μM) over compound 2, and its activity was similar to that of Pazopanib, suggesting that although the two compounds were chemically very similar the difference in substituent on the phenyl moiety caused changes in properties. PMID:26298678

  20. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of fluorescent 4-aminoantipyrine analogues: Molecular docking and in vitro cytotoxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premnath, D.; Mosae Selvakumar, P.; Ravichandiran, P.; Tamil Selvan, G.; Indiraleka, M.; Jannet Vennila, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two substituted aromatic carbonyl compounds (compounds 1 and 2) of 4-aminoantipyrine were synthesized by condensation of fluorine substituted benzoyl chlorides and 4-aminoantipyrine. The structures of synthesized derivatives were established on the basis of UV-Vis, IR, and Mass, 1H, 13C NMR and Fluorescence spectroscopy. Both compounds showed significant fluorescence emission and two broad emission bands were observed in the region at 340 nm and 450 nm on excitation at 280 nm. Theoretically to prove that the molecule has anticancer activity against cervical cancer cells, the compounds were analyzed for molecular docking interactions with HPV16-E7 target protein by Glide protocol. Furthermore, 4-aminoantipyrine derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cervical cancer cells (SiHa) by MTT assay. Compound 1 showed two fold higher activity (IC50 = 0.912 μM) over compound 2, and its activity was similar to that of Pazopanib, suggesting that although the two compounds were chemically very similar the difference in substituent on the phenyl moiety caused changes in properties.

  1. Fluorescent Ag nanoclusters prepared in aqueous poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) solutions: a spectroscopic study of their excited state dynamics, size and local environment.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Manika; Mandal, Debabrata

    2016-01-28

    Stable, fluorescent Ag nanoclusters were prepared in aqueous solutions of Na(+) salt of the carboxylate-rich polymer poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) under brief spells of UV irradiation. The nanoclusters were nearly spherical, with diameters within 1.90 ± 0.50 nm, but displayed a prominent red edge excitation shift (REES) of fluorescence upon exciting within the visible absorption band, indicating heterogeneity of energy level distributions. Spectroscopic studies revealed that irrespective of whether the nanoclusters are excited in their UV or visible absorption bands, their fluorescence always ensues from the same manifold of emissive states, with a broad range of fluorescence lifetimes from ∼150 fs to 1 ns. PMID:26700465

  2. Identification of Medicinally Active Ingredient in Ultradiluted Digitalis purpurea: Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Cyclic-Voltammetric Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Purkait, Bulbul

    2012-01-01

    Serially diluted and agitated (SAD) drugs available commercially are in use with great faith because of the astonishing results they produce. The scientific viewpoint attached to the centuries-old therapy with SAD drugs, as in homeopathy, remained doubtful for want of appropriate research and insufficient evidence base. The conflicting points related to SAD drug mostly related to the level of concentrations/dilutions, use of drug in contradictory clinical conditions compared to the modern system of medicine, identification of medicinally active ingredient in concentrations and dilutions used in commercially available SAD drugs, and lack of laboratory-based pharmacological data vis-à-vis modern medicine. Modus operandi of SAD drug is also unknown. To address some of these issues an analytical study was carried out wherein commercially available SAD drug Digitalis purpurea, commonly used in different systems of medicine, was put to test. Various concentrations of commercially available Digitalis purpurea were analyzed using analytical methods: cyclic voltammetry, emission spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy. These analytical methods apparently identified the medicinal ingredients and effect of serial dilution in commercial preparation of the drugs. PMID:22606641

  3. Silver-Gold Nanocomposite Substrates for Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence: Ensemble and Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Studies.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the studies involving the interactions of fluorophores with plasmonic nanostructures or nanoparticles. These interactions lead to several favorable effects such as increase in the fluorescence intensities, increased photostabilities, and reduced excited-state lifetimes that can be exploited to improve the capabilities of present fluorescence methodologies. In this regard, we report the use of newly developed silver-gold nanocomposite (Ag-Au-NC) structures as substrates for metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). The Ag-Au-NC substrates have been prepared by a one-step galvanic replacement reaction from thin silver films coated on glass slides. This approach is simple and suitable for the fabrication of MEF substrates with large area. We have observed about 15-fold enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of ATTO655 from ensemble fluorescence measurements using these substrates. The fluorescence enhancement on the Ag-Au-NC substrates is also accompanied by a reduction in the fluorescence lifetime of ATTO655, which is consistent with the fluorophore-plasmon coupling mechanism. Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been performed to gain more insight into the metal-fluorophore interactions and to unravel the heterogeneity in the interaction of individual fluorophores with the fabricated substrates. The single-molecule studies are in good agreement with the ensemble measurements and show maximum enhancements of ~50-fold for molecules located in proximity to the "hotspots" on the substrates. In essence, the Ag-Au-NC substrates have a very good potential for various MEF applications.

  4. Silver–Gold Nanocomposite Substrates for Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence: Ensemble and Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the studies involving the interactions of fluorophores with plasmonic nanostructures or nanoparticles. These interactions lead to several favorable effects such as increase in the fluorescence intensities, increased photostabilities, and reduced excited-state lifetimes that can be exploited to improve the capabilities of present fluorescence methodologies. In this regard, we report the use of newly developed silver–gold nanocomposite (Ag–Au–NC) structures as substrates for metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). The Ag–Au–NC substrates have been prepared by a one-step galvanic replacement reaction from thin silver films coated on glass slides. This approach is simple and suitable for the fabrication of MEF substrates with large area. We have observed about 15-fold enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of ATTO655 from ensemble fluorescence measurements using these substrates. The fluorescence enhancement on the Ag–Au–NC substrates is also accompanied by a reduction in the fluorescence lifetime of ATTO655, which is consistent with the fluorophore–plasmon coupling mechanism. Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been performed to gain more insight into the metal–fluorophore interactions and to unravel the heterogeneity in the interaction of individual fluorophores with the fabricated substrates. The single-molecule studies are in good agreement with the ensemble measurements and show maximum enhancements of ~50-fold for molecules located in proximity to the “hotspots” on the substrates. In essence, the Ag–Au–NC substrates have a very good potential for various MEF applications. PMID:22707999

  5. Single-Particle Spectroscopic Study on Fluorescence Enhancement by Plasmon Coupled Gold Nanorod Dimers Assembled on DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taishi; Gao, Nengyue; Li, Shuang; Lang, Matthew J; Xu, Qing-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence has attracted much attention due to its scientific importance and lots of potential applications. Plasmon coupled metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated to further improve the enhancement effects. Conventional studies of metal-enhanced fluorescence on the bulk systems are complicated by the ensemble average effects over many critical factors with large variations. Here, fluorescence enhancement of ATTO-655 by a plasmon coupled gold nanorod dimer fixed on a DNA origami nanobreadboard was studied on the single-particle level. A series of gold nanorod dimers with linear orientation and different gap distances ranging from 6.1 to 26.0 nm were investigated to explore the plasmon coupling effect on fluorescence enhancement. The results show that the dimer with the smallest gap (6.1 nm) gives the highest enhancement (470-fold), and the enhancement gradually decreases as the gap distance increases and eventually approaches that from a monomer (120-fold). This trend is consistent with the numerical calculation results. This study indicates that plasmon coupling in gold nanorod dimers offers further increased excitation efficiency to achieve large fluorescence enhancement.

  6. Exploring spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of new fluorescent ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Marwani, Hadi M

    2013-03-01

    In the current study, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of newly prepared ionic liquids were investigated. Ionic liquids were synthesized via a simple and straightforward route using a metathesis reaction of either N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine monohydrochloride or N-phenacylpyridinium bromide with bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium in water. High yield and purity were obtained for the resultant ionic liquids. Data acquired by use of (1)H NMR and FT-IR measurements were consistent with the chemical structures of newly prepared ionic liquids. Results of thermal gravimetric analysis also implied that these ionic liquids have good thermal stability. In addition, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements provided that new ionic liquids are good absorbent and fluorescent. Time-based fluorescence steady-state measurements showed that ionic liquids have high photostability against photobleaching. For a deeper mechanistic understanding of the analytical potential of newly synthesized ionic liquids, spectroscopic and physicochemical parameters, including singlet absorption, extinction coefficient, fluorescence quantum yield, Stokes shift, oscillator strength and dipole moment, were also investigated.

  7. Effect of room temperature surface active ionic liquids on aggregated nanostructures of γ-Cyclodextrins: A picosecond fluorescence spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Surajit; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-05-01

    In this Letter we report on controllable transition of aggregated γ-Cyclodextrins (γ-CDs) nanostructures by tuning the concentration of a long chain ionic liquid, 1-dodecyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C12mimCl) added to the aqueous solution of γ-CDs. The gradual increase in concentration of C12mimCl first results in the breaking of γ-CDs aggregates by the formation of inclusion complexes with C12mimCl and then self-organizes into a new supramolecular aggregate. This spontaneous transition from one nanostructure to another has been established by spectroscopic and microscopic studies. It is worth to mention that addition of 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C8mimCl) does not lead to any such transition.

  8. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Properties of Normal and Abnormal Biomedical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Asima

    Steady state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy and native fluorescence is used to study the physical and optical properties occurring in diseased and non-diseased biological human tissue, in particular, cancer of the human breast, artery and the dynamics of a photosensitizer useful in photodynamic therapy. The main focus of the research is on the optical properties of cancer and atherosclerotic tissues as compared to their normal counterparts using the different luminescence based spectroscopic techniques such as steady state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, excitation spectroscopy and phosphorescence. The excitation and steady-state spectroscopic fluorescence using visible excitation wavelength displays a difference between normal and malignant tissues. This difference is attributed to absorption of the emission by hemoglobin in normal tissues. This method using 488nm fails to distinguish neoplastic tissue such as benign tissues and tumors from malignant tumors. The time-resolved fluorescence at visible, near -uv and uv excitation wavelengths display non-exponential profiles which are significantly different for malignant tumors as compared to non-malignant tissues only with uv excitation. The differences observed with visible and near-uv excitation wavelengths are not as significant. The non-exponential profiles are interpreted as due to a combination of fluorophores along with the action of non-radiative processes. Low temperature luminescence studies confirm the occurrence of non-radiative decay processes while temporal studies of various relevant biomolecules indicate the probable fluorophores responsible for the observed signal in tissues. Phosphorescence from human tissues have been observed for the first time and lifetimes of a few hundred nanoseconds are measured for malignant and benign tissues. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of normal artery and atherosclerotic plaque have shown that a combination of two excitation wavelengths can

  9. Biomolecular interaction study of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin and effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding by fluorescence, 3D, synchronous, CD, and Raman spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Bolattin, Mallavva B; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2016-07-01

    Spectrofluoremetric technique was employed to study the binding behavior of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at different temperatures. Binding study of bovine serum albumin with hydralazine has been studied by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and confirmed by three-dimensional, synchronous, circular dichroism, and Raman spectroscopic methods. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding was studied. The experimental results showed a static quenching mechanism in the interaction of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin. The binding constant and the number of binding sites are calculated according to Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters ∆H(o) , ∆G(o) , ∆S(o) at different temperatures were calculated. These indicated that the hydrogen bonding and weak van der Waals forces played an important role in the interaction. Based on the Förster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding average distance, r, between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (hydralazine) was evaluated and found to be 3.95 nm. Spectral results showed that the binding of hydralazine to BSA induced conformational changes in BSA. The effect of common ions on the binding of hydralazine to BSA was also examined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with coumarin-8-yl Schiff-bases: Spectroscopic, in vitro antimicrobial, DNA cleavage and fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sangamesh A.; Unki, Shrishila N.; Kulkarni, Ajaykumar D.; Naik, Vinod H.; Badami, Prema S.

    2011-09-01

    A new series of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of the type ML·2H 2O of Schiff-bases derived from m-substituted thiosemicarbazides and 8-acetyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic studies. Schiff-bases exhibit thiol-thione tautomerism wherein sulphur plays an important role in the coordination. The coordination possibility of the Schiff-bases towards metal ions have been proposed in the light of elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-vis, FAB-mass, ESR and fluorescence), magnetic and thermal studies. The low molar conductance values in DMF indicate that, the metal complexes are non-electrolytes. The cyclic voltammetric studies suggested that, the Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes are of single electron transfer quasi-reversible nature. The Schiff-bases and its metal complexes have been evaluated for their in vitro antibacterial ( Escherichia coli, Staphilococcus aureus, Bascillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi) and antifungal activities ( Candida albicans, Cladosporium and Aspergillus niger) by MIC method. The Schiff-base I and its metal complexes exhibited DNA cleavage activity on isolated DNA of A. niger.

  11. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of segmental mobility in aequorin and a green fluorescent protein from Aequorea forskalea

    SciTech Connect

    Nageswara Rao, B.D.; Kemple, M.D.; Prendergast, F.G.

    1980-10-01

    Aequorin is a protein of low molecular weight (20,000) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea forskalea which emits blue light upon the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This bioluminescence requires neither exogenous oxygen nor any other cofactors. The light emission occurs from an excited state of a chromophore (an imidazolopyrazinone) which is tightly and noncovalently bound to the protein. Apparently the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ by the protein induces changes in the protein conformation which allow oxygen, already bound or otherwise held by the protein, to react with and therein oxidize the chromophore. The resulting discharged protein remains intact, with the Ca/sup 2 +/ and the chromophore still bound, but is incapable of further luminescence. The fluorescence spectrum of this discharged protein and the bioluminescence spectrum of the original charged aequorin are identical. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) of approx. 30,000 mol wt isolated from the same organism, functions in vivo as an acceptor of energy from aequorin and subsequently emits green light. We are applying proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy to examine structural details of, and fluctuations associated with the luminescent reaction of aequorin and the in vivo energy transfer from aequorin to the GFP.

  12. Dual-modal silica nanoprobes with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic and fluorescent signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Myung

    2015-07-01

    We present that dual-modal silica nanoprobes based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and fluorescence, demonstrating the several combinations of two spectroscopic signals for the noble combinatorial nanoprobes (F-SERS dot). Their synthetic procedure was introduced and dual-modal spectroscopic analyses were performed as preliminary studies. Hopefully, F-SERS dots will be one of promising and multifunctional nanoprobes for the various in vitro and in vivo biological diagnoses and screenings.

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic and DFT studies of novel fluorescent dyes: 3-aminoimidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone moieties.

    PubMed

    Shahrisa, Aziz; Safa, Kazem Dindar; Esmati, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone ring were synthesized by three-component condensation of 4-pyrone carbaldehydes, 2-aminopyridines and isocyanides. Bismuth (III) chloride was used as a catalyst in these reactions and desired products were synthesized in good yields at a very short period of time under solvent free conditions. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of these compounds were investigated. It shown that two of these compounds (10f and 10g) exhibit intense fluorescence in dichloromethane. Optimized ground-state molecular geometries and orbital distributions of these two fluorescent dyes were obtained using density functional theory (DFT). Thermogravimetric analysis and electrochemical properties of these compounds were also studied. PMID:24113013

  14. Spectroscopic Analysis of Today's Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Edward

    2012-03-01

    In today's consumer market, there are many different light bulbs that claim to produce `natural' light. In my research, I both quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed this claim. First, utilizing a spectroscope, I compared the spectra emitted by different brands and types of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs to the spectra emitted by the Sun. Once the bulbs were quantitatively analyzed, I proceeded to qualitatively analyze them by exposing subjects to the different bulbs. The subjects were asked to rate the quality of color in different pictures illuminated by each type of CFL. From these tests, I was able to determine the ``best'' CFL bulbs, and conclude whether the health risks associated with CFL bulbs outweigh the cost savings, longevity of the bulbs, and/or quality of light benefits.

  15. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  16. Shedding light on the photostability of two intermolecular charge-transfer complexes between highly fluorescent bis-1,8-naphthalimide dyes and some π-acceptors: A spectroscopic study in solution and solid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Ismail, Lamia A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the great importance of the various uses of 1,8-naphthalimides in the trends of biology, medicine and industry, the current study focused on extending the scope of these dyes by introducing some of their charge-transfer (CT) complexes. For this purpose, two highly fluorescent bis-1,8-naphthalimide dyes and their complexes with some π-acceptors have been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. The π-acceptors include picric acid (PA), chloranilic acid (CLA), tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ). The molecular structure, spectroscopic and fluorescence properties as well as the binding modes were deduced from IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectral studies. The binding ratio of complexation was determined to be 1:1 according to the elemental analyses and photometric titrations. It has been found that the order of acceptance ability for the different acceptors is TCNQ > DDQ > CLA > PA. The photostability of 1,8-naphthalimide dye as a donor and its charge-transfer complex doped in polymethyl methacrylate/PMMA were exposed to UV-Vis radiation and the change in the absorption spectra was achieved at different times during irradiation period.

  17. Spectroscopic study of Mentha oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.; Singh, A. K.

    The visible fluorescence and excitation spectra of Mentha oils (Japanese mint oil, peppermint oil and spearmint oil) have been recorded. Different physical constants which are characteristic of the fluorescent molecules have been calculated for all three oils. Results reveal that the same group of organic compounds dominate in the oils of peppermint and spearmint, whereas some different compound is present in Japanese mint oil. It is also found that the fluorescence intensity of these oils is comparable to that of Rhodamine 6G dye in methanol solution. Our studies suggest that Mentha oils may be a useful lasing material in the 450-600 nm wavelength range.

  18. Spectroscopic study of sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanmae, Takeshi

    Optical emissions from sprites--large electric discharges in the mesosphere caused by intense lightning strokes--have been studied for decades. Studies have identified that sprite emissions are primarily composed of molecular band emissions of nitrogen and notably identified the near ultraviolet and blue emission from the N2+ First Negative system, which provided direct evidence of ionization in sprites. This implies that further evidence of the ionization may be provided by the visible and near infrared emission from the N2+ Meinel system, which is more accessible from ground-based platforms, though anticipated strong quenching in the mesosphere and below have made the presence of the emission somewhat controversial. To investigate the presence of the Meinel emission along the vertical extent of sprites, we made ground-based spectral observations in 2005. The observed spectra were mainly composed of the N2 First Positive system, and no or little indication of the Meinel bands were found. This study suggests that the quenching is indeed severe at sprite altitude, and it is difficult to study the ionization process in sprites via the Meinel emission. In addition, the data allowed us to investigate details of the First Positive emission from sprites. The observed First Positive spectra showed that the vibrational distribution of the upper state varies along the vertical extent of sprites, which is in agreement with previous reports, and furthermore this study indicates that the variation is associated with altitude, implying that collisional energy transfer processes play roles in exciting the First Positive emission, particularly at lower altitudes. Recent high-speed imaging observations have revealed the very dynamic nature of sprites: they develop within a few to 10 ms in forms of streamers and columnar glows. The underlying electron energies in these features have been inferred from their emissions in previous measurements, but they lacked either sufficient

  19. Nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1993-02-08

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While our main emphasis is on experimental problems involving heavy-ion accelerators, we have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of our measurements. During the last year we have led several experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and participated in others at Argonne National Laboratory. Also, we continue to be very active in the collaboration to study ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in a RHIC detector R D project. Our experimental work is in four broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) heavy-ion induced transfer reactions, (3) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (4) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas will be described in this document in sections IIA, IIB, IIC, and IID, respectively. Areas (1), (3), and (4) concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Area (2) pursues the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum, both to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions. An important component of our program is the strong emphasis on the theoretical aspects of nuclear structure and reactions.

  20. UV-fluorescence spectroscopic technique in the diagnosis of breast, ovarian, uterus, and cervix cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bidyut B.; Glassman, Wenling S.; Alfano, Robert R.; Cleary, Joseph; Prudente, R.; Celmer, Edward J.; Lubicz, Stephanie

    1991-06-01

    Malignant breast tumors can be separated from benign and normal tissues using uv-fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Using the same method one can also distinguish cancerous tissues from noncancerous ones in case of cervix, uterus and ovary.

  1. Interactions of Isophorone Derivatives with DNA: Spectroscopic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Deiana, Marco; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Massin, Julien; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Andraud, Chantal; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of three new isophorone derivatives, Isoa Isob and Isoc with salmon testes DNA have been investigated using UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. All the studied compounds interact with DNA through intercalative binding mode. The stoichiometry of the isophorone/DNA adducts was found to be 1:1. The fluorescence quenching data revealed a binding interaction with the base pairs of DNA. The CD data indicate that all the investigated isophorones induce DNA modifications. PMID:26069963

  2. DNA cleavage, antimicrobial, spectroscopic and fluorescence studies of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with SNO donor coumarin Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sangamesh A.; Naik, Vinod H.; Kulkarni, Ajaykumar D.; Badami, Prema S.

    2010-01-01

    A series of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of the type ML 2 have been synthesized with Schiff bases derived from methylthiosemicarbazone and 5-formyl-6-hydroxy coumarin/8-formyl-7-Hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The complexes are insoluble in common organic solvents but soluble in DMF and DMSO. The measured molar conductance values in DMF indicate that, the complexes are non-electrolytes in nature. In view of analytical, spectral (IR, UV-vis, ESR, FAB-mass and fluorescence), magnetic and thermal studies, it has been concluded that, all the metal complexes possess octahedral geometry in which ligand is coordinated to metal ion through azomethine nitrogen, thione sulphur and phenolic oxygen atom via deprotonation. The redox behavior of the metal complexes was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry. The Schiff bases and their complexes have been screened for their antibacterial ( Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and antifungal activities ( Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Cladosporium) by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration method. The DNA cleavage is studied by agarose gel electrophoresis method.

  3. Fluorescence quenching of quantum dots by gold nanoparticles: a potential long range spectroscopic ruler.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Zhou, Yadong; Zou, Shengli; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-09-10

    The dependence of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence emission on the proximity of 30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was studied with controlled interparticle distances ranging from 15 to 70 nm. This was achieved by coassembling DNA-conjugated QDs and AuNPs in a 1:1 ratio at precise positions on a triangular-shaped DNA origami platform. A profound, long-range quenching of the photoluminescence intensity of the QDs was observed. A combination of static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements suggests that the quenching is due to an increase in the nonradiative decay rate of QD emission. Unlike FRET, the energy transfer is inversely proportional to the 2.7th power of the distance between nanoparticles with half quenching at ∼28 nm. This long-range quenching phenomena may be useful for developing extended spectroscopic rulers in the future. PMID:25084363

  4. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  5. Preparation of plasmid DNA in transfection complexes for fluorescence and electron spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Malecki, M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop procedures necessary to study mechanisms of receptor mediated gene transfer by means of integrated microscopy. Plasmid DNA was incorporated into a transfection complex consisting of poly(L)lysine and transferrin to which the nuclear localization signal was conjugated. This complex was presented to cultured glioma cells. Preparation of the transfected DNA for imaging was pursued by two methods. In the first method tetramethylrhodamine, nanogold, and ferritin were linked through streptavidin to the biotinylated plasmid DNA. Trafficking of the fluorescent derivatives was studied in living cells with fluorescence microscopy. Then, selected cells were rapidly cryo-immobilized. Ultra-structural distribution of the transfected DNA was imaged with energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. In the second method, the unmodified transfected DNA was detected in cryo-immobilized cells by in situ polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. For laser scanning fluorescence microscopy probes were labeled with tetramethylrhodamine. For ultrastructural analysis by electron spectroscopic imaging, probes containing incorporated digoxigenin were labeled with anti-digoxigenin boronated antibodies. Based upon the developed procedures, it has been demonstrated that the presence of the nuclear localization signal in the transfection complex resulted in rapid nuclear import of the transfected DNA. PMID:9601525

  6. Characterization of fresh and aged natural ingredients used in historical ointments by molecular spectroscopic techniques: IR, Raman and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, L; Riedo, C; Baraldi, C; Nevin, A; Gamberini, M C; D'Andrea, C; Chiantore, O; Goidanich, S; Toniolo, L

    2011-10-01

    Natural organic materials used to prepare pharmaceutical mixtures including ointments and balsams have been characterized by a combined non-destructive spectroscopic analytical approach. Three classes of materials which include vegetable oils (olive, almond and palm tree), gums (Arabic and Tragacanth) and beeswax are considered in this study according to their widespread use reported in ancient recipes. Micro-FTIR, micro-Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies have been applied to fresh and mildly thermally aged samples. Vibrational characterization of these organic compounds is reported together with tabulated frequencies, highlighting all spectral features and changes in spectra which occur following artificial aging. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy has been shown to be particularly useful for the assessment of changes in oils after aging; spectral difference between Tragacanth and Arabic gum could be due to variations in origin and processing of raw materials. Analysis of these materials using non-destructive spectroscopic techniques provided important analytical information which could be used to guide further study.

  7. Structural alterations induced by photodynamic action of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in plasma membrane of glioblastoma (U-87MG) cells: time dependent fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Joshi, K; Joshi, P G; Joshi, N B

    1995-08-01

    Photodynamic action of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) on the plasma membrane of human glioblastoma U-87MG cells was investigated using lipid and protein specific fluorescent probes trimethylammonium-1,6-diphenyl 1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH) and N-(1-pyrene)-maleimide (PM) respectively. Steady state anisotropy, decay time and time dependent anisotropy of these probes in U-87MG cells were measured. Light irradiation caused an increase in the steady state anisotropy of TMA-DPH in cells treated with HpD; however, no change in decay time was observed. Time dependent anisotropy measurements were performed and the data were analyzed using wobbling in cone model. A decrease in the rotational relaxation time (phi) as well as the cone angle (theta(c)) and an increase in the order parameter (S) of TMA-DPH were observed on photosensitization of cells. A decrease in the order parameter (S) of TMA-DPH were observed on photosensitization of cells. A decrease in the steady rate anisotropy and the rotational relaxation time (phi) of PM and enhancement in the lipid peroxidation were also observed. Our results show that the photodynamic action of HpD increases the order in the lipid bilayer and the mobility of the proteins in the plasma membrane of cells. PMID:8655188

  8. [Intermolecular Interactions between Cytisine and Bovine Serum Albumin A Synchronous Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis and Molecular Docking Research].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-hang; Han, Zhong-bao; Ma, Jia-ze; He, Yan; Liu, Li-yan; Xin, Shi-gang; Yu, Zhan

    2016-03-01

    Cytisine (Cy) is one of the alkaloids that exist naturally in the plant genera Laburnum of the family Fabaceae. With strong bioactivities, Cy is commercialized for smoking cessation for years. In this work, the study of intermolecular interactions between Cy and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was performed by applying fluorescence spectroscopic methods under simulated physiological conditions. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching of BSA by Cy was also studied. Parameters such as bathing temperature, time and solution pH were investigated to optimize the fluorescence quenching. The binding type, binding ratio and binding constant between BSA and Cy were calculated by using the Stem-Volmer equation. Experimental results indicated that Cy can quench the fluorescent emission of BSA statically by forming a 1 : 1 type non-covalent complex and the binding constant is 5.6 x 10(3) L x mol(-1). Synchronous fluorescence spectral research shows Cy may affect the fluorescence emission of Trp residues of BSA. Furthermore, molecular docking is utilized to model the complex and probe the plausible quenching mechanism. It can be noted that the hydrogen bindings and hydrophobic interactions between Cy and BSA change the micro-environment of Trp213, which leads to the fluorescence quenching of BSA. PMID:27400521

  9. Time-resolved spectroscopic fluorescence imaging, transient absorption and vibrational spectroscopy of intact and photo-inhibited photosynthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Philip B; Rehman, Shakil; Stevens, Gregory B; George, Doaa

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence, absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques were used to study spinach at the photosystem II (PS II), chloroplast and cellular levels and to determine the effects and mechanisms of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photoinhibition of these structures. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of intact chloroplasts shows significant spatial variations in the component fluorescence spectra in the range 640-740 nm, indicating that the type and distribution of chlorophylls vary markedly with position in the chloroplast. The chlorophyll distributions and excitonic behaviour in chloroplasts and whole plant tissue were studied using picosecond time-gated fluorescence imaging, which also showed UV-induced kinetic changes that clearly indicate that UV-B induces both structural and excitonic uncoupling of chlorophylls within the light-harvesting complexes. Transient absorption measurements and low-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the predominant sites of UV-B damage in PS II are at the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) itself, as well as at specific locations near the OEC-binding sites.

  10. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  11. Spectroscopic and dynamical studies of highly energized small polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.W.; Silbey, R.J.

    1993-12-01

    The authors have initiated a program to perform spectroscopic and dynamic studies of small molecules. Large amplitude motions in excited acetylene were discussed along with plans to record the dispersed fluorescence (DF) and the stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra. SEP spectra were reported for the formyl radical. A Fourier transform spectrometer was discussed with respect to its ability to probe the structure of radicals. This instrument is capable of performing studies using various techniques such as magnetic rotation spectroscopy and sub-Doppler sideband-OODR Zeman (SOODRZ) spectroscopy.

  12. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting. PMID:26995929

  13. Studies on the binding behavior of prodigiosin with bovine hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Ma, Fei; Liu, Shuchao; Wei, Shaohua; Zhou, Jiahong; Zhou, Yanhuai

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the interaction mechanism of prodigiosin (PG) with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) is studied in detail using various spectroscopic technologies. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra demonstrate the interaction process. The Stern-Volmer plot and the time-resolved fluorescence study suggest the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BHb by PG is a static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of PG to BHb. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence studies, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that the conformation of BHb is changed after conjugation with PG.

  14. Studies on the binding behavior of prodigiosin with bovine hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Ma, Fei; Liu, Shuchao; Wei, Shaohua; Zhou, Jiahong; Zhou, Yanhuai

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the interaction mechanism of prodigiosin (PG) with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) is studied in detail using various spectroscopic technologies. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra demonstrate the interaction process. The Stern-Volmer plot and the time-resolved fluorescence study suggest the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BHb by PG is a static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of PG to BHb. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence studies, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that the conformation of BHb is changed after conjugation with PG.

  15. Spectroscopic study in Z-pinch discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Garamoon, A.A.; Saudy, A.H.; Shark, W.

    1995-12-31

    The temporal variation of the emitted line intensity has been investigated, and thus an important information about the dynamic ionization stages in the Z-pinch discharge has been studied. Also the electron temperature Te, has been deduced by using a spectroscopic technique.

  16. Spectroscopic study of photo and thermal destruction of riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astanov, Salikh; Sharipov, Mirzo Z.; Fayzullaev, Askar R.; Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Nizomov, Negmat

    2014-08-01

    Influence of temperature and light irradiation on the spectroscopic properties of aqueous solutions of riboflavin was studied using linear dichroism method, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was established that in a wide temperature range 290-423 K there is a decline of absorbance and fluorescence ability, which is explained by thermodestruction of riboflavin. It is shown that the proportion of molecules, which have undergone degradation, are in the range of 4-28%, and depends on the concentration and quantity of temperature effects. Introduction of hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, as well as different metal ions leads to an increase in the photostability of riboflavin solutions by 2-2.5 times. The observed phenomena are explained by the formation protonation form of riboflavin and a complex between the metal ions and oxygen atoms of the carbonyl group of riboflavin, respectively.

  17. Studying Young Stars with Large Spectroscopic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Galactic archaeology is the study of the history of star formation and chemical evolution in the Milky Way, based on present-day stellar populations. Studies of young stars are a key anchor point for Galactic archaeology, since quantities like the initial mass function and the star formation rate can be studied directly in young clusters and star forming regions. Conversely, massive spectroscopic Galactic archaeology surveys can be used as a data source for young star studies.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  19. Quantum-chemical investigations of spectroscopic properties of a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, T. Yu.; Morozova, Yu. P.; Zharkova, O. M.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Korolev, B. V.

    2012-09-01

    The prodan molecule (6-propionyl-2-dimethylamino naphthalene) - fluorescence probe - is investigated by quantum-chemical methods of intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP). The dipole moments of the ground and excited states, the nature and position of energy levels, the centers of specific solvation, the rate constants of photoprocesses, and the fluorescence quantum yield are estimated. To elucidate the role of the dimethylamino group in the formation of bands and spectral characteristics, the molecule only with the propionyl group (pron) is investigated. The long-wavelength absorption bands of prodan and pron molecules are interpreted. The results obtained for the prodan molecule by the INDO method with original spectroscopic parameterization are compared with the literature data obtained by the DFT/CIS, ZINDO/S, and AM1/CISD methods.

  20. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

  1. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1993-02-08

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While our main emphasis is on experimental problems involving heavy-ion accelerators, we have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of our measurements. During the last year we have led several experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and participated in others at Argonne National Laboratory. Also, we continue to be very active in the collaboration to study ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in a RHIC detector R&D project. Our experimental work is in four broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) heavy-ion induced transfer reactions, (3) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (4) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas will be described in this document in sections IIA, IIB, IIC, and IID, respectively. Areas (1), (3), and (4) concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Area (2) pursues the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum, both to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions. An important component of our program is the strong emphasis on the theoretical aspects of nuclear structure and reactions.

  2. Spectroscopic study of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Seamus; Weldon, Declan N.; Blau, Werner J.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Kastner, J.; Kuzmany, Hans

    1994-11-01

    We present a comprehensive experimental study of the vibrational spectra of nanotubes. There are two main lines observed in the Raman spectrum, one positioned at 1350 cm-1, the D line, and the other at 1580 cm-1, the G line. Both these lines are very similar to those seen with disordered graphite. The disorder induced D line is very weak compared to the G line which is indicative of high crystalline materials. The position and intensity of the D line strongly depends on the energy of the exciting laser. This dispersion effect was also observed for graphitic particles and may be explained by a photoselective resonance process of nanotubes with different sizes. There are two optically active modes in the Infrared spectrum for highly orientated polycrystalline graphite which are the E1u and A2u modes. The E1u mode is positioned at 1587 cm-1 while the A2u mode is positioned at 868 cm-1. The Infrared spectrum of the nanotubes shows both modes although the E1u mode is downshifted to 1575 cm-1.

  3. Integrated Spectroscopic Studies of MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Pieters, C. M.; Hiroi, T.; Lane, M. D.; Marchand, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies of the SNC meteorites continue to be of great interest because they provide the only "ground truth" available for ongoing Mossbauer, thermal emittance, MidIR, nearIR, and visible spectral analysis of the martian surface. We present here results of an integrated series of measurements made on the same split of MIL03346, in order to expand our understanding of the properties of these materials and to relate them to other SNCs.

  4. Macromolecular competition titration method accessing thermodynamics of the unmodified macromolecule-ligand interactions through spectroscopic titrations of fluorescent analogs.

    PubMed

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand-macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein-nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein-nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein-nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand-macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-03-01

    Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic glucocorticoid with potent anti-inflammatory activity that has been used effectively in the treatment of chronic asthma. The present work reports a vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate and gives proposed molecular assignments on the basis of ab initio calculations using BLYP density functional theory with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Several spectral features and band intensities are explained. This study generated a library of information that can be employed to aid the process monitoring of fluticasone propionate.

  6. Spectroscopic Study on the Interaction of 4-dimethylaminochalcones with Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomečková, V.; Revická, M.; Sassen, A.; Veliká, B.; Stupák, M.; Perjési, P.

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic properties of 4'-dimethylaminochalcone ( 1a) and its cyclic analogs 2a-4a have been studied in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (i.e., egg yolk lecithin and dipalmitoylpho sphatidylcholine), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lipoprotein particles (i.e., bovine serum albumin plus egg yolk lecithin). The spectral results showed that compounds 1a-4a formed hydrophobic interactions with the phospholipids, lipoproteins, and BSA at the polar/nonpolar interface. Compounds 3a and 4a exhibited the strongest hydrophobic interactions of all of the compounds tested towards the phospholipids. Compound 2a gave the best fluorescent fluorophore indicating interactions with the lipids, lipoproteins, and proteins. Fluorescent microscopic imaging of breast cancer cells treated with compounds 1a-4a revealed that they could be used to stain all of the cellular components and destroy the nuclear structure. Compounds 1a-4a were found to be concentrated predominantly on the surfaces of the liposomes and lipoproteins.

  7. Spectroscopic studies on the photochemical decarboxylation mechanisms of synthetic pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Ishizaka, Shoji; Kitamura, Noboru

    2012-12-01

    A novel radical trapping technique combined with a fluorescence spectroscopic analysis has been employed to investigate the radical intermediates produced by photodecarboxylation of four synthetic pyrethroids: fenvalerate (SMD), fenpropathrin (DTL), cyphenothrin (GKL), and cypermethrin (AGT). Under photoirradiation at >290 nm, all pyrethroids underwent direct photolysis via homolytic cleavage of the carbon-oxygen bonds in the ester groups. The consumed amount of a nitroxide free radical, as a trapping agent for the intermediate radical of a pyrethroid, was determined by ESR, which was the measure of the reaction yield of a photochemically generated α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl radical common to all pyrethroids. The reactivities of the pyrethroids studied was in the sequence of SMD > DTL > GKL > AGT. Furthermore, nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that geminate recombination of the radical pair within a solvent cage is the main deactivation route of the photochemically generated α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl radical common for all pyrethroids studied.

  8. The Spectroscopic study of {sup 33}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Knudsen, H. H.; Suemmerer, K.

    2011-10-28

    The proton-rich nucleus {sup 33}Ar has been produced at the low-energy facility SPIRAL at GANIL. Spectroscopic studies of gamma and p emission of this nucleus were performed with the 'Silicon Cube' detection system. The analysis of proton and gamma singles and coincidence spectra allowed us to establish a complete decay scheme of this nucleus. The comparison of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution deduced from our experiment and the theoretical one obtained with the Shell Model permitted the determination of a quenching factor for the Gamow-Teller strength.

  9. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  10. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  11. Availability of fluorescence spectroscopic in the accompaniment of formation of corneal cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M. M.; Kurachi, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Faria e Sousa, S. J.; Ventura, L.

    2010-02-01

    The corneal cross-linking is a method that associates riboflavin and ultraviolet light to induce a larger mechanical resistance at cornea. This method has been used for the treatment of Keratoconus. Since cross-linking is recent as treatment, there is a need to verify the effectiveness of the method. Therefore, the viability of the fluorescence spectroscopy technique to follow the cross-linking formation at cornea was studied. Corneas were divided in two measuring procedures: M1 (cornea + riboflavin), and M2 (cornea + riboflavina + light irradiation, 365nm). For fluorescence measurements, a spectrofluorimeter was used, where several wavelengths were selected (between 320nm and 370nm) for cornea excitation. Several fluorescence spectra were collected, at 10 min-interval, during 60 min. Spectra allowed one to observe two very well defined bands of fluorescence: the first one at 400nm (collagen), and the second one at 520nm (riboflavin). After spectra analyses, a decrease of collagen fluorescence was observed for both groups. For riboflavin, on the other hand, there was a fluorescence increase for M1, and a decrease for M2. Thus, it is possible to conclude that it this technique is sensitive for the detection of tissue structural changes during cross-linking treatment, encouraging subsequent studies on quantification of cross-linking promotion in tissue.

  12. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datson, Juliet; Flynn, Chris; Portinari, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims: This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48 000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods: The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar analogues versus a reference solar reflection spectrum. Results: We derive spectroscopic parameters for 148 solar analogues (about 70 are new entries to the literature) and verify with a-posteriori differential tests that our values are well-centred on the solar values. We use our dataset to assess the two alternative calibrations of the GCS parameters; our methods favour the latest revision. We show that the choice of spectral line list or the choice of asteroid or time of observation does not affect the results. We also identify seven solar twins in our sample, three of which are published here for the first time. Conclusions: Our methods provide an independent means to differentially test the calibration of stellar catalogues around the values of a well-known benchmark star, which makes our work interesting for calibration tests of upcoming Galactic surveys. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory under programme ID 077.D

  13. Effect of temperature on the methotrexate BSA interaction: Spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Maciążek, M.; Równicka, J.; Bojko, B.; Pentak, D.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2007-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune and chronic inflammatory illness which affects about one percent of the world's population. Methotrexate (4-amino-10-methylfolic acid) (MTX) also known as amethopterin is commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is transported in the circulary system as a complex with serum albumin. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions of MTX with transporting protein with the use of spectroscopic methods. The binding of MTX to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by monitoring the changes in the emission fluorescence spectra of protein in the presence of MTX at excitation wavelength of 280 nm and 295 nm. The quenching of protein fluorescence at temperature range from 298 K to 316 K was observed. Energy transfer between methotrexate and fluorophores contained in the serum albumin structure was found at the molar ratio MTX:BSA 7.5:1. The relative fluorescence intensity of BSA decreases with increase of temperature. Similar results were observed for BSA excited with 280 nm and 295 nm at the same temperature range. The presence of MTX seems to prevent these changes. Temperature dependence of the binding constant has been presented. The binding and quenching constants for equilibrium complex were calculated using Scatchard and Stern-Volmer method, respectively. The results show that MTX forms π-π complex with aromatic amino acid residues of BSA. The binding site for MTX on BSA was found to be situated in the hydrophobic IIA or IB subdomain where the Trps were located. The spontaneity of MTX-BSA complex formation in the temperature range 298-316 K was ascertained.

  14. Conformational changes monitored by fluorescence study on reconstituted hemoglobins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateshrao, S.; Manoharan, P. T.

    2004-09-01

    Intrinsic steady state fluorescence measurements were performed on a series of reconstituted metal ion and hybrid hemoglobins (Hbs). At 296 nm excitation, the spectrum exhibits a broad and asymmetric feature in the case of copper and nickel reconstituted hemoglobins. Deconvolution of the fluorescence bands clearly reveals the existence of two definite peaks. A similar trend was also observed for hybrid hemoglobins (CuNi, NiCu, CuFe-CO, and NiFe-CO). A guassian fit of the fluorescence bands in these proteins again yields two prominent peaks, which are assigned as due to two different tryptophan (Trp) environments. A relative ratio of the amplitudes of these peaks indicates the percentage of T-character in these molecules. This is in support to our previous findings by other spectroscopic studies on the same molecules. These studies therefore, suggest the presence of two different environments of a tryptophan thereby revealing structural heterogeneity among the subunits.

  15. Steady state fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of normal and diabetic urine at selective excitation wavelength 280 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, Anjana; Pachaiappan, Rekha; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Urine is considered diagnostically important for tits native fluorophores and they vary in their distribution, concentration and physiochemical properties, depending upon the metabolic condition of the subject. In this study, we have made an attempt, to characterize the urine of normal subject and diabetic patients under medication by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed employing the multivariate statistical method linear discriminant analysis (LDA) using leave one out cross validation method. The results were promising in discriminating diabetic urine from that of normal urine. This study in future may be extended to check the feasibility in ruling out the coexisting disorders such as cancer.

  16. Quadrupole resonance spectroscopic study of narcotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; West, Rebecca; Garroway, Allen N.; Lyndquist, R.; Yesinowski, James P.

    1997-02-01

    Bulk narcotic detection systems based upon Quadrupole Resonance Analysis (QRA) technology have a major advantage over imaging technologies, in that QRA is chemical-specific and consequently has a lower rate of false alarms. QRA is a magnetic resonance technology which occurs as a result of the inherent molecular properties of the atomic nuclei in crystalline and amorphous solids. The QRA response is characterized by 1) the precessional frequency of the nucleus, and 2) the nature of the electric field gradient experienced by the nucleus,due to its molecular environment. Another important detection parameter is linewidth, resonant quality. All of these parameters depend on sample purity and manufacturing process. Quantum Magnetics recently carried out a study on the QRA signatures of various narcotic materials with the support of the US Army, US Customs, and the Office of National Drug Control Policy. The aim of the study was to fully characterize the variation in QRA spectroscopic parameters of different samples of cocaine base and cocaine hydrochloride. The results from this study ar discussed here.

  17. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P.

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  18. Fluorescent-spectroscopic and imaging methods of investigations for diagnostics of head and neck tumors and control of PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinak, N. E.; Chental, Victor V.; Komov, D.; Vaculovskaya, E.; Tabolinovskaya, T. D.; Abdullin, N. A.; Pustynsky, I.; Chatikhin, V.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennady A.; Stratonnikov, A. A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Vladimir I.; Zuravleva, V.; Lukjanets, E.

    1996-01-01

    Methodics of PDT control and fluorescent-spectroscopic diagnostic of head and neck tumors and mammary gland cancer (nodular) with the use of Kr, He-Ne and semiconductor lasers and photosensitizer (PS) -- Al phtalocyanin (Photosense) are discussed. The results show that applied diagnostic methods permit us not only to identify the topology and malignancy of a tumor but also to correct PDT process directly during irradiation.

  19. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  20. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of Tb(III) complex with a novel β-diketone ligand as well as spectroscopic studies on the interaction between Tb(III) complex and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenfeng; Tang, Ruiren

    2012-02-01

    A novel aromatic β-diketone ligand, 4-isopropyl-2,6-bisbenzoylactyl pyridine (L), and its corresponding Tb(III) complex Tb2(L)3·5H2O were synthesised in this paper. The ligand was characterized by FT-IR and 1H NMR. The complex was characterized with elemental analysis and FT-IR. The investigation of fluorescence property of the complex showed that the Tb(III) ion could be sensitized efficiently by the ligand. Furthermore, the interaction of Tb2(L)3·5H2O with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by fluorescence quenching spectra, UV-vis absorbance and synchronous fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA by Tb2(L)3·5H2O was analyzed. The binding constants, binding site number and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures were calculated. The results indicated that the Van der Waals and hydrogen bond interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the complex. Moreover, the effect of Tb2(L)3·5H2O on the conformation of BSA was analyzed according to synchronous fluorescence.

  1. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  3. Rapid Flow Analysis Studies with Spectroscopic Detectors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalib, Amlius

    A rapid flow analysis study based on segmented flow and flow injection principles is described in this thesis. The main objective of this study was to establish the response characteristics in continuous flow analysis systems in order to improve sampling rates with several types of spectroscopic detectors. It was found from flame photometric studies that non-segmented flowing streams are applicable to rapid flow analysis with automatic sample aspiration. Calcium was used as a typical example and determined at sampling rates up to 360 h('-1) with a detection limit of 0.05 mg L(' -1). A rapid flow system is reported using direct aspiration for AAS analysis with both manual injection and automatic aspiration techniques, and found to give sampling rates of up to 600-720 samples h('-1). Speed of analysis was reduced by about 50% when using an external peristaltic pump in the flow system design, due to increased sample dispersion. A novel aspect of a rapid flow injection approach reported with ICPAES detection includes the method of injecting samples via a peristaltic pump with simultaneous computer data processing. Determination of serum cations (Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe) was demonstrated as an example of an application of the technique at sampling rates of 240 h('-1). Precision and detection limits for 13 elements in a single standard solution are reported. The use of automated aspiration sampling is also reported in this method for comparison. Further studies on flow characteristics were carried out by a combination of the rapid flow system with very short sampling times as low as 2 seconds using UV-visible spectrophotometric detection. Analysis of human blood serum samples was used as an example where total protein and inorganic phosphate were determined at sampling rates of 240 h('-1) and 360 h('-1) respectively. The novel aspects of the results from these studies include the very rapid sample throughput developed with simple and inexpensive experimental approaches in

  4. Spectroscopic study of 2-[2-(4-cyclaminophenyl)ethen-1-yl] benzothiazoles and their N-allylbenzothiazolium bromides. Solvent and substituent effects on their ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáplovský, Anton; Donovalová, Jana; Magdolen, Peter; Toma, Štefan; Zahradník, Pavol

    2002-01-01

    UV-vis and fluorescence spectra of 2-[2-(4-cyclaminophenyl)ethen-1-yl] benzothiazoles 1 and their N-allylbenzothiazolium bromides 2 have been measured and interpreted. The substitution and solvent effects on electronic structure and spectra have been investigated. The benzothiazolium salts substituted with saturated cyclamines show strong push-pull character and can be used as potential NLO materials. Formation of aggregated structures was observed at higher concentrations of the benzothiazolium bromides.

  5. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  6. Multimodal Spectroscopic Study of Amyloid Fibril Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    VandenAkker, Corianne C; Schleeger, Michael; Bruinen, Anne L; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Velikov, Krassimir P; Heeren, Ron M A; Deckert, Volker; Bonn, Mischa; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a large class of self-assembled protein aggregates that are formed from unstructured peptides and unfolded proteins. The fibrils are characterized by a universal β-sheet core stabilized by hydrogen bonds, but the molecular structure of the peptide subunits exposed on the fibril surface is variable. Here we show that multimodal spectroscopy using a range of bulk- and surface-sensitive techniques provides a powerful way to dissect variations in the molecular structure of polymorphic amyloid fibrils. As a model system, we use fibrils formed by the milk protein β-lactoglobulin, whose morphology can be tuned by varying the protein concentration during formation. We investigate the differences in the molecular structure and composition between long, straight fibrils versus short, wormlike fibrils. We show using mass spectrometry that the peptide composition of the two fibril types is similar. The overall molecular structure of the fibrils probed with various bulk-sensitive spectroscopic techniques shows a dominant contribution of the β-sheet core but no difference in structure between straight and wormlike fibrils. However, when probing specifically the surface of the fibrils with nanometer resolution using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), we find that both fibril types exhibit a heterogeneous surface structure with mainly unordered or α-helical structures and that the surface of long, straight fibrils contains markedly more β-sheet structure than the surface of short, wormlike fibrils. This finding is consistent with previous surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopic results ( VandenAkker et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. , 2011 , 133 , 18030 - 18033 , DOI: 10.1021/ja206513r ). In conclusion, only advanced vibrational spectroscopic techniques sensitive to surface structure such as TERS and VSFG are able to reveal the difference in structure that underlies the distinct morphology and rigidity of different amyloid

  7. Spectroscopic Evidence of Anthropogenic Compounds Extraction from Polymers by Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter in Natural Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, M.; Trojzuck, A.; Voss, D.; Gassmann, S.; Zielinski, O.

    2016-04-01

    FDOM is one of the most important carriers of anthropogenic compounds in natural waters. It can combine with environmental contaminants and polymers to form diverse chemical structures. To this end, here a microfluidic chip was designed for the analysis of these changes in fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) fingerprints due to thermal treatment and varying time intervals of exposure. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) approach was utilized to detect and identify the inherent compounds in sampled FDOM. Strong direct correlations were founded, Spearman rank correlation values (ρ = 0.85 at α = 0.1, n = 4) and linear correlation R2 = 0.8359 were noted between thermal treatment pattern 2 and fluorescence intensity of samples. Materials, acrylic based glue and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) polymer, used to design the microfluidic sensor were determined to possess unique spectral features in the ultraviolet to green spectrum using EEMS. The study therefore provides an insight on methods to identify contaminants in natural waters. This underlines the potential of optical sensors providing measurements at fast intervals, enabling environmental monitoring.

  8. Spectroscopic Study of Multiple IRAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Hovhannisyan, L. R.; Sargsyan, L. A.

    2003-04-01

    Spectroscopic observations by the 2.6 m BAO telescope of IRAS galaxies identified on the basis of the First Byurakan Survey (BIG objects) are reported. Slit spectra were obtained for 16 objects, including components of 7 multiple systems and 2 individual galaxies. The red shifts were measured, and the radial velocities, distances, absolute stellar magnitudes, and infrared and far infrared luminosities were calculated. A diagnostic diagram has been constructed based on the intensity ratios of emission lines and the activity types of the objects have been determined. Two LINERs, five galaxies with composite spectra (Comp, one of which has Sy2 features) and seven HII regions were found. Two objects are ultraluminous IR galaxies (ULIG). It is shown that all the multiple systems are physical pairs or groups. The observed high IR luminosity confirms the view that ULIG/HLIGs may be associated with interactions of galaxies.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of drugs used in the treatment of malignant tumors in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Carstocea, Benone D.; Staicu, Angela; Ionita, Marcel A.; Truica, Sorina; Pascu, Ruxandra

    2001-10-01

    Two classes of substances which may be used in the treatment of malignant tumors in ophthalmology are studied from the point of view of their spectroscopic properties: synthetic porphyrines such as TNP, TPP, TSPP and Zn-TSPP and cytostatics such as 5-fluorouracil. The absorption, excitation and fluorescence spectra of the porphyrins are measured in water and DMSO solutions to allow their efficient use in photodynamic therapy studies at irradiation with UV-laser light. A spectroscopic study of 5-fluorouracyl, a cytostatic drug used in the treatment of ophthalmologic tumors is reported. Absorption, fluorescence excitation/emission spectra were measured for solutions of 5-fluorouracyl at 5 X 10-5 M concentration. The effects of UV-VIS irradiation of on the 5-fluorouracyl solutions were investigated. The irradiation was performed with a classical Xe lamp having a power density of 11 mW/cm2, at time intervals between 15 min and 60 min. While the absorption is not affected by light irradiation, the fluorescence of the solutions is increasing with the irradiation duration.

  10. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Spectroscopic studies on lambda cro protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, C; Kidokoro, S; Takimoto, M; Kyogoku, Y; Wada, A

    1991-06-20

    Spectroscopic (circular dichroism and fluorescence) and thermodynamic studies were conducted on lambda Cro-DNA interactions. Some base substitutions were introduced to the operator and the effects on the conformation of the complex and thermodynamic parameters for dissociation of the complex were examined. It was found that, (1) in the specific binding of Cro with DNA which has a (pseudo) consensus sequence, DNA is overwound, while in non-specific binding it is unchanged, or rather unwound; (2) substitution of central base-pairs or the introduction of a mismatched base-pair at the center of the operator reduces the extent of DNA conformational change on Cro binding and lessens the stability of the Cro-DNA complex, even though there is apparently no direct interaction between Cro and DNA at these positions; (3) stability of the complex increases with the degree of DNA conformational change of the same type during binding; (4) in some cases of specific binding, there are three states in the dissociation of the complex as observed by salt titration: two conformational states for the complex depending on salt concentration and, in non-specific binding, dissociation is a two-state transition; (5) the number of ions involved in interactions between Cro and 17 base-pair DNA is about 7.7 for NaCl titrations; (6) dissociation free energy prediction of the Cro-DNA complex by simple addition of the dissociation free energy change of a single base-pair substitution agrees with our experimental results when DNA overwinding occurs during binding, i.e. in specific binding.

  12. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis of Aromatics from One Ring to Four Rings].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hai-feng; Yue, Zong-yu; Chen, Bei-ling; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to distinguish small aromatics preferably, a Nd : YAG Laser was used to supply an excitation laser, which was adjusted to 0.085 J x cm(-2) at 266 nm. Benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene were used as the representative of different rings aromatics. The fluorescence emission spectra were researched for each aromatic hydrocarbon and mixtures by Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Results showed that the rings number determined the fluorescence emission spectra, and the structure with same rings number did not affect the emission fluorescence spectrum ranges. This was due to the fact that the absorption efficiency difference at 266 nm resulted in that the fluorescence intensities of each aromatic hydrocarbon with same rings number were different and the fluorescence intensities difference were more apparently with aromatic ring number increasing. When the absorption efficiency was similar at 266 nm and the concentrations of each aromatic hydrocarbon were same, the fluorescence intensities were increased with aromatic ring number increasing. With aromatic ring number increasing, the fluorescence spectrum and emission peak wavelength were all red-shifted from ultraviolet to visible and the fluorescence spectrum range was also wider as the absorption efficiency was similar. The fluorescence emission spectra from one to four rings could be discriminated in the following wavelengths, 275 to 320 nm, 320 to 375 nm, 375 to 425 nm, 425 to 556 nm, respectively. It can be used for distinguish the type of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as it exists in single type. As PAHs are usually exist in a variety of different rings number at the same time, the results for each aromatic hydrocarbon may not apply to the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures. For the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures, results showed that the one- or two-ring PAHs in mixtures could not be detected by fluorescence as three- or four-ring PAHs existed in mixture

  13. Mechanism and conformational studies of farrerol binding to bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guowen; Wang, Lin; Fu, Peng; Hu, Mingming

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism and conformational changes of farrerol binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by spectroscopic methods including fluorescence quenching technique, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy under simulative physiological conditions. The results of fluorescence titration revealed that farrerol could strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change and entropy change for the binding were calculated to be -29.92 kJ mol -1 and 5.06 J mol -1 K -1 according to the van't Hoff equation, which suggested that the both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds play major role in the binding of farrerol to BSA. The binding distance r deduced from the efficiency of energy transfer was 3.11 nm for farrerol-BSA system. The displacement experiments of site markers and the results of fluorescence anisotropy showed that warfarin and farrerol shared a common binding site I corresponding to the subdomain IIA of BSA. Furthermore, the studies of synchronous fluorescence, CD and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the binding of farrerol to BSA induced conformational changes in BSA.

  14. Near real time, accurate, and sensitive microbiological safety monitoring using an all-fibre spectroscopic fluorescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanholsbeeck, F.; Swift, S.; Cheng, M.; Bogomolny, E.

    2013-11-01

    Enumeration of microorganisms is an essential microbiological task for many industrial sectors and research fields. Various tests for detection and counting of microorganisms are used today. However most of the current methods to enumerate bacteria require either long incubation time for limited accuracy, or use complicated protocols along with bulky equipment. We have developed an accurate, all-fibre spectroscopic system to measure fluorescence signal in-situ. In this paper, we examine the potential of this setup for near real time bacteria enumeration in aquatic environment. The concept is based on a well-known phenomenon that the fluorescence quantum yields of some nucleic acid stains significantly increase upon binding with nucleic acids of microorganisms. In addition we have used GFP labeled organisms. The fluorescence signal increase can be correlated to the amount of nucleic acid present in the sample. In addition we have used GFP labeled organisms. Our results show that we are able to detect a wide range of bacteria concentrations without dilution or filtration (1-108 CFU/ml) using different optical probes we designed. This high sensitivity is due to efficient light delivery with an appropriate collection volume and in situ fluorescence detection as well as the use of a sensitive CCD spectrometer. By monitoring the laser power, we can account for laser fluctuations while measuring the fluorescence signal which improves as well the system accuracy. A synchronized laser shutter allows us to achieve a high SNR with minimal integration time, thereby reducing the photobleaching effect. In summary, we conclude that our optical setup may offer a robust method for near real time bacterial detection in aquatic environment.

  15. Spectroscopic study of low-lying {sup 16}N levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, D. W.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Smith, M. S.; O'Malley, P. D.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Peters, W. A.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Jones, K. L.; Moazen, B. H.; Paulauskas, S.; Pittman, S. T.; Schmitt, K. T.; Chipps, K. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.; Matei, C.

    2008-11-15

    The magnitude of the {sup 15}N(n,{gamma}){sup 16}N reaction rate in asymptotic giant branch stars depends directly on the neutron spectroscopic factors of low-lying {sup 16}N levels. A new study of the {sup 15}N(d,p){sup 16}N reaction is reported populating the ground and first three excited states in {sup 16}N. The measured spectroscopic factors are near unity as expected from shell model calculations, resolving a long-standing discrepancy with earlier measurements that had never been confirmed or understood. Updated {sup 15}N(n,{gamma}){sup 16}N reaction rates are presented.

  16. The RbCs X(1)Sigma(+) Ground Electronic State: New Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Fellows; Gutterres; Campos; Vergès; Amiot

    1999-09-01

    In this paper a new spectroscopic investigation on the X(1)Sigma(+) electronic ground state of the RbCs molecule is reported. This study is conducted by using laser-induced fluorescence combined with Fourier transform spectroscopy (LIF-FTS). More than 23 000 spectral data are used in a global linear reduction to molecular constants. With these new and improved molecular constants, the potential energy curve has been calculated by the inverted perturbation approach (IPA). Accurate values for the dissociation energy and the long-range parameters have been derived. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of mobile residues in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.L.; Oldfield, E.

    1988-07-12

    The authors have used quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the dynamic structure of the backbone of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R/sub 1/ and JW-3. NMR experiments were performed using an internal sucrose quantitation standard on purple membranes in which one of the following /sup 13/C'-labeled amino acids had been biosynthetically incorporated: glycine, isoleucine, lysine, phenylalanine, and valine. The results suggest that the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain backbone, and possibly one of the connecting loops, undergoes rapid, large angle fluctuations. The results are compared with previous NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic data obtained on bacteriorhodopsin.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    One of the most powerful and versatile methods for studying molecules in solution is fluorescence. Crystallization typically takes place in a concentrated solution environment, whereas fluorescence typically has an upper concentration limit of approximately 1 x 10(exp -5)M, thus intrinsic fluorescence cannot be employed, but a fluorescent probe must be added to a sub population of the molecules. However the fluorescent species cannot interfere with the self-assembly process. This can be achieved with macromolecules, where fluorescent probes can be covalently attached to a sub population of molecules that are subsequently used to track the system as a whole. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process of tetragonal lysozyme crystal nucleation, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P432121 space group. FRET studies are being carried out between cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex 376 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex 425 nm, Em 520 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R0 for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approximately 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 43 helix. The short CB-lys lifetime (approximately 5 ns), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules ((sup 3) 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a second, shorter lifetime (approximately 0.2 ns). Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with a model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and grow, and the relevance of that model to microgravity protein crystal growth

  19. Optical caries diagnostics: comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with method of laser integral fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2000-11-01

    In this research we present the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyses parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries-involved bacterias. He-Ne-laser ((lambda) =632,8 nm, 1-2mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) =655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630nm, 1mW) and He-Ne laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries.

  20. Comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with laser integral fluorescence in optical caries diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2001-05-01

    In this research we represent the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyzes parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries- involved bacteria. Ia-Ne laser ((lambda) equals632.8 nm, 1-2 mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) equals655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630 nm, 1 mW) and Ia-Na laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries).

  1. Raman spectroscopic study of a genetically altered kidney cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Joel; Garcia, Francisco; Centeno, Silvia P.; Joshi, N. V.

    2008-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic investigation of a genetically altered Human Embryonic Kidney Cell (HEK293) along with a pathologically normal cell has been carried out by a conventional method. The genetic alteration was carried out with a standard protocol by using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP). Raman spectra show that there are dramatic differences between the spectrum obtained from a genetically altered cell and that obtained from a pathologically normal cell. The former shows three broad bands; meanwhile the latter shows several sharp peaks corresponding to the ring vibrational modes of Phen, GFP and DNA. The present analysis provides an indication that the force field near Phen located at 64, 65 and 66 was altered during the genetic transformation. The Raman spectrum could be a direct experimental evidence for substantial modifications triggered due to the expression of specific genes.

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis of the interaction of papain with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunchang; Yan, Jinlong; Zhang, Sheli; Li, Junhai; Chen, Dong; Duan, Peigao

    2012-10-01

    The interaction between papain and two typical ionic liquids (ILs), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(8)mim]Cl) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(4)mim]Cl), was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy technique at a pH value of 7.4. The results suggested that ILs could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of papain probably via a static quenching mechanism. The binding constants were determined by employing the fluorescence quenching method. They were very small compared with that of volatile organic solvents, indicating that only very weak interaction between ILs and papain existed. The Gibbs free energy change (∆G), enthalpy change (∆H), and entropy change (∆S) during the interaction of papain and ILs were estimated. Negative values of these parameters indicated that the interaction between ILs and papain was a spontaneous process, also implying that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces played important roles in the interaction processes. PMID:22798189

  3. Spectroscopic fluorescence measurements of lamb and human heart tissue in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidis, George; Zacharakis, Giannis; Kochiadakis, G. E.; Chrysostomakis, S. I.; Vardas, P. E.; Fotakis, Costas; Papazoglou, Theodore G.

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra were obtained during the exposure of lamb heart (n=20) tissue to Argon-ion radiation (457.9nm). Fluorescence spectra from different heart compartments (the left and right atria and ventricles, the myocardium, the epicardium, and the aorta) were recorded. Simple algebraic algorithms based on the spectral intensity variation were constructed in order to detect spectral features and characterize the different cardiac compartments. Additionally, it was investigated whether each chamber exhibited constant spectral response. After the end of each experiment the lamb hearts were stored in formalin (10%). The samples were irradiated again after forty eight (48) hours in order to investigate the spectral differences that appear due to formalin conservation. Similar fluorescence measurements were taken from a limited number of human heart tissues (n=2) ex vivo.

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic, fluorescence properties and biological evaluation of novel Pd(II) and Cd(II) complexes of NOON tetradentate Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omyma A M

    2014-01-01

    The solid complexes of Pd(II) and Cd(II) with N,N/bis(salicylaldehyde)4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine (H2L(1)), and N,N/bis(salicylaldehyde)4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylenediamine (H2L(2)) have been synthesized and characterized by several techniques using elemental analysis (CHN), FT-IR, (1)H NMR, UV-Vis spectra and thermal analysis. Elemental analysis data proved 1:1 stoichiometry for the reported complexes while spectroscopic data indicated square planar and octahedral geometries for Pd(II) and Cd(II) complexes, respectively. The prepared ligands, Pd(II) and Cd(II) complexes exhibited intraligand (π-π(∗)) fluorescence and can potentially serve as photoactive materials. Thermal behavior of the complexes was studied and kinetic parameters were determined by Coats-Redfern method. Both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for antimicrobial activities.

  5. Photophysics of α-furil at room temperature and 77 K: Spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pronab; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2016-06-21

    Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic measurements have been exploited to assign the emissions from different conformations of α-furil (2, 2'-furil) in solution phase at room temperature as well as cryogen (liquid nitrogen, LN2) frozen matrices of ethanol and methylcyclohexane. Room temperature studies reveal a single fluorescence from the trans-planar conformer of the fluorophore or two fluorescence bands coming from the trans-planar and the relaxed skew forms depending on excitation at the nπ(∗) or the ππ(∗) absorption band, respectively. Together with the fluorescence bands, the LN2 studies in both the solvents unambiguously ascertain two phosphorescence emissions with lifetimes 5 ± 0.3 ms (trans-planar triplet) and 81 ± 3 ms (relaxed skew triplet). Quantum chemical calculations have been performed using density functional theory at CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(∗∗) level to prop up the spectroscopic surveillance. The simulated potential energy curves (PECs) illustrate that α-furil is capable of giving two emissions from each of the S1 and the T1 states-one corresponding to the trans-planar and the other to the relaxed skew conformation. Contrary to the other 1,2-dicarbonyl molecular systems like benzil and α-naphthil, α-furil does not exhibit any fluorescence from its second excited singlet (S2) state. This is ascribed to the proximity of the minimum of the PEC of the S2 state and the hill-top of the PEC of the S1 state. PMID:27334172

  6. Photophysics of α-furil at room temperature and 77 K: Spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Pronab; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2016-06-01

    Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic measurements have been exploited to assign the emissions from different conformations of α-furil (2, 2'-furil) in solution phase at room temperature as well as cryogen (liquid nitrogen, LN2) frozen matrices of ethanol and methylcyclohexane. Room temperature studies reveal a single fluorescence from the trans-planar conformer of the fluorophore or two fluorescence bands coming from the trans-planar and the relaxed skew forms depending on excitation at the nπ∗ or the ππ∗ absorption band, respectively. Together with the fluorescence bands, the LN2 studies in both the solvents unambiguously ascertain two phosphorescence emissions with lifetimes 5 ± 0.3 ms (trans-planar triplet) and 81 ± 3 ms (relaxed skew triplet). Quantum chemical calculations have been performed using density functional theory at CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ level to prop up the spectroscopic surveillance. The simulated potential energy curves (PECs) illustrate that α-furil is capable of giving two emissions from each of the S1 and the T1 states - one corresponding to the trans-planar and the other to the relaxed skew conformation. Contrary to the other 1,2-dicarbonyl molecular systems like benzil and α-naphthil, α-furil does not exhibit any fluorescence from its second excited singlet (S2) state. This is ascribed to the proximity of the minimum of the PEC of the S2 state and the hill-top of the PEC of the S1 state.

  7. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V K; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2016-02-01

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  8. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2016-02-01

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  9. Spectroscopic features of dual fluorescence/luminescence resonance energy-transfer molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Tsourkas, Andrew; Behlke, Mark A; Xu, Yangqing; Bao, Gang

    2003-08-01

    Molecular beacons have the potential to become a powerful tool in gene detection and quantification in living cells. Here we report a novel dual molecular beacons approach to reduce false-positive signals in detecting target nucleic acids in homogeneous assays. A pair of molecular beacons, each containing a fluorescence quencher and a reporter fluorophore, one with a donor and a second with an acceptor fluorophore, hybridize to adjacent regions on the same target resulting in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The detection of a FRET signal leads to a substantially increased signal-to-background ratio compared with that seen in single molecular beacon assays and enables discrimination between fluorescence due to specific probe/target hybridization and a variety of possible false-positive events. Further, when a lanthanide chelate is used as a donor in a dual-probe assay, extremely high signal-to-background ratios can be achieved owing to the long lifetime and sharp emission peaks of the donor and the time-gated detection of acceptor fluorescence emission. These new approaches allow for the ultrasensitive detection of target molecules in a way that could be readily applied to real-time imaging of gene expression in living cells.

  10. Spectroscopic parameters of the cuticle and ethanol extracts of the fluorescent cave isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Isopoda, Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Giurginca, Andrei; Šustr, Vladimír; Tajovský, Karel; Giurginca, Maria; Matei, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The body surface of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Frivaldsky, 1863) showed blue autofluorescence under UV light (330–385 nm), using epifluorescence microscopy and also in living individuals under a UV lamp with excitation light of 365 nm. Some morphological cuticular structures expressed a more intense autofluorescence than other body parts. For this reason, only the cuticle was analyzed. The parameters of autofluorescence were investigated using spectroscopic methods (molecular spectroscopy in infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) in samples of two subspecies of Mesoniscus graniger preserved in ethanol. Samples excited by UV light (from 350 to 380 nm) emitted blue light of wavelengths 419, 420, 441, 470 and 505 nm (solid phase) and 420, 435 and 463 (ethanol extract). The results showed that the autofluorescence observed from living individuals may be due to some β-carboline or coumarin derivatives, some crosslinking structures, dityrosine, or due to other compounds showing similar excitation-emission characteristics. PMID:26261444

  11. Optical spectral fingerprints of tissues from patients with different breast cancer histologies using a novel fluorescence spectroscopic device.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, Laura A; Pu, Yang; Sordillo, Peter P; Budansky, Yury; Alfano, R R

    2013-10-01

    The fluorescence of paired human breast malignant and normal tissue samples was investigated using a novel fluorescence spectroscopic (S3-LED) ratiometer unit with no moving parts. This device can measure the emission spectra of key native organic biomolecules such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen and elastin within tissues by using LED (light emitting diode) excitation sources coupled to an optical fiber. With this device, the spectral profiles of 11 paired breast cancerous and normal samples from 11 patients with breast carcinoma were obtained. In each of the 11 cases, marked increases in the tryptophan levels were found in the breast carcinoma samples when compared to the normal breast tissues. In the breast cancer samples, there were also consistently higher ratios of the 340 to 440 nm and the 340 to 460 nm intensity peaks after 280 nm excitation, likely representing an increased tryptophan to NADH ratio in the breast cancer samples. This difference was seen in the spectral profiles of the breast cancer patients regardless of whether they were HER2 positive or negative or hormone receptor positive or negative, and was found regardless of menopausal status, histology, stage, or tumor grade.

  12. Optical spectroscopic studies of mononitrated benzo[a]pyrenes.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Shubham; Onchoke, Kefa K; Rajesh, Cheruvallil S; Hadad, Christopher M; Dutta, Prabir K

    2009-11-12

    Spectroscopic properties, including absorption, emission spectra, and excited-state lifetimes of the mononitrated benzo[a]pyrenes (NBaPs), specifically 1-, 3-, and 6-nitrobenzo[a]pyrenes (1-, 3-, and 6-NBaP), are reported, and correlations with structure are developed. With 1- and 3-NBaP, bathochromic shifts are observed in the absorption spectra. The quantum yields of emission display the following trend: BaP > 6-NBaP > 1-NBaP approximately 3-NBaP. Fluorescence lifetimes for nitrated BaPs were approximately 6 to 7 times shorter than that of BaP. With the help of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), assignments of the electronic transitions are proposed and are in good agreement with the electronic spectra for the NBaPs in methanol. On the basis of optimization of the triplet states, different photochemical consequences are discussed, and the observed fluorescence quenching is explained. Changes in the electron density distributions in the ground and excited states calculated at the second-order coupled-cluster level using the resolution-of-the-identity approximation (RI-CC2) provide information about the possible mechanism of photochemical reactions of NBaPs. Correlations between the orientation of the nitro group relative to the aromatic plane and the observed properties of the NBaP are discussed. PMID:19888776

  13. Spectroscopic studies of inclusion complexes of methyl- p-dimethylaminobenzoate and its ortho derivative with α- and β-cyclodextrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowska, Agata; Józefowicz, Marek; Heldt, Janina R.; Heldt, Józef

    2012-02-01

    The effects of α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) on the both emission modes (LE - locally excited and TICT - twisted intramolecular charge transfer) of the fluorescence spectrum of methyl- p-dimethylaminobenzoate (I) and its o-methoxy (II) derivative in aqueous solution have been investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. It is found that the intensity of both fluorescence bands increases with increasing concentration of α- and β-CD. The stoichiometries and equilibrium constants of the fluorophore-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes have been determined by steady-state fluorescence measurements. Performed spectroscopic studies demonstrate that in the case of I in α-CD and β-CD, both 1:1 and 1:2 inclusion complexes are formed, whereas only 1:1 inclusion complex is formed between II and β-CD.

  14. Integrated Spectroscopic Studies of Hydrous Sulfate Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Lane, M. D.; Bishop, J. L.; OConnor, V.; Cloutis, E.; Hiroi, T.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfate minerals have been identified in Martian meteorites and on Mars using a suite of instruments aboard the MER rovers. These results have confirmed previous groundbased observations and orbital measurements that suggested their presence. The orbiting OMEGA instrument on Mars Express is also finding evidence for sulfate. In order to better interpret remote-sensing data, we present here the results of a coordinated visible/near infrared (VNIR) reflectance, Moussbauer (MB), and thermal emittance study of wellcharacterized hydrous sulfate minerals.

  15. Spectroscopic Study of Microwave Induced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jovicevic, S.

    2004-12-01

    The results of the spatial distribution studies of electron densities, excitation and rotational temperatures and atomic line intensities of various elements in an atmospheric pressure mini-MIP torch with tangential argon flow. The electron number density, ne, is determined from the width of the hydrogen H{beta} 486.13 nm line while excitation temperature, Texc, is evaluated from the Boltzmann plot of relative line intensities either of carrier gas-argon or neutral iron that is introduced in the form of aerosols in MIP, The rotational temperatures, Trot, are determined from the relative intensities of OH (R2 and Q1 branch) electronic band A2{sigma} - X2{pi} (0,0) and to N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative system B{sup 2} {sigma}{sub u}{sup +} - X{sup 2} {sigma}{sub g}{sup +} (P branch). For the selected input power of 100 W, the influence of hydrogen in the wet and desolvated aerosols and support gas and the corresponding changes of the electron density, excitation and rotational temperature distributions are studied. The influence of potassium, low ionization potential element, to the spatial distribution of ne, Texc and Trot is studied also. Spatial intensity distributions and maximum intensities for investigate atomic line are determinate for the same conditions.

  16. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While the main emphasis is on experimental problems, the authors have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of their measurements. During the last year they have had several experiments at the ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory, the GAMMASPHERE at the LBL 88 Cyclotron, and with the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Institute Tandem. Also, they continue to be very active in the WA93/98 collaboration studying ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the last year their experimental work has been in three broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (3) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas are described in this document. These studies concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Another area of research is heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions, which utilize the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions.

  17. Spectroscopic Studies of Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamsley, R.; Leather, K.; Horn, A. B.; Percival, C.

    2008-12-01

    Particles are ubiquitous in the troposphere and are involved in chemical and physical processes affecting the composition of the atmosphere, climate, cloud albedo and human health (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 2000). Organic species, such as alcohols, carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, aromatics, alkenes and alkanes, originate both from anthropogenic and natural sources and comprise a large component of atmospheric particles. Gas-phase species, such as ozone, can oxidize these organics, changing the particle's oxygen-to carbon ratio and potentially altering its hygroscopicity, viscosity, morphology and reactivity. One reaction in particular, that between ozone and oleic acid, has been the focus of several recent studies and extensively researched by Ziemann (2005). Oleic acid reacts readily with ozone and has a low vapor pressure making this reaction convenient to study in the laboratory and has become the benchmark for studying heterogeneous reactions representing the oxidative processing of atmospheric organic aerosols. A critical source of uncertainty in reactivity estimates is a lack of understanding of the mechanism through which some VOCs are oxidized. This knowledge gap is especially critical for aromatic compounds. Because the intermediate reaction steps and products of aromatics oxidation are unknown, chemical mechanisms incorporate parameters estimated from environmental chamber experiments to represent their overall contribution to ozone formation, e.g. Volkamer et al. ( 2006). Previous studies of uncertainties in incremental reactivity estimates for VOCs found that the representation of aromatics chemistry contributed significantly to the estimated 40 - 50% uncertainties in the incremental reactivities of common aromatic compounds Carter et al. (2002). This study shows development of an effective IR method that can monitor the reaction and hence obtain the kinetics of the ozonolysis of an aromatic compound in the aerosol phase. The development of such

  18. Exploring binding properties of sertraline with human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Rahimi, Behnoosh; Nowroozi, Amin; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Sadrjavadi, Komail; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2015-12-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding is an important factor to determine half life and bioavailability of drugs. In the present research, the interaction of sertraline (SER) to HSA was investigated using combination of spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. Changes in the UV-Vis, CD and FT-IR spectra as well as a significant degree of tryptophan fluorescence quenching were observed upon SER-HSA interaction. Data obtained by spectroscopic methods along with the computational studies suggest that SER binds to residues located in subdomain IIA of HSA. Analysis of spectroscopic data represented the formation of 1:1 complex, significant binding affinity, negative values of entropy and enthalpy changes and the essential role of hydrophobic interactions in binding of SER to HSA. The binding models were demonstrated in the aspects of SER's conformation, active site interactions, important amino acids and hydrogen bonding. Computational mapping of the possible binding site of SER confirmed that the ligand to be bound in a large hydrophobic cavity of HSA. In accordance with experimental data, computational analyses indicated that SER binding does not alter the secondary structure of the protein. The results not only lead to a better understanding of interaction between SER and HSA but also provide useful data about the influence of SER on the protein conformation. PMID:26471709

  19. Nonlinear spectroscopic studies of interfacial molecular ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.

    1991-07-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful new probes of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the nonlinear susceptibility. In particular, infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) can obtain the vibrational spectrum of sub-monolayer coverages of molecules. In this thesis, we explore the unique information that can be obtained from SFG. We take advantage of the sensitivity of SFG to the conformation of alkane chains to study the interaction between adsorbed liquid crystal molecules and surfactant treated surfaces. The sign of the SFG susceptibility depends on the sign of the molecular polarizability and the orientation, up or down, of the molecule. We experimentally determine the sign of the susceptibility and use it to determine the absolute orientation to obtain the sign of the molecular polarizability and show that this quantity contains important information about the dynamics of molecular charge distributions. Finally, we study the vibrational spectra and the molecular orientation at the pure liquid/vapor interface of methanol and water and present the most detailed evidence yet obtained for the structure of the pure water surface. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    The experimental program in nuclear physics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is led by Professors Carrol Bingham, Lee Riedinger, and Soren Sorenseni who respectively lead the studies of the exotic decay modes of nuclei far from stability, the program of high-spin research, and our effort in relativistic heavy-ion physics. Over the years, this broad program of research has been successful partially because of the shared University resources applied to this group effort. The proximity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has allowed us to build extremely strong programs of joint research, and in addition to play an important leadership role in the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research (JIHIR). Our experimental program is also very closely linked with those at other national laboratories: Argonne (collaborations involving the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) and {gamma}-ray arrays), Brookhaven (the RHIC and Phenix projects), and Berkeley (GAMMASPHERE). We have worked closely with a variety of university groups in the last three years, especially those in the UNISOR and now UNIRIB collaborations. And, in all aspects of our program, we have maintained close collaborations with theorists, both to inspire the most exciting experiments to perform and to extract the pertinent physics from the results. The specific areas discussed in this report are: properties of high-spin states; study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability; and high energy heavy-ion physics.

  1. [FTIR spectroscopic studies of facial prosthetic adhesives].

    PubMed

    Kang, Biao; Yang, Qing-fang; Liang, Jian-feng; Zhao, Yi-min

    2008-10-01

    According to the composition of the traditional facial prosthetic adhesives, most of adhesives can be classified into two categories: acrylic polymer-based adhesive and silicone-based adhesive. In previous studies, measurements of various mechanical bond strengths were carried out, whereas the functional groups of the adhesives were evaluated seldom during the adhesion. In the present study the analysis of two facial prosthetic adhesives (Epithane and Secure Adhesive) was carried out by using infrared spectroscopy. Two adhesives in the form of fluid or semisolid were submitted to FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The results showed that water and ammonia residue volatilized during the solidification of Epithane, and absorption peak reduction of carbonyl was due to the volatilization of acetate vinyl from Secure Adhesive. Similar silicone functional groups both in the silicone-based adhesive and in silicone elastomer could be the key to higher bond strength between silicone elastomer and skin with silicone-based adhesive. The position, shape of main absorption peaks of three adhesives didn't change, which showing that their main chemicals and basic structures didn't change during solidification. PMID:19123392

  2. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies on bromopyrazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the FT-IR, micro-Raman and UV-vis. spectra of bromopyrazone molecule, C10H8BrN3O, (with synonym,1-phenyl-4-amino-5-bromopyridazon-(6) or 5-amino-4-bromo-2-phenyl-3(2H)-pyridazinone) were recorded experimentally. The molecular structure, vibrational wavenumbers, electronic transition absorption wavelengths in ethanol solvent, HOMOs and LUMOs analyses, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbitals (NBO), nonlinear optical (NLO) properties and atomic charges of bromopyrazone molecule have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state. The obtained results show that the calculated vibrational frequencies and UV-vis. values are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of silver boro tellurite glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, E. Ramesh Kumari, K. Rajani Rao, B. Appa Bhikshamaiah, G.

    2014-04-24

    The FTIR absorption and Raman scattering studies were used to obtain the structural information of AgI−Ag{sub 2}O−[(1−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−xTeO{sub 2}] (x=0 to 1 mol% in steps of 0.2) glasses. The glassy nature of the compounds has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. FTIR and Raman spectra were recorded for all samples at room temperature. FTIR spectra which provides the information about the change in bond structure of the glasses. Raman spectra provide the effect of TeO{sub 2} on SBT glass system is that as increasing the concentration of TeO{sub 2} the band intensity at 707 cm{sup −1} increase.

  4. Spectroscopic study of acetylene and hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozario, Hoimonti Immaculata

    High-resolution molecular spectroscopy has been used to study acetylene line parameters and emission spectra of hydrogen cyanide. All acetylene spectra were recorded in our laboratory at the University of Lethbridge using a 3-channel tuneable diode laser spectrometer. N2-broadened line widths and N2-pressure induced line shifts have been measured for transitions in the v1+v3 band of acetylene at seven temperatures in the range 213-333K to obtain the temperature dependences of broadening and shift coefficients. The Voigt and hard-collision line profile models were used to retrieve the line parameters. The line-broadening and line-shift coefficients as well as their temperature-dependent parameters have been also evaluated theoretically, in the frame work of a semi-classical approach based on an exponential representation of the scattering operator, an intermolecular potential composed of electrostatic quadrupole--quadrupole and pairwise atom--atom interactions as well as on exact trajectories driven by an effective isotropic potential. The experimental results for both N2-broadening and shifting show good agreement with the theoretical results. We have studied the line intensities of the 1vl 20←0v120 band system from the HCN emission spectrum. The infrared emission spectrum of H12C 14N was measured at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. The emission spectrum was analyzed with the spectrum analysis software Symath running using Mathematica as a platform. This approach allowed us to retrieve information on band intensity parameters.

  5. Ultrafast spectroscopic studies of metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Min

    An important aim of nanoparticle research is to understand how the properties of materials depend on their size and shape. In this thesis, time-resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the physical properties of nanometer sized objects, such as the characteristic time scale for heat dissipation and their elastic moduli. In our experiments, metal nanoparticles are excited with a sub-picosecond laser pulse, which causes a rapid increase in the lattice temperature. In the first project, the rate of heat dissipation from Au nanoparticles to their surroundings was examined for different size gold nanospheres in aqueous solution. Laser induced lattice heating can also impulsively excite the phonon modes of the particle that correlate with the expansion co-ordinates. For spherical Au particles the symmetric breathing mode is excited. Experimental results for ˜50 nm diameter Au particles were compared to a model calculation where the expansion coordinate is treated as a damped harmonic oscillator. This gives information about the excitation mechanism. In the second project, the extensional and breathing modes of cylindrical gold nanorods were studied by time-resolved spectroscopy. These experiments yield values for the elastic constants for the rods. Both the extensional mode and the breathing mode results show that gold nanorods produced by wet chemical techniques have a smaller elastic moduli than bulk gold. HR-TEM and SAED studies show that the rods have a 5-fold twinned structure with growth along the [110] crystal direction. However, neither the growth direction nor the twinning provide a simple explanation for the reduced elastic moduli measured in the experiments. In a final project, polydisperse silver nanoparticle samples were investigated. A signal due to coherently excited vibrational motion was observed. The analysis shows that the observed signal arises from the triangular-shaped particles, rather than the rods or spheres that are present in the sample

  6. Spectroscopic studies in open quantum systems

    PubMed

    Rotter; Persson; Pichugin; Seba

    2000-07-01

    The Hamiltonian H of an open quantum system is non-Hermitian. Its complex eigenvalues E(R) are the poles of the S matrix and provide both the energies and widths of the states. We illustrate the interplay between Re(H) and Im(H) by means of the different interference phenomena between two neighboring resonance states. Level repulsion may occur along the real or imaginary axis (the latter is called resonance trapping). In any case, the eigenvalues of the two states avoid crossing in the complex plane. We then calculate the poles of the S matrix and the corresponding wave functions for a rectangular microwave resonator with a scatter as a function of the area of the resonator as well as of the degree of opening to a waveguide. The calculations are performed by using the method of exterior complex scaling. Re(H) and Im(H) cause changes in the structure of the wave functions which are permanent, as a rule. The resonance picture obtained from the microwave resonator shows all the characteristic features known from the study of many-body systems in spite of the absence of two-body forces. The effects arising from the interplay between resonance trapping and level repulsion along the real axis are not involved in the statistical theory (random matrix theory).

  7. Integrated Spectroscopic Studies of Anhydrous Sulfate Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, M. D.; Bishop, J. L.; Dyar, M. D.; Cloutis, E.; Forray, F. L.; Hiroi, T.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfates have been identified in Martian soils and bedrock and are emerging as an important indicator for aqueous activity on Mars. Sulfate minerals can form in a variety of low-temperature (evaporitic; chemical-weathering) and high-temperature (volcanic/fumarolic; hydrothermal) environments and their formational environments can range from alkaline to acidic. Although sulfates generally form in the presence of water, not all sulfates are hydrous or contain water in their structures. Many of these anhydrous sulfates (Dana group 28; Strunz class 67A) are minerals that form as accompanying phases to the main minerals in ore deposits or as replacement deposits in sedimentary rocks. However, some form from thermal decomposition of OH or H2O-bearing sulfates, such as from the reaction [1]: jarosite = yavapaiite + Fe2O3 + H2O. Where known, the stability fields of these minerals all suggest that they would be stable under martian surface conditions [2]. Thus, anhydrous sulfate minerals may contribute to martian surface mineralogy, so they must be well-represented in spectral libraries used for interpretation of the Martian surface. We present here the preliminary results of an integrated study of emittance, reflectance, and Mossbauer spectroscopy of a suite of wel-lcharacterized anhydrous sulfates.

  8. Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumera, M.; Wacławska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

  9. Raman spectroscopic studies on screening of myopathies.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rekha; Vanga, Sandeep; Madan, Aditi; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Nongthomba, Upendra; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-02-17

    Myopathies are among the major causes of mortality in the world. There is no complete cure for this heterogeneous group of diseases, but a sensitive, specific, and fast diagnostic tool may improve therapy effectiveness. In this study, Raman spectroscopy is applied to discriminate between muscle mutants in Drosophila on the basis of associated changes at the molecular level. Raman spectra were collected from indirect flight muscles of mutants, upheld(1) (up(1)), heldup(2) (hdp(2)), myosin heavy chain(7) (Mhc(7)), actin88F(KM88) (Act88F(KM88)), upheld(101) (up(101)), and Canton-S (CS) control group, for both 2 and 12 days old flies. Difference spectra (mutant minus control) of all the mutants showed an increase in nucleic acid and β-sheet and/or random coil protein content along with a decrease in α-helix protein. Interestingly, the 12th day samples of up(1) and Act88F(KM88) showed significantly higher levels of glycogen and carotenoids than CS. A principal components based linear discriminant analysis classification model was developed based on multidimensional Raman spectra, which classified the mutants according to their pathophysiology and yielded an overall accuracy of 97% and 93% for 2 and 12 days old flies, respectively. The up(1) and Act88F(KM88) (nemaline-myopathy) mutants form a group that is clearly separated in a linear discriminant plane from up(101) and hdp(2) (cardiomyopathy) mutants. Notably, Raman spectra from a human sample with nemaline-myopathy formed a cluster with the corresponding Drosophila mutant (up(1)). In conclusion, this is the first demonstration in which myopathies, despite their heterogeneity, were screened on the basis of biochemical differences using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25583313

  10. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  11. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies of stripped Borage oil.

    PubMed

    Smyk, Bogdan; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szabelski, Mariusz; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2009-07-30

    In this study we explored the spectroscopic properties of Borage oil, particularly the use of fluorescence techniques to investigate the presence of conjugated fatty acids (CFAs). This research has important health and dietary applications. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of different CFAs and Borage oil in ethanol were measured. Time-domain fluorescence was employed to establish the life times of the samples. We found that Borage oil contains 1.2x10(-3) mol L(-1) of alpha-eleostearic acid or its isomer (i.e., a conjugated triene), 1.6x10(-4) mol L(-1) of cis-parinaric acid (i.e., a conjugated tetraene) and 1.1x10(-5) mol L(-1) of c-COPA (i.e., a conjugated pentaene). Because of the three-exponential fluorescence intensity decay for Borage oil, other fatty acids with a four conjugated double bond system could not be excluded. PMID:19523559

  12. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies of stripped Borage oil.

    PubMed

    Smyk, Bogdan; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szabelski, Mariusz; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2009-07-30

    In this study we explored the spectroscopic properties of Borage oil, particularly the use of fluorescence techniques to investigate the presence of conjugated fatty acids (CFAs). This research has important health and dietary applications. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of different CFAs and Borage oil in ethanol were measured. Time-domain fluorescence was employed to establish the life times of the samples. We found that Borage oil contains 1.2x10(-3) mol L(-1) of alpha-eleostearic acid or its isomer (i.e., a conjugated triene), 1.6x10(-4) mol L(-1) of cis-parinaric acid (i.e., a conjugated tetraene) and 1.1x10(-5) mol L(-1) of c-COPA (i.e., a conjugated pentaene). Because of the three-exponential fluorescence intensity decay for Borage oil, other fatty acids with a four conjugated double bond system could not be excluded.

  13. [Spectroscopic studies on the binding of phenazopyridine hydrochloride and bovine serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Chen, Chang-Yun; Xie, An-Jian

    2007-09-01

    The binding of phenazopyridine hydrochloride and bovine serum albumin under physiological conditions was studied by spectroscopic method. The quenching mechanism of the fluorescence of bovine serum albumin by phenazopyridine hydrochloride was studied with fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The binding constant Kb and the number of binding sites n were determined at different temperatures according to Scatchard equation, and the main binding force was discussed by thermodynamic equations. The effect of the drug on bovine serum albumin conformation was also studied by using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The quenching mechanism of phenazopyridine hydrochloride to bovine serum albumin is static quenching and non-radiation energy transfer. The binding constants Kb at 15, 25 and 37 degrees C are 2.47 x 10(7), 9.15 x 10(6) and 4.36 x 10(6) mol(-1) with one binding site, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of the reaction are DeltaH = -71.2 kJ x mol(-1), and DeltaS = 124.8 J x mol(-1) x K(-1). Binding phenazopyridine hydrochloride to bovine serum albumin is a spontaneous inter-molecular interaction in which entropy increases and Gibbs free energy decreases. The binding distance r between phenazopyridine hydrochloride and bovine serum albumin is 1.61 nm according to Forster theory of non-radiation energy transfer. The binding force is electrostatic interaction. Phenazopyridine hydrochloride can be deposited and transported by serum protein in vivo. Phenazopyridine hydrochloride does affect the serum protein conformation.

  14. Identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in suspended particulate matter by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Homdutt; Jain, V. K.; Khan, Zahid H.

    2007-09-01

    The synchronous fluorescence (SF) technique has been used in the identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from air particulate sample in an urban environment of Delhi, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Suspended particulate matter samples of 24 h duration were collected on glass fiber filter papers. PAHs were extracted from the filter papers using dichloromethane (DCM) + hexane with ultrasonication method. Qualitative measurements of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out using the SF technique at various wavelength intervals (Δ λ). Due to the difference in chemical structure, each PAH gives specific characteristic spectrum for each Δ λ. Following PAHs were detected in our measurement: benz(a)anthracene (BaA), pyrene (Pyr), chrysene (Chry), fluoranthene (Flan), phenanthrene (Phen), and benz(ghi)perylene (BghiP). This is in agreement with our earlier work for determination of these PAHs using gas chromatography (GC). The seasonal variation of the PAHs was found to be maximum in winter and minimum during the monsoon.

  15. A Chromone-Derived Schiff-Base Ligand as Al(3+) "Turn on" Fluorescent Sensor: Synthesis and Spectroscopic Properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-rui; Qin, Jing-can; Wang, Bao-dui; Fan, Long; Yan, Jun; Yang, Zheng-yin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel chromone-derived Schiff-base ligand called 6-Hydroxy-3-formylchromone (2'-furan formyl) hydrazone (HCFH) has been designed and synthesized as a "turn on" fluorescent sensor for Al(3+). This sensor HCFH showed high selectivity and sensitivity towards Al(3+) over other metal ions investigated, and most metal ions had nearly no influences on the fluorescence response of HCFH to Al(3+). Additionally, the significant enhancement by about 171-fold in fluorescence emission intensity at 502 nm was observed in the presence of Al(3+) in ethanol, and it was due to the chelation-enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect upon complexation of HCFH with Al(3+) which inhibited the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) phenomenon from the Schiff-base nitrogen atom to chromone group. Moreover, this sensor formed a 1 : 1 complex with Al(3+) and the fluorescence response of HCFH to Al(3+) was nearly completed within 1 min. Thus, this sensor HCFH could be used to detect and recognize Al(3+) for real-time detection.

  16. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  17. Ultraviolet emission and excitation fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DMBA-treated Swiss Albino mice skin carcinogenesis for measuring tissue transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruna, Prakasa R.; Hemamalini, Srinivasan; Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2002-05-01

    The ultraviolet fluorescence emission spectra of skin tissues under different pathological conditions were measured at 280nm excitation. At this excitation wavelength, the normal skin showed a primary peak emission at 352nm and this primary peak emission from neoplastic skin shows a blue shift with respect to normal tissue. This blue shift increases as the stage of abnormality increases and it is maximum (19nm) for well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. This alteration is further confirmed from fluorescence excitation spectra of the tissues for 340nm emission. The study concludes that the change in the emission of tryptophan around 340nm may be due to partial unfolding of protein.

  18. Study of the interaction between esculetin and human serum albumin by multi-spectroscopic method and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yaheng; Qin, Jin; Chen, Xingguo

    2008-10-01

    Esculetin derived from Cortex fraxin plays an important role as a traditional Chinese medicine because of its unique pharmacological properties. The interactions between esculetin and HSA were studied by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques under similar to human physiologic conditions. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. The results proved the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of HSA while interacting with esculetin is due to the formation of esculetin-HSA complex formation. The thermodynamic parameters like Δ H0 and Δ S0 were calculated to be -14.62 kJ/mol and 38.93 J/mol/K, respectively, which proves main interaction between esculetin and HSA is hydrophobic contact, but the electrostatic interaction cannot be excluded, which in agreement with the result of molecular docking study. The distance r between donor (HSA) and acceptor (esculetin) was obtained according to the Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer and found to be 2.89 nm. From the high value of fluorescence anisotropy ( r = 0.07) it was argued that the probe molecular was located in motionally restricted environment of the protein. The alterations of protein secondary structure in the presence of esculetin were confirmed by the evidences from UV, FT-IR and CD spectroscopes. In addition, the effects of common ions and amino acids on the constants of esculetin-HSA complex were also discussed.

  19. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of Tillage, Cropping Management, and Nitrogen Application Effects on Stable and Water-Extractable Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter (OM) controls many important soil ecosystem processes. Stable (humic and fulvic) and water-extractable OM was obtained from soils in a nine-year tillage, cropping management, and nitrogen application study and characterized for its composition using multi-dimensional fluorescence spec...

  20. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper.

  1. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper. PMID:27089183

  2. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298 K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper.

  3. Preferential binding of fisetin to the native state of bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Singha Roy, Atanu; Pandey, Nitin Kumar; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated the binding of the biologically important flavonoid fisetin with the carrier protein bovine serum albumin using multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The binding constants were found to be in the order of 10(4) M(-1) and the number of binding sites was determined as one. MALDI-TOF analyses showed that one fisetin molecule binds to a single bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecule which is also supported by fluorescence quenching studies. The negative Gibbs free energy change (∆G°) values point to a spontaneous binding process which occurs through the presence of electrostatic forces with hydrophobic association that results in a positive entropy change (+51.69 ± 1.18 J mol(-1) K(-1)). The unfolding and refolding of BSA in urea have been studied in absence and presence of fisetin using steady-state fluorescence and lifetime measurements. Urea denaturation studies indicate that fisetin is gradually released from its binding site on the protein. In the absence of urea, an increase in temperature that causes denaturation of the protein results in the release of fisetin from its bound state indicating that fisetin binds only to the native state of the protein. The circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies showed an increase in % α-helix content of BSA after binding with fisetin. Site marker displacement studies in accordance with the molecular docking results suggested that fisetin binds in close proximity of the hydrophobic cavity in site 1 (subdomain IIA) of the protein. The PEARLS (Program of Energetic Analysis of Receptor Ligand System) has been used to estimate the interaction energy of fisetin with BSA and the results are in good correlation with the experimental findings.

  4. Photoreceptor pigments for photomovement of microorganisms: some spectroscopic and related studies.

    PubMed

    Lenci, F; Ghetti, F

    1989-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy of photoreceptor pigments can substantially contribute to our understanding of the molecular processes which are the basis of photoreception and sensory transduction in photomotile microorganisms. The main spectroscopic techniques are briefly illustrated, together with the most significant types of progress that can be achieved. A few "case examples" are discussed in some detail: Halobacterium, with particular attention to the contribution of flash photolysis studies to the identification and characterization of sensory rhodopsins; Euglena, and the role of in vivo microspectrofluorometry in confirming the flavin nature of its photoreceptor pigment; the first suggestions on the rhodopsin-like nature of the Chlamydomonas photosensing system; Stentor and Blepharisma and the contribution of static and time-resolved fluorescence studies to a molecular model of the primary events in their photoreceptor pigments (stentorin and blepharismin) and systems. PMID:2498475

  5. Spectroscopic study of antileishmanial drug incubated in the promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, J.; Castillo, J.; Jiménez, G.; Hasegawa, M.; Rodriguez, M.

    2003-11-01

    In this work we present spectroscopic study of Boldine (aporphine alkaloid) that possesses important biological activities, in particular, in interaction with the promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana. The results show the applicability of autofluorescence of this drug to determinate the possible mechanism of its biological action. The blue shift and hyperchromic effect in the emission spectrum of the drug in interaction with the parasite cells indicate an energy transference process between them. The morphological change of cell shape of the promastigotes treated with the drug is observed using confocal microscopy. This morphological cell-shape transformation evidences an important interaction between the drug studied and some protein of the parasite cell. Here we describe for the first time the fluorescence properties of the Boldine in the promastigotes of L. mexicana.

  6. Locating the nucleation sites for protein encapsulated gold nanoclusters: a molecular dynamics and fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Russell, B A; Kubiak-Ossowska, K; Mulheran, P A; Birch, D J S; Chen, Y

    2015-09-14

    Fluorescent gold nanoclusters encapsulated by proteins have attracted considerable attention in recent years for their unique properties as new fluorescence probes for biological sensing and imaging. However, fundamental questions, such as the nucleation sites of gold nanoclusters within proteins and the fluorescence mechanism remain unsolved. Here we present a study of the location of gold nanoclusters within bovine serum albumin (BSA) combining both fully atomistic molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The MD simulations show gold clusters growing close to a number of cysteine sites across all three domains of BSA, although just two major sites in domains IIB and IA were found to accommodate large clusters comprising more than 12 atoms. The dependence of the fluorescence on pH is found to be compatible with possible nucleation sites in domains IIB and IA. Furthermore, the energy transfer between tryptophan and gold nanoclusters reveals a separation of 29.7 Å, further indicating that gold nanoclusters were most likely located in the major nucleation site in domain IIB. The disclosure of the precise location of the gold nanoclusters and their surrounding amino acid residues should help better understanding of their fluorescence mechanism and aid their optimization as fluorescent nanoprobes.

  7. Fluorescence Techniques to Study Lipid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Schwille, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Biological research has always tremendously benefited from the development of key methodology. In fact, it was the advent of microscopy that shaped our understanding of cells as the fundamental units of life. Microscopic techniques are still central to the elucidation of biological units and processes, but equally important are methods that allow access to the dimension of time, to investigate the dynamics of molecular functions and interactions. Here, fluorescence spectroscopy with its sensitivity to access the single-molecule level, and its large temporal resolution, has been opening up fully new perspectives for cell biology. Here we summarize the key fluorescent techniques used to study cellular dynamics, with the focus on lipid and membrane systems. PMID:21669985

  8. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of bilirubin with liver cystatin.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aaliya; Bano, Bilqees

    2011-02-01

    Studies on the role of endogenous metabolites such as bilirubin and their interactions with biomolecules have attracted considerable attention over the past several years. In this work, the interaction of bilirubin (BR) with purified goat liver cystatin (LC) was studied using fluorescence and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy. The fluorescence data proved that the fluorescence quenching of liver cystatin by BR was the result of BR-cystatin complex formation. Stern-Volmer analysis of fluorescence quenching data showed the binding constant to be 9.27 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ and the number of binding sites to be close to unity. The conformation of the BR-cystatin complex was found to change upon varying the pH of the complex. The BR-cystatin complex was found to have reduced papain inhibitory activity. Photo-illumination of BR-cystatin complex causes perturbation in the micro-environment of goat liver cystatin as indicated by red-shift. This report summarizes our research efforts to reveal the mechanism of interaction of bilirubin with liver cystatin.

  9. Fluorescence microscopy studies on ALA-sensitized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Achtelik, Wolfgang; Loening, Martin; Sommer, Konrad; Diddens, Heyke C.

    1996-12-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has the potential to study the spatial distribution of photosensitizers in tissue samples with cellular or subcellular resolution. A fluorescence microscope was developed to study the distribution of photosensitizer in tissue samples by acquiring fluorescence images in various spectral ranges and spatially resolved fluorescence spectra both from identical samples. Both methods provide complementary information, since the fluorescence images show the distribution of the sensitizers with a high spatial resolution whereas spatially resolved fluorescence spectra can identify the sensitizers and separate their fluorescence from background light emission by the spectral shape of the fluorescence. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) distribution induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was studied by fluorescence microscopy in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In an attempt to understand the varying success in treating BCC with topically applied ALA the PPIX distribution was studied in BCC samples of 10 patients. A strong fluorescence was observed in tumor cells as well as in epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. The depth of PPIX sensitization of the BCCs ranged from 0.4 to 3 mm and the ratio of tumor versus epidermal fluorescence of uninvolved skin was near one. In the BCCs an uneven sensitization with a lower fluorescence in the center of the tumor was often observed. Samples of the cervical mucosa also showed PPIX fluorescence in the endothelial layer, the malignant tissues and the glands. No increased fluorescence of the dysplastic lesions compared to the epithelium was observed.

  10. Molecular interactions of flavonoids to pepsin: Insights from spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua-Jin; Yang, Ran; Liang, Huili; Qu, Ling-Bo

    2015-01-01

    In the work described on this paper, the inhibitory effect of 10 flavonoids on pepsin and the interactions between them were investigated by a combination of spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The results indicated that all flavonoids could bind with pepsin to form flavonoid-pepsin complexes. The binding parameters obtained from the data at different temperatures revealed that flavonoids could spontaneously interact with pepsin mainly through electrostatic forces and hydrophobic interactions with one binding site. According to synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and molecular docking results, all flavonoids bound directly into the enzyme cavity site and the binding influenced the microenvironment and conformation of the pepsin activity site which resulted in the reduced enzyme activity. The present study provides direct evidence at a molecular level to understand the mechanism of digestion caused by flavonoids.

  11. Molecular spectroscopic studies on the interaction of morin with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-Jun; Yue, Hua-Li; Li, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Si-Si; Tang, E; Zhang, Li-Ping

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between morin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied using molecular spectroscopic approach at different temperatures under imitated physiological conditions. Quenching of intrinsic tryptophanyl fluorescence of BSA with increasing morin concentration is the actuating tool in the analysis. The obtained quenching mechanisms, binding constants, binding sites and corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures indicate that the hydrophobic interaction play a major role in the morin-BSA association. Binding affinity between morin and BSA was determined using Scatchard equation and the modified Stern-Volmer equation, and the corresponding Structure-affinity relationships of flavonoids were discussed. Site marker competitive displacement experiments demonstrated that morin binds with high affinity to site II (subdomain IIIA) of BSA. Furthermore, the circular dichroism spectral results indicated that the conformation of BSA changed in the presence of morin. In addition, the effect of some common metal ions on the binding constant between morin and BSA was examined.

  12. Ultraviolet fluorescence of coelenteramide and coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins. Experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Roza R; Tomilin, Felix N; Kuzubov, Alexander A; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S

    2016-09-01

    Coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins are products of bioluminescent reactions of marine coelenterates. They are called 'discharged photoproteins'. Their light-induced fluorescence spectra are variable, depending considerably on external conditions. Current work studies a dependence of light-induced fluorescence spectra of discharged photoproteins obelin, aequorin, and clytin on excitation energy. It was demonstrated that photoexcitation to the upper electron-excited states (260-300nm) of the discharged photoproteins initiates a fluorescence peak in the near UV region, in addition to the blue-green emission. To characterize the UV fluorescence, the light-induced fluorescence spectra of coelenteramide (CLM), fluorophore of the discharged photoproteins, were studied in methanol solution. Similar to photoproteins, the CLM spectra depended on photoexcitation energy; the additional peak (330nm) in the near UV region was observed in CLM fluorescence at higher excitation energy (260-300nm). Quantum chemical calculations by time depending method with B3LYP/cc-pVDZ showed that the conjugated pyrazine-phenolic fragment and benzene moiety of CLM molecule are responsible for the additional UV fluorescence peak. Quantum yields of CLM fluorescence in methanol were 0.028±0.005 at 270-340nm photoexcitation. A conclusion was made that the UV emission of CLM might contribute to the UV fluorescence of the discharged photoproteins. The study develops knowledge on internal energy transfer in biological structures - complexes of proteins with low-weight aromatic molecules. PMID:27400455

  13. Spectroscopic studies of interaction between CuO nanoparticles and bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Esfandfar, Paniz; Falahati, Mojtaba; Saboury, AliAkbar

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the great interests in manufacturing and application of metal oxide nanoparticles in commercial and industrial products have led to focus on the potential impact of these particles on biomacromolecules. In the present study, the interaction of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by spectroscopic techniques. The zeta potential value for BSA and CuO nanoparticles with average diameter of around 50 nm at concentration of 10 μM in the deionized (DI) water were -5.8 and -22.5 mV, respectively. Circular dichroism studies did not show any changes in the content of secondary structure of the protein after CuO nanoparticles interaction. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by CuO nanoparticles was the result of the formed complex of CuO nanoparticles - BSA. Binding constants and other thermodynamic parameters were determined at three different temperatures. The hydrogen bond interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the CuO nanoparticle - BSA complex. This study provides important insight into the interaction of CuO nanoparticles with proteins, which may be of importance for further application of these nanoparticles in biomedical applications. PMID:26555383

  14. Studies of tropical fruit ripening using three different spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Huang, Jing; Li, Tianqi; Wu, Xiuxiang; Svanberg, Sune; Svanberg, Katarina

    2014-06-01

    We present a noninvasive method to study fruit ripening. The method is based on the combination of reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS). Chlorophyll and oxygen are two of the most important constituents in the fruit ripening process. Reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to quantify the changes of chlorophyll and other chromophores. GASMAS, based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, was used to measure free molecular oxygen in the fruit tissue at 760 nm, based on the fact that the free gases have much narrower spectral imprints than those of solid materials. The fruit maturation and ripening processes can be followed by studying the changes of chlorophyll and oxygen contents with these three techniques.

  15. Spectroscopic Studies on Eu3+ Doped Boro-Tellurite Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraju, K.; Marimuthu, K.

    2011-07-01

    Eu3+ doped boro-tellurite glasses have been synthesized and its optical behavior have been studied and reported. The presence of varying tellurium dioxide content results changes in spectroscopic behavoir were explored through UV-VIS, and Luminescence spectra. The bonding parameters have been calculated based on the observed band positions of the absorption spectra. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters Ωλ (λ = 2, 4 and 6) have been determined through the luminescence spectra without applying any constraints and the results are presented. The Judd-Ofelt parameters have been used to determine various optical properties corresponding to 5D0→7FJ (J = 1,2,3 and 4) transitions of Eu3+ ions. The varying optical properties of the prepared glasses with the change in tellurium dioxide have been studied and compared with similar studies.

  16. Study on the interaction of catechins with human serum albumin using spectroscopic and electrophoretic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trnková, Lucie; Boušová, Iva; Staňková, Veronika; Dršata, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between eight naturally occurring flavanols (catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin gallate, epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by spectroscopic (fluorescence quenching and UV-Vis absorption) and electrophoretic (native and SDS PAGE) techniques under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.40, 37 °C). The spectroscopic results confirmed the complex formation for the tested systems. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were obtained by analysis of fluorescence data. The strongest binding affinity to HSA was found for epicatechin gallate and decreased in the order epicatechin gallate ⩾ catechin gallate > epigallocatechin gallate > gallocatechin gallate ≫ epicatechin ⩾ catechin > gallocatechin ⩾ epigallocatechin. All free energy changes possessed negative sign indicating the spontaneity of catechin-HSA systems formation. The binding distances between the donor (HSA) and the acceptors (catechins) estimated by the Förster theory revealed that non-radiation energy transfer from HSA to catechins occurred with high possibility. According to results obtained by native PAGE, the galloylated catechins increased the electrophoretic mobility of HSA, which indicated the change in the molecular charge of HSA, whilst the non-galloylated catechins caused no changes. The ability of aggregation and cross-linking of tested catechins with HSA was not proved by SDS-PAGE. The relationship between the structure characteristics of all tested catechins (e.g. presence of the galloyl moiety on the C-ring, the number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, and the spatial arrangement of the substituents on the C-ring) and their binding properties to HSA is discussed. The presented study contributes to the current knowledge in the area of protein-ligand binding, particularly catechin-HSA interactions.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of carbon impurities in PISCES-A

    SciTech Connect

    Ra, Y.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W. . Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Pospieszczyk, A. . Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik)

    1989-08-01

    The graphite used for the limiter of the tokamak reactor produces carbon-containing molecular impurities as a result of the interactions with the edge plasma. The behavior of these molecular impurities has been studied using emission spectroscopy. The present study includes: finding molecular bands and atomic lines in the visible spectral range which can be used for the study of the molecular impurities, studying the breakup processes of the molecular impurities on their way from the source into the plasma, developing a spectroscopic diagnostic method for the absolute measurement of the molecular impurity flux resulting from graphite erosion. For these studies, carbon-containing molecules such as CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} were injected into the tokamak-boundary,like plasma generated by PISCES-A. The spectrograms of these gases were taken. Many useful bands and lines were determined from the spectrograms. The breakup processes of these gases were studied by observing the spatial profiles of the emission of the molecules and their radicals for different plasma conditions. For the absolute measurement of the eroded molecular impurity flux, the photon efficiency of the lines and bands were found by measuring the absolute number of the emitted photons and injected gas molecules. The chemical sputtering yield of graphite by hydrogen plasma was spectroscopically measured using the previously obtained photon efficiencies. It showed good agreement with results obtained by weight loss measurements. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence can be used to study protein crystal nucleation through methods such as anisotropy, quenching, and resonance energy transfer (FRET), to follow pH and ionic strength changes, and follow events occurring at the growth interface. We have postulated, based upon a range of experimental evidence that the growth unit of tetragonal hen egg white lysozyme is an octamer. Several fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme have been prepared. The fluorescent probes lucifer yellow (LY), cascade blue, and 5-((2-aminoethyl)aminonapthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS), have been covalently attached to ASP 101. All crystallize in the characteristic tetragonal form, indicating that the bound probes are likely laying within the active site cleft. Crystals of the LY and EDANS derivatives have been found to diffract to at least 1.7 A. A second group of derivatives is to the N-terminal amine group, and these do not crystallize as this site is part of the contact region between the adjacent 43 helix chains. However derivatives at these sites would not interfere with formation of the 43 helices in solution. Preliminary FRET studies have been carried out using N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and LY (Ex -425 nm, Em 525 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1 M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10(exp -5) M respectively). The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence intensity of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations reflected in the lower solubility. The calculated average distance between any two protein molecules at 5 x 10(exp -6) M is approximately 70nm, well beyond the

  19. Combined spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of ezetimibe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Preeti; Pandey, Jaya; Shimpi, Manishkumar R.; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Velaga, Sitaram P.; Sinha, Kirti

    2016-12-01

    Ezetimibe (EZT) is a hypocholesterolemic agent used for the treatment of elevated blood cholesterol levels as it lowers the blood cholesterol by blocking the absorption of cholesterol in intestine. Study aims to combine experimental and computational methods to provide insights into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of EZT which is important for explaining drug substance physical and biological properties. Computational study on molecular properties of ezetimibe is presented using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. A detailed vibrational assignment has been done for the observed IR and Raman spectra of EZT. In addition to the conformational study, hydrogen bonding and molecular docking studies have been also performed. For conformational studies, the double well potential energy curves have been plotted for the rotation around the six flexible bonds of the molecule. UV absorption spectrum was examined in methanol solvent and compared with calculated one in solvent environment (IEF-PCM) using TD-DFT/6-31G basis set. HOMO-LUMO energy gap of both the conformers have also been calculated in order to predict its chemical reactivity and stability. The stability of the molecule was also examined by means of natural bond analysis (NBO) analysis. To account for the chemical reactivity and site selectivity of the molecules, molecular electrostatic potential (MEPS) map has been plotted. The combination of experimental and calculated results provide an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of EZT. In order to give an insight for the biological activity of EZT, molecular docking of EZT with protein NPC1L1 has been done.

  20. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  1. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

  2. Specific binding and inhibition of 6-benzylaminopurine to catalase: multiple spectroscopic methods combined with molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Lu, Yanni; Jing, Longyun; Cai, Lijuan; Zhu, Xinfeng; Xie, Ju; Hu, Xiaoya

    2014-04-01

    6-Benzylaminopurine (6-BA) is a kind of cytokinin which could regulate the activities of the antioxidant defense system of plants. In this work, its interaction with and inhibition of beef liver catalase have been systematically investigated using spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetric and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching of beef liver catalase (BLC) by 6-BA is due to the formation of 6-BA-BLC complex. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions play major roles in stabilizing the complex. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant, binding constant, the corresponding thermodynamic parameters and binding numbers were measured. The results of UV-vis absorption, three-dimensional fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results demonstrate that the binding of 6-BA results in the micro-environment change around tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues of BLC. The BLC-mediated conversion of H2O2 to H2O and O2, in the presence and absence of 6-BA, was also studied. Lineweaver-Burk plot indicates a noncompetitive type of inhibition. Molecular docking study was used to find the binding sites. PMID:24412785

  3. Spectroscopic Study of ThCl+ by Two-Photon Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Joshua; VanGundy, Robert A.; Heaven, Michael; Peterson, Kirk

    2016-06-01

    Despite the irreplaceable role experimental data plays for evaluating the performance of computational predictions, diatomic actinide species have not received much spectroscopic attention. As an early actinide element, thorium-containing species are ideal candidates for these types of studies. The electronic structure is expected to be relatively simple compared to later actinides, and therefore allows straightforward assessment of calculations. Here, we have studied ThCl+ for the first time via resonant two-photon ionization of jet-cooled ThCl produced by laser ablation of the metal reacted with dilute Cl2. Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra have been recorded for the neutral molecule from 16000 - 23500 cm-1 in search of a suitable intermediate state for subsequent two-photon ionization experiments. Monochromator dispersion of the fluorescence has recovered the ground state vibration and anharmonic constants of ThCl. Resonant Two-Photon Ionization (R2PI) within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to confirm ThCl production, and Pulsed Field Ionization Zero Kinetic Energy photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-ZEKE) has been performed to identify the ionization energy as well as several of the low-lying states of the ThCl+ molecule. These constants have been predicted at the CASPT2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory, and a discussion of the calculations' performance will be presented alongside the recorded spectra.

  4. Spectroscopic study on binding of gentisic acid to bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Andrés; Bravo, Iván; Carrión-Jiménez, M Rosario; Rubio-Moraga, Ángela; Albaladejo, José

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of (gentisic acid) GA with (bovine serum albumin) BSA has been studied by different spectroscopic techniques. GA is a monoanionic specie at the working pH of 7.4, it was determined by combining UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. A set of fluorescence quenching experiments at different temperatures was carried out employing the native fluorescence of BSA. A Stern-Volmer constant (KSV) of (2.07±0.12)×10(4) mol(-1) L and a binding constant (Ka) of (8.47±4.39)×10(3) were determined at 310 K. The static quenching caused by the BSA-GA complex formation seems to play a significant role in the overall quenching process. A single binding site on BSA for GA was observed. ΔH=-55.6±0.2 kJ mol(-1) and ΔS=-104.3±0.6 J mol(-1) K(-1) were determined in a set of experiments on the dependence of Ka with the temperature. The binding process is, therefore, spontaneous and enthalpy-driven. Van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds could also play the major role in the binding mode. The secondary structure changes of BSA in the absence and presence of GA were studied by FTIR and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy.

  5. A Spectroscopic-Based Laboratory Experiment for Protein Conformational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Carlos Henrique I.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a practical experiment for teaching basic spectroscopic techniques to introduce the topic of protein conformational change to students in the field of molecular biology, biochemistry, or structural biology. The spectroscopic methods employed in the experiment are absorbance, for protein concentration measurements, and…

  6. Molecular spectroscopic study for suggested mechanism of chrome tanned leather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashy, Elshahat H. A.; Osman, Osama; Mahmoud, Abdel Aziz; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-03-01

    Collagen represents the structural protein of the extracellular matrix, which gives strength of hides and/or skin under tanning process. Chrome tan is the most important tanning agent all over the world. The methods for production of leather evolved over several centuries as art and engineering with little understanding of the underlying science. The present work is devoted to suggest the most probable mechanistic action of chrome tan on hide proteins. First the affect of Cr upon hide protein is indicated by the studied mechanical properties. Then the spectroscopic characterization of the hide protein as well as chrome tanned leather was carried out with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflection (HATR) FT-IR. The obtained results indicate how the chromium can attached with the active sites of collagen. Molecular modeling confirms that chromium can react with amino as well as carboxylate groups. Four schemes were obtained to describe the possible interactions of chrome tan with hide proteins.

  7. A detailed spectroscopic study of an Italian fresco

    SciTech Connect

    Barilaro, Donatella; Crupi, Vincenza; Majolino, Domenico; Barone, Germana; Ponterio, Rosina

    2005-02-15

    In the present work we characterized samples of plasters and pictorial layers taken from a fresco in the Acireale Cathedral. The fresco represents the Coronation of Saint Venera, patron saint of this Ionian town. By performing a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the plaster preparation layer by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and of the painting layer by FTIR and confocal Raman microspectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy+energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and XRD, we were able to identify the pigments and the binders present. In particular, Raman investigation was crucial to the characterization of the pigments thanks to the high resolution of the confocal apparatus used. It is worth stressing that the simultaneous use of complementary techniques was able to provide more complete information for the conservation of the artifact we studied.

  8. Spectroscopic study of Gd nanostructures quantum confined in Fe corrals

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, R. X.; Sun, L.; Miao, B. F.; Li, Q. L.; Zheng, C.; Wu, D.; You, B.; Zhang, W.; Han, P.; Bader, S. D.; et al

    2015-07-10

    Low dimensional nanostructures have attracted attention due to their rich physical properties and potential applications. The essential factor for their functionality is their electronic properties, which can be modified by quantum confinement. Here the electronic states of Gd atom trapped in open Fe corrals on Ag(111) were studied via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. A single spectroscopic peak above the Fermi level is observed after Gd adatoms are trapped inside Fe corrals, while two peaks appear in empty corrals. The single peak position is close to the higher energy peak of the empty corrals. These findings, attributed to quantum confinement of themore » corrals and Gd structures trapped inside, are supported by tight-binding calculations. As a result, this demonstrates and provides insights into atom trapping in open corrals of various diameters, giving an alternative approach to modify the properties of nano-objects.« less

  9. Raman spectroscopic study of "The Malatesta": a Renaissance painting?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J

    2015-02-25

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research.

  10. Spectroscopic study of Gd nanostructures quantum confined in Fe corrals

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, R. X.; Sun, L.; Miao, B. F.; Li, Q. L.; Zheng, C.; Wu, D.; You, B.; Zhang, W.; Han, P.; Bader, S. D.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ding, H. F.

    2015-07-10

    Low dimensional nanostructures have attracted attention due to their rich physical properties and potential applications. The essential factor for their functionality is their electronic properties, which can be modified by quantum confinement. Here the electronic states of Gd atom trapped in open Fe corrals on Ag(111) were studied via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. A single spectroscopic peak above the Fermi level is observed after Gd adatoms are trapped inside Fe corrals, while two peaks appear in empty corrals. The single peak position is close to the higher energy peak of the empty corrals. These findings, attributed to quantum confinement of the corrals and Gd structures trapped inside, are supported by tight-binding calculations. As a result, this demonstrates and provides insights into atom trapping in open corrals of various diameters, giving an alternative approach to modify the properties of nano-objects.

  11. Raman spectroscopic study of "The Malatesta": a Renaissance painting?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J

    2015-02-25

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research. PMID:25194320

  12. Study on the fluorescence characteristics of bromadiolone in aqueous and organized media and application in analysis.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Deepa; Kala, Subramanian; Mishra, Ashok K

    2005-12-01

    The fluorescence spectroscopic behavior of bromadiolone (anticoagulant rodenticide), a substituted 4-hydroxycoumarin derivative, was investigated in water and in organized media like micelles and cyclodextrins. A detailed study on various photophysical parameters like fluorescence intensity (I(F)), quantum yield (phi), lifetime (tau) and steady state fluorescence anisotropy (r) of bromadiolone in aqueous and in organized media was carried out. Bromadiolone in aqueous solution was observed to be in an aggregated state, thereby showing weak emission due to self-quenching. Marked enhancement of fluorescence intensity was observed in organized media like micelles and beta-cyclodextrin. A preliminary investigation has been done to find out whether this enhancement of fluorescence can be used to develop a sensitive analytical method for determination of bromadialone in aqueous media. A linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and concentration of bromadiolone was observed in the range of 0.15-7.9 microg ml(-1) in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and 0.5-26.4 microg ml(-1) in beta-cyclodextrin medium. The lower detection limit was found to be 37 ng ml(-1) in presence of CTAB and 23 ng ml(-1) in beta-cyclodextrin. Comparison with 4-hydroxycoumarin, an unsubstituted analogue, was made. PMID:15982718

  13. Spectroscopic study of the peculiar galaxy IC 883

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, V. A.; Merkulova, O. A.; Karataeva, G. M.; Shalyapina, L. V.; Yablokova, N. V.; Burenkov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze new optical spectroscopic observations obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the SCORPIO focal reducer (in the modes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) and long-slit spectroscopy) and the Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph for the galaxy IC 883. We have confirmed that the main body of the galaxy rotates around its minor axis. The positions of the dynamical axes of the stellar and gaseous components have been found to differ by ~10°. The velocities in the SE tail do not correspond to the circular rotation around the galaxy's minor axis. This structure is probably a fragment of an unwound curved spiral arm. Regions with high velocity dispersions and peculiarities in the velocity fields have been found along the minor axis. Our study of the age and metallicity of the galaxy's stellar population has shown that the mean values of these parameters in the stellar disk, except for the central region ( r ≤ 5"), are ≈1 Gyr and ≈-0.4 dex, respectively. Both young (2-5 × 108 yr) and old (5-10 × 109 yr) stellar populations are present in the circumnuclear region. Our analysis of the spectroscopic data for the bright feature 8" south of the nucleus coincident in position with a compact X-ray source has shown that this is apparently a dwarf galaxy or a remnant of a companion galaxy. Our FPI observations in the Hα emission line and direct images have revealed a region of ionized gas that together with the already known structures along the minor axis forms a clumpy tidal structure of ionized gas pulled from the companion galaxy. The results of our study confirm the previously proposed hypothesis that the observed peculiar structures were formed by the merger of two galaxies. However, it can be said that IC 883 does not belong to the class of polar-ring galaxies.

  14. Spectroscopic studies on chemical- and photo-responsive molecular machines and their bio-applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Yuen Agnes

    2011-07-01

    The four chapters presented in this dissertation describe how various spectroscopic techniques are used: 1) to study the operation of molecular machines in solution, 2) to track the operation of molecular machines inside a single cell, and 3) to investigate the photo-decomposition pathway of a biological chromophore. Recent advances in nanotechnology have enriched the development of nano-scale molecular assemblies to be used as delivery platforms for biologically relevant molecules. Among all the molecular assemblies, molecular machines that are incorporated onto various domains of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) hold considerable potential as a reliable delivery system. Because the ease of functionalization enables chemical or photo-responsive molecular moieties to be covalently attached to the silica framework, these molecular assemblies, with defined mechanized properties, can perform specific functions under external stimuli (pH, redox, or light). While the primary function of these molecular machines is to deliver stored cargo molecules, the means of activation and the motif in which they operate are different. In the first and second chapters of this dissertation, two types of molecular machines, nanovalves and nanoimpellers, and their operations are studied. The ability to continuously monitor and image progression of molecular-based biological events in real-time can enhance our understanding of intracellular processes upon drug, protein and nucleic acid delivery. Using the photo-activated nanoimpeller described in the second chapter, the third chapter explores how it can be used to transport a nuclear staining agent, PI, inside a single cell. Nanoimpellers are made by functionalizing azobenzene molecules to the internal pore surface of MSN. The continuous cis/trans isomerizations are set in motion upon laser illumination at optimal wavelength(s), which facilitate cargo molecules to be expelled from the pores to the surrounding medium. By refining a

  15. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction of bichromophoric cyanine dyes with DNA. Effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Schaberle, Fábio A; Kuz'min, Vladimir A; Borissevitch, Iouri E

    2003-05-01

    Spectroscopic characteristics of a cyanine dye with two chromophores (biscyanine dye, BCD) in aqueous solutions and effects of NaCl and DNA upon these characteristics have been studied by optical absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies. In homogeneous solutions, BCD is characterized by intense optical absorption (epsilon =1.33 x 10(5) M(-1) x cm(-1)) and weak fluorescence (phi(fl)=0.018) in the wavelength region greater than 600 nm. The dye forms H-aggregates at low concentrations (10(-6) M). NaCl stimulates the formation of both H- and J-aggregates of the dye at much lower dye concentrations, while DNA in low concentrations (<10(-6) M) stimulated the formation of just J-aggregates on the surface of the DNA molecule. Higher DNA concentrations induce the dye to disaggregate, and there exists an equilibrium between three dye forms: free monomers, J-aggregates and bound monomers, the maximum content of J-aggregates was observed at [DNA]/[BCD]=0.6+/-0.2 and total disaggregation at [DNA]/[BCD]=190+/-20. J-aggregates are characterized by phi(fl)=0.05 and bound monomers by phi(fl)=0.44. In the presence of NaCl, total disaggregation was observed at [DNA]/[BCD]=570+/-10 due to competition between Na(+) and the dye molecules for DNA electronegative binding sites.

  16. Study of Ellagic Acid as a Natural Elastase Inhibitor by Spectroscopic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X.; Yang, X.; Cao, Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A new natural inhibitor, ellagic acid (EA), was developed, and its inhibition efficiency on elastase was studied by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results proved that EA is a potent elastase inhibitor with an IC50 value of 1.44 mg/mL by UV-vis spectroscopy, and the inhibition mechanism of elastase was confirmed by fluorescence quenching. The interacting between EA and elastase was mainly based on the static quenching owing to the complex formation when the concentration of EA was ≤40 μM. Fluorescence quenching mainly occurred via dynamic quenching with increasing EA concentration. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH and ΔS were calculated to be -86.35 kJ/mol and -165.88 J/mol · K, respectively, indicating that the interactions between EA and elastase were mainly due to van der Waals forces or hydrogen bonding. The synchronous fl uorescence spectra showed that binding of EA to elastase can induce conformational changes in elastase.

  17. Fluorescent lidar for organic aerosol study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Timofeev, V. I.; Grishin, A. I.; Fateyeva, N. L.

    2005-10-01

    The paper describes the fluorescent lidar created for monitoring of the atmosphere and for estimating the content of fluorescent components of organic aerosol. The lidar operation is based on the use of ultraviolet radiation of harmonics of Nd:YAG solid state laser for exciting the atmospheric fluorescence and the spectral analysis of the atmospheric fluorescence is used in the near ultraviolet and blue spectral range with the resolution of 2 nm. The lidar was found to be efficient for remote analysis of organic aerosol occurring as a result of vegetation emission of secondary metabolites to the atmosphere. Fluorescence spectra processing allows us to select some organic compounds, which molecules contain 7 and more carbon atoms. Taking into account the availability of interconnection between organic aerosol and vegetation, in lidar the second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser is also used for exciting the fluorescence of vegetation covers. In this case the receiving system detects the fluorescence of vegetation in the red spectral range conditioned by the chlorophyll of vegetation. Simultaneous detection of the fluorescence from the atmosphere and from vegetation makes it possible to obtain data on the interaction of the atmosphere and underlying surface covered by vegetation. It has been found that a disruption in the vegetation feeding or the impact of pollutions on vegetation resulted in a sharp increase of the fluorescence intensity of vegetation chlorophyll in the red spectral range and in the simultaneous appearance of organic aerosol in the atmosphere adjacent to vegetation in the region of negative impact.

  18. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  19. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    We have postulated that, in the case of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme, crystal growth occurs by the addition of pre-critical nuclei sized n-mers that form in the bulk solution, and that the n-mer growth units were multiples of the tetrameric 4(sub 3) helical structure. These have the strongest intermolecular bonds in the crystal and are therefore likely to be the first species formed. High resolution AFM studies provide strong supporting evidence for this model, but the data also suggest that the actual species in solution may not be identical in structure to that found in the crystal. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2(sub 1) space group. FRET studies are being carried out between the cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex(sub max) 366 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex(sub max) 430 nm, Em 528 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R(sub 0) for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approx. 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 4(sub 3) helix. The short donor lifetime of 2.80 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.644), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules (greater than or equal to 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Lifetime data show that CB-lys has a single lifetime when it is the only species in solution. Similarly, LY-lys also exhibits a single lifetime of 4.63 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.42) when alone in solution. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a third lifetime component of 0.348ns for the CB-lys. The fractional intensities of the different species present can be used to estimate the distribution of monomer and n-mers in solution. The self

  20. Ground and excited state proton transfer of the bioactive plant flavonol robinetin in a protein environment: spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Pahari, Biswa Pathik; Chaudhuri, Sudip; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K

    2015-02-12

    We performed spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies to explore the interaction of the bioactive plant flavonol robinetin (3,7,3',4',5'-OH flavone), with the carrier protein human serum albumin (HSA). Multiparametric fluorescence sensing, exploiting the intrinsic "two color" fluorescence of robinetin (comprising excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and charge transfer (CT) emissions) reveals that binding to HSA significantly affects the emission and excitation profiles, with strongly blue-shifted (∼29 nm) normal fluorescence and remarkable increase in the ESIPT fluorescence anisotropy (r) and lifetime (τ). Flavonol-induced HSA (tryptophan) fluorescence quenching data yield the dynamic quenching constant (KD) as 5.42 × 10(3) M(-1) and the association constant (Ks) as 5.59 × 10(4) M(-1). Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay studies show dramatic (∼170 times) increase in the rotational correlation time (τ(rot)), reflecting greatly enhanced restrictions in motion of robinetin in the protein matrix. Furthermore, prominent induced circular dichroism (ICD) bands appear, indicating that the chiral environment of HSA strongly perturbs the electronic transitions of the intrinsically achiral robinetin molecule. Molecular docking calculations suggest that robinetin binds in subdomain IIA of HSA, where specific interactions with basic residues promote ground state proton abstraction and stabilize an anionic species, which is consistent with spectroscopic observations. PMID:25313717

  1. Spectroscopic studies of glassy phospho-silicate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitarz, Maciej; Handke, Mirosław; Fojud, Zbigniew; Jurga, Stefan

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the work is to determine the internal structure of bioactive glasses based on structural studies. Due to the absence of the long-range order, the X-ray methods usually applied in the studies of crystalline materials are of low applicability in the investigations of glasses. Therefore, spectroscopic methods, such as IR and NMR, which make it possible to 'see' the short- and the middle-range order are extremely suitable in their studies. IR investigations have shown that the glasses studied exhibit non-uniform domain composition, which should facilitate their transformation into glass-crystalline state. Additionally, detailed NMR measurements have been carried out in order to determine the influence of glass structure on the course of its crystallization. These studies make it possible to verify the common opinions on the middle-range order (domains) in the glasses studied. The results obtained for 27Al and 31P are particularly promising. Changes in the environment of [SiO 4] 4-tetrahedra, which can be spatially connected with various numbers of [PO 4] 3- and [AlO 4] 5- tetrahedra cause the presence of various types of bridging bonds, such as Si-O-Si, Si-O-Al and Si-O-P. This in turn has significant impact on the number and the shape of the bands occurring in the spectra.

  2. Femtosecond study of light-induced fluorescence increase of the dark chromoprotein asFP595

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüttrigkeit, Tanja A.; Feilitzsch, Till von; Kompa, Christian K.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Voityuk, Alexander A.; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E.

    2006-04-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy is applied to study the mechanism of the light-induced increase of fluorescence quantum yield of the initially non-fluorescent (dark) chromoprotein asFP595. Spectroscopic and kinetic characteristics of this unique fluorescence "kindling" phenomenon are: (i) the small Stokes shift of the dark chromophore consistent with either the zwitterion or the anion; (ii) the singlet excited state of the dark chromophore decaying predominantly with a time constant of ˜320 fs corresponding to a fluorescence quantum yield ΦFl ⩽ 10 -4. Since ground state recovery occurs on the same time scale, this radiationless channel is assigned to internal conversion; (iii) the formation of the fluorescent species depending on the sequential absorption of two photons with a delay significantly exceeding the excitation pulse duration of 150 fs; (iv) the fluorescent species showing a red-shift of ˜20 nm in absorption and emission, and an excited state lifetime of 2.2 ns. The ultrafast internal conversion of the excited dark state is attributed to the proximity of the S 0 and S 1 potential energy surfaces favored by the non-planarity of the chromophore as revealed in recent X-ray structures. Competing with internal conversion two different transformations of the chromophore structure are suggested which may be identified in a future X-ray structural analysis of the the photoconverted fluorescent state. The predominant kindling mechanism may be either (i) trans- cis isomerization or (ii) proton transfer between an excited zwitterion and the protein cleft. For mechanism (ii) the large dipole moment change of about 11 D upon S 0-S 1 excitation of the chromophore would be crucial in order to initiate protein relaxation and deprotonation of a zwitterion. Both mechanisms are assumed to lead to a metastable planar structure responsible for the long-lived fluorescence of the chromophore "kindled" at high light intensities.

  3. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H+ and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN− ligands of the H-cluster, tracing 57Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe–S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN− ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications. PMID:26508821

  4. Dynamics of hybrid amoeba proteus containing zoochlorellae studied using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.-H.; Fong, B. A.; Alfano, S. A., Jr.; Rakhlin, I.; Wang, W. B.; Ni, X. H.; Yang, Y. L.; Zhou, F.; Zuzolo, R. C.; Alfano, R. R.

    2011-03-01

    The microinjection of organelles, plants, particles or chemical solutions into Amoeba proteus coupled with spectroscopic analysis and observed for a period of time provides a unique new model for cancer treatment and studies. The amoeba is a eukaryote having many similar features of mammalian cells. The amoeba biochemical functions monitored spectroscopically can provide time sequence in vivo information about many metabolic transitions and metabolic exchanges between cellar organelles and substances microinjected into the amoeba. It is possible to microinject algae, plant mitochondria, drugs or carcinogenic solutions followed by recording the native fluorescence spectra of these composites. This model can be used to spectroscopically monitor the pre-metabolic transitions in developing diseased cells such as a cancer. Knowing specific metabolic transitions could offer solutions to inhibit cancer or reverse it as well as many other diseases. In the present study a simple experiment was designed to test the feasibility of this unique new model by injecting algae and chloroplasts into amoeba. The nonradiative dynamics found from these composites are evidence in terms of the emission ratios between the intensities at 337nm and 419nm; and 684nm bands. There were reductions in the metabolic and photosynthetic processes in amoebae that were microinjected with chloroplasts and zoochlorellae as well of those amoebae that ingested the algae and chloroplasts. The changes in the intensity of the emissions of the peaks indicate that the zoochlorellae lived in the amoebae for ten days. Spectral changes in intensity under the UV and 633nm wavelength excitation are from the energy transfer of DNA and RNA, protein-bound chromophores and chlorophylls present in zoochlorellae undergoing photosynthesis. The fluorescence spectroscopic probes established the biochemical interplay between the cell organelles and the algae present in the cell cytoplasm. This hybrid state is indicative

  5. Spectroscopic Studies on the Characterization of a Persian Playing Card.

    PubMed

    Holakooei, Parviz; Niknejad, Maryam; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our investigations on a playing card preserved at The Mūzih-i Āynih va Rushanāī in Yazd, Iran. Conducting micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-XRF), micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-Raman), infrared reflectography (IRR), ultraviolet fluorescence photography, radiography, and optical microscopy, various paints applied on the playing card were identified. According to our analytical studies, red, green, blue, black, and gold-like metallic paints were identified to be a red monoazo pigment (β-naphthol PR 53:1), chrome green, artificial ultramarine blue, carbon black, and brass powder (Dutch metal powder), respectively, dating the playing card to 1895 onward based on the manufacturing date of the red monoazo pigment. Barite was also shown to be mixed with the pigments as an extender. On the other hand, the portrait's face of the playing card was peculiarly blackened. Our analytical approach toward characterizing the blackened face showed that the black paint was achieved by carbon black and, in other words, the face was not blackened due to the darkening of Pb-bearing pigments. Moreover, it was shown that there was no underdrawing under the black face and the black paint was most probably executed in the same time with the other paints. Considering the possible use of the playing card, it was suggested not to remove the blackened face in the cleaning process since the black paint was a part of the integrity of the playing card.

  6. Spectroscopic Studies on the Characterization of a Persian Playing Card.

    PubMed

    Holakooei, Parviz; Niknejad, Maryam; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our investigations on a playing card preserved at The Mūzih-i Āynih va Rushanāī in Yazd, Iran. Conducting micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-XRF), micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-Raman), infrared reflectography (IRR), ultraviolet fluorescence photography, radiography, and optical microscopy, various paints applied on the playing card were identified. According to our analytical studies, red, green, blue, black, and gold-like metallic paints were identified to be a red monoazo pigment (β-naphthol PR 53:1), chrome green, artificial ultramarine blue, carbon black, and brass powder (Dutch metal powder), respectively, dating the playing card to 1895 onward based on the manufacturing date of the red monoazo pigment. Barite was also shown to be mixed with the pigments as an extender. On the other hand, the portrait's face of the playing card was peculiarly blackened. Our analytical approach toward characterizing the blackened face showed that the black paint was achieved by carbon black and, in other words, the face was not blackened due to the darkening of Pb-bearing pigments. Moreover, it was shown that there was no underdrawing under the black face and the black paint was most probably executed in the same time with the other paints. Considering the possible use of the playing card, it was suggested not to remove the blackened face in the cleaning process since the black paint was a part of the integrity of the playing card. PMID:26767645

  7. Particle in a Disk: A Spectroscopic and Computational Laboratory Exercise Studying the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Corannulene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, E. Ramsey; Sygula, Andrzej; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces undergraduate chemistry majors to the spectroscopic and theoretical study of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), corannulene. Students explore the spectroscopic properties of corannulene using UV-vis and Raman vibrational spectroscopies. They compare their experimental results to simulated vibrational…

  8. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  9. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-01

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  10. Infrared Imaging, Spectroscopic, and Photometric Studies of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    We have continued our program of infrared (IR) photometric, imaging, spectroscopic, and polarimetric temporal observations of comets to study the properties of comet dust and comet nuclei. During the first two years we digitized our IR data base on P/Halley and other recent comets to facilitate further analysis and comparison with other data bases, and found compelling evidence for the emission of a burst of small grains from P/Halley's nucleus at perihelion. We reported imaging and photometric observations of Comets Austin 1990 V and Swift-Tuttle 1992. The Swift-Tuttle 1992t observations included IR photometry, several 7-14 micron long-slit spectra of the coma and a time-sequence of more than 150 10 micron broadband images of the coma. An analysis of near-IR images of the inner coma of P/Halley obtained on three consecutive nights in 1986 March showed sunwardjets. We completed our analysis of IR imaging spectrosco-photometric data on comets. We also obtained observations of Comets Hyakutake 1996 B2 and Hale/Bopp 1995 01. We obtained infrared imaging, photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric temporal observations of bright comets using a network of five telescopes, with emphasis on simultaneous observations of comets at many wavelengths with different instruments. Our program offers several unique advantages: 1) rapid observational response to new comets with dedicated infrared telescopes; 2) observations within a few degrees of the sun when comets are near perihelion and 3) access to advanced infrared array imagers and spectrometers. In particular, reduction, analysis, publication and archiving of our Jupiter/sl-9 and Comet Hyakutake infrared data received special emphasis. Instrumentation development included installation of the latest version of the innovative FORTH telescope control and a data acquisition system that enables us to control three telescopes remotely by telephone from anywhere in the world for comet observations in broad daylight. We have

  11. Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Systems relevant in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In the Astrobiology context, the study of the physico-chemical interactions involving "building blocks of life" in plausible prebiotic and space-like conditions is fundamental to shed light on the processes that led to emergence of life on Earth as well as to molecular chemical evolution in space. In this PhD Thesis, such issues have been addressed both experimentally and computationally by employing vibrational spectroscopy, which has shown to be an effective tool to investigate the variety of intermolecular interactions that play a key role in self-assembling mechanisms of nucleic acid components and their binding to mineral surfaces. In particular, in order to dissect the contributions of the different interactions to the overall spectroscopic signals and shed light on the intricate experimental data, feasible computational protocols have been developed for the characterization of the spectroscopic properties of such complex systems. This study has been carried out through a multi-step strategy, starting the investigation from the spectroscopic properties of the isolated nucleobases, then studying the perturbation induced by the interaction with another molecule (molecular dimers), towards condensed phases like the molecular solid, up to the case of nucleic acid components adsorbed on minerals. A proper modeling of these weakly bound molecular systems has required, firstly, a validation of dispersion-corrected Density Functional Theory methods for simulating anharmonic vibrational properties. The isolated nucleobases and some of their dimers have been used as benchmark set for identifying a general, reliable and effective computational procedure based on fully anharmonic quantum mechanical computations of the vibrational wavenumbers and infrared intensities within the generalized second order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2) approach, combined with the cost-effective dispersion-corrected density functional B3LYP-D3, in conjunction with basis sets of

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic study of vinyl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Anju; Rastogi, Shantanu

    2015-12-01

    The mid infrared emission features observed in various astrophysical sources are attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The models of emission spectra from a collection of PAHs show uncertainty in matching the 6.2 μm feature. This indicates the need to consider a larger variety of PAHs and PAH derivatives. Chemical pathways towards formation of PAHs in the astrophysical environments involve vinyl substituted PAHs as intermediate products. Vibrational spectroscopic study of vinyl-PAHs is reported in the present work. The vinyl group is substituted at similar positions in eight different PAHs. The obtained optimized structures show that vinyl substitution at 2 position in acenes gives planar geometry, while all other vinyl-PAHs are non-planar. Infrared spectra is simulated for neutrals as well as for cations. The results are compared with the spectra of corresponding plain PAHs and analyzed for possible match with astrophysical observations. New features, due to vinyl group in the composite spectra, identified at 6.64, 6.92, 7.27, 8.77 and 10.35 μm fall close to some sub features of the observed emission spectra. The paper provides data that may be used in the emission models particularly along proto planetary nebulae type cool objects. PMID:26117194

  13. Spectroscopic study of HNO3 dissociation on ice.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Patrick; Marcotte, Guillaume; Ayotte, Patrick

    2012-12-13

    A detailed spectroscopic study of HNO(3):H(2)O binary amorphous mixtures, and of the adsorption of HNO(3) onto ice, is reported. Using a classical optics model, the extent of intermixing and of ionic dissociation of adsorbed HNO(3), which forms a strong acid with liquid water, is determined as a function of HNO(3) coverage and temperature. Even at temperatures as low as 45 K, where intermixing is limited to at most a few molecular layers at the interface, ionic dissociation of adsorbed HNO(3) is observed to be extensive. While some amount of molecularly adsorbed HNO(3) is observed at the surface of ice at 45 K, its ionic dissociation occurs irreversibly upon heating the ice substrate to 120 K. The molecularly adsorbed state of HNO(3) is not restored upon cooling, suggesting HNO(3) is a metastable entity at the surface of ice. Therefore, despite ionic dissociation of HNO(3) being thermodynamically favored, it appears to be kinetically inhibited at the surface of amorphous solid water at temperatures below 120 K.

  14. A spectroscopic study of the globular Cluster NGC 4147

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanova, S.; Monaco, L.; Moni Bidin, C.; Assmann, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the abundance analysis for a sample of 18 red giant branch stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4147 based on medium- and high-resolution spectra. This is the first extensive spectroscopic study of this cluster. We derive abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y, Ba, and Eu. We find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.84 ± 0.02 and an α-enhancement of +0.38 ± 0.05 (errors on the mean), typical of halo globular clusters in this metallicity regime. A significant spread is observed in the abundances of light elements C, N, O, Na, and Al. In particular, we found an Na-O anticorrelation and Na-Al correlation. The cluster contains only ˜15 per cent of stars that belong to the first generation (Na-poor and O-rich). This implies that it suffered a severe mass-loss during its lifetime. Its [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] mean values agree better with the Galactic halo trend than with the trend of extragalactic environments at the cluster metallicity. This possibly suggests that NGC 4147 is a genuine Galactic object at odd with what claimed by some author that proposed the cluster to be member of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. An antirelation between the light s-process element Y and Na may also be present.

  15. Molecular docking, spectroscopic studies and quantum calculations on nootropic drug.

    PubMed

    Uma Maheswari, J; Muthu, S; Sundius, Tom

    2014-04-01

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of piracetam [(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide)] have been carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral data. The vibrational analysis was aided by an electronic structure calculation based on the hybrid density functional method B3LYP using a 6-311G++(d,p) basis set. Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, IR and Raman intensities, and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been computed. The assignments are based on the experimental IR and Raman spectra, and a complete assignment of the observed spectra has been proposed. The UV-visible spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and the maximum absorption wavelengths λmax were determined by the time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method. The geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and absorption wavelengths were compared with the experimental data. The complete vibrational assignments are performed on the basis of the potential energy distributions (PED) of the vibrational modes in terms of natural internal coordinates. The simulated FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV spectra of the title compound have been constructed. Molecular docking studies have been carried out in the active site of piracetam by using Argus Lab. In addition, the potential energy surface, HOMO and LUMO energies, first-order hyperpolarizability and the molecular electrostatic potential have been computed.

  16. Raman spectroscopic studies of the cure of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S. E.; Brown, E. C.; Corrigan, N.; Coates, P. D.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2005-10-01

    The cure of polydicyclopentadiene conducted by ring-opening metathesis polymerisation in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst was studied using non-invasive Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of the monomer precursor and polymerised product were fully characterised and all stages of polymerisation monitored. Because of the monomer's high reactivity, the cure process is adaptable to reaction injection moulding and reactive rotational moulding. The viscosity of the dicyclopentadiene undergoes a rapid change at the beginning of the polymerisation process and it is critical that the induction time of the viscosity increase is determined and controlled for successful manufacturing. The results from this work show non-invasive Raman spectroscopic monitoring to be an effective method for monitoring the degree of cure, paving the way for possible implementation of the technique as a method of real-time analysis for control and optimisation during reactive processing. Agreement is shown between Raman measurements and ultrasonic time of flight data acquired during the initial induction period of the curing process.

  17. Raman spectroscopic studies of the cure of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD).

    PubMed

    Barnes, S E; Brown, E C; Corrigan, N; Coates, P D; Harkin-Jones, E; Edwards, H G M

    2005-10-01

    The cure of polydicyclopentadiene conducted by ring-opening metathesis polymerisation in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst was studied using non-invasive Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of the monomer precursor and polymerised product were fully characterised and all stages of polymerisation monitored. Because of the monomer's high reactivity, the cure process is adaptable to reaction injection moulding and reactive rotational moulding. The viscosity of the dicyclopentadiene undergoes a rapid change at the beginning of the polymerisation process and it is critical that the induction time of the viscosity increase is determined and controlled for successful manufacturing. The results from this work show non-invasive Raman spectroscopic monitoring to be an effective method for monitoring the degree of cure, paving the way for possible implementation of the technique as a method of real-time analysis for control and optimisation during reactive processing. Agreement is shown between Raman measurements and ultrasonic time of flight data acquired during the initial induction period of the curing process.

  18. BH2 revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH2 has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the A ˜ 2 B 1 ( Π u ) - X ˜ 2A1 band system of 11BH2, 10BH2, 11BD2, and 10BD2 have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were "synthesized" by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B2H6 or B2D6) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH2 were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm-1 above the X ˜ (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm-1) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances.

  19. Application of fluorescence to the study of crude petroleum.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Juliana; Landulfo, Eduardo; Courrol, Lilia Coronato; Guardani, Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Crude petroleum oils are complex mixtures of different compounds (mainly organic), which are obtained from an extensive range of different geological sources. The fluorescence of crude petroleum oils derives largely from the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction, and this fluorescence emission is strongly influenced by the chemical composition (e.g., fluorophore and quencher concentrations) and physical characteristics (e.g., viscosity and optical density) of the oil. The fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) is increasingly used in petroleum technology due the availability of better optical detection techniques, because FS offers high sensitivity, good diagnostic potential, and relatively simple instrumentation. In this work we analyzed crude petroleum at different dilution in Nujol, a transparent mineral oil. The main objective of this work was to verify the possibility to measure crude oil emission spectroscopic without use of volatile solvents. The mixtures of nujol with different -crude oil concentrations were measured with a 10 mm optical path cuvette thus simplifying the fluorescence spectroscopy signal detection. The emission spectra were obtained by exciting the samples with a 400 W Xenon lamp at 350 nm, 450 nm and 532 nm. The emissions of the samples were collected perpendicularly with the excitation axis. PMID:20111988

  20. Binding of phenazinium dye safranin T to polyriboadenylic acid: spectroscopic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Haque, Lucy; Roy, Snigdha; Das, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report results from experiments designed to explore the association of the phenazinium dye safranin T (ST, 3,7-diamino-2,8-dimethyl-5-phenylphenazinium chloride) with single and double stranded form of polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter poly-A) using several spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate that the dye binds to single stranded polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter ss poly-A) with high affinity while it does not interact at all with the double stranded (ds) form of the polynucleotide. Fluorescence and absorption spectral studies reveal the molecular aspects of binding of ST to single stranded form of the polynucleotide. This observation is also supported by the circular dichroism study. Thermodynamic data obtained from temperature dependence of binding constant reveals that association is driven by negative enthalpy change and opposed by negative entropy change. Ferrocyanide quenching studies have shown intercalative binding of ST to ss poly-A. Experiments on viscosity measurements confirm the binding mode of the dye to be intercalative. The effect of [Na⁺] ion concentration on the binding process suggests the role of electrostatic forces in the complexation. Present studies reveal the utility of the dye in probing nucleic acid structure. PMID:24498422

  1. Line narrowing spectroscopic studies of DNA-carcinogen adducts and DNA-dye complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Myungkoo

    1995-12-06

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing and non-line narrowing spectroscopic methods were applied to conformational studies of stable DNA adducts of the 7{beta}, 8{alpha}-dihydoxy-9{alpha}, l0{alpha}-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[{alpha}]pyrene (anti-BPDE). Stereochemically distinct (+)-trans-, ({minus})-trans-, (+)-cis- and ({minus})-cis adducts of anti-BPDE bound to exocyclic amino group of the central guanine in an 11-mer oligonucleotide, exist in a mixture of conformations in frozen aqueous buffer matrices. The (+)-trans adduct adopts primarily an external conformation with a smaller fraction ( {approximately} 25 %) exists in a partially base-stacked conformation. Both cis adducts were found to be intercalated with significant {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between the pyrenyl residues and the bases. Conformations of the trans-adduct of (+)-anti -BPDE in 11-mer oligonucleotides were studied as a function of flanking bases. In single stranded form the adduct at G{sub 2} or G{sub 3} (5 ft-flanking, base guanine) adopts a conformation with strong, interaction with the bases. In contrast, the adduct with a 5ft-flanking, thymine exists in a primarily helixexternal conformation. Similar differences were observed in the double stranded oligonucleotides. The nature of the 3ft-flanking base has little influence on the conformational equilibrium of the (+)-trans-anti BPDE-dG adduct. The formation and repair of BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG in DNA isolated from the skin of mice treated topically with benzo[{alpha}]pyrene (BP) was studied. Low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy of the intact DNA identified the major adduct as (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N-dG, and the minor adduct fraction consisted mainly of (+)-cis-anti-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG.

  2. Binding of several benzodiazepines to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machicote, Roberta G.; Pacheco, María E.; Bruzzone, Liliana

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of lorazepam, oxazepam and bromazepam with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectrometry. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ G and Δ S were calculated. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were also investigated. The distances between the donor (BSA) and the acceptors (benzodiazepines) were obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer and conformational changes of BSA were observed from synchronous fluorescence spectra.

  3. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies of RNA: A Decade's Progress

    PubMed Central

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Rueda, David

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, single-molecule fluorescence studies have elucidated the structure-function relationship of RNA molecules. The real-time observation of individual RNAs by single-molecule fluorescence has unveiled the dynamic behavior of complex RNA systems in unprecedented detail, revealing the presence of transient intermediate states and their kinetic pathways. This review provides an overview of how single-molecule fluorescence has been used to explore the dynamics of RNA folding and catalysis. PMID:20161154

  4. Photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopic study of undisturbed human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S

    2013-02-15

    Chemical pretreatment has been the prevailing sample preparation procedure for infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies on bone. However, experiments have indicated that chemical pretreatment can potentially affect the interactions between the components. Typically the IR techniques have involved transmission experiments. Here we report experimental studies using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PA-FTIR). As a nondestructive technique, PA-FTIR can detect absorbance spectrum from a sample at controllable sampling depth and with little or no sample preparation. Additionally, the coupling inert gas, helium, which is utilized in the PA-FTIR system, can inhibit bacteria growth of bone by displacing oxygen. Therefore, we used this technique to study the undisturbed human cortical bone. It is found that photoacoustic mode (linear-scan, LS-PA-FTIR) can obtain basically similar spectra of bone as compared to the traditional transmission mode, but it seems more sensitive to amide III and ν(2) carbonate bands. The ν(3) phosphate band is indicative of detailed mineral structure and symmetry of native bone. The PA-FTIR depth profiling experiments on human cortical bone also indicate the influence of water on OH band and the cutting effects on amide I and mineral bands. Our results indicate that phosphate ion geometry appears less symmetric in its undisturbed state as detected by the PA-FTIR as compared to higher symmetry observed using transmission techniques on disturbed samples. Moreover, the PA-FTIR spectra indicate a band at 1747 cm(-1) possibly resulting from CO stretching of lipids, cholesterol esters, and triglycerides from the arteries. Comparison of the spectra in transverse and longitudinal cross-sections demonstrates that, the surface area of the longitudinal section bone appears to have more organic matrix exposed and with higher mineral stoichiometry.

  5. Photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopic study of undisturbed human cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2013-02-01

    Chemical pretreatment has been the prevailing sample preparation procedure for infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies on bone. However, experiments have indicated that chemical pretreatment can potentially affect the interactions between the components. Typically the IR techniques have involved transmission experiments. Here we report experimental studies using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PA-FTIR). As a nondestructive technique, PA-FTIR can detect absorbance spectrum from a sample at controllable sampling depth and with little or no sample preparation. Additionally, the coupling inert gas, helium, which is utilized in the PA-FTIR system, can inhibit bacteria growth of bone by displacing oxygen. Therefore, we used this technique to study the undisturbed human cortical bone. It is found that photoacoustic mode (linear-scan, LS-PA-FTIR) can obtain basically similar spectra of bone as compared to the traditional transmission mode, but it seems more sensitive to amide III and ν2 carbonate bands. The ν3 phosphate band is indicative of detailed mineral structure and symmetry of native bone. The PA-FTIR depth profiling experiments on human cortical bone also indicate the influence of water on OH band and the cutting effects on amide I and mineral bands. Our results indicate that phosphate ion geometry appears less symmetric in its undisturbed state as detected by the PA-FTIR as compared to higher symmetry observed using transmission techniques on disturbed samples. Moreover, the PA-FTIR spectra indicate a band at 1747 cm-1 possibly resulting from Cdbnd O stretching of lipids, cholesterol esters, and triglycerides from the arteries. Comparison of the spectra in transverse and longitudinal cross-sections demonstrates that, the surface area of the longitudinal section bone appears to have more organic matrix exposed and with higher mineral stoichiometry.

  6. Spectroscopic studies on the spontaneous assembly of phenosafranin on glycosaminoglycans templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzhen; Zhao, Fenglin; Li, Na; Li, Ke'an; Tong, Shenyang

    2002-10-01

    Spectroscopic studies showed that binding of phenosafranin (PSF) molecules to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) resulted in the following observations: (i) appearance of a 52.6 nm hypsochromic shift of the visible absorption band; (ii) static quenching of fluorescence from PSF; (iii) induction of strong circular dichroism (CD) signal of PSF. Stoichiometry of the PSF-GAGs complex was determined by spectrophotometric titration, spectrofluorimetric titration and MacIntosh extraction method. These studies demonstrated the formation of the extended helical PSF array aligned on the helical backbone of GAGs templates by electrostatic force, and the dimeric binding mode of PSF to each anionic site was proposed. The comparative studies between PSF-heparin (Hep) and PSF-chondroitin 4-sulfate (CS) complexes revealed that: (i) stoichiometry of PSF-Hep complex was 1.8 times of PSF-CS complex; (ii) Hep was more effective than CS (1.8 times) in decreasing the absorbance of PSF; and (iii) Stern-Volmer constants of the Hep-PSF system were greater than that of the CS-PSF system. These differences were attributed to the different charge density on the Hep and CS molecules, which in turn suggested that the electrostatic force was dominant in the interaction between PSF and GAGs.

  7. Structural studies of E. coli ribosomes by spectroscopic techniques: A specialized review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicontro, Adalberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2005-12-01

    We present a review on our interdisciplinary line of research based on strategies of molecular biology and biophysics. These have been applied to the study of the prokaryotic ribosome of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our investigations on this organelle have continued for more than a decade and we have adopted different spectroscopic biophysical techniques such as: dielectric and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as light scattering (photon correlation spectroscopy). Here we report studies on the whole 70S ribosomes and on the separated subunits 30S and 50S. Our results evidence intrinsic structural features of the subunits: the small shows a more "floppy" structure, while the large one appears to be more rigid. Also, an inner "kernel" formed by the RNA/protein association is found within the ribosome. This kernel is surrounded by a ribonucleoprotein complex more exposed to the solvent. Initial analyses were done on the so called Kaldtschmit-Wittmann ribosome: more recently we have extended the studies to the "tight couple" ribosome known for its better functional performance in vitro. Data evidence a phenomenological correlation between the differential biological activity and the intrinsic structural properties of the two-ribosome species. Finally, investigations were also conducted on particles treated at sub-denaturing temperatures and on ribosomes partially deproteinized by salt treatment (ribosomal cores). Results suggest that the thermal treatment and the selective removal of proteins cause analogous structural alterations.

  8. Study on the interaction between ginsenoside Rh2 and calf thymus DNA by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dudu; Chen, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between ginsenoside Rh2 (G-Rh2) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was investigated by spectroscopic methods including UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with DNA melting techniques and viscosity measurements. Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures proved that the quenching mechanism was a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be -22.83 KJ · mol(-1) and 15.11 J · mol(-1) · K(-1) by van 't Hoff equation, suggesting that hydrophobic force might play a major role in the binding of G-Rh2 to ctDNA. Moreover, the fluorescence quenching study with potassium iodide as quencher indicated that the KSV (Stern-Volmer quenching constant) value for the bound G-Rh2 with ctDNA was lower than the free G-Rh2. The relative viscosity of ctDNA increased with the addition of G-Rh2 and also the ctDNA melting temperature increased in the presence of G-Rh2. Denatured DNA studies showed that quenching by single-stranded DNA was less than that by double-stranded DNA. The observed changes in CD spectra also demonstrated that the intensities of the positive and negative bands decreased with the addition of G-Rh2. The experimental results suggest that G-Rh2 molecules bind to ctDNA via an intercalative binding mode.

  9. Study on the interaction between ginsenoside Rh2 and calf thymus DNA by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dudu; Chen, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between ginsenoside Rh2 (G-Rh2) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was investigated by spectroscopic methods including UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with DNA melting techniques and viscosity measurements. Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures proved that the quenching mechanism was a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be -22.83 KJ · mol(-1) and 15.11 J · mol(-1) · K(-1) by van 't Hoff equation, suggesting that hydrophobic force might play a major role in the binding of G-Rh2 to ctDNA. Moreover, the fluorescence quenching study with potassium iodide as quencher indicated that the KSV (Stern-Volmer quenching constant) value for the bound G-Rh2 with ctDNA was lower than the free G-Rh2. The relative viscosity of ctDNA increased with the addition of G-Rh2 and also the ctDNA melting temperature increased in the presence of G-Rh2. Denatured DNA studies showed that quenching by single-stranded DNA was less than that by double-stranded DNA. The observed changes in CD spectra also demonstrated that the intensities of the positive and negative bands decreased with the addition of G-Rh2. The experimental results suggest that G-Rh2 molecules bind to ctDNA via an intercalative binding mode. PMID:25727213

  10. Fibreoptic fluorescent microscopy in studying biological objects

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A N; Turchin, Il'ya V; Kamenskii, V A; Fiks, I I; Lazutkin, A A; Bezryadkov, D V; Ivanova, A A; Toptunov, D M; Anokhin, K V

    2010-11-13

    The method of fluorescent microscopy is developed based on employment of a single-mode fibreoptic channel to provide high spatial resolution 3D images of large cleared biological specimens using the 488-nm excitation laser line. The transverse and axial resolution of the setup is 5 and 13 {mu}m, respectively. The transversal sample size under investigation is up to 10 mm. The in-depth scanning range depends on the sample transparency and reaches 4 mm in the experiment. The 3D images of whole mouse organs (heart, lungs, brain) and mouse embryos obtained using autofluorescence or fluorescence of exogenous markers demonstrate a high contrast and cellular-level resolution.

  11. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption and desorption of Pb on RuO2 xH2O were examined kinetically and thermodynamically via spectroscopic and macroscopic investigations. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to determine the sorption mechanism with regard to identity of nearest atomic neighbo...

  12. Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Systems relevant in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In the Astrobiology context, the study of the physico-chemical interactions involving "building blocks of life" in plausible prebiotic and space-like conditions is fundamental to shed light on the processes that led to emergence of life on Earth as well as to molecular chemical evolution in space. In this PhD Thesis, such issues have been addressed both experimentally and computationally by employing vibrational spectroscopy, which has shown to be an effective tool to investigate the variety of intermolecular interactions that play a key role in self-assembling mechanisms of nucleic acid components and their binding to mineral surfaces. In particular, in order to dissect the contributions of the different interactions to the overall spectroscopic signals and shed light on the intricate experimental data, feasible computational protocols have been developed for the characterization of the spectroscopic properties of such complex systems. This study has been carried out through a multi-step strategy, starting the investigation from the spectroscopic properties of the isolated nucleobases, then studying the perturbation induced by the interaction with another molecule (molecular dimers), towards condensed phases like the molecular solid, up to the case of nucleic acid components adsorbed on minerals. A proper modeling of these weakly bound molecular systems has required, firstly, a validation of dispersion-corrected Density Functional Theory methods for simulating anharmonic vibrational properties. The isolated nucleobases and some of their dimers have been used as benchmark set for identifying a general, reliable and effective computational procedure based on fully anharmonic quantum mechanical computations of the vibrational wavenumbers and infrared intensities within the generalized second order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2) approach, combined with the cost-effective dispersion-corrected density functional B3LYP-D3, in conjunction with basis sets of

  13. Studies on the inclusion behavior of 9-Aminoacridine into cyclodextrins: Spectroscopic and theoretical evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, C.; Vijay Solomon, R.; Venuvanalingam, P.; Renganathan, R.

    2013-02-01

    9-Aminoacridine (9-AA) is an important attractive pharmaceutical drug employed as chemotheraptic agent for wound dressings. However, 9-AA possesses limited solubility and rapid metabolic decomposition renders this potential drug to limit its applications. Here we propose cyclodextrins (CDs) as a drug carrier to improve the bioavailability, solubility of 9-AA. The interaction between 9-AA and CDs (α-CD and β-CD) has been studied using UV-Vis absorption, steady state time resolved fluorescence, 1H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. The spectroscopic measurements show that 9-AA does not form stable complex with α-CD and also confirmed by DFT calculations. On the other hand, 9-AA forms inclusion complex with β-CD in a 1:1 stoichiometry ratio. Our DFT results suggest that 9-AA stabilizes inside the CD environment through hydrogen bonding that has unambiguously confirmed by AIM analysis. Thus our studies provide a useful insights in the development of Aminoacridine based drugs & its delivery through a suitable carrier like CDs.

  14. Study on the interaction between Besifloxacin and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xianyong; Jiang, Bingfei; Liao, Zhixi; Jiao, Yue; Yi, Pinggui

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between Besifloxacin (BFLX) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectroscopic (fluorescence, UV-Vis absorption and circular dichroism) techniques under imitated physiological conditions. The experiments were conducted at different temperatures (298, 304 and 310 K) and the results showed that the BFLX caused the fluorescence quenching of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant (Ka), binding sites (n) were obtained. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) of the interaction system were calculated at different temperatures. The results revealed that the binding process was spontaneous and the acting force between BFLX and BSA were mainly electrostatic forces. According to Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between BFLX and BSA was calculated to be 4.96 nm. What is more, both synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra confirmed conformational changes of BSA.

  15. Fluorescence and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy studies on polymer blend films for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stam, Jan; Lindqvist, Camilla; Hansson, Rickard; Ericsson, Leif; Moons, Ellen

    2015-08-01

    The quinoxaline-based polymer TQ1 (poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5- diyl]) is a promising candidate as electron donor in organic solar cells. In combination with the electron acceptor [6,6]- phenyl-C71- butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM), TQ1 has resulted in solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 7 %. We have studied TQ1 films, with and without PC70BM, spin-casted from different solvents, by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. We used chloroform (CF), chlorobenzene (CB), and odichlorobenzene (o-DCB) as solvents for the coating solutions and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) as solvent additive. CN addition has been shown to enhance photo-conversion efficiency of these solar cells. Phase-separation causes lateral domain formation in the films and the domain size depends on the solvent . These morphological differences coincide with changes in the spectroscopic patterns of the films. From a spectroscopic point of view, TQ1 acts as fluorescent probe and PC70BM as quencher. The degree of fluorescence quenching is coupled to the morphology through the distance between TQ1 and PC70BM. Furthermore, if using a bad solvent for PC70BM, morphological regions rich in the fullerene yield emission characteristic for aggregated PC70BM. Clear differences were found, comparing the TQ1:PC70BM blend films casted from different solvents and at different ratios between the donor and acceptor. The morphology also influences the UV/VIS absorption spectra, yielding further information on the composition. The results show that fluorescence and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy can be used to detect aggregation in blended films and that these methods extend the morphological information beyond the scale accessible with microscopy.

  16. Photophysical properties of hydroxyphenyl benzazoles and their applications as fluorescent probes to study local environment in DNA, protein and lipid.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Saba A J; Al-Rasbi, Ghalia S; Abou-Zied, Osama K

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence techniques have drawn increasing attention because they provide crucial information about molecular interactions in protein-ligand systems beyond that obtained by other methods. The advantage of fluorescence spectroscopy stems from the fact that the majority of molecules in biological systems do not exhibit fluorescence, making fluorescent probes useful with high sensitivity. Also, the fluorescence emission is highly sensitive to the local environment, providing a valuable tool to investigate the nature of binding sites in macromolecules. In this review, we discuss some of the important applications of a class of molecules that have been used as fluorescent probes in a variety of studies. Hydroxyphenyl benzazoles (HBXs) show distinct spectroscopic features that make them suitable probes for the study of certain biological mechanisms in DNA, protein and lipid. In particular, the complex photophysics of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and the distinguished fluorescence signatures of its different tautomeric forms make this molecule a useful probe in several applications. Among these are probing the DNA local environment, study of the flexibility and specificity of protein-binding sites, and detecting the heterogeneity and ionization ability of the head groups of different lipidic phases. The spectroscopy of HBX molecules and some of their chemically modified structures is also reviewed.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totir, Dana Alexa

    2000-10-01

    Structural changes that occur during electrochemical cycling of lithium-ion battery cathode materials have been investigated using in situ spectroscopic techniques. A new method was developed for the preparation of carbon and binder free cathodes utilizing powder materials of interest for commercial batteries. The extraordinary quality of the cyclic voltammetric curves recorded for this type of electrodes during the in situ measurements allows direct correlations to be made between the state of charge of the material and its structural and electronic characteristics. LiCoO2, LiMn2O4 and LiCo0.15Ni 0.85O2 electrodes were evaluated using cycling voltammetry and the mean diffusion coefficient for Li-ions in the lattice (DLi) was calculated for LiMn2O4. LiMn2O4 electrodes prepared by this technique have been studied in situ using Mn K-edge XAS. Data analysis for the species formed at different potentials indicated a contraction of the lattice associated with the increase in the oxidation state of manganese. In situ Raman spectra of particles of LiMn2O 4, and LiCoO2 embedded in Au and also of KS-44 graphite and carbon microfibers MCF28 embedded in thermally annealed Ni have been recorded as a function of the applied potential. Fe K-edge XAFS of pyrite electrodes in a Li/PEO(LiClO4)/FeS 2 cell and S K-edge XANES measurements of a FeS2 electrode in a non-aqueous electrolyte have been acquired as a function of the state of charge. The studies have clearly evidenced the formation of metallic Fe and Li2S as intermediates after 4 e- discharge and the formation of Li2FeS2 after 2 e- recharge. While Fe K-edge studies have indicated that there is no change in the Fe environment and oxidation state upon 4 e- recharge, the results obtained from S K-edge studies are inconclusive for this stage. Finally, in situ Co K-edge XAFS data were obtained for the first time during the electrochemical cycling of electrodeposited Co(OH) 2 films in alkaline solutions. The results support

  18. Spectroscopic study of excitations in pi-conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cungeng

    This dissertation deals with spin-physics of photo excitations in pi-conjugated polymers. Optical and magneto-optical spectroscopies, including continuous wave and time-resolved photo-induced absorption, photoluminescence, electroluminescence, and their optically detected magnetic resonance, were used to study steady state and transient photogeneration, energy transfer, spin relaxation, and spin dependent recombination process in the time domain from tens of nanoseconds to tens of milliseconds in polymer materials including regio-random poly (3-hexyl-thiophene-2,5-diyl), regio-regular poly (3-hexyl-thiophene-2,5-diyl), poly (9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl), poly (poly (2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) of various morphologies, and transition metal complex poly (Pt-quinoxene). Our studies provided the tools to clarify the physical pictures regarding two types of long-lived photoexcitations, namely polarons (both germinate polaron-pairs, and unpaired polarons) and triplet excitons, which are the major excitations in these exotic semiconductors in electrical and optical related applications. From measurements of transient fluorescence and transient fluorescence detected magnetic resonance we show that photogenerated geminate polaron pairs live up to hundreds of microseconds following laser pulsed excitation. This conclusion is in agreement with the delayed formation of triplet excitons that we measured by transient photoinduced absorption. It also agrees with the weak spin-lattice relaxation rate in polymers that we measured using the optically detected magnetic resonance dynamic in thin films and organic light emitting devices. Randomly captured nongeminate polaron pairs were shown to be the major source of optically detected magnetic resonance signal at steady, state. We found that the dynamics and magnitude of the signal depend on the spin-relaxation rate, generation rate and decay rate of the geminate pairs and nongeminate pairs. Importantly we

  19. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of carminic acid DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comanici, Radu; Gabel, Bianca; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Cornaggia, Christian; Pommeret, Stanislas; Rusu, Catalin; Kryschi, Carola

    2006-06-01

    Photo-excited carminic acid and carminic acid-DNA complexes in a buffer solution at pH 7 have been examined using a variety of spectroscopy techniques, that are in particular, the femtosecond resolved fluorescence upconversion and transient absorption spectroscopy. The observation of dual fluorescence emission, one peaks at 470 nm and the other at 570 nm, indicates to an excited-state (S 1) intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). A detailed analysis of the transient absorption measurements of an aqueous carminic-acid solution at pH 7 yielded four lifetimes for the excited-state (S 1): 8, 15, 33 and 46 ps. On the other hand, only two lifetimes, 34 and 47 ps, were observed by fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy because of the detection limitation to the long wavelength edge of the carminic-acid spectrum. The four S 1 lifetimes were ascribed to the coexistence of respectively two tautomer (normal and tautomer) forms of carminic acid, in the non-dissociated state (CAH) and in the deprotonated state (CA -). The fluorescence upconversion measurements of carminic acid-DNA complexes exhibited a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetimes. This effect was accepted as evidence for the formation of intercalation complexes between the carminic acid and the DNA. The intercalative binding of the carminic acid to DNA was confirmed by the fluorescence titration experiments resulting to a binding constant of 2 × 10 5 M -1 that is typical for anthracycline-DNA complexes.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of uranium species for environmental decontamination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Charlotte

    After the Cold War, Department of Energy began to concentrate its efforts on cleanup of former nuclear material processing facilities, especially uranium-contaminated groundwater and soil. This research aims to study uranium association to both organic and inorganic compounds found in the contaminated environment in the hopes that the information gathered can be applied to the development and optimization of cost-effective remediation techniques. Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods will be employed to examine the behavior of uranium in given conditions to further our understanding of its impact on the environment. Uranium found in groundwater and soil bind with various ligands, especially organic ligands present in the environment due to natural sources (e.g. metabolic by-products or degradation of plants and animals) or man-made sources (e.g. chelating agents used in operating or cleanup of uranium processing facilities). We selected reasonable analogs of naturally occurring matter and studied their structure, chemical and electrochemical behavior and found that the structure of uranyl complexes depends heavily on the nature of the ligand and environmental factors such as pH. Association of uranium-organic complexes with anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium sp. was studied to establish if the bacteria can effectively bioreduce uranium while going through normal bacterial activity. It was found that the nature of the organic ligand affected the bioavailability and toxicity of the uranium on the bacteria. In addition, we have found that the type of iron corrosion products and uranyl species present on the surface of corroded steel depended on various environmental factors, which subsequently affected the removal rate of uranium by a citric acid/hydrogen peroxide/deionized water cleaning process. The method was found to remove uranium from only the topmost corrosion layers and residual uranium could be found (a) deeper in the corrosion layers where it is occluded by

  1. Studies on the interaction of apigenin with calf thymus DNA by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shufang; Sun, Xuejun; Kong, Rongmei; Xu, Mingming

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between apigenin and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) in a pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, DNA melting techniques, and viscosity measurements. It was found that apigenin molecules could intercalate into the base pairs of DNA, forming a apigenin-DNA complex with a binding constant of K310K = 6.4 × 104 L mol-1. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) were calculated to be 7.36 × 104 J mol-1, 329 J K-1 mol-1 and -2.84 × 104 J mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. Hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the apigenin-DNA complex. Thermal denaturation study suggested that the stabilization of the ctDNA helix was increased when the apigenin binding to ctDNA as indicated by the increase in thermal denaturation temperature of ctDNA at around 5.0 °C in the presence of apigenin. Spectroscopic techniques together with melting techniques and viscosity determination provided evidences of intercalation mode of binding for the interaction between apigenin and ctDNA.

  2. Spectroscopic and MD simulation studies on unfolding processes of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA induced by urea.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is primarily expressed in the mitochondria and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. To understand the biophysical properties of CAVA, we carried out a reversible urea-induced isothermal denaturation at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Spectroscopic probes, [θ]222 (mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm), F344 (Trp-fluorescence emission intensity at 344 nm) and Δε280 (difference absorption at 280 nm) were used to monitor the effect of urea on the structure and stability of CAVA. The urea-induced reversible denaturation curves were used to estimate [Formula: see text], Gibbs free energy in the absence of urea; Cm, the mid-point of the denaturation curve, i.e. molar urea concentration ([urea]) at which ΔGD = 0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]). Coincidence of normalized transition curves of all optical properties suggests that unfolding/refolding of CAVA is a two-state process. We further performed 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different urea concentrations. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies.

  3. Spectroscopic Studies of Carotenoid-to-Bacteriochlorophyll Energy Transfer in LHRC Photosynthetic Complex from Roseiflexus castenholzii

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Collins, Aaron M.; LaFountain, Amy M.; Enriquez, Miriam M.; Frank, Harry A.; Blankenship, R. E.

    2010-06-14

    Carotenoids present in the photosynthetic light-harvesting reaction center (LHRC) complex from chlorosome lacking filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus castenholzii were purified and characterized for their photochemical properties. The LHRC from anaerobically grown cells contains five different carotenoids, methoxy-keto-myxocoxanthin, γ-carotene, and its three derivatives, whereas the LHRC from aerobically grown cells contains only three carotenoid pigments with methoxy-keto-myxocoxanthin being the dominant one. The spectroscopic properties and dynamics of excited singlet states of the carotenoids were studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy in organic solvent and in the intact LHRC complex. Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy performed in the near-infrared (NIR) on purified carotenoids combined with steady-state absorption spectroscopy led to the precise determination of values of the energies of the S1(21Ag-) excited state. Global and single wavelength fitting of the ultrafast spectral and temporal data sets of the carotenoids in solvents and in the LHRC revealed the pathways of de-excitation of the carotenoid excited states.

  4. A fluorescence study of tetraphenylporphyrinatozinc(II)/imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin-Wang; Hu, Shu-Guang; Li, Tao; Fan, Li-Fen; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2003-09-01

    The fluorescence spectra of porphyrinatozinc(II)/iron(III) systems which consisted of tetraphenylporphyrinatozinc(II) and three kinds of imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) have been studied. An efficient fluorescence quenching of tetraphenylporphyrinatozinc(II) in the system was observed. Addition of a stronger organic base, such as piperdine, to the system can displace imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) and the fluorescence of the system restored partly. All these indicate the formation of porphyrinatozinc(II)/iron(III) supramolecular complex and coordination bonding formed by the coordination of imidazolyl group in imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) to Zn(II) in tetraphenyl-porphyrinatozinc(II) is the driving force of the supramolecular self-assembly. The association constants of the supramolecular complexes were calculated from the fluorescence spectroscopic titration data, and the differences among the association constants of the supramolecular complexes are discussed on the basis of the conformations which are dependent on the length of alkoxy chain linking imidazolyl group to porphyrinatoiron(III).

  5. Spectroscopic studies of the several isomers of UO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Reilly, Dallas D.; Abrecht, David G.; Buck, Edgar C.; Meier, David E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Szecsody, James E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2013-10-01

    Uranium trioxide is known to adopt seven different structural forms. While these structural forms have been well characterized using x-ray or neutron diffraction techniques, little work has been done to characterize their spectroscopic properties, particularly of the pure phases. Since the structural isomers of UO3 all have similar thermodynamic stabilities and most tend to hydrolyze under open atmospheric conditions, mixtures of UO3 phases and the hydrolysis products are common. Much effort went into isolating pure phases of UO3. Utilizing x-ray diffraction as a sample identification check, UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopic signatures of α-UO3, β-UO3, γ-UO3 and α-UO2(OH)2 products were obtained. The spectra of the pure phases can now be used to characterize typical samples of UO3, which are often mixtures of isomers.

  6. Spectroscopic Studies of the Several Isomers of UO3

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Reilly, Dallas D.; Abrecht, David G.; Buck, Edgar C.; Meier, David E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Szecsody, James E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2013-09-26

    Uranium trioxide is known to adopt seven different structural forms. While these structural forms have been well characterized using x-ray or neutron diffraction techniques, little work has been done to characterize their spectroscopic properties, particularly of the pure phases. Since the structural isomers of UO3 all have similar thermodynamic stabilities and most tend to hydrolyze under open atmospheric conditions, mixtures of UO3 phases and the hydrolysis products are common. Much effort went into isolating pure phases of UO3. Utilizing x-ray diffraction as a sample identification check, UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopic signatures of α-UO3, β-UO3, γ-UO3 and UO2(OH)2 products were obtained. The spectra of the pure phases can now be used to characterize typical samples of UO3, which are often mixtures of isomers.

  7. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Thaddeus, P.; Gottlieb, C.

    1992-05-01

    This document details activities during this reporting period topics discussed are: The first spectroscopic identification of the HCCCO and DCCCO radicals; detection of new vibrationally excited states of the carbon chain radicals CCH and CCD and the three-membered carbene ring, cyclopropenylidene; determination of an accurate structure of the cumulene carbene H{sub 2}CCC; analysis the hyperfine structure in the SiC radical; and the undertaking of a systematic search for new sulfur bearing radicals.

  8. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of novel nanostructured transparent conducting oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroabadi, Akram A.; Norwood, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been used to find the optical constants, including refractive index, extinction coefficient, thickness and volume fraction of nanostructured transparent conducting oxides including indium tin oxide (ITO) and indium zinc oxide (IZO). We observed sharp features in the ellipsometry data, with the spectral peaks and positions depending on the nanostructure dimensions and material. A superposition of Lorentzian oscillators and the effective medium approximation has been applied to determine the volume ratio of voids and nanopillars, thereby providing the effective optical constants.

  9. Structural, spectroscopic and theoretical study of novel ephedrinum salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, B.; Kolev, T.; Lamshöft, M.; Mayer-Figge, H.; Seidel, R.; Sheldrick, W. S.; Spiteller, M.

    2010-05-01

    Ephedrinum violurate dihydrate was synthesized, spectroscopically and structural elucidated. The data are compared with those of the free-base ephedrine hemihydrate. Discussion on the stable conformer of the ephedrinum cation is carried out. Quantum chemical calculations were performed for the theoretical elucidation of the conformational preference of the ephedrinum cation and its vibrational properties. The model systems neutral ephedrine hemihydrate ( 1) and violurate salt dihydrate ( 2) are elucidated.

  10. Interaction of a Julolidine-Based Neutral Ultrafast Molecular Rotor with Natural DNA: Spectroscopic and Molecular Docking Studies.

    PubMed

    Kalel, Rahul; Mora, Aruna K; Ghosh, Rajib; Dhavale, Dilip D; Palit, Dipak K; Nath, Sukhendu

    2016-09-22

    Ultrafast molecular rotors (UMRs) are reported to be one of the best fluorescent sensors to study different microenvironments, including biomolecules. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of application of a julolidine-based neutral UMR, 9-(2,2-dicyano vinyl) julolidine (DCVJ), as a DNA sensor and studied its mode of binding with DNA in detail using spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques. Our spectroscopic studies indicate that association of DCVJ with DNA leads to a very large enhancement in its emission intensity. Detailed investigation reveals that, despite being a neutral molecule, binding of DCVJ with DNA is largely modulated in the presence of salt. Such an unusual salt effect has been explained by invoking the ion-dipole interaction between DCVJ and the phosphate backbone of DNA. The ion-dipole interaction has also been established by studying the interaction of DCVJ with nucleosides. Detailed time-resolved studies show that the twisting motion around the vinyl bond in DCVJ gets retarded to a great extent because of its association with DNA molecules. Through competitive binding studies, it has also been established that DCVJ also binds to DNA through intercalation. Finally, quantum chemical calculations and molecular docking studies have been performed to confirm the mode of binding of DCVJ with DNA. PMID:27559832

  11. Spectroscopic studies of gas-phase molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chi-Kin

    Spectroscopic investigations of hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals' interactions in molecular clusters were studied by the techniques of infrared predissociation and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopies (REMPI). Ab initio calculations were applied in conjunction for data interpretation. The infrared predissociation spectroscopy of CN-·(H 2O)n (n = 2--6) clusters was reported in the region of 2950--3850 cm-1. The hydrogen bondings for the C-site and N-site binding, and among the water molecules were identified for n = 2 to 4. A spectral transition was observed for n = 5 and 6, implying that the anion was surface-bound onto the water aggregates in larger clusters. The infrared predissociation spectroscopy of Br-·(NH 3) and I-·(NH3) n (n = 1--3) clusters was reported in the region of 3050--3450 cm-1. For the Br -·(NH3) complex, a dominating ionic NH stretch appeared at 3175 cm-1, and the weaker free NH stretch appeared at 3348 cm-1. The observed spectrum was consistent to the structure in which there was one nearly linear hydrogen bond between Br- and the NH3 moiety. For the I- ·(NH3) complex, five distinct IR absorption bands were observed in the spectrum. The spectrum was not consistent with basic frequency patterns of three geometries considered in the ab initio calculations---complex with one, two and three hydrogen bondings between I- and the NH3 moiety. Substantial inhomogenous broadening were displayed in the spectra for I- ·(NH3)n (n = 2--3), suggesting the presence of multiple isomers. The REMPI spectroscopy of the bound 4p 2pi 1/2 and 2pi3/2 states, and the dissociative 3d 2Sigma+1/2 state in the Al·Ar complex was reported. The dissociative spectrum at Al+ channel suggested the coupling of the 4p 2pi 1/2,3/2 states to the repulsive 3d 2Sigma+1/2 state. The spin-electronic coupling was further manifested in the dissociative Al+ spectrum of the 3d 2Sigma+1/2 state. Using the potential energy curves obtained from ab initio

  12. A Raman Spectroscopic Study of Kernite to 25 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. E.; O'Bannon, E. F., III; Williams, Q. C.

    2015-12-01

    A Raman spectroscopic study of kernite to 25 GPaMarcus Silva, Earl O'Bannon III, and Quentin Williams Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz The Raman spectrum of kernite (Na2B4O6(OH)2·3(H2O)) has been characterized up to ~25 GPa in order to explore pressure-induced changes in a structurally novel mineral that contains mixed coordination borate groups (three- and four-fold), and both hydroxyl units and water. During compression, all of the ~30 modes monitored shift positively and monotonically until ~2.2 GPa where a few low frequency modes disappear and tetrahedral borate modes merge. The low frequency modes that disappear at ~2.2 GPa are likely associated with Na vibrations, and their disappearance suggests that dramatic changes occur in the Na sites at ~2.2 GPa. The merging of the boron bending and stretching modes at ~2.2 GPa suggests that the local symmetry of the BO4 tetrahedra changes at this pressure, and likely becomes more symmetric. The remaining modes shift positively up to ~7.4 GPa where a second notable change occurs. All but 5 modes (with initial frequencies of 150, 166, 289, 307, and 525 cm-1) disappear at ~7.4 GPa. This indicates that a second phase transition has occurred which affects both the BO3H and BO4­ groups: based on the loss of modes, this transition may be associated with disordering of the crystal. These 5 modes persist and shift monotonically up to ~25 GPa. On decompression, the 5 modes shift smoothly down to ~2.0 GPa where a few new modes appear in the spectrum. When fully decompressed to room pressure, the Raman spectrum of the recovered sample is significantly different from the ambient spectrum of the initial sample. Thus, our results are suggest a phase transition occurring at 2.2 GPa with changes in the Na and tetrahedral boron sites, followed by an additional transition at 7.4 GPa that may involve disordering of the crystal. In the latter transition, at least the BO3H groups appear to be

  13. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  14. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  15. Pulp tissue in sex determination: A fluorescent microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Amit; Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Leekha, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To determine and compare the reliability of pulp tissue in determination of sex and to analyze whether caries have any effect on fluorescent body test. Materials and Methods: This study was carried on 50 maxillary and mandibular teeth (25 male teeth and 25 female teeth), which were indicated for extraction. The teeth are categorized into 5 groups, 10 each (5 from males and 5 from females) on the basis of caries progression. The pulp cells are stained with quinacrine hydrochloride and observed with fluorescent microscope for fluorescent body. Gender is determined by identification of Y chromosome fluorescence in dental pulp. Results: Fluorescent bodies were found to be more in sound teeth in males as the caries increase the mean percentage of fluorescent bodies observed decreases in males. We also observed the fluorescent spots in females, and the value of the spot increases in female as the caries progresses, thereby giving false positive results in females. Conclusion: Sex determination by fluorescent staining of the Y chromosome is a reliable technique in teeth with healthy pulps or caries with enamel or up to half way of dentin. Teeth with caries involving pulp cannot be used for sex determination. PMID:25125912

  16. Transport and spectroscopic studies of liquid and polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopege, Dharshani Nimali

    trifluoromethanesulfonate, LiCF3SO3, abbreviated here as lithium triflate(LiTf). The molar absorption coefficients of nus(SO3), deltas(CF3), and deltas(SO3) vibrational modes of triflate anion in the LiTf-2-pentanone system were found to be 6708+/-89, 5182+/-62, and 189+/-2 kg mol-1 cm-1, respectively using Beer-Lambert law. Our results show that there is strong absorption by nu s(SO3) mode and weak absorption by deltas(CF 3) mode. Also, the absorptivity of each mode is independent of the ionic association with Li ions. This work allows for the direct quantitative comparison of calculated concentrations in different samples and different experimental conditions. In addition, this dissertation reports the temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic studies of pure poly(ethylene oxide) and LiTf-poly(ethylene oxide) complexes. A significant portion of this dissertation focuses on crystallographic studies of ketone-salt (LiTf:2-pentanone and NaTf:2-hexanone) and amine-acid (diethyleneamine: H3PO4, N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine:H 3PO4, and piperazine:H3PO4) systems. Here, sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate, NaCF3SO3 is abbreviated as NaTf. As model compounds, these systems provide valuable information about ion-ion interactions, which are helpful for understanding complex polymer systems. During this study, five crystal structures were solved using single X-ray diffractometry, and their vibrational modes were studied in the mid-infrared region. In the secondary amine/phosphoric acid systems, the nature of hydrogen-bonding network was examined.

  17. An arsenic fluorescent compound as a novel probe to study arsenic-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Femia, A Lis; Temprana, C Facundo; Santos, Javier; Carbajal, María Laura; Amor, María Silvia; Grasselli, Mariano; Alonso, Silvia Del V

    2012-12-01

    Arsenic-binding proteins are under continuous research. Their identification and the elucidation of arsenic/protein interaction mechanisms are important because the biological effects of these complexes may be related not only to arsenic but also to the arsenic/protein structure. Although many proteins bearing a CXXC motif have been found to bind arsenic in vivo, new tools are necessary to identify new arsenic targets and allow research on protein/arsenic complexes. In this work, we analyzed the performance of the fluorescent compound APAO-FITC (synthesized from p-aminophenylarsenoxide, APAO, and fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC) in arsenic/protein binding assays using thioredoxin 1 (Trx) as an arsenic-binding protein model. The Trx-APAO-FITC complex was studied through different spectroscopic techniques involving UV-Vis, fluorescence, atomic absorption, infrared and circular dichroism. Our results show that APAO-FITC binds efficiently and specifically to the Trx binding site, labeling the protein fluorescently, without altering its structure and activity. In summary, we were able to study a protein/arsenic complex model, using APAO-FITC as a labeling probe. The use of APAO-FITC in the identification of different protein and cell targets, as well as in in vivo biodistribution studies, conformational studies of arsenic-binding proteins, and studies for the design of drug delivery systems for arsenic anti-cancer therapies, is highly promising.

  18. One-Pot Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Physicochemical Studies of Quinoline Based Blue Emitting Donor-Acceptor Chromophores with Their Biological Application.

    PubMed

    Asiri, Abdullah M; Khan, Salman A; Al-Thaqafya, Saad H

    2015-09-01

    Blue emitting cyano substituted isoquinoline dyes were synthesized by one-pot multicomponent reactions (MCRs) of aldehydes, malononitrile, 6-methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-naphthalin-1-one and ammonium acetate. Results obtained from spectroscopic (FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, EI-MS) and elemental analysis of synthesized compounds was in good agreement with their chemical structures. UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements proved that all compounds are good absorbent and fluorescent. Fluorescence polarity study demonstrated that these compounds were sensitive to the polarity of the microenvironment provided by different solvents. In addition, spectroscopic and physicochemical parameters, including electronic absorption, excitation coefficient, stokes shift, oscillator strength, transition dipole moment and fluorescence quantum yield were investigated in order to explore the analytical potential of synthesized compounds. The anti-bacterial activity of these compounds were first studied in vitro by the disk diffusion assay against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria then the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined with the reference of standard drug chloramphenicol. The results displayed that compound 3 was better inhibitors of both types of the bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) than chloramphenicol. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  20. Ultrasonic separation of a suspension for in situ spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Qi, Wei; Mori, Keita; Ogawa, Satoshi; Inohara, Daichi; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Application of spectroscopic techniques to suspensions is difficult because optical scattering caused by solid particles reduces the accuracy. At the extreme, dense suspensions like blood cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. In the present study, an ultrasonic standing wave was used to agglomerate fluorescent particles in an aqueous ethanol suspension at the nodes of the standing wave. Relatively clear liquid regions, which contained few particles that could cause optical scattering, appeared around the anti-nodes and were used for spectroscopic imaging. This produced a spectrum that was similar to that of clear aqueous ethanol without any fluorescent particles.

  1. Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigations of the Acyl Surface Modification of Hydrogel Beads for the Deposition of a Phospholipid Coating.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2015-10-27

    The scaffolded vesicle has been employed as an alternative means of developing natural model membranes and envisioned as a potential nutraceutical transporter. Furthering the research of the scaffolded vesicle system, a nucleophilic substitution reaction was implemented to form an ester linkage between palmitate and terminal hydroxyl groups of dextran in order to hydrophobically modify the hydrogel scaffold. An average tilt angle of 38° of the hydrophobic palmitate modifying layer on the surface of the hydrogel was determined from dichroic ratios obtained from infrared spectra collected in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. ATR-IR studies of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel demonstrated that the hydrocarbon chains of the DMPC coating was similar to those of the DMPC bilayers and that the underlying palmitate layer had a negligible effect on the average tilt angle (26°) of the DMPC coating. The permeability of this acylated hydrogel was investigated with fluorescence spectroscopy and the terbium/dipicolinic acid assay. The hydrophobic modification on the surface of the hydrogel bead allowed for an efficient deposition of a DMPC layer that served as an impermeable barrier to terbium efflux. About 72% of DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel beads showed ideal barrier properties. The remaining 28% were leaking, but the half-life of terbium efflux of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel was increasing, and the total amount of leaked terbium was decreasing with the incubation time. The half-life time and the retention were considered a marked improvement relative to past scaffolded vesicle preparations. The process of acylating hydrogel beads for efficient DMPC deposition has been identified as another viable method for controlling the permeability of the scaffolded vesicle.

  2. Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigations of the Acyl Surface Modification of Hydrogel Beads for the Deposition of a Phospholipid Coating.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2015-10-27

    The scaffolded vesicle has been employed as an alternative means of developing natural model membranes and envisioned as a potential nutraceutical transporter. Furthering the research of the scaffolded vesicle system, a nucleophilic substitution reaction was implemented to form an ester linkage between palmitate and terminal hydroxyl groups of dextran in order to hydrophobically modify the hydrogel scaffold. An average tilt angle of 38° of the hydrophobic palmitate modifying layer on the surface of the hydrogel was determined from dichroic ratios obtained from infrared spectra collected in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. ATR-IR studies of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel demonstrated that the hydrocarbon chains of the DMPC coating was similar to those of the DMPC bilayers and that the underlying palmitate layer had a negligible effect on the average tilt angle (26°) of the DMPC coating. The permeability of this acylated hydrogel was investigated with fluorescence spectroscopy and the terbium/dipicolinic acid assay. The hydrophobic modification on the surface of the hydrogel bead allowed for an efficient deposition of a DMPC layer that served as an impermeable barrier to terbium efflux. About 72% of DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel beads showed ideal barrier properties. The remaining 28% were leaking, but the half-life of terbium efflux of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel was increasing, and the total amount of leaked terbium was decreasing with the incubation time. The half-life time and the retention were considered a marked improvement relative to past scaffolded vesicle preparations. The process of acylating hydrogel beads for efficient DMPC deposition has been identified as another viable method for controlling the permeability of the scaffolded vesicle. PMID:26429738

  3. Resonance Raman spectroscopic studies of enzymesubstrate intermediates at 5 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Munsok; Carey, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    A simple and versatile system for resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic analysis of enzymesubstrate complexes at liquid helium temperatures is described. The system allows us to record high-quality RR spectra for dithioacyl papain intermediates (MeO-Phe-Gly- and MeO-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-C (dbnd S)S-papain) in ice matrices at 5 K. Based on established structure-spectra correlations, it is concluded that the active-site conformation of the intermediates about the φ', ψ' glycinic linkages and cysteine-25 side chain is B-G+-PH both in ice matrices at 5 K and in solution at room temperature.

  4. Picosecond flash spectroscopic studies on ultraviolet stabilizers and stabilized polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Spectroscopic and excited state decay kinetics are reported for monomeric and polymeric forms of ultraviolet stabilizers in the 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzotriazole and 2-hydroxybenzophenone classes. For some of these molecules in various solvents at room temperature, (1) ground state absorption spectra, (2) emission spectra, (3) picosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectra, (4) ground state absorption recovery kinetics, (5) emission kinetics, and (6) transient absorption kinetics are reported. In the solid state at low temperatures, emission spectra and their temperature dependent kinetics up to approximately 200K as well as, in one case, the 12K excitation spectra of the observed dual emission are also reported.

  5. Spectroscopic study of the extremely fast rotating star 44 Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, L.; Vennes, S.; Kawka, A.; Kubat, J.; Nemeth, P.; Borisov, G.; KRaus, M.

    Stars with extremely fast rotation represent interesting challenge to modern understanding of the stellar evolution. The reasons why such a spin-up process should occur during the evolution to otherwise normal star are still not well understood. Already in the beginning of the XX century Otto Struve proposed that fast rotation of the group of stars spectroscopically classified as Be could be the main reason for the formation of observed disks of circumstellar material around them. This circumstellar material is responsible for the emission lines observed in the spectrum of Be-stars as well as for the whole complex of spectral and photometrical patterns called in general Be-phenomenon.

  6. BH{sub 2} revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-07

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH{sub 2} has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the A{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 1}(Π{sub u})−X{sup ~2}A{sub 1} band system of {sup 11}BH{sub 2}, {sup 10}BH{sub 2}, {sup 11}BD{sub 2}, and {sup 10}BD{sub 2} have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were “synthesized” by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6} or B{sub 2}D{sub 6}) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH{sub 2} were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm{sup −1} above the X{sup ~} (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm{sup −1}) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances.

  7. A spectroscopic study of uranyl-cytochrome b5/cytochrome c interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mei-Hui; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is harmful to human health due to its radiation damage and the ability of uranyl ion (UO22+) to interact with various proteins and disturb their biological functions. Cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) is a highly negatively charged heme protein and plays a key role in mediating cytochrome c (cyt c) signaling in apoptosis by forming a dynamic cyt b5-cyt c complex. In previous molecular modeling study in combination with UV-Vis studies, we found that UO22+ is capable of binding to cyt b5 at surface residues, Glu37 and Glu43. In this study, we further investigated the structural consequences of cyt b5 and cyt c, as well as cyt b5-cyt c complex, upon uranyl binding, by fluorescence spectroscopic and circular dichroism techniques. Moreover, we proposed a uranyl binding site for cyt c at surface residues, Glu66 and Glu69, by performing a molecular modeling study. It was shown that uranyl binds to cyt b5 (KD = 10 μM), cyt c (KD = 87 μM), and cyt b5-cyt c complex (KD = 30 μM) with a different affinity, which slightly alters the protein conformation and disturbs the interaction of cyt b5-cyt c complex. Additionally, we investigated the functional consequences of uranyl binding to the protein surface, which decreases the inherent peroxidase activity of cyt c. The information of uranyl-cyt b5/cyt c interactions gained in this study likely provides a clue for the mechanism of uranyl toxicity.

  8. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of ct-DNA with manganese Salen complex containing triphenyl phosphonium groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkordi, Maryam Nejat; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Lincoln, Per; Mirkhani, Valiollah

    2012-05-01

    The DNA binding properties of a bulky and hydrophobic Schiff base complex of manganese(III) [N,N'-bis(5-(triphenyl phosphonium methyl)salicylidene)-1,2-ethylene diamine chloride Mn(III) acetate] was examined by spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis titration data indicate both hypo and hyperchromic effect with addition of DNA to complex. A competitive binding study showed that the enhanced emission intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA was quenched by adding Mn Salen complex. This finding indicates that Mn Salen complex displaces EB from its binding site in DNA. Helix melting studies indicate improvement in the helix stability, and an increase in the melting temperature. The analysis of CD spectra represents the structural changes in DNA due to the binding of Mn Salen complex. The binding constant has been calculated using absorbance and fluorescence data. The results also represent that the binding process proceeds by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  9. A comparative study of fluorescence in malignant melanoma and nevocellular nevus using a fluorescence microscope and formalin-fixed specimens.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, T; Nonaka, S; Yoshida, H

    1990-09-01

    Fluorescence in malignant melanoma cells was investigated. The specimens from 18 cases of malignant melanoma and 26 cases of nevocellular nevus, which were fixed with formalin and embedded in paraffin wax, were studied by the fluorescence microscopic method. On the fluorescence microscope, the malignant melanoma cells emitted intense fluorescence from the cytoplasm. The nevus cells with large amounts of melanin granules showed moderate fluorescence. The tumor cells of melanoma in situ and nevus cells with few melanin granules emitted little fluorescence. Not only malignant melanoma cells but also nevus cells in the formalin fixed specimens had various degrees of fluorescence. Many cases of malignant melanoma emitted intense fluorescence, but this was rarely found in nevocellular nevus. This method is also useful in differentiating melanoma from nevocellular nevus. PMID:2277143

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses and fluorescence emission characteristics of PbO-Bi203-Ga203 glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Gyu; Kim, Kyong-Hon; Chernov, Vladimir A.; Heo, Jong

    1999-12-01

    A representative of heavy metal oxide glasses, i.e., a PbO- Bi2O3-Ga2O3 glass, was investigated to identify the network structure of the glass and the electronic transition properties of rare-earth ions doped. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses showed that gallium forms GaO4 tetrahedral units with an average Ga-O bond length of approximately 1.87 A. Lead forms both PbO3 and PbO4 polyhedra, but the fraction of PbO4 decreases with decreasing PbO content. Bismuth in glasses constructs BiO5 and BiO6 polyhedra, which have a similar coordination scheme of the (alpha) -Bi2O3 crystal. Formation of three-coordinated oxygens is necessary to compensate shortage of oxygens to be two-fold coordinated. These glasses exhibit a relatively good thermal stability as well as the lowest phonon energy among oxide glasses, and thereby enhance numerous fluorescence emissions that are quenched in the conventional oxide glasses. Magnitudes of multiphonon relaxation are the lowest among oxide glasses and comparable to those of fluoride glasses. Fluorescence emission characteristics of Pr3+: 1.3 micrometer and Er3+: 2.7 micrometer were discussed in detail. In addition, influence of OH- on the Nd3+: 1.3 micrometer emission was analyzed. Further research efforts on impurity minimization and fiberization may realize a new oxide-based fiber-optic host.

  11. The study of blue LED to induce fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for oral carcinoma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Longjiang; Hu, Yuanting

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging diagnosis of malignant lesions provides us with a new method to diagnose diseases in precancerous stage. Early diagnosis of disease has significant importance in cancer treatment, because most cancers can be cured well in precancerous, especially when the diffusion of cancer is limited in a restricted region. In this study, Golden hamster models were applied to 5% 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) to induce hamster buccal cheek pouch carcinoma three times a week. Rose Bengal, which has been used in clinican for years and avoids visible side-effect to human was chosen as photosensitizer. 405 nm blue LED was used to induce the fluorescence of photosensitizer. After topical application of photosensitizer, characteristic red emission fluorescence peak was observed around 600nm. Similar, normal oral cavity has special luminescence around 480nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy technology is based on analysing emission peaks of photosensitizer in the areas of oral carcinoma, moreover, red-to-green (IR/IG) intensity ratio is also applied as a diagnostic algorithm. A CCD which is connected with a computer is used to take pictures at carcinoma areas through different filters. Fluorescence images from normal hamster buccal cheek pouch are compared with those from carcinogen-induced models of carcinoma, and morphological differences between normal and lesion tissue can be distinguished. The pictures are analyzed by Matlab and shown on the screen of computer. This paper demonstrates that Rose Bengal could be used as photosensitizer to detect oral carcinoma, and blue LED as excitation source could not only have a good effect to diagnose oral carcinoma, but also decrease cost greatly.

  12. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization and Fluorescent Assessment of 1,3,5-Triaryl-2-pyrazoline Derivatives: Experimental and Theoretical Studies.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammad M; Al-Refai, Mahmoud; Ayub, Khurshid; Ali, Basem F

    2016-07-01

    Two new pyrazoline derivatives, namely 5-(4-bromophenyl)-3-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-1-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole (3) and 5-(4-bromophenyl)-3-(2,5-dichlorothiophen-3-yl)-1-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole (4) have been synthesized and characterized based on their spectral (IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR and MS) data and microanalysis. The fluorescence properties of 3 and 4 were studied by UV-Vis and emission spectroscopy. For compound 3, a fluorescence emission was observed in the blue region of the visible spectrum. The effect of different solvents on fluorescence was also investigated. Density Functional Theory calculations have also been performed to gain insight into geometric, electronic and spectroscopic properties of the pyrazoline derivatives. Both structures are analysed and compared in order to rationalize the different behaviour in 3 and 4. PMID:27220512

  13. Fluorescent Penetrant INSPECTION—CLEANING Study Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, D.; Brasche, L.

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) is widely used in the aviation industry and other industries for surface-breaking crack detection. As with all inspection methods, adherence to the process parameters is critical to the successful detection of defects. There is variety of lubricants and surface coatings used in the aviation industry which must be removed prior to FPI. Before the FPI process begins, components are cleaned using a variety of cleaning methods which are selected based on the alloy and the soil types which must be removed. It is also important that the cleaning process not adversely affect the FPI process. From the first three phases of this project it has been found that a hot water rinse can aid in the detection process when using this nondestructive method.

  14. Acoustically levitated droplets: a contactless sampling method for fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Jork; Grabolle, Markus; Rurack, Knut; Resch-Genger, Ute; Ziegler, Jan; Nann, Thomas; Panne, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic levitation is used as a new tool to study concentration-dependent processes in fluorescence spectroscopy. With this technique, small amounts of liquid and solid samples can be measured without the need for sample supports or containers, which often limits signal acquisition and can even alter sample properties due to interactions with the support material. We demonstrate that, because of the small sample volume, fluorescence measurements at high concentrations of an organic dye are possible without the limitation of inner-filter effects, which hamper such experiments in conventional, cuvette-based measurements. Furthermore, we show that acoustic levitation of liquid samples provides an experimentally simple way to study distance-dependent fluorescence modulations in semiconductor nanocrystals. The evaporation of the solvent during levitation leads to a continuous increase of solute concentration and can easily be monitored by laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:18596335

  15. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of the aminoglycoside (neomycin)--perylene conjugate binding to human telomeric DNA.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Ranjan, Nihar; Arya, Dev P

    2011-04-12

    Synthesis of a novel perylene-neomycin conjugate (3) and the properties of its binding to human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA, 5'-d[AG3(T2AG3)3] (4), are reported. Various spectroscopic techniques were employed to characterize the binding of conjugate 3 to 4. A competition dialysis assay revealed that 3 preferentially binds to 4, in the presence of other nucleic acids, including DNA, RNA, DNA-RNA hybrids, and other higher-order structures (single strands, duplexes, triplexes, other G-quadruplexes, and the i-motif). UV thermal denaturation studies showed that thermal stabilization of 4 increases as a function of the increasing concentration of 3. The fluorescence intercalator displacement (FID) assay displayed a significantly tighter binding of 3 with 4 as compared to its parent constituents [220-fold stronger than neomycin (1) and 4.5-fold stronger than perylene diamine (2), respectively]. The binding of 3 with 4 resulted in pronounced changes in the molar ellipticity of the DNA absorption region as confirmed by circular dichroism. The UV-vis absorption studies of the binding of 3 to 4 resulted in a red shift in the spectrum of 3 as well as a marked hypochromic change in the perylene absorption region, suggesting that the ligand-quadruplex interaction involves stacking of the perylene moiety. Docking studies suggest that the perylene moiety serves as a bridge that end stacks on 4, making contacts with two thymine bases in the loop, while the two neomycin moieties branch into the grooves of 4.

  16. An azo-based PNA monomer: synthesis and spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Mohamed E; Hudson, Robert H E

    2011-09-01

    The full synthetic details and photospectroscopic characterization of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) monomer suitable for Fmoc-based oligomerization chemistry that bears an azobenzene moiety as a base surrogate are reported. The monomer showed the ability to quench the fluorescence emission of fluorescein and pyrene luminophores and proved to be a competent Föster resonance energy transfer partner in a PNA-based molecular beacon.

  17. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response.

  18. Insights into the structure and substrate interactions of the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter from spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Sharom, F J; Liu, R; Romsicki, Y; Lu, P

    1999-12-01

    The P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter is a 170-kDa efflux pump which exports a diverse group of natural products, chemotherapeutic drugs, and hydrophobic peptides across the plasma membrane, driven by ATP hydrolysis. The transporter has been proposed to interact with its drug substrates within the membrane environment; however, much remains to be learned about the nature and number of the drug binding site(s). The two nucleotide binding domains are responsible for ATP binding and hydrolysis, which is coupled to drug movement across the membrane. In recent years, P-glycoprotein has been purified and functionally reconstituted in amounts large enough to allow biophysical studies. The use of spectroscopic techniques has led to insights into both its secondary and tertiary structure, and its interaction with nucleotides and drugs. In this review, we will summarise what has been learned by application to purified P-glycoprotein of fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy.

  19. Study on the interaction of Co (III) DiAmsar with serum albumins: Spectroscopic and molecular docking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Bahman Vasheghani; Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade; Rajabi, Farzaneh Hosseinpour; Hooshyar, Zari

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of cobalt-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane-1,8-diamine (Co(III) DiAmsar) as a hexadentate ligand with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) under physiological conditions in Tris-HCl buffer solution at pH 7.4. To this aim, at first, Co (III) DiAmsar was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and mass spectroscopy and then its interaction with HSA and BSA was investigated by means of various spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-visible (UV-vis), fluorescence, and cyclic voltammetry (CV)) and molecular docking technique. The results of fluorescence titration revealed that the Co (III) DiAmsar strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and BSA through a static quenching procedure. Binding constants (Ka) and the number of binding sites (n ∼ 1) were calculated using Stern-Volmer equations. The ΔG parameters at different temperatures were calculated. Subsequently, the values of ΔH and ΔS were also calculated, which revealed that the van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interaction splay a major role in Co (III) DiAmsar-HSA and Co (III) DiAmsar-BSA associations. The distance r between donor (HSA and BSA) and acceptor (Co (III) DiAmsar) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The data obtained by the molecular modeling study revealed the surrounding residues of HSA and BSA around Co (III) DiAmsar.

  20. Studies of the interaction between demeclocycline and human serum albumin by multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chengyu; Ma, Shuying; Liu, Ying

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of demeclocycline (DMCTC) with human serum albumin (HSA) by multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The inner filter effect was corrected before we calculated the binding parameters. Fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that DMCTC induced the fluorescence quenching of HSA though a static quenching procedure. Thermodynamic analysis by Van Hoff equation found enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were -53.01 kJ mol-1 and -65.13 J mol-1 K-1, respectively, which indicated hydrogen bond and van der Waals force were the predominant force in the binding process. According to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), the specific binding distances between Trp-214 (donor) and DMCTC (acceptor) were 3.18 nm. Through site marker competitive experiments, subdomain IIA of HSA has been assigned to possess the high-affinity binding site of DMCTC. The three dimensional fluorescence showed that the conformation of HSA was changed after its complexation with DMCTC, and the alternations of protein secondary structure were quantitatively calculated from FT-IR with reduction of α-helices content about 4.8%, β-sheet from 30.3% to 21.6% and with increases of β-turn from 15.6% to 22.2%. Furthermore, the binding details between DMCTC and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking studies, which revealed that DMCTC was bound at subdomain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, polar forces and π-π interactions. Moreover, the coexist metal ions such as Al3+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Cr3+ and Cd2+ can decrease the binding constants of DMCTC-HSA.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of the color modulation mechanism of firefly (beetle) bioluminescence with amino-analogs of luciferin and oxyluciferin.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Matsuhashi, Takuto; Hasumi, Yosuke; Iwano, Satoshi; Ito, Kazuto; Maki, Shojiro; Niwa, Haruki; Viviani, Vadim R

    2012-08-01

    Spectroscopic properties of amino-analogs of luciferin and oxyluciferin were investigated to confirm the color modulation mechanism of firefly (beetle) bioluminescence. Fluorescence solvatochromic character of aminooxyluciferin analogs indicates that the bioluminescence of aminoluciferin is useful for evaluating the polarity of a luciferase active site.

  2. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Severino, Reyna del Carmen; Camacho-López, Miguel Ángel; García-Macedo, Jessica Marlene; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M.; Sandoval-Trujillo, Ángel H.; Isaac-Olive, Keila; Ramírez-Durán, Ninfa

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detection limits of the excitation, emission, and synchronous fluorescence methods, during the quantification of the residual anthracene concentration from the following haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes cultures Kocuria rosea, Kocuria palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, and 4 strains of Nocardia farcinica, in order to establish the proper fluorescence method to study the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinobacteria. The study demonstrated statistical differences among the strains and among the fluorescence methods regarding the anthracene residual concentration. The results showed that excitation and emission fluorescence methods performed very similarly but sensitivity in excitation fluorescence is slightly higher. Synchronous fluorescence using Δλ = 150 nm is not the most convenient method. Therefore we propose the excitation fluorescence as the fluorescence method to be used in the study of the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes. PMID:26925294

  3. Using Spectroscopic Profiles to Study the Morphology of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ien; Pierce, Donna M.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2016-10-01

    We have used the integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectroscopic images of the comae of several comets. The images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3. CH, CN, NH2). Radial and azimuthal average profiles of the radical species were created to enhance any observed cometary coma morphological features. We compare the observed coma features across the observed species and over the different observation periods in order to constrain possible rotational states of the observed comets. We will present results for several comets, including 2009P1 (Garradd). This work was funded by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH186).

  4. Biophysical studies on the interactions of a classic mitochondrial uncoupler with bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetric and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Jia-Han; Ge, Yu-Shu; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between a classic uncoupler (2,4-dinitrophenol, DNP) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy under the physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching constants were calculated by the Stern-Volmer equation, and based upon the temperature dependence of quenching constants, it was proved that DNP caused a static quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. Owing to the static quenching mechanism, different associative binding constants at various temperatures were determined and thus the thermodynamic parameters, namely enthalpy (ΔH=-21.12 kJ mol(-1)) and entropy changes (ΔS=23.51 J mol(-1) K(-1)) could be calculated based on the binding constants. Moreover, the enthalpy and entropy changes are consistent with the "Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation" equation obtained from our previous work. The negative enthalpy and positive entropy indicated that the electrostatic interactions played a major role in DNP-BSA binding process. Site marker competitive displacement experiments were carried out by using fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods. These results showed that DNP bound with high affinity to Sudlow's site I (subdomain IIA) of BSA. The distance (r=3.78 nm) between donor (BSA) and acceptor (DNP) was obtained according to the mechanism of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Furthermore, the results of synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies indicated that the microenvironment and the secondary conformation of BSA were altered. The above results were supported by theoretical molecular modeling methods.

  5. A New Optical Cell for Spectroscopic Studies of Geofluids at Pressures up to 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, I.; Burruss, R. C.

    2003-12-01

    Interpretation of Raman and fluorescence spectra of hydrocarbon fluid inclusions and spectroscopic observations of reactions in hydrocarbon-water systems require high quality reference spectra of individual gases, gas mixtures, and hydrocarbon-water systems. We constructed a new optical cell from a square flexible fused silica capillary tube (300 μ m x 300 μ m with 100 μ m x 100 μ m cavity) and a high-pressure valve that allows studies of fluids at room temperature and pressures up to 100 MPa. The cell has several advantages over existing ones, including the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell, and they are: (1) ability to directly load sample fluids and monitor pressure during investigation; (2) no optical distortion; (3) small cell volume suitable for samples of limited supply (e.g., commercially available gas mixtures); (4) high pressures can be achieved; (5) a high-magnification, high-numerical-aperture objective lens (e.g., 100x) with a short working distance can be used due to the thin wall of the capillary tube, and (6) a heating-cooling stage can be added, allowing for investigations at temperatures other than room temperature, particularly suitable for studies of gas hydrates. Raman spectra have been collected from the cell for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, and also for two gas mixtures containing up to 9 components as a function of pressure up to 41 MPa. The spectra document the shift in Raman bands with pressure as well as constrain the detection limits for various gas species in the mixtures. Preliminary experiments on the diffusion of methane in water were conducted by monitoring the concentration of dissolved methane in water, as a function of time and distance from the vapor-water boundary, immediately after the perturbation of an equilibrium state induced by a sudden change in methane pressure.

  6. Perspectives of studying fluorescence of dental solid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, M. T.; Taubinsky, Ilia M.; Kozma, S. J.; Romanov, A. M.

    1999-07-01

    As an object of study extracted human teeth were used. The whole was explored 30 teeth; measurements were conducted in intact regions of tooth: enamel, dentine, cement, root canal and in pathologically changed areas: caries of teeth and a solid teeth plaque. From present fluorescent spectrums of intact: enamel, dentine, cement; and of pathological: caries and teeth stone is seen that curves are likely shaped for each of the groups, but their amplitudes are not the same. Fluorescence maximum of all tooth areas falls on 700 nm, herewith possible to say that, spectrum shapes are specific for each tooth area, that can be used in diagnostic purposes, for example when processing a carious cavity. As to florescence intensity that teeth stone possesses the maximum of fluorescence, then an area submitted to caries, intact areas possess a weak fluorescence.

  7. Development of Laser Spectroscopic Techniques and Their Application to the Study of Self-Organizing Molecular Assemblies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Wayne Frederick

    Laser spectroscopic techniques have been developed and adapted to computer based data gathering, reduction and analysis. The systems implemented are a laser flash photolysis and transient dichroism spectrometer, a single photon counting spectrometer for determination of fluorescence lifetimes and time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy, and a light scattering system for both static and dynamic measurements. These techniques have been concerted to study self-organizing molecular assemblies, particularly surfactant vesicles. Quaternary ammonium surfactant monomers with polymerizable styrene moieties on the headgroup have been sonicated into unilamellar vesicles and these in turn have been photopolymerized by both steady state and pulsed laser irradiation. The detailed kinetics of photopolymerization have been determined and a model developed which permits, in conjunction with the laser spectroscopic data, the characterization of the process in terms of average polymer chain length, quantum efficiency of free radical formation, free radical lifetime, and a characteristic rate parameter. Subsequent to characterizing and modelling the photopolymerization process the consequences of it on vesicle surface properties have been investigated with molecular probes. Strong evidence has been obtained that indicates that photopolymerization leads to the formation of clefts or pockets on the vesicle surface and to extensive surface inhomogeneity. Based on the experimental data, a computer simulation has been developed to help graphically visualize the photopolymerization process and to semi-quantitatively characterize the resulting surface inhomogeneity. As a first step in exploring the possibilities opened up by the discovery of clefts in the vesicle surface, the interaction between a photoexcitable proton transfer agent, 8-hydroxy-1,3,6 - pyrenetrisulfonate (POH), and vesicles has been studied. In unpolymerized vesicles POH loses its proton ejection capacity after

  8. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  9. The Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC) for raman spectroscopic studies of geologic fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Christian; Chou, I-Ming; Dubessy, Jean; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Pérez, Fernando Rull

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC), which is specifically designed for experiments on systems with aqueous fluids to temperatures up to ⬚~1000ºC and pressures up to a few GPa to tens of GPa. This cell permits optical observation of the sample and the in situ determination of properties by ‘photon-in photon-out’ techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Several methods for pressure measurement are discussed in detail including the Raman spectroscopic pressure sensors a-quartz, berlinite, zircon, cubic boron nitride (c-BN), and 13C-diamond, the fluorescence sensors ruby (α-Al2O3:Cr3+), Sm:YAG (Y3Al5O12:Sm3+) and SrB4O7:Sm2+, and measurements of phase-transition temperatures. Furthermore, we give an overview of published Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids to high pressures and temperatures, in which diamond anvil cells were applied.

  10. Chapter 7: The hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) for Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Christian; Chou, I-Ming; Dubessy, J.; Caumon, M.-C.; Rull, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC), which is specifically designed for experiments on systems with aqueous fluids to temperatures up to ~1000ºC and pressures up to a few GPa to tens of GPa. This cell permits optical observation of the sample and the in situ determination of properties by ‘photon-in photon-out’ techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Several methods for pressure measurement are discussed in detail including the Raman spectroscopic pressure sensors a-quartz, berlinite, zircon, cubic boron nitride (c-BN), and 13C-diamond, the fluorescence sensors ruby (α-Al2O3:Cr3+), Sm:YAG (Y3Al5O12:Sm3+) and SrB4O7:Sm2+, and measurements of phase-transition temperatures. Furthermore, we give an overview of published Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids to high pressures and temperatures, in which diamond anvil cells were applied.

  11. Spectroscopic and diffraction study of uranium speciation in contaminated vadose zone sediments from the Hanford site, Washington state.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Jeffrey G; Heald, Steven M; Zachara, John M; Brown, Gordon E

    2004-05-15

    Contamination of vadose zone sediments under tank BX-102 at the Hanford site, Washington, resulted from the accidental release of 7-8 metric tons of uranium dissolved in caustic aqueous sludge in 1951. We have applied synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopic and diffraction techniques to characterize the speciation of uranium in samples of these contaminated sediments. UIII-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that uranium occurs predominantly as a uranium(VI) silicate from the uranophane group of minerals. XAFS cannot distinguish between the members of this mineral group due to the near identical local coordination environments of uranium in these phases. However, these phases differ crystallographically, and can be distinguished using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. As the concentration of uranium was too low for conventional XRD to detect these phases, X-ray microdiffraction (microXRD) was used to collect diffraction patterns on approximately 20 microm diameter areas of localized high uranium concentration found using microscanning X-ray fluorescence (microSXRF). Only sodium boltwoodite, Na(UO2)(SiO3OH) x 1.5H20, was observed; no other uranophane group minerals were present. Sodium boltwoodite formation has effectively sequestered uranium in these sediments under the current geochemical and hydrologic conditions. Attempts to remediate the uranium contamination will likely face significant difficulties because of the speciation and distribution of uranium in the sediments.

  12. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter in coking wastewater during bio-treatment: full-scale plant study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ronghua; Ou, Huase; Yu, Xubiao; He, Runsheng; Lin, Chong; Wei, Chaohai

    2015-01-01

    This paper taking a full-scale coking wastewater (CWW) treatment plant as a case study aimed to characterize removal behaviors of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by UV spectra and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and investigate the correlations between spectroscopic indices and water quality parameters. Efficient removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total nitrogen (TN) after the bio-treatment were 91.3%, 87.3% and 69.1%, respectively. UV270 was proven to be a stable UV absorption peak of CWW that could reflect the mixture of phenols, heterocyclics, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Molecular weight and aromaticity were increased, and also the content of polar functional groups was greatly reduced after bio-treatment. Three fluorescent components were identified by PARAFAC: C1 (tyrosine-like), C2 (tryptophan-like) and C3 (humic-like). The removal rate of protein-like was higher than that of humic-like and C1 was identified as biodegradable substance. Correlation analysis showed UV270 had an excellent correlation with COD (r=0.921, n=60, P<0.01) and DOC (r=0.959, n=60, P<0.01) and significant correlation (r=0.875, n=60, P<0.01) was also found between C2 and TN. Therefore, spectroscopic characterization could provide novel insights into removal behaviors of DOM and potential to monitor water quality real-time during CWW bio-treatment.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter in coking wastewater during bio-treatment: full-scale plant study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ronghua; Ou, Huase; Yu, Xubiao; He, Runsheng; Lin, Chong; Wei, Chaohai

    2015-01-01

    This paper taking a full-scale coking wastewater (CWW) treatment plant as a case study aimed to characterize removal behaviors of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by UV spectra and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and investigate the correlations between spectroscopic indices and water quality parameters. Efficient removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total nitrogen (TN) after the bio-treatment were 91.3%, 87.3% and 69.1%, respectively. UV270 was proven to be a stable UV absorption peak of CWW that could reflect the mixture of phenols, heterocyclics, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Molecular weight and aromaticity were increased, and also the content of polar functional groups was greatly reduced after bio-treatment. Three fluorescent components were identified by PARAFAC: C1 (tyrosine-like), C2 (tryptophan-like) and C3 (humic-like). The removal rate of protein-like was higher than that of humic-like and C1 was identified as biodegradable substance. Correlation analysis showed UV270 had an excellent correlation with COD (r=0.921, n=60, P<0.01) and DOC (r=0.959, n=60, P<0.01) and significant correlation (r=0.875, n=60, P<0.01) was also found between C2 and TN. Therefore, spectroscopic characterization could provide novel insights into removal behaviors of DOM and potential to monitor water quality real-time during CWW bio-treatment. PMID:26465313

  15. Surfactants induced release of a red emitting dye from the nanocavity of a molecular container: A spectroscopic and calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Chatterjee, Aninda; Maity, Banibrata; Seth, Debabrata

    2016-08-01

    Supramolecular interaction of a red emitting dye Nile blue A (NBA) with Cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) in aqueous solution was studied and the release of the dye from the hydrophobic cavity of CB7 was reported. To investigate the supramolecular host-guest complex formation and release of dye, we have used the steady state absorption, fluorescence and time resolved fluorescence emission spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The spectral properties of NBA were changed in the presence of CB7. The change in spectral features of NBA in presence of CB7 indicates the formation of supramolecular host-guest complexes. By using the SED equation the diameter of the complex was estimated. The complex formation further affirmed by the (1)H NMR study. Upfield and downfield shifts of the protons of NBA was observed in both the aliphatic and aromatic region. From the ITC measurement, we have drawn up the forces involved for the complexation of NBA with CB7. We have studied the release of NBA from the hydrophobic cavity of CB7 by using ionic, neutral surfactants and ionic liquid with the help of spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. It is observed that on addition of SDS and ionic liquid (

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DOM fractions isolated from a filtered river water after ozonation and catalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Lu, Jinfeng; Ma, Jun; Qiang, Zhimin

    2008-03-01

    Fluorescence spectra were applied to investigate the structural changes of four dominant dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) fractions of a filtered river water before and after ozonation and catalytic ozonation. The ozonation and catalytic ozonation with synthetic goethite (FeOOH) and cerium dioxide (CeO(2)) were carried out under normal conditions, i.e. pH 7, reaction time of 10 min, and ozone/DOC ratio of about 1. The fluorescence spectra were recorded at both excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous scanning modes. EEM results reveal that ozonation of these DOM fractions causes a significant decrease of the aromaticity of humic-like structures and an increase of electron withdrawing groups, e.g., carboxylic groups. The catalysts can further improve the destruction of the humic-like structures in catalytic ozonation. Synchronous spectra reveal that ozonation of hydrophobic acid and hydrophilic acid (HIA) yields a significant amount of by-products with low aromaticity and low molecular weight. Catalytic ozonation enhances substantially the formation of these by-products from HIA and improves the destruction of highly polycyclic aromatic structures for all examined DOM fractions. PMID:18190948

  17. Co-treatment of fruit and vegetable waste in sludge digesters: Chemical and spectroscopic investigation by fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Maria Rosaria; Cavallo, Ornella; Malerba, Anna Daniela; Di Maria, Francesco; Cucina, Mirko; Massaccesi, Luisa; Gigliotti, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In a previous work co-digestion of food waste and sewage sludge was performed in a pilot apparatus reproducing operating conditions of an existing full scale digester and processing waste mixed sludge (WMS) and fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) at different organic loading rates. An analysis of the relationship among bio-methane generation, process stability and digestate phytotoxicity was conducted. In this paper we considered humification parameters and spectroscopic analysis. Humification parameters indicated a higher not humified fraction (NH) and a lower degree of humification (DH) of FVW with respect to WMS (NH=19.22 and 5.10%; DH=36.65 and 61.94% for FVW and WMS, respectively) associated with their different chemical compositions and with the stabilization process previously undergone by sludge. FVW additions seemed to be favourable from an agronomical point of view since a lower percentage of organic carbon was lost. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested consumption of aliphatics associated with rising in bio-methane generation followed by accumulation of aliphatics and carboxylic acids when the biogas production dropped. The trend of peaks ratios can be used as an indicator of the process efficiency. Fluorescence intensity of peak B associated with tryptophan-like substances and peak D associated with humic-like substances observed on tridimensional Excitation Emission Matrix maps increased up to sample corresponding to the highest rate of biogas production. Overall spectroscopic results provided evidence of different chemical pathways of anaerobic digestion associated with increasing amount of FVW which led to different levels of biogas production.

  18. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-06-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effect of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that, after a 20-sec 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber (UHV), and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer, after being heated to about 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-08-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effects of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si(100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si(100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber, and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface-layer, after being heated to approximately 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of homogeneous precursors to atmospheric acids and aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, K.R.; Canagaratna, M.; Phillips, J.A.; Goodfriend, H.

    1996-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the nucleation and growth of atmospheric particulates is benefitted by precise knowledge of the structure and energetics of small molecular aggregates. We present the results of microwave spectroscopic characterization of three binary clusters which are potential precursors in such processes: H{sub 2}O-SO{sub 3}, H{sub 3}N-SO{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O-HNO{sub 3}. In addition to providing detailed structural information, we describe the nature of the bonding in these systems. For the SO{sub 3} complexes, the intermolecular interaction is weaker than a chemical bond, but stronger than a van der Waals bond. We discuss how this feature of these systems renders their structure and energetics unusually sensitive to the presence of additional binding partners, and infer that an accurate molecular-level description of cluster growth will need to account for this effect. The results are compared with published high level ab initio calculations for all three systems.

  1. Structural and spectroscopic studies of a model for catechol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah J; Noble, Christopher J; Palmer, Randahl C; Hanson, Graeme R; Schenk, Gerhard; Gahan, Lawrence R; Riley, Mark J

    2008-05-01

    A binuclear copper complex, [Cu2(BPMP) (OAc)2][ClO4] x H2O, has been prepared using the binucleating ligand 2,6-bis[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)methyl]-4-methylphenol (H-BPMP). The X-ray crystal structure reveals the copper centers to have a five-coordinate square pyramidal geometry, with the acetate ligands bound terminally. The bridging phenolate occupies the apical position of the square-based pyramids and magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and variable-temperature variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements indicate that the two centers are very weakly antiferromagnetically coupled (J = -0.6 cm(-1)). Simulation of the dipole-dipole-coupled EPR spectrum showed that in solution the Cu-O-Cu angle was increased from 126 degrees to 160 degrees and that the internuclear distance was larger than that observed crystallographically. The high-resolution spectroscopic information obtained has been correlated with a detailed ligand-field analysis to gain insight into the electronic structure of the complex. Symmetry arguments have been used to demonstrate that the sign of the MCD is characteristic of the tetragonally elongated environment. The complex also displays catecholase activity (k(cat) = 15 +/- 1.5 min(-1), K(M) = 6.4 +/- 1.8 mM), which is compared with other dicopper catechol oxidase models. PMID:18188615

  2. Dielectric and impedance spectroscopic studies of neodymium gallate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhya, Anup Pradhan; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    The AC electrical properties of a polycrystalline neodymium gallate, NdGaO3 (NGO), synthesized by the sol-gel method have been investigated by employing impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range from 323 K to 593 K. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic phase with Pbnm space group at room temperature. Two relaxation processes with different relaxation times are observed from the impedance as well as modulus spectroscopic measurements, which have been attributed to the grain and the grain boundary effects at different temperatures in NGO. The complex impedance data are analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistance and a constant phase element in parallel. It has been observed that the value of the capacitance and the resistance associated with the grain boundary is higher than those associated with the grain. The temperature dependent electrical conductivity shows the negative temperature coefficient of resistance. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to follow the power law.

  3. Acid doping of polyaniline: Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, D.W.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J.

    1999-12-16

    A detailed investigation of the acid doping behavior of polyaniline has led to a robust and reproducible procedure for controlled adjustment of the redox state of dry polyaniline films. The initial step in this procedure is the casting of PANI films from formic acid. The subsequent exchange of the trapped formic acid for other primary dopants obtained from mono- and polyprotic acids (e.g., CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}, BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, HSO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) is demonstrated. The voltammetric and the spectroscopic behavior of the PANI doped with different anions indicate that both the protons and the anions of dopant acids influence the structure and redox properties of the polymer. The redox state of PANI doped with homologous series of chloroacetic and carboxylic acids correlates with the pK{sub a} of the dopant acid. These results show that it is possible to prepare the polymer with a desired oxidation state according to the pK{sub a} of the dopant acid of a given homologous series. The exchange of the formic acid for both stronger and weaker doping acid can be repeatedly accomplished by electrochemical cycling.

  4. Agricultural pest monitoring using fluorescence lidar techniques. Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Guan, Z. G.; Zhou, H. J.; Lv, J.; Zhu, Z. R.; Cheng, J. A.; Chen, F. J.; Löfstedt, C.; Svanberg, S.; Somesfalean, G.

    2012-03-01

    The fluorescence of different types of planthopper ( Hemiptera) and moth ( Lepidoptera), which constitute important Chinese agricultural pests, was investigated both in situ in a laboratory setting and remotely using a fluorescence light detection and ranging (lidar) system operating at a range of about 50 m. The natural autofluorescence of different species, as well as the fluorescence from insects that had been dusted with fluorescent dye powder for identification were studied. Autofluorescence spectra of both moths and planthoppers show a maximum intensity peak around 450 nm. Bleaching upon long-time laser illumination was modest and did not affect the shape of the spectrum. A single dyed rice planthopper, a few mm in size, could be detected at 50 m distance by using the fluorescence lidar system. By employing various marking dyes, different types of agricultural pest could be determined. We suggest that lidar may be used in studies of migration and movement of pest insects, including studies of their behavior in the vicinity of pheromone traps and in pheromone-treated fields.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and fluorescence studies of novel bi-phenyl based acrylate and methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, R.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-09-01

    4-[(1 E)-3-(biphenyl-4-yl)buta-1,3-dien-1-yl]phenyl prop-2-enoate ( ACH) and 4-[(1 E)-3-(biphenyl-4-yl)buta-1,3-dien-1-yl]phenyl 2-methylprop-2-enoate ( MCH) was synthesized from biphenyl in three steps and their structures were confirmed by elemental analysis, IR, NMR ( 1H, 13C, DEPT135, 1H- 1H COSY, 1H- 13C HSQC and 1H- 13C HMBC) spectroscopic techniques. In this present study, various physicochemical characteristics we demonstrate solubility, color, absorbance and fluorescence property of novel biphenyl based acrylate and methacrylate measured in different solvents like benzene, dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide and ethanol.

  6. Spectroscopic studies of the small-amplitude Cepheid SU Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, I. A.; Klochkova, V. G.; Tavolzhanskaya, N. S.

    2013-09-01

    A new set of 16 high-resolution spectra for the small-amplitude Cepheid SU Cas obtained in 2007-2009 has allowed us to determine its atmospheric parameters ( T eff = 6345 ± 30 K, log g = 2.40, V t = 3.25 km s-1) and to measure its radial velocities. The latter were added to the general list of radial velocities (375 estimates) obtained in the last 90 years. Using a frequency analysis, we have refined the pulsation and orbital periods of the Cepheid. Apart from the well-known fundamental pulsation period [Figure not available: see fulltext.], we have detected a possible secondary period of [Figure not available: see fulltext.]. Their ratio of 0.96 suggests the existence of nonradial pulsations in the Cepheid's atmosphere. Based on photoelectric photometry in the last 60 years, we have shown that the effective temperature undergoes cyclic secular changes of ±200 K with an unknown period. The mean effective temperature T eff = 6395 ± 52 K estimated from photometric data agrees well with our estimate from spectroscopic data. The variations of the mean color index, effective temperature, and γ-velocity (in 90 years of observations) point to a possible orbital motion of the well-known hot companion with the most probable periods of [Figure not available: see fulltext.], [Figure not available: see fulltext.], and [Figure not available: see fulltext.]. The elemental abundances in the atmosphere of SU Cas confirm the conclusion that this Cepheid is a typical yellow supergiant after the first dredge-up. Our T eff estimate gives a radius of 32 R ⊙ and a distance of 455 pc for it, which is inconsistent with its membership in the open cluster Alessi 95. The question about the pulsation mode of SU Cas still remains open.

  7. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  8. Molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic approaches to study the interaction between antibacterial drug and human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Min, Suotian; Liu, Zhifeng; Zhang, Shengrui

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic and conformational studies on the interaction of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) with human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) were performed by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods. The interaction mechanism was firstly predicted through molecular modeling that confirmed the interaction between SMX and HIgG. The binding parameters and thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures had been calculated according to the Stern-Volmer, Scatchard, Sips and Van 't Hoff equations, respectively. Experimental results showed that the fluorescence intensity of HIgG was quenched by the gradual addition of SMX. The binding constants of SMX with HIgG decreased with the increase of temperature, which meant that the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. Meanwhile, the results also confirmed that there was one independent class of binding site on HIgG for SMX during their interaction. The thermodynamic parameters of the reaction, namely standard enthalpy ΔH(0) and entropy ΔS(0), had been calculated to be -14.69 kJ·mol(-1) and 22.99 J·mol(-1) ·K(-1), respectively, which suggested that the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the SMX-HIgG complex. Furthermore, experimental results obtained from three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy confirmed that the conformational structure of HIgG was altered in the presence of SMX.

  9. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of hydrogen ion bombardment of crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.Z.; Li, M.; Conrad, K.; Andres, J.W.; Irene, E.A.; Denker, M.; Ray, M.; McGuire, G.

    1992-05-01

    Hydrogen-bombardment induced damage in single crystal silicon as a function of the substrate temperature, ion energy, and ion dose was studied using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry over the photon energy range 2.0-5.5 eV under high vacuum conditions. The incident hydrogen ion energies were 300 and 1000 eV, and the doses were 10{sup 15}-10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry results showed that the damage layer thicknesses for the samples bombarded at elevated temperatures are smaller than for samples bombarded at room temperature and subsequently annealed at the same elevated temperature. The diffusion coefficient for hydrogen in silicon of 6 x 10{sup {minus}15} cm{sup {minus}2}/s was obtained from the in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry data. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of energy transfer in phycobiliproteins and model dye systems

    SciTech Connect

    Switalski, S.C.

    1987-02-01

    Energy transfer was investigated in the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and separated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of C-phycocyanin from Anabaena variabilis and Anacystis nidulans, using steady-state and picosecond spectroscopy. Fluorescence excitation polarization spectra were consistent with a sensitizing (s) - fluorescing (f) model using a Forster energy transfer mechanism. The rise in polarization across the absorption band towards longer wavelength for the ..beta.. subunit and the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer was attributed to energy transfer among the three chromophores in the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and between the 2 chromophores in the ..beta.. subunit. The constant polarization of the ..cap alpha.. subunit, with one chromophore, is consistent with a lack of any possibility of energy transfer. Fluorescence emission maxima were at 640 nm for the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and the separated subunits of Anabaena variabilis, and 645 nm for the ..beta.. subunit, 640 nm for the ..cap alpha.. subunit, and 644 nm for ..cap alpha beta.. monomer of Anacystis nidulans. We have shown that the labels s and f are not consistent with all the steady-state spectroscopic results. 171 refs., 32 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Remote Raman and fluorescence studies of mineral samples.

    PubMed

    Bozlee, Brian J; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Ingram, Melissa

    2005-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated remote laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), at a distance of 4.8 m, of a variety of natural minerals and rocks, and Hawaiian Ti (Cordyline terminalis) plant leaves. These minerals included calcite cleavage, calcite onex and calcite travertine, gypsum, fluorapatite, Dover flint and chalk, chalcedony and nephelene syenite, and rubies containing rock. Pulsed laser excitation of the samples at 355 and 266 nm often resulted in strong fluorescence. The LIF bands in the violet-blue region at approximately 413 and approximately 437 nm were observed only in the spectrum of calcite cleavage. The green LIF bands with band maxima in the narrow range of approximately 501-504 nm were observed in the spectra of all the minerals with the exception of the nephelene syenite and ruby rocks. The LIF red bands were observed in the range approximately 685-711 nm in all samples. Excitation with 532 nm wavelength laser gave broad but relatively low fluorescence background in the low-frequency region of the Raman spectra of these minerals. One microsecond signal gating was effective in removing nearly all background fluorescence (with peak at approximately 610 nm) from calcite cleavage Raman spectra, indicating that the fluorescence was probably from long-lifetime inorganic phosphorescence. PMID:16029855

  12. Remote Raman and fluorescence studies of mineral samples.

    PubMed

    Bozlee, Brian J; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Ingram, Melissa

    2005-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated remote laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), at a distance of 4.8 m, of a variety of natural minerals and rocks, and Hawaiian Ti (Cordyline terminalis) plant leaves. These minerals included calcite cleavage, calcite onex and calcite travertine, gypsum, fluorapatite, Dover flint and chalk, chalcedony and nephelene syenite, and rubies containing rock. Pulsed laser excitation of the samples at 355 and 266 nm often resulted in strong fluorescence. The LIF bands in the violet-blue region at approximately 413 and approximately 437 nm were observed only in the spectrum of calcite cleavage. The green LIF bands with band maxima in the narrow range of approximately 501-504 nm were observed in the spectra of all the minerals with the exception of the nephelene syenite and ruby rocks. The LIF red bands were observed in the range approximately 685-711 nm in all samples. Excitation with 532 nm wavelength laser gave broad but relatively low fluorescence background in the low-frequency region of the Raman spectra of these minerals. One microsecond signal gating was effective in removing nearly all background fluorescence (with peak at approximately 610 nm) from calcite cleavage Raman spectra, indicating that the fluorescence was probably from long-lifetime inorganic phosphorescence.

  13. [Study on fluorescence spectra of Chinese rice wine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhou-yi; Zhu, Tuo; Gu, En-dong; Liu, Ying; Song, Chun-yuan

    2008-10-01

    Chinese rice wine has a history of more than 5000 years, only in China, hich is called "Nation Wine", and Shao Xing Chinese rice wine is a representative of it. The fluorescence spectra of 3 kinds of Shao Xing Chinese rice wine with different storage age induced by suitable UV-light were obtained in the present paper through experiment. The authors compared and analyzed them comprehensively by using three dimensional contour and two dimensional fluorescence technique, and found that their best induced light was all in the vicinity of 370 nm. The peak wavelength of 3 year storage age wine was 504 nm, while 488 nm and 505 nm were for 5 and 8 year storage age wine respectively. The emitted fluorescence existed in 400 to 680 nm, which had wide peak. More over, the emitting mechanism of Shao Xing Chinese rice wine was discussed. The authors also have explained the similarity and difference of fluorescence spectra among the 3 kinds of wine. The reason for wide fluorescence peak was also analyzed. This investigation contributes to the study of the characteristic, year detection and food safety of Chinese rice wine.

  14. Spectroscopic study of the chromophore--protein association and primary photoinduced events in the photoreceptor of Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Pascal; Mahet, Mathilde; Martin, Monique M; Angelini, Nicola; Malatesta, Manuela; Checcucci, Giovanni; Lenci, Francesco

    2005-09-01

    Blepharisma japonicum is a ciliated protozoan exhibiting a strong step-up photophobic response upon illumination. The photoreceptor chromophores responsible for this response have been identified to be hypericin-like chromophores (blepharismin and oxyblepharismin), complexed to a 200 kDa non-water-soluble protein. The present work opens up new perspectives on the primary phototransduction steps of B. japonicum's light perception through a joined approach by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy and sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The free chromophore of the light-adapted form of the cell (oxyblepharismin) was studied in various solvents and its spectroscopic properties, as well as its primary excited-state reactivity, compared with those of the corresponding pigment-protein complex, extracted by phosphate-concentration-step chromatography on a hydroxyapatite column. Fluorescence anisotropy together with SDS PAGE electrophoresis results confirm that oxyblepharismin is non-covalently bound to the apoprotein and show that, in the excited state, it is free to rotate in all directions within the binding site where it experiences a large local viscosity. Time-resolved anisotropy measurements on aromatic amino acids confirm that the molecular weight of the protein is of the order of 200 kDa. Although showing very similar steady-state spectra, free oxyblepharismin and its protein complex have noticeably different excited-state behaviours. In particular, the protein complex exhibits a pronounced short-lived absorption feature in the 640--750 nm range, decaying biexponentially in 4 ps and 56 ps. Those decays, also observed in other spectral regions, are not found in the corresponding kinetics of the isolated pigment in solution. This early behaviour of the protein complex might be the signature of the primary phototransduction process, possibly involving an electron transfer from the pigment to a neighbouring protein

  15. Spectroscopic Signatures and Structural Motifs of Dopamine: a Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Vipin Bahadur

    2016-06-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an essential neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it plays integral role in numerous brain functions including behaviour, cognition, emotion, working memory and associated learning. In the present work the conformational landscapes of neutral and protonated dopamine have been investigated in the gas phase and in aqueous solution by MP2 and DFT (M06-2X, ωB97X-D, B3LYP and B3LYP-D3) methods. Twenty lowest energy structures of neutral DA were subjected to geometry optimization and the gauche conformer, GIa, was found to be the lowest gas phase structure at the each level of theory in agreement with the experimental rotational spectroscopy. All folded gauche conformers (GI) where lone electron pair of the NH2 group is directed towards the π system of the aromatic ring ( 'non up' ) are found more stable in the gas phase. While in aqueous solution, all those gauche conformers (GII) where lone electron pair of the NH2 group is directed opposite from the π system of the aromatic ring ('up' structures) are stabilized significantly.Nine lowest energy structures, protonated at the amino group, are optimized at the same MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. In the most stable gauche structures, g-1 and g+1, mainly electrostatic cation - π interaction is further stabilized by significant dispersion forces as predicted by the substantial differences between the DFT and dispersion corrected DFT-D3 calculations. In aqueous environment the intra-molecular cation- π distance in g-1 and g+1 isomers, slightly increases compared to the gas phase and the magnitude of the cation- π interaction is reduced relative to the gas phase, because solvation of the cation decreases its interaction energy with the π face of aromatic system. The IR intensity of the bound N-H+ stretching mode provides characteristic 'IR spectroscopic signatures' which can reflect the strength of cation- π interaction energy. The CC2 lowest lying S1 ( 1ππ* ) excited state of neutral

  16. Study of fluorescence quenching of Barley α-amylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkialakshmi, S.; Shanthi, B.; Bhuvanapriya, T.

    2012-05-01

    The fluorescence quenching of Barley α-amylase by acrylamide and succinimide has been studied in water using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The steady-state fluorescence quenching technique has been performed in three different pHs (i.e., 6, 7 and 8) of water. Ground state and excited state binding constants (Kg &Ke) have been calculated. From the calculated binding constants (Kg &Ke) the free energy changes for the ground (ΔGg) and excited (ΔGe) states have been calculated and are presented in tables. UV and FTIR spectra have also been recorded to prove the binding of Barley α-amylase with acrylamide and succinimide.

  17. Folding study of Venus reveals a strong ion dependence of its yellow fluorescence under mildly acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Blaser, Georg; Behrens, Caroline; Cabrita, Lisa D; Dobson, Christopher M; Jackson, Sophie E

    2010-02-12

    Venus is a yellow fluorescent protein that has been developed for its fast chromophore maturation rate and bright yellow fluorescence that is relatively insensitive to changes in pH and ion concentrations. Here, we present a detailed study of the stability and folding of Venus in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 using chemical denaturants and a variety of spectroscopic probes. By following hydrogen-deuterium exchange of (15)N-labeled Venus using NMR spectroscopy over 13 months, residue-specific free energies of unfolding of some highly protected amide groups have been determined. Exchange rates of less than one per year are observed for some amide groups. A super-stable core is identified for Venus and compared with that previously reported for green fluorescent protein. These results are discussed in terms of the stability and folding of fluorescent proteins. Under mildly acidic conditions, we show that Venus undergoes a drastic decrease in yellow fluorescence at relatively low concentrations of guanidinium chloride. A detailed study of this effect establishes that it is due to pH-dependent, nonspecific interactions of ions with the protein. In contrast to previous studies on enhanced green fluorescence protein variant S65T/T203Y, which showed a specific halide ion-binding site, NMR chemical shift mapping shows no evidence for specific ion binding. Instead, chemical shift perturbations are observed for many residues primarily located in both lids of the beta-barrel structure, which suggests that small scale structural rearrangements occur on increasing ionic strength under mildly acidic conditions and that these are propagated to the chromophore resulting in fluorescence quenching.

  18. Spectroscopic Studies of the Super Relaxed State of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Nogara, Leonardo; Naber, Nariman; Pate, Edward; Canton, Marcella; Reggiani, Carlo; Cooke, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In the super-relaxed state of myosin, ATPase activity is strongly inhibited by binding of the myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the interacting-heads motif. In the disordered relaxed state myosin heads are not bound to the core of the thick filament and have an ATPase rate that is 10 fold greater. In the interacting-heads motif the two regulatory light chains appear to bind to each other. We have made single cysteine mutants of the regulatory light chain, placed both paramagnetic and fluorescent probes on them, and exchanged them into skinned skeletal muscle fibers. Many of the labeled light chains tended to disrupt the stability of the super-relaxed state, and showed spectral changes in the transition from the disordered relaxed state to the super-relaxed state. These data support the putative interface between the two regulatory light chains identified by cryo electron microscopy and show that both the divalent cation bound to the regulatory light chain and the N-terminus of the regulatory light chain play a role in the stability of the super-relaxed state. One probe showed a shift to shorter wavelengths in the super-relaxed state such that a ratio of intensities at 440nm to that at 520nm provided a measure of the population of the super-relaxed state amenable for high throughput screens for finding potential pharmaceuticals. The results provide a proof of concept that small molecules that bind to this region can destabilize the super-relaxed state and provide a method to search for small molecules that do so leading to a potentially effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:27479128

  19. Spectroscopic Studies of the Super Relaxed State of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Pate, Edward; Canton, Marcella; Reggiani, Carlo; Cooke, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In the super-relaxed state of myosin, ATPase activity is strongly inhibited by binding of the myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the interacting-heads motif. In the disordered relaxed state myosin heads are not bound to the core of the thick filament and have an ATPase rate that is 10 fold greater. In the interacting-heads motif the two regulatory light chains appear to bind to each other. We have made single cysteine mutants of the regulatory light chain, placed both paramagnetic and fluorescent probes on them, and exchanged them into skinned skeletal muscle fibers. Many of the labeled light chains tended to disrupt the stability of the super-relaxed state, and showed spectral changes in the transition from the disordered relaxed state to the super-relaxed state. These data support the putative interface between the two regulatory light chains identified by cryo electron microscopy and show that both the divalent cation bound to the regulatory light chain and the N-terminus of the regulatory light chain play a role in the stability of the super-relaxed state. One probe showed a shift to shorter wavelengths in the super-relaxed state such that a ratio of intensities at 440nm to that at 520nm provided a measure of the population of the super-relaxed state amenable for high throughput screens for finding potential pharmaceuticals. The results provide a proof of concept that small molecules that bind to this region can destabilize the super-relaxed state and provide a method to search for small molecules that do so leading to a potentially effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:27479128

  20. The Fluorescence Methods to Study Neurotransmitters (Biomediators) in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence as a parameter for analysis of intracellular binding and localization of neurotransmitters also named biomediators (acetylcholine and biogenic amines such as catecholamines, serotonin, histamine) as well as their receptors in plant cells has been estimated basing on several world publications and own experiments of the author. The subjects of the consideration were 1. application of reagents forming fluorescent products (for catecholamines - glyoxylic acid, for histamine - formaldehyde or ortho-phthalic aldehyde) to show the presence and binding of the compounds in cells, 2. binding of their fluorescent agonists and antagonists with cell, 3. effects of the compounds, their agonists and antagonists on autofluorescence, 4. action of external factors on the accumulation of the compounds in cells. How neurotransmitters can bind to certain cellular compartments has been shown on intact individual cells (vegetative microspores, pollens, secretory cells) and isolated organelles. The staining with reagents on biogenic amines leads to the appearance blue or blue-green emission on the surface and excretions of intact cells as well in some DNA-containing organelles within cells. The difference between autofluorescence and histochemically induced fluorescence may reflect the occurrence and amount of biogenic amines in the cells studied. Ozone and salinity as external factors can regulate the emission of intact cells related to biogenic amines. After the treatment of isolated cellular organelles with glyoxylic acid blue emission with maximum 460-475 nm was seen in nuclei and chloroplasts (in control variants in this spectral region the noticeable emission was absent) and very expressive fluorescence (more than twenty times as compared to control) in the vacuoles. After exposure to ortho-phthalic aldehyde blue emission was more noticeable in nuclei and chloroplasts. Fluorescent agonists (muscarine, 6,7-diOHATN, BODIPY-dopamine or BODIPY-5HT) or antagonists (d

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic properties and theoretical studies of bis-Schiff bases derived from polyamine and pyrazolones.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tiegang; Liu, Shuyun; Li, Guihui; Zhang, Jinglai; Guo, Jia; Li, Weijie; Yang, Lirong

    2012-11-01

    A series of novel bis-Schiff base were synthesized from 1-aryl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolones and diethylenetriamine (or triethylenetetramine) as the starting materials. All of these bis-Schiff bases were characterized by means of NMR, IR, and MS. The UV-vis absorption spectra and fluorescent spectra of these bis-Schiff bases were also measured. Moreover, the B3LYP/6-31G(d) method was used to optimize the ground state geometry of the bis-Schiff bases; and the UV-vis spectroscopic properties of the products were computed and compared with corresponding experimental data based on cc-pVDZ basis set of TD-B3LYP method. It has been found that all of these bis-Schiff bases show a remarkable absorption peak in a wavelength range of 270-340 nm; and their maximum emission peaks are around 348 nm.

  2. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies of the interaction between morin and polyamidoamine dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Wang, Yanqing

    2014-09-01

    Interactions between the polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer and drug molecules are of interest for their potential biomedical applications. The goal of this work is to examine the interaction of PAMAM-C12 25% dendrimer with morin. The ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyze drug-binding mode, binding constants and binding sites, etc. The experimental data showed that the binding constant of morin-PAMAM-C12 25% is about 10(5) L/mol. The interaction of morin with PAMAM-C12 25% is mainly driven by the hydrophobic, electrostatic, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. There are mainly three classes of binding site of morin at the interface of PAMAM-C12 25%. These results provided some useful information for self-assembling and disassembling the PAMAM dendrimer as well as efficient drug delivery and therapeutic applications.

  3. Spectroscopic study of firefly oxyluciferin in an enzymatic environment on the basis of stability monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2014-02-27

    To understand the influence of the enzyme microenvironment on the properties of the emitter oxyluciferin (OL) in firefly bioluminescence, we investigated the spectroscopic characteristics of OL in a complex with the enzyme luciferase formed in a consumed reaction mixture. By monitoring the in situ absorption spectra, we analyzed the enzymatic synthesis and the stability of OL in luciferase environment. The absorption spectra of OL in Photinus pyralis luciferase showed that the dominant form was neutral OL, probably the enol form, which emitted blue fluorescence (∼450 nm). A monoanionic OL emitting green fluorescence (∼560 nm) exhibited a weak pH-dependent equilibrium with the neutral enol-OL. The red-emitting form of OL was almost completely absent from the consumed reaction mixture. The peak wavelengths of the green and red emissions of the fluorescence and bioluminescence were similar, but the peak intensities, and hence the spectral shapes, differed greatly. The above characteristics were also found in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of OL in a complex with the H433Y mutant of Luciola cruciata luciferase, which catalyzes pH-independent red bioluminescence. Optical excitation could not reproduce the excited states of bioluminescence that was generated from the chemical reaction. The probable reason is that the chemical excited states formed from a keto-like transition state after decomposition of a dioxetanone intermediate, whereas the optical excited states were generated by exciting the neutral enol-OL. Different luciferases only influenced the chemical transition state during the bioluminescence reaction; they did not influence the ground states or optical excited states after the reaction.

  4. A whole spectroscopic mapping approach for studying the spatial distribution of pigments in paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, S.; Alberti, R.; Frizzi, T.; Nevin, A.; Valentini, G.; Comelli, D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a non-invasive approach for the identification and mapping of pigments in paintings. The method is based on three highly complementary imaging spectroscopy techniques, visible multispectral imaging, X-Ray fluorescence mapping and Raman mapping, combined with multivariate data analysis of multidimensional spectroscopic datasets for the extraction of key distribution information in a semi-automatic way. The proposed approach exploits a macro-Raman mapping device, capable of detecting Raman signals from non-perfectly planar surfaces without the need of refocusing. Here, we show that the presence of spatially correlated Raman signals, detected in adjacent points of a painted surface, reinforces the level of confidence for material identification with respect to single-point analysis, even in the presence of very weak and complex Raman signals. The new whole-mapping approach not only provides the identification of inorganic and organic pigments but also gives striking information on the spatial distribution of pigments employed in complex mixtures for achieving different hues. Moreover, we demonstrate how the synergic combination on three spectroscopic methods, characterized by highly different time consumption, yields maximum information.

  5. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    farquar, G; Leif, R

    2008-09-12

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds are being used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres are being produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. The advantages and disadvantages of each method will be presented and discussed in greater detail along with fluorescent and charge properties of the aerosols. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  6. Spectroscopic study of the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin associated with colorless linker peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pizarro, Shelly A.

    2000-05-12

    The phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna is composed of chromophore-containing biliproteins and 'colorless' linker peptides and is structurally designed to support unidirectional transfer of excitation energy from the periphery of the PBS to its core. The linker peptides have a unique role in this transfer process by modulating the spectral properties of the associated biliprotein. There is only one three-dimensional structure of a biliprotein/linker complex available to date (APC/LC7.8) and the mechanism of interaction between these two proteins remains unknown. This study brings together a detailed spectroscopic characterization of C-Phycocyanin (PC)-linker complexes (isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002) with proteomic analysis of the linker amino acid sequences to produce a model for biliprotein/linker interaction. The amino acid sequences of the rod linkers [LR8.9, LR32.3 and LRC28.5] were examined to identify evolutionarily conserved regions important to either the structure or function of this protein family. Although there is not one common homologous site among all the linkers, there are strong trends across each separate subset (LC, LR and LRC) and the N-terminal segments of both LR32.3 and LRC28.5 display multiple regions of similarity with other linkers. Predictions of the secondary structure of LR32.3 and LRC28.5, and comparison to the crystal structure of LC7.8, further narrowed the candidates for interaction sites with the PC chromophores. Measurements of the absorption, fluorescence, CD and excitation anisotropy of PC trimer, PC/LR32.3, and PC/LRC28.5, document the spectroscopic effect of each linker peptide on the PC chromophores at a series of temperatures (298 to 77 K). Because LR32.3 and LRC28.5 modulate the PC trimer spectral properties in distinct manners, it suggests different chromophore-interaction mechanisms for each linker. The low temperature absorbance spectrum of the PC trimer is consistent with an excitonic coupling

  7. Results of the 2008 dissolved organic matter fluorescence intercalibration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Butler, K.; Spencer, R. G.; Boehme, J.; Aiken, G.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008, 20 laboratories around the world participated in an intercalibration study of organic matter fluorescence measurements via Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS). The goal was to assess the variability of fluorescence measurements obtained for identical samples (n = 5 natural samples, Suwanee River Fulvic Acid, quinine sulphate and four Starna Fluorescence Reference cells) by different laboratories, and to examine potential sources of this variability. Operator error was found to be a significant source of variability, with 6 laboratories submitting erroneous EEMs in an initial round. Uncorrected EEMs were significantly different from corrected EEMs, particularly at relatively low and relatively high excitation (λex) and emission (λem) wavelengths. When data from each lab were corrected according to a standard set of algorithms, the variability between EEMs for the same sample measured by different labs was wavelength dependent, with EEMs normalized to raman areas more similar at low λex and λem, and EEMs normalized to quinine sulphate equivalents more similar at higher wavelengths. The results confirm the importance of (1) applying spectral corrections prior to comparing fluorescence data acquired on different instruments, (2) full reporting of correction procedures and implementation according to an agreed standard protocol, and (3) strict implementation of quality assurance protocols prior to reporting EEMs.

  8. How specific Raman spectroscopic models are: a comparative study between different cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Kumar, K. Kalyan; Chowdary, M. V. P.; Maheedhar, K.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2010-02-01

    Optical spectroscopic methods are being contemplated as adjunct/ alternative to existing 'Gold standard' of cancer diagnosis, histopathological examination. Several groups are actively pursuing diagnostic applications of Ramanspectroscopy in cancers. We have developed Raman spectroscopic models for diagnosis of breast, oral, stomach, colon and larynx cancers. So far, specificity and applicability of spectral- models has been limited to particular tissue origin. In this study we have evaluated explicitly of spectroscopic-models by analyzing spectra from already developed spectralmodels representing normal and malignant tissues of breast (46), cervix (52), colon (25), larynx (53), and oral (47). Spectral data was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using scores of factor, Mahalanobis distance and Spectral residuals as discriminating parameters. Multiparametric limit test approach was also explored. The preliminary unsupervised PCA of pooled data indicates that normal tissue types were always exclusive from their malignant counterparts. But when we consider tissue of different origin, large overlap among clusters was found. Supervised analysis by Mahalanobis distance and spectral residuals gave similar results. The 'limit test' approach where classification is based on match / mis-match of the given spectrum against all the available spectra has revealed that spectral models are very exclusive and specific. For example breast normal spectral model show matches only with breast normal spectra and mismatch to rest of the spectra. Same pattern was seen for most of spectral models. Therefore, results of the study indicate the exclusiveness and efficacy of Raman spectroscopic-models. Prospectively, these findings might open new application of Raman spectroscopic models in identifying a tumor as primary or metastatic.

  9. Photon Antibunching in Complex Intermolecular Fluorescence Quenching Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arjun; Enderlein, Jörg; Kumbhakar, Manoj

    2016-08-18

    We present a novel fluorescence spectroscopic method, which combines fluorescence antibunching, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC), and steady-state emission spectroscopy, to study chemical reactions at the single molecule level. We exemplify our method on investigating intermolecular fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine110 by aniline. We demonstrate that the combination of measurements of fluorescence antibunching, fluorescence lifetime, and fluorescence steady state intensity, captures the full picture of the complex quenching kinetics, which involves static and dynamics quenching, and which cannot be seen by steady-state or lifetime measurements alone. PMID:27468007

  10. Comparative studies on the interaction of cefixime with bovine serum albumin by fluorescence quenching spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihui; Liu, Baosheng; Li, Zhiyun; Guo, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Under simulated physiological conditions, the reaction mechanism between cefixime and bovine serum albumin at different temperatures (293, 303 and 310 K) was investigated using a fluorescence quenching method and synchronous fluorescence method, respectively. The results indicated that the fluorescence intensity and synchronous fluorescence intensity of bovine serum albumin decreased regularly on the addition of cefixime. In addition, the quenching mechanism, binding constants, number of binding sites, type of interaction force and energy-transfer parameters of cefixime with bovine serum albumin obtained from two methods using the same equation were consistent. The results indicated that the synchronous fluorescence spectrometry could be used to study the binding mechanism between drug and protein, and was a useful supplement to the conventional method.

  11. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-10-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies.

  12. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between tetrandrine and two serum albumins by chemometrics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Liu, Rong; jiang, Xiaohui

    2013-11-01

    The binding interactions of tetrandrine (TETD) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated by spectroscopic methods. These experimental data were further analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method, and the concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA/HSA, TETD and TETD-BSA/HSA) existed in the interaction procedure, as well as, the apparent equilibrium constants Kapp were evaluated. The binding sites number n and the binding constants K were obtained at various temperatures. The binding distance between TETD and BSA/HSA was 1.455/1.451 nm. The site markers competitive experiments indicated that TETD primarily bound to the tryptophan residue of BSA/HSA within site I. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) calculated on the basis of different temperatures revealed that the binding of TETD-BSA was mainly depended on the hydrophobic interaction strongly and electrostatic interaction, and yet the binding of TETD-HSA was strongly relied on the hydrophobic interaction. The results of synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FT-IR spectra show that the conformation of proteins has altered in the presence of TETD. In addition, the effect of some common ions on the binding constants between TETD and proteins were also discussed.

  13. Use of Pyrene Spectroscopic Probes in the Study of Colloidal Systems.

    PubMed

    Campbell; Somasundaran

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial behavior of polyethylene oxide (PEO) end-labeled with the often-used fluorescent probe pyrene was monitored to asess the effect of use of such hydrophobic probes on system behavior. Mixtures of labeled and unlabeled PEO were adsorbed on silica and the resulting suspension properties noted. The suspension behavior was found to be markedly different, depending on the ratio of labeled-to-unlabeled PEO employed. While it was "safe" to use pyrene probes in amounts of 3% or less for spectroscopic investigation of PEO effects, it was found that ratios equal to, or greater than, 1 : 3 produced anomalous behavior of the silica suspensions. This was manifested in the form of decreased suspension stability, as evidenced by significantly higher settling rates. Similar experiments using free pyrene revealed that these effects could be attributed to the chemical attachment of the pyrene probe to the polyethylene oxide chain. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to simultaneously monitor the behavior of the adsorbed polyethylene oxide molecules. These results were used to explain the observed suspension behavior as a function of the labeled-to-unlabeled polymer mixing ratio. Bridging effects facilitated by hydrophobic interaction between pyrene end groups is proposed as the reason for the observed phenomena. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF MATERIALS FOR ELECTROCHEMICAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    Several battery materials research projects were undertaken, suing NMR spectroscopy as a primary analytical tool. These include transport proerties of liquid and solid electrolytes and structural studies of Li ion electrodes.

  15. Spectroscopic and microcalorimetric studies on the molecular binding of food colorant acid red 27 with deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-08-01

    Interaction of the food colorant acid red 27 with double stranded DNA was investigated using spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. Absorbance and fluorescence studies suggested an intimate binding interaction between the dye and DNA. The quantum efficiency value testified an effective energy transfer from the DNA base pairs to the dye molecules. Minor groove displacement assay with Hoechst 33258 revealed that the binding occurs in the minor groove of DNA. Circular dichroism studies revealed that acid red 27 induces moderate conformational perturbations in DNA. Results of calorimetric studies suggested that the complexation process was driven largely by positive entropic contribution with a smaller favorable enthalpy contribution. The equilibrium constant of the binding was calculated to be (3.04 ± 0.09) × 10(4)  M(-1) at 298.15 K. Negative heat capacity value along with the enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon established the involvement of dominant hydrophobic forces in the binding process. Differential scanning calorimetry studies presented evidence for an increased thermal stability of DNA on binding of acid red 27. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26846192

  16. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-12

    Determination of bond dissociation energies and heats of formation of hydrocarbon radicals and carbenes requires knowledge of their structures, but this is not provided by standard mass spectrometric studies; what is needed is high-resolution spectroscopy, often best achieved at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. Nearly 60 reactive organic molecules were investigated in the period from 1988--1998.

  17. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal oxide phases play an important role in governing the sorption and desorption mechanisms of metals in water, soils, and sediments. Many researchers have examined the efficiency of Pb sorption on Mn, Fe, Al, Ti, and Si oxide surfaces. Most studies concluded that adsorption ...

  18. Conceptual design study to determine optimal enclosure vent configuration for the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kei; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Hangan, Horia; Jubayer, Chowdhury M.; Breckenridge, Craig; Loewen, Nathan; Bauman, Steven; Salmon, Derrick

    2014-07-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE; formerly Next Generation Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) is a dedicated, 10m aperture, wide-field, fiber-fed multi-object spectroscopic facility proposed as an upgrade to the existing Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea. The enclosure vent configuration design study is the last of three studies to examine the technical feasibility of the proposed MSE baseline concept. The enclosure vent configuration study compares the aero-thermal performance of three enclosure ventilation configurations based on the predicted dome thermal seeing and air flow attenuation over the enclosure aperture opening of a Calotte design derived from computational fluid dynamics simulations. In addition, functional and operation considerations such as access and servicing of the three ventilation configurations is discussed.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  20. Study on the interaction between methyl jasmonate and the coiled-coil domain of rice blast resistance protein Pi36 by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin Q.; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Xiang M.; Wang, Chun T.; Liu, Xue Q.; Tan, Yan P.; Wu, Yun H.

    2012-03-01

    Interaction between the coiled-coil domain of rice blast resistance protein Pi36 and methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) was studied by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. The quenching mechanism of fluorescence of MeJA by this domain was discussed to be a static quenching procedure. Fluorescence quenching was explored to measure the number of binding sites n and apparent binding constants K. The thermodynamics parameters ΔH, ΔG, ΔS were also calculated. The results indicate the binding reaction was not entropy-driven but enthalpy-driven, and hydrophobic binding played major role in the interaction. The binding sites of MeJA with the coiled-coil structural domain of rice blast resistance protein Pi36 were found to approach the microenvironment of both Tyr and Trp by the synchronous fluorescence spectrometry. The distance r between donor (the coiled-coil domain of rice blast resistance protein Pi36) and acceptor (MeJA) was obtained according to Förster theory of non-radioactive energy transfer.

  1. Raman spectroscopic study of sodium chloride water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furić, K.; Ciglenečki, I.; Ćosović, B.

    2000-09-01

    The Raman spectra of NaCl water solutions have been studied in the concentration range between 0 and 3.3 M using a difference technique. The temperature dependence of the spectral profiles observed for the O-H stretching in the high frequency region (between 2500 and 4000 cm -1) was also investigated in the narrow interval around a room temperature. Although the considered bandshape is not of a simple kind, the measured Id/ I0 ratio plotted versus NaCl concentration and temperature fits a straight line in both diagrams very satisfactorily. The linear dependence of Id/ I0 versus NaCl molarity was checked in the study of natural seawater samples for which discrepancies were found. These deviations were attributed to other organic and inorganic dissolved components in the seawater.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study nitric-acid/ice films representative of type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These studies reveal that in addition to amorphous nitric acid/ice mixtures, there are three stable stoichiometric hydrates of nitric acid: nitric-acid monohydrate (NAM), dihydrate (NAD), and trihydrate (NAT). We also observe two distinct crystalline forms of the trihydrate, which we denote alpha- and beta-NAT. These two forms appear to differ in their concentration of crystalline defects, but not in their chemical composition. In addition to probing the composition of type I PSCs, we have also used FTIR spectroscopy to study the interaction of HCl with model PSC films. In this work we find that for HCl pressures in the range 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -7 Torr, HCl is taken up by ice at 155 K to form a thin layer of HCl.6H2O. At 193 K, the uptake of HCl by ice was consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage. Uptake of HCl by alpha and beta-NAT at 175 K was also consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage.

  3. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF STRUCTURE, DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY IN IONIC LIQUIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    WISHART,J.F.

    2007-11-30

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  4. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed. PMID:25956330

  5. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L.

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)2- units were observed.

  6. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed.

  7. Impedance and modulus spectroscopic study of nano hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogiya, B. V.; Jethava, H. O.; Tank, K. P.; Raviya, V. R.; Joshi, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2, HAP) is the main inorganic component of the hard tissues in bones and also important material for orthopedic and dental implant applications. Nano HAP is of great interest due to its various bio-medical applications. In the present work the nano HAP was synthesized by using surfactant mediated approach. Structure and morphology of the synthesized nano HAP was examined by the Powder XRD and TEM. Impedance study was carried out on pelletized sample in a frequency range of 100Hz to 20MHz at room temperature. The variation of dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and a.c. conductivity with frequency of applied field was studied. The Nyquist plot as well as modulus plot was drawn. The Nyquist plot showed two semicircle arcs, which indicated the presence of grain and grain boundary effect in the sample. The typical behavior of the Nyquist plot was represented by equivalent circuit having two parallel RC combinations in series.

  8. Interaction studies of Epirubicin with DNA using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charak, Sonika; Jangir, Deepak K.; Tyagi, Gunjan; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2011-08-01

    Epirubicin (EPR) is an anticancer chemotherapeutic drug which exerts its cytotoxic effect by inhibiting DNA synthesis and DNA replication. We report the structural and conformational effect of EPR binding on DNA duplex under physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy were used to determine the binding mode and binding constant of EPR with DNA. The effect of EPR-DNA complexation on stability and secondary structure of DNA was studied. FTIR measurements showed that EPR-DNA interaction occurs through guanine and cytosine bases. External binding of EPR with DNA was observed through phosphate backbone. UV-visible measurements revealed the intercalative mode of binding of EPR with DNA. The binding constant was estimated to be K = 3.4 × 10 4 which is indicative of moderate binding between EPR and DNA helix. FTIR and CD studies suggested partial transition from B-conformation of DNA to A-conformation of DNA after EPR binding to DNA duplex.

  9. Thermo-active polymer nanocomposites: a spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, A. Douglas; Larios, Eduardo; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Omastová, Mária; Campo, Eva M.

    2014-09-01

    Photo- and thermo-mechanical actuation behaviour in specific polymer-carbon nanotube composites has been observed in recent years and studied at the macroscale. These systems may prove to be suitable components for a wide range of applications, from MOEMs and nanotechnology to neuroscience and tissue engineering. Absence of a unified model for actuation behaviour at a molecular level is hindering development of such smart materials. We observed thermomechanical actuation of ethylene-vinyl acetate | carbon nanotube composites through in situ near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to correlate spectral trends with macroscopic observations. This paper presents spectra of composites and constituents at room temperature to identify resonances in a building block model, followed by spectra acquired during thermo-actuation. Effects of strain-induced filler alignment are also addressed. Spectral resonances associated with C=C and C=O groups underwent synchronised intensity variations during excitation, and were used to propose a conformational model of actuation based on carbon nanotube torsion. Future actuation studies on other active polymer nanocomposites will verify the universality of the proposed model.

  10. Raman spectroscopic study of Lactarius spores (Russulales, Fungi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gussem, Kris; Vandenabeele, Peter; Verbeken, Annemieke; Moens, Luc

    2005-10-01

    Fungi are important organisms in ecosystems, in industrial and pharmaceutical production and are valuable food sources as well. Classical identification is often time-consuming and specialistic. In this study, Raman spectroscopy is applied to the analysis of fungal spores of Lactarius, an economically and ecologically important genus of Basidiomycota. Raman spectra of spores of Lactarius controversus Pers.: Fr., Lactarius lacunarum (Romagn.) ex Hora, Lactarius quieticolor Romagn. and Lactarius quietus (Fr.: Fr.) Fr. are reported for the first time. The spectra of these species show large similarity. These spectra are studied and compared with the Raman spectra of reference substances known to occur in macrofungi, including saccharides, lipids and some minor compounds that may serve as specific biomarkers (adenine, ergosterol and glycine). Most Raman bands could be attributed to specific components. In agreement with the biological role of fungal spores, high amounts of lipids were observed, the main fatty acid being oleate. In addition to different types of lipids and phospholipids, the polysaccharides chitin and amylopectin could be detected as well. The presence of trehalose is not equivocally shown, due to overlapping bands. Raman band positions are reported for the observed bands of the different species and reference products.

  11. Photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopic study of undisturbed nacre from red abalone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Devendra; Katti, Kalpana; Katti, Dinesh

    2006-07-01

    In this work, photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared (PA-FTIR) spectroscopy has been utilized to study interfacial interactions of undisturbed nacre and nacre powder from red abalone shell. The spectra of both undisturbed nacre and nacre powder showed characteristic bands of aragonite and proteins. Although nacre powder and undisturbed nacre are chemically identical, PA-FTIR spectrum of undisturbed nacre is found to be significantly different from that of nacre powder. A broad and strong band is observed at around 1485 cm -1 in nacre powder. The intensity of this band is notably reduced in undisturbed nacre. This result is explained on the basis of interfacial interactions between aragonite platelets and acidic proteins. It is also observed that band at around 1788 cm -1 originates from three overlapping bands 1797, 1787 and 1778 cm -1. The band at around 1787 cm -1 is assigned to C dbnd O stretching of carboxylate groups of acidic proteins. The other two bands at 1797 and 1778 cm -1, originate from aragonite and have been assigned to combination bands, ν 3 + ν 4a and ν 3 + ν 4b, respectively. For the study of stratification in undisturbed nacre, PA-FTIR spectra have been collected in step scan mode. The variation in spectra with depth can be attributed to changes in conformation of proteins as well as interfacial interactions.

  12. Ligand exchange in quaternary alloyed nanocrystals--a spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2014-11-14

    Exchange of initial, predominantly stearate ligands for pyridine in the first step and butylamine (BA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) in the second one was studied for alloyed quaternary Cu-In-Zn-S nanocrystals. The NMR results enabled us to demonstrate, for the first time, direct binding of the pyridine labile ligand to the nanocrystal surface as evidenced by paramagnetic shifts of the three signals attributed to its protons to 7.58, 7.95 and 8.75 ppm. XPS investigations indicated, in turn, a significant change in the composition of the nanocrystal surface upon the exchange of initial ligands for pyridine, which being enriched in indium in the 'as prepared' form became enriched in zinc after pyridine binding. This finding indicated that the first step of ligand exchange had to involve the removal of the surface layer enriched in indium with simultaneous exposure of a new, zinc-enriched layer. In the second ligand exchange step (replacement of pyridine with BA or MUA) the changes in the nanocrystal surface compositions were much less significant. The presence of zinc in the nanocrystal surface layer turned out necessary for effective binding of pyridine as shown by a comparative study of ligand exchange in Cu-In-Zn-S, Ag-In-Zn-S and CuInS2, carried out by complementary XPS and NMR investigations.

  13. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of adsorbates on bimetallic surfaces. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, W.K.

    1992-12-01

    In this work, well-defined bimetallic surfaces have been studied using carbon monoxide adsorption in conjunction with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). These studies have indicated that for CO adsorbed on Cu overlayers, the bond between the CO and the Cu adatoms is comprised of both pi-back-donation and polarization interaction components. The sum of the contributions from these effects determines the observed bond strength with the observed CO stretching frequency being determined by the relative contributions of the components. In addition, it was determined that IR spectra of adsorbed CO show a remarkable sensitivity to surface structure. Three-dimensional Cu clusters, well-ordered two dimensional Cu islands and isolated Cu atoms are distinctively characterized by their CO IR peaks. In addition, both disorder-order and order-order transitions are observed for the metal overlayers on the single crystal metal substrates. It was also observed that localized segregation and ordering of mixed Co and S overlayers on a Mo(110) substrate occurs upon annealing.

  14. Identification and derivatization of selected cathinones by spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Nycz, Jacek E; Pazdziorek, Tadeusz; Malecki, Grzegorz; Szala, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    In this study we identified three novel hydrochloride salts of cathinones 2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)pentan-1-one (1a) (TH-PVP), 2-(methylamino)-1-(2-methylphenyl)-1-propanone (1b) (2-MMC) and 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(methylamino)propan-1-one (1c) (4-CMC). Their properties have been examined through combinations of GC-MS, IR, NMR, electronic absorption spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. NMR solution spectra showed readily diagnostic H-1 and C-13 signals from methyl, N-methyl and carbonyl groups. Additionally the use of thionation and amination reactions for identification of selected cathinones was presented. PMID:27423024

  15. High resolution spectroscopic study of Be10Lambda;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Danagoulian, S.; de Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fujita, M.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Han, Y.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman, Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.; Hksjlab E05-115 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopy of a Be10Lambda; hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the (e ,e'K+) reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of ˜0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using p (e ,e'K+)Λ ,Σ0 reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels; and the binding energy of the ground-state peak (mixture of 1- and 2- states) was found to be BΛ=8.55 ±0.07 (stat . ) ±0.11 (sys . ) MeV. The result indicates that the ground-state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on the charge symmetry breaking effect in the Λ N interaction.

  16. Enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of rotational isomers on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, B. H.; Lee, Y. G.; Frazier, D. O.

    1986-01-01

    Surfaced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study rotational isomers of succinonitrile and N-methyl-thioacetamide on Cu and Ag surfaces. Both the gauche and trans conformers of succinonitrile are found to chemisorb on the metal surface. The doubly degenerate nu(C-triple bond-N) in the free molecules is removed when succinonitrile adsorbs on copper, which indicates that the two (C-triple bond-N) groups are no longer chemically equivalent. Both conformers are found to coordinate to the copper surface through the pi system of one of the two (C-triple bond-N) groups. In the case of N-methyl-thioacetamide, the population of the cis isomer is greatly increased on Cu and Ag surfaces. This is probably due to surface-induced cis-trans isomerization, in which the predominant trans isomer is converted to the cis isomer.

  17. Spectroscopic structural studies of salicylic acid, salicylamide and aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shahawy, Anwar S.

    The electronic absorption spectra of the salicylic acid and the salicylamide molecules have been studied using SCF—CL calculations. The singlet and the triplet electronic transition energies have been calculated. The state functions of eight excited states for these molecules have been calculated in addition to the oscillator strengths, charge densities, ionization potentials and electron affinities. Our calculations lead to the presence of salicylic acid and salicylamide in the β-forms in which the carboxylic hydroxyl group or the amino group is directed toward the enolic hydroxyl group. The salicylic acid and the salicylamide molecules have the Cs point group symmetry, but the aspirin molecule has the C1 point group symmetry, in which the acetyl group does not lie in the plane of the salicylic acid molecule.

  18. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of ofloxacin with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagdinc, S.; Bayarı, S.

    2004-03-01

    Several coordination compounds (1:1) formed between alkaline earth metal cations [Mg(II), Ca(II) and Ba(II)] and transition metal ions [Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)] with oflocaxin were synthesized. The compounds have been characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and 1H NMR spectra. The solid state samples of all complexes have been measured within the range 4000-400 cm -1. Based on normal mode calculations for complexes, the assignments of bands observed in FT-IR spectra of studied compounds have been done. Some significant differences in vibrational structure have been observed and discussed. The frequencies and intensities of some bands of the ofloxacin depend systematically on the second ionization potential of the metals.

  19. Raman spectroscopic study of plasma-treated salmon DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Geon Joon; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan

    2013-01-14

    In this research, we studied the effect of plasma treatment on the optical/structural properties of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from salmon sperm. DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) films were obtained by complexation of DNA with CTMA. Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectra indicated that DNA retained its double helical structure in the solid film. The Raman spectra exhibited several vibration modes corresponding to the nuclear bases and the deoxyribose-phosphate backbones of the DNA, as well as the alkylchains of CTMA. Dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma treatment induced structural modification and damage to the DNA, as observed by changes in the ultraviolet-visible absorption, CD, and Raman spectra. The optical emission spectra of the DBD plasma confirmed that DNA modification was induced by plasma ions such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species.

  20. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of kamphaugite-(Y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    We have studied the carbonate mineral kamphaugite-(Y)(CaY(CO3)2(OH)·H2O), a mineral which contains yttrium and specific rare earth elements. Chemical analysis shows the presence of Ca, Y and C. Back scattering SEM appears to indicate a single pure phase. The vibrational spectroscopy of kamphaugite-(Y) was obtained using a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Two distinct Raman bands observed at 1078 and 1088 cm-1 provide evidence for the non-equivalence of the carbonate anion in the kamphaugite-(Y) structure. Such a concept is supported by the number of bands assigned to the carbonate antisymmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands in the ν4 region offers further support for the non-equivalence of carbonate anions in the structure. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the structure of the mineral kamphaugite-(Y) to be assessed.

  1. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaga, K. Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Kawae, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.

    2015-01-12

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H{sub 2} using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H{sub 2}, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ∼ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  2. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ienaga, K.; Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.; Kawae, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H2 using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H2, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ˜ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  3. Mechanism of Arsenic Adsorption Using Wheat Biomass -- a spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Oscar; Manciu, Felicia; Maldonado, Josefina; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic is a trace element that is toxic to animals, humans included. Since the current Environmental Protection Agency guidelines regarding water quality standards indicate that arsenic concentrations in excess of 50 ppb are hazardous to welfare of humans, the search for new water remediation methods or improvements of previous methods have been a focus in environmental technology. Investigations of arsenic uptake have used wide range of sorbents including iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, for which it have been proved that arsenic shows high affinity. In this study, we used far-infrared spectroscopy to examine the arsenic reduction using biomaterials. pH dependence analysis by FTIR demonstrates the sorption of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides by the wheat biomass. The splitting of 350 cm-1 amorphous iron oxide vibrations is a direct proof of the arsenic uptake. In addition, there is evidence of sorption of arsenic at sulfhydryl group of cysteine existent in wheat.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of Yb3+-doped rare earth orthosilicate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, S.; Denoyer, A.; Jandl, S.; Viana, B.; Vivien, D.; Loiseau, P.; Ferrand, B.

    2004-06-01

    Infrared transmission and Raman scattering have been used to study Raman active phonons and crystal-field excitations in Yb3+-doped yttrium, lutetium and scandium orthosilicate crystals (Y2SiO5 (YSO), Lu2SiO5 (LSO) and Sc2SiO5 (SSO)), which belong to the same C2h6 crystallographic space group. Energy levels of the Yb3+ ion 2F5/2 manifold are presented. In the three hosts, Yb3+ ions experience high crystal field strength, particularly in Yb:SSO. Satellites in the infrared transmission spectra have been detected for the first time in the Yb3+-doped rare earth orthosilicates. They could be attributed to perturbed Yb3+ sites of the lattices or to magnetically coupled Yb3+ pairs.

  5. Raman spectroscopic studies of carbon in extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macklin, John; Brownlee, Donald; Chang, Sherwood; Bunch, Ted

    1990-01-01

    The measurements obtained here indicate ways in which micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to elucidate structural characteristics and distribution of carbon in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Existing information about structurally significant aspects of Raman measurements of graphite is combined with structurally relevant findings from the present micro-Raman studies of carbons prepared by carbonization of polyvinylidine chloride (PVDC) at various temperatures and natural material, as well as several acid residues from the Allende and Murchison meteorites in order to establish new spectra-structure relationships. Structural features of many of the materials in this study have been measured by x ray analysis and electron microscopy: thus, their structural differences can be directly correlated with differences in the Raman spectra. The spectral parameters consequently affirmed as indicators of structure are used as a measure of structure in materials that have unknown carbon structure, especially IDPs. The unique applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy is realized not only in the ability to conveniently measure spectra of micron-size IDPs, but also micro-sized parts of an inhomogeneous material. Microcrystalline graphite is known to give Raman spectra that differ dependent on crystallite size (see e.g., Lespade, et. al., 1984, or Nemanich and Solin, 1979). The spectral changes that accompany decreasing particle size include increase in the ratio (R) of the intensity of the band near 1350 cm(-1) (D band) to that of the band near 1600 cm(-1) (G band) increase in the half width of the D band (wD) increase in the frequency maximum of the G band and increase in the half-width (wG) of the 2nd order band near 2700 cm(-1) (G) band.

  6. FTIR Spectroscopic Studies on Cross Linking of SU-8 Photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiselvi, S. M. P.; Tan, T. L.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Heussler, S. P.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2013-11-01

    The usage of chemically-amplified, negative tone SU-8 photoresist is numerous, spanning industrial, scientific and medical fields. Hence, in this study, some preliminary studies were conducted to understand the dosage and heat treatment requirements of the SU-8 photoresist essential for pattern generation using X-ray lithography. In this work, using Synchrotron as the X-ray source, SU-8 photoresist was characterized for X-ray lithography in terms of its process parameters such as X-ray exposure dose, post exposure bake (PEB) time and temperature for various photoresist thicknesses which is considered worthwhile in view of applications of SU-8 for the fabrication of very high aspect ratio micro structures. The process parameters were varied and the resultant cross linking of the molecular chains of the photoresist was accurately monitored using a Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectrometer and the results are discussed. The infrared absorption peak at 914 cm-1 in the spectrum of the SU-8 photoresist was found to be a useful indicator for the completion of cross linking in the SU-8 photoresist. Results show that the cross linking of the SU-8 photoresist is at a higher rate from 0 J/cm3 to 30 J/cm3 after which the peak almost saturates regardless of the PEB time. It is a good evidence for the validation of dosage requirement of SU-8 photoresist for effective completion of cross linking, which in turn is a requirement for efficient fabrication of micro and nano structures. An analogous behavior was also observed between the extent of cross linking and the PEB time and temperature. The rate of cross linking declines after a certain period of PEB time regardless of PEB temperature. The obtained results also show a definite relation between variation of the absorbance area of the peak at 914 cm-1 and the X-ray exposure dose.

  7. Raman spectroscopic study of ancient South African domestic clay pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legodi, M. A.; de Waal, D.

    2007-01-01

    The technique of Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the composition of ancient African domestic clay pottery of South African origin. One sample from each of four archaeological sites including Rooiwal, Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop was studied. Normal dispersive Raman spectroscopy was found to be the most effective analytical technique in this study. XRF, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy were used as complementary techniques. All representative samples contained common features, which were characterised by kaolin (Al 2Si 2O 5(OH) 5), illite (KAl 4(Si 7AlO 20)(OH) 4), feldspar (K- and NaAlSi 3O 8), quartz (α-SiO 2), hematite (α-Fe 2O 3), montmorillonite (Mg 3(Si,Al) 4(OH) 2·4.5H 2O[Mg] 0.35), and calcium silicate (CaSiO 3). Gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) and calcium carbonates (most likely calcite, CaCO 3) were detected by Raman spectroscopy in Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop shards. Amorphous carbon (with accompanying phosphates) was observed in the Raman spectra of Lydenburg, Rooiwal and Makahane shards, while rutile (TiO 2) appeared only in Makahane shard. The Raman spectra of Lydenburg and Rooiwal shards further showed the presence of anhydrite (CaSO 4). The results showed that South African potters used a mixture of clays as raw materials. The firing temperature for most samples did not exceed 800 °C, which suggests the use of open fire. The reddish brown and grayish black colours were likely due to hematite and amorphous carbon, respectively.

  8. Vibrationally resolved negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic studies of niobium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.M.E.; Alex, S.; Leopold, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy provides a means of obtaining vibrational data for atoms and small molecules {open_quotes}chemisorbed{close_quotes} on size-selected metal clusters. In the present study, Nb{sub 3}O{sup -}, Nb{sub 4}O{sup -} and Nb{sub 4}CO{sup -} were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor equipped with a metal cathode cluster source. The 488 nm photoelectron spectrum of the mass-selected Nb{sub 3}O{sup -} anions shows a vertical transition to the ground state of neutral Nb{sub 3}O, with weak progressions in the Nb{sub 3}-O stretching (710{+-}20 cm{sup -1} in Nb{sub 3}O) and Nb, bending (320{+-}15 cm{sup -1}-in both Nb{sub 3}O and Nb{sub 3}O{sup -}) vibrational modes. These results indicate that the Nb{sub 3}O{sup -} anion, like Nb{sub 3}O and Nb{sub 3}O{sup +}, has a planar Ca{sub 2v} structure with the O atom bridging two Nb atoms. The Nb{sub 4}O{sup -} spectrum shows resolved transitions to the ground state of Nb{sub 3}O and to an excited electronic state lying 3050{+-}20 cm{sup -1} higher in energy. In analogy with the Nb{sub 4}O results, the 670{+-}20 cm{sup -1} frequency observed for the Nb{sub 4}O ground state is assigned to a metal-oxygen stretching mode, and the 215{+-}15 cm{sup -1} and 195{+-}15 cm{sup -1} frequencies observed in the ground and excited states, respectively, to a bending mode of the metal cluster. The electron affinities of Nb{sub 3}O and Nb{sub 4}O are 1.402 and 1.178 ({+-}0.006) eV, respectively. Preliminary, ongoing studies of mass selected Nb{sub 4}CO{sup -} anions prepared under a variety of source conditions thus far suggest the presence of two isomers, one with a greatly weakened but intact CO bond as indicated by a very low CO stretching frequency of about 1300 cm{sup -1} and the other with the dissociated C and O atoms bound separately to the niobium cluster.

  9. Ir Spectroscopic Studies on Microsolvation of HCl by Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Devendra; Schwan, Raffael; Fischer, Theo; Dey, Arghya; Kaufmann, Matin; Redlich, Britta; van der Meer, Lex; Schwaab, Gerhard; Havenith, Martina

    2016-06-01

    Acid dissociation reactions are at the heart of chemistry. These reactions are well understood at the macroscopic level. However, a microscopic level understanding is still in the early stages of development. Questions such as 'how many H_2O molecules are needed to dissociate one HCl molecule?' have been posed and explored both theoretically and experimentally.1-5 Most of the theoretical calculations predict that four H_2O molecules are sufficient to dissociate one HCl molecule, resulting in the formation of a solvent separated H_3O+(H_2O)3Cl- cluster.1-3 IR spectroscopy in helium nanodroplets has earlier been used to study this dissociation process.3-5 However, these studies were carried out in the region of O-H and H-Cl stretch, which is dominated by the spectral features of undissociated (HCl)m-(H_2O)n clusters. This contributed to the ambiguity in assigning the spectral features arising from the dissociated cluster.4,5 Recent predictions from Bowman's group, suggest the presence of a broad spectral feature (1300-1360 wn) for the H_3O+(H_2O)3Cl- cluster, corresponding to the umbrella motion of H_3O+ moiety.6 This region is expected to be free from the spectral features due to the undissociated clusters. In conjunction with the FELIX laboratory, we have performed experiments on the (HCl)m(H_2O)n (m=1-2, n≥4) clusters, aggregated in helium nanodroplets, in the 900-1700 wn region. Mass selective measurements on these clusters revealed the presence of a weak-broad feature which spans between 1000-1450 wn and depends on both HCl as well as H_2O concentration. Measurements are in progress for the different deuterated species. The details will be presented in the talk. References: 1) C.T. Lee et al., J. Chem. Phys., 104, 7081 (1996). 2) H. Forbert et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 4062 (2011). 3) A. Gutberlet et al., Science, 324, 1545 (2009). 4) S. D. Flynn et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 1, 2233 (2010). 5) M. Letzner et al., J. Chem. Phys., 139, 154304 (2013). 6) J. M

  10. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-01

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  11. Spectroscopic and thermal studies of PS/PVAc blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elashmawi, I. S.; Hakeem, N. A.; Abdelrazek, E. M.

    2008-10-01

    Polystyrene and polyvinyl acetate (PS/PVAc) films were blended with different contents using casting method. The effect of PS content on PVAc blends was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Ultra violet and visible studies (UV/VIS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Significant changes in FT-IR, XRD and DSC analysis are observed which reveals an interactions between the two polymers and PS/PVAc blends had good or certain miscibility. XRD scans show some changes in the intensity and the height of the amorphous halos with increased PS. UV/VIS analysis revealed that the optical band gap decreases with increasing content of PS from 5 to 4.11 eV. A single glass transition temperature for each blend was observed, this DSC results supported that the miscibility existed in the blend. The apparent activation energy (E) of the blends was evaluated using TGA analysis. The value of E was increased with the increase of PS content.

  12. High resolution spectroscopic study of BeΛ10

    DOE PAGES

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; et al

    2016-03-10

    Spectroscopy of amore » $$^{10}_{\\Lambda}$$Be hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the $$(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})$$ reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of 0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using the $$p(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})\\Lambda,\\Sigma^{0}$$ reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels, and the binding energy of the ground state peak (mixture of 1$$^{-}$$ and 2$$^{-}$$ states) was obtained to be B$$_{\\Lambda}$$=8.55$$\\pm$$0.07(stat.)$$\\pm$$0.11(sys.) MeV. Furthermore, the result indicates that the ground state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on charge symmetry breaking effect in the $$\\Lambda N$$ interaction.« less

  13. Oxidation of pyrite surfaces: a photoelectron spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthe, S.; Szargan, R.; Suoninen, E.

    1993-10-01

    Surfaces of pyrite (FeS 2) differently prepared in situ and ex situ have been studied before and after contact to air and air-saturated aqueous solutions of 4≤pH≤10 by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. Pyrite surfaces fractured or scraped in situ revealed FeS-like species concentrated in the surface region. Preparation (polishing, grinding, powdering) and prolonged oxidation in air mainly resulted in basic iron sulphate and iron oxide/hydroxide. A promoting effect of an increased surface roughness due to the preparation was observed for the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide compared with sulphate in contrast to the natural oxidation process. Oxidation in air also led to sulphur-rich species identified as iron-deficient regions below monolayer coverage. Similar regions were present at ground surfaces exposed to air-saturated solution of pH4 and pH5. In near-neutral to alkaline solution mainly iron hydroxy-oxide is formed the layer thickness of which was estimated in the range of 0.5 nm (pH5) to 1.7 nm (pH10).

  14. Spectroscopic study of neodymium doped lead-bismuth-borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, Altaf; Dayani, P.; Negalur, Mahesh; Swamy, Manjunatha; Abhiram, J.; Rajaramakrishna, R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on different physical and optical properties of rare earth doped heavy metal oxide glasses. The glass composition of 10Bi2O3-30PbO-60B2O3-xNd2O3 where x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 (in mol %) has been synthesized using melt-quenching technique. Refractive index measurements for these glasses were done and physical parameters were studied. Structural properties of these glasses were analysed through infrared spectra that was recorded between 1600cm-1 and 300cm-1 in transmission mode. The optical absorption spectra were recorded in the wavelength range from 300 to 700 nm. The transitions originated from ground state energy 4I9/2. The energy level analysis has been carried out by considering absorption spectral bands. The results thus obtained are comparable with reports on similar glasses, indicating that the prepared glasses may have potential laser applications.

  15. Spectroscopic studies of refractory and dielectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    This work demonstrated the application of the techniques and methodology of surface science to investigate the mechanisms of thin film deposition processes on solid surfaces. The synthesis of boron nitride (BN) thin films was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). In this model system, diborane (B[sub 2]H[sub 6]), ammonia (NH[sub 3]) and hydrazine (N[sub 2]H[sub 4]) were used as precursors to deposit BN thin films on a clean Ru(0001) surface. The result showed that ammonia reaction with diborane yielded only boron-rich boron nitride overlayers. However, stoichiometric BN films in excess of one monolayer could be produced when hydrazine was substituted for ammonia. The effects of oxygen on boron-rich and stoichiometric boron-nitrogen films were also examined. In the second part of this work, high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to characterize defect centers in MgO and in lithium-doped MgO thin films. The HREELS results showed that MgO thin films grown on Mo(100) were nearly defect-free at temperatures up to 1100 K. HREELS measurements indicated that annealings to higher temperatures induced F-type defect centers in the MgO films. The formation of [Li[sup +]O[sup [minus

  16. HPLC assisted Raman spectroscopic studies on bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, W. L.; Cheng, Y.; Yu, W.; Zhang, X. B.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    We applied confocal Raman spectroscopy to investigate 12 normal bladder tissues and 30 tumor tissues, and then depicted the spectral differences between the normal and the tumor tissues and the potential canceration mechanism with the aid of the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique. Normal tissues were demonstrated to contain higher tryptophan, cholesterol and lipid content, while bladder tumor tissues were rich in nucleic acids, collagen and carotenoids. In particular, β-carotene, one of the major types of carotenoids, was found through HPLC analysis of the extract of bladder tissues. The statistical software SPSS was applied to classify the spectra of the two types of tissues according to their differences. The sensitivity and specificity of 96.7 and 66.7% were obtained, respectively. In addition, different layers of the bladder wall including mucosa (lumps), muscle and adipose bladder tissue were analyzed by Raman mapping technique in response to previous Raman studies of bladder tissues. All of these will play an important role as a directive tool for the future diagnosis of bladder cancer in vivo.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopic properties of hydrogen bonded acetonitrile studied by DFT.

    PubMed

    Alía, Jose M; Edwards, Howell G M

    2005-09-01

    Vibrational properties (band position, Infrared and Raman intensities) of the acetonitrile C[triple bond]N stretching mode were studied in 27 gas-phase medium intensity (length range: = 1.71-2.05 angstroms; -deltaE range = 13-48 kJ/mol) hydrogen-bonded 1:1 complexes of CH3CN with organic and inorganic acids using density functional theory (DFT) calculations [B3LYP-6-31++G(2d,2p)]. Furthermore, general characteristics of the hydrogen bonds and vibrational changes in the OH stretching band of the acids were also considered. Experimentally observed blue-shifts of the C[triple bond]N stretching band promoted by the hydrogen bonding, which shortens the triple bond length, are very well reproduced and quantitatively depend on the hydrogen bond length. Both predicted enhancement of the infrared and Raman nu(C[triple bond]N) band intensities are in good agreement with the experimental results. Infrared band intensity increase is a direct function of the hydrogen bond energy. However, the predicted increase in the Raman band intensity increase is a more complex function, depending simultaneously on the characteristics of both the hydrogen bond (C[triple bond]N bond length) and the H-donating acid polarizability. Accounting for these two parameters, the calculated nu(C[triple bond]N) Raman intensities of the complexes are explained with a mean error of +/- 2.4%.

  18. Spectroscopic studies of aluminosilicate formation in tank waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.; Wang, L.; Bunker, B.C.; Windisch, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    Aluminosilicates are one of the major class of species controlling the volume of radioactive high-level waste that will be produced from future remediation at Hanford site. Here the authors present studies of the phases and structures of aluminosilicates as a function of sludge composition using X-ray powder diffraction, solid state {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the content of NaNO{sub 3} in solution has significant effects on the nature of the insoluble aluminosilicate phases produced. It was found that regardless of the initial Si:Al ratio, nitrate cancrinite was the main phase formed in the solution with pH of 13.5 and 5 M NaNO{sub 3}. However, at lower NaNO{sub 3} concentration with initial Si:Al ratios of 1.1, 2.2, and 11.0 in the solutions, a range of aluminosilicate zeolites was produced with Si:Al ratios of 1.1, 1.3, and 1.5, respectively. Lowering the solution pH appears to promote the formation of amorphous aluminosilicates. The results presented here are important for the prediction of the solubility and dissolution rate of Al in tank wastes.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric and antimicrobial studies of mixed ligands complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mahmoud, Nessma F.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.; El-Bindary, Ashraf A.

    2015-09-01

    An interesting series of mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal chloride with guaifenesin (GFS) in the presence of 2-aminoacetic acid (HGly) (1:1:1 molar ratio). The elemental analysis, magnetic moments, molar conductance, spectral (UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR and ESR) and thermal studies were used to characterize the isolated complexes. The molecular structure of GFS is optimized theoretically and the quantum chemical parameters are calculated. The IR showed that the ligand (GFS) acts as monobasic tridentate through the hydroxyl, phenoxy etheric and methoxy oxygen atoms and co-ligand (HGly) as monobasic bidentate through the deprotonated carboxylate oxygen atom and nitrogen atom of amino group. The molar conductivities showed that all the complexes are non-electrolytes except Cr(III) complex is electrolyte. Electronic and magnetic data proposed the octahedral structure for all complexes under investigation. ESR spectrum for Cu(II) revealed data which confirm the proposed structure. Antibacterial screening of the compounds were carried out in vitro on gram positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) bacteria and for in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans organism. However, some complexes showed more chemotherapeutic efficiency than the parent GFS drug. The complexes were also screened for their in vitro anticancer activity against the breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained showed that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity.

  20. Cyclotetrapeptides with alternating ?-Ala residues: synthesis and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngu-Schwemlein, Maria; Zhou, Zhe; Bowie, Toni; Eden, Rebecca

    2003-07-01

    Three cyclotetrapeptides, c[Leu- D-Ala-Xaa- D-Ala], where Xaa is Leu ( P1), Lys ( P2) and Glu ( P3) were synthesized and studied by 1H and 13C NMR and CD spectroscopy. These cyclotetrapeptides exhibit similar coupling constants, 3JHNHα, in the range of 8.56-9.93 Hz, commonly observed for β-turn structures. All amide proton chemical shifts for P1, P2 and P3 exhibited linear dependence on temperature with moderate temperature coefficients ranging from -3.1 to -9.8 ppb/K. Amide proton signal broadening was observed for all residues in P1, P2 and P3, indicating that they are solvent accessible. The number of resonance observed for P1 was half of the total counts, indicating a C2 symmetric conformation. P2 and P3 exhibit similar CD in solvents of varying dielectric constants and dilutions, with characteristic positive CD bands at ca. 210 and 222 nm, which correspond to a β-turn type structure. Small CD/temperature effect was also observed with isodichroic points, consistent with conformational stability and a well-populated cyclotetrapeptide energy state. These heterochiral cyclotetrapeptides consisting of alternating D-Ala residues adopt stabilized open β-turn conformations and may be useful as a ligand template for further functionalization.

  1. Borax methylene blue: a spectroscopic and staining study.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P T; Russo, A; Reynolds, C; Lillie, R D

    1978-07-01

    Borax methylene blue is quite stable at room temperatures of 22-25 C. At 30 C polychroming is slow; during 50 days in a water bath at this temperature the absorption peak moves from 665 to 656 nm. At 35 C, the absorption peak reaches 660 nm in 7 days, 654 nm in 14. At 60 C polychroming is rapid, the absorption peak reaching 640-620 nm in 3 days. When the pH of the borax methylene blue solutions, normally about 9.0, is adjusted to pH 6.5, the absorption peak remains at 665 nm even when incubated at 60 C for extended periods. When used as a blood stain 0.4 ml borax methylene blue (1% methylene blue in 1% borax), 4 ml acetone, 2 ml borax-acid phosphate buffer to bring the solution to pH 6.5, and distilled water to make 40 ml, with 0.2 ml 1% eosin added just before using, an excellent Nocht-Giemsa type stain is achieved after 30 minutes staining. The material plasmodia P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei stain moderate blue with dark red chromatin and green to black pigment granules. The study confirms Malachowski's 1891 results and explains Gautier's 1896-98 failure to duplicate it.

  2. Application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in protein studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Since the physical process of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was elucidated more than six decades ago, this peculiar fluorescence phenomenon has turned into a powerful tool for biomedical research due to its compatibility in scale with biological molecules as well as rapid developments in novel fluorophores and optical detection techniques. A wide variety of FRET approaches have been devised, each with its own advantages and drawbacks. Especially in the last decade or so, we are witnessing a flourish of FRET applications in biological investigations, many of which exemplify clever experimental design and rigorous analysis. Here we review the current stage of FRET methods development with the main focus on its applications in protein studies in biological systems, by summarizing the basic components of FRET techniques, most established quantification methods, as well as potential pitfalls, illustrated by example applications. PMID:25368432

  3. Archaeometrical studies using X-ray fluorescence methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pauna, Catalina; Constantinescu, B.; Constantin, F.; Bugoi, R.; Stan, D.; Vasilescu, A.

    2010-04-26

    Elemental analysis contributes to authentication (knowing the elemental composition and considering the information about the usual composition of the objects in different historical periods it can be established if the item is original or fake), provenance studies (minor and trace elements indicates ores origin and 'consequently' mines location), (relative) dating of archaeological objects (e.g. for painted items--the chemical recipes for pigments can offer information about the age of objects). The paper gives a general layout for the NIPNE Archaeometry Laboratory's applications using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), micro--Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (micro-PIXE), micro-Synchrotron Radiation Induced X-Ray Fluorescence (micro--SR-XRF) methods.

  4. Raman spectroscopic study of the tellurite minerals: rajite and denningite.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Dickfos, Marilla J; Keeffe, Eloise C

    2008-12-15

    Tellurites may be subdivided according to formula and structure. There are five groups based upon the formulae (a) A(XO3), (b) A(XO3).xH2O, (c) A2(XO3)3.xH2O, (d) A2(X2O5) and (e) A(X3O8). Raman spectroscopy has been used to study rajite and denningite, examples of group (d). Minerals of the tellurite group are porous zeolite-like materials. Raman bands for rajite observed at 740, and 676 and 667 cm(-1) are attributed to the nu1 (Te2O5)(2-) symmetric stretching mode and the nu3 (TeO3)(2-) antisymmetric stretching modes, respectively. A second rajite mineral sample provided a more complex Raman spectrum with Raman bands at 754 and 731 cm(-1) assigned to the nu1 (Te2O5)(2-) symmetric stretching modes and two bands at 652 and 603 cm(-1) are accounted for by the nu3 (Te2O5)(2-) antisymmetric stretching mode. The Raman spectrum of dennigite displays an intense band at 734 cm(-1) attributed to the nu1 (Te2O5)(2-) symmetric stretching mode with a second Raman band at 674 cm(-1) assigned to the nu3 (Te2O5)(2-) antisymmetric stretching mode. Raman bands for rajite, observed at (346, 370) and 438 cm(-1) are assigned to the (Te2O5)(2-)nu2 (A1) bending mode and nu4 (E) bending modes.

  5. Influence of environment on piroxicam polymorphism: vibrational spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Taddei, P; Torreggiani, A; Simoni, R

    2001-01-01

    FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopies were used to evaluate the mechanism of transformation of piroxicam into its different forms (alpha, beta, and monohydrate), depending on the environment. These vibrational techniques allowed us to identify the forms of piroxicam that crystallize from different solvents at different cooling rates and the conformation of the drug in some of its derivatives: piroxicam hydrochloride, piroxicam thallium and sodium salt hemihydrates, and piroxicam sodium salt. The usefulness of Raman spectroscopy in characterizing piroxicam:beta-cyclodextrin (PbetaCD) inclusion compounds was described. The Raman spectrum of 1:2 PbetaCD was discussed in comparison with that of the corresponding piroxicam sodium salt containing inclusion compound (1:2 PNabetaCD) in order to study the influence of the piroxicam derivative used on the structure of the inclusion compound. The Raman results showed that in both of the inclusion compounds the piroxicam mainly assumes the zwitterionic structure typical of a monohydrate; therefore, the kind of derivative used does not affect the conformation of the drug in its inclusion compound. The effect of the method of synthesis utilized (freeze-drying or freeze-thaw cycling) to obtain 1:2.5 PbetaCD was investigated. The inclusion compound obtained by freeze-thaw cycling proved to be more crystalline and to contain a higher amount of the beta form than the freeze-dried inclusion compound. Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful technique for evaluating the effectiveness of the manufacturing process in relation to the pharmaceutical properties of the drug and to the nondestructive and noninvasive on-line quality control of the industrial products.

  6. Electron spin resonance spectroscopic studies of radical cation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, S.

    1990-01-01

    A spin Hamiltonian suitable for theoretical analyses of ESR spectra is derived using the general effective Hamiltonian theory in the usual Schroedinger representation. The Permutation Indices method is extended to obtain the dynamic exchange equations used in ESR lineshape simulation. The correlation between [beta]-hydrogen coupling constants and their geometric orientations are derived using a perturbation method. The three electron bond model is extended to rationalize unimolecular rearrangements of radical cations. The ring-closed radical cations of 9,10-octalin oxide and synsesquinorbornene oxide have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy in the CFCl[sub 3] matrix at low temperature. The self-electron-transfer rate constants between the methyl viologen dication and cation have been determined by dynamic ESR lineshape simulations at room temperature in allyl alcohol, water, methanol and propargyl alcohol solvents. The radical cation formed by the radiolytic oxidation of allylamine in Freon matrices at 77 K is the 3-iminiopropyl distonic species(3-iminium-1-propyl radical). The nucleophilic endocylization of the but-3-en-1-ol radical cation to the protonated tetrahydrofuran-3-yl radical was observed in the radiolytic oxidation of but-3-en-1-ol in Freon matrices. ESR studies of the radiolytic oxidation of 1,5-hexdiyne have resulted in characterization the 1,5-hexadiyne radical cation isomerizing to the 1,2,4,5-hexatetraene radical cation. The symmetric (C[sub 2v]) bicyclo[3.3.0]-octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl(a bridged 1,4-bishomobenzene species) radical cation is produced by the radiolytic oxidation of semibullvalene in Freon matrices. The ring-opening 3,4-dimethylenecyclobutene radical cation to 1,2,4,5-hexatetraene radical cation was observed in the photolysis of 3,4-dimethylenecyclobutene radical cation. The cyclooctatetraene radical cation generated by radiolytic oxidation photoisomerizes to bicyclo[3.3.0]octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl radical cation.

  7. Solvated crystalline forms of nevirapine: thermoanalytical and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Renu; Arora, Poonam; Saini, Anupam; Jain, Dharamvir Singh

    2010-09-01

    The study is aimed at exploring the utility of thermoanalytical methods in the solid-state characterization of various crystalline forms of nevirapine. The different forms obtained by recrystallization of nevirapine from various solvents were identified using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The appearance of desolvation peak accompanied by weight loss in TGA indicated the formation of solvates: hemi-ethanolate (Form I), hemi-acetonitrilate (Form II), hemi-chloroformate (Form III), hemi-THF solvate (Form IV), mixed hemi-ethanolate hemi-hydrate (Form V), and hemi-toluenate (Form VI). The higher desolvation temperatures of all the solvates except toluenate than their respective boiling point indicate tighter binding of solvent. Emphasis has been laid on the determination of heat capacity and heat of solution utilizing microreaction calorimeter to further distinguish the various forms. The enthalpy of solution (ΔH(sol)), an indirect measure of the lattice energy of a solid, was well correlated with the crystallinity of all the solid forms obtained. The magnitude of ΔH(sol) was found to be -14.14 kJ/mol for Form I and -2.83 kJ/mol for Form V in phosphate buffer of pH 2, exhibiting maximum ease of molecular release from the lattice in Form I. The heat capacity for solvation (ΔC(p)) was found to be positive, providing information about the state of solvent molecules in the host lattice. The solubility and dissolution rate of the forms were also found to be in agreement with their enthalpy of solution. Form (I), being the most exothermic, was found to be the most soluble of all the forms.

  8. Raman spectroscopic study of the uranyl tricarbonate mineral liebigite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Erickson, Kristy L.; Weier, Matt L.; Carmody, Onuma; Čejka, Jiří

    2005-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy at 298 and 77 K has been employed to study the structure of the uranyl tricarbonates liebigite {Ca 2[UO 2(CO 3) 3]11H 2O}. The spectra of the samples are sample dependent and significant differences in the Raman spectra are obtained upon cooling to 77 K. It is proposed that the mineral undergoes a phase change upon cooling. Significant changes in the Raman spectra are observed in the hydroxyl stretching region and in the low wavenumber region. Two Raman bands are observed at 3468 and 3528 cm -1 showing the non-equivalence of the water units in the structure. Obtaining spectra at 77 K enables well resolved bands at 3530, 3501, 3482, 3463, 3443, 3405 and 3364 cm -1. Two well resolved bands at 1087 and 1073 cm -1 in the 298 K spectra become bands at 1093, 1076 and 1008 cm -1 in the 77 K spectrum proving the non-equivalence of the carbonate units. This non-equivalence is reflected in the observation of multiple bands in the carbonate bending regions. The (UO 2) 2+ units are characterised by the antisymmetric stretching vibrations at 902, 885 and 873 cm -1 and by the ν2 bending modes at 248 cm -1. Two bands near 820 cm -1 may be assigned to the ν1 (UO 2) 2+ symmetric stretching vibrations, however, a coincidence of these vibrations with the ν2 (CO 3) 2- out-of plane bending vibrations cannot be excluded. The use of Raman spectroscopy enables a better definition of the vibrational modes of liebigite and shows changes in the molecular structure upon reaching 77 K.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of Synechococcus sp PCC 7002 phycobilisome core mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Gindt, Y.M.

    1993-04-01

    The role of the L[sub cm] (I), [beta][sup 18] (II), and [alpha][sup AP-B] (III) chromoproteins in the phycobilisome (PBS) core was investigated using genetically engineered strains of Synechococcus missing different polypeptides. Intact cells, isolated PBS, and subcore preparations for each mutant were studied to determine the effect of that mutation on energy transfer within the PBS core and to the reaction centers. Three mutants lacked the II and/or III polypeptides, while the I chromophore was altered in others. A lower energy absorbing chromophore, A[sub max] = 695 nm, was substituted for the I chromophore. The deletion of the II and III subunits had no discernible effect on energy transfer from the PBS to PSII. In cells and isolated PBS, the altered I chromophore acts to quench the PBS complex and to redirect the energy which would be transferred to PSII. In the PBS and subcore preparations, deletion of the III subunit did not alter energy transfer within the core. The deletion of the II subunit from the PBS caused a small decrease in the excited state lifetimes of the final emitters indicating more disorder within the core. The I chromophore was found to absorb at 670nm and to emit at 683nm within the intact PBS. The II chromophore emits at 679nm while the III chromophore emits at 682nm. A strong interaction exists between the I chromophore and the II subunit. Upon deletion of the II subunit from the PBS core, the I chromophore emits at a higher energy. The II subunit could act to stabilize the I chromophore-binding pocket, or exciton coupling could be occurring between the two. The role of the III chromophore is still unclear at this time. The III chromophore does contribute to the RT emission of the isolated PBS, but it transfers energy to I at 77 K. One can conclude that the III subunit is adjacent to the trimer containing the I polypeptide.

  10. Spectroscopic studies of Synechococcus sp PCC 7002 phycobilisome core mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Gindt, Y.M.

    1993-04-01

    The role of the L{sub cm} (I), {beta}{sup 18} (II), and {alpha}{sup AP-B} (III) chromoproteins in the phycobilisome (PBS) core was investigated using genetically engineered strains of Synechococcus missing different polypeptides. Intact cells, isolated PBS, and subcore preparations for each mutant were studied to determine the effect of that mutation on energy transfer within the PBS core and to the reaction centers. Three mutants lacked the II and/or III polypeptides, while the I chromophore was altered in others. A lower energy absorbing chromophore, A{sub max} = 695 nm, was substituted for the I chromophore. The deletion of the II and III subunits had no discernible effect on energy transfer from the PBS to PSII. In cells and isolated PBS, the altered I chromophore acts to quench the PBS complex and to redirect the energy which would be transferred to PSII. In the PBS and subcore preparations, deletion of the III subunit did not alter energy transfer within the core. The deletion of the II subunit from the PBS caused a small decrease in the excited state lifetimes of the final emitters indicating more disorder within the core. The I chromophore was found to absorb at 670nm and to emit at 683nm within the intact PBS. The II chromophore emits at 679nm while the III chromophore emits at 682nm. A strong interaction exists between the I chromophore and the II subunit. Upon deletion of the II subunit from the PBS core, the I chromophore emits at a higher energy. The II subunit could act to stabilize the I chromophore-binding pocket, or exciton coupling could be occurring between the two. The role of the III chromophore is still unclear at this time. The III chromophore does contribute to the RT emission of the isolated PBS, but it transfers energy to I at 77 K. One can conclude that the III subunit is adjacent to the trimer containing the I polypeptide.

  11. Fluorescence Techniques Using Dehydroergosterol to Study Cholesterol Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Huang, Huan; Gallegos, Adalberto M.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Cholesterol itself has very few structural/chemical features suitable for real-time imaging in living cells. Thus, the advent of dehydroergosterol [ergosta-5,7,9(11),22-tetraen-3β-ol, DHE] the fluorescent sterol most structurally and functionally similar to cholesterol to date, has proven to be a major asset for real-time probing/elucidating the sterol environment and intracellular sterol trafficking in living organisms. DHE is a naturally-occurring, fluorescent sterol analog that faithfully mimics many of the properties of cholesterol. Because these properties are very sensitive to sterol structure and degradation, such studies require the use of extremely pure (>98%) quantities of fluorescent sterol. DHE is readily bound by cholesterol-binding proteins, is incorporated into lipoproteins (from the diet of animals or by exchange in vitro), and for real-time imaging studies is easily incorporated into cultured cells where it co-distributes with endogenous sterol. Incorporation from an ethanolic stock solution to cell culture media is effective, but this process forms an aqueous dispersion of dehydroergosterol crystals which can result in endocytic cellular uptake and distribution into lysosomes which is problematic in imaging DHE at the plasma membrane of living cells. In contrast, monomeric DHE can be incorporated from unilamellar vesicles by exchange/fusion with the plasma membrane or from DHE-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (DHE-MβCD) complexes by exchange with the plasma membrane. Both of the latter techniques can deliver large quantities of monomeric dehydroergosterol with significant distribution into the plasma membrane. The properties and behavior of DHE in protein-binding, lipoproteins, model membranes, biological membranes, lipid rafts/caveolae, and real-time imaging in living cells indicate that this naturally-occurring fluorescent sterol is a useful mimic for probing the properties of cholesterol in these systems. PMID:18536950

  12. Single molecule fluorescence studies of ribosome dynamics: An application of metal enhanced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharill, Shashank

    Metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF), in which a surface plasmon near a noble metal alters the spectral properties of an organic fluorophore, has been reported to increase fluorescence intensity without a concomitant increase in photobleaching rate. The fluorescence intensities of Cy3- and Cy5-labeled ribosomal initiation complexes (ICs) near 50 nm silver particles were increased 4 - 7-fold compared to ICs in the absence of silver colloids. Photobleaching lifetime was not significantly decreased, resulting in 4 - 5.5-fold enhancement in total photon emission prior to photobleaching. Fluorophores showing enhanced fluorescence were located within ˜280 nm of the colloidal particles, as detected by light scattering and scanning probe microscopy. Aggregates of silver particles or larger colloids themselves produced wavelength-shifted luminescence similar to fluorescence, presumably due to resonant extinction between nearby metal particles. Intensity fluctuations above shot noise, at 0.1 - 5 Hz, were greater from slides containing colloidal particles than from plain glass. Overall signal to noise ratio was similar or slightly better near the silver particles. Proximity to silver particles did not compromise ribosome function, as measured by codon-dependent binding of fluorescent tRNA to the A site of fluorescent labeled ribosomes, dynamics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between adjacent tRNAs in the ribosomal A and P sites, and elongation factor G catalyzed translocation.

  13. A spectroscopic and dynamical study of binary and other Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petterson, Orlon King Lee

    High resolution observations have been made of a number of southern Cepheids to make an observational and theoretical study of Cepheid variables using radial velocities. The stars studied were part of a long term programme to observe southern variable stars, from which a valuable database of radial velocities gathered over a long period were available. Sixteen échelle spectrograph orders in the wavelength region 5400 - 8600Å were used, which included a number of absorption lines covering a range of species and excitation potentials. The line bisector technique was used to measure stellar and telluric lines and to obtain radial velocities. To improve the precision of the radial velocities we used telluric lines to calibrate the observations to a common reference frame. The radial velocities have a precision of ~300ms-1 allowing the detection of velocity differences of ~1 kms-1 with confidence. The radial velocity data obtained at Mount John University Observatory (MJUO) was combined with data from various sources to determine the orbits of any Cepheids exhibiting orbital motion. The various orbital parameters were determined for a number of systems and where radial velocities for the companions exist, some estimate of the mass was made. The precision of the radial velocities obtained from MJUO also allowed us to search for line level effects for a number of species among the Cepheid spectra. A number of IAU standard stars were observed to calibrate the radial velocities obtained at MJUO to the IAU standard scale. The radial velocities from MJUO were found not to differ significantly from the IAU values. Binary Cepheids are particularly useful in the determination of Cepheid masses, which are still an active topic for astronomical research. The value of the MJUO data was that it provided a consistent set of data against which other sources of data could be compared. For 8 of the Cepheids new or improved orbital solutions were found. They are Y Car, YZ Car, AX Cir

  14. Spectroscopic Survey of Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J.

    This program will obtain far-UV spectra of cool stars that span a broad range of spectral type and luminosity class. It is our intention to obtain these spectra early in the FUSE program and to provide the spectra quickly to the user community in order to guide potential guest investigators in designing their observing programs. The specific science objectives include: (1) studying transition region dynamics (winds and downflows), (2) modeling the thermal structure of transition regions, (3) measuring electron densities, (4) search for low temperature coronae, (5) studying molecular excitation and fluorescence processes, and (6) inferring how the transition regions of spectroscopic binary systems differ from those of single stars.

  15. Conformation and dynamics of nucleotides in bulges and symmetric internal loops in duplex DNA studied by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Cekan, Pavol; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bulges and loops were studied by both EPR and fluorescence spectroscopies using the probe C/C{sup f}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One-base bulge was in a temperature-dependent equilibrium between looped-out and stacked states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bases in two- and three-base bulges were stacked at all temperatures, resulting in DNA bending. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bases were stacked in symmetrical two- to five-base internal loops, according to EPR data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unexpectedly high fluorescence for the smaller loops indicated local structural perturbations. -- Abstract: The dynamics and conformation of base bulges and internal loops in duplex DNA were studied using the bifunctional spectroscopic probe C, which becomes fluorescent (C{sup f}) upon reduction of the nitroxide functional group, along with EPR and fluorescence spectroscopies. A one-base bulge was in a conformational equilibrium between looped-out and stacked states, the former favored at higher temperature and the latter at lower temperature. Stacking of bulge bases was favored in two- and three-base bulges, independent of temperature, resulting in DNA bending as evidenced by increased fluorescence of C{sup f}. EPR spectra of C-labeled three-, four- and five-base symmetrical interior DNA bulges at 20 Degree-Sign C showed low mobility, indicating that the spin-label was stacked within the loop. The spin-label mobility at 37 Degree-Sign C increased as the loops became larger. A considerable variation in fluorescence between different loops was observed, as well as a temperature-dependence within constructs. Fluorescence unexpectedly increased as the size of the loop decreased at 2 Degree-Sign C. Fluorescence of the smallest loops, where a single T{center_dot}T mismatch was located between the stem region and the probe, was even larger than for the single strand, indicating a considerable local structural deformation of these loops

  16. Spectroscopic study of the microbial community in chemocline zones of relic meromictic lakes separating from the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Voronov, Dmitry A.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2015-03-01

    As a result of a recent years study on the Karelia shore of the White Sea more than ten relict lakes in different stages of separation from the sea have been discovered. Five of them are located close to the Nikolai Pertsov White Sea Biological Station of Moscow State University. Such separated lakes are interesting to explore for their firm vertical stratification. Water layers differ not only by temperature, salinity and other physic and chemical characteristics and optical properties, but also by ibhabiting microorganisms and by the quality of dissolved organic matter. To study phototropic organisms in water sampled from different depths we used spectroscopic techniques. Identification of the main bands in the absorption and fluorescence spectra showed that there are two main groups of photosynthetic organisms in the redox zone (chemocline): unicellular algae containing chlorophyll a and green sulfur bacteria with bacteriochlorophylls c, d, e. Spectral data were compared with physical and chemical characteristics of the water layer (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and sunlight illumination at certain depth). It gave an opportunity to compare vertical profiles of oxygen and hydrogen sulphide concentration with the number and distribution of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophic microorganisms. Maximum abundance of both algae and green sulfur bacteria were achieved within the redox zone. Typical thickness of the layer with the highest concentration of microorganisms did not exceed 10-20 cm.

  17. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10/sup 6/ atoms/cm/sup 3/ with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed.

  18. Studying electron-PAG interactions using electron-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Amrit; Grzeskowiak, Steven; Ostrander, Jonathan; Schad, Jonathon; Rebeyev, Eliran; Neisser, Mark; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Denbeaux, Gregory; Brainard, Robert L.

    2016-03-01

    In extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, 92 eV photons are used to expose photoresists. Typical EUV resists are organic-based and chemically amplified using photoacid generators (PAGs). Upon exposure, PAGs produce acids which catalyze reactions that result in changes in solubility. In EUV lithography, photo- and secondary electrons (energies of 10- 80 eV) play a large role in PAG acid-production. Several mechanisms for electron-PAG interactions (e.g. electron trapping, and hole-initiated chemistry) have been proposed. The aim of this study is to explore another mechanism - internal excitation - in which a bound PAG electron can be excited by receiving energy from another energetic electron, causing a reaction that produces acid. This paper explores the mechanism of internal excitation through the analogous process of electron-induced fluorescence, in which an electron loses energy by transferring that energy to a molecule and that molecule emits a photon rather than decomposing. We will show and quantify electron-induced fluorescence of several fluorophores in polymer films to mimic resist materials, and use this information to refine our proposed mechanism. Relationships between the molecular structure of fluorophores and fluorescent quantum yield may aid in the development of novel PAGs for EUV lithography.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of chemically engineered green fluorescent protein mutants: comparison of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Felicity L; Frank, Filipp; Marks, Gabriel E; Suzuki, Miho; Douglas, Kenneth T; Bryce, Richard A

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unusual spectroscopic properties, green fluorescent protein (GFP) has become a useful tool in molecular genetics, biochemistry and cell biology. Here, we computationally characterize the behavior of two GFP constructs, designed as bioprobes for enzymatic triggering using intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These constructs differ in the location of an intramolecular FRET partner, an attached chemical chromophore (either near an N-terminal or C-terminal site). We apply the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics method to the two flexible constructs in conjunction with a generalized Born implicit solvent model. The calculated rate of FRET was derived from the interchromophore distance, R, and orientational factor, kappa(2). In agreement with experiment, the construct with the C-terminally attached dye was predicted to have higher energy transfer rate than observed for the N-terminal construct. The molecular basis for this observation is discussed. In addition, we find that the orientational factor, kappa(2), deviates from the commonly assumed value, the implications of which are also considered.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of adhesion of polyurethane to epoxy-coated steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namjung

    2000-10-01

    demonstrated that LTV-reflection and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques are useful for failure mode analysis techniques, and can be used for in-situ analysis using fiber-optic attachments.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of copper doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, S. Sreehari; Rao, B. Rupa Venkateswara

    2014-02-01

    In this paper spectroscopic investigation of Cu2+ doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses was done through the spectroscopic techniques like X-ray diffraction, Ultra Violet (UV) absorption Spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR - X band), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy. Alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses containing 0.1% copper oxide (CuO) were prepared by the melt quenching technique. Spectroscopic studies indicated that there is a greater possibility for the copper ions to exist in Cu2+ state in these glasses. The optical absorption spectra indicated that the absorption peak of Cu2+ is a function of composition. The maxima absorption peak was reported at 862 nm for strontium lead zinc phosphate glass. Bonding parameters were calculated for the optical and EPR data. All these spectral results indicated clearly that there are certain structural changes in the present glass system with different alkaline earth contents. The IR and Raman spectra noticed the breaking of the P-O-P bonds and creating more number of new P-O-Cu bonds.

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance and fluorescence studies of trialkylamines irradiated by pulse radiolysis in alkane solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkowitz, S.M.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1984-01-05

    Time-resolved fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance (FDMR) studies of irradiated alkane solutions of trialkylamines and scintillators reveal the EPR spectra of the trialkylaminium radicals, formed by scavenging solvent radical cations. A qualitative kinetic analysis indicates that the growth of the triethylaminium radical (TEA/sup +/-) FDMR signal occurs on similar time scales in both n-hexane and cyclohexane, suggesting that, in cyclohexane, TEA/sup +/- is formed by scavenging the lower mobility ''trapped'' cyclohexane radical cations. Fluorescence results indicate that TEA quenches both scintillator fluorescence and total FDMR intensities to a greater extent than is expected from amine scavenging of solvent holes. TEA also exhibits an intense, relatively long-lived fluorescence which is apparently not produced by radical ion recombination or energy transfer. 6 figures

  3. Spectroscopic studies of the interactive model of methylene blue with DNA by means of β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guang-Chao; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    1999-05-01

    The formation of the inclusion complex of methylene blue with β-cyclodextrin is studied by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods and the binding constant of the inclusion complex is 4.5×10 3 l mol -1. The interactive model of methylene blue with DNA has been investigated by means of the inclusion action of β-cyclodextrin. Through the changes of absorption and fluorescence spectra, the intrinsic binding constant ( k) of methylene blue with DNA and inclusion complex with DNA is obtained. In the case of 20 m mol l -1 Tris buffer solution (pH 7.2), their values are 1.53×10 5 l mol -1 and 9.98×10 4 l mol -1, respectively. The experimental results suggest that the inclusion complex does not decompose when it interacts with DNA. The binding number ( n) is 1 for both methylene blue and inclusion complex with DNA. According to the experimental results, it can be inferred that the interactive model of methylene blue with DNA is 'electrostatic binding'. This conclusion is able to explain the experimental phenomena clearly.

  4. The protein environment surrounding tyrosyl radicals D. and Z. in photosystem II: a difference Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S; Barry, B A

    1998-01-01

    Photosystem II contains two redox-active tyrosine residues, termed D and Z, which have different midpoint potentials and oxidation/reduction kinetics. To understand the functional properties of redox-active tyrosines, we report a difference Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic study of these species. Vibrational spectra associated with the oxidation of each tyrosine residue are acquired; electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and fluorescence experiments demonstrate that there is no detectable contribution of Q(A)- to these spectra. Vibrational lines are assigned to the radicals by isotopic labeling of tyrosine. Global 15N labeling, 2H exchange, and changes in pH identify differences in the reversible interactions of the two redox-active tyrosines with N-containing, titratable amino acid side chains in their environments. To identify the amino acid residue that contributes to the spectrum of D, mutations at His189 in the D2 polypeptide were examined. Mutations at this site result in substantial changes in the spectrum of tyrosine D. Previously, mutations at the analogous histidine, His190 in the D1 polypeptide, were shown to have no significant effect on the FT-IR spectrum of tyrosine Z (Bernard, M. T., et al. 1995. J. Biol. Chem. 270:1589-1594). A disparity in the number of accessible, proton-accepting groups could influence electron transfer rates and energetics and account for functional differences between the two redox-active tyrosines. PMID:9591683

  5. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of sodium benzoate, a food preservative, with calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guowen; Ma, Yadi

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between sodium benzoate (SB) and calf thymus DNA in simulated physiological buffer (pH 7.4) using acridine orange (AO) dye as a fluorescence probe, was investigated by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with DNA melting studies and viscosity measurements. An expanded UV-Vis spectral data matrix was resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) approach. The equilibrium concentration profiles and the pure spectra for SB, DNA and DNA-SB complex from the high overlapping composite response were simultaneously obtained. The results indicated that SB could bind to DNA, and hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played a vital role in the binding process. Moreover, SB was able to quench the fluorescence of DNA-AO complex through a static procedure. The quenching observed was indicative of an intercalative mode of interaction between SB and DNA, which was supported by melting studies, viscosity measurements and CD analysis.

  6. Spectroscopic studies of brilliant cresyl blue/water-soluble sulfonated calix[4]arene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Pham, T.H.; Sanchez Pena, M.; Agbaria, R.A.; Warner, I.M.

    1998-07-01

    Water-soluble sulfonated calix[4]arene (SCX4) was used as the host molecule for the guest dye(probe), Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB), which is commonly employed for studies of various biological systems. Absorption and fluorescence techniques were employed for the analysis of this system. The formation of a complex between the BCB dye and SCX4 results in a decrease in the BCB fluorescence intensity. A study of the changes in absorption and of temperature effects on the fluorescence of BCB/SCX4 was conducted. The binding constant for BCB/SCX4 at room temperature was estimated to be 8.49{times}10{sup 3}thinspM{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  7. Electrostatic Interactions of Fluorescent Molecules with Dielectric Interfaces Studied by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Chmyrov, Andriy; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between dielectric surfaces and different fluorophores used in ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy are investigated using objective-based Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). The interfacial dynamics of cationic rhodamine 123 and rhodamine 6G, anionic/dianionic fluorescein, zwitterionic rhodamine 110 and neutral ATTO 488 are monitored at various ionic strengths at physiological pH. As analyzed by means of the amplitude and time-evolution of the autocorrelation function, the fluorescent molecules experience electrostatic attraction or repulsion at the glass surface depending on their charges. Influences of the electrostatic interactions are also monitored through the triplet-state population and triplet relaxation time, including the amount of detected fluorescence or the count-rate-per-molecule parameter. These TIR-FCS results provide an increased understanding of how fluorophores are influenced by the microenvironment of a glass surface, and show a promising approach for characterizing electrostatic interactions at interfaces. PMID:20386645

  8. Inhibitory effects of deferasirox on the structure and function of bovine liver catalase: a spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Moradi, M; Divsalar, A; Saboury, A A; Ghalandari, B; Harifi, A R

    2015-01-01

    Deferasirox (DFX), as an oral chelator, is used for treatment of transfusional iron overload. In this study, we have investigated the effects of DFX as an iron chelator, on the function and structure of bovine liver catalase (BLC) by different spectroscopic methods of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) at two temperatures of 25 and 37 °C. In vitro kinetic studies showed that DFX can inhibit the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. KI value was calculated 39 nM according to the Lineweaver-Burk plot indicating a high rate of inhibition of the enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence data showed that increasing the drug concentrations leads to a significant decrease in the intrinsic emission of the enzyme indicating a significant change in the three-dimensional environment around the chromophores of the enzyme structure. By analyzing the fluorescence quenching data, it was found that the BLC has two binding sites for DFX and the values of binding constant at 25 and 37 °C were calculated 1.7 × 10(7) and 3 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. The static type of quenching mechanism is involved in the quenching of intrinsic emission of enzyme. The thermodynamic data suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a major role in the binding reaction. UV-vis spectroscopy results represented the changes in tryptophan (Trp) absorption and Soret band spectra, which indicated changes in Trp and heme group position caused by the drug binding. Also, CD data represented that high concentrations of DFX lead to a significant decreasing in the content of β-sheet and random coil accompanied an increasing in α-helical content of the protein. The molecular docking results indicate that docking may be an appropriate method for prediction and confirmation of experimental results and also useful for determining the binding mechanism of proteins and drugs. According to above results, it can be concluded that the DFX can chelate the Fe(III) on the enzyme active site leading

  9. Inhibitory effects of deferasirox on the structure and function of bovine liver catalase: a spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Moradi, M; Divsalar, A; Saboury, A A; Ghalandari, B; Harifi, A R

    2015-01-01

    Deferasirox (DFX), as an oral chelator, is used for treatment of transfusional iron overload. In this study, we have investigated the effects of DFX as an iron chelator, on the function and structure of bovine liver catalase (BLC) by different spectroscopic methods of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) at two temperatures of 25 and 37 °C. In vitro kinetic studies showed that DFX can inhibit the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. KI value was calculated 39 nM according to the Lineweaver-Burk plot indicating a high rate of inhibition of the enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence data showed that increasing the drug concentrations leads to a significant decrease in the intrinsic emission of the enzyme indicating a significant change in the three-dimensional environment around the chromophores of the enzyme structure. By analyzing the fluorescence quenching data, it was found that the BLC has two binding sites for DFX and the values of binding constant at 25 and 37 °C were calculated 1.7 × 10(7) and 3 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. The static type of quenching mechanism is involved in the quenching of intrinsic emission of enzyme. The thermodynamic data suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a major role in the binding reaction. UV-vis spectroscopy results represented the changes in tryptophan (Trp) absorption and Soret band spectra, which indicated changes in Trp and heme group position caused by the drug binding. Also, CD data represented that high concentrations of DFX lead to a significant decreasing in the content of β-sheet and random coil accompanied an increasing in α-helical content of the protein. The molecular docking results indicate that docking may be an appropriate method for prediction and confirmation of experimental results and also useful for determining the binding mechanism of proteins and drugs. According to above results, it can be concluded that the DFX can chelate the Fe(III) on the enzyme active site leading

  10. A photoelectron spectroscopic and computational study of the o-dicarbadodecaborane parent anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit

    2016-06-01

    We report a combined photoelectron spectroscopic and computational study of the o-dicarbadodecaborane (o-carborane) parent anion, (C2B10H12)-. Previous studies that focused on the electrophilic nature of o-carborane led to tantalizing yet mixed results. In our study, we confirmed that o-carborane does in fact form a parent anion and that it has considerable stability. This anion is an isomer ("Anion iso 2") where unlike in neutral o-carborane, the two carbon atoms are not bound.

  11. Europium Uptake and Partitioning in Oat (Avena sativa) Roots as studied By Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Confocal Microscopy Profiling Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J.; Wang, Zheming; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2003-11-15

    The uptake of Eu3+ by elongating oat plant roots was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime measurement, as well as laser excitation time-resolved confocal fluorescence profiling technique. The results of this work indicated that the initial uptake of Eu(III) by oat root was most evident within the apical meristem of the root just proximal to the root cap. Distribution of assimilated Eu(III) within the roots differentiation and elongation zone was non-uniform. Higher concentrations were observed within the vascular cylinder, specifically in the phloem and developing xylem parenchyma. Elevated levels of the metal were also observed in the root hairs of the mature root. The concentration of assimilated Eu3+ dropped sharply from the apical meristem to the differentiation and elongation zone and then gradually decreased as the distance from the root cap increased. Fluorescence spectroscopic characteristics of the assimilated Eu3+ suggested that the Eu3+ exists a s inner-sphere mononuclear complexes inside the root. This work has also demonstrated the effectiveness of a time-resolved Eu3+ fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence profiling techniques for the in vivo, real-time study of metal[Eu3+] accumulation by a functioning intact plant root. This approach can prove valuable for basic and applied studies in plant nutrition and environmental uptake of actinide radionuclides.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of the light-color modulation mechanism of firefly (beetle) bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Hasumi, Yosuke; Ohtsuka, Kazuhiro; Maki, Shojiro; Niwa, Haruki; Yamaji, Minoru; Hashizume, Daisuke

    2009-02-18

    To reveal the light-color modulation mechanism of firefly (beetle) bioluminescence, we investigated the spectroscopic properties of the phenolate anion 1-O(-) generated from 5,5-dimethyloxyluciferin (1-OH) using various base/solvent combinations. Phenolate anion 1-O(-) is a model compound for the keto form of wild-type oxyluciferin phenolate anion (OL(-)), which is postulated to be the emitter of the bioluminescence. The fluorescence maxima of 1-O(-) were found to depend on the base/solvent combination used, and they varied in the range 541-640 nm, which covers the almost whole range of the bioluminescence emission maximum. In a polar solvent, where (1)(1-O(-))* and the countercation (the conjugate acid of a base) make a solvent-separated ion pair or a free ion couple, the emission maxima of 1-O(-) were found to be modulated by the solvent polarity. In a less polar solvent, where (1)(1-O(-))* and the countercation are formed as a contact ion pair, the strength of the covalent character of the O8'...H bond between (1)(1-O(-))* and the countercation is operative. The effect of the base/solvent combination on the emission properties of (1)(1-O(-))* was also verified using fluorescence lifetime measurements and density functional theory calculations on 1-O(-) and its ion-pair models. On the basis of these results, we propose the following light-color modulation mechanism: (1) the light emitter is the excited singlet state of OL(-) [(1)(OL(-))*], and (2) light emission from (1)(OL(-))* is modulated by the polarity of the active-site environment of a luciferase and the degree of covalent character of the O8'...H bond between (1)(OL(-))* and a protonated basic moiety in the active site. Mechanisms for variation of the bioluminescence colors and their applications are discussed. PMID:19159303

  13. Studies of new two-photon fluorescent probes suitable for multiphoton microscopy in biological settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvishi, Raz; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi; Krief, Pnina; Shapiro, Lev; Klug, Jacob T.; Skorka, Jacqueline; Khodorkovsky, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    Multi-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM) requires efficient two-photon absorbing fluorescent (TPF) probes. In particular, probes exhibiting bio-functionality are very attractive for MPLSM studies of biological samples. We have synthesized and studied a new class of TPF probes capable of caging metal ions, such as Ca+2 and Na+, which play an important role in neuronal mechanisms. The TPF probes are based on a tetraketo derivative with a symmetric Donor-Acceptor-Donor (D-A-D) structure. The donor is an azacrown moiety, which also serves as a metal ion-caging unit. We studied the linear and the non-linear spectroscopic properties of these TPF probes as a function of conjugation length and the size of the crown ring. We find that this new class of TPF probes possesses very large two-photon excitation cross-section coefficients (~1000GM) at near IR wavelengths as well as affinity to metal ions. In the presence of changing sodium ion concentration the dye spectra reveals four distinguishable forms and the TPF efficiency changes strongly. We therefore conclude that the dye can perform as a sensitive metal ion TPF probe.

  14. A spectroscopic study on interaction between bovine serum albumin and titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesized from microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Srivastava, Priyanka; Ramalingam, Chidambaram

    2016-08-01

    The use of nanoparticles in food or pharma requires a molecular-level perceptive of how NPs interact with protein corona once exposed to a physiological environment. In this study, the conformational changes of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated in detail when exposed to different concentration of titanium dioxide nanoparticle by various techniques. To analyze the effects of NPs on proteins, the interaction between bovine serum albumin and titanium dioxide nanoparticles at different concentrations were investigated. The interaction, BSA conformations, kinetics, and adsorption were analyzed by dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching. Dynamic light scattering analysis confirms the interaction with major changes in the size of the protein. Fluorescence quenching analysis confirms the side-on or end-on interaction of 1.1 molecules of serum albumin to titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Further, pseudo-second order kinetics was determined with equilibrium contact time of 20min. The spectroscopic analysis suggests that there is a conformational change both at secondary and tertiary structure levels. A distortion in both α-helix and β-sheets was observed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Fluorescence quenching analysis confirms the interaction of a molecule of bovine serum albumin to the single TiO2 nanoparticle. Further, pseudo-second order kinetics was determined with equilibrium contact time of 20min. The data of the present study determines the detailed evaluation of BSA adsorption on TiO2 nanoparticle along with mechanism and adsorption kinetics.

  15. A spectroscopic study on interaction between bovine serum albumin and titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesized from microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Srivastava, Priyanka; Ramalingam, Chidambaram

    2016-08-01

    The use of nanoparticles in food or pharma requires a molecular-level perceptive of how NPs interact with protein corona once exposed to a physiological environment. In this study, the conformational changes of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated in detail when exposed to different concentration of titanium dioxide nanoparticle by various techniques. To analyze the effects of NPs on proteins, the interaction between bovine serum albumin and titanium dioxide nanoparticles at different concentrations were investigated. The interaction, BSA conformations, kinetics, and adsorption were analyzed by dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching. Dynamic light scattering analysis confirms the interaction with major changes in the size of the protein. Fluorescence quenching analysis confirms the side-on or end-on interaction of 1.1 molecules of serum albumin to titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Further, pseudo-second order kinetics was determined with equilibrium contact time of 20min. The spectroscopic analysis suggests that there is a conformational change both at secondary and tertiary structure levels. A distortion in both α-helix and β-sheets was observed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Fluorescence quenching analysis confirms the interaction of a molecule of bovine serum albumin to the single TiO2 nanoparticle. Further, pseudo-second order kinetics was determined with equilibrium contact time of 20min. The data of the present study determines the detailed evaluation of BSA adsorption on TiO2 nanoparticle along with mechanism and adsorption kinetics. PMID:27318604

  16. Insect monitoring with fluorescence lidar techniques: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Guan, Zuguang; Wellenreuther, Maren; Svanberg, Sune

    2009-10-20

    We investigate the possibilities of light detection and ranging (lidar) techniques to study migration of the damselfly species Calopteryx splendens and C. virgo. Laboratory and testing-range measurements at a distance of 60 m were performed using dried, mounted damselfly specimens. Laboratory measurements, including color photography in polarized light and spectroscopy of reflectance and induced fluorescence, reveal that damselflies exhibit reflectance and fluorescence properties that are closely tied to the generation of structural color. Lidar studies on C. splendens of both genders show that gender can be remotely determined, especially for specimens that were marked with Coumarin 102 and Rhodamine 6G dyes. The results obtained in this study will be useful for future field experiments, and provide guidelines for studying damselflies in their natural habitat using lidar to survey the air above the river surface. The findings will be applicable for many other insect species and should, therefore, bring new insights into migration and movement patterns of insects in general. PMID:19844299

  17. A novel rhodamine-riboflavin conjugate probe exhibits distinct fluorescence resonance energy transfer that enables riboflavin trafficking and subcellular localization studies.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Mitch A; Foraker, Amy B; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T; Swaan, Peter W

    2004-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2, RF) is taken up in eukaryotic cells via specialized transport mechanisms. Although RF has fluorescence properties, direct microscopic visualization of RF uptake and trafficking has been complicated by cellular autofluorescence. We describe the synthesis, cellular uptake characteristics, and spectroscopic properties of a novel rhodamine-riboflavin conjugate (RD-RF), including absorption and emission spectra, two-photon excitation spectra, and fluorescence pH dependence. The conjugate has a molar extinction coefficient of 23 670 M(-1) cm(-1) at 545 nm (excitation wavelength) with a fluorescence quantum yield of 0.94. This compound exhibits intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective quenching of the FRET signal is observed when RD-RF is bound with high affinity by the chicken riboflavin carrier protein. In addition to the typical rhodamine excitation and emission, FRET provides a secondary signal for conjugate localization and an in situ mechanism for observing riboflavin binding. Solution and in vitro stability determinations indicate that the linkage between riboflavin and rhodamine is stable for the duration of typical pulse--chase and cellular trafficking experiments. The distinct spectroscopic properties of RD-RF together with a comparable affinity for RF-binding proteins render it an excellent tool for the study of RF transport and trafficking in living cells. PMID:15981585

  18. Study on the interaction between NCP-(4-hydroxycoumarins) and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianyong; Lu, Shiyu; Yang, Ying; Li, Xiaofang; Yi, Pinggui

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between N-confused porphyrins-(4-hydroxycoumarins) diad (NCP-(4-hydroxycoumarins)) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied using fluorescence and ultraviolet spectroscopy at different temperatures under imitated physiological conditions. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence of BSA was quenched by NCP-(4-hydroxycoumarins) through a combined quenching procedure. The binding constants, binding sites and corresponding thermodynamic parameters between NCP-(4-hydroxycoumarins) and BSA at different temperatures were obtained. According to Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between BSA and NCP-(4-hydroxycoumarins) was calculated to be about 2.1 nm. The effect of NCP-(4-hydroxycoumarins) on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of some metal ions Cu(2+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Ni(2+) on the binding constant between NCP-(4-hydroxycoumarins) and BSA was examined.

  19. Spectroscopic and Docking Studies on the Binding of Liquiritigenin with Hyaluronidase for Antiallergic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hua-jin; Yang, Ran; You, Jing; Qu, Ling-bo; Sun, Yan-jun

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of liquiritigenin on hyaluronidase and its binding mechanism were investigated systematically by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, and molecular modeling approaches. These results indicated that liquiritigenin could interact with hyaluronidase to form a liquiritigenin-hyaluronidase complex. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated, which indicated that liquiritigenin could spontaneously bind with hyaluronidase mainly through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with one binding site. Synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, and molecular docking results revealed that liquiritigenin bound directly to the enzyme cavity site and this binding influenced the microenvironment of the hyaluronidase activity site, resulting in reduced hyaluronidase activity. The present study provides useful information for clinical applications of liquiritigenin as a hyaluronidase inhibitor. PMID:27313960

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a specific tool for the interaction study of two surfactants with natural and synthetic organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Aude-Valérie; Frochot, Céline; Bersillon, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    Four different techniques were used to study the binding of cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and non-ionic nonylphenylethoxyl (NPE) surfactants to three synthetic organic components that mimic humic-like aggregates and to two natural aggregated humic substances (HS) extracted from aquatic suspended matter. The composition of synthetic organic components were chosen to be similar to high molecular weight highly processed terrigenous HS and low and high molecular weight less processed terrigenous (or aquatic terrigenous) HS. The natural HS were extracted under two different meteorological conditions (rainy and dry periods). No significant interaction between the non-ionic surfactant and any of the studied compounds was found. Concerning CTAB; pH, conductivity and turbidity measurements, along with fluorescence spectroscopy were combined to provide a better understanding of interactions between organic aggregates and the surfactant. The spectroscopic data show that a "highly processed terrigenous HS" fluorophore interacts in a different way with the cationic surfactant than an "aquatic terrigenous (or less processed terrigenous) HS" fluorophore does. Under similar conditions, some spectral changes in the fluorescence signal are correlated to changes in non-specific physical-chemical parameters (pH, turbidity, conductivity) for the organic compounds tested. The complexation mechanism is essentially governed by charge neutralization, which can be monitored specifically by the fluorescence of the organic moieties.

  1. Study of spectroscopic and thermal characteristics of nonlinear optical molecular crystals based on 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovetc, I. M.; Fokina, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of study of spectroscopic and thermal characteristics of molecular co-crystals: 2-aminopyridine-4-nitrophenol-4-mtrophenolate (2AP4N) and 2,6- diaminopyridine-4-nitrophenol-4nitrophenolate (26DAP4N). Crystals were successfully grown by slow evaporation technique. Optical transparency in the region of 190-1100 was found to be suitable for applications with cut off wavelengths 420 and 430 nm respectively. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis show good quality and thermal stability for studied crystals. Kurtz and Perry powder technique proves that the crystals are acentric and have significant nonlinear optical response.

  2. Spectroscopic study of sub-barrier quasi-elastic nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pass, C.N.; Evans, P.M.; Smith, A.E.; Stuttge, L.; Betts, R.R.; Lilley, J.S.; Connell, K.A.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.R.; James, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The technique developed in this paper is particularly well suited to the detailed spectroscopic study of low energy quasi-elastic nuclear reactions and by overcoming the limitations of conventional procedure, the prospect of detailed studies of inclusive reaction mechanism may be realised. With only limited statistics we find evidence for strong multistep character in the transfer of a single nucleon from spherical vibrational target to spherical projectile nuclei. The suggestive measurements reported here may be made definitive through extended runs based on this technique and experiments planned for the future offer the real prospect of developing a quantified interpretation of the reaction process. 9 refs. 5 figs.

  3. Rapid fluorescent reporter quantification by leaf disc analysis and its application in plant-virus studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluorescent proteins are extraordinary tools for biology studies due to their versatility; they are used extensively to improve comprehension of plant-microbe interactions. The viral infection process can easily be tracked and imaged in a plant with fluorescent protein-tagged viruses. In plants, fluorescent protein genes are among the most commonly used reporters in transient RNA silencing and heterologous protein expression assays. Fluorescence intensity is used to quantify fluorescent protein accumulation by image analysis or spectroscopy of protein extracts; however, these methods might not be suitable for medium- to large-scale comparisons. Results We report that laser scanners, used routinely in proteomic studies, are suitable for quantitative imaging of plant leaves that express different fluorescent protein pairs. We developed a microtiter plate fluorescence spectroscopy method for direct quantitative comparison of fluorescent protein accumulation in intact leaf discs. We used this technique to measure a fluorescent reporter in a transient RNA silencing suppression assay, and also to monitor early amplification dynamics of a fluorescent protein-labeled potyvirus. Conclusions Laser scanners allow dual-color fluorescence imaging of leaf samples, which might not be acquired in standard stereomicroscope devices. Fluorescence microtiter plate analysis of intact leaf discs can be used for rapid, accurate quantitative comparison of fluorescent protein accumulation. PMID:25053970

  4. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopic characters of naphtho-homologated yy-DNA bases and effect of methanol solution and base pairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Li, Huifang; Li, Jilai; Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2010-03-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study of electronic transitions of naphtho-homologated base analogs, namely, yy-T, yy-C, yy-A, and yy-G, was performed. The nature of the low-lying excited states is discussed, and the results are compared with those from experiment and also with those of y-bases. Geometrical characteristics of the lowest excited singlet pipi* and npi* states were explored using the CIS method, and the effects of methanol solution and paring with their complementary natural bases on the relevant absorption and emission spectra of these modified bases were examined. The calculated excitation and emission energies agree well with the measured data, where experimental results are available. In methanol solution, the fluorescence from yy-A and yy-G would be expected to occur around 539 and 562 nm, respectively, suggesting that yy-A is a green-colored fluorophore, whereas yy-G is a yellow-colored fluorophore. The methanol solution was found to red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima of yy-A, yy-T, and yy-C, but blue-shift those for yy-G. Generally, though base pairing has no significant effects on the absorption and fluorescence maxima of yy-A, yy-C, and yy-T, it blue-shifts those for yy-G.

  5. Intrinsic fluorescence studies on saccharide binding to Artocarpus integrifolia lectin.

    PubMed

    Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-10-01

    The combining region of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin has been studied by using the ligand-induced changes in the fluorescence of the lectin. The saccharide binding properties of the lectin show that C-1, C-2, C-4, and C-6 hydroxyl groups of D-galactose are important loci for sugar binding. The alpha-anomer of galactose binds more strongly than its beta-counterpart. Inversion in the configuration at C-4 as in glucose results in a loss of binding to the lectin. The C-6 hydroxyl group is also presumably involved in binding as D-fucose does not bind to the lectin. The lectin binds to the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (Gal beta(1----3)GalNAc) more strongly than the other disaccharides studied, viz. Gal beta (1----4) Gal and Gal beta (1----3) GlcNAc, which are topographically similar to T-antigen. This observation suggests that the combining region of Artocarpus lectin is complementary to that of T-antigen. Solvent accessibility of the protein fluorophores have been probed by the quenching of protein fluorescence by Iodide ion in the absence and presence of sugar. In the presence of sugar a slight inaccessibility of the fluorophores to the solvent has been observed.

  6. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Transition in Underexpanded Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for studying the onset of transition to turbulence. For this study, we have used PLIF of nitric oxide (NO) to image underexpanded axisymmetric free jets issuing into a low-pressure chamber through a smooth converging nozzle with a sonic orifice. Flows were studied over a range of Reynolds numbers and nozzle-exit-to-ambient pressure ratios with the aim of empirically determining criteria governing the onset of turbulence. We have developed an image processing technique, involving calculation of the standard deviation of the intensity in PLIF images, in order to aid in the identification of turbulence. We have used the resulting images to identify laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes. Jet scaling parameters were used to define a rescaled Reynolds number that incorporates the influence of a varying pressure ratio. An empirical correlation was found between transition length and this rescaled Reynolds number for highly underexpanded jets.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterizations, crystal structures and DFT studies of nalidixic acid carbonyl hydrazones derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, F. R. G.; Ribeiro, M. A.; Lancellotti, M.; Machado, D.; Miranda, P. C. M. L.; Cuin, A.; Formiga, A. L. B.; Corbi, P. P.

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the synthesis and characterization of the 1-ethyl-7-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbohydrazide (hzd) and six carbonyl hydrazones derivatives of the nalidixic with 1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethylidene (hpyrr), 1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylidene (h2imi), pyridin-2-ylmethylidene (h2py), pyridin-3-ylmethylidene (h3py), pyridin-4-ylmethylidene(h4py) and (2-hydroxyphenyl)methylidene (hsali). The carbonyl hydrazones were characterized by elemental and ESI-QTOF-MS analyses, IR and detailed NMR spectroscopic measurements. The 2D NMR experiments allowed the unambiguous assignment of the hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen atoms, which have not been reported for nalidixic acid carbonyl hydrazone derivatives so far. Crystal structures of hzd and the new carbonyl hydrazones h2imi, hpyrr and h3py were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Although the synthesis of hzd was reported decades ago, the hzd crystal structure have not been reported yet. Geometric optimizations of all the characterized structures were performed with the aid of DFT studies. Despite the fact that the hydrazones with 2-pyridine carboxylic acid (h2py) and salicyl aldehyde (hsali) were already reported by literature, a detailed spectroscopic study followed by DFT studies are also reported for such compounds in this manuscript. Antimicrobial studies of the compounds are also presented.

  8. Thermal Physical, and Infrared Spectroscopic Studies on Glasses Prepared by Microwave Route

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesha, N.; Gowda, V. C. Veeranna; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes thermal, physical and spectroscopic properties of glasses prepared by a novel micro wave method. These studies exhibited a strong compositional dependent trend and existence of characteristic boro-vanadate groups in these glasses. The scheme of modification of borate and vanadate groups is controlled by Sanderson's electronegativity principle. Analysis of density and glass transition temperatures suggests the presence of characteristic four coordinated borate and diboro - vanadate groups in these glasses. The presence of [BO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} and [B{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 9}]{sup 2-}) groups are confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy of investigated glasses.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of amino acid ionic liquid-supported Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Ossowicz, Paula; Janus, Ewa; Schroeder, Grzegorz; Rozwadowski, Zbigniew

    2013-04-29

    Amino acid ionic liquid-supported Schiff bases, derivatives of salicylaldehyde and various amino acids (L-threonine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-histidine) have been investigated by means of various spectroscopic techniques (NMR, UV-Vis, IR, MS) and deuterium isotope effects on ¹³C-NMR chemical shifts. The results have shown that in all studied amino acid ionic liquid-supported Schiff bases (except the L-histidine derivative) a proton transfer equilibrium exists and the presence of the COO⁻ group stabilizes the proton transferred NH-form.

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on anthrax lethal toxin.

    PubMed

    Croney, John C; Cunningham, Kristina M; Collier, R John; Jameson, David M

    2003-08-28

    Anthrax lethal toxin is a binary bacterial toxin consisting of two proteins, protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF), that self-assemble on receptor-bearing eukaryotic cells to form toxic, non-covalent complexes. PA(63), a proteolytically activated form of PA, spontaneously oligomerizes to form ring-shaped heptamers that bind LF and translocate it into the cell. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute cysteine for each of three residues (N209, E614 and E733) at various levels on the lateral face of the PA(63) heptamer and for one residue (E126) on LF(N), the 30 kDa N-terminal PA binding domain of LF. Cysteine residues in PA were labeled with IAEDANS and that in LF(N) was labeled with Alexa 488 maleimide. The mutagenesis and labeling did not significantly affect function. Time-resolved fluorescence methods were used to study fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AEDANS and Alexa 488 probes after the complex assembled in solution. The results clearly indicate energy transfer between AEDANS labeled at residue N209C on PA and the Alexa 488-labeled LF(N), whereas transfer from residue E614C on PA was slight, and none was observed from residue E733C. These results support a model in which LF(N) binds near the top of the ring-shaped (PA(63))(7) heptamer.

  11. Synthetic fluorescent probes for studying copper in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Aron, Allegra T.; Ramos-Torres, Karla M.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The potent redox activity of copper is required for sustaining life. Mismanagement of its cellular pools, however, can result in oxidative stress and damage connected to aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic disorders. Therefore, copper homeostasis is tightly regulated by cells and tissues. Whereas copper and other transition metal ions are commonly thought of as static cofactors buried within protein active sites, emerging data points to the presence of additional loosely bound, labile pools that can participate in dynamic signalling pathways. Against this backdrop, we review advances in sensing labile copper pools and understanding their functions using synthetic fluorescent indicators. Following brief introductions to cellular copper homeostasis and considerations in sensor design, we survey available fluorescent copper probes and evaluate their properties in the context of their utility as effective biological screening tools. We emphasize the need for combined chemical and biological evaluation of these reagents, as well as the value of complementing probe data with other techniques for characterizing the different pools of metal ions in biological systems. This holistic approach will maximize the exciting opportunities for these and related chemical technologies in the study and discovery of novel biology of metals. PMID:25692243

  12. In-vivo pharmacokinetic study of two fluorescein derivatives by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulie-Begu, Sylvie; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.

    1995-12-01

    We have already demonstrated the ability of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to measure the pH of superficial tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent probes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo behavior of such fluorescent probes. We report the monitoring of tissue fluorescence after injection of two fluorescein derivatives (carboxyfluorescein and biscarboxyethyl-carboxyfluorescein). The in vivo study was performed on anaesthetized adult Wistar rats. After laparotomy, CF or BCECF solution was injected into the penial vein. Fluorescence spectra were recorded during one hour using an optical multichannel analyzer coupled to a CCD camera. Fiber optic was placed alternatively on the liver area or on the skin. Blood samples were collected and fluorescence was measured in vitro. A clear linear relationship between dose and fluorescence intensity was found in liver for these fluorescent markers. Concerning spectral characteristics, it was found that CF and BCECF spectra show a shift compared to in vivo maximum emission peak and BCECF emission peak was different when recorded in the liver and in the skin. Differences of kinetic profiles are also observed between CF and BCECF. The BCECF derivative displays a fluorescence peak in the liver two minutes after injection, while CF fluorescence peak is observed seven minutes after injection. Clearance of skin fluorescence is slower than the plasmatic one indicating that dye elimination in superficial blood vessels does not follow the same pharmacokinetic behavior. Based on these preliminary findings, fluorescence spectroscopy appears as a tool in pharmacokinetic study in situ and in vivo.

  13. [Spectroscopic and dynamical studies of highly energized small polyatomic molecules]. Technical progress report, February 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectroscopy was used on acetylene and on formyl radical. An attempt was made for pattern recognition based on statistics; a method was invented that combined CNPI (complete nuclear permutation-inversion) group theory and SCC (spectral cross-correlation). But the direction away from statistical pattern recognition back to traditional spectroscopic pattern recognition was taken. Vibrational states and quantum numbers are discussed. For the formyl radical, the fluorescence excitation spectrum was recorded and a rotational analysis of the 0{sup 0}{sub 0} band performed.

  14. A spectroscopic study on the interaction between gold nanoparticles and hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Garabagiu, Sorina

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction was studied using UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gold nanoparticles quench the fluorescence emission of hemoglobin solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding and thermodynamic constants were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Major impact: electrochemical applications of the complex onto a substrate. -- Abstract: The interaction between horse hemoglobin and gold nanoparticles was studied using optical spectroscopy. UV-vis and fluorescence spectra show that a spontaneous binding process occurred between hemoglobin and gold nanoparticles. The Soret band of hemoglobin in the presence of gold nanoparticles does not show significant changes, which proves that the protein retained its biological function. A shift to longer wavelengths appears in the plasmonic band of gold nanoparticles upon the attachment of hemoglobin molecules. Gold nanoparticles quench the fluorescence emission of tryptophan residues in the structure of hemoglobin. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were also calculated. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding was mainly due to hydrophobic interactions.

  15. Fluorescence decay studies of modified dinucleoside monophosphates containing 1-N6-ethenoadenosine.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Motoda, Y; Fujisaki, Y; Steiner, R F

    1983-10-01

    Five dinucleoside monophosphates containing 1-N6-ethenoadenosine (epsilon A) have been studied using fluorescence measurements. The fluorescence spectra of these dinucleoside monophosphates are almost the same as the fluorescence spectrum of epsilon AMP. Fluorescence quantum yields of these dimers are greatly reduced compared to that of epsilon AMP. Intramolecular base-base interactions may be responsible for fluorescence quenching. It is found that the fluorescence decay kinetics does not obey a simple decay law but that the decay data can be well described as a sum of three exponentials. This implies that these dimers cannot be characterized as a two-state system, but can be described as systems consisting of three or more conformational states. Sequence effects upon the fluorescence behavior are observed. The fluorescence quenching and decay parameters of Gp epsilon A and Up epsilon A indicate a higher degree of base-base interaction than in their epsilon ApG and epsilon ApU counterparts.

  16. Spectroscopic Studies of Polymer Structure in the Solid State and Water Soluble Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyukjin

    The chemical changes before and after sulfonation of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) were studied by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of the photoelectrons was also measured by controlling the overlayer film thickness. The measured IMFP values for the C 1s, O 1s, S 2p and Si 2p photoelectrons were 30 +/- 3 A, 28 +/- 2 A, 34 +/- 2 Aand 35 +/- 3 A, respectively. Based on angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) experiments, the concentration profiles and the diffusion constant D for interdiffusion of SPEEK into PEEK film could be determined. The measured diffusion coefficients varied from 3 times 10^{-15} rm cm ^2/sec (@ 583 K) to 6 times 10^{-18} (@ 443 K) cm ^2/sec. The activation energy derived from the measured diffusion coefficients was 22.8 kcal/mol. In addition, the molecular level conformational changes of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) with temperature were studied by using fluorescence spectroscopy. In order to identify the origins of PEEK fluorescence, a model compound for PEEK was synthesized and characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characteristic emission bands at 434 nm and 490 nm were monitored in order to understand local conformational changes of the polymer chain during the thermal treatment process. The changes in relative intensity ratio rm(I_{490}/I _{434}) were compared with differential scanning calorimeter and X-ray scattering data, and were explained in view of molecular morphology. In order to understand polymer complexation in solution, three different systems were studied. First, molecular binding between poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and europium chloride hexahydrate rm(EuCl_3 6H_2O) and their chain conformations during the complexation process in aqueous solution was studied using fluorescence and IR spectroscopy. Second, complexation of poly(vinyl alcohol sulfate) (KPVS) with papain was investigated with fluorescence and UV absorption

  17. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies on alkali borate glasses: evidence of mixed alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, G; Kistaiah, P

    2009-03-19

    A lithium-potassium-borate glass system containing manganese and iron cations has been thoroughly investigated in order to obtain information about the mixed alkali effect and the structural role of both the manganese and iron in such glass hosts. Mixed alkali borate glasses of the (30 - x)Li(2)O - xK(2)O - 10CdO/ZnO - 59B(2)O(3) (x = 0, 10, 15, 20, and 30) doped with 1MnO(2)/1Fe(2)O(3) system were prepared by a melt quench technique. The amorphous phase of the prepared glass samples was confirmed from their X-ray diffraction. The spectroscopic properties of glass samples were studied using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The density of all the prepared glasses was measured using Archimedes principle. Molar volumes were estimated from the density data. IR spectra of these glasses revealed a dramatic variation of three- and four-coordinated boron structures as a function of mixed alkali concentration. The vibrations due to Li-O, K-O, and MnO(4)/FeO(4) arrangements are consistent in all the compositions and show a nonlinear variation in the intensity with alkali content. Raman spectra of different alkali combinations with CdO and ZnO present drastic changes in the intensity of various Raman bands. The observation of disappearance and reappearance of IR and Raman bands as a function of various alkali concentrations is an important result pertaining to the mixed alkali effect in borate glasses. Acting as complementary spectroscopic techniques, both types of measurements, IR and Raman, revealed that the network structure of the studied glasses is mainly based on BO(3) and BO(4) units placed in different structural groups, the BO(3) units being dominant. The measured IR and Raman spectra of different glasses are used to clarify the optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and composition. PMID:19235995

  18. Design, synthesis, physicochemical studies, solvation, and DNA damage of quinoline-appended chalcone derivative: comprehensive spectroscopic approach toward drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Himank; Chattopadhyay, Anjan; Prasath, R; Devaraji, Vinod; Joshi, Ritika; Bhavana, P; Saini, Praveen; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The present study epitomizes the design, synthesis, photophysics, solvation, and interaction with calf-thymus DNA of a potential antitumor, anticancer quinoline-appended chalcone derivative, (E)-3-(anthracen-10-yl)-1-(6,8-dibromo-2-methylquinolin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (ADMQ) using steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular modeling, molecular docking, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and gel electrophoresis studies. ADMQ shows an unusual photophysical behavior in a variety of solvents of different polarity. The dual emission has been observed along with the formation of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) excited state. The radiationless deactivation of the TICT state is found to be promoted strongly by hydrogen bonding. Quantum mechanical (DFT, TDDFT, and ZINDO-CI) calculations show that the ADMQ is sort of molecular rotor which undergoes intramolecular twist followed by a complete charge transfer in the optimized excited state. FTIR studies reveals that ADMQ undergoes important structural change from its native structure to a β-hydroxy keto form in water at physiological pH. The concentration-dependent DNA cleavage has been identified in agarose gel DNA electrophoresis experiment and has been further supported by MD simulation. ADMQ forms hydrogen bond with the deoxyribose sugar attached with the nucleobase adenine DA-17 (chain A) and result in significant structural changes which potentially cleave DNA double helix. The compound does not exhibit any deleterious effect or toxicity to the E. coli strain in cytotoxicity studies. The consolidated spectroscopic research described herein can provide enormous information to open up new avenues for designing and synthesizing chalcone derivatives with low systematic toxicity for medicinal chemistry research. PMID:24962605

  19. Study on fluorescence spectra of thiamine, riboflavin and pyridoxine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Xiao, Xue; Zhao, Xuesong; Hu, Lan; Lv, Caofang; Yin, Zhangkun

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of vitamin B1, B2 and B6 measured with 3D fluorescence Spectrophotometer. Three strong fluorescence areas of vitamin B2 locate at λex/λem=270/525nm, 370/525nm and 450/525nm, one fluorescence areas of vitamin B1 locates at λex/λem=370/460nm, two fluorescence areas of vitamin B6 locate at λex/λem=250/370nm and 325/370nm were found. The influence of pH of solution to the fluorescence profile was also discussed. Using the PARAFAC algorithm, 10 vitamin B1, B2 and B6 mixed solutions were successfully decomposed, and the emission profiles, excitation profiles, central wavelengths and the concentration of the three components were retrieved precisely through about 5 iteration times.

  20. Free volume dependent fluorescence property of PMMA composite: Positron annihilation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindrachary, V.; Praveena, S. D.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ismayil, Crasta, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    The free volume related fluorescence properties of chalcone chromophore [1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(4-N, N, dimethylaminophenyl)-2-propen-1-one doped Poly(methyl methacrylate) have been studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and Positron Annihilation lifetime spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence spectra show that the fluorescence behavior depends on the free volume dependent polymer microstructure and varies with dopant concentration with in the composite. The origin and variation of fluorescence is understood by twisted internal charge transfer state as well as free volume. The Positron annihilation study shows that the free volume related microstructure of the composite is vary with doping level.

  1. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies. PMID:27748381

  2. The Distance to the Massive Galactic Cluster Westerlund 2 from a Spectroscopic and HST Photometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Álvarez, Carlos A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Bradley, David R.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Norris, Mark A.; Cool, Richard J.; Miller, Brendan P.

    2013-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric determination of the distance to the young Galactic open cluster Westerlund 2 using WFPC2 imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical spectroscopy. HST imaging in the F336W, F439W, F555W, and F814W filters resolved many sources previously undetected in ground-based observations and yielded photometry for 1136 stars. We identified 15 new O-type stars, along with two probable binary systems, including MSP 188 (O3 + O5.5). We fit reddened spectral energy distributions based on the Padova isochrones to the photometric data to determine individual reddening parameters RV and AV for O-type stars in Wd2. We find average values langRV rang = 3.77 ± 0.09 and langAV rang = 6.51 ± 0.38 mag, which result in a smaller distance than most other spectroscopic and photometric studies. After a statistical distance correction accounting for close unresolved binaries (factor of 1.08), our spectroscopic and photometric data on 29 O-type stars yield that Westerlund 2 has a distance langdrang = 4.16 ± 0.07 (random) +0.26 (systematic) kpc. The cluster's age remains poorly constrained, with an upper limit of 3 Myr. Finally, we report evidence of a faint mid-IR polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring surrounding the well-known binary candidate MSP 18, which appears to lie at the center of a secondary stellar grouping within Westerlund 2. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  3. THE DISTANCE TO THE MASSIVE GALACTIC CLUSTER WESTERLUND 2 FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC AND HST PHOTOMETRIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas Alvarez, Carlos A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Bradley, David R.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Norris, Mark A.; Cool, Richard J.; Miller, Brendan P. E-mail: chipk@uwyo.edu E-mail: sheila@physics.unc.edu E-mail: rcool@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2013-05-15

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric determination of the distance to the young Galactic open cluster Westerlund 2 using WFPC2 imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical spectroscopy. HST imaging in the F336W, F439W, F555W, and F814W filters resolved many sources previously undetected in ground-based observations and yielded photometry for 1136 stars. We identified 15 new O-type stars, along with two probable binary systems, including MSP 188 (O3 + O5.5). We fit reddened spectral energy distributions based on the Padova isochrones to the photometric data to determine individual reddening parameters R{sub V} and A{sub V} for O-type stars in Wd2. We find average values (R{sub V} ) = 3.77 {+-} 0.09 and (A{sub V} ) = 6.51 {+-} 0.38 mag, which result in a smaller distance than most other spectroscopic and photometric studies. After a statistical distance correction accounting for close unresolved binaries (factor of 1.08), our spectroscopic and photometric data on 29 O-type stars yield that Westerlund 2 has a distance (d) = 4.16 {+-} 0.07 (random) +0.26 (systematic) kpc. The cluster's age remains poorly constrained, with an upper limit of 3 Myr. Finally, we report evidence of a faint mid-IR polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring surrounding the well-known binary candidate MSP 18, which appears to lie at the center of a secondary stellar grouping within Westerlund 2.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on the inclusion complex of 2-naphthol-6-sulfonate with β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Shafi, Ayman Ayoub

    2007-03-01

    The photophysical properties of 2-naphthol-6-sulfonate (2-NOH-6-S) in various solvents and in aqueous β-cyclodextrin solution have been investigated. The fluorescence quantum yields in non-aqueous solvents are approximately 0.20 ± 0.02, while in water the yield is higher. The fluorescence quantum yield in water was found to depend on the pH value of the medium and increases as the pH increase up to a pH value of 4.0 where it comes to be constant. Absorption and fluorescence measurements show 1:1 inclusion of 2-NOH-6-S in the β-cyclodextrin cavity. The association constant of 2-NOH-6-S-β-cyclodextrin complex based on fluorescence measurements was calculated using Benesi-Hildbrand relationship and found to be 330 ± 30 M -1. 1H NMR studies are used to confirm the inclusion and to provide information on the geometry of 2-NOH-6-S inside the cavity of β-cyclodextrin.

  5. Studies on the interaction between vincamine and human serum albumin: a spectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Pu, Hanlin; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Rongrong; Wang, Hongcui

    2014-08-01

    The interaction between vincamine (VCM) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied using a fluorescence quenching technique in combination with UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and molecular modeling under conditions similar to human physiological conditions. VCM effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA via static quenching. The binding constants were calculated from the fluorescence data. Thermodynamic analysis by Van't Hoff equation revealed enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were -4.57 kJ/mol and 76.26 J/mol/K, respectively, which indicated that the binding process was spontaneous and the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant force. The distance r between the donor (HSA) and acceptor (VCM) was obtained according to the Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer and found to be 4.41 nm. Metal ions, viz., Na(+), K(+), Li(+), Ni(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+) and Al(3+) were found to influence binding of the drug to protein. The 3D fluorescence, FT-IR and CD spectral results revealed changes in the secondary structure of the protein upon interaction with VCM. Furthermore, molecular modeling indicated that VCM could bind to the subdomain IIA (site I) of HSA.

  6. Interaction of prometryn to human serum albumin: insights from spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Zhang, Guowen; Wang, Langhong

    2014-01-01

    Prometryn possesses much potential hazard to environment because of its chemical stability and biological toxicity. Here, the binding properties of prometryn with human serum albumin (HSA) and the protein structural changes were determined under simulative physiological conditions (pH 7.4) by multispectroscopic methods including fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with molecular modeling technique. The result of fluorescence titration suggested that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by prometryn was considered as a static quenching procedure. The negative enthalpy change (ΔH(○)) and positive entropy change (ΔS(○)) values indicated that the binding process was governed mainly by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The site marker displacement experiments suggested the location of prometryn binding to HSA was Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA. Furthermore, molecular docking studies revealed prometryn can bind in the large hydrophobic activity of subdomain IIA. Analysis of UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence, CD and FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the addition of prometryn resulted in rearrangement and conformational alteration of HSA with reduction in α-helix and increases in β-sheet, β-turn and random coil structures. This work provided reasonable model helping us further understand the transportation, distribution and toxicity effect of prometryn when it spreads into human blood serum. PMID:24485317

  7. Spectroscopic studies on the riboflavin-sensitized conformational changes of calf lens alpha-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Andley, U P

    1988-04-01

    The change in conformation of calf lens alpha-crystallin by oxidation in the presence of the photosensitizer riboflavin and light has been investigated. Near-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectrum, absorption spectrum, tryptophan fluorescence yield and fluorescence lifetime of the SH-specific fluorescent probe, N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphtyl) ethylenediamine (1,5-IAEDANS), were significantly altered by irradiation in the presence of RF. In the initial stages of photolysis (1-2 hr), a slight degradation of the protein to lower molecular weight peptides was observed. Upon increased photolysis, intersubunit cross-linking to dimers and other high molecular weight species was observed. To determine the effects of cross-linking on the accessibility of the cysteine residues of the protein, lifetime quenching studies on the IAEDANS-labeled alpha-crystallin were performed. A decrease in the quenching constant (kappa q) in the photolysed sample indicates that the labeled SH groups are less susceptible to collisional quenching, which requires contact between the quencher and the excited state of the fluorophore, due to steric inhibition in the cross-linked protein. Cross-linking and the rate of loss of tryptophan fluorescence of alpha-crystallin diminished under anaerobic conditions and increased when D2O was used in the medium for irradiation. Use of inhibitors and quenchers of active species of oxygen suggests that photo-oxidation probably occurs via the action of singlet oxygen as well as substrate-sensitizer complexation.

  8. Stability of Pin1 as revealed by thermal and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Guo-Fei; Du, Lin-Fang

    2010-06-01

    Pin1 is a two-domain enzyme which has peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. Pin1 recognizes phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro motifs in cell-signaling proteins, and is both a cancer and an Alzheimer's disease target. The thermal stability of Pin1 was studied intensively by SDS-PAGE, enzymatic activity assay, intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The activity of Pin1 gradually decreased above 40 °C, and the Tm was 57.6 ± 1.0 °C. Fluorescence experiments indicated that heat treatment induced changes in the substructures in Pin1, resulting in that the polarity in the microenvironments of the tryptophan residues increased. It is assumed that the thermal denaturation of Pin1 involved a three-state transition. The intermediate state of Pin1 at about 60 °C was confirmed by fluorescence emission spectra, the synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD measurements. Decreases in α-helix and β-sheet appeared above 40 °C, which was balanced by an enhancement in unordered coil. The Tm values calculated from α-helix transition and β-sheet transition were 54.6 ± 0.6 °C and 70.7 ± 3.3 °C, respectively. Our results illustrated that Pin1 had a relatively high thermal stability and the WW domain had a higher stability than the PPIase domain.

  9. Fluorescence study of Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Wasylewski, M; Małecki, J; Wasylewski, Z

    1995-07-01

    Time-resolved, steady-state fluorescence and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD) have been used to resolve the fluorescence contributions of the two tryptophan residues, Trp-13 and Trp-85, in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). The iodide and acrylamide quenching data show that in CRP one tryptophan residue, Trp-85, is buried within the protein matrix and the other, Trp-13, is moderately exposed on the surface of the protein. Fluorescence-quenching-resolved spectra show that Trp-13 has emission at about 350 nm and contributes 76-83% to the total fluorescence emission. The Trp-85, unquenchable by iodide and acrylamide, has the fluorescence emission at about 337 nm. The time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that Trp-13 has a longer fluorescence decay time. The Trp-85 exhibits a shorter fluorescence decay time. In the CRP-cAMP complex the Trp-85, previously buried in the apoprotein becomes totally exposed to the iodide and acrylamide quenchers. The FDCD spectra indicate that in the CRP-cAMP complex Trp-85 remains in the same environment as in the protein alone. It has been proposed that the binding of cAMP to CRP is accompanied by a hinge reorientation of two protein domains. This allows for penetration of the quencher molecules into the Trp-85 residue previously buried in the protein matrix. PMID:8590598

  10. Laser Spectroscopic Study of CaH in the B^2σ^+ and D^2σ^+ States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kyohei; Uchida, Kanako; Kobayashi, Kaori; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Moriwaki, Yoshiki

    2015-06-01

    Calcium hydride is one of the abundant molecules in the stellar environment, and is considered as a probe of stellar analysis. Ab initio calculations have shown that the electronic excited states of CaH have complex potential curves. It is suggested that the B^2σ^+ state has an interesting double minimum potential due to the avoided crossing. Such a potential leads to drastic change of the rotational constants when the vibrational energy level goes across the potential barrier. Spectroscopic studies on CaH began in the 1920's, and many studies have been carried out since then. Bell et al. extensively assigned the D^2σ^+-X^2σ^+ bands in the UV region. Bernath's group has observed transitions in the IR and visible regions and identified their upper states as the A^2σ^+, B^2σ^+ and E^2σ^+ states. We have carried out a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) study in the UV region between 360 and 430 nm. We have produced CaH by using laser ablation of a calcium target in a hydrogen gas environment, then molecules have been excited by a second harmonic pulse of dye laser and the fluorescence from molecules have been detected through a monochromator. Detection of the D^2σ^+-X^2σ^+ bands already identified by Bell et al. indicates the production of CaH. In addition, many other bands have been also found and a few bands have been assigned by using the combination differences, the lower state of these bands have been confirmed to the vibrational ground state of X^2σ^+ state. We have tentatively assigned these bands as the B^2σ^+ -X^2σ^+ transition. We will discuss the assignment of these bands, together with the rotational constants comparing with those calculated from the ab initio potential. B. Barbuy, R. P. Schiavon, J. Gregorio-Hetem, P. D. Singh C. Batalha , Astron. Astrophys. Sippl. Ser. 101, 409 (1993). P. F. Weck and P. C .Stabcil, J. Chem. Phys. {118}, 9997 (2003). R. S. Mulliken, Phys. Rev. {25}, 509 (1925). G. D. Bell, M, Herman, J. W. C. Johns, and E. R

  11. Investigation into the interaction of losartan with human serum albumin and glycated human serum albumin by spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation techniques: A comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moeinpour, Farid; Mohseni-Shahri, Fatemeh S; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan; Nassirli, Hooriyeh

    2016-09-25

    The interaction between losartan and human serum albumin (HSA), as well as its glycated form (gHSA) was studied by multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation under physiological conditions. The binding information, including the binding constants, effective quenching constant and number of binding sites showed that the binding partiality of losartan to HSA was higher than to gHSA. The findings of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the binding of losartan to HSA and gHSA would alter the protein conformation. The distances between Trp residue and the binding sites of the drug were evaluated on the basis of the Förster theory, and it was indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from HSA and gHSA to the losartan happened with a high possibility. According to molecular dynamics simulation, the protein secondary and tertiary structure changes were compared in HSA and gHSA for clarifying the obtained results.

  12. Theoretical DFT study on spectroscopic signature and molecular dynamics of neurotransmitter and effect of hydrogen removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, V.; Singh, N. P.; Yadav, R. A.

    2013-04-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic study has been made for the serotonin molecule and its deprotonated form. The Infrared and Raman spectra in optimum geometry of these two molecules are calculated using density functional theorem and the normal modes are assigned using potential energy distributions (PEDs) which are calculated using normal coordinate analysis method. The vibrational frequencies of these two molecules are reported and a comparison has been made. The effect of removal of the hydrogen atom from the serotonin molecule upon its geometry and vibrational frequencies are studied. Electronic structures of these two molecules are also studied using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Theoretical Raman spectrum of serotonin at different exciting laser frequencies and at different temperatures are obtained and the results are discussed. Present study reveals that some wrong assignments had been made for serotonin molecule in earlier study.

  13. Inhibition of nickel precipitation by gluconate. 1: Kinetic studies and spectroscopic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D.

    1998-08-01

    The role of gluconate on nickel precipitation kinetics was evaluated through particle size distribution analyses, and the inhibition mechanisms were explored through spectroscopic studies. Batch kinetic studies showed that nickel precipitation does not achieve equilibrium within the time frame of typical process units. The molar ratio of gluconate to nickel had a profound effect on precipitation kinetics. A complete inhibition of nickel precipitation was observed when the molar concentration of gluconate was high, and a time-dependent resolubilization was observed at lower ratios. Particle size distribution indicated that nickel precipitates were colloidal in nature. Nucleation rates were promoted by the presence of gluconate; however, the removal efficiency decreased due to complexation reactions. Spectroscopic analysis of the solids suggested the presence of a mixture of two solids, a nickel-gluconate complex and a nickel hydroxide. The kinetics of the formation of the precipitates suggests that design of treatment units for the recovery of nickel in the metal finishing industry should be proceeded with advanced oxidation that would oxidize the organic impurities, before nickel recovery is accomplished.

  14. Laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the structures and encapsulation motifs of functional molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebata, Takayuki; Kusaka, Ryoji; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-01-22

    Extensive laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies have been recently carried out with the aim to reveal the structure and dynamics of encapsulation complexes in the gas phase. The characteristics of the encapsulation complexes are governed by the fact that (i) most of the host molecules are flexible and (ii) the complexes form high dimensional structures by using weak non-covalent interactions. These characteristics result in the possibility of the coexistence of many conformers in close energetic proximity. The combination of supersonic jet/laser spectroscopy and high level quantum chemical calculations is essential in tackling these challenging problems. In this report we describe our recent studies on the structures and dynamics of the encapsulation complexes formed by calix[4]arene (C4A), dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), and benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) 'hosts' interacting with N{sub 2}, acetylene, water, and ammonia 'guest' molecules. The gaseous host-guest complexes are generated under jet-cooled conditions. We apply various laser spectroscopic methods to obtain the conformer- and isomer-specified electronic and IR spectra. The experimental results are complemented with quantum chemical calculations ranging from density functional theory to high level first principles calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. We discuss the possible conformations of the bare host molecules, the structural changes they undergo upon complexation, and the key interactions that are responsible in stabilizing the specific complexes.

  15. Laser Spectroscopic and Theoretical Studies of the Structures and Encapsulation Motifs of Functional Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebata, Takayuki; Kusaka, Ryoji; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-02-01

    Extensive laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies have been recently carried out with the aim to reveal the structure and dynamics of encapsulation complexes in the gas phase. The characteristics of the encapsulation complexes are governed by the fact that (i) most of the host molecules are flexible and (ii) the complexes form high dimensional structures by using weak non-covalent interactions. These characteristics result in the possibility of the coexistence of many conformers in close energetic proximity. The combination of supersonic jet/laser spectroscopy and high level quantum chemical calculations is essential in tackling these challenging problems. In this report we describe our recent studies on the structures and dynamics of the encapsulation complexes formed by calix[4]arene (C4A), dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), and benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) "hosts" interacting with N2, acetylene, water, and ammonia "guest" molecules. The gaseous host-guest complexes are generated under jet-cooled conditions. We apply various laser spectroscopic methods to obtain the conformer- and isomer-specified electronic and IR spectra. The experimental results are complemented with quantum chemical calculations ranging from density functional theory to high level first principles calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. We discuss the possible conformations of the bare host molecules, the structural changes they undergo upon complexation, and the key interactions that are responsible in stabilizing the specific complexes

  16. Laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the structures and encapsulation motifs of functional molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebata, Takayuki; Kusaka, Ryoji; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies have been recently carried out with the aim to reveal the structure and dynamics of encapsulation complexes in the gas phase. The characteristics of the encapsulation complexes are governed by the fact that (i) most of the host molecules are flexible and (ii) the complexes form high dimensional structures by using weak non-covalent interactions. These characteristics result in the possibility of the coexistence of many conformers in close energetic proximity. The combination of supersonic jet/laser spectroscopy and high level quantum chemical calculations is essential in tackling these challenging problems. In this report we describe our recent studies on the structures and dynamics of the encapsulation complexes formed by calix[4]arene (C4A), dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), and benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) "hosts" interacting with N2, acetylene, water, and ammonia "guest" molecules. The gaseous host-guest complexes are generated under jet-cooled conditions. We apply various laser spectroscopic methods to obtain the conformer- and isomer-specified electronic and IR spectra. The experimental results are complemented with quantum chemical calculations ranging from density functional theory to high level first principles calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. We discuss the possible conformations of the bare host molecules, the structural changes they undergo upon complexation, and the key interactions that are responsible in stabilizing the specific complexes.

  17. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  18. Counter tube window and X-ray fluorescence analyzer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertel, R.; Holm, M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the best design tube window and X-ray fluorescence analyzer for quantitative analysis of Venusian dust and condensates. The principal objective of the project was to develop the best counter tube window geometry for the sensing element of the instrument. This included formulation of a mathematical model of the window and optimization of its parameters. The proposed detector and instrument has several important features. The instrument will perform a near real-time analysis of dust in the Venusian atmosphere, and is capable of measuring dust layers less than 1 micron thick. In addition, wide dynamic measurement range will be provided to compensate for extreme variations in count rates. An integral pulse-height analyzer and memory accumulate data and read out spectra for detail computer analysis on the ground.

  19. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Studies of DNA Polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Towle-Weicksel, Jamie B.; Dalal, Shibani; Sohl, Christal D.; Doublié, Sylvie; Anderson, Karen S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2014-01-01

    During DNA repair, DNA polymerase β (Pol β) is a highly dynamic enzyme that is able to select the correct nucleotide opposite a templating base from a pool of four different deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). To gain insight into nucleotide selection, we use a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based system to monitor movement of the Pol β fingers domain during catalysis in the presence of either correct or incorrect dNTPs. By labeling the fingers domain with ((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) and the DNA substrate with Dabcyl, we are able to observe rapid fingers closing in the presence of correct dNTPs as the IAEDANS comes into contact with a Dabcyl-labeled, one-base gapped DNA. Our findings show that not only do the fingers close after binding to the correct dNTP, but that there is a second conformational change associated with a non-covalent step not previously reported for Pol β. Further analyses suggest that this conformational change corresponds to the binding of the catalytic metal into the polymerase active site. FRET studies with incorrect dNTP result in no changes in fluorescence, indicating that the fingers do not close in the presence of incorrect dNTP. Together, our results show that nucleotide selection initially occurs in an open fingers conformation and that the catalytic pathways of correct and incorrect dNTPs differ from each other. Overall, this study provides new insight into the mechanism of substrate choice by a polymerase that plays a critical role in maintaining genome stability. PMID:24764311

  20. Spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies of binding mechanism of metformin with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Deepti; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Mallika; Singh, Bhawna; Sharma, Navneet; Singh, Anju; Kakkar, Rita; Sharma, Rakesh K.

    2016-08-01

    Metformin is a biguanide class of drug used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. It is well known that serum protein-ligand binding interaction significantly influence the biodistribution of a drug. Current study was performed to characterize the binding mechanism of metformin with serum albumin. The binding interaction of the metformin with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was examined using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence, circular dichroism, density functional theory and molecular docking studies. Absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra pointed out the weak binding of metformin with BSA as was apparent from the slight change in absorbance and fluorescence intensity of BSA in presence of metformin. Circular dichroism study implied the significant change in the conformation of BSA upon binding with metformin. Density functional theory calculations showed that metformin has non-planar geometry and has two energy states. The docking studies evidently signified that metformin could bind significantly to the three binding sites in BSA via hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. The data suggested the existence of non-covalent specific binding interaction in the complexation of metformin with BSA. The present study will certainly contribute to the development of metformin as a therapeutic molecule.

  1. Excited state complex formation between methyl glyoxal and some aromatic bio-molecules: a fluorescence quenching study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Mandal, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching of some important aromatic bio-molecules (ABM) such as 3-aminophthalhydrazide (luminol), tryptophan (Try), phenylalanine and tyrosine (Tyr) by methyl glyoxal (MG) has been studied employing different spectroscopic techniques. The interaction of MG with ABM in the excited state has been analysed using Stern-Volmer (S-V) mechanism. In the case of MG-luminol system time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique has also been applied to explain the S-V mechanism. The bimolecular rate constants obtained are found to be higher than the rate constant for diffusion controlled process. A plausible explanation of the quenching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of hydrogen bonding, charge transfer and energy transfer interaction between the colliding species.

  2. Synthesis, DNA/HSA Interaction Spectroscopic Studies and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of a New Mixed Ligand Cu(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qian; Fu, Xiabing; Chen, Weijiang; Xiong, Yahong; Fu, Yinlian; Chen, Shi; Le, Xueyi

    2016-05-01

    A new mixed ligand copper(II)-dipeptide complex with 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole (pbt), [Cu(Gly-L-leu)(pbt)(H2O)]·ClO4 (Gly-L-leu = Glycyl-L-leucine anion) was synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical means. The DNA binding and cleavage properties of the complex investigated by viscosity, agarose gel electrophoresis and multi-spectroscopic techniques (UV, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence) showed that the complex was bound to CT-DNA through intercalation mode with moderate binding constant (K b = 3.132 × 10(4) M(-1)), and cleaved pBR322 DNA efficiently (~ 5 μM) in the presence of Vc, probably via an oxidative mechanism induced by •OH. Additionally, the interaction of the complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was explored by UV-visible, CD, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy. The complex exhibits desired affinity to HSA through hydrophobic interaction. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of the complex against three human carcinoma cell lines (HeLa, HepG2 and A549) was evaluated by MTT assay, which showed that the complex had effective cytotoxicity and higher inhibition toward A549 cell lines with IC50 of 38.0 ± 3.2 μM.

  3. Fluorescence studies of red blood cell membranes from individuals with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sumbilla, C; Lakowicz, J R

    1982-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to investigate and compare the properties of erythrocyte membranes from individuals with Huntington's Disease (HD) and from normal individuals. Erythrocyte ghosts were labeled with four different fluorescent probes: 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH); 6-lauroyl-2-(dimethylamino)-naphthalene (Laurdan); 2-(4-maleimide anilino)-naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (MIANS) and 5-(iodoacetamidoethyl)aminoaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS). DPH is sensitive to the microviscosity of the membranes. Laurdan is highly sensitive to the polarity and relaxation time of its environment. MIANS and IAEDANS both react covalently with sulfhydryl groups in membrane proteins. Erythrocyte membranes were labeled separately with each of these four probes, and we measured the centers of gravity of the fluorescence emission, the fluorescence anisotropies, and the fluorescence lifetimes. In 10 separate experiments, including a total of 24 patients and 14 control individuals, we found no significant differences between the two groups for any of the probes or spectral parameters. These results do not support the existence of a "generalized membrane defect" in individuals with HD.

  4. A study of the interaction between malachite green and lysozyme by steady-state fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Feng; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Ying

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a N-methylated diaminotriphenylmethane dye, malachite green, with lysozyme was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. The results revealed that malachite green caused the fluorescence quenching of lysozyme through a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters like DeltaH and DeltaS were calculated to be -15.33 kJ mol(-1) and 19.47 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to van't Hoff equation, respectively, which proves main interaction between malachite green and lysozyme is hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond contact. The distance r between donor (lysozyme) and acceptor (malachite green) was obtained to be 3.82 nm according to Frster's theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that binding of malachite green with lysozyme can induce conformational changes in lysozyme. In addition, the effects of common ions on the constants of lysozyme-malachite green complex were also discussed.

  5. A fluorescence spectroscopy study of traditional Chinese medicine Angelica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongyan; Song, Feng; Liu, Shujing; Chen, Guiyang; Wei, Chen; Liu, Yanling; Liu, Jiadong

    2013-10-01

    By measuring the fluorescence spectra of Chinese medicine (CM) Angelica water solutions with different concentrations from 0.025 to 2.5 mg/mL, results showed that the fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration. Through fluorescence spectra of Angelica solution under different pH values, results indicated coumarin compounds were the active ingredients of Angelica. We also observed fluorescence quenching of the Angelica solution in the presence of spherical silver nanoparticles with radius of 12 nm. Keeping a certain value for the volume of the silver nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity at 402 nm was linearly proportional to the Angelica in the range of 1-3 mg/mL.

  6. Spectroscopic study of 3-Hydroxyflavone - protein interaction in lipidic bi-layers immobilized on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Voicescu, Mariana; Ionescu, Sorana; Nistor, Cristina L

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of 3-Hydroxyflavone with serum proteins (BSA and HSA) in lecithin lipidic bi-layers (PC) immobilized on silver nanoparticles (SNPs), was studied by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. BSA secondary structure was quantified with a deconvolution algorithm, showing a decrease in α-helix structure when lipids were added to the solution. The effect of temperature on the rate of the excited-state intra-molecular proton transfer and on the dual fluorescence emission of 3-HF in the HSA/PC/SNPs systems was discussed. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of 3-HF in HSA/PC/SNPs systems was also studied. The antioxidant activity of 3-HF decreased in the presence of SNPs. The results are discussed with relevance to the secondary structure of proteins and of the 3-HF based nano-systems to a topical formulation useful in the oxidative stress process. PMID:27380623

  7. Interaction of diuron to human serum albumin: Insights from spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huilun; Rao, Honghao; Yang, Jian; Qiao, Yongxiang; Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the interaction of diuron with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by monitoring the spectral behavior of diuron-HSA system. The fluorescence of HSA at 340 nm excited at 230 nm was obviously quenched by diuron due to dynamic collision and the quenching constant was of the order of 10(4) L mol(-1) at 310 K. However, no fluorescence quenching was observed when excited at 280 nm. Thermodynamic investigations revealed that the combination between diuron and HSA was entropy driven by predominantly hydrophobic interactions. The binding of diuron induced the drastic reduction in α-helix conformation and the significant enhancement in β-turn conformation of HSA. In addition, both sites marker competition study and molecular modeling simulation evidenced the binding of diuron to HSA primarily took place in subdomain IIIA (Sudlow's site II). PMID:26671830

  8. Low temperature FTIR, Raman, NMR spectroscopic and theoretical study of hydroxyethylammonium picrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudharsana, N.; Sharma, A.; Kuş, N.; Fausto, R.; Luísa Ramos, M.; Krishnakumar, V.; Pal, R.; Guru Row, T. N.; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2016-01-01

    A combined experimental (infrared, Raman and NMR) and theoretical quantum chemical study is performed on the charge-transfer complex hydroxyethylammonium picrate (HEAP). The infrared (IR) spectra for HEAP were recorded at various temperatures, ranging from 16 K to 299 K, and the Raman spectrum was recorded at room temperature. A comparison of the experimental IR and Raman spectra with the corresponding calculated spectra was done, in order to facilitate interpretation of the experimental data. Formation of the HEAP complex is evidenced by the presence of the most prominent characteristic bands of the constituting groups of the charge-transfer complex [e.g., NH3+, CO- and NO2]. Vibrational spectroscopic analysis, together with natural bond orbital (NBO) and theoretical charge density analysis in the crystalline phase, was used to shed light on relevant structural details of HEAP resulting from deprotonation of picric acid followed by formation of a hydrogen bond of the N-H⋯OC type between the hydroxyethylammonium cation and the picrate. 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis are also presented for the DMSO-d6 solution of the compound revealing that in that medium the HEAP crystal dissolves forming the free picrate and hydroxyethylammonium ions. Finally, the electron excitation analysis of HEAP was performed in an attempt to determine the nature of the most important excited states responsible for the NLO properties exhibited by the compound.

  9. Studies on Nephrite and Jadeite Jades by Fourier Transform Infrared (ftir) and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Ng, L. L.; Lim, L. C.

    2013-10-01

    The mineralogical properties of black nephrite jade from Western Australia are studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using both transmission and specular reflectance techniques in the 4000-400 cm-1 wavenumber region. The infrared absorption peaks in the 3700-3600 cm-1 region which are due to the O-H stretching mode provides a quantitative analysis of the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio in the mineral composition of jade samples. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) percentage in black nephrite is found to be higher than that in green nephrite, but comparable to that of actinolite (iron-rich nephrite). This implies that the mineralogy of black nephrite is closer to actinolite than tremolite. The jade is also characterized using Raman spectroscopy in the 1200-200 cm-1 region. Results from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic data of black nephrite jade are compared with those of green nephrite jade from New Zealand and jadeite jade from Myanmar. Black nephrite appears to have a slightly different chemical composition from green nephrite. Spectra from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were found to be useful in differentiating black nephrite, green nephrite, and green jadeite jades. Furthermore, data on refractive index, specific gravity, and hardness of black nephrite jade are measured and compared with those of green nephrite and of jadeite jade.

  10. A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, Michael C.

    2013-08-01

    We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

  11. Lanthanide and transition metal complexes of bioactive coumarins: molecular modeling and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, I; Mihaylov, Tz; Trendafilova, N

    2014-06-01

    The present paper summarizes theoretical and spectroscopic investigations on a series of active coumarins and their lanthanide and transition metal complexes with application in medicine and pharmacy. Molecular modeling as well as IR, Raman, NMR and electronic spectral simulations at different levels of theory were performed to obtain important molecular descriptors: total energy, formation energy, binding energy, stability, conformations, structural parameters, electron density distribution, molecular electrostatic potential, Fukui functions, atomic charges, and reactive indexes. The computations are performed both in gas phase and in solution with consideration of the solvent effect on the molecular structural and energetic parameters. The investigations have shown that the advanced computational methods are reliable for prediction of the metal-coumarin binding mode, electron density distribution, thermodynamic properties as well as the strength and nature of the metal-coumarin interaction (not experimentally accessible) and correctly interpret the experimental spectroscopic data. Known results from biological tests for cytotoxic, antimicrobial, anti-fungal, spasmolytic and anti-HIV activities on the studied metal complexes are reported and discussed. PMID:24680836

  12. Laser Spectroscopic Study of Cold Gas-Phase Host-Guest Complexes of Crown Ethers.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Takayuki; Inokuchi, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    The structure, molecular recognition, and inclusion effect on the photophysics of guest species are investigated for neutral and ionic cold host-guest complexes of crown ethers (CEs) in the gas phase. Here, the cold neutral host-guest complexes are produced by a supersonic expansion technique and the cold ionic complexes are generated by the combination of electrospray ionization (ESI) and a cryogenically cooled ion trap. The host species are 3n-crown-n (3nCn; n = 4, 5, 6, 8) and (di)benzo-3n-crown-n ((D)B3nCn; n = 4, 5, 6, 8). For neutral guests, we have chosen water and aromatic molecules, such as phenol and benzenediols, and as ionic species we have chosen alkali-metal ions (M(+) ). The electronic spectra and isomer-specific vibrational spectra for the complexes are observed with various laser spectroscopic methods: laser-induced fluorescence (LIF); ultraviolet-ultraviolet hole-burning (UV-UV HB); and IR-UV double resonance (IR-UV DR) spectroscopy. The obtained spectra are analyzed with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. We will discuss how the host and guest species change their flexible structures for forming best-fit stable complexes (induced fitting) and what kinds of interactions are operating for the stabilization of the complexes. For the alkali metal ion•CE complexes, we investigate the solvation effect by attaching water molecules. In addition to the ground-state stabilization problem, we will show that the complexation leads to a drastic effect on the excited-state electronic structure and dynamics of the guest species, which we call a "cage-like effect". PMID:27006080

  13. Spectroscopic studies of interactions between dyes and model molecules of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhaddaoui, A.; Delacourte, A.; Turrell, S.

    1993-06-01

    Raman, FTIR, fluorescence, and UV-visible spectra are used to study interactions between amuloid-labelling dyes and poly-L-lysine and bovine insulin, two proteins which play the role of models of (beta) amyloid of Alzheimers disease. It is found that though the (beta) conformation of the peptide is not essential, it helps to encourage binding which appears to be stable and specific in nature, involving SO3- groups of the dyes and NH2 groups of the proteins.

  14. Quantitative infrared spectroscopic method for the study of the hydration of ions in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kristiansson, O.; Lindgren, J.; de Villepin, J.

    1988-05-05

    An infrared spectroscopic method for the study of the hydration of ions in aqueous solutions has been developed. OD stretching bands of isotopically dilute HDO molecules in the first hydration sphere of ions are obtained when the absorption from H/sub 2/O molecules and HDO molecules in the bulk water are removed by a double difference technique. The method is applied to aqueous solutions of Ni(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, Ni(BF/sub 4/)/sub 2/, and Ni(PF/sub 6/)/sub 2/. Coordination numbers of 4.6 +/- 0.8 for the ClO/sub 4//sup -/ anion and 3.9 +/- 0.8 for the BF/sub 4//sup -/ anion are obtained. A systematic study of the influence of different salt and HDO concentrations has been undertaken. It is found that Lambert-Beer's law is valid in the concentration ranges studied.

  15. Spectroscopic study of N-acetylcysteine and N-acetylcystine/hydrogen peroxide complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picquart, Michel; Abedinzadeh, Zohreh; Grajcar, Lydie; Baron, Marie Héléne

    1998-03-01

    A spectroscopic study of N-acetylcysteine (RSH) and N-acetylcystine (RSSR) has been performed using infrared absorption and Raman scattering in order to pinpoint the sites of complexation of these two species with H 2O 2. Molecules of RSH and RSSR were studied in KBr pellets, and in aqueous solutions of H 2O, D 2O and H 2O with H 2O 2 (1 mol l -1) to characterize the specific influence of the solvent molecules. A time-resolved Raman study was performed for RSH-H 2O 2 in aqueous solution at 1:1 molar ratio in order to observe the formation of RSSR and to discuss the mechanism of this redox reaction.

  16. Spectroscopic Studies on Eu{sup 3+} Doped Boro-Tellurite Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraju, K.; Marimuthu, K.

    2011-07-15

    Eu{sup 3+} doped boro-tellurite glasses have been synthesized and its optical behavior have been studied and reported. The presence of varying tellurium dioxide content results changes in spectroscopic behavoir were explored through UV-VIS, and Luminescence spectra. The bonding parameters have been calculated based on the observed band positions of the absorption spectra. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters {Omega}{sub {lambda}} ({lambda} = 2, 4 and 6) have been determined through the luminescence spectra without applying any constraints and the results are presented. The Judd-Ofelt parameters have been used to determine various optical properties corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J}(J = 1,2,3 and 4) transitions of Eu{sup 3+} ions. The varying optical properties of the prepared glasses with the change in tellurium dioxide have been studied and compared with similar studies.

  17. Spectroscopic, crystallographic and theoretical studies of lasalocid complex with ammonia and benzylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huczyński, Adam; Janczak, Jan; Rutkowski, Jacek; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    A natural antibiotic - Lasalocid is able to form stable complexes with ammonia and organic amines. New complexes of lasalocid with benzylamine and ammonia were obtained in the crystal forms and studied using X-ray, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and DFT methods. These studies have shown that in both complexes the proton is transferred from the carboxylic group to the amine group with the formation of a pseudo-cyclic structure of lasalocid anion complexing the protonated amine or NH4+ cation. The spectroscopic and DFT studies demonstrated that the structure of the complex formed between Lasalocid and benzylamine in the solid is also conserved in the solution and gas phase. In contrast, the structure of the complex formed between lasalocid and ammonium cation found in the solid state undergoes dissociation in chloroform solution accompanied with a change in the coordination form of the NH4+ cation.

  18. Fluorescence optimisation and lifetime studies of fingerprints treated with magnetic powders.

    PubMed

    Seah, L K; Dinish, U S; Phang, W F; Chao, Z X; Murukeshan, V M

    2005-09-10

    Fluorescence study plays a significant role in fingerprint detection when conventional chemical enhancement methods fail. The basic properties of fluorescence emission such as colour, intensity and lifetime could be well exploited in the detection of latent fingerprints under steady state and in dynamic methods. This paper describes a systematic study of fluorescence emission intensity from fingerprint samples treated with different magnetic powders. Understanding of suitable excitation wavelength required for getting maximum fluorescence emission intensity could be beneficial when selecting the appropriate fluorescent powders for the fingerprint detection. Lifetime study of fingerprints treated with various magnetic powders was also carried out. The importance of lifetime study is well explained through the time-resolved (TR) imaging of fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Results from the TR imaging study revealed an improvement in the fingerprint image contrast. This is significant when the print is deposited on fluorescing background and its emission wavelength is close to that of treated fingerprint.

  19. Raman spectroscopic study of acute oxidative stress induced changes in mice skeletal muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alimova, Alexandra; Chakraverty, Rahul; Katz, A.; Gayen, S. K.; Larsson, L.; Savage, H. E.; Alfano, R. R.

    2008-02-01

    The oxidative stress due to free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in diseases such as muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer dementia, diabetes mellitus, and mitochrondrial myopathies. In this study, the acute oxidative stress induced changes in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in mouse skeletal muscles are studied in vitro using Raman spectroscopy. Mammalian skeletal muscles are rich in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in both reduced (NADH) and oxidized (NAD) states, as they are sites of aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The relative levels of NAD and NADH are altered in certain physiological and pathological conditions of skeletal muscles. In this study, near infrared Raman spectroscopy is used to identify the molecular fingerprints of NAD and NADH in five-week-old mice biceps femoris muscles. A Raman vibrational mode of NADH is identified in fresh skeletal muscle samples suspended in buffered normal saline. In the same samples, when treated with 1% H IIO II for 5 minutes and 15 minutes, the Raman spectrum shows molecular fingerprints specific to NAD and the disappearance of NADH vibrational bands. The NAD bands after 15 minutes were more intense than after 5 minutes. Since NADH fluoresces and NAD does not, fluorescence spectroscopy is used to confirm the results of the Raman measurements. Fluorescence spectra exhibit an emission peak at 460 nm, corresponding to NADH emission wavelength in fresh muscle samples; while the H IIO II treated muscle samples do not exhibit NADH fluorescence. Raman spectroscopy may be used to develop a minimally invasive, in vivo optical biopsy method to measure the relative NAD and NADH levels in muscle tissues. This may help to detect diseases of muscle, including mitochondrial myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

  20. Antitubercular and fluorescence studies of copper(II) complexes with quinolone family member, ciprofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharadi, G. J.

    2011-09-01

    Four new mixed-ligand complexes of Cu(II) with ciprofloxacin (Cip) and uninegative bidentate ligands have been synthesized and characterized. The structure of mixed-ligand complexes was investigated using spectroscopic method, physicochemical and elemental analyses. The fluorescence spectra of complexes show red shift, which may be due to the chelation by the ligands to the metal ion. It enhances ligand ability to accept electrons and decreases the electron transition energy. Antimycobacterial screening of ligand and its copper compound against Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows clear enhancement in the antitubercular activity upon copper complexation.

  1. A study on a portable fluorescence imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Han-Chao; Wu, Wen-Hong; Chang, Chun-Li; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Chiu, Shang-Chen

    2011-09-01

    The fluorescent reaction is that an organism or dye, excited by UV light (200-405 nm), emits a specific frequency of light; the light is usually a visible or near infrared light (405-900 nm). During the UV light irradiation, the photosensitive agent will be induced to start the photochemical reaction. In addition, the fluorescence image can be used for fluorescence diagnosis and then photodynamic therapy can be given to dental diseases and skin cancer, which has become a useful tool to provide scientific evidence in many biomedical researches. However, most of the methods on acquiring fluorescence biology traces are still stay in primitive stage, catching by naked eyes and researcher's subjective judgment. This article presents a portable camera to obtain the fluorescence image and to make up a deficit from observer competence and subjective judgment. Furthermore, the portable camera offers the 375nm UV-LED exciting light source for user to record fluorescence image and makes the recorded image become persuasive scientific evidence. In addition, when the raising the rate between signal and noise, the signal processing module will not only amplify the fluorescence signal up to 70 %, but also decrease the noise significantly from environmental light on bill and nude mouse testing.

  2. Fluorescence Fluctuation Approaches to the Study of Adhesion and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Alexia I.; Kubow, Kristopher E.; Horwitz, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell–matrix adhesions are large, multimolecular complexes through which cells sense and respond to their environment. They also mediate migration by serving as traction points and signaling centers and allow the cell to modify the surroucnding tissue. Due to their fundamental role in cell behavior, adhesions are germane to nearly all major human health pathologies. However, adhesions are extremely complex and dynamic structures that include over 100 known interacting proteins and operate over multiple space (nm–µm) and time (ms–min) regimes. Fluorescence fluctuation techniques are well suited for studying adhesions. These methods are sensitive over a large spatiotemporal range and provide a wealth of information including molecular transport dynamics, interactions, and stoichiometry from a single time series. Earlier chapters in this volume have provided the theoretical background, instrumentation, and analysis algorithms for these techniques. In this chapter, we discuss their implementation in living cells to study adhesions in migrating cells. Although each technique and application has its own unique instrumentation and analysis requirements, we provide general guidelines for sample preparation, selection of imaging instrumentation, and optimization of data acquisition and analysis parameters. Finally, we review several recent studies that implement these techniques in the study of adhesions. PMID:23280111

  3. [Interaction between ambroxol hydrochloride and human serum albumin studied by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods].

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Feng, Su-Ling

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, the interaction between ambroxol hydrochloride (ABX) and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied under simulative physiological condition by spectroscopy and molecular modeling method. Stern-Volmer curvers at different temperatures and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy showed that ABX quenched the fluorescence of HSA mainly through dynamic quenching mode. On the basis of the thermodynamic data, the main binding force between them is hydrophobic interaction. According to the theory of Forster non-radiation energy transfer, the binding distance between the donor and the acceptor was 3.01 nm. The effect of ABX on the conformation of HSA was analyzed by the synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, using the molecular modeling method, the interaction between them was predicted from molecular angle: ABX might locate in the subdomain III A of HSA. PMID:21714251

  4. Dielectric studies of boron sub phthalocyanine chloride thin films by admittance spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalia, Sameer; Mahajan, Aman; Neerja, Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bedi, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    The dielectric properties of Boron Sub Phthalocyanine Chloride (Cl-SubPc) thermally deposited on ITO substrate have been studied using admittance spectroscopic techniques. The I-V and capacitance -frequency (C-F) studies at various bias voltages reveal that the mobility of charge carriers decrease with bias voltage, however the conduction phenomenon still remain hopping in nature. From the differential susceptance curve, the contribution of the Schottky barrier contact in the charge carrier concentration was found to be absent. The mobility of charge carriers have been determined using differential susceptance variation and from the phase of admittance curve. The values obtained in two cases have been found to be in agreement with each other.

  5. Fundamental study of photoresist dissolution with real time spectroscopic ellipsometry and interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Sean D.; Schmid, Gerard M.; Trinque, Brian C.; Willson, James; Wunderlich, Jennifer; Tsiartas, Pavlos C.; Taylor, James C.; Burns, Ryan L.; Wilson, C. Grant

    2003-06-01

    The use of in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is demonstrated as a technique for studying photoresist dissolution. Experiments carried out using a J.A.Woollam M-2000 ellipsometer and a custom built cell designed for in situ film measurements show that bulk dissolution rate measurements using the SE technique agree with dissolution rate data obtained using multiwavelength interferometry. SE is also demonstrated as a method for measuring thin film dissolution rates, water sorption, and films that swell. An additional focus of this work was the topic of interfacial "gel" layer formation during photoresist dissolution. Ellipsometry and interferometry were used to test several photoresist resins, with an emphasis on phenolic polymers. Single and multiple layer models were used to analyze the data, and were compared to model calculations predicting formation of a gel layer. For the materials studied, interfacial gel layer formation in low molecular weight phenolic polymers was not detected, within the resolution of the experimental techniques (< 15 nm).

  6. Electronic properties of diphenyl-s-tetrazine and some related oligomers. An spectroscopic and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moral, Mónica; García, Gregorio; Peñas, Antonio; Garzón, Andrés; Granadino-Roldán, José M.; Melguizo, Manuel; Fernández-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a theoretical and spectroscopic study on the electronic and structural properties of the diphenyl-s-tetrazine molecule (Ph2Tz) and some oligomeric derivatives. Ph2Tz was synthesized through a variation of Pinner-type reaction which uses N-acetylcysteine as catalyst. Insight into the structure and electronic properties of the title compound was obtained through IR, Raman, UV-Vis spectra in different solvents, and theoretical calculations. Theoretical studies have been extended to different n-mers derivatives up to an ideal molecular wire through the oligomeric approximation, predicting this way electronic properties such as LUMO energy levels, electron affinity and reorganization energy in order to assess their possible applications in molecular electronics.

  7. Interaction of Di-2-pyridylketone 2-pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone and Its Copper Complex with BSA: Effect on Antitumor Activity as Revealed by Spectroscopic Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Huang, Tengfei; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Zhou, Sufeng; Qi, Zhangyang; Li, Changzheng

    2016-04-28

    The drug, di-2-pyridylketone-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (DPPCAH) and its copper complex (DPPCAH-Cu) exhibit significant antitumor activity. However, the mechanism of their pharmacological interaction with the biological molecule bovine serum albumin (BSA) remains poorly understood. The present study elucidates the interactions between the drug and BSA through MTT assays, spectroscopic methods and molecular docking analysis. Our results indicate that BSA could attenuate effect on the cytotoxicity of DPPCAH, but not DPPCAH-Cu. Data from fluorescence quenching measurements demonstrated that both DPPCAH and DPPCAH-Cu could bind to BSA, with a reversed effect on the environment of tryptophan residues in polarity. CD spectra revealed that the DPPCAH-Cu exerted a slightly stronger effect on the secondary structure of BSA than DPPCAH. The association constant of DPPCAH with BSA was greater than that of DPPCAH-Cu. Docking studies indicated that the binding of DPPCAH to BSA involved a greater number of hydrogen bonds compared to DPPCAH-Cu. The calculated distances between bound ligands and tryptophans in BSA were in agreement with fluorescence resonance energy transfer results. Thus, the binding affinity of the drug (DPPCAH or DPPCAH-Cu) with BSA partially contributes to its antitumor activity; the greater the drug affinity is to BSA, the less is its antitumor activity.

  8. Interaction of Di-2-pyridylketone 2-pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone and Its Copper Complex with BSA: Effect on Antitumor Activity as Revealed by Spectroscopic Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Huang, Tengfei; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Zhou, Sufeng; Qi, Zhangyang; Li, Changzheng

    2016-01-01

    The drug, di-2-pyridylketone-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (DPPCAH) and its copper complex (DPPCAH-Cu) exhibit significant antitumor activity. However, the mechanism of their pharmacological interaction with the biological molecule bovine serum albumin (BSA) remains poorly understood. The present study elucidates the interactions between the drug and BSA through MTT assays, spectroscopic methods and molecular docking analysis. Our results indicate that BSA could attenuate effect on the cytotoxicity of DPPCAH, but not DPPCAH-Cu. Data from fluorescence quenching measurements demonstrated that both DPPCAH and DPPCAH-Cu could bind to BSA, with a reversed effect on the environment of tryptophan residues in polarity. CD spectra revealed that the DPPCAH-Cu exerted a slightly stronger effect on the secondary structure of BSA than DPPCAH. The association constant of DPPCAH with BSA was greater than that of DPPCAH-Cu. Docking studies indicated that the binding of DPPCAH to BSA involved a greater number of hydrogen bonds compared to DPPCAH-Cu. The calculated distances between bound ligands and tryptophans in BSA were in agreement with fluorescence resonance energy transfer results. Thus, the binding affinity of the drug (DPPCAH or DPPCAH-Cu) with BSA partially contributes to its antitumor activity; the greater the drug affinity is to BSA, the less is its antitumor activity. PMID:27136517

  9. DNA binding and oligomerization of NtrC studied by fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Sevenich, F W; Langowski, J; Weiss, V; Rippe, K

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements of rhodamine-labeled DNA oligonucleotide duplexes have been used to determine equilibrium binding constants for DNA binding of the prokaryotic transcription activator protein NtrC. Measurements were made with wild-type NtrC from Escherichia coli and the constitutively active mutant NtrCS160Ffrom Salmonella using DNA duplexes with one or two binding sites. The following results were obtained: (i) the dissociation constant K d for binding of one NtrC dimer to a single binding site was the same for the wild-type and mutant proteins within the error of measurement. (ii) The value of K d decreased from 1.4 +/- 0.7 x 10(-11) M at 15 mM K acetate to 5.8 +/- 2.6 x 10(-9) M at 600 mM K acetate. From the salt dependence of the dissociation constant we calculated that two ion pairs form upon binding of one dimeric protein to the DNA. (iii) Binding of two NtrC dimers to the DNA duplex with two binding sites occured with essentially no cooperativity. Titration curves of NtrCS160Fbinding to the same duplex demonstrated that more than two protein dimers of the mutant protein could bind to the DNA. PMID:9490780

  10. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  11. Spectroscopic study on the interaction between mononaphthalimide spermidine (MINS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiyong; Zang, Fenglei; Luo, Wen; Zhao, Zhonghua; Wang, Yueqiao; Xu, Xuejun; Wang, Chaojie

    2015-01-01

    The interaction mononaphthalimide spermidine (MINS, 1) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by UV/vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra (CD) under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The observed spectral quenching of BSA by compound 1 indicated compound 1 could bind to BSA. Further fluorescent tests revealed that the quenching mechanism of BSA by compound 1 was overall static. Meanwhile, the obtained binding constant and thermodynamic parameters on compound-BSA interaction showed that the type of interaction force of compound 1 and BSA was mainly hydrophobic. The analysis of synchronous, three-dimensional fluorescence and CD showed that compound 1 had weak influence on the conformational changes in BSA. Molecular docking simulation was performed and docking model in silico suggested that the configuration of compound 1 was localized in enzymatic drug site II in BSA. Furthermore, naphthalimide moiety of compound 1 greatly contributed to the hydrophobic interaction between compound 1 and BSA protein, as confirmed by experimental data.

  12. Binding interaction of hypocrellin B to myoglobin: A spectroscopic and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinato, Mary Grace I.; Fogle, Robert S.; Galan, Jhenny F.

    2013-11-01

    Hypocrellin B (Hyp B), a perylenequinone naturally present in Hypocrella bambusae, is commonly used to treat a variety of diseases. Its versatile role in different biomedical applications necessitates a thorough investigation of its interaction with different biomolecules, particularly enzymes. To address this need, the binding mode of Hyp B to myoglobin (Mb) was studied using UV-visible absorption, emission, and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as flexible docking simulations. Analyses of the absorbance and fluorescence data establish that Hyp B quenches tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence via the formation of two unique ground-state complexes on the surface of Mb, with one site being more energetically preferred than the other (the fraction of fluorophores accessible by Hyp B is 0.32). Molecular modeling simulations demonstrate preferential Hyp B binding at the Tyr103 site first, followed by the Trp7 site. In both cases, a ground-state complex is generated through H-bonding interaction between Hyp B and the respective residues, with the Tyr103 complex being more stable than that of the Trp7 complex. Synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the microenvironment surrounding Trp7 becomes more hydrophilic upon Hyp B interaction. This is evidenced by a red-shift of the band associated with this residue, while that of Tyr103 remains the same. Electrostatic potential surfaces reveal a more pronounced shift in electron density of Trp7 upon Hyp B binding compared to Tyr103. The binding constant of Hyp B to Mb is 1.21 × 105 M-1, suggesting a relatively strong interaction between the ligand and enzyme.

  13. A spectroscopic proton-exchange membrane fuel cell test setup allowing fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements during state-of-the-art cell tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Olga; Kulp, Christian; van den Berg, Maurits W. E.; Klementiev, Konstantin V.; Otto, Bruno; Otto, Horst; Lopez, Marco; Bron, Michael; Grünert, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A test setup for membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells which allows in situ fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of one electrode with safe exclusion of contributions from the counter electrode is described. Interference by the counter electrode is excluded by a geometry including a small angle of incidence (< 6°) between primary beam and electrode layer. The cell has been constructed by introducing just minor modifications to an electrochemical state-of-the-art MEA test setup, which ensures realistic electrochemical test conditions. This is at the expense of significant intensity losses in the path of the incident beam, which calls for the brilliance of third-generation synchrotrons to provide meaningful data. In measurements on Pt/C and Pt-Co/C cathodes combined with Pt-C anodes (H2/O2 feed), good data quality was demonstrated both for the majority element Pt as well as for Co despite of a low areal Co density in the order of 0.02 mg/cm2.

  14. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  15. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  16. FTIR spectroscopic studies of lipid dynamics in phytosphingosine ceramide models of the stratum corneum lipid matrix.

    PubMed

    Rerek, Mark E; Van Wyck, Dina; Mendelsohn, Richard; Moore, David J

    2005-03-01

    IR spectroscopic studies are reported for N-stearyl-D-erythro-phytosphingosine (Cer NP) and N-stearyl-2-hydroxy-D-erythro-phytosphingosine (Cer AP) in a hydrated model of the skin lipid barrier comprised of equimolar mixtures of each ceramide with cholesterol and d(35)-stearic acid. Examination of the methylene stretching, rocking and bending modes reveal some rotational freedom and hexagonal packing in both the ceramide and stearic acid chains. Analysis of the acid carbonyl stretch and the ceramide Amide I modes show both shift to higher frequencies, indicating weaker hydrogen bonding, in the mixed systems compared to the pure materials. For both systems, the fatty acid chain disordering temperatures are significantly increased from those of the pure acids. The observed behaviors of these phytosphingosine ceramide systems are fundamentally different from the previously reported analogous sphingosine ceramide systems. The implications of these observations for lipid organization in the stratum corneum are briefly discussed.

  17. Raman spectroscopic study on the excystation process in a single unicellular organism amoeba (Acanthamoeba polyphaga).

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chung; Perevedentseva, Elena; Cheng, Chia-Liang

    2015-05-01

    An in vivo Raman spectroscopic study of amoeba (Acanthamoeba polyphaga) is presented. The changes of the spectra during the amoeba cyst activation and excystation are analyzed. The spectra show the changes of the relative intensities of bands corresponding to protein, lipid, and carotenoid components during cyst activation. The presence of carotenoids in the amoeba is observed via characteristic Raman bands. These signals in the Raman spectra are intense in cysts but decrease in intensity with cyst activation and exhibit a correlation with the life cycle of amoeba. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for the detection of single amoeba microorganisms in vivo and for the analysis of the amoeba life activity. The information obtained may have implications for the estimation of epidemiological situations and for the diagnostics and prognosis of the development of amoebic inflammations.

  18. Spectroscopic-ellipsometric study of native oxide removal by liquid phase HF process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurhekar, Anil Sudhakar; Apte, Prakash R.

    2013-02-01

    Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements have been employed to investigate the effect of liquid-phase hydrofluoric acid (HF) cleaning on Si<100> surfaces for microelectromechanical systems application. The hydrogen terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was realized as an equivalent dielectric layer, and SE measurements are performed. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 100:5 HF dip with rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed and analyzed by the ex-situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer is studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry, and discussed. This piece of work explains the usage of an ex situ, non-destructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the H-termination of Si<100> surfaces.

  19. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas: applications to acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Janes, N.; Clemens, J.A.; Glickson, J.D.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas is described. Both in-vivo, ex-vivo protocols and NMR observables are discussed. The stability of the ex-vivo preparation based on the NMR observables is established for at least four hours. The spectra obtained from the in-vivo and ex-vivo preparations exhibited similar metabolite ratios, further validating the model. Metabolite levels were unchanged by a 50% increase in perfusion rate. Only trace amounts of phosphocreatine were observed either in the intact gland or in extracts. Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was mimicked by free fatty acid infusion. Injury resulted in hyperamylasemia, edema (weight gain), increased hematocrit and perfusion pressure, and depressed levels of high energy phosphates.

  20. Raman spectroscopic study on the excystation process in a single unicellular organism amoeba (Acanthamoeba polyphaga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chung; Perevedentseva, Elena; Cheng, Chia-Liang

    2015-05-01

    An in vivo Raman spectroscopic study of amoeba (Acanthamoeba polyphaga) is presented. The changes of the spectra during the amoeba cyst activation and excystation are analyzed. The spectra show the changes of the relative intensities of bands corresponding to protein, lipid, and carotenoid components during cyst activation. The presence of carotenoids in the amoeba is observed via characteristic Raman bands. These signals in the Raman spectra are intense in cysts but decrease in intensity with cyst activation and exhibit a correlation with the life cycle of amoeba. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for the detection of single amoeba microorganisms in vivo and for the analysis of the amoeba life activity. The information obtained may have implications for the estimation of epidemiological situations and for the diagnostics and prognosis of the development of amoebic inflammations.

  1. Wrapping Together Galactic Archaeology and Interstellar Medium Studies in Large Spectroscopic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, J.

    2016-10-01

    The cold interstellar medium (ISM) in our galaxy is usually observed at wavelengths other than optical. But optical spectroscopic surveys of stars give unprecedented information that is valuable also for ISM studies because they cover millions of lines-of-sight penetrating regions in and out of the Galactic plane that most all-sky surveys. Big advantages are distances to observed stars from which we infer distances to clumps of the ISM. The ISM is detected as scarce absorptions of several atoms and simple molecules and also as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), weak but numerous absorption features at visible and near IR wavelengths. With the enormous amount of information the surveys provide we can start doing galactic archaeology from the ISM point of view. Even though the principles are very different for star and gas dynamics, the starting points are the same. Here we present some results that are the first steps toward the galactic archaeology of the ISM.

  2. Spectroscopic analyses of Fe and water in clays: A Martian surface weathering study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Edwards, J. O.; Coyne, L. M.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Martian surface morphology suggests the presence of liquid H2O on Mars in the past. Reflectance spectra of the Martian surface include features which correspond to the crystal field transitions of iron, as well as features supporting the presence of ice and minerals containing structural OH and surface water. Researchers initiated further spectroscopic studies of surface iron and water and structural OH in clays in order to determine what remotely obtained spectra can indicate about the presence of clays on Mars based on a clearer understanding of the factors influencing the spectral features. Current technology allows researchers to better correlate the low frequency fundamental stretching and bending vibrations of O-H bonds with the diagnostic near infrared overtone and combination bands used in mineral characterization and identification.

  3. Spectroscopic studies on gallic acid and its azo derivatives and their iron(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mamdouh S; Ali, Alaa E; Haggag, Sawsan S; Nasr, Nessma M

    2014-01-01

    Azo gallic derivatives and their iron(III) complexes were synthesized and characterized. The stereochemistry and the mode of bonding of the complexes were achieved based on elemental analysis, UV-Vis and IR. The thermal behaviors of the complexes were studied. The effect of pH on the electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and its azo derivatives are discussed. Different spectroscopic methods (molar ratio, straight line method, continuous variation, slope ratio and successive method) are applied for determination of stoichiometry and pK values for the complex formation of gallic acid with iron(III) in aqueous media. Iron(III) complexes of gallic acid is formed with different ratio: 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 (M:L).

  4. Raman spectroscopic study of “The Malatesta”: A Renaissance painting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research.

  5. Spectroscopic study of mixed oxide SAT 1- x:LA x perovskite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runka, T.; Łapsa, K.; Łapiński, A.; Aleksiyko, R.; Berkowski, M.; Drozdowski, M.

    2004-10-01

    Mixed perovskite crystals have been grown from multicomponent melts using the Czochralski method. The Raman, FT-IR and Brillouin investigations of perovskite (1- x)Sr(Al 0.5Ta 0.5)O 3: xLaAlO 3 crystals are reported. The measurements have been performed for several LA concentrations in the range 0.22≤ x≤0.36 at room temperature. The assignment of vibrational modes of IR and Raman spectra was proposed. The experimental results were correlated with structural data, obtained from X-ray diffraction study. The dependence of hypersonic velocity of transverse and longitudinal modes as a function of LA content was also determined. Spectroscopic investigations confirmed the disordered Al/Ta distribution, which increases with the increase of LA content.

  6. Spectroscopic and theoretical study of the o-vanillin hydrazone of the mycobactericidal drug isoniazid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Baró, Ana C.; Pis-Diez, Reinaldo; Parajón-Costa, Beatriz S.; Rey, Nicolás A.

    2012-01-01

    A complete and detailed study of the hydrazone obtained from condensation of antituberculous isoniazid (hydrazide of the isonicotinic acid, INH) and o-vanillin (2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, o-HVa) is performed. It includes structural and spectroscopic analyses, comparing experimental and theoretical results. The compound was obtained as a chloride of the pyridinic salt (INHOVA +Cl -) but it will be referred as INHOVA for the sake of simplicity. The conformational space was searched and optimized geometries were determined both in gas phase and including solvent effects. Vibrational (IR and Raman), electronic and NMR spectra were registered and assigned with the help of computational methods based on the Density Functional Theory. Isoniazid hydrazones are good candidates for therapeutic agents against tuberculosis with conserved efficiency and lower toxicity and resistance than parent INH.

  7. The study of interaction between PFOA/PFOS and uracil by topology quality and spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui-Ying; Zhu, Jian-Qing; Wang, Wei; Xu, Xiao-Lu; Lu, Yin

    2014-02-01

    It has been established that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) can be considered as emerging persistent organic pollutants. In recent years, there was increasing distribution of PFOA/PFOS in environmental systems, and accumulation and toxic effects of PFOA/PFOS in human body. In this paper, quantum chemistry methods were employed to study the interaction between perfluorinated organic pollutants and base (uracil). The results showed that there were four stable binding modes between the two perfluorinated compounds with uracil, especially the second mode which caused the most detrimental physiological functional response. NBO analysis showed that reactive hydrogen in the two perfluorinated compounds had the greatest effect on the hydrogen bond. The nature of the hydrogen bond formed between the two perfluorinated compounds and base was investigated using the AIM theory. The changes of spectroscopic properties in complexes were analyzed by IR and NMR spectra.

  8. Fe-complex of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand: Spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Pulla, Sharon; Brezden, Anna M.; Collom, Samulel L.; Woods, Ross M.; Munshi, Pradip; Schnackenberg, Laura; Pierce, Brad S.; Kannarpady, Ganesh K.

    2010-10-01

    This work presents the spectroscopic characterization and reaction studies of a Fe III-complex (2) of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (1, 15,15-dimethyl-5,8,13,17-tetrahydro-5,8,13,17-tetraaza-dibenzo[a,g]cyclotridecene-6,7,14,16-tetraone). 2 was characterized primarily by means of EPR. In agreement with the magnetic moment ( μeff = 3.87 BM), EPR spectroscopy of 2 shows signals consistent with S = 3/2 intermediate-spin ferric-iron. Besides EPR, mass spectrometry, UV/vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to further characterize 2. 2 is soluble in water and activates hydrogen peroxide under ambient conditions. 2 catalytically bleaches dyes, pulp and paper effluents and oxidizes several amines to their corresponding N-oxides with high turnover number and good yields.

  9. Spectroscopic-ellipsometric study of native oxide removal by liquid phase HF process

    PubMed Central

    Kurhekar, Anil Sudhakar; Apte, Prakash R

    2014-01-01

    Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements have been employed to investigate the effect of liquid-phase hydrofluoric acid (HF) cleaning on Si<100> surfaces for microelectromechanical systems application. The hydrogen terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was realized as an equivalent dielectric layer, and SE measurements are performed. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 100:5 HF dip with rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed and analyzed by the ex-situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer is studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry, and discussed. This piece of work explains the usage of an ex situ, non-destructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the H-termination of Si<100> surfaces. PMID:24619506

  10. Inhibitory effect of morin on tyrosinase: insights from spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Zhang, Guowen; Yan, Jiakai; Gong, Deming

    2014-11-15

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in the production of melanin in the human body, excessive accumulation of melanin can lead to skin disorders. Morin is an important bioactive flavonoid compound widely distributed in plants and foods of plant origin. In this study, the inhibitory kinetics of morin on tyrosinase and their binding mechanism were determined using spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques. The results indicate that morin reversibly inhibited tyrosinase in a competitive manner through a multi-phase kinetic process. Morin was found to bind to tyrosinase at a single binding site mainly by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. Analysis of circular dichroism spectra revealed that the binding of morin to tyrosinase induced rearrangement and conformational changes of the enzyme. Moreover, molecular docking results suggested that morin competitively bound to the active site of tyrosinase with the substrate levodopa.

  11. Unfolding and Refolding Study of a Large Dimeric Protein β-Glucosidase from Almond Monitored by Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kanti K; Paul, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    In our present investigation, the unfolding and refolding of β-glucosidase (BGL-Al) from sweet almond was investigated using tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence spectroscopy. When the unfolding of BGL-Al was induced by guanidium chloride (GdnHCl) and monitored using biological activity as well as Trp fluorescence spectroscopic measurement, we observed that the denaturation of BGL-Al could be easily induced by low concentration of GdnHCl and the enzyme was completely inactivated at 1.0 M GdnHCl. Higher unfolding in the presence of reducing agent revealed that the protein perhaps containing multiple di-sulfide bonds indicating a reason of high stability against unfolding by GdnHCl. Refolding results suggested that the protein refolded with high yield from 1 M GdnHCl denatured state, however, refolded with negligible yield from completely unfolded state. The kinetic studies of BGL-Al refolding unravel a two phase refolding process with calculated t1/2 (refolding half time) of 1.8 and 33 min, respectively. When 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) was used as extrinsic fluorophore, we found that the surface hydrophobicity of BGL-Al was continuously decreased during GdnHCl-mediated unfolding. The surface hydrophobicity of the protein was calculated to be as high as 128.32. Acrylamide quenching study demonstrated that Trp residues of BGL-Al are mostly and hence they must be located either on the surface or in the crevices accessible by quenchers.

  12. Synthesis of two new azo-azomethines; spectral characterization, crystal structures, computational and fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskikanbur, Sevgi; Sayin, Koray; Kose, Muhammet; Zengin, Huseyin; McKee, Vickie; Kurtoglu, Mukerrem

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the preparation, characterization and the photoluminescence properties of novel azo-azomethines (2-{(E)-[(4-ethylphenyl)imino]methyl}-4-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]phenol, HL1 and 2-{(E)-[(3-ethylphenyl)imino]methyl}-4-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]phenol, HL2 dyes). The dyes were characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic studies such as IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass and fluorescence spectra. Molecular structures of the dyes were examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular structures are mostly similar, differing mainly in the position of the ethyl group and dihedral angles between aromatic rings. X-ray data revealed that both HL1 and HL2 favor phenol-imine tautomer in the solid state. An intramolecular phenol-imine hydrogen bond (O1⋯N1) were observed in both compounds resulting in a S(6) hydrogen bonding motif. Molecular packing of both compounds are determined by π⋯π interactions. Quantum chemical investigation of mentioned molecules were performed by using DFT hybrid function (B3LYP) with 6-31+G(d) basis set. The compounds HL1 and HL1 gave intense light emissions upon irradiation by Ultra-Violet light. The photoluminescence quantum yields and long excited-state lifetimes of the compounds HL1 and HL2 were measured. The azo-azomethine dyes HL1 and HL2 have photoluminescence quantum yields of 34% and 32% and excited-state lifetimes of 3.21 and 2.98 ns, respectively. The photoluminescence intensities and quantum yields of these dyes were dependent on the position of alkyl group on the phenyl ring.

  13. Investigation of the β-cyclodextrin-quinine inclusion complex in aqueous solution by spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-Mei; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    1995-03-01

    The effect of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on the spectral properties of quinine molecules has been specifically studied by absorption/fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In particular, FTIR studies of the complexation of aqueous quinine hydrochloride with β-CD provide fresh insight into the molecular structure of the complex and reveal some important information in relation to the molecular interactions of the cyclodextrin complex system. Nuclear magnetic resonance data support the inclusion conformation of the interaction sites and the presence of hydrogen bonds which stabilize the complexes.

  14. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the studies of guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Juskowiak, Bernard; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2006-01-01

    A guanine (G)-quadruplex DNA motif has recently emerged as a biologically important structure that is believed to interfere with telomere maintenance by telomerase. G-quadruplexes exhibit four-stranded structures containing one or more nucleic acid strands with central channel able to accommodate metal cations. Coordination of certain metal cations stabilizes G-quadruplex as with some promising small organic molecules that promote the formation and/or stabilization of G-quadruplex. Among many techniques employed to explore properties of G-quadruplexes, the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique has been recognized as a powerful tool to study G-quadruplex formation. This review summarizes the current developments in the uses of FRET technique for the fundamental structural investigations and its practical applications. Applications include FRET-based selection of efficient quadruplex-binding ligands, design of a nanomolecular machine, and a molecular aptamer beacon for protein recognition. We also describe a technique for detection of potassium ions in aqueous solution with the use of quadruplex-based sensor (potassium-sensing oligonucleotide).

  15. Studies on the interaction between promethazine and human serum albumin in the presence of flavonoids by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Xian-Ping; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence, absorption, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques as well as molecular modeling methods were used to study the binding characterization of promethazine (PMT) to human serum albumin (HSA) and the influence of flavonoids, rutin and baicalin, on their affinity. The results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA by PMT is a static quenching due to the formation of complex. The reaction was spontaneous and mainly mediated by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding distance between the tryptophan residue of HSA and PMT is less than 8nm, which indicated that the energy transfer from the tryptophan residue of HSA to PMT occurred. The binding site of PMT on HSA was located in sites I and the presence of PMT can cause the conformational changes of HSA. There was the competitive binding to HSA between PMT and flavonoids because of the overlap of binding sites in HSA. The flavonoids could decrease the association constant and increase the binding distance. In addition, their synergistic effect can further change the conformation of HSA. The decrease in the affinities of PMT binding to HSA in the presence of flavonoids may lead to the increase of free drug in blood, which would affect the transportation or disposition of drug and evoke an adverse or toxic effect. Hence, rationalising dosage and diet regimens should be taken into account in clinical application of PMT.

  16. Studies on the interaction between promethazine and human serum albumin in the presence of flavonoids by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Xian-Ping; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence, absorption, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques as well as molecular modeling methods were used to study the binding characterization of promethazine (PMT) to human serum albumin (HSA) and the influence of flavonoids, rutin and baicalin, on their affinity. The results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA by PMT is a static quenching due to the formation of complex. The reaction was spontaneous and mainly mediated by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding distance between the tryptophan residue of HSA and PMT is less than 8nm, which indicated that the energy transfer from the tryptophan residue of HSA to PMT occurred. The binding site of PMT on HSA was located in sites I and the presence of PMT can cause the conformational changes of HSA. There was the competitive binding to HSA between PMT and flavonoids because of the overlap of binding sites in HSA. The flavonoids could decrease the association constant and increase the binding distance. In addition, their synergistic effect can further change the conformation of HSA. The decrease in the affinities of PMT binding to HSA in the presence of flavonoids may lead to the increase of free drug in blood, which would affect the transportation or disposition of drug and evoke an adverse or toxic effect. Hence, rationalising dosage and diet regimens should be taken into account in clinical application of PMT. PMID:27315330

  17. Molecular modeling and spectroscopic studies on binding of 2,6-bis[4-(4-amino-2-trifluoromethylphenoxy)benzoyl] pyridine to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen-ying; Chen, Hui-juan; Sheng, Fen-ling; Yao, Xiao-jun

    2009-10-01

    BAFP (2,6-bis[4-(4-amino-2-trifluoromethylphenoxy)benzoyl] pyridine), a synthesized polyimide compound, was exploited for the first time to analyze its interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) by molecular modeling, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR ATR) with drug concentrations of 3.3 × 10 -6 to 3.0 × 10 -5 mol L -1. Molecular docking was performed to reveal the possible binding mode. The results suggested that BAFP can strongly bind to human serum albumin (HSA) and the primary binding site of BAFP is located in site II of HSA, which is supported by the results from the competitive experiment. The binding constants for the interaction of BAFP with HSA have been evaluated from relevant fluorescence data at different temperatures (296, 303, 310 and 308 K). The alterations of the protein secondary structure in the presence of BAFP in aqueous solution were quantitatively calculated by the evidences from FTIR ATR spectroscopes. The binding process was exothermic and spontaneous, as indicated by the thermodynamic analyses, and the major part of the binding energy is hydrophobic interaction, which is also in good agreement with the results of molecule modeling study. The enthalpy change Δ H0, the free energy change Δ G0 and the entropy change Δ S0 of 296 K were calculated to be -7.75, -27.68 kJ mol -1 and 67.33 J mol -1 K -1, respectively.

  18. Coupled cluster study of spectroscopic constants of ground states of heavy rare gas dimers with spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Zhe-Yan; Wang, Wen-Liang; Li, Ren-Zhong; Xia, Cai-Juan; Li, Lian-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The CCSD(T) approach based on two-component relativistic effective core potential with spin-orbit interaction just included in coupled cluster iteration is adopted to study the spectroscopic constants of ground states of Kr2, Xe2 and Rn2 dimers. The spectroscopic constants have significant basis set dependence. Extrapolation to the complete basis set limit provides the most accurate values. The spin-orbit interaction hardly affects the spectroscopic constants of Kr2 and Xe2. However, the equilibrium bond length is shortened about 0.013 Å and the dissociation energy is augmented about 18 cm-1 by the spin-orbit interaction for Rn2 in the complete basis set limit.

  19. Novel heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones derivatives as colorimetric and “turn on” fluorescent sensors for fluoride anion sensing employing hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok Kumar, S. L.; Saravana Kumar, M.; Sreeja, P. B.; Sreekanth, A.

    2013-09-01

    Two novel heterocyclic thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized, and characterized, by means of spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Their chromophoric-fluorogenic response towards anions in competing solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was studied. The receptor shows selective recognition towards fluoride anion. The binding affinity of the receptors with fluoride anion was calculated using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Spectroscopic and theoretical studies on the excited state in diimine dithiolate complexes of platinum(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Zuleta, J.A.; Bevilacqua, J.M.; Eisenberg, R. ); Proserpio, D.M. ); Harvey, P.D. )

    1992-06-10

    The photophysical properties of a series of Pt(N-N)(S-S) complexes have been studied where (N-N) is either an [alpha],[alpha][prime]-diimine or saturated diamine chelating ligand and (S-S) is either a dithiolate chelating ligand or two monothiolate ligands in order to determine the orbital composition of the excited state. The solvent dependence of the absorption spectra of these complexes and the temperature dependence of their emission intensities and lifetimes have been examined while the ligands have been systematically varied. The electronic spectra are found to be dependent on whether or not the nitrogen chelating ligand is unsaturated (contains a vacant [pi]* orbital). On the basis of the spectroscopic data, the lowest energy absorption band in the diimine complexes is assigned as a metal-dithiolate to [pi]*(diimine) transition, whereas in the diamine complexes it is assigned as a metal-to-dithiolate MLCT transition. The only room-temperature emissive complexes are those that contain an [alpha],[alpha][prime]-diimine chelating ligand. The nature of the emission in these complexes at all temperatures depends on the dithiolate ligand, and the temperature dependence of the emission spectra has been examined. The nature of the HOMO and LUMO has been examined experimentally using cyclic voltammetry. On the basis of the electrochemical and spectroscopic data, the emission from all of the Pt(diimine)(S-S) complexes except those of 1,2-dithiolate maleonitriledithiolate (mnt) is assigned as a [sup 3](d(Pt)/p(S)-[pi]*(diimine)) transition, while, for the mnt complexes, it corresponds to a [sup 3](d(Pt)/p(S)-[pi]*(mnt)) transition. These assignments are supported by extended Hueckel molecular orbital calculations.