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Sample records for fluorescent protein screen

  1. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  2. Green Fluorescent Protein-based Expression Screening of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Louise E.; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  3. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  4. Protein-based fluorescent metal nanoclusters for small molecular drug screening.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; New, Siu Yee; Xie, Jianping; Su, Xiaodi; Tan, Yen Nee

    2014-11-18

    A facile drug screening method based on synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters inside albumin proteins loaded with small molecular drugs and comparing the relative fluorescence intensities of the resultant gold nanoclusters has been developed and successfully applied for the quantitative measurement of drug-protein binding constants. PMID:25253537

  5. Fluorescence-Detectino Size-Exclusion Chromatography for Precrystallization Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate,T.; Gouaux, E.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of well-ordered crystals of membrane proteins is a bottleneck for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Nevertheless, one can increase the probability of successful crystallization by precrystallization screening, a process by which one analyzes the monodispersity and stability of the protein-detergent complex. Traditionally, this has required microgram to milligram quantities of purified protein and a concomitant investment of time and resources. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient precrystallization screening strategy in which the target protein is covalently fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the resulting unpurified protein is analyzed by fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC). This strategy requires only nanogram quantities of unpurified protein and allows one to evaluate localization and expression level, the degree of monodispersity, and the approximate molecular mass. We show the application of this precrystallization screening to four membrane proteins derived from prokaryotic or eukaryotic organisms.

  6. Expression Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins by Fusion to Fluorescent Reporters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Järvinen, Valtteri; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Owens, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The production of recombinant integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to their relatively low levels of expression. To address this problem, screening strategies have been developed to identify the optimal membrane sequence and expression host for protein production. A common approach is to genetically fuse the membrane protein to a fluorescent reporter, typically Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) enabling expression levels, localization and detergent solubilisation to be assessed. Initially developed for screening the heterologous expression of bacterial membrane proteins in Escherichia coli, the method has been extended to eukaryotic hosts, including insect and mammalian cells. Overall, GFP-based expression screening has made a major impact on the number of membrane protein structures that have been determined in the last few years. PMID:27553231

  7. Attenuation-based dual-fluorescent-protein reporter for screening translation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Osterman, Ilya A; Prokhorova, Irina V; Sysoev, Vasily O; Boykova, Yulia V; Efremenkova, Olga V; Svetlov, Maxim S; Kolb, Vyacheslav A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Sergiev, Petr V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2012-04-01

    A reporter construct was created on the basis of the transcription attenuator region of the Escherichia coli tryptophan operon. Dual-fluorescent-protein genes for red fluorescent protein and cerulean fluorescent protein were used as a sensor and internal control of gene expression. The sequence of the attenuator was modified to avoid tryptophan sensitivity while preserving sensitivity to ribosome stalling. Antimicrobial compounds which cause translation arrest at the stage of elongation induce the reporter both in liquid culture and on an agar plate. This reporter could be used for high-throughput screening of translation inhibitors. PMID:22252829

  8. Fluorescent probe for high-throughput screening of membrane protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Backmark, A E; Olivier, N; Snijder, A; Gordon, E; Dekker, N; Ferguson, A D

    2013-01-01

    Screening of protein variants requires specific detection methods to assay protein levels and stability in crude mixtures. Many strategies apply fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to qualitatively monitor expression, stability, and monodispersity. However, GFP fusion proteins have several important disadvantages; including false-positives, protein aggregation after proteolytic removal of GFP, and reductions in protein yields without the GFP fusion. Here we describe a FSEC screening strategy based on a fluorescent multivalent NTA probe that interacts with polyhistidine-tags on target proteins. This method overcomes the limitations of GFP fusion proteins, and can be used to rank protein production based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. Domain boundaries of the human G-protein coupled adenosine A2a receptor were readily identified from crude detergent-extracts of a library of construct variants transiently produced in suspension-adapted HEK293-6E cells. Well expressing clones of MraY, an important bacterial infection target, could be identified from a library of 24 orthologs. This probe provides a highly sensitive tool to detect target proteins to expression levels down to 0.02 mg/L in crude lysate, and requires minimal amounts of cell culture. PMID:23776061

  9. A multidimensional screening method for the selection of two-photon enhanced fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb; Barnett, Lauren; Rebane, Aleksander; Hughes, Thomas; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhailov, Alexandr

    2014-03-01

    Two-photon excitation of fluorescent proteins (FPs) is widely used in imaging whole organisms or living tissues. Many different FPs are now available but these proteins have only been optimized for their one-photon properties. We have developed a technique for screening entire libraries of E. coli colonies expressing FPs that utilizes multiple wavelengths of linear excitation as well as two-photon excitation. Single mutations in a particular protein that affect one or twophoton properties are easily identified, providing new views of structure/function relationships. An amplified femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and a spectrally filtered lamp source are used to acquire the fluorescence signals of up to ~1000 E. coli colonies on a standard Petri dish. Automation of the analysis and acquisition of the fluorescent signals makes it feasible to rapidly screen tens of thousands of colonies. In a proof of principle experiment with the commonly used EGFP, we used two rounds of error prone PCR and selection to evolve new proteins with shifted absorption and increased two-photon cross sections at 790nm. This method of screening, coupled with careful measurements of photo bleaching dynamics and two-photon cross sections, should make it possible to optimize a wide variety of fluorescent proteins and biosensors for use in two-photon microscopes.

  10. Screening for in planta protein-protein interactions combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation with flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Understanding protein and gene function requires identifying interaction partners using biochemical, molecular or genetic tools. In plants, searching for novel protein-protein interactions is limited to protein purification assays, heterologous in vivo systems such as the yeast-two-hybrid or mutant screens. Ideally one would be able to search for novel protein partners in living plant cells. We demonstrate that it is possible to screen for novel protein-protein interactions from a random library in protoplasted Arabidopsis plant cells and recover some of the interacting partners. Our screen is based on capturing the bi-molecular complementation of mYFP between an YN-bait fusion partner and a completely random prey YC-cDNA library with FACS. The candidate interactions were confirmed using in planta BiFC assays and in planta FRET-FLIM assays. From this work, we show that the well characterized protein Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase 3 (CPK3) interacts with APX3, HMGB5, ORP2A and a ricin B-related lectin domain containing protein At2g39050. This is one of the first randomin planta screens to be successfully employed. PMID:22789293

  11. Generation of a fast maturating red fluorescent protein by a combined approach of elongation mutagenesis and functional salvage screening

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eun-Sil; Han, Sang-Soo; Cheong, Dea-Eun; Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be useful as indicators or reporters must have rapid maturation time, high quantum yield and photobleaching stability. A red fluorescent protein DsRed that has a high quantum yield and photostability has an innately slow maturation time when compared to other fluorescence proteins. In this study, we combined a functional salvage screen (FSS) and elongation mutagenesis to obtain a DsRed variant that maintained structural features closely linked with a high quantum yield and photostability and evolved to have a rapid maturation time. It is expected that the variant generated here, FmRed (fast maturating red fluorescent protein), will be widely used as an indicator or reporter because it maintained traits superior to that of the wild-type protein and also matured rapidly.

  12. pGreen-S: a clone vector bearing absence of enhanced green fluorescent protein for screening recombinants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinbao; Liang, Shujuan; Zhang, Jinbao; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhang, Suhua

    2009-05-01

    The bacterial cloning vector, pGreen-S, was constructed by inserting the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene at the XbaI restriction site of pUC18 plasmid. When expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha produced colonies that were an absinthe green color under daylight and strongly fluorescent green under longwave ultraviolet light. The pGreen-S vector was used to select for directional insert based on the loss of green fluorescence in recombinant colonies that was caused by the absence of EGFP. The EGFP reporter system differs from the conventional complementation of lacZ, making screening recombinants simpler, less expensive, and more effective.

  13. Establishment of a stable cell line coexpressing dengue virus-2 and green fluorescent protein for screening of antiviral compounds.

    PubMed

    Leardkamolkarn, V; Sirigulpanit, W

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to generate a stable cell line harboring subgenomic dengue virus replicon and a green fluorescent gene (DENV/GFP) for a cell-based model to screen anti-DENV compounds. The gene-encoding envelope protein of DENV-2 was deleted and then replaced with fragments of the GFP gene and a foot-and-mouth-disease virus 2A-derived cleavage site. The human cytomegalovirus immediate early and antisense hepatitis delta virus ribozyme sequences were added at the 5'- and 3'-ends. An internal ribosome entry site and neomycin resistance genes were placed upstream and next to the NS1 gene. The recombinant plasmids were propagated in a mammalian cell line. A stable cell line with the brightest green fluorescent protein and the highest viral protein and RNA expression was selected from six clones. The clone was then examined for effectiveness in an antiviral drug screening assay with compounds isolated from the local plants using two known antiviral agents as controls. Two novel flavones, PMF and TMF, were discovered having DENV-inhibitory properties. The data were validated by a conventional plaque titration assay. The results indicate that this newly developed cell line is efficient for use as a cell-based model for primary screening of anti-DENV compounds.

  14. Fluorescent protein pair emit intracellular FRET signal suitable for FACS screening

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Daniel X.; Brismar, Hjalmar . E-mail: mats.persson@ki.se

    2007-01-12

    The fluorescent proteins ECFP and HcRed were shown to give an easily resolved FRET-signal when expressed as a fusion inside mammalian cells. HeLa-tat cells expressing ECFP, pHcRed, or the fusion protein pHcRed-ECFP were analyzed by flow cytometry after excitation of ECFP. Cells expressing HcRed-ECFP, or ECFP and HcRed, were mixed and FACS-sorted for FRET positive cells: HcRed-ECFP cells were greatly enriched (72 times). Next, cloned human antibodies were fused with ECFP and expressed anchored to the ER membrane. Their cognate antigens (HIV-1 gp120 or gp41) were fused to HcRed and co-expressed in the ER. An increase of 13.5 {+-} 1.5% (mean {+-} SEM) and 8.0 {+-} 0.7% in ECFP fluorescence for the specific antibodies reacting with gp120 or gp41, respectively, was noted after photobleaching. A positive control (HcRed-ECFP) gave a 14.8 {+-} 2.6% increase. Surprisingly, the unspecific antibody (anti-TT) showed 12.1 {+-} 1.1% increase, possibly because overexpression in the limited ER compartment gave false FRET signals.

  15. Screening by coral green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromoproteins supports a role in photoprotection of zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. G.; D'Angelo, C.; Salih, A.; Wiedenmann, J.

    2013-06-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments are responsible for the vivid colouration of many reef-building corals and have been proposed to act as photoprotectants. Their role remains controversial because the functional mechanism has not been elucidated. We provide direct evidence to support a photoprotective role of the non-fluorescent chromoproteins (CPs) that form a biochemically and photophysically distinct group of GFP-like proteins. Based on observations of Acropora nobilis from the Great Barrier Reef, we explored the photoprotective role of CPs by analysing five coral species under controlled conditions. In vitro and in hospite analyses of chlorophyll excitation demonstrate that screening by CPs leads to a reduction in chlorophyll excitation corresponding to the spectral properties of the specific CPs present in the coral tissues. Between 562 and 586 nm, the CPs maximal absorption range, there was an up to 50 % reduction of chlorophyll excitation. The screening was consistent for established and regenerating tissue and amongst symbiont clades A, C and D. Moreover, among two differently pigmented morphs of Acropora valida grown under identical light conditions and hosting subclade type C3 symbionts, high CP expression correlated with reduced photodamage under acute light stress.

  16. Identification of interacting proteins for calcium-dependent protein kinase 8 by a novel screening system based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Mayu; Han, Yulong; Kito, Nobuki; Che, Fang-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases are key regulators of cell function that constitute one of the largest and most functionally diverse gene families. We developed a novel assay system, based on the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technique in Escherichia coli, for detecting transient interactions such as those between kinases and their substrates. This system detected the interaction between OsMEK1 and its direct target OsMAP1. By contrast, BiFC fluorescence was not observed when OsMAP2 or OsMAP3, which are not substrates of OsMEK1, were used as prey proteins. We also screened for interacting proteins of calcium-dependent protein kinase 8 (OsCPK8), a regulator of plant immune responses, and identified three proteins as interacting molecules of OsCPK8. The interaction between OsCPK8 and two of these proteins (ARF-GEF and peptidyl prolyl isomerase) was confirmed in rice cells by means of BiFC technology. These results indicate that our new assay system has the potential to screen for protein kinase target molecules.

  17. Screening for protein-protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM)

    PubMed Central

    Margineanu, Anca; Chan, Jia Jia; Kelly, Douglas J.; Warren, Sean C.; Flatters, Delphine; Kumar, Sunil; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Christopher W.; French, Paul M. W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a high content multiwell plate cell-based assay approach to quantify protein interactions directly in cells using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) read out by automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Automated FLIM is implemented using wide-field time-gated detection, typically requiring only 10 s per field of view (FOV). Averaging over biological, thermal and shot noise with 100’s to 1000’s of FOV enables unbiased quantitative analysis with high statistical power. Plotting average donor lifetime vs. acceptor/donor intensity ratio clearly identifies protein interactions and fitting to double exponential donor decay models provides estimates of interacting population fractions that, with calibrated donor and acceptor fluorescence intensities, can yield dissociation constants. We demonstrate the application to identify binding partners of MST1 kinase and estimate interaction strength among the members of the RASSF protein family, which have important roles in apoptosis via the Hippo signalling pathway. KD values broadly agree with published biochemical measurements. PMID:27339025

  18. Screening for protein-protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    PubMed

    Margineanu, Anca; Chan, Jia Jia; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Flatters, Delphine; Kumar, Sunil; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Christopher W; French, Paul M W

    2016-01-01

    We present a high content multiwell plate cell-based assay approach to quantify protein interactions directly in cells using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) read out by automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Automated FLIM is implemented using wide-field time-gated detection, typically requiring only 10 s per field of view (FOV). Averaging over biological, thermal and shot noise with 100's to 1000's of FOV enables unbiased quantitative analysis with high statistical power. Plotting average donor lifetime vs. acceptor/donor intensity ratio clearly identifies protein interactions and fitting to double exponential donor decay models provides estimates of interacting population fractions that, with calibrated donor and acceptor fluorescence intensities, can yield dissociation constants. We demonstrate the application to identify binding partners of MST1 kinase and estimate interaction strength among the members of the RASSF protein family, which have important roles in apoptosis via the Hippo signalling pathway. KD values broadly agree with published biochemical measurements. PMID:27339025

  19. Screening of high toxic Metarhizium strain against Plutella xylostella and its marking with green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qianqian; Zhang, Yi; Zang, Yanchao; Nong, Xiangqun; Wang, Guangjun; Zhang, Zehua

    2014-10-01

    Entomopathogenic fungus is proposed to be one of the best biocontrol agents against the destructive insect pest Plutella xylostella. In this study, we tested the virulence of 11 Metarhizium strain isolates against P. xylostella using a leaf dipping method, and found one strain, named 609, which had displayed the highest pathogenicity. Bioassay results showed that the accumulated corrected mortality rate was 86.7 % on the eighth day after inoculation with a spore concentration 1 × 10(8) conidia/mL, and that the time to 50 % lethality was 5.7-day. The strain was identified as Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequencing. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker containing vector, camben-gfp, was constructed and delivered into strain 609 by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Six positive clones expressing GFP were selected and tested for toxicity against P. xylostella, all of which displayed the same toxicity as the parental wild type strain. The survival rate of transformant T1 was investigated by monitoring GFP levels at 4-day intervals after inoculation into soil. We found that the concentration of Metarhizium spores decreased sharply from 1 × 10(7) conidia/g to 1 × 10(6) conidia/g in the first 5 days after inoculation. The decreasing trend then stabilized and the spore count declined to approximately 1 × 10(4)-10(5) conidia/g after 1 month. The results of this study indicate that the expression of gfp gene in strain 609 does not alter the virulence capability of Metarhizium. This strain will therefore be useful for the control of P. xylostella and as a tool to study molecular biology properties and monitor colonization of M. anisopliae in the field. PMID:25037866

  20. Photoconversion in orange and red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Hazelwood, Kristin L; Murphy, Christopher S; Davidson, Michael W; Piston, David W

    2009-05-01

    We found that photoconversion is fairly common among orange and red fluorescent proteins, as in a screen of 12 proteins, 8 exhibited photoconversion. Specifically, three red fluorescent proteins could be switched to a green state, and two orange variants could be photoconverted to a far-red state. The orange proteins are ideal for dual-probe highlighter applications, and they exhibited the most red-shifted excitation of all fluorescent proteins described to date.

  1. Engineering fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Nagai, Takeharu; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victora (GFP) and GFP-like proteins from Anthozoa species encode light-absorbing chromophores intrinsically within their respective protein sequences. Recent studies have made progress in obtaining bright variants of these proteins which develop chromophores quickly and efficiently, as well as novel fluorescent proteins that photoactivate or photoconvert, i.e., become fluorescent or change colors upon illumination at specific wavelengths. Also, monomeric versions of these proteins have been engineered for fusion protein applications. Simple GFP variants and circularly permuted GFP variants have been used to develop fluorescent probes that sense physiological signals such as membrane potential and concentrations of free calcium. Further molecular characterization of the structure and maturation of these proteins is in progress, aimed at providing information for rational design of variants with desired fluorescence properties.

  2. TIR fluorescence screening of cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Thomas; Strauss, Wolfgang S.; Sailer, Reinhard; Wagner, Michael; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2005-03-01

    A novel setup for fluorescence measurements of surfaces of biological samples, in particular cell membranes, is described. The method is based on multiple total internal reflection (TIR) of a laser beam on the surface of a multi-well plate, such that 96 individual samples are excited simultaneously. Main prerequisites are an appropriate thickness and high transmission of the glass bottom, a non-cytotoxic adhesive, and appropriate glass rods for TIR illumination. Fluorescence from cell surface is detected simultaneously using an integrating CCD camera and appropriate optical filters. For validation of the system, transfected cells expressing a fluorescent membrane protein are used. In addition, intracellular translocation of green fluorescent protein kinase c upon stimulation is examined. The method appears well suitable for high throughput screening (HTS), since neither washing of the samples nor any re-adjustment of the equipment after changing of individual plates are necessary.

  3. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  4. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Two-photon absorption of fluorescent protein chromophores incorporating non-canonical amino acids: TD-DFT screening and classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alaraby Salem, M; Brown, Alex

    2015-10-14

    Two-photon spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins is a powerful bio-imaging tool characterized by deep tissue penetration and little damage. However, two-photon spectroscopy has lower sensitivity than one-photon microscopy alternatives and hence a protein with a large two-photon absorption cross-section is needed. We use time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory to screen twenty-two possible chromophores that can be formed upon replacing the amino-acid Tyr66 that forms the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore with a non-canonical amino acid. A proposed chromophore with a nitro substituent was found to have a large two-photon absorption cross-section (29 GM) compared to other fluorescent protein chromophores as determined at the same level of theory. Classical molecular dynamics are then performed on a nitro-modified fluorescent protein to test its stability and study the effect of the conformational flexibility of the chromophore on its two-photon absorption cross-section. The theoretical results show that the large cross-section is primarily due to the difference between the permanent dipole moments of the excited and ground states of the nitro-modified chromophore. This large difference is maintained through the various conformations assumed by the chromophore in the protein cavity. The nitro-derived protein appears to be very promising as a two-photon absorption probe.

  7. A cellular assay using metal-modified fluorescence lifetime analysis for high-content screening of protein internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cade, Nic; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Archibald, Stephen J.; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2010-04-01

    Current high-content screening (HCS) techniques involve the analysis of cellular assays using high-resolution imaging combined with sophisticated algorithms for automated image analysis. Commercially available platforms are invariably highly specialised and expensive. Here we present a novel assay utilising changes in fluorescence lifetime in the vicinity of a rough Au film. A mammary carcinoma cell line was created expressing EGFP in the membrane, and cells were plated onto multi-well slides covered with a 30 nm Au film. FLIM images show a large reduction in lifetime for membrane-bound GFP in close proximity to the Au surface. Addition of a suitable ligand leads to internalization of the GFP with a corresponding increase in lifetime. The degree of internalization can be very quickly and easily checked using standard lifetime analysis techniques, with no need for image analysis. We demonstrate the method by comparing the efficacies of two small molecule inhibitors interfering with the internalization process.

  8. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  9. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  10. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  11. Fluorescent protein methods: strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins such as the "green fluorescent protein" (GFP) are popular tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, because as genetically encoded markers they are easy to introduce. Furthermore, they can be used in a living animal without the need for extensive sample preparation, because C. elegans is transparent and small enough so that entire animals can be imaged directly. Consequently, fluorescent proteins have emerged as the method of choice to study gene expression in C. elegans and reporter constructs for thousands of genes are currently available. When fused to a protein of interest, fluorescent proteins allow the imaging of its subcellular localization in vivo, offering a powerful alternative to antibody staining techniques. Fluorescent proteins can be employed to label cellular and subcellular structures and as indicators for cell physiological parameters like calcium concentration. Genetic screens relying on fluorescent proteins to visualize anatomical structures and recent progress in automation techniques have tremendously expanded their potential uses. This chapter presents tools and techniques related to the use of fluorescent proteins, discusses their advantages and shortcomings, and provides practical considerations for various applications. PMID:22226521

  12. The cellular distribution of fluorescently labeled arrestins provides a robust, sensitive, and universal assay for screening G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Robert H; Hudson, Christine C; Cruickshank, Rachael D; Meyers, Diane M; Payne, Richard E; Rhem, Shay M; Loomis, Carson R

    2002-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have proven to be a rich source of therapeutic targets; therefore, finding compounds that regulate these receptors is a critical goal in drug discovery. The Transfluor technology utilizes the redistribution of fluorescently labeled arrestins from the cytoplasm to agonist-occupied receptors at the plasma membrane to monitor quantitatively the activation or inactivation of GPCRs. Here, we show that the Transfluor technology can be quantitated on the INCell Analyzer system (INCAS) using the vasopressin V(2) receptor (V(2)R), which binds arrestin with high affinity, and the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR), which binds arrestin with low affinity. U2OS cells stably expressing an arrestin-green fluorescent protein conjugate and either the V(2)R or the beta(2)AR were plated in 96-well plastic plates and analyzed by the INCAS at a screening rate of 5 min per plate. Agonist dose-response and antagonist dose-inhibition curves revealed signal-to-background ratios of approximately 25:1 and 8:1 for the V(2)R and beta(2)AR, respectively. EC(50) values agreed closely with K(d) values reported in the literature for the different receptor agonists. In addition, small amounts of arrestin translocation induced by sub-EC(50) doses of agonist were distinguished from the background noise of untreated cells. Furthermore, differences in the magnitude of arrestin translocation distinguished partial agonists from full agonists, and Z' values for these ligands were >0.5. These data show that the Transfluor technology, combined with an automated image analysis system, provides a direct, robust, and universal assay for high throughput screening of known and orphan GPCRs.

  13. Screening Fluorescent Voltage Indicators with Spontaneously Spiking HEK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Veena; Kralj, Joel M.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    Development of improved fluorescent voltage indicators is a key challenge in neuroscience, but progress has been hampered by the low throughput of patch-clamp characterization. We introduce a line of non-fluorescent HEK cells that stably express NaV 1.3 and KIR 2.1 and generate spontaneous electrical action potentials. These cells enable rapid, electrode-free screening of speed and sensitivity of voltage sensitive dyes or fluorescent proteins on a standard fluorescence microscope. We screened a small library of mutants of archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) in spiking HEK cells and identified two mutants with greater voltage-sensitivity than found in previously published Arch voltage indicators. PMID:24391999

  14. Rapid screening of Veillonella by ultraviolet fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, A W; Patten, V; Guze, L B

    1975-01-01

    Among 51 strains of anaerobic gram-negative cocci belonging to the family Veillonellaceae, all strains of Veillonella (V. parvula and V. alcalescens) displayed red fluorescence under long-wave (366 nm) ultraviolet light, whereas no Acidaminococcus or Megasphaera demonstrated fluorescence. In contrast to Bacteroides melaninogenicus, growth of Veillonella does not require hemin and menadione, and flourescence is rapidly lost upon exposure to air. The fluorescent component of a strain of V. parvula examined could not be extracted in solution with water, ether, methanol, or chloroform, but was readily extracted with 0.4 N NaOH. Spectrophotofluorometrically, the fluorescence maximum of this extract was 660 nm with an excitation maximum of 300 nm, when measured at pH 7.2 and 25 C. Coupled with the Gram stain, ultraviolet fluorescence may be a useful tool for rapid screening of Veillonella and is particularly helpful for detection and, isolation of this organism from mixed culture. Images PMID:1419

  15. Ligand screening using fluorescence thermal shift analysis (FTS).

    PubMed

    Luan, Chi-Hao; Light, Samuel H; Dunne, Sara F; Anderson, Wayne F

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence thermal shift (FTS) method is a biophysical technique that can improve productivity in a structural genomics pipeline and provide a fast and easy platform for identifying ligands in protein function or drug discovery screening. The technique has gained widespread popularity in recent years due to its broad-scale applicability, throughput, and functional relevance. FTS is based on the principle that a protein unfolds at a critical temperature that depends upon its intrinsic stability. A probe that will fluoresce when bound to hydrophobic surfaces is used to monitor protein unfolding as temperature is increased. In this manner, conditions or small molecules that affect the thermal stability of a protein can be identified. Herein, principles, protocols, data analysis, and special considerations of FTS screening as performed for the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) pipeline are described in detail. The CSGID FTS screen is designed as a high-throughput 384-well assay to be performed on a robotic platform; however, all protocols can be adapted to a 96-well format that can be assembled manually. Data analysis can be performed using a simple curve fitting of the fluorescent signal using a Boltzmann or double Boltzmann equation. A case study of 100 proteins screened against Emerald Biosystem's ADDit™ library is included as discussion. PMID:24590724

  16. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment.

  17. Rapid fluorescent assay for screening drugs on Leishmania amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Shimony, Orly; Jaffe, Charles L

    2008-10-01

    A rapid fluorescent viability assay employing alamarBlue was optimized for use with Leishmania axenic amastigotes, the stage of the parasite responsible for disease pathology. The activity of two protein kinase inhibitors, Staurosporine and H-89, as well as Amphotericin B, on promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania donovani and Leishmania tropica was compared. Both protein kinase inhibitors inhibited promastigote growth at lower concentrations than amastigotes, while the GI(50) for Amphotericin B on both stages was similar. This assay only requires a limited number of axenic amastigotes (50,000 cells/well) and can be used to rapidly screen large chemical or natural product libraries for activity against amastigotes.

  18. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  19. Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cranfill, Paula J; Sell, Brittney R; Baird, Michelle A; Allen, John R; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-07-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FPs) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has unique properties. Thus, there is no single 'best' FP for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for a given application, we have quantitatively characterized the brightness, photostability, pH stability and monomeric properties of more than 40 FPs to enable straightforward and direct comparison between them. We focus on popular and/or top-performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  20. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  1. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Ian B; Bosse, Jens B; Engel, Esteban A; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-11-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  2. Latest methods of fluorescence-based protein crystal identification

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Arne; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-28

    Fluorescence, whether intrinsic or by using trace fluorescent labeling, can be a powerful aid in macromolecule crystallization. Its use in screening for crystals is discussed here. Successful protein crystallization screening experiments are dependent upon the experimenter being able to identify positive outcomes. The introduction of fluorescence techniques has brought a powerful and versatile tool to the aid of the crystal grower. Trace fluorescent labeling, in which a fluorescent probe is covalently bound to a subpopulation (<0.5%) of the protein, enables the use of visible fluorescence. Alternatively, one can avoid covalent modification and use UV fluorescence, exploiting the intrinsic fluorescent amino acids present in most proteins. By the use of these techniques, crystals that had previously been obscured in the crystallization drop can readily be identified and distinguished from amorphous precipitate or salt crystals. Additionally, lead conditions that may not have been obvious as such under white-light illumination can be identified. In all cases review of the screening plate is considerably accelerated, as the eye can quickly note objects of increased intensity.

  3. A green fluorescent protein solubility screen in E. coli reveals domain boundaries of the GTP-binding domain in the P element transposase

    PubMed Central

    Sabogal, Alex; Rio, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding and hydrolysis events often act as molecular switches in proteins, modulating conformational changes between active and inactive states in many signaling molecules and transport systems. The P element transposase of Drosophila melanogaster requires GTP binding to proceed along its reaction pathway, following initial site-specific DNA binding. GTP binding is unique to P elements and may represent a novel form of transpositional regulation, allowing the bound transposase to find a second site, looping the transposon DNA for strand cleavage and excision. The GTP-binding activity has been previously mapped to the central portion of the transposase protein; however, the P element transposase contains little sequence identity with known GTP-binding folds. To identify soluble, active transposase domains, a GFP solubility screen was used testing the solubility of random P element gene fragments in E. coli. The screen produced a single clone spanning known GTP-binding residues in the central portion of the transposase coding region. This clone, amino acids 275–409 in the P element transposase, was soluble, highly expressed in E.coli and active for GTP-binding activity, therefore is a candidate for future biochemical and structural studies. In addition, the chimeric screen revealed a minimal N-terminal THAP DNA-binding domain attached to an extended leucine zipper coiled-coil dimerization domain in the P element transposase, precisely delineating the DNA-binding and dimerization activities on the primary sequence. This study highlights the use of a GFP-based solubility screen on a large multidomain protein to identify highly expressed, soluble truncated domain subregions. PMID:20842711

  4. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  5. Guide to Red Fluorescent Proteins and Biosensors for Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first red fluorescent protein (RFP), named DsRed, 12 years ago, a wide pallet of red-shifted fluorescent proteins has been cloned and biotechnologically developed into monomeric fluorescent probes for optical microscopy. Several new types of monomeric RFPs that change the emission wavelength either with time, called fluorescent timers, or after a brief irradiation with violet light, known as photoactivatable proteins, have been also engineered. Moreover, RFPs with a large Stokes shift of fluorescence emission have been recently designed. Because of their distinctive excitation and fluorescence detection conditions developed specifically for microscopy, these fluorescent probes can be suboptimal for flow cytometry. Here, we have selected and summarized the advanced orange, red, and far-red fluorescent proteins with the properties specifically required for the flow cytometry applications. Their effective brightness was calculated for the laser sources available for the commercial flow cytometers and sorters. Compatibility of the fluorescent proteins of different colors in a multiparameter flow cytometry was determined. Novel FRET pairs, utilizing RFPs, RFP-based intracellular biosensors, and their application to a high-throughput screening, are also discussed. PMID:21704849

  6. A practical teaching course in directed protein evolution using the green fluorescent protein as a model.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain reaction. Screening of bacterial colonies transformed with random mutant libraries identified GFP variants with increased fluorescence yields. Mapping the three-dimensional structure of these mutants demonstrated how alterations in structural features such as the environment around the fluorophore and properties of the protein surface can influence functional properties such as the intensity of fluorescence and protein solubility.

  7. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  8. Blue protein with red fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Swagatha; Yu, Chi-Li; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Sudha, Sai; Pal, Samir Kumar; Schaefer, Wayne F.; Gibson, David T.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The walleye (Sander vitreus) is a golden yellow fish that inhabits the Northern American lakes. The recent sightings of the blue walleye and the correlation of its sighting to possible increased UV radiation have been proposed earlier. The underlying molecular basis of its adaptation to increased UV radiation is the presence of a protein (Sandercyanin)–ligand complex in the mucus of walleyes. Degradation of heme by UV radiation results in the formation of Biliverdin IXα (BLA), the chromophore bound to Sandercyanin. We show that Sandercyanin is a monomeric protein that forms stable homotetramers on addition of BLA to the protein. A structure of the Sandercyanin–BLA complex, purified from the fish mucus, reveals a glycosylated protein with a lipocalin fold. This protein–ligand complex absorbs light in the UV region (λmax of 375 nm) and upon excitation at this wavelength emits in the red region (λmax of 675 nm). Unlike all other known biliverdin-bound fluorescent proteins, the chromophore is noncovalently bound to the protein. We provide here a molecular rationale for the observed spectral properties of Sandercyanin. PMID:27688756

  9. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  10. Fluorescence-based multiplex protein detection using optically encoded microbeads.

    PubMed

    Jun, Bong-Hyun; Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong

    2012-01-01

    Potential utilization of proteins for early detection and diagnosis of various diseases has drawn considerable interest in the development of protein-based multiplex detection techniques. Among the various techniques for high-throughput protein screening, optically-encoded beads combined with fluorescence-based target monitoring have great advantages over the planar array-based multiplexing assays. This review discusses recent developments of analytical methods of screening protein molecules on microbead-based platforms. These include various strategies such as barcoded microbeads, molecular beacon-based techniques, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based techniques. Their applications for label-free protein detection are also addressed. Especially, the optically-encoded beads such as multilayer fluorescence beads and SERS-encoded beads are successful for generating a large number of coding.

  11. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Yi; Zhang Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2008-11-28

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure.

  12. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  13. A new fluorescent based screening system for high throughput screening of drugs targeting HBV-core and HBsAg interaction.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Krishnakumar, K A; Asha, V V

    2015-03-01

    The existing screening systems for anti-hepatitis B virus (anti-HBV) drug discovery is time-consuming mainly due to the laborious detection system it is using. A new fluorescence based screening system for high throughput anti-HBV drug discovery was created by tagging hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) with monomeric red fluorescent protein and hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein. The two constructs were co-transfected on to Hep3B cells and the transfection was stabilized by fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS). The fusion proteins expressed through the secretory protein pathway as evidenced by localization with ER-Tracker and tubulin tracker. The new system has given analogues results like that of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hence it can be of very high potential for large scale drug screening systems.

  14. Coral Fluorescent Proteins as Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Caroline V.; Modi, Chintan K.; Mydlarz, Laura D.

    2009-01-01

    Background A wide array of fluorescent proteins (FP) is present in anthozoans, although their biochemical characteristics and function in host tissue remain to be determined. Upregulation of FP's frequently occurs in injured or compromised coral tissue, suggesting a potential role of coral FPs in host stress responses. Methodology/Principal Findings The presence of FPs was determined and quantified for a subsample of seven healthy Caribbean coral species using spectral emission analysis of tissue extracts. FP concentration was correlated with the in vivo antioxidant potential of the tissue extracts by quantifying the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging rates. FPs of the seven species varied in both type and abundance and demonstrated a positive correlation between H2O2 scavenging rate and FP concentration. To validate this data, the H2O2 scavenging rates of four pure scleractinian FPs, cyan (CFP), green (GFP), red (RFP) and chromoprotein (CP), and their mutant counterparts (without chromophores), were investigated. In vitro, each FP scavenged H2O2 with the most efficient being CP followed by equivalent activity of CFP and RFP. Scavenging was significantly higher in all mutant counterparts. Conclusions/Significance Both naturally occurring and pure coral FPs have significant H2O2 scavenging activity. The higher scavenging rate of RFP and the CP in vitro is consistent with observed increases of these specific FPs in areas of compromised coral tissue. However, the greater scavenging ability of the mutant counterparts suggests additional roles of scleractinian FPs, potentially pertaining to their color. This study documents H2O2 scavenging of scleractinian FPs, a novel biochemical characteristic, both in vivo across multiple species and in vitro with purified proteins. These data support a role for FPs in coral stress and immune responses and highlights the multi-functionality of these conspicuous proteins. PMID:19806218

  15. Green fluorescent protein as a quantitative tool.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Billups, B; Guthrie, P B; Rogers, J H; Muir, E M; Parks, T N; Kater, S B

    2000-02-15

    Manipulating the expression of a protein can provide a powerful tool for understanding its function, provided that the protein is expressed at physiologically-significant concentrations. We have developed a simple method to measure (1) the concentration of an overexpressed protein in single cells and (2) the covariation of particular physiological properties with a protein's expression. As an example of how this method can be used, teratocarcinoma cells were transfected with the neuron-specific calcium binding protein calretinin (CR) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). By measuring GFP fluorescence in microcapillaries, we created a standard curve for GFP fluorescence that permitted quantification of CR concentrations in individual cells. Fura-2 measurements in the same cells showed a strong positive correlation between CR-GFP fusion protein expression levels and calcium clearance capacity. This method should allow reliable quantitative analysis of GFP fusion protein expression.

  16. Mapping membrane protein structure with fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins regulate many cellular processes including signaling cascades, ion transport, membrane fusion, and cell-to-cell communications. Understanding the architecture and conformational fluctuations of these proteins is critical to understanding their regulation and functions. Fluorescence methods including intensity mapping, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and photo-induced electron transfer, allow for targeted measurements of domains within membrane proteins. These methods can reveal how a protein is structured and how it transitions between different conformational states. Here, I will review recent work done using fluorescence to map the structures of membrane proteins, focusing on how each of these methods can be applied to understanding the dynamic nature of individual membrane proteins and protein complexes. PMID:22445227

  17. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  18. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  19. Fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Daniel Aaron; Melikov, Rustamzhon; Conkar, Deniz; Nur Firat-Karalar, Elif; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2016-11-01

    The usage time of displays (e.g., TVs, mobile phones, etc) is in general shorter than their functional life time, which worsens the electronic waste (e-waste) problem around the world. The integration of biomaterials into electronics can help to reduce the e-waste problem. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs to use as a backlight source for liquid crystal (LC) displays for the first time. We express and purify enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and monomeric Cherry protein (mCherry), and afterward we integrate these proteins as a wavelength-converter on a blue LED chip. The protein-integrated backlight exhibits a high luminous efficacy of 248 lm/Wopt and the area of the gamut covers 80% of the NTSC color gamut. The resultant colors and objects in the image on the display can be well observed and distinguished. Therefore, fluorescent proteins show promise for display applications.

  20. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  1. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range. PMID:26145791

  2. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  3. Radioactive contamination screening with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, R.; Di Benedetto, J.

    1994-06-01

    The ability to induce, detect and discriminate fluorescence of uranium oxides makes available new capabilities for screening the surface of large complex facilities for uranium. This paper will present the results of field tests evaluate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a contamination screening tool and report on the progress to produce a field portable instrument for uranium surveys on exposed surfaces. The principal effect is to illuminate the surface of an object or an area with a remotely-located light source, and to evaluate the re-radiated emission energy. A gated intensified CCD camera was used with ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation to discriminate the phosphorescent (persistent) green uranium emission from the prompt background fluorescence which results from excitation of plants, concrete, soils, and other background materials.

  4. Use of fluorescent Ca2+ dyes with green fluorescent protein and its variants: problems and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S; Ibrahim, O; O'luanaigh, N; Williams, H; Cockcroft, S

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes, and green fluorescent protein and its variants, can be used together. We find that the most commonly used fluorescent protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), seriously contaminates fura 2 signals. We suggest two alternative combinations for which there is no detectable contamination of the Ca(2+) indicator signal by the fluorescent protein. Blue fluorescent protein can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura Red; EGFP can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator X-Rhod 1. The use of these combinations will permit the accurate measurement of Ca(2+) signals in cells transfected with fluorescent proteins. PMID:11368760

  5. A Fluorescence-Based Assay for Proteinuria Screening in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Hanke, Nils; King, Benjamin L; Vaske, Bernhard; Haller, Hermann; Schiffer, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of genes compromising the glomerular filtration barrier in rodent models using transgenic or knockdown approaches is time- and resource-consuming and often leads to unsatisfactory results. Therefore, it would be beneficial to have a selection tool indicating that your gene of interest is in fact associated with proteinuria. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a rapid screening tool to study effects in glomerular filtration barrier integrity after genetic manipulation. We use either injection of high-molecular-weight dextrans or a transgenic fluorescent fish line [Tg(l-fabp:DBP:EGFP)] expressing a vitamin D-binding protein fused with eGFP for indirect detection of proteinuria. A loss of high-molecular-weight proteins from the circulation of the fish into the urine can be identified by monitoring fluorescence intensity in the zebrafish eye. Paired with an optimized analysis method, this assay provides an effective screening solution to detect filtration barrier damage with proteinuria before moving to a mammalian system.

  6. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  7. Diversity and evolution of coral fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Naila O; Konzen, Karen A; Field, Steven F; Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Hunt, Marguerite E; Beltran-Ramirez, Victor; Miller, David J; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Salih, Anya; Matz, Mikhail V

    2008-07-16

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red) and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a "chromo-red" color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae) and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae), both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria). The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of structural

  8. Diversity and Evolution of Coral Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alieva, Naila O.; Konzen, Karen A.; Field, Steven F.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Hunt, Marguerite E.; Beltran-Ramirez, Victor; Miller, David J.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Salih, Anya; Matz, Mikhail V.

    2008-01-01

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red) and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a “chromo-red” color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae) and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae), both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria). The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of structural

  9. Screening a cDNA library for protein-protein interactions directly in planta.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Wu, Fu-Hui; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Shen, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Hsuan-Yu; Liao, De-Chih; Fang, Mei-Jane; Liu, Nien-Tze; Yen, Yu-Chen; Dokládal, Ladislav; Sykorová, Eva; Gelvin, Stanton B; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2012-05-01

    Screening cDNA libraries for genes encoding proteins that interact with a bait protein is usually performed in yeast. However, subcellular compartmentation and protein modification may differ in yeast and plant cells, resulting in misidentification of protein partners. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology to screen a plant cDNA library against a bait protein directly in plants. As proof of concept, we used the N-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein- or nVenus-tagged Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirE2 and VirD2 proteins and the C-terminal extension (CTE) domain of Arabidopsis thaliana telomerase reverse transcriptase as baits to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library encoding proteins tagged with the C-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein. A library of colonies representing ~2 × 10(5) cDNAs was arrayed in 384-well plates. DNA was isolated from pools of 10 plates, individual plates, and individual rows and columns of the plates. Sequential screening of subsets of cDNAs in Arabidopsis leaf or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 protoplasts identified single cDNA clones encoding proteins that interact with either, or both, of the Agrobacterium bait proteins, or with CTE. T-DNA insertions in the genes represented by some cDNAs revealed five novel Arabidopsis proteins important for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. We also used this cDNA library to confirm VirE2-interacting proteins in orchid (Phalaenopsis amabilis) flowers. Thus, this technology can be applied to several plant species. PMID:22623495

  10. Imaging the environment of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Klaus; Siegel, Jan; Phillips, David; French, Paul M W; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Webb, Stephen E D; Davis, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    An emerging theme in cell biology is that cell surface receptors need to be considered as part of supramolecular complexes of proteins and lipids facilitating specific receptor conformations and distinct distributions, e.g., at the immunological synapse. Thus, a new goal is to develop bioimaging that not only locates proteins in live cells but can also probe their environment. Such a technique is demonstrated here using fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP). We first show, by time-correlated single-photon counting, that the fluorescence decay of GFP depends on the local refractive index. This is in agreement with the Strickler Berg formula, relating the Einstein A and B coefficients for absorption and spontaneous emission in molecules. We then quantitatively image, by wide-field time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging, the refractive index of the environment of GFP. This novel approach paves the way for imaging the biophysical environment of specific GFP-tagged proteins in live cells. PMID:12496126

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as tool for high-content-screening in yeast (HCS-FCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Christopher; Huff, Joseph; Marshall, Will; Yu, Elden Qingfeng; Unruh, Jay; Slaughter, Brian; Wiegraebe, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    To measure protein interactions, diffusion properties, and local concentrations in single cells, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established and widely accepted method. However, measurements can take a long time and are laborious. Therefore investigations are typically limited to tens or a few hundred cells. We developed an automated system to overcome these limitations and make FCS available for High Content Screening (HCS). We acquired data in an auto-correlation screen of more than 4000 of the 6000 proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tagged with eGFP and expanded the HCS to use cross-correlation between eGFP and mCherry tagged proteins to screen for molecular interactions. We performed all high-content FCS screens (HCS-FCS) in a 96 well plate format. The system is based on an extended Carl Zeiss fluorescence correlation spectrometer ConfoCor 3 attached to a confocal microscope LSM 510. We developed image-processing software to control these hardware components. The confocal microscope obtained overview images and we developed an algorithm to search for and detect single cells. At each cell, we positioned a laser beam at a well-defined point and recorded the fluctuation signal. We used automatic scoring of the signal for quality control. All data was stored and organized in a database based on the open source Open Microscopy Environment (OME) platform. To analyze the data we used the image processing language IDL and the open source statistical software package R.

  12. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen.

    PubMed

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2015-07-01

    High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions.

  13. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    One of the most powerful and versatile methods for studying molecules in solution is fluorescence. Crystallization typically takes place in a concentrated solution environment, whereas fluorescence typically has an upper concentration limit of approximately 1 x 10(exp -5)M, thus intrinsic fluorescence cannot be employed, but a fluorescent probe must be added to a sub population of the molecules. However the fluorescent species cannot interfere with the self-assembly process. This can be achieved with macromolecules, where fluorescent probes can be covalently attached to a sub population of molecules that are subsequently used to track the system as a whole. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process of tetragonal lysozyme crystal nucleation, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P432121 space group. FRET studies are being carried out between cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex 376 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex 425 nm, Em 520 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R0 for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approximately 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 43 helix. The short CB-lys lifetime (approximately 5 ns), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules ((sup 3) 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a second, shorter lifetime (approximately 0.2 ns). Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with a model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and grow, and the relevance of that model to microgravity protein crystal growth

  14. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers

    PubMed Central

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. PMID:26609072

  15. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs.

    PubMed

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies.

  16. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  17. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs.

    PubMed

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  18. Yeast protein-protein interaction assays and screens.

    PubMed

    de Folter, Stefan; Immink, Richard G H

    2011-01-01

    Most transcription factors fulfill their role in protein complexes. As a consequence, information about their interaction capacity sheds light on a protein's function and the molecular mechanism underlying this activity. The yeast two-hybrid GAL4 (Y2H) assay is a powerful method to unravel and identify the composition of protein complexes. This in vivo based system makes use of two functional protein domains of the GAL4 transcription factor, each fused to a protein of interest. Upon interaction between the two proteins under study, a transcriptional activator gets reconstituted and reporter genes get activated, allowing the yeast to grow on selective medium. In this chapter protocols are given for Y2H library screening, directed Y2H screening, Y2H matrix screening, and YnH screening involving more than two proteins. PMID:21720951

  19. Development of a noninvasive diabetes screening device using the ratio of fluorescence to Rayleigh scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nai-Teng; Krantz, Brian S.; Eppstein, Jonathan A.; Ignotz, Keith D.; Samuels, Mark A.; Long, James R.; Price, John

    1996-07-01

    We have developed a new lens measurement system that simultaneously measures the intensities of fluorescence and Rayleigh components at various distances into the lens along the optical axis. The noninvasive measurement is performed through an undilated pupil, and with the assistance of a pupil tracking system that facilitates maintaining the x and y positions of the sample volume to within +/- 100 micrometers of any programmed 'lock' position. The intensity of the Rayleigh component that is used to normalize the measured fluorescent signal serves to correct the attenuation effects due to absorption and lens light scatter. This report, resulting from a SpectRx Site L clinical study using a refined instrumentation, presents analysis of fluorescence and Rayleigh data from the lenses of 923 controls and 239 diabetic subjects ranging from 23 to 75 years old. Fluorescence and Rayleigh data have been obtained via confocal mode from various locations nominally along the lens optical axis for controls and diabetics, at different ages, using three pairs of excitation and collection wavelengths: 364/495 nm, 434/495 nm, and 485/515 nm. For control subjects, there exists a strong, almost linear relationship between age and fluorescence, while diabetic subjects tend to deviate from this age-fluorescence relationship. Our data show that the lenses of diabetic patients are subject to an accelerated aging process, presumably due to an elevated level of brown and fluorescence protein adducts and crosslinks from nonenzymatic glycosylation. We have also shown that by using the measured Rayleigh profiles to normalize the measured fluorescence, most of the absorption effects are removed and therefore the separation between the fluorescence of diabetics and controls is greatly improved. Thus, the device for measuring fluorescence/Rayleigh ratios can be used to noninvasively screen populations for possible undiagnosed diabetes.

  20. A bright monomeric green fluorescent protein derived from Branchiostoma lanceolatum

    PubMed Central

    Shaner, Nathan C.; Lambert, Gerard G.; Chammas, Andrew; Ni, Yuhui; Cranfill, Paula J.; Baird, Michelle A.; Sell, Brittney R.; Allen, John R.; Day, Richard N.; Israelsson, Maria; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Jiwu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of fluorescent proteins spanning the entire visual spectrum, the bulk of modern imaging experiments continue to rely on variants of the green fluorescent protein derived from Aequorea victoria. Meanwhile, a great deal of recent effort has been devoted to engineering and improving red fluorescent proteins, and relatively little attention has been given to green and yellow variants. Here we report a novel monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein, mNeonGreen, which is derived from a tetrameric fluorescent protein from the cephalochordate Branchiostoma lanceolatum. This fluorescent protein is the brightest monomeric green or yellow fluorescent protein yet described, performs exceptionally well as a fusion tag for traditional imaging as well as stochastic single-molecule superresolution imaging, and is an excellent FRET acceptor for the newest generation of cyan fluorescent proteins. PMID:23524392

  1. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    SciTech Connect

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2015-06-27

    MORPHEUS II is a 96-condition initial crystallization screen formulated de novo. The screen incorporates reagents selected from the Protein Data Bank to yield crystals that are not observed in traditional conditions. In addition, the formulation facilitates the optimization and cryoprotection of crystals. High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions.

  2. Fluorescent Screening of Transgenic Arabidopsis Seeds without Germination1

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu; Bravdo, Ben-Ami; Shoseyov, Oded

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a reliable method for the screening and selection of Arabidopsis transgenic seeds within minutes without germination. Expression of the Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase gene BGL1 in the plant's endoplasmic reticulum was used as a visual marker, together with 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (MUGluc) as a substrate. Subsequent to incubation in a solution of MUGluc at room temperature for 2 to 15 min, transgenic seeds expressing BGL1 demonstrated a distinct fluorescent signal under UV light. Optimal screening conditions at room temperature were achieved between 75 and 450 μm MUGluc, at a pH of 2.5 to 5.0 and 2 to 5 min of incubation. No significant loss of viability was detected in transgenic seeds that were redried and stored for 45 d after incubation in MUGluc solution for 2 to 150 min. Transgenic plants expressing BGL1 displayed normal phenotypes relative to the wild type. Selection frequency was 3.1% ± 0.34% for the fluorescence selection method, while kanamycin resistant selection resulted in only 0.56% ± 0.13% using the same seed batch. This novel selection method is nondestructive, practical, and efficient, and eliminates the use of antibiotic genes. In addition, the procedure shortens the selection time from weeks to minutes. PMID:15208418

  3. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  4. Development of Tyrosinase Promoter-Based Fluorescent Assay for Screening of Anti-melanogenic Agents.

    PubMed

    Lee, JaeHo; Lee, SeungJun; Lee, ByungMan; Roh, KyungBaeg; Park, DeokHoon; Jung, EunSun

    2015-01-01

    For screening of skin-whitening ingredients that modulate inhibition of melanogenesis, tyrosinase promoter-based assay using a three-dimensional (3D) spheroid culture technique is a beneficial tool to improve the accuracy of raw material screening in cosmetics through mimicking of the in vivo microenvironment. Although the advantages of high-throughput screening (HTS) are widely known, there has been little focus on specific cell-based promoter assays for HTS in identifying skin-whitening ingredients that inhibit accumulation of melanin. The aim of this study was therefore to develop a large-scale compatible assay through pTyr-EGFP, an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-based tyrosinase-specific promoter, to seek potential melanogenesis inhibitors for cosmetic use. Herein, a stably transfected human melanoma cell line expressing EGFP under the control of a 2.2-kb fragment derived from the tyrosinase gene was generated. Spontaneous induction of the tyrosinase promoter by 3D spheroid culture resulted in increased expression of EGFP, providing a significant correlation with the tyrosinase mRNA level, and subsequent inhibition of tyrosinase activity. Importantly, the pTyr-EGFP system provided successful tracking of the changes in the live image and real-time monitoring. Thus tyrosinase promoter-based fluorescent assay using a 3D spheroid culture can be useful as a screening system for exploring the efficiency of anti-melanogenesis ingredients. PMID:26179334

  5. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  6. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-03-18

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications.

  7. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  8. Protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA): protein degradation meets the CRISPR-Cas9 library.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-06-29

    The regulation of protein stability is a fundamental issue for biophysical processes, but there has not previously been a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability. However, as reported in the article entitled "A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A," recently published in Cell Discovery, our team developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Based on our findings, we are confident that this efficient and unbiased screening method at the genome scale will be used by researchers worldwide to identify regulators of protein stability.

  9. Generation of red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Teoan; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) share many common genetic diseases with humans and development of disease models using a transgenic approach has long been awaited. However, due to the technical difficulty in obtaining fertilizable eggs and the unavailability of embryonic stem cells, no transgenic dog has been generated. Canine fetal fibroblasts were stably transfected with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene-expressing construct using retrovirus gene delivery method. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was then employed to replace the nucleus of an oocyte with the nucleus of the RFP-fibroblasts. Using this approach, we produced the first generation of transgenic dogs with four female and two male expressing RFP.

  10. Photoactivation and imaging of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Patterson, George H

    2011-07-01

    A major advance in the microscopic study of cells and tissues is the introduction of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, which can specifically mark proteins of interest within a living cell. Fluorescent proteins are now available that allow a pool of molecules to be "turned on" by photoactivation. This unit discusses technical aspects for the general use of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins and introduces some specific applications in the concluding remarks.

  11. Rapid screening test for porphyria diagnosis using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, A.; Stepp, H.; Homann, C.; Hennig, G.; Brittenham, G. M.; Vogeser, M.

    2015-07-01

    Porphyrias are rare genetic metabolic disorders, which result from deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the enzyme defect, different types of porphyrins and heme precursors accumulate for the different porphyria diseases in erythrocytes, liver, blood plasma, urine and stool. Patients with acute hepatic porphyrias can suffer from acute neuropathic attacks, which can lead to death when undiagnosed, but show only unspecific clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain. Therefore, in addition to chromatographic methods, a rapid screening test is required to allow for immediate identification and treatment of these patients. In this study, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were conducted on blood plasma and phantom material, mimicking the composition of blood plasma of porphyria patients. Hydrochloric acid was used to differentiate the occurring porphyrins (uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III) spectroscopically despite their initially overlapping excitation spectra. Plasma phantom mixtures were measured using dual wavelength excitation and the corresponding concentrations of uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III were determined. Additionally, three plasma samples of porphyria patients were examined and traces of coproporphyrin-III and uroporphyrin-III were identified. This study may therefore help to establish a rapid screening test method with spectroscopic differentiation of the occurring porphyrins, which consequently allows for the distinction of different porphyrias. This may be a valuable tool for clinical porphyria diagnosis and rapid or immediate treatment.

  12. Proton Pathways in Green Fluorescence Protein

    PubMed Central

    Agmon, Noam

    2005-01-01

    Proton pathways in green fluorescent protein (GFP) are more extended than previously reported. In the x-ray data of wild-type GFP, a two-step exit pathway exists from the active site to the protein surface, controlled by a threonine switch. A proton entry pathway begins at a glutamate-lysine cluster around Glu-5, and extends all the way to the buried Glu-222 near the active site. This structural evidence suggests that GFP may function as a portable light-driven proton-pump, with proton emitted in the excited state through the switchable exit pathway, and replenished from Glu-222 and the Glu-5 entry pathway in the ground state. PMID:15681647

  13. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence can be used to study protein crystal nucleation through methods such as anisotropy, quenching, and resonance energy transfer (FRET), to follow pH and ionic strength changes, and follow events occurring at the growth interface. We have postulated, based upon a range of experimental evidence that the growth unit of tetragonal hen egg white lysozyme is an octamer. Several fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme have been prepared. The fluorescent probes lucifer yellow (LY), cascade blue, and 5-((2-aminoethyl)aminonapthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS), have been covalently attached to ASP 101. All crystallize in the characteristic tetragonal form, indicating that the bound probes are likely laying within the active site cleft. Crystals of the LY and EDANS derivatives have been found to diffract to at least 1.7 A. A second group of derivatives is to the N-terminal amine group, and these do not crystallize as this site is part of the contact region between the adjacent 43 helix chains. However derivatives at these sites would not interfere with formation of the 43 helices in solution. Preliminary FRET studies have been carried out using N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and LY (Ex -425 nm, Em 525 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1 M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10(exp -5) M respectively). The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence intensity of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations reflected in the lower solubility. The calculated average distance between any two protein molecules at 5 x 10(exp -6) M is approximately 70nm, well beyond the

  14. Phycobiliprotein fusion proteins: versatile intensely fluorescent constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping A.; Tooley, Aaron J.

    2004-06-01

    Since 1982, phycobiliproteins have served as fluorescent labels in a wide variety of cell and molecule analyses. The exceptional spectroscopic properties of these labels include very high absorbance coefficients and quantum yields, and large Stokes shifts. The spectroscopic diversity of these reagents is restricted to a subset of naturally occurring phycobiliproteins with stable assembly states in vitro, whose target specificity is generated by chemical conjugation to proteins or small molecules. The latter step generates heterogeneity. These limitations have been overcome by expressing various recombinant phycobiliprotein constructs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Modular recombinant phycobiliprotein-based labels were constructed with some or all of the following features (a) an affinity purification tag; (b) a stable oligomerization domain (to maintain stable higher order assemblies of the phycobiliprotein monomers at very low protein concentration); (c) a biospecific recognition domain. Such phycobiliprotein constructs are readily purified from crude cell extracts by affinity chromatography and used directly as fluorescent labels. To generate constructs for intracellular in vivo labeling, the entire pathways for the biosynthesis of the His-tagged holo- α (phycocyanobilin-bearing) subunit of phycocyanin (emission max. 641 nm) and of the His-tagged holo-α (phycobiliviolin-bearing) subunit of phycoerythrocyanin (emission max. 582 nm) were reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

  15. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  16. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  17. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fenglei

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  18. A fluorescent multiplex-DGGE screening test for mutations in the BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Kuperstein, Graciela; Jack, Elaine; Narod, Steven A

    2006-01-01

    Screening for mutations in the BRCA1 gene is challenging because of the wide spectrum of mutations found in this large gene. As the extensive exon 11 is commonly screened by the protein truncation test (PTT), here a fluorescent multiplex denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (FMD) mutation screening technique was developed to test the remaining numerous small exons and splice sites of the gene. The method is based upon the use of an efficient multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the target regions, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) separation of the amplicon mixture, and the immediate achievement of results by wet gel scanning. The technique was applied to screen 16 samples with different BRCA1 sequence variants distributed over 12 exons. All variants were detected. In addition, 188 DNA samples from ovarian cancer patients were screened, identifying 22 new sequence variants (11.7% of the samples) and 243 common polymorphisms in the BRCA1 locus. Variants included 16 single nucleotide substitutions, 3 deletions of 2 nucleotides, 1 deletion of 4 nucleotides, and 2 insertions of 1 nucleotide. The FMD test provides an accurate, fast, nonradioactive and cost-efficient way to scan the BRCA1 gene with high sensitivity and an ease of result interpretation. This technique may prove to be a useful research tool for the detection of mutations and polymorphisms in the BRCA1 gene and for large-scale epidemiologic studies. PMID:16544996

  19. Fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1992-12-01

    A fluorescent screen was used to monitor relative beam position and spot size of a 56-MeV electron beam in the linac test stand. A chromium doped alumina ceramic screen inserted into the beam was monitored by a video camera. The resulting image was captured using a frame grabber and stored into memory. Reconstruction and analysis of the stored image was performed using PV-WAVE. This paper will discuss the hardware and software implementation of the fluorescent screen and imaging system. Proposed improvements for the APS linac fluorescent screens and image processing will also be discussed.

  20. Recent advances on in vivo imaging with fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In vivo imaging with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and other fluorescent proteins is revolutionizing cancer biology and other fields of in vivo biology (Hoffman, 2005; Hoffman and Yang, 2006a,b,c). Our laboratory pioneered the use of GFP for in vivo imaging in 1997 (Chishima et al., 1997). This chapter highlights recent developments from our laboratory on both macro and micro in vivo imaging by using fluorescent proteins.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of enhanced green fluorescent protein in protein aggregates with expanded polyglutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is one of the characteristic steps in a number of neurodegenerative diseases eventually leading to neuronal death and thorough study of aggregation is required for the development of effective therapy. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the fluorescence dynamics of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in fusion with the polyQ-expanded polyglutamine stretch. At the expansion of polyQ above 39 residues, it has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregates, and is responsible for Huntington's disease. The results of the experiments show that expression of the eGFP in fusion with the 97Q protein leads to the decrease of the eGFP fluorescence lifetime by ~300 ps. This phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells, where the aggregation in polyQ is prevented. We demonstrate that the lifetime decrease observed is related to the aggregation per se and discuss the possible role of refractive index and homo-FRET in these dynamics.

  2. A continuous fluorescent assay for protein prenyltransferases measuring diphosphate release.

    PubMed

    Pais, June E; Bowers, Katherine E; Stoddard, Andrea K; Fierke, Carol A

    2005-10-15

    Protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I catalyze the transfer of a 15- and a 20-carbon prenyl group, respectively, from a prenyl diphosphate to a cysteine residue at the carboxyl terminus of target proteins, with the concomitant release of diphosphate. Common substrates include oncogenic Ras proteins, which are implicated in up to 30% of all human cancers, making prenyltransferases a viable target for chemotherapeutic drugs. A coupled assay has been developed to measure the rate constant of diphosphate (PPi) dissociation during the prenyltransferase reaction under both single and multiple turnover conditions. In this assay, the PPi group produced in the prenyltransferase reaction is rapidly cleaved by inorganic pyrophosphatase to form phosphate (Pi), which is then bound by a coumarin-labeled phosphate binding protein from Escherichia coli, resulting in a fluorescence increase. The observed rate constant for PPi release is equal to the rate constant of prenylation of the peptide, as measured by other assays, so that this nonradioactive assay can be used to measure prenyltransferase activity under either single or multiple turnover conditions. This assay can be adapted for high-throughput screening for potential prenyltransferase substrates and inhibitors.

  3. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Red Fluorescent Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konold, Patrick Eugene

    Red-emitting homologues (RFPs) of the native Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with emission wavelengths beyond 650 nm are desirable probes for in vivo imaging experiments. They offer the potential for deeper tissue penetration and lower background scatter given a cleaner spectral window. However, bioimaging applications are hindered by poor photophysics ( e.g. low fluorescence quantum yield, high photobleaching), which limits experimental resolution and represents a significant obstacle towards utilization for low copy-number, long-duration imaging applications. In this thesis, a variety of femtosecond nonlinear electronic spectroscopies were employed jointly with site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the photophysical properties of RFPs. In one study, the molecular mechanism of red emission was pursued in two notable RFPs, mPlum and TagRFP675. Solvation dynamics observed with time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy were interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations to indicate that their red-emission is correlated with the ability of specific chromophore-sidechain hydrogen-bonding interactions to interconvert between direct and water-mediated states. In a second set of studies, two-dimensional double quantum coherence spectroscopy was used to probe the electronic transitions of mPlum. It was discovered that it displayed a response distinctly different from an organic dye in bulk solvent. Modeling indicate of these spectra indicate the spectral features may be attributed to the existence of multiple high-lying (n>1) excited states. The results provide new insight into the electronic structure of these widely used fluorescent probes.

  4. A fluorescent reporter for mapping cellular protein-protein interactions in time and space.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Daniel; Neller, Joachim; Kestler, Hans A; Kraus, Johann; Dünkler, Alexander; Johnsson, Nils

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a fluorescent reporter for monitoring protein-protein interactions in living cells. The method is based on the Split-Ubiquitin method and uses the ratio of two auto-fluorescent reporter proteins as signal for interaction (SPLIFF). The mating of two haploid yeast cells initiates the analysis and the interactions are followed online by two-channel time-lapse microscopy of the diploid cells during their first cell cycle. Using this approach we could with high spatio-temporal resolution visualize the differences between the interactions of the microtubule binding protein Stu2p with two of its binding partners, monitor the transient association of a Ran-GTPase with its receptors at the nuclear pore, and distinguish between protein interactions at the polar cortical domain at different phases of polar growth. These examples further demonstrate that protein-protein interactions identified from large-scale screens can be effectively followed up by high-resolution single-cell analysis. PMID:23511205

  5. Cell tracking using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Kohei; Tsujii, Hitomi; Omura, Tomomi

    2006-01-01

    The tracking of cell fate, shape and migration is an essential component in the study of the development of multicellular organisms. Here we report a protocol that uses the protein Kaede, which is fluorescent green after synthesis but can be photoconverted red by violet or UV light. We have used Kaede along with confocal laser scanning microscopy to track labeled cells in a pattern of interest in zebrafish embryos. This technique allows the visualization of cell movements and the tracing of neuronal shapes. We provide illustrative examples of expression by mRNA injection, mosaic expression by DNA injection, and the creation of permanent transgenic fish with the UAS-Gal4 system to visualize morphogenetic processes such as neurulation, placode formation and navigation of early commissural axons in the hindbrain. The procedure can be adapted to other photoconvertible and reversible fluorescent molecules, including KikGR and Dronpa; these molecules can be used in combination with two-photon confocal microscopy to specifically highlight cells buried in tissues. The total time needed to carry out the protocol involving transient expression of Kaede by injection of mRNA or DNA, photoconversion and imaging is 2-8 d.

  6. A Fluorescence-Based Assay for Proteinuria Screening in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Hanke, Nils; King, Benjamin L; Vaske, Bernhard; Haller, Hermann; Schiffer, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of genes compromising the glomerular filtration barrier in rodent models using transgenic or knockdown approaches is time- and resource-consuming and often leads to unsatisfactory results. Therefore, it would be beneficial to have a selection tool indicating that your gene of interest is in fact associated with proteinuria. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a rapid screening tool to study effects in glomerular filtration barrier integrity after genetic manipulation. We use either injection of high-molecular-weight dextrans or a transgenic fluorescent fish line [Tg(l-fabp:DBP:EGFP)] expressing a vitamin D-binding protein fused with eGFP for indirect detection of proteinuria. A loss of high-molecular-weight proteins from the circulation of the fish into the urine can be identified by monitoring fluorescence intensity in the zebrafish eye. Paired with an optimized analysis method, this assay provides an effective screening solution to detect filtration barrier damage with proteinuria before moving to a mammalian system. PMID:26125680

  7. A Fluorescence-Based Assay for Proteinuria Screening in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    King, Benjamin L.; Vaske, Bernhard; Haller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Analysis of genes compromising the glomerular filtration barrier in rodent models using transgenic or knockdown approaches is time- and resource-consuming and often leads to unsatisfactory results. Therefore, it would be beneficial to have a selection tool indicating that your gene of interest is in fact associated with proteinuria. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a rapid screening tool to study effects in glomerular filtration barrier integrity after genetic manipulation. We use either injection of high-molecular-weight dextrans or a transgenic fluorescent fish line [Tg(l-fabp:DBP:EGFP)] expressing a vitamin D-binding protein fused with eGFP for indirect detection of proteinuria. A loss of high-molecular-weight proteins from the circulation of the fish into the urine can be identified by monitoring fluorescence intensity in the zebrafish eye. Paired with an optimized analysis method, this assay provides an effective screening solution to detect filtration barrier damage with proteinuria before moving to a mammalian system. PMID:26125680

  8. A novel pair of split venus fragments to detect protein-protein interactions by in vitro and in vivo bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical components of almost every cellular process. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method has been used to detect protein-protein interactions in both living cells and cell-free systems. The BiFC method is based on the principle that a fluorescent protein is reassembled from its two complementary non-fluorescent fragments when an interaction occurs between two proteins, each one fused to each fragment. In vivo and in vitro BiFC assays, which use a new pair of split Venus fragments composed of VN210 (amino acids 1-210) and VC210 (amino acids 210-238), are useful tools to detect and quantify various protein-protein interactions (including the cofilin-actin and Ras-Raf interactions) with high specificity and low background fluorescence. Moreover, these assays can be applied to screen small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  9. Detergent-Specific Membrane Protein Crystallization Screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A suite of reagents has been developed for three-dimensional crystallization of integral membranes present in solution as protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The compositions of these reagents have been determined in part by proximity to the phase boundaries (lower consolute boundaries) of the detergents present in the PDCs. The acquisition of some of the requisite phase-boundary data and the preliminary design of several of the detergent- specific screens was supported by a NASA contract. At the time of expiration of the contract, a partial set of preliminary screens had been developed. This work has since been extended under non-NASA sponsorship, leading to near completion of a set of 20 to 30 different and unique detergent- specific 96-condition screens.

  10. Ultra-sensitive fluorescent proteins for imaging neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsai-Wen; Wardill, Trevor J.; Sun, Yi; Pulver, Stefan R.; Renninger, Sabine L.; Baohan, Amy; Schreiter, Eric R.; Kerr, Rex A.; Orger, Michael B.; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L.; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fluorescent calcium sensors are widely used to image neural activity. Using structure-based mutagenesis and neuron-based screening, we developed a family of ultra-sensitive protein calcium sensors (GCaMP6) that outperformed other sensors in cultured neurons and in zebrafish, flies, and mice in vivo. In layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of the mouse visual cortex, GCaMP6 reliably detected single action potentials in neuronal somata and orientation-tuned synaptic calcium transients in individual dendritic spines. The orientation tuning of structurally persistent spines was largely stable over timescales of weeks. Orientation tuning averaged across spine populations predicted the tuning of their parent cell. Although the somata of GABAergic neurons showed little orientation tuning, their dendrites included highly tuned dendritic segments (5 - 40 micrometers long). GCaMP6 sensors thus provide new windows into the organization and dynamics of neural circuits over multiple spatial and temporal scales. PMID:23868258

  11. Designed Modular Proteins as Scaffolds To Stabilize Fluorescent Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Couleaud, Pierre; Adan-Bermudez, Sergio; Aires, Antonio; Mejías, Sara H; Sot, Begoña; Somoza, Alvaro; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2015-12-14

    Proteins have been used as templates to stabilize fluorescent metal nanoclusters thus obtaining stable fluorescent structures, and their fluorescent properties being modulated by the type of protein employed. Designed consensus tetratricopeptide repeat (CTPR) proteins are suited candidates as templates for the stabilization of metal nanoclusters due to their modular structural and functional properties. Here, we have studied the ability of CTPR proteins to stabilize fluorescent gold nanoclusters giving rise to designed functional hybrid nanostructures. First, we have investigated the influence of the number of CTPR units, as well as the presence of cysteine residues in the CTPR protein, on the fluorescent properties of the protein-stabilized gold nanoclusters. Synthetic protocols to retain the protein structure and function have been developed, since the structural and functional integrity of the protein template is critical for further applications. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, a CTPR module with specific binding capabilities has been used to stabilize gold nanoclusters with positive results. Remarkably, the protein-stabilized gold nanocluster obtained combines both the fluorescence properties of the nanoclusters and the functional properties of the protein. The fluorescence changes in nanoclusters fluorescence have been successfully used as a sensor to detect when the specific ligand was recognized by the CTPR module.

  12. Very Bright Green Fluorescent Proteins from the Pontellid Copepod Pontella mimocerami

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Marguerite E.; Scherrer, Michael P.; Ferrari, Frank D.; Matz, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluorescent proteins (FP) homologous to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria have revolutionized biomedical research due to their usefulness as genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Fluorescent proteins from copepods are particularly promising due to their high brightness and rapid fluorescence development. Results Here we report two novel FPs from Pontella mimocerami (Copepoda, Calanoida, Pontellidae), which were identified via fluorescence screening of a bacterial cDNA expression library prepared from the whole-body total RNA of the animal. The proteins are very similar in sequence and spectroscopic properties. They possess high molar extinction coefficients (79,000 M−1 cm−) and quantum yields (0.92), which make them more than two-fold brighter than the most common FP marker, EGFP. Both proteins form oligomers, which we were able to counteract to some extent by mutagenesis of the N-terminal region; however, this particular modification resulted in substantial drop in brightness. Conclusions The spectroscopic characteristics of the two P. mimocerami proteins place them among the brightest green FPs ever described. These proteins may therefore become valuable additions to the in vivo imaging toolkit. PMID:20644720

  13. Quantitation of carcinogen bound protein adducts by fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liang-Shang; Otteson, Michael S.; Doxtader, Mark M.; Skipper, Paul L.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    A highly significant correlation of aflatoxin B 1 serum albumin adduct level with daily aflatoxin B 1 intake was observed in a molecular epidemiological study of aflatoxin carcinogenesis which used conventional fluorescence spectroscopy methods for adduct quantitation. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence techniques have been employed to quantitate antibenzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide derived globin peptide adducts. Fast and efficient methods to isolate the peptide adducts as well as eliminate protein fluorescence background are described. A detection limit of several femtomoles has been achieved. Experimental and technical considerations of low temperature synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence line narrowing to improve the detection sensitivities are also presented.

  14. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  15. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Steven H D; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M

    2010-04-22

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals.

  16. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Steven H. D.; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals. PMID:20018790

  17. Fluorescent-protein-based probes: general principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-01-01

    An important application of fluorescent proteins is to derive genetically encoded fluorescent probes that can actively respond to cellular dynamics such as pH change, redox signaling, calcium oscillation, enzyme activities, and membrane potential. Despite the large diverse group of fluorescent-protein-based probes, a few basic principles have been established and are shared by most of these probes. In this article, the focus is on these general principles and strategies that guide the development of fluorescent-protein-based probes. A few examples are provided in each category to illustrate the corresponding principles. Since these principles are quite straightforward, others may adapt them to create fluorescent probes for their own interest. Hopefully, the development of the ever-growing family of fluorescent-protein-based probes will no longer be limited to a small number of laboratories specialized in senor development, leading to the situation that biological studies will be bettered assisted by genetically encoded sensors.

  18. Toward fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Patricia R.; Jones, Anita C.; Baxter, Robert L.; Baxter, Helen C.; Whittaker, A. Gavin; Campbell, Gaynor A.

    2004-06-01

    Prion proteins are the infectious agents that cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) in humans. These proteins are particularly resistant to normal sterilization procedures, and the theoretical risk of prion transmission via surgical instruments is of current public and professional concern. We are currently investigating fluorescence methods for the detection of proteins on surfaces, with a view to developing an optical-fiber-based system for routine, online monitoring of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments, in hospital sterilization departments. This paper presents preliminary results on the detection of femtomole amounts of fluorescently labelled protein on surgical steel and discusses some of the problems involved in the detection of fluorescence from metal samples.

  19. Pooled screening for antiproliferative inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Nim, Satra; Jeon, Jouhyun; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Ivarsson, Ylva; Moffat, Jason; Tarasova, Nadya; Kim, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are emerging as a promising new class of drug targets. Here, we present a novel high-throughput approach to screen inhibitors of PPIs in cells. We designed a library of 50,000 human peptide-binding motifs and used a pooled lentiviral system to express them intracellularly and screen for their effects on cell proliferation. We thereby identified inhibitors that drastically reduced the viability of a pancreatic cancer line (RWP1) while leaving a control line virtually unaffected. We identified their target interactions computationally, and validated a subset in experiments. We also discovered their potential mechanisms of action, including apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Finally, we confirmed that synthetic lipopeptide versions of our inhibitors have similarly specific and dosage-dependent effects on cancer cell growth. Our screen reveals new drug targets and peptide drug leads, and it provides a rich data set covering phenotypes for the inhibition of thousands of interactions. PMID:26900867

  20. Fluorescence Polarization Screening Assays for Small Molecule Allosteric Modulators of ABL Kinase Function

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Prerna; Shi, Haibin; Baumgartner, Matthew; Camacho, Carlos J.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The ABL protein-tyrosine kinase regulates intracellular signaling pathways controlling diverse cellular processes and contributes to several forms of cancer. The kinase activity of ABL is repressed by intramolecular interactions involving its regulatory Ncap, SH3 and SH2 domains. Small molecules that allosterically regulate ABL kinase activity through its non-catalytic domains may represent selective probes of ABL function. Here we report a screening assay for chemical modulators of ABL kinase activity that target the regulatory interaction of the SH3 domain with the SH2-kinase linker. This fluorescence polarization (FP) assay is based on a purified recombinant ABL protein consisting of the N-cap, SH3 and SH2 domains plus the SH2-kinase linker (N32L protein) and a short fluorescein-labeled probe peptide that binds to the SH3 domain. In assay development experiments, we found that the probe peptide binds to the recombinant ABL N32L protein in vitro, producing a robust FP signal that can be competed with an excess of unlabeled peptide. The FP signal is not observed with control N32L proteins bearing either an inactivating mutation in the SH3 domain or enhanced SH3:linker interaction. A pilot screen of 1200 FDA-approved drugs identified four compounds that specifically reduced the FP signal by at least three standard deviations from the untreated controls. Secondary assays showed that one of these hit compounds, the antithrombotic drug dipyridamole, enhances ABL kinase activity in vitro to a greater extent than the previously described ABL agonist, DPH. Docking studies predicted that this compound binds to a pocket formed at the interface of the SH3 domain and the linker, suggesting that it activates ABL by disrupting this regulatory interaction. These results show that screening assays based on the non-catalytic domains of ABL can identify allosteric small molecule regulators of kinase function, providing a new approach to selective drug discovery for this important

  1. Fluorescence study of Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Wasylewski, M; Małecki, J; Wasylewski, Z

    1995-07-01

    Time-resolved, steady-state fluorescence and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD) have been used to resolve the fluorescence contributions of the two tryptophan residues, Trp-13 and Trp-85, in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). The iodide and acrylamide quenching data show that in CRP one tryptophan residue, Trp-85, is buried within the protein matrix and the other, Trp-13, is moderately exposed on the surface of the protein. Fluorescence-quenching-resolved spectra show that Trp-13 has emission at about 350 nm and contributes 76-83% to the total fluorescence emission. The Trp-85, unquenchable by iodide and acrylamide, has the fluorescence emission at about 337 nm. The time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that Trp-13 has a longer fluorescence decay time. The Trp-85 exhibits a shorter fluorescence decay time. In the CRP-cAMP complex the Trp-85, previously buried in the apoprotein becomes totally exposed to the iodide and acrylamide quenchers. The FDCD spectra indicate that in the CRP-cAMP complex Trp-85 remains in the same environment as in the protein alone. It has been proposed that the binding of cAMP to CRP is accompanied by a hinge reorientation of two protein domains. This allows for penetration of the quencher molecules into the Trp-85 residue previously buried in the protein matrix. PMID:8590598

  2. Screening for oligonucleotide binding affinity by a convenient fluorescence competition assay.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J G; Liu, X; Balasubramanian, S

    1999-09-01

    A competitive homogeneous quenched fluorescence assay system is described for the high throughput screening of DNA conjugates that bind to single-stranded DNA. Fluorescence signal is generated by competitive binding of the sample molecule to a target strand labelled with a quencher probe, which is otherwise hybridised to a complementary strand containing a fluorescent probe. Thus fluorescence generated is related to the affinity of the sample. Competitive analysis of a number of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates gave data that correlated well with the corresponding UV melting data. The assay will be useful for screening of large numbers of potential single-stranded binding molecules.

  3. Identification of a Fluorescent Protein from Rhacostoma Atlantica.

    PubMed

    Tota, Michael R; Allen, Jeanna M; Karolin, Jan O; Geddes, Chris D; Ward, William W

    2016-09-01

    We have cloned a novel fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Rhacostoma atlantica. The closest known related fluorescent protein is the Phialidium yellow fluorescent protein, with only a 55% amino acid sequence identity. A somewhat unusual alanine-tyrosine-glycine amino acid sequence forms the presumed chromophore of the novel protein. The protein has an absorption peak at 466 nm and a fluorescence emission peak at 498 nm. The fluorescence quantum yield was measured to be 0.77 and the extinction coefficient is 58 200 M(-1) cm(-1) . Several mutations were identified that shift the absorption peak to about 494 nm and the emission peak to between 512 and 514 nm. PMID:27288884

  4. Screening for small molecules' bilayer-modifying potential using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Andersen, Olaf S

    2010-08-01

    Many drugs and other small molecules used to modulate biological function are amphiphiles that adsorb at the bilayer/solution interface and thereby alter lipid bilayer properties. This is important because membrane proteins are energetically coupled to their host bilayer by hydrophobic interactions. Changes in bilayer properties thus alter membrane protein function, which provides a possible mechanism for "off-target" drug effects. We have previously shown that channels formed by the linear gramicidins are suitable probes for changes in lipid bilayer properties, as experienced by bilayer-spanning proteins. We now report a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay for changes in bilayer properties. The assay is based on measuring the time course of fluorescence quenching in fluorophore-loaded large unilamellar vesicles, due to entry of a gramicidin channel-permeable quencher. The method is scalable and suitable for both mechanistic studies and high-throughput screening for bilayer-perturbing, potential off-target effects, which we illustrate using capsaicin (Cap) and other compounds.

  5. High expression of green fluorescent protein in Pichia pastoris leads to formation of fluorescent particles.

    PubMed

    Lenassi Zupan, Ana; Trobec, Sonja; Gaberc-Porekar, Vladka; Menart, Viktor

    2004-04-01

    Wild type gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was stably integrated into the Pichia pastoris genome and yielded an expression level of over 40% of total cellular protein. The high cytoplasmic concentration of fluorescent (properly folded and processed) GFP caused the formation of fluorescent spherical structures, which could be observed by fluorescence or confocal microscopy after controlled permeabilization of the yeast cells with 0.2% N-lauroyl sarcosine (NLS). Fluorescent GFP particles were also isolated after removal of the cell wall and found to be quite resistant to 0.2% N-lauroyl sarcosine. SDS-PAGE analysis of the isolated fluorescent particles revealed the presence of an 80 kDa protein (alcohol oxidase) and GFP (30%). We conclude that GFP is able to enter spontaneously into the peroxisomes and is inserted into densely packed layers of alcohol oxidase. Consequently, the formation of similar fluorescent particles can also be expected in other organisms when using high-level expression systems. As GFP is widely used in fusion with other proteins as a reporter for protein localization and for many other applications in biotechnology, care must be taken to avoid false interpretations of targeting or trafficking mechanisms inside the cells. In addition, when whole cells or cytoplasmic fractions are used for the quantitative determination of GFP levels, incorrect and misleading values of GFP could be obtained due to the formation of fluorescent particles containing material inside which is not available for fluorescence measurements.

  6. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  7. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Gaffney, Jean P; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  8. Flow-Based Single Cell Deposition for High-Throughput Screening of Protein Libraries.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Cassandra; Pizzey, Arnold; Kalber, Tammy; Badar, Adam; Lythgoe, Mark; Pule, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The identification and engineering of proteins having refined or novel characteristics is an important area of research in many scientific fields. Protein modelling has enabled the rational design of unique proteins, but high-throughput screening of large libraries is still required to identify proteins with potentially valuable properties. Here we report on the development and evaluation of a novel fluorescent activated cell sorting based screening platform. Single bacterial cells, expressing a protein library to be screened, are electronically sorted and deposited onto plates containing solid nutrient growth media in a dense matrix format of between 44 and 195 colonies/cm2. We show that this matrix format is readily applicable to machine interrogation (<30 seconds per plate) and subsequent bioinformatic analysis (~60 seconds per plate) thus enabling the high-throughput screening of the protein library. We evaluate this platform and show that bacteria containing a bioluminescent protein can be spectrally analysed using an optical imager, and a rare clone (0.5% population) can successfully be identified, picked and further characterised. To further enhance this screening platform, we have developed a prototype electronic sort stream multiplexer, that when integrated into a commercial flow cytometric sorter, increases the rate of colony deposition by 89.2% to 24 colonies per second. We believe that the screening platform described here is potentially the foundation of a new generation of high-throughput screening technologies for proteins. PMID:26536118

  9. Structure-based Drug Screening and Ligand-Based Drug Screening Toward Protein-Compound Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi

    2007-12-01

    We developed two new methods to improve the accuracy of molecular interaction data using a protein-compound affinity matrix calculated by a protein-compound docking software. One method is a structure-based in silico drug screening method and another method is a ligand-based in silico drug screening method. These methods were applied to enhance the database enrichment of in silico drug screening and in silico target protein screening.

  10. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  11. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  12. Green Fluorescent Protein with Anionic Tryptophan-Based Chromophore and Long Fluorescence Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Lidsky, Peter V.; Gorbachev, Dmitry A.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu.; Pereverzeva, Alina R.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Zherdeva, Victoria V.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Bommarius, Andreas S.; Sharonov, George V.; Lindquist, Jake R.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP—the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins. PMID:26200874

  13. Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Lewis, Cris; Mahan, Cynthia A.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2009-04-14

    Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow-separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

  14. Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Lewis, Cris; Mahan, Cynthia A.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2011-04-26

    Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

  15. Antibody Labeling with Fluorescent Dyes Using Magnetic Protein A and Protein G Beads.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies labeled with small molecules like fluorescent dyes, cytotoxic drugs, and radioactive tracers are essential tools in biomedical research, immunodiagnostics and more recently as therapeutic agents. Traditional methods for labeling antibodies with small molecules require purified antibodies at relatively high concentration, involve multiple dialysis steps and have limited throughput. However, several applications, including the field of Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs), will benefit from new methods that will allow labeling of antibodies directly from cell media. Such methods may allow antibodies to be screened in biologically relevant assays, for example, the receptor-mediated antibody internalization assay in the case of ADCs. Here, we describe a method (on-bead method) that enables labeling of small amounts of antibodies directly from cell media. This approach utilizes high capacity magnetic Protein A and Protein G affinity beads to capture antibodies from the cell media followed by labeling with small molecules using either amine or thiol chemistry and subsequent elution of the labeled antibodies. Taking fluorescent dyes as surrogates for small molecules, we demonstrate the on-bead labeling of three different mouse antibodies directly from cell media using both amine and thiol labeling chemistry. The high binding affinity of antibodies to Protein A and Protein G ensures high recoveries as well as high purity of the labeled antibodies. In addition, use of magnetic beads allows multiple samples to be handled manually, thereby significantly improving labeling throughput. PMID:27685323

  16. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  17. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding. PMID:23056480

  18. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  19. Chlorophyll Fluorescence as a Possible Tool for Salinity Tolerance Screening in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed Central

    Belkhodja, R.; Morales, F.; Abadia, A.; Gomez-Aparisi, J.; Abadia, J.

    1994-01-01

    The application of chlorophyll fluorescence measurements to screening barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) genotypes for salinity tolerance has been investigated. Excised barley leaves were cut under water and incubated with the cut end immersed in water or in a 100-mM NaCl solution, either in the dark or in high light. Changes in rapid fluorescence kinetics occurred in excised barley leaves exposed to the saline solution only when the incubation was carried out in the presence of high light. Fluorescence changes consisted of decreases in the variable to maximum fluorescence ratio and in increases in the relative proportion of variable fluorescence leading to point I in the Kautsky fluorescence induction curve. These relative increases in fluorescence at point I appeared to arise from a delayed plastoquinone reoxidation in the dark, since they disappeared after short, far-red illumination, which is known to excite photosystem I preferentially. We show that a significant correlation existed between some fluorescence parameters, measured after a combined salt and high-light treatment, and other independent measurements of salinity tolerance. These results suggest that chlorophyll fluorescence, and especially the relative fluorescence at point I in the Kautsky fluorescence induction curve, could be used for the screening of barley genotypes for salinity tolerance. PMID:12232117

  20. A Laboratory Exercise for Visible Gel Filtration Chromatography Using Fluorescent Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified,…

  1. A never ending race for new and improved fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins are now used as tools for research in all organisms. There has been massive progress over the past 15 years in creating a palette of fluorescent proteins with a wide spectrum of specific properties. One of the big challenges is to decide which variant may be best for a certain application. A recent article by Mann et al. in BMC Biotechnology describes a new orange fluorescent protein in plants. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6750/12/17 PMID:22554191

  2. Ultraviolet fluorescence of coelenteramide and coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins. Experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Roza R; Tomilin, Felix N; Kuzubov, Alexander A; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S

    2016-09-01

    Coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins are products of bioluminescent reactions of marine coelenterates. They are called 'discharged photoproteins'. Their light-induced fluorescence spectra are variable, depending considerably on external conditions. Current work studies a dependence of light-induced fluorescence spectra of discharged photoproteins obelin, aequorin, and clytin on excitation energy. It was demonstrated that photoexcitation to the upper electron-excited states (260-300nm) of the discharged photoproteins initiates a fluorescence peak in the near UV region, in addition to the blue-green emission. To characterize the UV fluorescence, the light-induced fluorescence spectra of coelenteramide (CLM), fluorophore of the discharged photoproteins, were studied in methanol solution. Similar to photoproteins, the CLM spectra depended on photoexcitation energy; the additional peak (330nm) in the near UV region was observed in CLM fluorescence at higher excitation energy (260-300nm). Quantum chemical calculations by time depending method with B3LYP/cc-pVDZ showed that the conjugated pyrazine-phenolic fragment and benzene moiety of CLM molecule are responsible for the additional UV fluorescence peak. Quantum yields of CLM fluorescence in methanol were 0.028±0.005 at 270-340nm photoexcitation. A conclusion was made that the UV emission of CLM might contribute to the UV fluorescence of the discharged photoproteins. The study develops knowledge on internal energy transfer in biological structures - complexes of proteins with low-weight aromatic molecules. PMID:27400455

  3. Dependence of fluorescent protein brightness on protein concentration in solution and enhancement of it

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Takamitsu J.; Fujita, Hideaki; Kitamura, Akira; Horio, Takashi; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Kinjo, Masataka; Sasaki, Akira; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Ichimura, Taro; Imada, Katsumi; Nagai, Takeharu; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been widely used in biology because of their compatibility and varied applications in living specimens. Fluorescent proteins are often undesirably sensitive to intracellular conditions such as pH and ion concentration, generating considerable issues at times. However, harnessing these intrinsic sensitivities can help develop functional probes. In this study, we found that the fluorescence of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) depends on the protein concentration in the solution and that this dependence can be enhanced by adding a glycine residue in to the YFP; we applied this finding to construct an intracellular protein-crowding sensor. A Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair, involving a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) insensitive to protein concentration and a glycine-inserted YFP, works as a genetically encoded probe to evaluate intracellular crowding. By measuring the fluorescence of the present FRET probe, we were able to detect dynamic changes in protein crowding in living cells. PMID:26956628

  4. Novel Phenotypic Fluorescent Three-Dimensional Platforms for High-throughput Drug Screening and Personalized Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changge; Avis, Ingalill; Salomon, David; Cuttitta, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We have developed novel phenotypic fluorescent three-dimensional co-culture platforms that efficiently and economically screen anti-angiogenic/anti-metastatic drugs on a high-throughput scale. Individual cell populations can be identified and isolated for protein/gene expression profiling studies and cellular movement/interactions can be tracked by time-lapse cinematography. More importantly, these platforms closely parallel the in vivo angiogenic and metastatic outcomes of a given tumor xenograft in the nude mouse model but, unlike in vivo models, our co-culture platforms produce comparable results in five to nine days. Potentially, by incorporating cancer patient biopsies, the co-culture platforms should greatly improve the effectiveness and efficiency of personalized chemotherapy. PMID:23833685

  5. LucY: A Versatile New Fluorescent Reporter Protein

    PubMed Central

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrast to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions. PMID:25906065

  6. LucY: A versatile new fluorescent reporter protein

    SciTech Connect

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2015-04-23

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrast to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.

  7. LucY: A versatile new fluorescent reporter protein

    DOE PAGES

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2015-04-23

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrastmore » to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.« less

  8. High Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E.; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green-fluorescent-protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug ‘hits’ that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wildtype-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. ‘Hits’ of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant-IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients. PMID:26795471

  9. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  10. Development of a Fluorescent Quenching Based High Throughput Assay to Screen for Calcineurin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Syeb, Kathleen; Concannon, John; Callegari, Keri; Soto, Claudio; Glicksman, Marcie A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no effective treatment available for major neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's disease. One of most promising therapeutic approaches under development focuses on inhibiting the misfolding and aggregation pathway. However, it is likely that by the time clinical symptoms appear, there is a large accumulation of misfolded aggregates and a very substantial damage to the brain. Thus, it seems that at the clinical stage of the disease it is necessary also to develop strategies aiming to prevent the neuronal damage produced by already formed misfolded aggregates. Chronic activation of calcineurin (CaN), a type IIB phosphatase, has been implicated as a pivotal molecule connecting synaptic loss and neuronal damage to protein misfolding. The fact that the crystal structure of CaN is also well established makes it an ideal target for drug discovery. CaN activity assays for High Throughput Screening (HTS) reported so far are based on absorbance. In this article we report the development of a fluorescent quenching based CaN activity assay suitable for robotic screening of large chemical libraries to find novel inhibitors. The assay yielded a Z score of 0.84 with coefficient of variance ≤ 15%. Our results also show that this assay can be used to identify CaN inhibitors with a wide range of potencies. PMID:26176772

  11. Development of a Fluorescent Quenching Based High Throughput Assay to Screen for Calcineurin Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Syeb, Kathleen; Concannon, John; Callegari, Keri; Soto, Claudio; Glicksman, Marcie A

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no effective treatment available for major neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. One of most promising therapeutic approaches under development focuses on inhibiting the misfolding and aggregation pathway. However, it is likely that by the time clinical symptoms appear, there is a large accumulation of misfolded aggregates and a very substantial damage to the brain. Thus, it seems that at the clinical stage of the disease it is necessary also to develop strategies aiming to prevent the neuronal damage produced by already formed misfolded aggregates. Chronic activation of calcineurin (CaN), a type IIB phosphatase, has been implicated as a pivotal molecule connecting synaptic loss and neuronal damage to protein misfolding. The fact that the crystal structure of CaN is also well established makes it an ideal target for drug discovery. CaN activity assays for High Throughput Screening (HTS) reported so far are based on absorbance. In this article we report the development of a fluorescent quenching based CaN activity assay suitable for robotic screening of large chemical libraries to find novel inhibitors. The assay yielded a Z score of 0.84 with coefficient of variance ≤ 15%. Our results also show that this assay can be used to identify CaN inhibitors with a wide range of potencies. PMID:26176772

  12. Screening a cDNA Library for Protein–Protein Interactions Directly in Planta[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Wu, Fu-Hui; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Shen, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Hsuan-Yu; Liao, De-Chih; Fang, Mei-Jane; Liu, Nien-Tze; Yen, Yu-Chen; Dokládal, Ladislav; Sýkorová, Eva; Gelvin, Stanton B.; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2012-01-01

    Screening cDNA libraries for genes encoding proteins that interact with a bait protein is usually performed in yeast. However, subcellular compartmentation and protein modification may differ in yeast and plant cells, resulting in misidentification of protein partners. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology to screen a plant cDNA library against a bait protein directly in plants. As proof of concept, we used the N-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein– or nVenus-tagged Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirE2 and VirD2 proteins and the C-terminal extension (CTE) domain of Arabidopsis thaliana telomerase reverse transcriptase as baits to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library encoding proteins tagged with the C-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein. A library of colonies representing ∼2 × 105 cDNAs was arrayed in 384-well plates. DNA was isolated from pools of 10 plates, individual plates, and individual rows and columns of the plates. Sequential screening of subsets of cDNAs in Arabidopsis leaf or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 protoplasts identified single cDNA clones encoding proteins that interact with either, or both, of the Agrobacterium bait proteins, or with CTE. T-DNA insertions in the genes represented by some cDNAs revealed five novel Arabidopsis proteins important for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. We also used this cDNA library to confirm VirE2-interacting proteins in orchid (Phalaenopsis amabilis) flowers. Thus, this technology can be applied to several plant species. PMID:22623495

  13. Fast plasmid based protein expression analysis in insect cells using an automated SplitGFP screen

    PubMed Central

    Bleckmann, Maren; Schmelz, Stefan; Schinkowski, Christian; Scrima, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant protein expression often presents a bottleneck for the production of proteins for use in many areas of animal‐cell biotechnology. Difficult‐to‐express proteins require the generation of numerous expression constructs, where popular prokaryotic screening systems often fail to identify expression of multi domain or full‐length protein constructs. Post‐translational modified mammalian proteins require an alternative host system such as insect cells using the Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS). Unfortunately this is time‐, labor‐, and cost‐intensive. It is clearly desirable to find an automated and miniaturized fast multi‐sample screening method for protein expression in such systems. With this in mind, in this paper a high‐throughput initial expression screening method is described using an automated Microcultivation system in conjunction with fast plasmid based transient transfection in insect cells for the efficient generation of protein constructs. The applicability of the system is demonstrated for the difficult to express Nucleotide‐binding Oligomerization Domain‐containing protein 2 (NOD2). To enable detection of proper protein expression the rather weak plasmid based expression has been improved by a sensitive inline detection system. Here we present the functionality and application of the sensitive SplitGFP (split green fluorescent protein) detection system in insect cells. The successful expression of constructs is monitored by direct measurement of the fluorescence in the BioLector Microcultivation system. Additionally, we show that the results obtained with our plasmid‐based SplitGFP protein expression screen correlate directly to the level of soluble protein produced in BEVS. In conclusion our automated SplitGFP screen outlines a sensitive, fast and reliable method reducing the time and costs required for identifying the optimal expression construct prior to large scale protein production in

  14. Quantification of photosensitized singlet oxygen production by a fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Ragàs, Xavier; Cooper, Laurie P; White, John H; Nonell, Santi; Flors, Cristina

    2011-01-17

    Fluorescent proteins are increasingly becoming actuators in a range of cell biology techniques. One of those techniques is chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI), which is employed to specifically inactivate the function of target proteins or organelles by producing photochemical damage. CALI is achieved by the irradiation of dyes that are able to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). The combination of CALI and the labelling specificity that fluorescent proteins provide is useful to avoid uncontrolled photodamage, although the inactivation mechanisms by ROS are dependent on the fluorescent protein and are not fully understood. Herein, we present a quantitative study of the ability of the red fluorescent protein TagRFP to produce ROS, in particular singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). TagRFP is able to photosensitize (1)O(2) with an estimated quantum yield of 0.004. This is the first estimation of a quantum yield of (1)O(2) production value for a GFP-like protein. We also find that TagRFP has a short triplet lifetime compared to EGFP, which reflects relatively high oxygen accessibility to the chromophore. The insight into the structural and photophysical properties of TagRFP has implications in improving fluorescent proteins for fluorescence microscopy and CALI. PMID:21226197

  15. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system.

  16. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system. PMID:23996319

  17. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Pedelacq,J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP.

  18. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  19. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  20. A straightforward and quantitative approach for characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Pei, Zhiguo; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of highlighter fluorescence proteins (FPs) is crucial for screening better highlighter FPs and optimizing the photoactivation efficiency of a certain highlighter FP. Currently, photoactivation contrast and half-time values of photoactivation and photobleaching processes are used for such purpose. However, the relations among these parameters are not clear, and little guidance for practical experiments could be obtained from the half-time values. Here, we show that light dose dependent fluorescence curve, which is calculated from activation-intensity-dependent photoactivation and photobleaching rates, is capable of quantifying the photoactivation performance straightforwardly. Moreover, the photoactivation contrast is easily obtained from the curve.

  1. Molecular spies for bioimaging--fluorescent protein-based probes.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Niino, Yusuke

    2015-05-21

    Convergent advances in optical imaging and genetic engineering have fueled the development of new technologies for biological visualization. Those technologies include genetically encoded indicators based on fluorescent proteins (FPs) for imaging ions, molecules, and enzymatic activities "to spy on cells," as phrased by Roger Tsien, by sneaking into specific tissues, cell types, or subcellular compartments, and reporting on specific intracellular activities. Here we review the current range of unimolecular indicators whose working principle is the conversion of a protein conformational change into a fluorescence signal. Many of the indicators have been developed from fluorescence resonance energy transfer- and single-FP-based approaches. PMID:26000848

  2. Far-red fluorescent tag for protein labelling.

    PubMed

    Fradkov, Arkady F; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Staroverov, Dmitry B; Bulina, Maria E; Yanushevich, Yurii G; Martynov, Vladimir I; Lukyanov, Sergey; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2002-11-15

    Practical applications of green fluorescent protein ('GFP')-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) from species of the class Anthozoa (sea anemones, corals and sea pens) are strongly restricted owing to their oligomeric nature. Here we suggest a strategy to overcome this problem by the use of two covalently linked identical red FPs as non-oligomerizing fusion tags. We have applied this approach to the dimeric far-red fluorescent protein HcRed1 and have demonstrated superiority of the tandem tag in the in vivo labelling of fine cytoskeletal structures and tiny nucleoli. In addition, a possibility of effective fluorescence resonance energy transfer ('FRET') between enhanced yellow FP mutant ('EYFP') and tandem HcRed1 was demonstrated in a protease assay.

  3. Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins from the anthozoan Corynactis californica.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Keenan, Robert J; McCord, Robert; Matysik, Artur; Christianson, Lynne M; Haddock, Steven H D

    2008-01-01

    Color morphs of the temperate, nonsymbiotic corallimorpharian Corynactis californica show variation in pigment pattern and coloring. We collected seven distinct color morphs of C. californica from subtidal locations in Monterey Bay, California, and found that tissue- and color-morph-specific expression of at least six different genes is responsible for this variation. Each morph contains at least three to four distinct genetic loci that code for these colors, and one morph contains at least five loci. These genes encode a subfamily of new GFP-like proteins, which fluoresce across the visible spectrum from green to red, while sharing between 75% to 89% pairwise amino-acid identity. Biophysical characterization reveals interesting spectral properties, including a bright yellow protein, an orange protein, and a red protein exhibiting a "fluorescent timer" phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the FP genes from this species evolved together but that diversification of anthozoan fluorescent proteins has taken place outside of phylogenetic constraints, especially within the Corallimorpharia. The discovery of more examples of fluorescent proteins in a non-bioluminescent, nonsymbiotic anthozoan highlights possibilities of adaptive ecological significance unrelated to light regulation for algal symbionts. The patterns and colors of fluorescent proteins in C. californica and similar species may hold meaning for organisms that possess the visual pigments to distinguish them. PMID:18330643

  4. Development of output signal-to-noise ratio tester for microchannel plate and fluorescent screen component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinglin; Qiu, Yafeng; Zhou, Jin; Qian, Yunsheng

    The core components of Image intensifier is microchannel plate (MCP) and fluorescent screen component. The present paper deeply studies output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) characteristics of MCP and fluorescent screen component. A tester system using to the evaluation of characteristics of the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component, consists of a vacuum system, a surface electron source, mechanical mechanism components ,a high-voltage power supply system, a signal processing system, communication interfaces, a data acquisition and control system, computer system, and testing software. a hot cathode used as an electron source, generates a surface electron flow to provide the input signal. A photomultiplier tube is used to detection faceplate output brightness of the light spot. Then, the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is processed with a combination of methods of the hardware filter and digital filtering software. The output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is measured under different conditions, and the results are analyzed. This test system Provide a technical to promote the image intensifier research, and experience to testing other parameters or in other areas of research.

  5. Measuring and Sorting Cell Populations Expressing Isospectral Fluorescent Proteins with Different Fluorescence Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Naivar, Mark; Houston, Jessica P.; Brent, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs) fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP) and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼1.5 ns vs ∼3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a “pseudophasor” that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation. PMID:25302964

  6. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  7. A novel cell-based duplex high-throughput screening assay combining fluorescent Ca(2+) measurement with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, László; Cselenyák, Attila; Varga, Ágnes; Visegrády, András

    2016-08-15

    Cell-based assays for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation applied in high-throughput screening (HTS) monitor various readouts for second messengers or intracellular effectors. Recently, our understanding of diverging signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation and the capability of small molecules to selectively modulate signaling routes has increased substantially, underlining the importance of selecting appropriate readouts in cellular functional screens. To minimize the rate of false negatives in large-scale screening campaigns, it is crucial to maximize the chance of a ligand being detected, and generally applicable methods for detecting multiple analytes from a single well might serve this purpose. The few assays developed so far based on multiplexed GPCR readouts are limited to only certain applications and usually rely on genetic manipulations hindering screening in native or native-like cellular systems. Here we describe a more generally applicable and HTS-compatible homogeneous assay based on the combination of fluorometric detection of [Ca(2+)] with subsequent homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) cAMP readout in the same well. Besides describing development and validation of the assay, using a cell line recombinantly expressing the human PTH1 receptor screening of a small library is also presented, demonstrating the robustness and HTS compatibility of the novel paradigm.

  8. A novel cell-based duplex high-throughput screening assay combining fluorescent Ca(2+) measurement with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, László; Cselenyák, Attila; Varga, Ágnes; Visegrády, András

    2016-08-15

    Cell-based assays for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation applied in high-throughput screening (HTS) monitor various readouts for second messengers or intracellular effectors. Recently, our understanding of diverging signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation and the capability of small molecules to selectively modulate signaling routes has increased substantially, underlining the importance of selecting appropriate readouts in cellular functional screens. To minimize the rate of false negatives in large-scale screening campaigns, it is crucial to maximize the chance of a ligand being detected, and generally applicable methods for detecting multiple analytes from a single well might serve this purpose. The few assays developed so far based on multiplexed GPCR readouts are limited to only certain applications and usually rely on genetic manipulations hindering screening in native or native-like cellular systems. Here we describe a more generally applicable and HTS-compatible homogeneous assay based on the combination of fluorometric detection of [Ca(2+)] with subsequent homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) cAMP readout in the same well. Besides describing development and validation of the assay, using a cell line recombinantly expressing the human PTH1 receptor screening of a small library is also presented, demonstrating the robustness and HTS compatibility of the novel paradigm. PMID:27235172

  9. Rational design of enhanced photoresistance in a photoswitchable fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chenxi; Byrdin, Martin; El Khatib, Mariam; Henry, Xavier; Adam, Virgile; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are particularly susceptible to photobleaching, the permanent loss of fluorescence emission resulting from photodestruction of the chromophore. In the case of Reversibly Switchable Fluorescent Proteins (RSFPs), which can be switched back and forth between a non-fluorescent and a fluorescent state, the achievable number of switching cycles is limited by photobleaching, a process known as photofatigue. Photofatigue has become a crucial limitation in a number of advanced applications based on repeated photoswitching of RSFPs, notably in the field of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, based on our previous structural investigation of photobleaching mechanisms in IrisFP, an RSFP also capable of green-to-red photoconversion, we present the rational design of a single-mutant IrisFP-M159A that displays considerably enhanced photostability. The results suggest that, under moderate illumination intensities, photobleaching of IrisFP-like Anthozoan fluorescent proteins such as EosFP, Dendra or Dronpa derivatives is mainly driven by an oxygen-dependent mechanism resulting in the irreversible sulfoxidation of methionine 159. The photofatigue decay profiles of IrisFP and its photoresistant mutant IrisFP-M159A were investigated in different experimental conditions, in vitro and in cellulo. Although the performance of the mutant was found to be always superior, the results showed switching behaviors strongly dependent on the nanoenvironment. Thus, in general, assessment of photostability and switching properties of RSFPs should be carried out in real experimental conditions.

  10. Protein specific fluorescent microspheres for labelling a protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, stable and biocompatible microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing an acrylic monomer containing a covalent bonding group such as hydroxyl, amine or carboxyl, for example, hydroxyethylmethacrylate, with an addition polymerizable fluorescent comonomer such as dansyl allyl amine. A lectin or antibody is bound to the covalent site to provide cell specificity. When the microspheres are added to a cell suspension the marked microspheres will specifically label a cell membrane by binding to a specific receptor site thereon. The labeled membrane can then be detected by fluorescence of the fluorescent monomer.

  11. Exploiting fluorescence for multiplex immunoassays on protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Andrea; Matkó, János; Prechl, József

    2014-09-01

    Protein microarray technology is becoming the method of choice for identifying protein interaction partners, detecting specific proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, or for characterizing protein interactions and serum antibodies in a massively parallel manner. Availability of the well-established instrumentation of DNA arrays and development of new fluorescent detection instruments promoted the spread of this technique. Fluorescent detection has the advantage of high sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and wide dynamic range required by most measurements. Fluorescence through specifically designed probes and an increasing variety of detection modes offers an excellent tool for such microarray platforms. Measuring for example the level of antibodies, their isotypes and/or antigen specificity simultaneously can offer more complex and comprehensive information about the investigated biological phenomenon, especially if we take into consideration that hundreds of samples can be measured in a single assay. Not only body fluids, but also cell lysates, extracted cellular components, and intact living cells can be analyzed on protein arrays for monitoring functional responses to printed samples on the surface. As a rapidly evolving area, protein microarray technology offers a great bulk of information and new depth of knowledge. These are the features that endow protein arrays with wide applicability and robust sample analyzing capability. On the whole, protein arrays are emerging new tools not just in proteomics, but glycomics, lipidomics, and are also important for immunological research. In this review we attempt to summarize the technical aspects of planar fluorescent microarray technology along with the description of its main immunological applications.

  12. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  13. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  14. Fragment Screening at Adenosine-A3 Receptors in Living Cells Using a Fluorescence-Based Binding Assay

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A.; Vernall, Andrea J.; Denman, Jessica L.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Kellam, Barrie; Hill, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane proteins. For GPCR drug discovery, it is important that ligand affinity is determined in the correct cellular environment and preferably using an unmodified receptor. We developed a live cell high-content screening assay that uses a fluorescent antagonist, CA200645, to determine binding affinity constants of competing ligands at human adenosine-A1 and -A3 receptors. This method was validated as a tool to screen a library of low molecular weight fragments, and identified a hit with submicromolar binding affinity (KD). This fragment was structurally unrelated to substructures of known adenosine receptor antagonists and was optimized to show selectivity for the adenosine-A3 receptor. This technology represents a significant advance that will allow the determination of ligand and fragment affinities at receptors in their native membrane environment. PMID:22999879

  15. Enhanced Archaerhodopsin Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yiyang; Li, Jin Zhong; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    A longstanding goal in neuroscience has been to develop techniques for imaging the voltage dynamics of genetically defined subsets of neurons. Optical sensors of transmembrane voltage would enhance studies of neural activity in contexts ranging from individual neurons cultured in vitro to neuronal populations in awake-behaving animals. Recent progress has identified Archaerhodopsin (Arch) based sensors as a promising, genetically encoded class of fluorescent voltage indicators that can report single action potentials. Wild-type Arch exhibits sub-millisecond fluorescence responses to trans-membrane voltage, but its light-activated proton pump also responds to the imaging illumination. An Arch mutant (Arch-D95N) exhibits no photocurrent, but has a slower, ~40 ms response to voltage transients. Here we present Arch-derived voltage sensors with trafficking signals that enhance their localization to the neural membrane. We also describe Arch mutant sensors (Arch-EEN and -EEQ) that exhibit faster kinetics and greater fluorescence dynamic range than Arch-D95N, and no photocurrent at the illumination intensities normally used for imaging. We benchmarked these voltage sensors regarding their spike detection fidelity by using a signal detection theoretic framework that takes into account the experimentally measured photon shot noise and optical waveforms for single action potentials. This analysis revealed that by combining the sequence mutations and enhanced trafficking sequences, the new sensors improved the fidelity of spike detection by nearly three-fold in comparison to Arch-D95N. PMID:23840563

  16. Stably transfected human cell lines as fluorescent screening assay for nuclear factor KB activation dependent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Horneck, Gerda

    2004-06-01

    Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway as a possible antiapoptotic route represents one important cellular stress response. For identifying conditions which are capable to modify this pathway, a screening assay for detection of NF-kappaB-dependent gene activation using the reporter proteins Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) and its destabilized variant (d2EGFP) has been developed. Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK/293) cells were stably transfected with a vector carrying EGFP or d2EGFP under control of a synthetic promoter containing four copies of the NF-kappaB response element. Treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gave rise to substantial EGFP / d2EGFP expression in up to 90 % of the cells and was therefore used to screen different stably transfected clones for induction of NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The time course of d2EGFP expression after treatment with TNF-alpha or phorbol ester was measured using flow cytometry. Cellular response to TNF-alpha was faster than to phorbol ester. Treatment of cells with TNF-alpha and DMSO revealed antagonistic interactions of these substances in the activation NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The detection of d2EGFP expression required FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy, while EGFP could also be measured in the microplate reader, rendering the assay useful for high-throughput screening.

  17. Expansion Microscopy with Conventional Antibodies and Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chozinski, Tyler J.; Halpern, Aaron R.; Okawa, Haruhisa; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Tremel, Grant J.; Wong, Rachel O.L.; Vaughan, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Expansion microscopy is a recently introduced technique in which fluorophores on fixed specimens are linked to a swellable polymer that is physically expanded to enable super-resolution microscopy with ordinary microscopes. We have developed and characterized new methods for linking fluorophores to the polymer that now enable expansion microscopy with conventional fluorescently-labeled antibodies and fluorescent proteins. Our methods simplify the procedure, expand the palette of compatible labels, and will aid in rapid dissemination of the technique. PMID:27064647

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy.

  19. A palette of fluorescent proteins optimized for diverse cellular environments

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Markwardt, Michele L.; Rizzo, Mark; Guo, Feng; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    To perform quantitative live cell imaging, investigators require fluorescent reporters that accurately report protein localization and levels, while minimally perturbing the cell. Yet, within the biochemically distinct environments of cellular organelles, popular fluorescent proteins (FPs), including EGFP, can be unreliable for quantitative imaging, resulting in underestimation of protein levels and incorrect localization. Specifically, within the secretory pathway, significant populations of FPs misfold and fail to fluoresce due to non-native disulphide bond formation. Furthermore, transmembrane FP fusion constructs can disrupt organelle architecture due to oligomerizing tendencies of numerous common FPs. Here, we describe a powerful set of bright and inert FPs optimized for use in multiple cellular compartments, especially oxidizing environments and biological membranes. Also, we provide new insights into use of red FPs in the secretory pathway. Our monomeric "oxFPs" finally resolve long standing, underappreciated, and important problems of cell biology and should be useful for a number of applications. PMID:26158227

  20. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging of a single living cell using green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Kay, Steve A.; Day, Richard N.

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging microscopy is a unique tool to visualize the spatiotemporal dynamics of protein interactions in living cells. Genetic vectors that encode protein fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP) provide a method for imaging protein localization in living cells. We used FRET to study dimerization of the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1 fused to GFP and BFP. A fusion protein containing GFP separated from BFP by 29 amino acids served as a positive control for FRET. Transcriptional activity of the GFP- and BFP-Pit-1 fusion proteins was demonstrated by their ability to activate the prolactin gene promoter. Using optimized excitation and emission filters, cells expressing the fluorescently-tagged Pit-1 proteins were imaged with a back- thinned, back-illuminated CCD chip that has about 50% quantum efficiency in the blue range. 2D FRET images acquired at the focal plane demonstrated Pit-1 protein associations in the nucleus of living cells. The significance of 2- and 3-D energy transfer imaging from these living cells is discussed.

  1. Sensing of a nucleic acid binding protein via a label-free perylene probe fluorescence recovery assay.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dongli; Li, Wenying; Chen, Jian; Jiao, Huping; Zhou, Huipeng; Wang, Bin; Yu, Cong

    2013-10-01

    A novel label-free fluorescence recovery assay for the sensing of a DNA binding protein has been developed. A transcription factor c-Jun protein, and a 21 base pair duplex DNA containing the c-Jun protein binding site (J-DNA) were selected. J-DNA was mixed with a cationic fluorescent perylene probe (compound 1), and induced aggregation of the probe. Quenching of the probe's fluorescence was observed. However, when c-Jun protein was mixed with the J-DNA, c-Jun bound to the duplex DNA, which reduced the degree of the induced perylene probe aggregation, and a turn on fluorescence signal was observed. The recovered fluorescence intensity was directly related to the amount of c-Jun added. The method is highly selective, six non-DNA binding proteins and one randomly selected 21 base pair duplex DNA (con-1) were tested. No noticeable compound 1 fluorescence recovery was observed. Mutations were also introduced to the c-Jun recognition sequence and much reduced fluorescence recovery was observed. Our assay is label-free, convenient, inexpensive, and fast. It can be used in biomedical research such as high throughput screening of drugs targeted at DNA-binding proteins.

  2. Heterogeneity and restricted state selection in FRET with fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacker, T. S.; Duchen, M. R.; Bain, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Most fluorescent proteins exhibit multi-exponential fluorescence decays, indicating the presence of a heterogeneous excited state population. In the analysis of FRET to and between fluorescent proteins, it is often convenient to assume that a single interaction pathway is involved. However, in recent work we have shown that this assumption does not hold. Moreover, certain pathways can be highly constrained, leading to the potential misinterpretation of experimental data concerning protein-protein interactions. FRET and single-photon absorption both obey the same global electric dipole selection rules but differ greatly in the mechanism of the acceptor photoselection. In an isotropic medium, single-photon excitation accesses all acceptor transition dipole moment orientations with an equal probability. However, the FRET rate depends on the relative orientation of the donor and acceptor through the κ2 orientation parameter. We show how time- and spectrally- resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay measurements following direct acceptor excitation, combined with those of the interacting FRET pair, can be used to identify restricted FRET state selection and thus provide accurate measurements of protein-protein interaction dynamics.

  3. Large-scale drug screening against Babesia divergens parasite using a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-08-30

    The validation of a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for determining the efficacies of large chemical libraries against Babesia divergens (bovine strain) in in vitro cultures was evaluated in this study. Hematocrits (HCTs) of 2.5%, 5%, and 10% were used for the in vitro culture at 1% parasitemia without daily replacement of the medium. Linearity and HTS assay results revealed that the best HCTs were 5% and 10%. The obtained IC50 values of diminazene aceturate, either by fluorescence-based HTS assay with and without daily replacement of medium or by fluorescence- and microscopy-based methods, did not differ significantly at 5% HCT. Actinonin and chloroquine diphosphate were the most effective drugs against the in vitro growth of B. divergens, followed by pyronaridine tetraphosphate- and luteolin-treated cultures. On contrary, tetracycline hydrochloride and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate from green tea exhibited poor activity as compared with diminazene aceturate (positive control drug). The data indicated that 5% HCT without daily replacement of the culture medium mixed with bovine serum in vitro using a fluorescence-based HTS assay creates the best conditions for large-scale drug screening against B. divergens that infect cattle. PMID:27523944

  4. Monomeric red fluorescent proteins with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Hulit, James; Subach, Oksana M; Wu, Bin; Abdulla, Arian; Segall, Jeffrey E; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-03-23

    Two-photon microscopy has advanced fluorescence imaging of cellular processes in living animals. Fluorescent proteins in the blue-green wavelength range are widely used in two-photon microscopy; however, the use of red fluorescent proteins is limited by the low power output of Ti-Sapphire lasers above 1,000 nm. To overcome this limitation we have developed two red fluorescent proteins, LSS-mKate1 and LSS-mKate2, which possess large Stokes shifts with excitation/emission maxima at 463/624 and 460/605 nm, respectively. These LSS-mKates are characterized by high pH stability, photostability, rapid chromophore maturation, and monomeric behavior. They lack absorbance in the green region, providing an additional red color to the commonly used red fluorescent proteins. Substantial overlap between the two-photon excitation spectra of the LSS-mKates and blue-green fluorophores enables multicolor imaging using a single laser. We applied this approach to a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer to intravitally study the motility and Golgi-nucleus alignment of tumor cells as a function of their distance from blood vessels. Our data indicate that within 40 mum the breast cancer cells show significant polarization towards vessels in living mice.

  5. Integrated imaging instrument for self-calibrated fluorescence protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddington, A. P.; Monroe, M. R.; Ünlü, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Protein microarrays, or multiplexed and high-throughput assays, monitor multiple protein binding events to facilitate the understanding of disease progression and cell physiology. Fluorescence imaging is a popular method to detect proteins captured by immobilized probes with high sensitivity and specificity. Reliability of fluorescence assays depends on achieving minimal inter- and intra-assay probe immobilization variation, an ongoing challenge for protein microarrays. Therefore, it is desirable to establish a label-free method to quantify the probe density prior to target incubation to calibrate the fluorescence readout. Previously, a silicon oxide on silicon chip design was introduced to enhance the fluorescence signal and enable interferometric imaging to self-calibrate the signal with the immobilized probe density. In this paper, an integrated interferometric reflectance imaging sensor and wide-field fluorescence instrument is introduced for sensitive and calibrated microarray measurements. This platform is able to analyze a 2.5 mm × 3.4 mm area, or 200 spots (100 μm diameter with 200 μm pitch), in a single field-of-view.

  6. Fluorescence anisotropy (polarization): from drug screening to precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hairong; Wu, Qian; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is one of the major established methods accepted by industry and regulatory agencies for understanding the mechanisms of drug action and selecting drug candidates utilizing a high-throughput format. Areas covered This review covers the basics of FA and complementary methods, such as fluorescence lifetime anisotropy and their roles in the drug discovery process. The authors highlight the factors affecting FA readouts, fluorophore selection, and instrumentation. Furthermore, the authors describe the recent development of a successful, commercially valuable FA assay for Long QT syndrome drug toxicity to illustrate the role that FA can play in the early stages of drug discovery. Expert opinion Despite the success in drug discovery, the FA-based technique experiences competitive pressure from other homogeneous assays. That being said, FA is an established yet rapidly developing technique, recognized by academic institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, and regulatory agencies across the globe. The technical problems encountered in working with small molecules in homogeneous assays are largely solved, and new challenges come from more complex biological molecules and nanoparticles. With that, FA will remain one of the major work-horse techniques leading to precision (personalized) medicine. PMID:26289575

  7. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  8. On the Design of Low-Cost Fluorescent Protein Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, Leah

    , magnetic beads, nanoparticles or quantum dots designed to form covalent bonds with amino groups, sulfhydryl groups, carboxylic groups and other reactive functionalities in amino acids. It is not uncommon to conduct combinations of techniques, for example, the introduction of fluorescent labels or probes to proteins require in many cases, site-directed mutagenesis followed by covalent bonding of the fluorescent dye. Accordingly, two or more proteins can be combined to create hybrid or fusion proteins with multiple or altered functions. Indeed, research involving the green fluorescent protein and fluorescent proteins of a variety of colors has expanded by leaps and bounds in the last decade. Because these fluorescent proteins can be genetically encoded in cells, it is possible to observe various cellular processes in vivo. However, this topic has been reviewed extensively in the literature and, thus, will not be expounded on in this chapter.

  9. Real time monitoring of superoxide dynamics in vivo through fluorescent proteins using a sensitive fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ken, Chuian-Fu; Hsu, Che-Wei; Liu, Ya-Ging

    2014-03-01

    Superoxide anion is the primary oxygen free radical generated in mitochondria that causes intracellular oxidative stress. The lack of a method to directly monitor superoxide concentration in vivo in real time has severely hindered our understanding on its pathophysiology. We made transgenic zebrafish to specifically express fluorescent proteins, which are recently developed as reversible superoxide-specific indicators, in the liver. A fiber-optic fluorescent probe was used to noninvasively monitor superoxide generation in the liver in real time. The fish were placed in microfluidic channels for manipulation and reagents administration. Several superoxide-inducing and scavenging reagents were administrated onto the fish to investigate their effects on superoxide anion balancing. The biochemical dynamics of superoxide due to the application reagents were revealed in the transient behaviors of fluorescence time courses. With the ability to monitor superoxide dynamics in vivo in real time, this method can be used as an in vivo pharmaceutical screening platform.

  10. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  11. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  12. The photochemistry of fluorescent proteins: implications for their biological applications.

    PubMed

    Seward, Harriet E; Bagshaw, Clive R

    2009-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria, its relatives and derivatives are ubiquitous in their use as biological probes. In this tutorial review, we discuss the photochemistry of this fascinating class of proteins and illustrate some of their advantages and drawbacks in a range of applications. In particular, we focus on the ionisation states of the chromophore and how they are affected by internal and external proton transfer. Light-induced reversible and irreversible events are discussed in terms of the underlying chromophore structure. These phenomena have an influence on the interpretation of FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer), FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching), as well as single molecule studies.

  13. Detergent screening of the human voltage-gated proton channel using fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Agharkar, Amruta; Rzadkowolski, Jennifer; McBroom, Mandy; Gonzales, Eric B

    2014-08-01

    The human voltage-gated proton channel (Hv1) is a membrane protein consisting of four transmembrane domains and intracellular amino- and carboxy-termini. The protein is activated by membrane depolarization, similar to other voltage-sensitive proteins. However, the Hv1 proton channel lacks a traditional ion pore. The human Hv1 proton channel has been implicated in mediating sperm capacitance, stroke, and most recently as a biomarker/mediator of cancer metastasis. Recently, the three-dimensional structures for homologues of this voltage-gated proton channel were reported. However, it is not clear what artificial environment is needed to facilitate the isolation and purification of the human Hv1 proton channel for structural study. In the present study, we generated a chimeric protein that placed an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to the amino-terminus of the human Hv1 proton channel (termed EGFP-Hv1). The chimeric protein was expressed in a baculovirus expression system using Sf9 cells and subjected to detergent screening using fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography. The EGFP-Hv1 proton channel can be solubilized in the zwitterionic detergent Anzergent 3-12 and the nonionic n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) with little protein aggregation and a prominent monomeric protein peak at 48 h postinfection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the chimeric protein exhibits a monomeric protein peak, which is distinguishable from protein aggregates, at the final size-exclusion chromatography purification step. Taken together, we can conclude that solubilization in DDM will provide a useable final product for further structural characterization of the full-length human Hv1 proton channel.

  14. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein-protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces.

  15. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques.

  16. Understanding Protein Folding from Advances of Fluorescence Energy Transfer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcherkasskaya, Olga; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2001-03-01

    A multi-site fluorescence energy transfer method was developed for the study of protein folding. Technique uses "tyrosine-phenylalanine" substitution mutagenesis to place the "tyrosine-guest" into positions of interest into the protein structure. Tetranitromethane modification of the tyrosine-guest renders this amino acid an acceptor of the tryptophan fluorescence. This approach can be applied to any protein system, and, most importantly, does not require single- or double-labeling of the protein molecule by a donor and/or an acceptor fluorophore. It is equally suited for equilibrium as well as kinetic studies of folding. We tested the methodology to monitor the equilibrium (un)folding of the immunoglobulin binding domain B1 of streptococcal protein G (GB1) induced by guanidine hydrochloride. Wild-type GB1 contains three tyrosines located at positions 3, 33, 45 and a single tryptophan residue at position 43. Two of the three tyrosines were replaced in turn, thereby allowing us to measure the energy transfer from Trp43 to each particular tyrosine. Overall, multi-parametrical experiments on GB1 including circular dichroism, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, as well as fluorescence energy transfer revealed the existence of highly stable unfolded intermediates, which precede the formation of the rigid (native) secondary structure.

  17. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    PubMed

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders.

  18. Fluorescent Protein Nanowire-Mediated Protein Microarrays for Multiplexed and Highly Sensitive Pathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Men, Dong; Zhou, Juan; Li, Wei; Leng, Yan; Chen, Xinwen; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Xian-En

    2016-07-13

    Protein microarrays are powerful tools for high-throughput and simultaneous detection of different target molecules in complex biological samples. However, the sensitivity of conventional fluorescence-labeling protein detection methods is limited by the availability of signal molecules for binding to the target molecule. Here, we built a multifunctional fluorescent protein nanowire (FNw) by harnessing self-assembly of yeast amyloid protein. The FNw integrated a large number of fluorescent molecules, thereby enhancing the fluorescent signal output in target detection. The FNw was then combined with protein microarray technology to detect proteins derived from two pathogens, including influenza virus (hemagglutinin 1, HA1) and human immunodeficiency virus (p24 and gp120). The resulting detection sensitivity achieved a 100-fold improvement over a commercially available detection reagent. PMID:27315221

  19. An improved cyan fluorescent protein variant useful for FRET.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Mark A; Springer, Gerald H; Granada, Butch; Piston, David W

    2004-04-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins to report biochemical phenomena in living cells. Most commonly, the enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) is used as the donor fluorophore, coupled with one of several yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variants as the acceptor. ECFP is used despite several spectroscopic disadvantages, namely a low quantum yield, a low extinction coefficient and a fluorescence lifetime that is best fit by a double exponential. To improve the characteristics of ECFP for FRET measurements, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to overcome these disadvantages. The resulting variant, which we named Cerulean (ECFP/S72A/Y145A/H148D), has a greatly improved quantum yield, a higher extinction coefficient and a fluorescence lifetime that is best fit by a single exponential. Cerulean is 2.5-fold brighter than ECFP and replacement of ECFP with Cerulean substantially improves the signal-to-noise ratio of a FRET-based sensor for glucokinase activation. PMID:14990965

  20. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein–protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces. PMID:25972078

  1. Determination of proteins by fluorescence quenching of Magdala Red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wen-wu; Gong, Guo-quan; Song, Yu-min

    2000-04-01

    Magdala Red (MR) binding to protein causes a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of MR at 556 nm. Based on this, a new quantitative determination method for proteins is developed. The linear range of this assay is 0.1-4.0 μg ml -1 of Bovine Serum albumin (BSA). The measurements can be made easily on a common fluorimeter. The reaction between MR and proteins is completed in 1 min, and the fluorescence intensity is stable for at least 2 h. There is little or no interference from amino acids and most metal ions. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of protein in milk powder and soybean milk powder and the results are in agreement with the results by the other methods.

  2. Microfluidic cell sorter for use in developing red fluorescent proteins with improved photostability.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lloyd M; Lubbeck, Jennifer L; Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E; Jimenez, Ralph

    2013-06-21

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic cytometer for mammalian cells that rapidly measures the irreversible photobleaching of red fluorescent proteins expressed within each cell and achieves high purity (>99%) selection of individual cells based on these measurements. The selection is achieved by using sub-millisecond timed control of a piezo-tilt mirror to steer a focused 1064-nm laser spot for optical gradient force switching following analysis of the fluorescence signals from passage of the cell through a series of 532-nm laser beams. In transit through each beam, the fluorescent proteins within the cell undergo conversion to dark states, but the microfluidic chip enables the cell to pass sufficiently slowly that recovery from reversible dark states occurs between beams, thereby enabling irreversible photobleaching to be quantified separately from the reversible dark-state conversion. The microfluidic platform achieves sorting of samples down to sub-millilitre volumes with minimal loss, wherein collected cells remain alive and can subsequently proliferate. The instrument provides a unique first tool for rapid selection of individual mammalian cells on the merits of photostability and is likely to form the basis of subsequent lab-on-a-chip platforms that combine photobleaching with other spectroscopic measurements for on-going research to develop advanced red fluorescent proteins by screening of genetic libraries. PMID:23636097

  3. Microfluidic cell sorter for use in developing red fluorescent proteins with improved photostability

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Lubbeck, Jennifer L.; Dean, Kevin M.; Palmer, Amy E.; Jimenez, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic cytometer for mammalian cells that rapidly measures the irreversible photobleaching of red fluorescent proteins expressed within each cell and achieves high purity (>99%) selection of individual cells based on these measurements. The selection is achieved by using sub-millisecond timed control of a piezo-tilt mirror to steer a focused 1064-nm laser spot for optical gradient force switching following analysis of the fluorescence signals from passage of the cell through a series of 532-nm laser beams. In transit through each beam, the fluorescent proteins within the cell undergo conversion to dark states, but the microfluidic chip enables the cell to pass sufficiently slowly that recovery from reversible dark states occurs between beams, thereby enabling irreversible photobleaching to be quantified separately from the reversible dark-state conversion. The microfluidic platform achieves sorting of samples down to sub-millilitre volumes with minimal loss, wherein collected cells remain alive and can subsequently proliferate. The instrument provides a unique first tool for rapid selection of individual mammalian cells on the merits of photostability and is likely to form the basis of subsequent lab-on-a-chip platforms that combine photobleaching with other spectroscopic measurements for on-going research to develop advanced red fluorescent proteins by screening of genetic libraries. PMID:23636097

  4. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  5. Red fluorescent protein with reversibly photoswitchable absorbance for photochromic FRET

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Fedor V.; Zhang, Lijuan; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed the first red fluorescent protein, named rsTagRFP, which possesses reversibly photoswitchable absorbance spectra. Illumination with blue and yellow light switches rsTagRFP into a red fluorescent state (ON state) or non-fluorescent state (OFF state), respectively. The ON and OFF states exhibit absorbance maxima at 567 and 440 nm, respectively. Due to the photoswitchable absorbance, rsTagRFP can be used as an acceptor for a photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer (pcFRET). The photochromic acceptor facilitates determination of a protein-protein interaction by providing an internal control for FRET. Using pcFRET with EYFP as a donor we observed an interaction between epidermal growth factor receptor and growth factor receptor-binding protein 2 in live cells by detecting the modulation of both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the EYFP donor upon the ON-OFF photoswitching of the rsTagRFP acceptor. PMID:20659687

  6. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  7. Electrotransformation of Bacillus mojavensis with fluorescent protein markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gram-positive endophytic bacteria are difficult to transform. To study endophytic interactions between Bacillus mojavensis and maize, a method was developed to transform this species by electroporation with three fluorescent protein expressing integrative plasmids: pSG1154, pSG1192, and pSG1193. The...

  8. Light-assisted small molecule screening against protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Inglés-Prieto, Álvaro; Reichhart, Eva; Muellner, Markus K.; Nowak, Matthias; Nijman, Sebastian M.; Grusch, Michael; Janovjak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput live-cell screens are intricate elements of systems biology studies and drug discovery pipelines. Here, we demonstrate an optogenetics-assisted method that obviates the addition of chemical activators and reporters, reduces the number of operational steps and increases information content in a cell-based small molecule screen against human protein kinases including an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase. This blueprint for all-optical screening can be adapted to many drug targets and cellular processes. PMID:26457372

  9. Computational Design of the β-Sheet Surface of a Red Fluorescent Protein Allows Control of Protein Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Wannier, Timothy M.; Moore, Matthew M.; Mou, Yun; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Computational design has been used with mixed success for the design of protein surfaces, with directed evolution heretofore providing better practical solutions than explicit design. Directed evolution, however, requires a tractable high-throughput screen because the random nature of mutation does not enrich for desired traits. Here we demonstrate the successful design of the β-sheet surface of a red fluorescent protein (RFP), enabling control over its oligomerization. To isolate the problem of surface design, we created a hybrid RFP from DsRed and mCherry with a stabilized protein core that allows for monomerization without loss of fluorescence. We designed an explicit library for which 93 of 96 (97%) of the protein variants are soluble, stably fluorescent, and monomeric. RFPs are heavily used in biology, but are natively tetrameric, and creating RFP monomers has proven extremely difficult. We show that surface design and core engineering are separate problems in RFP development and that the next generation of RFP markers will depend on improved methods for core design. PMID:26075618

  10. A high throughput screening strategy to identify protein-protein interaction inhibitors that block the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voter, Andrew F.; Manthei, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for re-sensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol. PMID:26962873

  11. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  12. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  13. Evaluation of a Fluorescence-Based Method for Antibabesial Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Guswanto, Azirwan; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; Elsayed, Shimaa Abd Elsalam; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; ElSaid, ElSaid El Shirbini; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia and Theileria parasites has become routine, and the effectiveness of these chemicals is usually determined by comparing the parasitemia dynamics of untreated and treated parasites. Although microscopy is widely used to calculate parasitemia, several disadvantages are associated with this technique. The present study evaluated a fluorescence-based method using SYBR green I stain (SG I) to screen antibabesial agents in in vitro cultures of Babesia bovis. The linearity between relative fluorescence units (RFU) and parasitemia was found to be well correlated with a 0.9944 goodness-of-fit (r2) value. Subsequently, 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated for 3 antiprotozoan agents, diminazene aceturate, nimbolide, and gedunin, by this method. For diminazene aceturate and nimbolide, the IC50s determined by the fluorescence-based method (408 nM and 8.13 μM, respectively) and microscopy (400.3 nM and 9.4 μM, respectively) were in agreement. Furthermore, the IC50 of gedunin determined by the fluorescence-based method (19 μM) was similar to the recently described microscopy-based value (21.7 μM) for B. bovis. Additionally, the Z′ factor (0.80 to 0.90), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio (44.15 to 87.64), coefficient of variation at the maximum signal (%CVmax) (0.50 to 2.85), and coefficient of variation at the minimum signal (%CVmin) (1.23 to 2.21) calculated for the fluorescence method using diminazene aceturate were comparable to those previously determined in malaria research for this assay. These findings suggest that the fluorescence-based method might be useful for antibabesial drug screening and may have potential to be developed into a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. PMID:24914124

  14. Evaluation of a fluorescence-based method for antibabesial drug screening.

    PubMed

    Guswanto, Azirwan; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; Elsayed, Shimaa Abd Elsalam; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; ElSaid, ElSaid El Shirbini; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2014-08-01

    In vitro evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia and Theileria parasites has become routine, and the effectiveness of these chemicals is usually determined by comparing the parasitemia dynamics of untreated and treated parasites. Although microscopy is widely used to calculate parasitemia, several disadvantages are associated with this technique. The present study evaluated a fluorescence-based method using SYBR green I stain (SG I) to screen antibabesial agents in in vitro cultures of Babesia bovis. The linearity between relative fluorescence units (RFU) and parasitemia was found to be well correlated with a 0.9944 goodness-of-fit (r(2)) value. Subsequently, 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated for 3 antiprotozoan agents, diminazene aceturate, nimbolide, and gedunin, by this method. For diminazene aceturate and nimbolide, the IC(50)s determined by the fluorescence-based method (408 nM and 8.13 μM, respectively) and microscopy (400.3 nM and 9.4 μM, respectively) were in agreement. Furthermore, the IC50 of gedunin determined by the fluorescence-based method (19 μM) was similar to the recently described microscopy-based value (21.7 μM) for B. bovis. Additionally, the Z' factor (0.80 to 0.90), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio (44.15 to 87.64), coefficient of variation at the maximum signal (%CVmax) (0.50 to 2.85), and coefficient of variation at the minimum signal (%CVmin) (1.23 to 2.21) calculated for the fluorescence method using diminazene aceturate were comparable to those previously determined in malaria research for this assay. These findings suggest that the fluorescence-based method might be useful for antibabesial drug screening and may have potential to be developed into a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. PMID:24914124

  15. Fluorescence quenching in proteins: some applications to protein-DNA and protein-lipid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Jay R.; Chen, Raymond F.; Porter, D. K.; Hensley, Preston; Han, Myun K.; Kim, S. J.; Wilson, Samuel H.; Clague, M.; Williamson, Cynthia K.

    1992-04-01

    The authors outline some examples of the advantages found in subdividing overall quenching into heterogeneous contributions. Subdivision is accomplished by overdetermination (global) and association (DAS, decay associated spectral) methods. In some cases, the subdivision of fluorescence leads to the unique identification of different fluorophores in different sites. Alternatively, the recovered components may reflect conformational heterogeneity at each site. For intrinsic protein fluorescence, it is often noted in the literature that single Trp proteins may be multiexponential. Genetic substitution in multi-Trp proteins, however, often leads to very strong (if not complete) lifetime-to-Trp assignment. Even if a single Trp experiences two or more microenvironments, it can be a useful reporter. The linkage of multiple lifetimes and amplitudes to changes in global conformation often reveals a more `sensitive' subpopulation or lifetime component that becomes a better indicator for important conformational states than aggregate intensity can provide. This has proven useful in studying pH transitions of proteins both in solution and embedded in membranes. Energy transfer is particularly useful in differentiating sites at different distances. Further, the disclosure of heterogeneity in distance is clearly superior to the reporting of a mean distance. This report surveys several systems that have been examined via emission DAS techniques, showing how each protein is better understood when viewed in terms of discrete spectral contributions. We conclude with an overview and some details about our construction of an EDAS (excitation-DAS) instrument; i.e., how excitation scans can be incorporated into a time-resolved instrument.

  16. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Meer, Margarita V; Usmanova, Dinara R; Mishin, Alexander S; Sharonov, George V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bozhanova, Nina G; Baranov, Mikhail S; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Vlasov, Peter K; Egorov, Evgeny S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Tawfik, Dan S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2016-05-19

    Fitness landscapes depict how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level and form the basis of our understanding of many areas of biology, yet their properties remain elusive. Previous studies have analysed specific genes, often using their function as a proxy for fitness, experimentally assessing the effect on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence or in different sequences. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here we visualize an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function (fluorescence) of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We show that the fitness landscape of avGFP is narrow, with 3/4 of the derivatives with a single mutation showing reduced fluorescence and half of the derivatives with four mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations and mostly occurred through the cumulative effect of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease in protein stability and a concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for several fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design.

  17. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Meer, Margarita V; Usmanova, Dinara R; Mishin, Alexander S; Sharonov, George V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bozhanova, Nina G; Baranov, Mikhail S; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Vlasov, Peter K; Egorov, Evgeny S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Tawfik, Dan S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2016-05-19

    Fitness landscapes depict how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level and form the basis of our understanding of many areas of biology, yet their properties remain elusive. Previous studies have analysed specific genes, often using their function as a proxy for fitness, experimentally assessing the effect on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence or in different sequences. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here we visualize an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function (fluorescence) of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We show that the fitness landscape of avGFP is narrow, with 3/4 of the derivatives with a single mutation showing reduced fluorescence and half of the derivatives with four mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations and mostly occurred through the cumulative effect of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease in protein stability and a concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for several fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design. PMID:27193686

  18. A Fluorescence-Based Screening Protocol for the Identification of Water Oxidation Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Detz, Remko J; Abiri, Zohar; Kluwer, Alexander M; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-09-21

    Efficient catalysts are crucial for the sustainable generation of fuel by splitting water. A versatile screening protocol would simplify the identification of novel and better catalysts by using high throughput experimentation. Herein, such a screening approach for the identification of molecular catalysts for chemical oxidation of water is reported, which is based on oxygen-sensitive fluorescence quenching using an OxoDish. More than 200 reactions were performed revealing several catalysts, for example, a dinuclear Fe complex that produced oxygen under the used reaction conditions. Clark electrode measurements confirmed a similar rate in oxygen evolution, making the developed parallel screening approach a robust and versatile tool to screen for molecular water oxidation catalysts using chemical oxidants under acidic and neutral conditions.

  19. Fluorescent protein senses and reports mechanical damage in glass-fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Makyła, Katarzyna; Müller, Christoph; Lörcher, Samuel; Winkler, Thomas; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Eder, Michaela; Bruns, Nico

    2013-05-21

    Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is used as a mechanoresponsive layer at the fiber/resin interface in glass-fiber-reinforced composites. The protein loses its fluorescence when subjected to mechanical stress. Within the material, it reports interfacial shear debonding and barely visible impact damage by a transition from a fluorescent to a non-fluorescent state. PMID:23423911

  20. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain…

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Spatial Protein-protein Proximity in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Liu, Yi-Kuang; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Stefani, Enrico

    2009-02-01

    To quantify spatial protein-protein proximity (colocalization) in fluorescence microscopic images, cross-correlation and autocorrelation functions were decomposed into fast and slowly decaying components. The fast component results from clusters of proteins specifically labeled and the slow one from background/image heterogeneity. We show that the calculation of the protein-protein proximity index and the correlation coefficient are more reliably determined by extracting the fast-decaying component.

  2. Deglycosylation-dependent fluorescent proteins provide unique tools for the study of ER-associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Grotzke, Jeff E.; Lu, Qiao; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation (ERAD) is a constitutive process that identifies misfolded proteins in the ER and shuttles them to the cytosol, where they can be degraded by the proteasome. The accumulation of misfolded proteins can be catastrophic at both the cellular and organismal level. Although the players involved and mechanistic details of ERAD are being characterized, much remains to be learned. Because of the complexity of the pathway, experimental studies generally require labor-intensive biochemical techniques. Here, we report the development of a system to analyze ERAD based on mutants of split or intact Venus fluorescent protein for which fluorescence depends on enzymatic deglycosylation. We have generated variants that only become fluorescent when they are first glycosylated in the ER and subsequently deglycosylated after retrotranslocation into the cytosol. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HMG-coA reductase degradation 1 homolog (Hrd1) and, consistent with the demonstrated glycosylation/deglycosylation requirement, the cytosolic deglycosylating enzyme peptide:N′glycanase are both required for fluorescence. Furthermore, although these deglycosylation-dependent fluorescent proteins are themselves ERAD substrates, they can also be fused to additional ERAD substrates to interrogate substrate-specific pathways. To validate the system we performed a genomewide siRNA screen that successfully identified known ERAD factors such as Hrd1; homocysteine-inducible, endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducible, ubiquitin-like domain member 1 (HERP); sel-1 suppressor of lin-12-like (SEL1L); and p97. These tools should greatly facilitate the identification of ERAD components and investigation of the mechanisms involved in this critical pathway. PMID:23401531

  3. Screening and large-scale expression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, April; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Wang, Kevin H.; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Claxton, Derek P.; Baconguis, Isabelle; Althoff, Thorsten; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins are often hampered by difficulties in over-expression of the candidate molecule. Baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells (BacMam), although a powerful method to heterologously express membrane proteins, can be cumbersome for screening and expression of multiple constructs. We therefore developed plasmid Eric Gouaux (pEG) BacMam, a vector optimized for use in screening assays, as well as for efficient production of baculovirus and robust expression of the target protein. In this protocol we show how to use small-scale transient transfection and fluorescence-detection, size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) experiments using a GFP-His8 tagged candidate protein to screen for monodispersity and expression level. Once promising candidates are identified, we describe how to generate baculovirus, transduce HEK293S GnTI− (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I-negative) cells in suspension culture, and over-express the candidate protein. We have used these methods to prepare pure samples of chicken acid-sensing ion channel 1a (cASIC1) and Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl), for X-ray crystallography, demonstrating how to rapidly and efficiently screen hundreds of constructs and accomplish large-scale expression in 4-6 weeks. PMID:25299155

  4. [Isolation and purification of enhanced green fluorescent protein using chromatography].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qinghua; Song, Shuliang; Liang, Hao; Wang, Weili; Ji, Aiguo

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is a common biological marker. In this research, on the foundation of successful clone and expression of EGFP, a two-step chromatographic method was established to separate and purify EGFP, which includes the use of HisTrap HP immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and Sephadex G-10 HR size exclusion chromatography in sequence. Sephacryl S-300 HR size exclusion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were used to check out the purity of EGFP. At last, it was found that EGFP still had fluorescent activity using fluorescence spectrophotometric detection and Native-PAGE detection. This method can effectively separate the active EGFP. The purity of the obtained EGFP was more than 98%.

  5. Exploring color tuning strategies in red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Hense, Anika; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Red-emitting fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with fluorescence emission above 600 nm are advantageous for cell and tissue imaging applications for various reasons. Fluorescence from an RFP is well separated from cellular autofluorescence, which is in the green region of the spectrum, and red light is scattered less, which allows thicker specimens to be imaged. Moreover, the phototoxic response of cells is lower for red than blue or green light exposure. Further red-shifted FP variants can be obtained by genetic modifications causing an extension of the conjugated π-electron system of the chromophore, or by placing amino acids near the chromophore that stabilize its excited state or destabilize its ground state. We have selected the tetrameric RFP eqFP611 from Entacmaea quadricolor as a lead structure and discuss several rational design trials to generate RFP variants with improved photochemical properties.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Highly Charged Green Fluorescent Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Phillips, J L; Colvin, M E

    2009-03-26

    A recent experimental study showed that green fluorescent protein (GFP) that has been mutated to have ultra-high positive or negative net charges, retain their native structure and fluorescent properties while gaining resistance to aggregation under denaturing conditions. These proteins also provide an ideal test case for studying the effects of surface charge on protein structure and dynamics. They have performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the near-neutral wildtype GFP and mutants with net charges of -29 and +35. They analyzed the resulting trajectories to quantify differences in structure and dynamics between the three GFPs. This analyses shows that all three proteins are stable over the MD trajectory, with the near-neutral wild type GFP exhibiting somewhat more flexibility than the positive or negative GFP mutants, as measured by the order parameter and changes in phi-psi angles. There are more dramatic differences in the properties of the water and counter ions surrounding the proteins. The water diffusion constant near the protein surface is closer to the value for bulk water in the positively charged GFP than in the other two proteins. Additionally, the positively charged GFP shows a much greater clustering of the counter ions (CL-) near its surface than corresponding counter ions (Na+) near the negatively charged mutant.

  7. Nucleic acid-based fluorescence sensors for detecting proteins.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Ewa; Heyduk, Tomasz

    2005-02-15

    We report here development of a rapid, homogeneous, aptamer-based fluorescence assay ("molecular beacons") for detecting proteins. The assay involves protein-induced coassociation of two aptamers recognizing two distinct epitopes of the protein. The aptamers contain short fluorophore-labeled complementary "signaling" oligonucleotides attached to the aptamer by non-DNA linker. Coassociation of the two aptamers with the protein results in bringing the two "signaling" oligonucleotides into proximity, producing a large change of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the fluorophores. We used thrombin as a model system to provide proof-of-principle evidence validating this molecular beacon design. Thrombin beacon was capable of detecting the protein with high selectivity (also in complex biological mixtures), picomolar sensitivity, and high signal-to-background ratio. This is a homogeneous assay requiring no sample manipulation. Since the design of molecular beacons described here is not limited to any specific protein, it will be possible to develop these beacons to detect a variety of target proteins of biomedical importance.

  8. Dual-color fluorescence imaging of tumor/host interaction with green and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Baranov, Eugene; Wang, Jin Wei; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2004-06-01

    Dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing transgenic mice has been shown to be a powerful technology to study tumor-host interaction. Host animals include mice which express the GFP transgene in essentially all cells as well as animals in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP. The general GFP-transgenic mouse is available in both the normal and athymic nude (nu/nu) background. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma interaction especially tumor induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. GFP-expressing tumor vasculature could be visualized interacting with the RFP-expressing tumor cells transplanted to the nestin-driven GFP transgenic mice which expressed nestin-GFP in nascent blood vessels was shown as a marker of nascent tumor angiogenesis. Dual-color fluorescence imaging, which visualizes the tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh tissues, dramatically expanding previous studies in fixed and stained preparations (1).

  9. INFLUENCE OF FLUORESCENCE ON SCREENING DECISIONS FOR ORAL MUCOSAL LESIONS IN COMMUNITY DENTAL PRACTICES

    PubMed Central

    Laronde, Denise M.; Williams, P. Michele; Hislop, T. Greg; Poh, Catherine; Ng, Samson; Bajdik, Chris; Zhang, Lewei; MacAulay, Calum; Rosin, Miriam P.

    2013-01-01

    Quality of oral screening examinations is dependent upon the experience of the clinician and can vary widely. Deciding when a patient needs to be referred is a critical and difficult decision for general practice clinicians. A device to aid in this decision would be beneficial. Objectives To examine the utility of direct fluorescence visualization (FV) by dental practitioners as an aid in decision-making during screening for cancer and other oral lesions. Methods Dentists were trained to use a stepwise protocol for evaluation of the oral mucosa: medical history, head, neck and oral exam and fluorescent visualization exam. They were asked to use clinical features to categorize lesions as low (LR), intermediate (IR) or high (HR) risk and then to determine FV status of these lesions. Clinicians made the decision of which lesions to reassess in 3 weeks and based on this reassessment, to refer forward. Results Of 2404 patients screened over 11 months, 357 initially had lesions with 325 (15%) identified as LR, 16 (4.5%) IR and 16 (4.5%) HR. Lesions assessed initially as IR and HR had a 2.7 fold increased risk of FV loss persisting to the reassessment appointment versus the LR lesions. The most predictive model for lesion persistence included both FV status and lesion risk assessment. Conclusion A protocol for screening (assess risk, reassess and refer) is recommended for the screening of abnormal intraoral lesions. Integrating FV into a process of assessing and reassessing lesions significantly improved this model. PMID:23750637

  10. Dual-readout fluorescent assay of protein kinase activity by use of TiO2-coated magnetic microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Zhao, Yunjie; Wang, Zhibin; Liu, Chenghui; Wang, Yucong; Li, Zhengping

    2013-05-01

    A simple, highly sensitive, and dual-readout fluorescent assay is developed for the detection of protein kinase activity based on the specific recognition utility of TiO2-coated Fe3O4/SiO2 magnetic microspheres (TMSPs) for kinase-induced phosphopeptides. When the fluorophore-labeled substrate peptides are phosphorylated by the kinase reaction, they can bind specifically to the TiO2 layer of TMSPs by means of phosphate groups, resulting in fluorophore enrichment on the TMSP surfaces. The accumulated fluorophores on the TMSPs are proportional to the kinase activity, and the fluorescence signal readout could be run through either direct fluorescent imaging of the TMSPs or measurement of the fluorescence intensity by simply detaching the fluorescent phosphopeptides into the solution. The TMSPs exhibit extremely high selectivity for capturing phosphorylated peptides over the nonphosphorylated ones, resulting in an ultrahigh fluorescence signal-to-background ratio of 42, which is the highest fluorescence change thus far in fluorescent assays for detection of protein kinase activities. Therefore, the proposed fluorescent assay presents high sensitivity, low detection limit of 0.1 milliunit/μL, and wide dynamic range from 0.5 milliunit/μL to 0.5 unit/μL with protein kinase A (PKA) as a model target. Moreover, the TMSP-based fluorescent assay can simultaneously quantify multiple kinase activities with their specific peptides labeled with different dyes. This new strategy is also successfully applied to monitoring drug-triggered PKA activation in cell lysates. Therefore, the TMSP-based fluorescent assay is very promising in high-throughput screening of kinase inhibitors and in highly sensitive detection of kinase activity, and thus it is a valuable tool for development of targeted therapy, clinical diagnosis, and studies of fundamental life science. PMID:23581884

  11. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  12. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for contaminant screening of leafy greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoyoung

    2014-05-01

    The production of contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is needed to reduce foodborne illnesses and related costs. Leafy greens grown in the field can be susceptible to fecal matter contamination from uncontrolled livestock and wild animals entering the field. Pathogenic bacteria can be transferred via fecal matter and several outbreaks of E.coli O157:H7 have been associated with the consumption of leafy greens. This study examines the use of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis to detect fecal contamination on Spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). Hyperspectral fluorescence images from 464 to 800 nm were captured; ultraviolet excitation was supplied by two LED-based line light sources at 370 nm. Key wavelengths and algorithms useful for a contaminant screening optical imaging device were identified and developed, respectively. A non-invasive screening device has the potential to reduce the harmful consequences of foodborne illnesses.

  13. Orange fluorescent proteins constructed from cyanobacteriochromes chromophorylated with phycoerythrobilin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Fang; Xu, Jin-Guo; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Zhou, Ming

    2014-05-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are a structurally and spectrally highly diverse class of phytochrome-related photosensory biliproteins. They contain one or more GAF domains that bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) autocatalytically; some of these proteins are also capable of further modifying PCB to phycoviolobilin or rubins. We tested the chromophorylation with the non-photochromic phycoerythrobilin (PEB) of 16 cyanobacteriochrome GAFs from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, of Slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and of Tlr0911 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1. Nine GAFs could be autocatalytically chromophorylated in vivo/in E. coli with PEB, resulting in highly fluorescent biliproteins with brightness comparable to that of fluorescent proteins like GFP. In several GAFs, PEB was concomitantly converted to phycourobilin (PUB) during binding. This not only shifted the spectra, but also increased the Stokes shift. The chromophorylated GAFs could be oligomerized further by attaching a GCN4 leucine zipper domain, thereby enhancing the absorbance and fluorescence of the complexes. The presence of both PEB and PUB makes these oligomeric GAF-"bundles" interesting models for energy transfer akin to the antenna complexes found in cyanobacterial phycobilisomes. The thermal and photochemical stability and their strong brightness make these constructs promising orange fluorescent biomarkers. PMID:24604419

  14. Noninvasive fluorescence-based instrumentation for cancer and precancer detection and screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Katz, Alvin

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we review our research in the use of UV and visible native fluorescence emission and excitation spectroscopy for the detection of cancer and precancer. We discuss some of the spectroscopic signatures indicative of the presence of cancer and precancer. We describe three generations of instruments being developed to extent optical biopsy technology into the clinical environment as both a screening tool and as a diagnostic aide suitable for gynecological, gastro-intestinal tract, oral cavity, brain and breast.

  15. Protein-protein interactions visualized by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in tobacco protoplasts and leaves.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Regina; Schwenkert, Serena

    2014-03-09

    Many proteins interact transiently with other proteins or are integrated into multi-protein complexes to perform their biological function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is an in vivo method to monitor such interactions in plant cells. In the presented protocol the investigated candidate proteins are fused to complementary halves of fluorescent proteins and the respective constructs are introduced into plant cells via agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Subsequently, the proteins are transiently expressed in tobacco leaves and the restored fluorescent signals can be detected with a confocal laser scanning microscope in the intact cells. This allows not only visualization of the interaction itself, but also the subcellular localization of the protein complexes can be determined. For this purpose, marker genes containing a fluorescent tag can be coexpressed along with the BiFC constructs, thus visualizing cellular structures such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, the Golgi apparatus or the plasma membrane. The fluorescent signal can be monitored either directly in epidermal leaf cells or in single protoplasts, which can be easily isolated from the transformed tobacco leaves. BiFC is ideally suited to study protein-protein interactions in their natural surroundings within the living cell. However, it has to be considered that the expression has to be driven by strong promoters and that the interaction partners are modified due to fusion of the relatively large fluorescence tags, which might interfere with the interaction mechanism. Nevertheless, BiFC is an excellent complementary approach to other commonly applied methods investigating protein-protein interactions, such as coimmunoprecipitation, in vitro pull-down assays or yeast-two-hybrid experiments.

  16. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate.

  17. The fluorescent protein palette: tools for cellular imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding family of fluorescent proteins (FPs) that have become essential tools for studies of cell biology and physiology. Here, we describe the characteristics of the genetically encoded fluorescent markers that now span the visible spectrum from deep blue to deep red. We identify some of the novel FPs that have unusual characteristics that make them useful reporters of the dynamic behaviors of proteins inside cells, and describe how many different optical methods can be combined with the FPs to provide quantitative measurements in living systems. “If wood is rubbed with the Pulmo marinus, it will have all the appearance of being on fire; so much so, indeed, that a walking-stick, thus treated, will light the way like a torch” (translation of Pliny the Elder from John Bostock, 1855). PMID:19771335

  18. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-10-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies.

  19. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Structure Changes Detected by Intramolecular Fluorescence Energy Transfer for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Iram, Surtaj H; Gruber, Simon J; Raguimova, Olga N; Thomas, David D; Robia, Seth L

    2015-07-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) actively transports a wide variety of drugs out of cells. To quantify MRP1 structural dynamics, we engineered a "two-color MRP1" construct by fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and TagRFP to MRP1 nucleotide-binding domains NBD1 and NBD2, respectively. The recombinant MRP1 protein expressed and trafficked normally to the plasma membrane. Two-color MRP1 transport activity was normal, as shown by vesicular transport of [(3)H]17β-estradiol-17-β-(D-glucuronide) and doxorubicin efflux in AAV-293 cells. We quantified fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from GFP to TagRFP as an index of NBD conformational changes. Our results show that ATP binding induces a large-amplitude conformational change that brings the NBDs into closer proximity. FRET was further increased by substrate in the presence of ATP but not by substrate alone. The data suggest that substrate binding is required to achieve a fully closed and compact structure. ATP analogs bind MRP1 with reduced apparent affinity, inducing a partially closed conformation. The results demonstrate the utility of the two-color MRP1 construct for investigating ATP-binding cassette transporter structural dynamics, and it holds great promise for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for unknown activators, inhibitors, or transportable substrates of MRP1.

  20. ATP–Binding Cassette Transporter Structure Changes Detected by Intramolecular Fluorescence Energy Transfer for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Iram, Surtaj H.; Gruber, Simon J.; Raguimova, Olga N.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) actively transports a wide variety of drugs out of cells. To quantify MRP1 structural dynamics, we engineered a “two-color MRP1” construct by fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and TagRFP to MRP1 nucleotide–binding domains NBD1 and NBD2, respectively. The recombinant MRP1 protein expressed and trafficked normally to the plasma membrane. Two-color MRP1 transport activity was normal, as shown by vesicular transport of [3H]17β-estradiol-17-β-(d-glucuronide) and doxorubicin efflux in AAV-293 cells. We quantified fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from GFP to TagRFP as an index of NBD conformational changes. Our results show that ATP binding induces a large-amplitude conformational change that brings the NBDs into closer proximity. FRET was further increased by substrate in the presence of ATP but not by substrate alone. The data suggest that substrate binding is required to achieve a fully closed and compact structure. ATP analogs bind MRP1 with reduced apparent affinity, inducing a partially closed conformation. The results demonstrate the utility of the two-color MRP1 construct for investigating ATP-binding cassette transporter structural dynamics, and it holds great promise for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for unknown activators, inhibitors, or transportable substrates of MRP1. PMID:25924616

  1. Fluorescence-based assay as a new screening tool for toxic chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Moczko, Ewa; Mirkes, Evgeny M.; Cáceres, César; Gorban, Alexander N.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Our study involves development of fluorescent cell-based diagnostic assay as a new approach in high-throughput screening method. This highly sensitive optical assay operates similarly to e-noses and e-tongues which combine semi-specific sensors and multivariate data analysis for monitoring biochemical processes. The optical assay consists of a mixture of environmental-sensitive fluorescent dyes and human skin cells that generate fluorescence spectra patterns distinctive for particular physico-chemical and physiological conditions. Using chemometric techniques the optical signal is processed providing qualitative information about analytical characteristics of the samples. This integrated approach has been successfully applied (with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 97%) in assessing whether particular chemical agents are irritating or not for human skin. It has several advantages compared with traditional biochemical or biological assays and can impact the new way of high-throughput screening and understanding cell activity. It also can provide reliable and reproducible method for assessing a risk of exposing people to different harmful substances, identification active compounds in toxicity screening and safety assessment of drugs, cosmetic or their specific ingredients. PMID:27653274

  2. Fluorescence-based assay as a new screening tool for toxic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczko, Ewa; Mirkes, Evgeny M.; Cáceres, César; Gorban, Alexander N.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Our study involves development of fluorescent cell-based diagnostic assay as a new approach in high-throughput screening method. This highly sensitive optical assay operates similarly to e-noses and e-tongues which combine semi-specific sensors and multivariate data analysis for monitoring biochemical processes. The optical assay consists of a mixture of environmental-sensitive fluorescent dyes and human skin cells that generate fluorescence spectra patterns distinctive for particular physico-chemical and physiological conditions. Using chemometric techniques the optical signal is processed providing qualitative information about analytical characteristics of the samples. This integrated approach has been successfully applied (with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 97%) in assessing whether particular chemical agents are irritating or not for human skin. It has several advantages compared with traditional biochemical or biological assays and can impact the new way of high-throughput screening and understanding cell activity. It also can provide reliable and reproducible method for assessing a risk of exposing people to different harmful substances, identification active compounds in toxicity screening and safety assessment of drugs, cosmetic or their specific ingredients.

  3. Construction of green fluorescent protein-tagged recombinant iridovirus to assess viral replication.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Cai, Jia; Ye, Fuzhou; Guan, Liya; Liu, Hong; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein-tagged recombinant virus has been successfully applied to observing the infective dynamics and evaluating viral replication. Here, we identified soft-shelled turtle iridovirus (STIV) ORF55 as an envelope protein (VP55), and developed a recombinant STIV expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to VP55 (EGFP-STIV). Recombinant EGFP-STIV shared similar single-step growth curves and ultrastructural morphology with wild type STIV (wt-STIV). The green fluorescence distribution during EGFP-STIV infection was consistent with the intracellular distribution of VP55 which was mostly co-localized with virus assembly sites. Furthermore, EGFP-STIV could be used to evaluate viral replication conveniently under drug treatment, and the result showed that STIV replication was significantly inhibited after the addition of antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). Thus, the EGFP-tagged recombinant iridovirus will not only be useful for further investigations on the viral replicative dynamics, but also provide an alternative simple strategy to screen for antiviral substances.

  4. Fluorophore Absorption Size Exclusion Chromatography (FA-SEC): An Alternative Method for High-Throughput Detergent Screening of Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Yao; Sun, Xing-Han; Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Shao-En; Li, Guan-Syun; Hu, Nien-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many fundamental functions in cells including ATP synthesis, ion and molecule transporter, cell signalling and enzymatic reactions, accounting for ~30% genes of whole genomes. However, the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins frequently hampers the progress of structure determination. Detergent screening is the critical step in obtaining stable detergent-solubilized membrane proteins and well-diffracting protein crystals. Fluorescence Detection Size Exclusion Chromatography (FSEC) has been developed to monitor the extraction efficiency and monodispersity of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. By tracing the FSEC profiles of GFP-fused membrane proteins, this method significantly enhances the throughput of detergent screening. However, current methods to acquire FSEC profiles require either an in-line fluorescence detector with the SEC equipment or an off-line spectrofluorometer microplate reader. Here, we introduce an alternative method detecting the absorption of GFP (FA-SEC) at 485 nm, thus making this methodology possible on conventional SEC equipment through the in-line absorbance spectrometer. The results demonstrate that absorption is in great correlation with fluorescence of GFP. The comparably weaker absorption signal can be improved by using a longer path-length flow cell. The FA-SEC profiles were congruent with the ones plotted by FSEC, suggesting FA-SEC could be a comparable and economical setup for detergent screening of membrane proteins. PMID:27332877

  5. Fluorophore Absorption Size Exclusion Chromatography (FA-SEC): An Alternative Method for High-Throughput Detergent Screening of Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Yao; Sun, Xing-Han; Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Shao-En; Li, Guan-Syun; Hu, Nien-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many fundamental functions in cells including ATP synthesis, ion and molecule transporter, cell signalling and enzymatic reactions, accounting for ~30% genes of whole genomes. However, the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins frequently hampers the progress of structure determination. Detergent screening is the critical step in obtaining stable detergent-solubilized membrane proteins and well-diffracting protein crystals. Fluorescence Detection Size Exclusion Chromatography (FSEC) has been developed to monitor the extraction efficiency and monodispersity of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. By tracing the FSEC profiles of GFP-fused membrane proteins, this method significantly enhances the throughput of detergent screening. However, current methods to acquire FSEC profiles require either an in-line fluorescence detector with the SEC equipment or an off-line spectrofluorometer microplate reader. Here, we introduce an alternative method detecting the absorption of GFP (FA-SEC) at 485 nm, thus making this methodology possible on conventional SEC equipment through the in-line absorbance spectrometer. The results demonstrate that absorption is in great correlation with fluorescence of GFP. The comparably weaker absorption signal can be improved by using a longer path-length flow cell. The FA-SEC profiles were congruent with the ones plotted by FSEC, suggesting FA-SEC could be a comparable and economical setup for detergent screening of membrane proteins.

  6. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  7. Improved "optical highlighter" probes derived from discosoma red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lisbeth C; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2005-02-01

    The tetrameric red fluorescent protein, DsRed, undergoes a rapid red to green color change evoked by short wavelength (lambda < 760 nm) femtosecond irradiation--a phenomenon that underpins the application of DsRed as an "optical highlighter" probe for tracking live cells, organelles, and fusion proteins. This color change results from selective bleaching of the "mature" red-emitting species of DsRed and an enhancement of emission from the "immature" green species, likely caused by dequenching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring within the protein tetramer. Here, we have examined the role of residues known to influence the rate and completeness of chromophore maturation on the cellular and biophysical properties of DsRed mutants. Surprisingly, a single amino acid mutation (N42Q) with increased basal green emission yet rapid chromophore maturation displayed a multiphoton-evoked color change that was brighter, more consistent, more vivid, and easier to evoke than DsRed, despite the larger proportion of green chromophores. Rapidly maturing mutants with more complete chromophore maturation, exhibited little color change and increased resistance to multiphoton bleaching. We describe improved optical and cell biological properties for two DsRed-derived variants which we showcase in photolabeling studies, and discuss these data in terms of implications for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probes.

  8. Differential rates of gene expression monitored by green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canghai; Albano, C Renee; Bentley, William E; Rao, Govind

    2002-08-20

    The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene has made a broad impact in several areas, especially in studies of protein trafficking, localization, and expression analysis. GFP's many advantages are that it is small, autocatalytic, and does not require fixation, cell disruption, or the addition of cofactors or substrates. Two characteristics of GFP, extreme stability and chromophore cyclization lag time, pose a hindrance to the application of GFP as a real-time gene expression reporter in bioprocess applications. In this report, we present analytical methods that overcome these problems and enable the temporal visualization of discrete gene regulatory events. The approach we present measures the rate of change in GFP fluorescence, which in turn reflects the rate of gene expression. We conducted fermentation and microplate experiments using a protein synthesis inhibitor to illustrate the feasibility of this system. Additional experiments using the classic gene regulation of the araBAD operon show the utility of GFP as a near real-time indicator of gene regulation. With repetitive induction and repression of the arabinose promoter, the differential rate of GFP fluorescence emission shows corresponding cyclical changes during the culture.

  9. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  10. A fluorescent tool set for yeast Atg proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Song, Jing-Zhen; Shan, Mei-Hua; Li, Shi-Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Hui; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Yue; Lin, Jianping; Xie, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells is instrumental in deciphering the molecular details of autophagy. To facilitate the routine examination of yeast Atg proteins under diverse conditions, here we provide a comprehensive tool set, including (1) plasmids for the expression of GFP chimeras at endogenous levels for most Atg proteins, (2) RFP-Atg8 constructs with improved properties as a PAS marker, and (3) plasmids for the complementation of common yeast auxotrophic markers. We hope that the availability of this tool set will further accelerate yeast autophagy research. PMID:25998947

  11. A pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars based on fluorescence in situ hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Bou, Gerelchimeg; Sun, Mingju; Lv, Ming; Zhu, Jiang; Li, Hui; Wang, Juan; Li, Lu; Liu, Zhongfeng; Zheng, Zhong; He, Wenteng; Kong, Qingran; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-08-01

    For efficient transgenic herd expansion, only the transgenic animals that possess the ability to transmit transgene into next generation are considered for breeding. However, for transgenic pig, practically lacking a pre-breeding screening program, time, labor and money is always wasted to maintain non-transgenic pigs, low or null transgenic transmission pigs and the related fruitless gestations. Developing a pre-breeding screening program would make the transgenic herd expansion more economical and efficient. In this technical report, we proposed a three-step pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars simply through combining the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay with the common pre-breeding screening workflow. In the first step of screening, combined with general transgenic phenotype analysis, FISH is used to identify transgenic boars. In the second step of screening, combined with conventional semen test, FISH is used to detect transgenic sperm, thus to identify the individuals producing high quality semen and transgenic sperm. In the third step of screening, FISH is used to assess the in vitro fertilization embryos, thus finally to identify the individuals with the ability to produce transgenic embryos. By this three-step screening, the non-transgenic boars and boars with no ability to produce transgenic sperm or transgenic embryos would be eliminated; therefore only those boars could produce transgenic offspring are maintained and used for breeding and herd expansion. It is the first time a systematic pre-breeding screening program is proposed for transgenic pigs. This program might also be applied in other transgenic large animals, and provide an economical and efficient strategy for herd expansion.

  12. Synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters using egg white proteins.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Dickson; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) have gained interest during the recent years because of their low toxicity and finer size for the bioimaging and biolabeling applications in comparison to the semiconductor quantum dot analogues. Diverse materials such as sulfur compounds, peptides, dendrimers, proteins, etc., are exploited for the preparation of AuNCs. Henceforth, highly fluorescent, water-soluble, and few atom-containing gold nanoclusters are created using a rapid, straightforward, and green method. In this regard for the first time chicken egg white (CEW), one of the most unique materials, is utilized in an aqueous solution under basic conditions at physiological temperature for the preparation of AuNCs. Tyrosine and tryptophan amino acid residues are responsible for the conversion of Au ions to Au(0) under alkaline condtions. CEW contains four major proteins of which the main constituent protein, ovalbumin also leads to the formation of the AuNCs with a higher fluorescence emission compared to the CEW. The ratios between the different reaction partners are very crucial, along with temperature and time for the preparation of AuNCs with high photoluminescence emission. The limited vibrational motion of the proteins under alkaline condition and the bulkiness of the proteins help in the formation of AuNCs.

  13. Automated protein-ligand interaction screening by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maple, Hannah J; Garlish, Rachel A; Rigau-Roca, Laura; Porter, John; Whitcombe, Ian; Prosser, Christine E; Kennedy, Jeff; Henry, Alistair J; Taylor, Richard J; Crump, Matthew P; Crosby, John

    2012-01-26

    Identifying protein-ligand binding interactions is a key step during early-stage drug discovery. Existing screening techniques are often associated with drawbacks such as low throughput, high sample consumption, and dynamic range limitations. The increasing use of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) demands that these techniques also detect very weak interactions (mM K(D) values). This paper presents the development and validation of a fully automated screen by mass spectrometry, capable of detecting fragment binding into the millimolar K(D) range. Low sample consumption, high throughput, and wide dynamic range make this a highly attractive, orthogonal approach. The method was applied to screen 157 compounds in 6 h against the anti-apoptotic protein target Bcl-x(L). Mass spectrometry results were validated using STD-NMR, HSQC-NMR, and ITC experiments. Agreement between techniques suggests that mass spectrometry offers a powerful, complementary approach for screening. PMID:22148839

  14. Fluorescent biphenyl derivatives of phenylalanine suitable for protein modification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengxi; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Wang, Lin; Jin, Yuguang; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-11-26

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that structurally compact fluorophores incorporated into the side chains of amino acids could be introduced into dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) with minimal disruption of protein structure or function, even when the site of incorporation was within a folded region of the protein. The modified proteins could be employed for FRET measurements, providing sensitive monitors of changes in protein conformation. The very favorable results achieved in that study encouraged us to prepare additional fluorescent amino acids of potential utility for studying protein dynamics. Presently, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of four positional isomers of biphenyl-phenylalanine, all of which were found to exhibit potentially useful fluorescent properties. All four phenylalanine derivatives were used to activate suppressor tRNA transcripts and incorporated into multiple positions of ecDHFR. All phenylalanine derivatives were incorporated with good efficiency into position 16 of ecDHFR and afforded modified proteins that consumed NADPH at rates up to about twice the rate measured for wild type. This phenomenon has been noted on a number of occasions previously and shown to be due to an increase in the off-rate of tetrahydrofolate from the enzyme, altering a step that is normally rate limiting. When introduced into sterically accessible position 49, the four phenylalanine derivatives afforded DHFRs having catalytic function comparable to wild type. The four phenylalanine derivatives were also introduced into position 115 of ecDHFR, which is known to be a folded region of the protein less tolerant of structural alteration. As anticipated, significant differences were noted in the catalytic efficiencies of the derived proteins. The ability of two of the sizable biphenyl-phenylalanine derivatives to be accommodated at position 115 with minimal perturbation of DHFR function is attributed to rotational

  15. Fluorescence, polarized fluorescence, and Brewster angle microscopy of palmitic acid and lung surfactant protein B monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, M M; Lee, K Y; Waring, A; Zasadzinski, J A

    1997-01-01

    Fluorescence, polarized fluorescence, and Brewster angle microscopy reveal that human lung surfactant protein SP-B and its amino terminus (SP-B[1-25]) alter the phase behavior of palmitic acid monolayers by inhibiting the formation of condensed phases and creating a new fluid protein-rich phase. This fluid phase forms a network that separates condensed phase domains at coexistence and persists to high surface pressures. The network changes the monolayer collapse mechanism from heterogeneous nucleation/growth and fracturing processes to a more homogeneous process through isolating individual condensed phase domains. This results in higher surface pressures at collapse, and monolayers easier to respread on expansion, factors essential to the in vivo function of lung surfactant. The network is stabilized by a low-line tension between the coexisting phases, as confirmed by the observation of extended linear domains, or "stripe" phases, and a Gouy-Chapman analysis of protein-containing monolayers. Comparison of isotherm data and observed morphologies of monolayers containing SP-B(1-25) with those containing the full SP-B sequence show that the shortened peptide retains most of the native activity of the full-length protein, which may lead to cheaper and more effective synthetic replacement formulations. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:9168053

  16. Temperature-induced fluorescence changes : a screening method for frost tolerance of potato (solanum sp.).

    PubMed

    Sundbom, E; Strand, M; Hällgren, J E

    1982-11-01

    Field-grown tuber-bearing potatoes were screened for frost tolerance in a late stage of development. Three different clones of Solanum tuberosum L. and two interspecific crosses between clones of S. tuberosum and the wild potato species S. demissum Lindl. were studied. Two different methods were used. (a) Temperature-induced fluorescence changes of intact leaves were measured in freeze-thaw cycles between 20 degrees C and -10 degrees C. The variable fluorescence pattern was characterized in relation to frost tolerance. (b) Controlled freezings of plants in a climate chamber with successively increased low temperature stress, of 1 to 2 hours duration during the dark period. Freezing damages were classified visually.The short-term frost during the fluorescence measurement was compared with the long-term frost treatments in the climate chamber. The results of the two were identical to ranking of the different clones for frost tolerance. The temperature-induced fluorescence changes also monitored progressive damages to the chloroplast membranes when plants were exposed to successively lower temperatures in a controlled climate chamber freezing test. It was deduced from the fluorescence measurements that the freezing injury of potato occurs on the water splitting side of photosystem II. PMID:16662670

  17. Prolonged irradiation of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein or Cerulean can invalidate Forster resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Birgit; Zimmer, Thomas; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; König, Karsten; Benndorf, Klaus; Biskup, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants have proven to be a good and convenient fluorescent label for proteins: GFP and other visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) can be fused selectively to the protein of interest by simple cloning techniques and develop fluorescence without additional cofactors. Among the steadily growing collection of VFPs, several pairs can be chosen that can serve as donor and acceptor fluorophores in Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. Among them, the cyan fluorescent proteins (ECFP/Cerulean) and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) are most commonly used. We show that ECFP and Cerulean have some disadvantages despite their common use: Upon irradiation with light intensities that are commonly used for intensity- and lifetime-based FRET measurements, both the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence lifetime of ECFP and Cerulean decrease. This can hamper both intensity- and lifetime-based FRET measurements and emphasizes the need for control measurements to exclude these artifacts. PMID:18601529

  18. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  19. Rapid protein crystallization by a micro osmotic screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Po-Hsiung; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2007-03-01

    This work presents a micro osmotic screening system that grows protein crystals in hours while consuming only micrograms of samples. Throughout the crystallization process, water can be driven in or out of a protein solution (across a semi-permeable membrane) to adjust its concentrations as desired. With the bi-directional and adjustable flow control realized by osmosis, each protein sample can be screened for crystallization conditions over a highly extended range. In the prototype demonstration, 6 × 8 screening arrays having an overall size of 20 × 24 × 2.5 mm3 were fabricated and characterized with crystallization experiments. In these experiments, crystallization conditions for four proteins, including lysozyme, catalase, thaumatin and xylanase, were identified within 2-6 h while consuming less than 20 µl of sample solution for each protein. Furthermore, it was also demonstrated that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from the prototype system. As such, this osmotic system pioneers a new class of rapid screening schemes for high-throughput protein crystallization. A portion of this paper was presented at the 10th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, Tokyo, Japan, November 2006.

  20. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  1. Development of Fluorescent Protein Probes Specific for Parallel DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Dang, Dung Thanh; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-01-01

    We have developed fluorescent protein probes specific for parallel G-quadruplexes by attaching cyan fluorescent protein to the G-quadruplex-binding motif of the RNA helicase RHAU. Fluorescent probes containing RHAU peptide fragments of different lengths were constructed, and their binding to G-quadruplexes was characterized. The selective recognition and discrimination of G-quadruplex topologies by the fluorescent protein probes was easily detected by the naked eye or by conventional gel imaging.

  2. Novel, fluorescent, SSB protein chimeras with broad utility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Choi, Meerim; Stanenas, Adam G; Byrd, Alicia K; Raney, Kevin D; Cohan, Christopher; Bianco, Piero R

    2011-06-01

    The Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) is a central player in DNA metabolism where it organizes genome maintenance complexes and stabilizes single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates generated during DNA processing. Due to the importance of SSB and to facilitate real-time studies, we developed a dual plasmid expression system to produce novel, chimeric SSB proteins. These chimeras, which contain mixtures of histidine-tagged and fluorescent protein(FP)-fusion subunits, are easily purified in milligram quantities and used without further modification, a significant enhancement over previous methods to produce fluorescent SSB. Chimeras retain the functionality of wild type in all assays, demonstrating that SSB function is unaffected by the FPs. We demonstrate the power and utility of these chimeras in single molecule studies providing a great level of insight into the biochemical mechanism of RecBCD. We also utilized the chimeras to show for the first time that RecG and SSB interact in vivo. Consequently, we anticipate that the chimeras described herein will facilitate in vivo, in vitro and single DNA molecule studies using proteins that do not require further modification prior to use.

  3. Multiplexed expression and screening for recombinant protein production in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Susan DJ; Crofts, Anna M; Shadbolt, S Paul; McCafferty, John; Dyson, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Background A variety of approaches to understanding protein structure and function require production of recombinant protein. Mammalian based expression systems have advantages over bacterial systems for certain classes of protein but can be slower and more laborious. Thus the availability of a simple system for production and rapid screening of constructs or conditions for mammalian expression would be of great benefit. To this end we have coupled an efficient recombinant protein production system based on transient transfection in HEK-293 EBNA1 (HEK-293E) suspension cells with a dot blot method allowing pre-screening of proteins expressed in cells in a high throughput manner. Results A nested PCR approach was used to clone 21 extracellular domains of mouse receptors as CD4 fusions within a mammalian GATEWAY expression vector system. Following transient transfection, HEK-293E cells grown in 2 ml cultures in 24-deep well blocks showed similar growth kinetics, viability and recombinant protein expression profiles, to those grown in 50 ml shake flask cultures as judged by western blotting. Following optimisation, fluorescent dot blot analysis of transfection supernatants was shown to be a rapid method for analysing protein expression yielding similar results as western blot analysis. Addition of urea enhanced the binding of glycoproteins to a nitrocellulose membrane. A good correlation was observed between the results of a plate based small scale transient transfection dot blot pre-screen and successful purification of proteins expressed at the 50 ml scale. Conclusion The combination of small scale multi-well plate culture and dot blotting described here will allow the multiplex analysis of different mammalian expression experiments enabling a faster identification of high yield expression constructs or conditions prior to large scale protein production. The methods for parallel GATEWAY cloning and expression of multiple constructs in cell culture will also be useful

  4. Application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in protein studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Since the physical process of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was elucidated more than six decades ago, this peculiar fluorescence phenomenon has turned into a powerful tool for biomedical research due to its compatibility in scale with biological molecules as well as rapid developments in novel fluorophores and optical detection techniques. A wide variety of FRET approaches have been devised, each with its own advantages and drawbacks. Especially in the last decade or so, we are witnessing a flourish of FRET applications in biological investigations, many of which exemplify clever experimental design and rigorous analysis. Here we review the current stage of FRET methods development with the main focus on its applications in protein studies in biological systems, by summarizing the basic components of FRET techniques, most established quantification methods, as well as potential pitfalls, illustrated by example applications. PMID:25368432

  5. A fluorescent hydrogel-based flow cytometry high-throughput screening platform for hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pitzler, Christian; Wirtz, Georgette; Vojcic, Ljubica; Hiltl, Stephanie; Böker, Alexander; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2014-12-18

    Screening throughput is a key in directed evolution experiments and enzyme discovery. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform based on a coupled reaction of glucose oxidase and a hydrolase (Yersinia mollaretii phytase [YmPh]). The coupled reaction produces hydroxyl radicals through Fenton's reaction, acting as initiator of poly(ethyleneglycol)-acrylate-based polymerization incorporating a fluorescent monomer. As a consequence, a fluorescent hydrogel is formed around Escherichia coli cells expressing active YmPh. We achieve five times enrichment of active cell population through flow cytometry analysis and sorting of mixed populations. Finally, we validate the performance of the fluorescent polymer shell (fur-shell) technology by directed phytase evolution that yielded improved variants starting from a library containing 10(7) phytase variants. Thus, fur-shell technology represents a rapid and nonlaborious way of identifying the most active variants from vast populations, as well as a platform for generation of polymer-hybrid cells for biobased interactive materials. PMID:25525992

  6. Screening system of blocking agents of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts in cells using fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong Ho; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) triggers cellular responses implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications; blockade of RAGE has been shown to inhibit the development of diabetic complications. To develop a screening system to identify novel disruptors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE)-RAGE binding, we used an AGE-RAGE binding system in RAGE-overexpressing cells; test compounds were screened using this system. To construct human RAGE-overexpressing cells, mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were stably transfected with the pcDNA-human RAGE (hRAGE) vector and selected under 1 mg/mL gentamicin (G418). RAGE expression in hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs was analyzed by Western blotting with specific RAGE antibody. To identify novel disruptors of AGE-RAGE binding, 50 single compounds and AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Alexa 488 (AGE-BSA labeled with Alexa 488) were treated to the hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs. Nonbinding AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 was washed and fluorescence measured by microtiter plate reader (excitation wavelength, 485 nm; emission wavelength, 528 nm). In hRAGE-overexpressing cells, only treatment with AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 significantly increased fluorescence intensity in a dose-dependent manner. Of 50 compounds tested, genistein disrupted AGE-RAGE binding in a dose-dependent manner. This AGE-RAGE binding system using AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 in hRAGE-overexpressing cells was suitable for screening of agents that disrupt AGE-hRAGE binding.

  7. Screening system of blocking agents of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts in cells using fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong Ho; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) triggers cellular responses implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications; blockade of RAGE has been shown to inhibit the development of diabetic complications. To develop a screening system to identify novel disruptors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE)-RAGE binding, we used an AGE-RAGE binding system in RAGE-overexpressing cells; test compounds were screened using this system. To construct human RAGE-overexpressing cells, mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were stably transfected with the pcDNA-human RAGE (hRAGE) vector and selected under 1 mg/mL gentamicin (G418). RAGE expression in hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs was analyzed by Western blotting with specific RAGE antibody. To identify novel disruptors of AGE-RAGE binding, 50 single compounds and AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Alexa 488 (AGE-BSA labeled with Alexa 488) were treated to the hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs. Nonbinding AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 was washed and fluorescence measured by microtiter plate reader (excitation wavelength, 485 nm; emission wavelength, 528 nm). In hRAGE-overexpressing cells, only treatment with AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 significantly increased fluorescence intensity in a dose-dependent manner. Of 50 compounds tested, genistein disrupted AGE-RAGE binding in a dose-dependent manner. This AGE-RAGE binding system using AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 in hRAGE-overexpressing cells was suitable for screening of agents that disrupt AGE-hRAGE binding. PMID:23037172

  8. Proteomic screening of glutamatergic mouse brain synaptosomes isolated by fluorescence activated sorting

    PubMed Central

    Biesemann, Christoph; Grønborg, Mads; Luquet, Elisa; Wichert, Sven P; Bernard, Véronique; Bungers, Simon R; Cooper, Ben; Varoqueaux, Frédérique; Li, Liyi; Byrne, Jennifer A; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Olaf; Brose, Nils; Herzog, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    For decades, neuroscientists have used enriched preparations of synaptic particles called synaptosomes to study synapse function. However, the interpretation of corresponding data is problematic as synaptosome preparations contain multiple types of synapses and non-synaptic neuronal and glial contaminants. We established a novel Fluorescence Activated Synaptosome Sorting (FASS) method that substantially improves conventional synaptosome enrichment protocols and enables high-resolution biochemical analyses of specific synapse subpopulations. Employing knock-in mice with fluorescent glutamatergic synapses, we show that FASS isolates intact ultrapure synaptosomes composed of a resealed presynaptic terminal and a postsynaptic density as assessed by light and electron microscopy. FASS synaptosomes contain bona fide glutamatergic synapse proteins but are almost devoid of other synapse types and extrasynaptic or glial contaminants. We identified 163 enriched proteins in FASS samples, of which FXYD6 and Tpd52 were validated as new synaptic proteins. FASS purification thus enables high-resolution biochemical analyses of specific synapse subpopulations in health and disease. PMID:24413018

  9. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hau B.; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O.; Terwilliger, Thomas C. Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2013-12-01

    A strategy using a new split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a modular binding partner to form stable protein complexes with a target protein is presented. The modular split GFP may open the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants. A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  10. Screening method for the detection of methamphetamine in hair using fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Jae Chul; Suh, SungIll; Ko, Beom Jun; Lee, Jae Il; Kim, Jin Young; Suh, Yong Jun; In, Moon Kyo

    2013-05-01

    A hair screening method has been developed for the detection of methamphetamine using an immunoassay analyzer (AxSYM) with a fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) technique. The method consisted of washing, cutting and digesting a hair sample (5 mg) with an enzymatic digestion solution. The digested hair sample was centrifuged, and then an aliquot of the supernatant was used to conduct the screening. The results obtained from FPIA, in most cases, showed concentrations above 70.0 ng/mL of methamphetamine for hair samples that contained 0.5 ng/mg of methamphetamine, determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The percent sensitivity, defined as the true positive rate of screened and confirmed results, and the percent specificity, defined as the true negative rate of screened and confirmed results, of the FPIA screening method were 100.0 and 96.7% (false positive rate of 3.3%), respectively, when the threshold level for FPIA analysis was set at 70.0 ng/mL (n = 60).The correlation coefficient (r) for the linear relationship between FPIA and GC-MS results was 0.91 in real hair samples. The recommended amount of hair sample was found to be 5.0 mg for FPIA screening analysis when the concentration of methamphetamine in hair samples determined by GC-MS was found to be more than 0.5 ng/mg. The method developed in this study was reliable and effective for the screening of methamphetamine in routine hair analysis.

  11. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOEpatents

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  12. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Cis-trans photoisomerization of fluorescent-protein chromophores.

    PubMed

    Voliani, Valerio; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Nifosì, Riccardo; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Grandi, Elena; Viappiani, Cristiano; Beltram, Fabio

    2008-08-28

    Photochromic variants of fluorescent proteins are opening the way to a number of opportunities for high-sensitivity regioselective studies in the cellular environment and may even lead to applications in information and communication technology. Yet, the detailed photophysical processes at the basis of photoswitching have not been fully clarified. In this paper, we used synthetic FP chromophores to clarify the photophysical processes associated with the photochromic behavior. In particular, we investigated the spectral modification of synthetic chromophore analogues of wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP), Y66F GFP (BFPF), and Y66W GFP (CFP) upon irradiation in solutions of different polarities. We found that the cis-trans photoisomerization mechanism can be induced in all the chromophores. The structural assignments were carried out both by NMR measurements and DFT calculations. Remarkably, we determined for the first time the spectra of neutral trans isomers in different solvents. Finally, we calculated the photoconversion quantum yields by absorption measurements under continuous illumination at different times and by a nanosecond laser-flash photolysis method. Our results indicate that cis-trans photoisomerization is a general mechanism of FP chromophores whose efficiency is modulated by the detailed mutant-specific protein environment. PMID:18671358

  16. Engineering fluorescent protein substrates for the AAA+ Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Nager, Andrew R; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2013-04-01

    AAA+ proteases, such as Escherichia coli Lon, recognize protein substrates by binding to specific peptide degrons and then unfold and translocate the protein into an internal degradation chamber for proteolysis. For some AAA+ proteases, attaching specific degrons to the N- or C-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) generates useful substrates, whose unfolding and degradation can be monitored by loss of fluorescence, but Lon fails to degrade appropriately tagged GFP variants at a significant rate. Here, we demonstrate that Lon catalyzes robust unfolding and degradation of circularly permuted variants of GFP with a β20 degron appended to the N terminus or a sul20 degron appended to the C terminus. Lon degradation of non-permuted GFP-sul20 is very slow, in part because the enzyme cannot efficiently extract the degron-proximal C-terminal β-strand to initiate denaturation. The circularly permuted GFP substrates described here allow convenient high-throughput assays of the kinetics of Lon degradation in vitro and also permit assays of Lon proteolysis in vivo.

  17. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  18. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  19. Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MAMEF) with silver colloids in 96-well plates: Application to ultra fast and sensitive immunoassays, High Throughput Screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Holley, Patrick; Geddes, Chris D

    2006-05-30

    Fluorescence detection is the basis of most assays used in drug discovery and High Throughput Screening (HTS) today. In all of these assays, assay rapidity and sensitivity is a primary concern, the sensitivity determined by both the quantum yield of the fluorophores and efficiency of the detection system, while rapidity is determined by the physical and biophysical parameters of temperature, concentration, assay bioaffinity, etc. In this paper we describe a platform technology that promises to fundamentally address these two physical constraints of sensitivity and rapidity. By combining the use of Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF), a near-field effect that can significantly enhance fluorescence signatures, with low power microwave heating, we can significantly increase the sensitivity of surface assays as well as >95% kinetically complete the assay within a few seconds. In addition, the metallic nanostructures used to facilitate MEF appear to be preferentially heated as compared to the surface assay fluid, advantageously localizing the MEF and heating around the nanostructures. To demonstrate proof of principle, a 96-well plate has been functionalized with silver nanostructures, and a model protein avidin-biotin assay studied. In our findings, a greater than 5-fold fluorescence enhancement coupled with a approximately 90-fold increase in assay kinetics was observed, but with no assay washing steps needed due to the silver-enhanced evanescent field mode of excitation. These findings promise to strongly facilitate high throughput fluorescence-based processes, such as in biology, drug discovery and general compound screening.

  20. Intracellular pH measurements made simple by fluorescent protein probes and the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Antonella; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Storti, Barbara; Beltram, Fabio; Bizzarri, Ranieri

    2012-05-25

    A versatile pH-dependent fluorescent protein was applied to intracellular pH measurements by means of the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging. By this fit-less method we obtain intracellular pH maps under resting or altered physiological conditions by single-photon confocal or two-photon microscopy.

  1. Electrodynamic theory of fluorescence polarization of solutions: theory and application to the determination of protein-protein separation.

    PubMed

    Collett, Edward; Schaefer, Beth

    2009-03-10

    The phenomenon of the fluorescence polarization of solutions has found numerous applications in biophysics, biochemistry, immunology, and diagnostic and clinical medicine. The current theory to explain the phenomenon of fluorescence polarization in solutions was developed by F. Perrin in 1926. Perrin based his theory on the belief that fluorescence polarization is a manifestation of rotational Brownian motion. Fluorescence polarization, however, is an electromagnetic radiation phenomenon. Using Maxwell's equations, suitably modified to account for the quantum behavior of fluorescence, E. Collett developed a theory of fluorescence polarization (the electrodynamic theory) based on a model of dipole-dipole interactions. The electrodynamic theory is used to investigate protein-protein assays to determine the minimum and maximum binding distances between the proteins for (1) an estrogen receptor DNA bound to a fluorescein labeled estrogen response element and (2) a green fluorescent protein chimera of S-peptide (S65T-His6) bound to a free S-protein. PMID:19277089

  2. A new screening method for flunitrazepam in vodka and tequila by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leesakul, Nararak; Pongampai, Sirintip; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Sudkeaw, Pravit; Tantirungrotechai, Yuthana; Buranachai, Chittanon

    2013-01-01

    A new screening method for flunitrazepam in colourless alcoholic beverages based on a spectroscopic technique is proposed. Absorption and steady-state fluorescence of flunitrazepam and its protonated form with various acids were investigated. The redshift of the wavelength of maximum absorption was distinctively observed in protonated flunitrazepam. An emissive fluorescence at 472 nm was detected in colourless spirits (vodka and tequila) at room temperature. 2-M perchloric acid was the most appropriated proton source. By using electron ionization mass spectrometry and time-dependent density functional theory calculations, the possible structure of protonated flunitrazepam was identified to be 2-nitro-N-methylacridone, an acridone derivative as opposed to 2-methylamino-5-nitro-2'-fluorobenzophenone, a benzophenone derivative.

  3. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Retina for the Screening of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Graham, Catherine; Czub, Stefanie; Dudas, Sandor; Rasmussen, Mark A; Casey, Thomas A; Petrich, Jacob W

    2016-01-13

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, of which bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is of special concern because it is infectious and debilitating to humans. The possibility of using fluorescence spectroscopy to screen for BSE in cattle was explored. Fluorescence spectra from the retinas of experimentally infected BSE-positive cattle with clinical disease were compared with those from both sham-inoculated and non-inoculated BSE-negative cattle. The distinct intensity difference of about 4-10-fold between the spectra of the BSE-positive and the BSE-negative (sham-inoculated and non-inoculated) eyes suggests the basis for a means of developing a rapid, noninvasive examination of BSE in particular and TSEs in general.

  4. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Retina for the Screening of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Graham, Catherine; Czub, Stefanie; Dudas, Sandor; Rasmussen, Mark A; Casey, Thomas A; Petrich, Jacob W

    2016-01-13

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, of which bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is of special concern because it is infectious and debilitating to humans. The possibility of using fluorescence spectroscopy to screen for BSE in cattle was explored. Fluorescence spectra from the retinas of experimentally infected BSE-positive cattle with clinical disease were compared with those from both sham-inoculated and non-inoculated BSE-negative cattle. The distinct intensity difference of about 4-10-fold between the spectra of the BSE-positive and the BSE-negative (sham-inoculated and non-inoculated) eyes suggests the basis for a means of developing a rapid, noninvasive examination of BSE in particular and TSEs in general. PMID:26623498

  5. Imaging fluorescently tagged Phytophthora effector proteins inside infected plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Boevink, Petra C; Birch, Paul R J; Whisson, Stephen C

    2011-01-01

    Assays to determine the role of pathogen effectors within an infected plant cell are yielding valuable information about which host processes are targeted to allow successful pathogen colonization. However, this does not necessarily inform on the cellular location of these interactions, or if these effector-virulence target interactions occur only in the presence of the pathogen. Here, we describe techniques to allow the subcellular localization of pathogen effectors inside infected plant cells or tissues, based largely on infiltration of plant tissue by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and its delivery of DNA encoding fluorescent protein-tagged effectors, and subsequent confocal microscopy. PMID:21359810

  6. Evaluating Baculovirus Infection Using Green Fluorescent Protein and Variants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Cha, Hyung Joon; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    By use of a strategy incorporating the green fluorescent protein (GFP), facile and rapid monitoring and visualization of baculovirus infection in insect cells is possible in vivo. This chapter describes two techniques for simple determination of virus titer in the baculovirus expression system using GFP co-expression and rapid monitoring of Sf-9 insect cell infection using a combination of GFP and the early-to-late (ETL) promoter of the virus vector. Because of its early appearance, GFP, when placed under the control of ETL promoter, will facilitate vector construction, virus isolation, and titer determination.

  7. Screening of HER2 Overexpressed Breast Cancer Subtype In Vivo by the Validation of High-Performance, Long-Term, and Noninvasive Fluorescence Tracer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhou, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Jiang, Liping; He, Zhiwei; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-12-15

    The high-performance and noninvasive screening of heterogeneous tumor subtypes in vivo is particularly desirable for the diagnosis and symptomatic treatment of cancer. Therefore, we report a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence tracer "smartly identified HER2" (SI-HER2) for rapid, accurate, and highly specific screening of HER2 overexpressed breast cancer. An antibody against HER2 protein receptor, EP1045Y, was conjugated with NIR emitting CdSeTe/CdS/ZnS QDs via polyhistidine-driven self-assembly approach. The further adsorption of black hole quencher 3 on antibody enabled a "turn on" fluorescence response of the fluorescence tracer to HER2 protein receptor. Aside from the capability of differentiating the HER2 overexpressed MCF-7 cells from its counterparts, the fluorescence tracer can also accurately and rapidly identify the HER2 overexpressed breast tumor subtype in two tumors-bearing mouse model, providing a platform for the investigation of advanced pathways to distinguish the different breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26598802

  8. A Differential Fluorescence-Based Genetic Screen Identifies Listeria monocytogenes Determinants Required for Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Kyle J.

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular pathogen capable of causing severe invasive disease with high mortality rates in humans. While previous studies have largely elucidated the bacterial and host cell mechanisms necessary for invasion, vacuolar escape, and subsequent cell-to-cell spread, the L. monocytogenes factors required for rapid replication within the restrictive environment of the host cell cytosol are poorly understood. In this report, we describe a differential fluorescence-based genetic screen utilizing fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and high-throughput microscopy to identify L. monocytogenes mutants defective in optimal intracellular replication. Bacteria harboring deletions within the identified gene menD or pepP were defective for growth in primary murine macrophages and plaque formation in monolayers of L2 fibroblasts, thus validating the ability of the screening method to identify intracellular replication-defective mutants. Genetic complementation of the menD and pepP deletion strains rescued the in vitro intracellular infection defects. Furthermore, the menD deletion strain displayed a general extracellular replication defect that could be complemented by growth under anaerobic conditions, while the intracellular growth defect of this strain could be complemented by the addition of exogenous menaquinone. As prior studies have indicated the importance of aerobic metabolism for L. monocytogenes infection, these findings provide further evidence for the importance of menaquinone and aerobic metabolism for L. monocytogenes pathogenesis. Lastly, both the menD and pepP deletion strains were attenuated during in vivo infection of mice. These findings demonstrate that the differential fluorescence-based screening approach provides a powerful tool for the identification of intracellular replication determinants in multiple bacterial systems. PMID:23687268

  9. Expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein in Bacillus methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Nilasari, Dewi; Dover, Nir; Rech, Sabine; Komives, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts are used in a wide range of industries to produce large scale quantities of proteins, amino acids, and commodity chemicals. While the majority of these processes use glucose or other low-cost sugars as the substrate, Bacillus methanolicus is one example of a biocatalyst that has shown sustained growth on methanol as a carbon source at elevated temperature (50-53°C optimum) resulting in reduced feed and utility costs. Specifically, the complete chemical process enabled by this approach takes methane from natural gas, and following a low-cost conversion to methanol, can be used for the production of high value products. In this study, production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by B. methanolicus is explored. A plasmid was constructed that incorporates the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh) promoter of B. methanolicus MGA3 together with the GFPuv gene. The plasmid, pNW33N, was shown to be effective for expression in other Bacillus strains, although not previously in B. methanolicus. A published electroporation protocol for transformation of B. methanolicus was modified to result in expression of GFP using plasmid pNW33N-mdh-GFPuv (pNmG). Transformation was confirmed by both agarose gel electrophoresis and by observation of green fluorescence under UV light exposure. The mass yield of cells and protein were measured in shake flask experiments. The optimum concentration of methanol for protein production was found to be at 200 mM. Higher concentrations than 200 mM resulted in slightly higher biomass production but lower amounts of recombinant protein. PMID:22275315

  10. Analysis of protein-ligand interactions by fluorescence polarization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ana M.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of the associations between biomolecules is required both to predict and understand the interactions that underpin all biological activity. Fluorescence polarization (FP) provides a non-disruptive means of measuring the association of a fluorescent ligand with a larger molecule. We describe an FP assay in which binding of fluorescein-labelled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to N-terminal fragments of IP3 receptors can be characterised at different temperatures and in competition with other ligands. The assay allows the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) changes of ligand binding to be determined. The method is applicable to any purified ligand-binding site for which an appropriate fluorescent ligand is available. FP can be used to measure low-affinity interactions in real-time without use of radioactive materials, it is non-destructive, and with appropriate care it can resolve ΔH° and ΔS°. The first part of the protocol, protein preparation, may take several weeks, while the FP measurements, once they have been optimised, would normally take 1-6 h. PMID:21372817

  11. Binding phenomena and fluorescence quenching. II: Photophysics of aromatic residues and dependence of fluorescence spectra on protein conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callis, Patrik R.

    2014-12-01

    The three amino acids with aromatic ring side chains-phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and especially tryptophan (Trp) have played a long and productive role in helping unlock the secrets of protein behavior by optical spectroscopy (absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, etc.) In principle, an appropriately placed Trp will undergo fluorescence wavelength and/or intensity changes upon whatever functional process a protein performs. Although perceived to be enigmatic and not well understood, Trp is arguably now better understood than many of the extrinsic probes currently in use. Basic principles of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching and wavelength shifts in proteins are presented, with strong emphasis on the importance of electrostatics. The condensed description of findings from recent experiments and simulations of tryptophan fluorescence and intrinsic quenching in proteins is designed to help authors in planning and interpreting experimental results of ligand binding studies.

  12. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ropp, J.D.; Cuthbertson, R.A.; Donahue, C.J.; Wolfgang-Kimball, D.

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types. The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP`s bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T- GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Probing Alzheimer amyloid peptide aggregation using a cell-free fluorescent protein refolding method.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Pharhad Eli; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2009-08-01

    Fibrillation of the Alzheimer beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and (or) formation of toxic oligomers are key pathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Several strategies have been introduced to identify small molecule aggregation inhibitors, and based on these methods, a number of aggregation inhibitors have been identified. However, most of these methods use chemically synthesized Abeta42 peptides, which are difficult to maintain in a monomeric state at neutral pH where anti-aggregation screening is usually carried out. We have developed a cell-free Abeta42 aggregation assay based on fluorescence protein refolding. This assay utilizes nanomolar concentrations of protein. We genetically fused Abeta42 to the N-terminus of vYFP, a variant of of GFP, and expressed and purified the folded fusion protein. The refolding efficiency of Abeta42-vYFP fusion was inversely correlated with the solubility of Abeta42. Using fluorescence to monitor refolding of Abeta42-vYFP, we confirmed that Zn2+ binds to Abeta42 and increases its aggregation. The IC50 value estimated for Zn binding is 3.03 +/- 0.65 micromol/L. We also show that this technique is capable of monitoring the aggregation of chemically synthesized Abeta42.

  14. Generation of a vector suite for protein solubility screening

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Agustín; Ortega, Claudia; Obal, Gonzalo; Alzari, Pedro; Vincentelli, Renaud; Oppezzo, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression has become an invaluable tool for academic and biotechnological projects. With the use of high-throughput screening technologies for soluble protein production, uncountable target proteins have been produced in a soluble and homogeneous state enabling the realization of further studies. Evaluation of hundreds conditions requires the use of high-throughput cloning and screening methods. Here we describe a new versatile vector suite dedicated to the expression improvement of recombinant proteins (RP) with solubility problems. This vector suite allows the parallel cloning of the same PCR product into the 12 different expression vectors evaluating protein expression under different promoter strength, different fusion tags as well as different solubility enhancer proteins. Additionally, we propose the use of a new fusion protein which appears to be a useful solubility enhancer. Above all we propose in this work an economic and useful vector suite to fast track the solubility of different RP. We also propose a new solubility enhancer protein that can be included in the evaluation of the expression of RP that are insoluble in classical expression conditions. PMID:24616717

  15. Comparison of gold leaf thickness in Namban folding screens using X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessanha, Sofia; Madeira, Teresa I.; Manso, Marta; Guerra, Mauro; Le Gac, Agnès; Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the thickness of the gold leaf applied in six Japanese folding screens is compared using a nondestructive approach. Four screens belonging to the Momoyama period (~1573-1603) and two screens belonging to the early Edo period (~1603-1868) were analyzed in situ using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and the thickness of the applied gold leaf was evaluated using a methodology based on the attenuation of the different characteristic lines of gold in the gold leaf layer. Considering that the leaf may well not be made of pure gold, we established that, for the purpose of comparing the intensity ratios of the Au lines, layers made with gold leaf of high grade can be considered identical. The gold leaf applied in one of the screens from the Edo period was found to be thinner than the gold leaf applied in the other ones. This is consistent with the development of the beating technology to obtain ever more thin gold leafs.

  16. Plasmon-enhanced emission from single fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donehue, Jessica E.; Haas, Beth L.; Wertz, Esther; Talicska, Courtney N.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we use evaporated gold nanoparticle films (GNPFs) as substrates for plasmon-enhanced imaging of two fluorescent proteins (FPs): mCherry and YFP. Through single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy, we show enhancement of single FP emission in the presence of GNPFs. The gold-coupled FPs demonstrate emission up to four times brighter and seven times longer lived, yielding order-of-magnitude enhancements in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracies for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, we introduce preliminary results for enhancement of mCherry-labeled TcpP membrane proteins inside live Vibrio cholerae cells coupled to GNPFs. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  17. Structure-guided design of fluorescent S-adenosylmethionine analogs for a high-throughput screen to target SAM-I riboswitch RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Scott F.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-binding RNAs and proteins are of interest as potential drug targets in diverse therapeutic areas, from infectious diseases to cancer. In the former case, the SAM-I riboswitch is an attractive target because this structured RNA element is found only in bacterial mRNAs and regulates multiple genes in several human pathogens. Here we describe the synthesis of stable and fluorescent analogs of SAM in which the fluorophore is introduced through a functionalizable linker to the ribose. A Cy5-labeled SAM analog was shown to bind several SAM-I riboswitches via in-line probing and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays, including one from Staphylococcus aureus that controls the expression of SAM synthetase in this organism. A fluorescent ligand displacement assay was developed and validated for high-throughput screening of compounds to target the SAM-I riboswitch class. PMID:24560607

  18. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins. PMID:27451201

  19. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins.

  20. Fluorescent Probe Encapsulated in SNAP-Tag Protein Cavity To Eliminate Nonspecific Fluorescence and Increase Detection Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Syun; Gao, Ruo-Cing; Wu, Ting-Wei; Cho, Chien; Tan, Kui-Thong

    2016-08-17

    Despite the promising improvements made recently on fluorescence probes for the detection of enzymes and reactive small molecules, two fundamental problems remain: weaker fluorescence of many dyes in aqueous buffers and strong nonspecific signals in samples containing high protein levels. In this paper, we introduce a novel fluorescent probe encapsulated in protein cavity (FPEPC) concept as demonstrated by SNAP-tag protein and three environment-sensitive fluorescence probes to overcome these two problems. The probes were constructed by following the current probe design for enzymes and reactive small molecules but with an additional benzylguanine moiety for selective SNAP-tag conjugation. The SNAP-tag conjugated probes achieved quantitative nitroreductase and hydrogen sulfide detection in blood plasma, whereas analyte concentrations were overestimated up to 700-fold when bare fluorescent probes were employed for detection. Furthermore, detection sensitivity was increased dramatically, as our probes displayed 390-fold fluorescence enhancement upon SNAP-tag conjugation, in stark contrast to the weak fluorescence of the free probes in aqueous solutions. Compared with the conventional approaches where fluorescent probes are encapsulated into polymers and nanoparticles, our simple and general approach successfully overcame many key issues such as dye leakage, long preparation steps, inconsistent dye-host ratios, difficulty in constructing in situ in a complex medium, and limited application to detect only small metabolites. PMID:27463260

  1. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  2. Fluorescent proteins as biosensors by quenching resonance energy transfer from endogenous tryptophan: detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Alexa; Sarette, Joseph; Shawler, Evan; Lee, Taeyoung; Freund, Steve; Holwitt, Eric; Hicks, Barry W

    2013-10-15

    Ensuring domestic safety from terrorist attack is a daunting challenge because of the wide array of chemical agents that must be screened. A panel of purified fluorescent protein isoforms (FPs) was screened for the ability to detect various explosives, explosive simulants, and toxic agents. In addition to their commonly used visible excitation wavelengths, essentially all FPs can be excited by UV light at 280 nm. Ultraviolet illumination excites electrons in endogenous tryptophan (W) residues, which then relax by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to the chromophore of the FP, and thus the FPs emit with their typical visible spectra. Taking advantage of the fact that tryptophan excitation can be quenched by numerous agents, including nitroaromatics like TNT and nitramines like RDX, it is demonstrated that quenching of visible fluorescence from UV illumination of FPs can be used as the basis for detecting these explosives and explosive degradation products. This work provides the foundation for production of an array of genetically-modified FPs for in vitro biosensors capable of rapid, simultaneous, sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of explosive or toxic agents.

  3. Pooled-matrix protein interaction screens using Barcode Fusion Genetics.

    PubMed

    Yachie, Nozomu; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Mellor, Joseph C; Weile, Jochen; Jacob, Yves; Verby, Marta; Ozturk, Sedide B; Li, Siyang; Cote, Atina G; Mosca, Roberto; Knapp, Jennifer J; Ko, Minjeong; Yu, Analyn; Gebbia, Marinella; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Tyagi, Tanya; Sheykhkarimli, Dayag; Roth, Jonathan F; Wong, Cassandra; Musa, Louai; Snider, Jamie; Liu, Yi-Chun; Yu, Haiyuan; Braun, Pascal; Stagljar, Igor; Hao, Tong; Calderwood, Michael A; Pelletier, Laurence; Aloy, Patrick; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput binary protein interaction mapping is continuing to extend our understanding of cellular function and disease mechanisms. However, we remain one or two orders of magnitude away from a complete interaction map for humans and other major model organisms. Completion will require screening at substantially larger scales with many complementary assays, requiring further efficiency gains in proteome-scale interaction mapping. Here, we report Barcode Fusion Genetics-Yeast Two-Hybrid (BFG-Y2H), by which a full matrix of protein pairs can be screened in a single multiplexed strain pool. BFG-Y2H uses Cre recombination to fuse DNA barcodes from distinct plasmids, generating chimeric protein-pair barcodes that can be quantified via next-generation sequencing. We applied BFG-Y2H to four different matrices ranging in scale from ~25 K to 2.5 M protein pairs. The results show that BFG-Y2H increases the efficiency of protein matrix screening, with quality that is on par with state-of-the-art Y2H methods. PMID:27107012

  4. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  5. A Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscope Extension for Ultrafast Screening of One-Bead One-Compound Libraries Using a Spectral Image Subtraction Approach.

    PubMed

    Heusermann, Wolf; Ludin, Beat; Pham, Nhan T; Auer, Manfred; Weidemann, Thomas; Hintersteiner, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The increasing involvement of academic institutions and biotech companies in drug discovery calls for cost-effective methods to identify new bioactive molecules. Affinity-based on-bead screening of combinatorial one-bead one-compound libraries combines a split-mix synthesis design with a simple protein binding assay operating directly at the bead matrix. However, one bottleneck for academic scale on-bead screening is the unavailability of a cheap, automated, and robust screening platform that still provides a quantitative signal related to the amount of target protein binding to individual beads for hit bead ranking. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy has long been considered unsuitable due to significant broad spectrum autofluorescence of the library beads in conjunction with low detection sensitivity. Herein, we demonstrate how such a standard microscope equipped with LED-based excitation and a modern CMOS camera can be successfully used for selecting hit beads. We show that the autofluorescence issue can be overcome by an optical image subtraction approach that yields excellent signal-to-noise ratios for the detection of bead-associated target proteins. A polymer capillary attached to a semiautomated bead-picking device allows the operator to efficiently isolate individual hit beads in less than 20 s. The system can be used for ultrafast screening of >200,000 bead-bound compounds in 1.5 h, thereby making high-throughput screening accessible to a wider group within the scientific community. PMID:27057765

  6. A Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscope Extension for Ultrafast Screening of One-Bead One-Compound Libraries Using a Spectral Image Subtraction Approach.

    PubMed

    Heusermann, Wolf; Ludin, Beat; Pham, Nhan T; Auer, Manfred; Weidemann, Thomas; Hintersteiner, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The increasing involvement of academic institutions and biotech companies in drug discovery calls for cost-effective methods to identify new bioactive molecules. Affinity-based on-bead screening of combinatorial one-bead one-compound libraries combines a split-mix synthesis design with a simple protein binding assay operating directly at the bead matrix. However, one bottleneck for academic scale on-bead screening is the unavailability of a cheap, automated, and robust screening platform that still provides a quantitative signal related to the amount of target protein binding to individual beads for hit bead ranking. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy has long been considered unsuitable due to significant broad spectrum autofluorescence of the library beads in conjunction with low detection sensitivity. Herein, we demonstrate how such a standard microscope equipped with LED-based excitation and a modern CMOS camera can be successfully used for selecting hit beads. We show that the autofluorescence issue can be overcome by an optical image subtraction approach that yields excellent signal-to-noise ratios for the detection of bead-associated target proteins. A polymer capillary attached to a semiautomated bead-picking device allows the operator to efficiently isolate individual hit beads in less than 20 s. The system can be used for ultrafast screening of >200,000 bead-bound compounds in 1.5 h, thereby making high-throughput screening accessible to a wider group within the scientific community.

  7. Small-Scale Screening to Large-Scale Over-Expression of Human Membrane Proteins for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarika; Saha, Sukanya; Thamminana, Sobrahani; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein structural studies are frequently hampered by poor expression. The low natural abundance of these proteins implies a need for utilizing different heterologous expression systems. E. coli and yeast are commonly used expression systems due to rapid cell growth at high cell density, economical production, and ease of manipulation. Here we report a simplified, systematically developed robust strategy from small-scale screening to large-scale over-expression of human integral membrane proteins in the mammalian expression system for structural studies. This methodology streamlines small-scale screening of several different constructs utilizing fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) towards optimization of buffer, additives, and detergents for achieving stability and homogeneity. This is followed by the generation of stable clonal cell lines expressing desired constructs, and lastly large-scale expression for crystallization. These techniques are designed to rapidly advance the structural studies of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins including that of human membrane proteins. PMID:27485338

  8. Analysis of green fluorescent protein bioluminescence in vivo and in vitro using a glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, L.; Mandujano, L. A.; Cuevas, J.; Reyes, P. G.; Osorio-González, D.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of fluorescent proteins has been a revolution in cell biology and related sciences because of their many applications, mainly emphasizing their use as cellular markers. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used as it requires no cofactors to generate fluorescence and retains this property into any organism when it is expressed by recombinant DNA techniques, which is a great advantage. In this work, we analyze the emission spectra of recombinant green fluorescent protein in vivo and in vitro exposed to a glow discharge plasma of nitrogen in order to relate electron temperature to fluorescence intensity.

  9. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, R. Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L.; Saini, Harpreet K.; Tickle, Ian J.; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-01-01

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26655740

  10. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  11. An Optimized Fluorescence-Based Bidimensional Immunoproteomic Approach for Accurate Screening of Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Launay, David; Sobanski, Vincent; Dussart, Patricia; Chafey, Philippe; Broussard, Cédric; Duban-Deweer, Sophie; Vermersch, Patrick; Prin, Lionel; Lefranc, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) combines classical proteomic technology with effective separation of cellular protein extracts on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, western blotting, and identification of the antigenic spot of interest by mass spectrometry. A critical point is related to the antigenic target characterization by mass spectrometry, which depends on the accuracy of the matching of antigenic reactivities on the protein spots during the 2D immunoproteomic procedures. The superimposition, based essentially on visual criteria of antigenic and protein spots, remains the major limitation of SERPA. The introduction of fluorescent dyes in proteomic strategies, commonly known as 2D-DIGE (differential in-gel electrophoresis), has boosted the qualitative capabilities of 2D electrophoresis. Based on this 2D-DIGE strategy, we have improved the conventional SERPA by developing a new and entirely fluorescence-based bi-dimensional immunoproteomic (FBIP) analysis, performed with three fluorescent dyes. To optimize the alignment of the different antigenic maps, we introduced a landmark map composed of a combination of specific antibodies. This methodological development allows simultaneous revelation of the antigenic, landmark and proteomic maps on each immunoblot. A computer-assisted process using commercially available software automatically leads to the superimposition of the different maps, ensuring accurate localization of antigenic spots of interest. PMID:26132557

  12. Receptor-ligand interactions studied with homogeneous fluorescence-based assays suitable for miniaturized screening.

    PubMed

    Scheel, A A; Funsch, B; Busch, M; Gradl, G; Pschorr, J; Lohse, M J

    2001-02-01

    Cell membrane receptors play a central role in controlling cellular functions, making them the target of drugs for a wide variety of diseases. This report describes how a recently developed method, fluorescence intensity distribution analysis (FIDA), can be used to develop homogeneous, nonradioactive high throughput screening assays for membrane receptors. With FIDA, free ligand and ligand accumulated on receptor-bearing membrane vesicles can be distinguished on the basis of their particle brightness. This allows the concentration of both bound and free ligand to be determined reliably from a single measurement, without any separation. We demonstrate that ligand affinity, receptor expression level, and potency of inhibitors can be determined using the epidermal growth factor and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors as model systems. Highly focused confocal optics enable single-molecule sensitivity, and sample volumes can thus be reduced to 1 microl without affecting the quality of the fluorescence signal. Our results demonstrate that FIDA is an ideal method for membrane receptor assays offering substantial benefits for assay development and high throughput pharmaceutical screening.

  13. A fluorescent microscopy-screening test for efficient STR-typing of telogen hair roots.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Luc; Hoste, Bernadette; Boonen, Tom; Vits, Kathy; Hubrecht, Françoise

    2008-12-01

    Nuclear DNA-profiling from human hairs is a well-known technique in forensic investigations, but its success rate is quite low with some hair types. As nuclear DNA (nuDNA) extracted from telogen hair roots is in short supply and is often degraded, a simple and effective method of estimating the number of nuclear DNAs in telogen roots has been developed. DAPI, a fluorescent, non-destructive DNA stain, allows the visualization of "nuclei" (DAPI-positive spots the shape and size of the human follicular cell nuclei) and does not interfere with subsequent PCR analyses. We stained 3242 telogen roots from 27 donors. Surprisingly, of the 2572 club roots without any soft tissue remnants 11% contained visible "nuclei" and 3.3% even contained many. At the same time 57% of the 670 telogen roots with soft tissue remnants did not show any fluorescent "nuclei". We analysed the STR-profile of some of the roots selected by the DAPI screening, i.e. 132 telogen roots without soft tissue remnants, with a success rate of 79%. Our proposed screening method allows the DNA laboratory to analyse nuclear DNA only in the most promising hair roots.

  14. Field Longevity of a Fluorescent Protein Marker in an Engineered Strain of the Pink Bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders)

    PubMed Central

    Claus, John; Tang, Guolei; Phillips, Caroline E.; Young, Robin; Zink, Richard T.; Alphey, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The cotton pest, pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders)), is a significant pest in most cotton-growing areas around the world. In southwestern USA and northern Mexico, pink bollworm is the target of the sterile insect technique (SIT), which relies on the mass-release of sterile pink bollworm adults to over-flood the wild population and thereby reduce it over time. Sterile moths reared for release are currently marked with a dye provided in their larval diet. There are concerns, however, that this marker fails from time to time, leading to sterile moths being misidentified in monitoring traps as wild moths. This can lead to expensive reactionary releases of sterile moths. We have developed a genetically marked strain that is engineered to express a fluorescent protein, DsRed2, which is easily screened under a specialised microscope. In order to test this marker under field conditions, we placed wild-type and genetically marked moths on traps and placed them in field cages. The moths were then screened, in a double-blind fashion, for DsRed2 fluorescence at regular intervals to determine marker reliability over time. The marker was shown to be robust in very high temperatures and generally proved reliable for a week or longer. More importantly, genotyping of moths on traps by PCR screening of the moths was 100% correct. Our findings indicate that this strain - and fluorescent protein markers in general - could make a valuable contribution to SIT. PMID:22693645

  15. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  16. Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2007-09-18

    The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime images of different green fluorescent proteins in fly brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Sih-Yu; Lin, Y. Y.; Chiang, A. S.; Huang, Y. C.

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of learning and memory are the most important functions in an animal brain. Investigating neuron circuits and network maps in a brain is the first step toward understanding memory and learning behavior. Since Drosophila brain is the major model for understanding brain functions, we measure the florescence lifetimes of different GFP-based reporters expressed in a fly brain. In this work, two Gal4 drivers, OK 107 and MZ 19 were used. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]) concentration is an importation indicator of neuronal activity. Therefore, several groups have developed GFP-based calcium sensors, among which G-CaMP is the most popular and reliable. The fluorescence intensity of G-CaMP will increase when it binds to calcium ion; however, individual variation from different animals prevents quantitative research. In this work, we found that the florescence lifetime of G-CaMP will shrink from 1.8 ns to 1.0 ns when binding to Ca2+. This finding can potentially help us to understand the neuron circuits by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a light-activated ion-channel protein on a neuron cell membrane. In this work, we express ChR2 and G-CaMP in a fly brain. Using a pulsed 470-nm laser to activate the neurons, we can also record the fluorescence lifetime changes in the structure. Hence, we can trace and manipulate a specific circuit in this animal. This method provides more flexibility in brain research.

  18. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  19. Quantitative Determination of Spatial Protein-Protein Correlations in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Ou, Jimmy; Lu, Rong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To quantify spatial protein-protein proximity (colocalization) in paired microscopic images of two sets of proteins labeled by distinct fluorophores, we showed that the cross-correlation and the autocorrelation functions of image intensity consisted of fast and slowly decaying components. The fast component resulted from clusters of proteins specifically labeled, and the slow component resulted from image heterogeneity and a broadly-distributed background. To better evaluate spatial proximity between the two specifically labeled proteins, we extracted the fast-decaying component by fitting the sharp peak in correlation functions to a Gaussian function, which was then used to obtain protein-protein proximity index and the Pearson's correlation coefficient. We also employed the median-filter method as a universal approach for background reduction to minimize nonspecific fluorescence. We illustrated our method by analyzing computer-simulated images and biological images. PMID:20141764

  20. A High-Throughput Fluorescence-Based Assay System for Appetite-Regulating Gene and Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yasuhito; Hirano, Minoru; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish). This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1), and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant) revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers. PMID:23300705

  1. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay system for appetite-regulating gene and drug screening.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuhito; Hirano, Minoru; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish). This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1), and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant) revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers. PMID:23300705

  2. Development of fiber optic spectroscopy for in-vitro and in-planta detection of fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to apply photonics technology to bio-safety management of genetically modified (GM) plants. The conventional method for screening GM plants is through selection using antibiotic resistance markers. There is public concern with such approaches and these are associated with food safety issues, escape of antibiotic resistance genes to pathogenic microorganisms and interference with antibiotic therapy. Thus, the strategy taken in this project is to replace antibiotic resistance markers with fluorescent protein markers that allow for rapid and non-invasive optical screening of genetically modified plants. In this paper, fibre optic spectroscopy was developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in planta. In vitro detection was first carried out to optimize the sensitivity of the optical system. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fibre optic spectroscopy using different light sources, namely, blue LED (475 nm), tungsten halogen (350 - 1000 nm) and double frequency Nd:YAG green laser (532 nm). Fluorescence near the expected emission wavelengths could be detected up to 320X dilution for EGFP and DsRED with blue LED and 532 nm green laser, respectively, as the excitation source. Tungsten halogen was found to be unsuitable for excitation of both EGFP and DsRED. EGFP was successfully purified by size separation under non-denaturing electrophoretic conditions and quantified. The minimum concentration of EGFP detectable with blue LED excitation was 5 mg/ml. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in planta, transgenic potato hairy roots and whole modified plant lines expressing the

  3. Screening and verification of proteins that interact with HSPC238.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jia-Yu; Chen, Jing-Lin; Huang, Xiang; Yuan, Chun-Lei

    2015-12-01

    HSPC238 is a recently identified tumor suppressor and demonstrates ubiquitin ligase E3 enzyme activity. HSPC238 was found to be significantly downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vivo and to inhibit the proliferation and invasion of hepatoma cells in vitro; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study, we screened for and identified proteins that physically interact with HSPC238. A bait vector for yeast two-hybrid was constructed with human HSPC238 gene cDNA. Yeast two-hybrid screening was performed using a human fetal liver cDNA library. Multiple reporter gene assays, DNA sequencing and BLAST comparison analysis were performed on positive clones. Protein interaction of screened candidates with HSPC238 was further validated by confocal microscopy, co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays. Yeast two-hybrid screening demonstrated 124 positive clones. Multiple reporter gene assays with LacZ, HIS and ADE2 selective media identified 12 genes. Further co-localization, co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays demonstrated that HMOX1, RPS27A, ubiquitinB and MT2A interacted with HSPC238. These four proteins are involved in tumor development and progression, and are associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our results suggest that HSPC238 may play a tumor suppressor role and interact with these proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The identification and validation of proteins interacting with HSP238 may lead to the discovery of novel mechanisms through which HSPC238 suppresses tumorigenesis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. Probing protein targeting to plasmodesmata using fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathryn M; MacKenzie, Katrin M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) involves the irreversible bleaching of a fluorescent protein within a specific area of the cell using a high-intensity laser. The recovery of fluorescence represents the movement of new protein into this area and can therefore be used to investigate factors involved in this movement. Here we describe a FRAP method to investigate the effect of a range of pharmacological agents on the targeting of Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein to plasmodesmata. PMID:25287209

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  6. Highly Fluorescent Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Analogues Made by Decorating the Imidazolone Ring.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sara; Martínez-López, David; Morón, María; Sucunza, David; Sampedro, Diego; Domingo, Alberto; Salgado, Antonio; Vaquero, Juan J

    2015-12-14

    The synthesis and photophysical behavior of an unexplored family of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophore analogues is reported. The compound (Z)-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1-propyl-2-(propylamino)-1H-imidazol-5(4 H)-one (p-HBDNI, 2 a) exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence properties relative to the parent compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2,3-dimethyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one (p-HBDI, 1). p-HBDNI was considered as a model system and the photophysical properties of other novel 2-amino-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one derivatives were evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations were carried out to rationalize the results. The analogue AIDNI (2 c), in which the 4-hydroxybenzyl group of p-HBDNI was replaced by an azaindole group, showed improved photophysical properties and potential for cell staining. The uptake and intracellular distribution of 2 c in living cells was investigated by confocal microscopy imaging.

  7. Protein fragment bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses for the in vivo study of protein-protein interactions and cellular protein complex localizations

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Schlücking, Kathrin; Schroeder, Julian I.; Kudla, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Summary The analyses of protein-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes including signal transduction, protein trafficking and movement. Protein fragment complementation assays are based on the reconstitution of protein function when non-active protein fragments are brought together by interacting proteins that were genetically fused to these protein fragments. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) relies on the reconstitution of fluorescent proteins and enables both the analysis of protein-protein interactions and the visualization of protein complex formations in vivo. Transient expression of proteins is a convenient approach to study protein functions in planta or in other organisms, and minimizes the need for time-consuming generation of stably expressing transgenic organisms. Here we describe protocols for BiFC analyses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves transiently transformed by Agrobacterium infiltration. Further we discuss different BiFC applications and provide examples for proper BiFC analyses in planta. PMID:24057390

  8. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  9. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-01-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters. PMID:27181496

  10. Portable and low cost fluorescence set-up for in-situ screening of Ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Diana; Mishra, Rupesh K; Hayat, Akhtar; Catanante, Gaëlle; Sharma, Vinay; Muñoz, Roberto; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2016-10-01

    The present article describes a portable and low cost fluorescence set-up designed and characterized for in-situ screening of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in cocoa samples at field settings. The sensing module (the set up) consists of a LED with the wavelength of 370-380nm and a color complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) micro-camera inbuilt at upright position of a black box to obtain an image of the sensing molecule. It allows the user to get an image of the sensing analytes under excitation conditions and process the image in order to predict the toxicity of the samples. The image capturing and processing of the system was based on the OTA concentration in the sample and analyzed data can be presented as RGB values. For each concentration of the OTA, the R, G, B co-ordinates were obtained and plotted to quantify actual OTA presents in the sample. Moreover, the system was tested for real sample analysis using cocoa contaminated with OTA. The system could detect OTA as low as 1.25ng/ml with the maximum recovery of 87.5% in cocoa samples. The OTA was extracted in 1% NaHCO3 and cleaned up using molecular imprinted polymer column (MIP). The method demonstrated a good linear range between 1.25 and 10ng/ml. The obtained results were cross validated using chromatographic method HPLC and also compared with commercially available fluorescence instrument. The developed fluorescence setup is simple, economical, and portable with added advantages of digital image processing. The system could be deployable to cocoa fields for monitoring of OTA in quick successions. It is noteworthy to mention that this is the first report of such portable fluorescence setup where, OTA sensing was explored.

  11. Portable and low cost fluorescence set-up for in-situ screening of Ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Diana; Mishra, Rupesh K; Hayat, Akhtar; Catanante, Gaëlle; Sharma, Vinay; Muñoz, Roberto; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2016-10-01

    The present article describes a portable and low cost fluorescence set-up designed and characterized for in-situ screening of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in cocoa samples at field settings. The sensing module (the set up) consists of a LED with the wavelength of 370-380nm and a color complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) micro-camera inbuilt at upright position of a black box to obtain an image of the sensing molecule. It allows the user to get an image of the sensing analytes under excitation conditions and process the image in order to predict the toxicity of the samples. The image capturing and processing of the system was based on the OTA concentration in the sample and analyzed data can be presented as RGB values. For each concentration of the OTA, the R, G, B co-ordinates were obtained and plotted to quantify actual OTA presents in the sample. Moreover, the system was tested for real sample analysis using cocoa contaminated with OTA. The system could detect OTA as low as 1.25ng/ml with the maximum recovery of 87.5% in cocoa samples. The OTA was extracted in 1% NaHCO3 and cleaned up using molecular imprinted polymer column (MIP). The method demonstrated a good linear range between 1.25 and 10ng/ml. The obtained results were cross validated using chromatographic method HPLC and also compared with commercially available fluorescence instrument. The developed fluorescence setup is simple, economical, and portable with added advantages of digital image processing. The system could be deployable to cocoa fields for monitoring of OTA in quick successions. It is noteworthy to mention that this is the first report of such portable fluorescence setup where, OTA sensing was explored. PMID:27474323

  12. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  13. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; et al

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction ofmore » high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.« less

  14. Translocation of green fluorescent protein to cyanobacterial periplasm using ice nucleation protein.

    PubMed

    Chungjatupornchai, Wipa; Fa-aroonsawat, Sirirat

    2009-04-01

    The translocation of proteins to cyanobacterial cell envelope is made complex by the presence of a highly differentiated membrane system. To investigate the protein translocation in cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 using the truncated ice nucleation protein (InpNC) from Pseudomonas syringae KCTC 1832, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused in frame to the carboxyl-terminus of InpNC. The fluorescence of GFP was found almost entirely as a halo in the outer regions of cells which appeared to correspond to the periplasm as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy, however, GFP was not displayed on the outermost cell surface. Western blotting analysis revealed that InpNC-GFP fusion protein was partially degraded. The N-terminal domain of InpNC may be susceptible to protease attack; the remaining C-terminal domain conjugated with GFP lost the ability to direct translocation across outer membrane and to act as a surface display motif. The fluorescence intensity of cells with periplasmic GFP was approximately 6-fold lower than that of cells with cytoplasmic GFP. The successful translocation of the active GFP to the periplasm may provide a potential means to study the property of cyanobacterial periplasmic substances in response to environmental changes in a non-invasive manner. PMID:19412603

  15. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  16. Green fluorescent protein as a tool for monitoring transgene expression in forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lining; Levée, Valerie; Mentag, Rachid; Charest, Pierre J.; Séguin, Armand

    1999-07-01

    The gene coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria was successfully used as a vital marker for the transformation of three woody plant species, black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP), white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and poplar (Populus spp.). The gfp gene and the gene conferring resistance to kanamycin (nptII) were introduced by microprojectile bombardment or Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated technology. Screening by fluorescence microscopy of the transformed plant material, under the selection of kanamycin, identified five to eight cell lines from each tree species that clearly expressed GFP. Expression of GFP was observed in somatic embryonal cells of the coniferous species and in stem sections of poplar. For all species, GFP transgene expression was stable over multiple subcultures. Stable integration of the gfp gene into plant genomes was confirmed by Southern hybridization or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. We conclude that GFP can be used as a vital marker and reporter protein in transformation experiments with gymnosperms and deciduous trees.

  17. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Pardo Garcia, Alan; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them. PMID:26501285

  18. From jellyfish to biosensors: the use of fluorescent proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ute; Larrieu, Antoine; Wells, Darren M

    2013-01-01

    The milestone discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, its optimisation for efficient use in plantae, and subsequent improvements in techniques for fluorescent detection and quantification have changed plant molecular biology research dramatically. Using fluorescent protein tags allows the temporal and spatial monitoring of dynamic expression patterns at tissue, cellular and subcellular scales. Genetically-encoded fluorescence has become the basis for applications such as cell-type specific transcriptomics, monitoring cell fate and identity during development of individual organs or embryos, and visualising protein-protein interactions in vivo. In this article, we will give an overview of currently available fluorescent proteins, their applications in plant research, the techniques used to analyse them and, using the recent development of an auxin sensor as an example, discuss the design principles and prospects for the next generation of fluorescent plant biosensors. PMID:24166435

  19. Dual fluorescence detection of protein and RNA in Drosophila tissues

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Hila; D’Alterio, Cecilia; Loza-Coll, Mariano; Jones, D Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Detection of RNAs by in situ hybridization (ISH) is a well-established technique that permits the study of specific RNA expression patterns in tissues; however, not all tissues are equally amenable to staining using the same procedure. Here we describe a protocol that combines whole-mount immunofluorescence (IF) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the simultaneous detection of specific RNA transcripts and proteins, greatly enhancing the spatial resolution of RNA expression in complex, intact fly tissues. To date, we have successfully used this protocol in adult testis, larval male gonads, adult intestine and Malpighian tubules. IF is conducted in RNase-free solutions, prior to the harsh conditions of FISH, in order to preserve protein antigenicity within dissected tissues. Separate protocols are described for mRNA and miRNA detection, which are based on robust digoxigenin (DIG) RNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes, respectively. The combined IF-FISH procedure can be completed in 2 d for miRNA detection and 4 d for mRNA detection. Although optimized for Drosophila, this IF-FISH protocol should be adaptable to a wide variety of organisms, tissues, antibodies and probes, thus providing a reliable and simple means to compare RNA and protein abundance and localization. PMID:22976352

  20. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    PubMed Central

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallo­graphic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate. PMID:19690368

  1. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors: resolving spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling

    PubMed Central

    DiPilato, Lisa M.; Zhang, Jin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cellular processes are orchestrated by the precise coordination and regulation of molecular events in the cell. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors coupled with live-cell imaging have enabled the visualization of these events in real time and helped shape some of the current concepts of signal transduction, such as spatial compartmentation. The quantitative information produced by these tools has been incorporated into mathematical models that are capable of predicting highly complex and dynamic behaviors of cellular signaling networks, thus providing a systems level understanding of how pathways interact to produce a functional response. Finally, with technological advances in high throughput and in vivo imaging, these molecular tools promise to continually engender significant contributions to our understanding of cellular processes under normal and diseased conditions. PMID:19910237

  2. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors: resolving spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling.

    PubMed

    DiPilato, Lisa M; Zhang, Jin

    2010-02-01

    Cellular processes are orchestrated by the precise coordination and regulation of molecular events in the cell. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors coupled with live-cell imaging have enabled the visualization of these events in real time and helped shape some of the current concepts of signal transduction, such as spatial compartmentation. The quantitative information produced by these tools has been incorporated into mathematical models that are capable of predicting highly complex and dynamic behaviors of cellular signaling networks, thus providing a systems level understanding of how pathways interact to produce a functional response. Finally, with technological advances in high-throughput and in vivo imaging, these molecular tools promise to continually engender significant contributions to our understanding of cellular processes under normal and diseased conditions.

  3. Screening of nucleation conditions using levitated drops for protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Cedergren-Zeppezauer, Eila S; Johansson, Thomas; Laurell, Thomas; Nilsson, Johan; Nilsson, Staffan

    2003-04-01

    The growth of suitable protein crystals is an essential step in the structure determination of a protein by X-ray crystallography. At present, crystals are mostly grown using trial-and-error procedures, and protocols that rapidly screen for the crystal nucleation step are rare. Presented here is an approach to minimize the consumption of precious protein material while searching for the nucleation conditions. Acoustically levitated drops of known protein concentration (0.25-1.5-microL volumes) are injected with crystallizing agents using piezoelectric flow-through dispensers (ejecting 50-100-pL droplets at 1-9000 droplets/s). A restricted number of crystallizing agents representing three classes are used: poly(ethylene glycol), salts, and the viscous alcohol 2-methyl 2,4-pentanediol. From a digitized picture of the levitated drop volume, calculations are performed giving the concentrations of all components in the drop at any time during a "precipitation experiment". Supersaturation is the prerequisite for crystal nucleation, and protein precipitation indicates high supersaturation. A light source illuminates the levitated drop, and protein precipitation is monitored using right-angle light scattering. On the basis of these intensity measurements and the volume determination, precipitation diagrams for each crystallizing agent are constructed that give the protein/crystallizing agent concentration boundaries between the minimum and the maximum detectable protein precipitation. Guided by the concentration values obtained from such plots, when approaching the supersaturation region, separate crystallization drops are mixed and allowed to equilibrate under paraffin oil. At conditions in which microcrystals can be observed, the nucleation tendency of the macromolecule is confirmed. Optimization of crystallization conditions can then follow. Proteins tested include alcohol dehydrogenase and D-serine dehydratase. Alcohol dehydrogenase, known to crystallize easily, was

  4. Ultra High Throughput Screening of Natural Product Extracts to Identify Pro-apoptotic Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hassig, Christian A.; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Kung, Paul; Kiankarimi, Mehrak; Kim, Sylvia; Diaz, Paul W.; Zhai, Dayong; Welsh, Kate; Morshedian, Shana; Su, Ying; O'Keefe, Barry; Newman, David J.; Rusman, Yudi; Kaur, Harneet; Salomon, Christine E.; Brown, Susan G.; Baire, Beeraiah; Michel, Andrew R.; Hoye, Thomas R.; Francis, Subhashree; Georg, Gunda I.; Walters, Michael A.; Divlianska, Daniela B.; Roth, Gregory P.; Wright, Amy E.; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins are validated cancer targets comprised of six related proteins. From a drug discovery perspective, these are challenging targets that exert their cellular functions through protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While several isoform-selective inhibitors have been developed using structure-based design or high throughput screening (HTS) of synthetic chemical libraries, no large scale screen of natural product collections has been reported. A competitive displacement fluorescence polarization (FP) screen of nearly 150,000 natural product extracts was conducted against all six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins using fluorochrome-conjugated peptide ligands that mimic functionally-relevant PPIs. The screens were conducted in 1,536-well format and displayed satisfactory overall HTS statistics, with Z’-factor values ranging from 0.72 to 0.83, and a hit confirmation rate between 16-64%. Confirmed active extracts were orthogonally tested in a luminescent assay for caspase-3/7 activation in tumor cells. Active extracts were resupplied and effort toward the isolation of pure active components was initiated through iterative bioassay-guided fractionation. Several previously described altertoxins were isolated from a microbial source and the pure compounds demonstrate activity in both Bcl-2 FP and caspase cellular assays. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of ultra high throughput screening using natural product sources and highlight some of the challenges associated with this approach. PMID:24870016

  5. Protein crystal screening and characterization for serial femtosecond nanocrystallography

    PubMed Central

    Darmanin, Connie; Strachan, Jamie; Adda, Christopher G.; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Abbey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) has spurred the development of serial femtosecond nanocrystallography (SFX) which, for the first time, is enabling structure retrieval from sub-micron protein crystals. Although there are already a growing number of structures published using SFX, the technology is still very new and presents a number of unique challenges as well as opportunities for structural biologists. One of the biggest barriers to the success of SFX experiments is the preparation and selection of suitable protein crystal samples. Here we outline a protocol for preparing and screening for suitable XFEL targets. PMID:27139248

  6. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  7. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-11-30

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  8. Characterization of a novel component of the peroxisomal protein import apparatus using fluorescent peroxisomal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, J E; Keller, G A; Morrell, J C; Mihalik, S J; Smith, B; Cregg, J M; Gould, S J

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent peroxisomal probes were developed by fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the matrix peroxisomal targeting signals PTS1 and PTS2, as well as to an integral peroxisomal membrane protein (IPMP). These proteins were used to identify and characterize novel peroxisome assembly (pas) mutants in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mutant cells lacking the PAS10 gene mislocalized both PTS1-GFP and PTS2-GFP to the cytoplasm but did incorporate IPMP-GFP into peroxisome membranes. Similar distributions were observed for endogenous peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. While peroxisomes from translocation-competent pas mutants sediment in sucrose gradients at the density of normal peroxisomes, >98% of peroxisomes from pas10 cells migrated to a much lower density and had an extremely low ratio of matrix:membrane protein. These data indicate that Pas10p plays an important role in protein translocation across the peroxisome membrane. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that Pas10p is an integral protein of the peroxisome membrane. In addition, Pas10p contains a cytoplasmically-oriented C3HC4 zinc binding domain that is essential for its biological activity. Images PMID:8670828

  9. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies. PMID:27748381

  10. Development of a reverse genetics system to generate a recombinant Ebola virus Makona expressing a green fluorescent protein

    SciTech Connect

    Albariño, César G. Wiggleton Guerrero, Lisa; Lo, Michael K.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2015-10-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential application of reverse genetics technology in studying a broad range of aspects of viral biology, including gene regulation, protein function, cell entry, and pathogenesis. Here, we describe a highly efficient reverse genetics system used to generate recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a recent isolate from a human patient infected during the 2014–2015 outbreak in Western Africa. We also rescued a recombinant EBOV expressing a fluorescent reporter protein from a cleaved VP40 protein fusion. Using this virus and an inexpensive method to quantitate the expression of the foreign gene, we demonstrate its potential usefulness as a tool for screening antiviral compounds and measuring neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) derived from Makona variant was rescued. • New protocol for viral rescue allows 100% efficiency. • Modified EBOV expresses a green fluorescent protein from a VP40-fused protein. • Modified EBOV was tested as tool to screen antiviral compounds and measure neutralizing antibodies.

  11. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  12. Gateway Vectors for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Protein-Protein Interactions in Plant Cells Using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation.

    PubMed

    Kamigaki, Akane; Nito, Kazumasa; Hikino, Kazumi; Goto-Yamada, Shino; Nishimura, Mikio; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Mano, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is widely used to detect protein-protein interactions, because it is technically simple, convenient, and can be adapted for use with conventional fluorescence microscopy. We previously constructed enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-based Gateway cloning technology-compatible vectors. In the current study, we generated new Gateway cloning technology-compatible vectors to detect BiFC-based multiple protein-protein interactions using N- and C-terminal fragments of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1). Using a combination of N- and C-terminal fragments from ECFP, EGFP and EYFP, we observed a shift in the emission wavelength, enabling the simultaneous detection of multiple protein-protein interactions. Moreover, we developed these vectors as binary vectors for use in Agrobacterium infiltration and for the generate transgenic plants. We verified that the binary vectors functioned well in tobacco cells. The results demonstrate that the BiFC vectors facilitate the design of various constructions and are convenient for the detection of multiple protein-protein interactions simultaneously in plant cells. PMID:27490375

  13. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT): a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Becker, Eric C; Jung, James; Tuwatananurak, Ida; Pogliano, Kit

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT) that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes) into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R) to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp) and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI). We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins. PMID:20090956

  14. Reverse MAPPIT: screening for protein-protein interaction modifiers in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Eyckerman, Sven; Lemmens, Irma; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Verhee, Annick; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan

    2005-06-01

    Interactions between proteins are at the heart of the cellular machinery. It is therefore not surprising that altered interaction profiles caused by aberrant protein expression patterns or by the presence of mutations can trigger cellular dysfunction, eventually leading to disease. Moreover, many viral and bacterial pathogens rely on protein-protein interactions to exert their damaging effects. Interfering with such interactions is an obvious pharmaceutical goal, but detailed insights into the protein binding properties as well as efficient screening platforms are needed. In this report, we describe a cytokine receptor-based assay with a positive readout to screen for disrupters of designated protein-protein interactions in intact mammalian cells and evaluate this concept using polypeptides as well as small organic molecules. These reverse mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT) screens were developed to monitor interactions between the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins, between FKBP12 and ALK4, and between MDM2 and p53. PMID:15908921

  15. Fluorescence imaging technology (FI) for high-throughput screening of selenide-modified nano-TiO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Lee, Jianchao; Zhang, Meijuan; Duan, Qiannan; Zhang, Jiarui; Qi, Hailang

    2016-02-18

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) method based on fluorescence imaging (FI) was implemented to evaluate the catalytic performance of selenide-modified nano-TiO2. Chemical ink-jet printing (IJP) technology was reformed to fabricate a catalyst library comprising 1405 (Ni(a)Cu(b)Cd(c)Ce(d)In(e)Y(f))Se(x)/TiO2 (M6Se/Ti) composite photocatalysts. Nineteen M6Se/Tis were screened out from the 1405 candidates efficiently.

  16. A Fluorescence-Based Genetic Screen to Study Retinal Degeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila visual system has been proved to be a powerful genetic model to study eye disease such as retinal degeneration. Here, we describe a genetic method termed “Rh1::GFP ey-flp/hid” that is based on the fluorescence of GFP-tagged major rhodopsin Rh1 in the eyes of living flies and can be used to monitor the integrity of photoreceptor cells. Through combination of this method and ERG recording, we examined a collection of 667 mutants and identified 18 genes that are required for photoreceptor cell maintenance, photoresponse, and rhodopsin synthesis. Our findings demonstrate that this “Rh1::GFP ey-flp/hid” method enables high-throughput F1 genetic screens to rapidly and precisely identify mutations of retinal degeneration. PMID:26659849

  17. A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Zhou, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Ruhua; Liang, Xiaoting; Wang, Li; Deng, Wuguo; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Haojie; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of stability is particularly crucial for unstable proteins in cells. However, a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability remains to be developed. Recently, a genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 library has been established as a genetic tool to mediate loss-of-function screening. Here, we developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome CRISPR-Cas9 library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Using Cdc25A as an example, Cul4B-DDB1DCAF8 was identified as a new E3 ligase for Cdc25A. Moreover, the acetylation of Cdc25A at lysine 150, which was acetylated by p300/CBP and deacetylated by HDAC3, prevented the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Cdc25A by the proteasome. This is the first study to report that acetylation, as a novel posttranslational modification, modulates Cdc25A stability, and we suggest that this unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 screening method at the genome scale may be widely used to globally identify regulators of protein stability. PMID:27462461

  18. A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Zhou, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Ruhua; Liang, Xiaoting; Wang, Li; Deng, Wuguo; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Haojie; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of stability is particularly crucial for unstable proteins in cells. However, a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability remains to be developed. Recently, a genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 library has been established as a genetic tool to mediate loss-of-function screening. Here, we developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome CRISPR-Cas9 library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Using Cdc25A as an example, Cul4B-DDB1(DCAF8) was identified as a new E3 ligase for Cdc25A. Moreover, the acetylation of Cdc25A at lysine 150, which was acetylated by p300/CBP and deacetylated by HDAC3, prevented the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Cdc25A by the proteasome. This is the first study to report that acetylation, as a novel posttranslational modification, modulates Cdc25A stability, and we suggest that this unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 screening method at the genome scale may be widely used to globally identify regulators of protein stability. PMID:27462461

  19. A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Zhou, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Ruhua; Liang, Xiaoting; Wang, Li; Deng, Wuguo; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Haojie; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of stability is particularly crucial for unstable proteins in cells. However, a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability remains to be developed. Recently, a genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 library has been established as a genetic tool to mediate loss-of-function screening. Here, we developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome CRISPR-Cas9 library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Using Cdc25A as an example, Cul4B-DDB1(DCAF8) was identified as a new E3 ligase for Cdc25A. Moreover, the acetylation of Cdc25A at lysine 150, which was acetylated by p300/CBP and deacetylated by HDAC3, prevented the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Cdc25A by the proteasome. This is the first study to report that acetylation, as a novel posttranslational modification, modulates Cdc25A stability, and we suggest that this unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 screening method at the genome scale may be widely used to globally identify regulators of protein stability.

  20. A label-free and sensitive fluorescent assay for one step detection of protein kinase activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yan, Xu; Su, Xingguang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a label-free, highly sensitive and simple assay for one step detection of protein kinase (PKA) activity and inhibition that avoids the fluorescent dye process has been established. The detection was based on the fluorescence (FL) quenching of peptide-Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) caused by antibody modified Au nanoparticles (anti-Au NPs) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). With PKA and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) introduced, the substrate peptide of Ag NCs could react with PKA via targeted phosphorylation, and followed by the linking interactions between peptide-Ag NCs and anti-Au NPs. According to the fluorescence quenching of Ag NCs, the activity of protein kinase can be facilely monitored in the range of 0.1-2000 mU/μL with high sensitivity. The detection limit for PKA is 0.039 mU/μL. We further explored the inhibitory effect of H-89 for protein kinase activity. The developed method was also applied to the investigation of drug-induced PKA activation in HeLa cells, which provides a promising means for screening of kinase-related drugs and the clinical diagnosis of disease. PMID:27543031

  1. Developing Fast Fluorescent Protein Voltage Sensors by Optimizing FRET Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Uhna; Sepehri-Rad, Masoud; Piao, Hong Hua; Jin, Lei; Hughes, Thomas; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Baker, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based protein voltage sensors can be useful for monitoring neuronal activity in vivo because the ratio of signals between the donor and acceptor pair reduces common sources of noise such as heart beat artifacts. We improved the performance of FRET based genetically encoded Fluorescent Protein (FP) voltage sensors by optimizing the location of donor and acceptor FPs flanking the voltage sensitive domain of the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase. First, we created 39 different “Nabi1” constructs by positioning the donor FP, UKG, at 8 different locations downstream of the voltage-sensing domain and the acceptor FP, mKO, at 6 positions upstream. Several of these combinations resulted in large voltage dependent signals and relatively fast kinetics. Nabi1 probes responded with signal size up to 11% ΔF/F for a 100 mV depolarization and fast response time constants both for signal activation (~2 ms) and signal decay (~3 ms). We improved expression in neuronal cells by replacing the mKO and UKG FRET pair with Clover (donor FP) and mRuby2 (acceptor FP) to create Nabi2 probes. Nabi2 probes also had large signals and relatively fast time constants in HEK293 cells. In primary neuronal culture, a Nabi2 probe was able to differentiate individual action potentials at 45 Hz. PMID:26587834

  2. Photoswitchable red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; English, Brian P; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Xiao, Hui; Almo, Steven C; Singer, Robert H; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2014-10-23

    A subclass of fluorescent proteins (FPs), large Stokes shift (LSS) FP, are characterized by increased spread between excitation and emission maxima. We report a photoswitchable variant of a red FP with an LSS, PSLSSmKate, which initially exhibits excitation and emission at 445 and 622 nm, but violet irradiation photoswitches PSLSSmKate into a common red form with excitation and emission at 573 and 621 nm. We characterize spectral, photophysical, and biochemical properties of PSLSSmKate in vitro and in mammalian cells and determine its crystal structure in the LSS form. Mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and spectroscopy of PSLSSmKate allow us to propose molecular mechanisms for the LSS, pH dependence, and light-induced chromophore transformation. We demonstrate the applicability of PSLSSmKate to superresolution photoactivated localization microscopy and protein dynamics in live cells. Given its promising properties, we expect that PSLSSmKate-like phenotype will be further used for photoactivatable imaging and tracking multiple populations of intracellular objects.

  3. Developing Fast Fluorescent Protein Voltage Sensors by Optimizing FRET Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sung, Uhna; Sepehri-Rad, Masoud; Piao, Hong Hua; Jin, Lei; Hughes, Thomas; Cohen, Lawrence B; Baker, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based protein voltage sensors can be useful for monitoring neuronal activity in vivo because the ratio of signals between the donor and acceptor pair reduces common sources of noise such as heart beat artifacts. We improved the performance of FRET based genetically encoded Fluorescent Protein (FP) voltage sensors by optimizing the location of donor and acceptor FPs flanking the voltage sensitive domain of the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase. First, we created 39 different "Nabi1" constructs by positioning the donor FP, UKG, at 8 different locations downstream of the voltage-sensing domain and the acceptor FP, mKO, at 6 positions upstream. Several of these combinations resulted in large voltage dependent signals and relatively fast kinetics. Nabi1 probes responded with signal size up to 11% ΔF/F for a 100 mV depolarization and fast response time constants both for signal activation (~2 ms) and signal decay (~3 ms). We improved expression in neuronal cells by replacing the mKO and UKG FRET pair with Clover (donor FP) and mRuby2 (acceptor FP) to create Nabi2 probes. Nabi2 probes also had large signals and relatively fast time constants in HEK293 cells. In primary neuronal culture, a Nabi2 probe was able to differentiate individual action potentials at 45 Hz. PMID:26587834

  4. Microfluidics-Based Selection of Red-Fluorescent Proteins with Decreased Rates of Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Lubbeck, Jennifer L.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Regmi, Chola K.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.; Jimenez, Ralph; Palmer, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins offer exceptional labeling specificity in living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, their photophysical properties remain far from ideal for long-term imaging of low-abundance cellular constituents, in large part because of their poor photostability. Despite widespread engineering efforts, improving the photostability of fluorescent proteins remains challenging due to lack of appropriate high-throughput selection methods. Here, we use molecular dynamics guided mutagenesis in conjunction with a recently developed microfluidic-based platform, which sorts cells based on their fluorescence photostability, to identify red fluorescent proteins with decreased photobleaching from a HeLa cell-based library. The identified mutant, named Kriek, has 2.5- and 4-fold higher photostability than its progenitor, mCherry, under widefield and confocal illumination, respectively. Furthermore, the results provide insight into mechanisms for enhancing photostability and their connections with other photophysical processes, thereby providing direction for ongoing development of fluorescent proteins with improved single-molecule and low-copy imaging capabilities. Insight, innovation, integration Fluorescent proteins enable imaging in situ, throughout the visible spectrum, with superb molecular specificity and single-molecule sensitivity. Unfortunately, when compared to leading small-molecule fluorophores (e.g., Cy3), fluorescent proteins, suffer from accelerated photobleaching and poor integrated photon output. This results from a lack of appropriate high-throughput methods for improving the photostability of fluorescent proteins, as well as a poor molecular understanding of fluorescent protein photobleaching. Here, we report the first application of a recently developed microfluidic cell-sorter to identify fluorescent proteins from a mCherry-derived library with improved photostability. The results provide insight into fluorescent protein photophysics, greatly

  5. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hau B; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-12-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10-11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1-9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10-11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1-9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  6. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hau B.; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-­strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization. PMID:24311592

  7. Interfacial water screens the protein-induced transmembrane voltage.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr

    2015-01-29

    Transmembrane proteins are crucial in cellular traffic, signal transduction, and energy storage in a form of transmembrane voltage. These proteins are stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, in which cytoplasmic and exoplasmic water plays a special role. Water structural ordering generates the dipole potential that typically overcompensates for an intrinsic membrane-protein potential gradient, and thus it modifies and sustains an overall cellular electrostatics. Although the transmembrane voltage has been extensively studied, the dipole potential has attracted very little attention. Here, by using molecular dynamics, we examined water electrostatic response to the transmembrane charge, field, and potential asymmetry introduced by the presence of four integral membrane proteins: typical of inner (α-helix) and outer membrane (β-barrel). In all cases, the protein presence introduces electrostatic directionality in the transmembrane dipole field and voltage. In particular, water generates a deep potential sink if strongly polar residues are densely packed on one side of bilayer, as frequently occurs in a selectivity filter of the K(+) channel. We also found that protein secondary structure is less important than the polar residue distribution along the protein channel. Our findings are relevant for understanding the driving force behind biomembrane conductivity: the ability of biological water to electrostatically screen the transmembrane voltage.

  8. Comprehensive Screen of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles for DNA Adsorption, Fluorescence Quenching, and Anion Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-11-11

    Although DNA has been quite successful in metal cation detection, anion detectioin remains challenging because of the charge repulsion. Metal oxides represent a very important class of materials, and different oxides might interact with anions differently. In this work, a comprehensive screen of common metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) was carried out for their ability to adsorb DNA, quench fluorescence, and release adsorbed DNA in the presence of target anions. A total of 19 MONPs were studied, including Al2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, In2O3, ITO, Mn2O3, NiO, SiO2, SnO2, a-TiO2 (anatase), r-TiO2 (rutile), WO3, Y2O3, ZnO, ZrO2. These MONPs have different DNA adsorption affinity. Some adsorb DNA without quenching the fluorescence, while others strongly quench adsorbed fluorophores. They also display different affinity toward anions probed by DNA desorption. Finally, CeO2, Fe3O4, and ZnO were used to form a sensor array to discriminate phosphate, arsenate, and arsenite from the rest using linear discriminant analysis. This study not only provides a solution for anion discrimination using DNA as a signaling molecule but also provides insights into the interface of metal oxides and DNA.

  9. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  10. Molecular recognition of DNA-protein complexes: a straightforward method combining scanning force and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Humberto; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2010-06-01

    Combining scanning force and fluorescent microscopy allows simultaneous identification of labeled biomolecules and analysis of their nanometer level architectural arrangement. Fluorescent polystyrene nano-spheres were used as reliable objects for alignment of optical and topographic images. This allowed the precise localization of different fluorescence particles within complex molecular assemblies whose structure was mapped in nanometer detail topography. Our experiments reveal the versatility of this method for analysis of proteins and protein-DNA complexes.

  11. How to Illustrate Ligand-Protein Binding in a Class Experiment: An Elementary Fluorescent Assay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Alain; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment (taking approximately five hours) which illustrates the binding of a small molecule to a protein. By using an appropriate fluorescent ligand and a given protein, the fluorescent probe technique is applied to measure the number of bonding sites, and number of site classes, and their association constants. (JN)

  12. Ultrafast protein structure-based virtual screening with Panther.

    PubMed

    Niinivehmas, Sanna P; Salokas, Kari; Lätti, Sakari; Raunio, Hannu; Pentikäinen, Olli T

    2015-10-01

    Molecular docking is by far the most common method used in protein structure-based virtual screening. This paper presents Panther, a novel ultrafast multipurpose docking tool. In Panther, a simple shape-electrostatic model of the ligand-binding area of the protein is created by utilizing the protein crystal structure. The features of the possible ligands are then compared to the model by using a similarity search algorithm. On average, one ligand can be processed in a few minutes by using classical docking methods, whereas using Panther processing takes <1 s. The presented Panther protocol can be used in several applications, such as speeding up the early phases of drug discovery projects, reducing the number of failures in the clinical phase of the drug development process, and estimating the environmental toxicity of chemicals. Panther-code is available in our web pages (http://www.jyu.fi/panther) free of charge after registration. PMID:26407559

  13. Discovery of Protein Phosphatase 2C Inhibitors by Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jessica P.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Flajolet, Marc; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Olson, Arthur; Greengard, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) is an archetype of the PPM Ser/Thr phosphatases, characterized by dependence on divalent magnesium or manganese cofactors, absence of known regulatory proteins, and resistance to all known Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitors. We have used virtual ligand screening with the AutoDock method and the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set to identify small molecule inhibitors of PP2Cα activity at a protein substrate. These inhibitors are active in the micromolar range, and represent the first non-phosphate-based molecules found to inhibit a type 2C phosphatase. The compounds docked to three recurrent binding sites near the PP2Cα active site and displayed novel Ser/Thr phosphatase selectivity profiles. Common chemical features of these compounds may form the basis for development of a PP2C inhibitor pharmacophore and may facilitate investigation of PP2C control and cellular function. PMID:16509582

  14. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes. PMID:27515076

  15. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family.

    PubMed

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments. PMID:27604321

  16. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  17. A novel fluorescent protein from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica (Anthozoa: Actiniaria).

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kenta; Shimada, Eriko; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Tsuruwaka, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A fluorescent protein was identified and cloned from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica. Bioluminescence and fluorescence expression were examined by direct observations of live specimens and RNA-Seq analysis. Both approaches revealed a novel green fluorescent protein in the tentacles of the anemone, but bioluminescence was not observed. Behavioural observations revealed that a blue light excited the fluorescence in the tentacles, and initiated a behavioural response whereby the fluorescent tentacles became fully exposed to the blue light. The excitation and emission peaks of C. japonica's fluorescent protein were at 500 and 510 nm, respectively, which were greener than those reported in homologs. Furthermore, this protein was highly tolerant of increased temperatures and repeated freeze-thaw treatments. The current study presents an example of fluorescence in a deep-sea cnidarian, demonstrating that fluorescent proteins could have important roles, regardless of the presence or absence of strong sunlight. It also demonstrates that this deep-sea fluorescent protein has unique characteristics, including high stability, perhaps as an adaptation to the extreme environment. PMID:27002644

  18. A novel fluorescent protein from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica (Anthozoa: Actiniaria)

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Kenta; Shimada, Eriko; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Tsuruwaka, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A fluorescent protein was identified and cloned from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica. Bioluminescence and fluorescence expression were examined by direct observations of live specimens and RNA-Seq analysis. Both approaches revealed a novel green fluorescent protein in the tentacles of the anemone, but bioluminescence was not observed. Behavioural observations revealed that a blue light excited the fluorescence in the tentacles, and initiated a behavioural response whereby the fluorescent tentacles became fully exposed to the blue light. The excitation and emission peaks of C. japonica’s fluorescent protein were at 500 and 510 nm, respectively, which were greener than those reported in homologs. Furthermore, this protein was highly tolerant of increased temperatures and repeated freeze–thaw treatments. The current study presents an example of fluorescence in a deep-sea cnidarian, demonstrating that fluorescent proteins could have important roles, regardless of the presence or absence of strong sunlight. It also demonstrates that this deep-sea fluorescent protein has unique characteristics, including high stability, perhaps as an adaptation to the extreme environment. PMID:27002644

  19. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION (BiFC) ANALYSIS AS A PROBE OF PROTEIN INTERACTIONS IN LIVING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kerppola, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    Protein interactions are a fundamental mechanism for the generation of biological regulatory specificity. The study of protein interactions in living cells is of particular significance because the interactions that occur in a particular cell depend on the full complement of proteins present in the cell and the external stimuli that influence the cell. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables direct visualization of protein interactions in living cells. The BiFC assay is based on the association between two non-fluorescent fragments of a fluorescent protein when they are brought in proximity to each other by an interaction between proteins fused to the fragments. Numerous protein interactions have been visualized using the BiFC assay in many different cell types and organisms. The BiFC assay is technically straightforward and can be performed using standard molecular biology and cell culture reagents and a regular fluorescence microscope or flow cytometer. PMID:18573091

  20. A laboratory exercise for visible gel filtration chromatography using fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified, and used in a laboratory exercise to intuitively demonstrate GFC. Different bands, corresponding to RFP, RFP-CFP (RC), YFP-RFP-YFP (YRY), and pyruvate kinase II-GFP (PKG) were well separated on a Superdex 200 column from a 0.5-mL sample. Increasing the sample volume and changing the chromatographic resin to Sephadex G-100 resulted in lower resolution separation. Students enjoyed identifying combinations of colored proteins and found this exercise helpful for understanding the factors that affect GFC resolution. PMID:25400007

  1. Microspectroscopic imaging tracks the intracellular processing of a signal transduction protein: fluorescent-labeled protein kinase C beta I.

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaens, P I; Jovin, T M

    1996-01-01

    We have devised a microspectroscopic strategy for assessing the intracellular (re)distribution and the integrity of the primary structure of proteins involved in signal transduction. The purified proteins are fluorescent-labeled in vitro and reintroduced into the living cell. The localization and molecular state of fluorescent-labeled protein kinase C beta I isozyme were assessed by a combination of quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, and novel determinations of fluorescence resonance energy transfer based on photobleaching digital imaging microscopy. The intensity and fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency images demonstrate the rapid nuclear translocation and ensuing fragmentation of protein kinase C beta I in BALB/c3T3 fibroblasts upon phorbol ester stimulation, and suggest distinct, compartmentalized roles for the regulatory and catalytic fragments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8710884

  2. A colorimetric and near-infrared fluorescent probe with high sensitivity and selectivity for acid phosphatase and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongqian; Li, Benhao; Xiao, Liangliang; Ouyang, Jia; Sun, Shiguo; Pang, Yi

    2014-08-14

    A dual-channel including a colorimetric and fluorescent probe based on the aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) and enzymolysis approach has been presented to screen acid phosphatase (ACP) and its inhibitor. Moreover, the ACP activity was determined by real time assay. PMID:24957006

  3. Fluorescence energy transfer efficiency in labeled yeast cytochrome c: a rapid screen for ion biocompatibility in aqueous ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Sheila N; Zhao, Hua; Pandey, Siddharth; Heller, William T; Bright, Frank; Baker, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence energy transfer de-quenching assay was implemented to follow the equilibrium unfolding behaviour of site-specific tetramethylrhodamine-labelled yeast cytochrome c in aqueous ionic liquid solutions; additionally, this approach offers the prospect of naked eye screening for biocompatible ion combinations in hydrated ionic liquids.

  4. Automated Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images to Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Venkatraman, S.; Doktycz, M. J.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protein interactions is important for elucidating biological networks. One obstacle in comprehensive interaction studies is the analyses of large datasets, particularly those containing images. Development of an automated system to analyze an image-based protein interaction dataset is needed. Such an analysis system is described here, to automatically extract features from fluorescence microscopy images obtained from a bacterial protein interaction assay. These features are used to relay quantitative values that aid in the automated scoring of positive interactions. Experimental observations indicate that identifying at least 50% positive cells in an image is sufficient to detect a protein interaction.more » Based on this criterion, the automated system presents 100% accuracy in detecting positive interactions for a dataset of 16 images. Algorithms were implemented using MATLAB and the software developed is available on request from the authors.« less

  5. An Affinity-Based Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Kumar, Sanjai; Wu, Li; Lawrence, David S.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important signaling enzymes that control such fundamental processes as proliferation, differentiation, survival/apoptosis, as well as adhesion and motility. Potent and selective PTP inhibitors serve not only as powerful research tools, but also as potential therapeutics against a variety illness including cancer and diabetes. PTP activity-based assays are widely used in high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for PTP inhibitor discovery. These assays suffer from a major weakness, in that the reactivity of the active site Cys can cause serious problems as highly reactive oxidizing and alkylating agents may surface as hits. We describe the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based displacement assay that makes the use of an active site Cys to Ser mutant PTP (e.g., PTP1B/C215S) that retains the wild type binding affinity. The potency of library compounds is assessed by their ability to compete with the fluorescently labeled active site ligand for binding to the Cys to Ser PTP mutant. Finally, the substitution of the active site Cys by a Ser renders the mutant PTP insensitive to oxidation and alkylation and thus will likely eliminate “false” positives due to modification of the active site Cys that destroy the phosphatase activity. PMID:17532513

  6. Determination of proteins at nanogram levels by synchronous fluorescence scan technique with a novel composite nanoparticle as a fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Guangfeng; Li, Ling; Xu, Fagong

    2004-09-01

    A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method and applied as a protein fluorescence probe. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (--COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the composite nanoparticles is significantly increased in the presence of trace protein at pH 6.90. Based on this, a new synchronous fluorescence scan (SFS) analysis was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA, and human gamma-IgG. When Delta lambda = 280 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 290 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The linear range is 0.1-10 microg ml(-1) for HSA, 0.09-8.0 microg ml(-1) for BSA, and 0.08-15 microg ml(-1) for human gamma-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are satisfactory. PMID:15294230

  7. Determination of proteins at nanogram levels by synchronous fluorescence scan technique with a novel composite nanoparticle as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Guangfeng; Li, Ling; Xu, Fagong

    2004-09-01

    A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method and applied as a protein fluorescence probe. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the composite nanoparticles is significantly increased in the presence of trace protein at pH 6.90. Based on this, a new synchronous fluorescence scan (SFS) analysis was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA, and human γ-IgG. When Δ λ=280 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 290 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The linear range is 0.1-10 μg ml -1 for HSA, 0.09-8.0 μg ml -1 for BSA, and 0.08-15 μg ml -1 for human γ-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are satisfactory.

  8. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  9. Mild and cost-effective green fluorescent protein purification employing small synthetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Pina, Ana Sofia; Dias, Ana Margarida G C; Ustok, Fatma Isik; El Khoury, Graziella; Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Branco, Ricardo J F; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, A Cecília A

    2015-10-30

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful indicator in a broad range of applications including cell biology, gene expression and biosensing. However, its full potential is hampered by the lack of a selective, mild and low-cost purification scheme. In order to address this demand, a novel adsorbent was developed as a generic platform for the purification of GFP or GFP fusion proteins, giving GFP a dual function as reporter and purification tag. After screening a solid-phase combinatorial library of small synthetic ligands based on the Ugi-reaction, the lead ligand (A4C7) selectively recovered GFP with 94% yield and 94% purity under mild conditions and directly from Escherichia coli extracts. Adsorbents containing the ligand A4C7 maintained the selectivity to recover other proteins fused to GFP. The performance of A4C7 adsorbents was compared with two commercially available methods (immunoprecipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography), confirming the new adsorbent as a low-cost viable alternative for GFP purification.

  10. Reverse Fluorescence Enhancement and Colorimetric Bimodal Signal Readout Immunochromatography Test Strip for Ultrasensitive Large-Scale Screening and Postoperative Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yingyi; Guo, Weisheng; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Yudong; Fu, Weihua; Liu, Tingting; Wu, Xiaoli; Wang, Hanjie; Gong, Xiaoqun; Liang, Xing-Jie; Chang, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasensitive and quantitative fast screening of cancer biomarkers by immunochromatography test strip (ICTS) is still challenging in clinic. The gold nanoparticles (NPs) based ICTS with colorimetric readout enables a quick spectrum screening but suffers from nonquantitative performance; although ICTS with fluorescence readout (FICTS) allows quantitative detection, its sensitivity still deserves more efforts and attentions. In this work, by taking advantages of colorimetric ICTS and FICTS, we described a reverse fluorescence enhancement ICTS (rFICTS) with bimodal signal readout for ultrasensitive and quantitative fast screening of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In the presence of target, gold NPs aggregation in T line induced colorimetric readout, allowing on-the-spot spectrum screening in 10 min by naked eye. Meanwhile, the reverse fluorescence enhancement signal enabled more accurately quantitative detection with better sensitivity (5.89 pg/mL for CEA), which is more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the conventional FICTS. The accuracy and stability of the rFICTS were investigated with more than 100 clinical serum samples for large-scale screening. Furthermore, this rFICTS also realized postoperative monitoring by detecting CEA in a patient with colon cancer and comparing with CT imaging diagnosis. These results indicated this rFICTS is particularly suitable for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings. PMID:27547984

  11. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol.

  12. Screening and analysis on the protein interaction of the protein VP7 in grass carp reovirus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuying; Xie, Jiguo; Li, Jie; Shuanghu, Cai; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang

    2015-06-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV) has caused serious economic losses for several decades in China. The protein VP7 is one of the important structural proteins in GCRV. Recent studies indicated that the protein VP7 had the commendable antigenicity and immunogenicity. The protein VP7 cooperated with VP5 could change the conformation of the cell membrane and facilitate entry of GCRV into host cells. We speculated that the protein VP7 should play an important role in the pathogenesis of GCRV. In order to explore the function of the protein VP7, the bait protein expression plasmid pGBKT7-vp7 and the cDNA library of CIK cells were constructed. By yeast two-hybrid system, after multiple screening with the high screening rate medium, rotary verification, sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, the interactions of the protein VP7 with ribosomal protein S20 (RPS20) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit b (eIF3b) in CIK cells were identified. RPS20 played the important roles in the generation of influenza B virus and a variety of diseases. eIF3b was relative to the infection of some viruses. This study suggested that the protein VP7 played the role in viral replication and most likely interacted with host proteins by RPS20 and eIF3b. The interaction mechanisms of the protein VP7 with RPS20 and eIF3b, and the subsequent effector mechanisms needed to be further studied. The corresponding protein interaction of the protein VP7 was not acquired in bioinformatics. The protein VP7 and its untranslated region may have the unknown special function. This study laid the foundation for deeply exploring the function of the protein VP7 in GCRV and had the important scientific significance for exploring the pathogenic mechanism of GCRV.

  13. Mapping fast protein folding with multiple-site fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Chao, Shu-Han; Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Fast protein folding involves complex dynamics in many degrees of freedom, yet microsecond folding experiments provide only low-resolution structural information. We enhance the structural resolution of the five-helix bundle protein λ6–85 by engineering into it three fluorescent tryptophan–tyrosine contact probes. The probes report on distances between three different helix pairs: 1–2, 1–3, and 3–2. Temperature jump relaxation experiments on these three mutants reveal two different kinetic timescales: a slower timescale for 1–3 and a faster one for the two contacts involving helix 2. We hypothesize that these differences arise from a single folding mechanism that forms contacts on different timescales, and not from changes of mechanism due to adding the probes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the corresponding three distances in one published single-trajectory all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation of a similar mutant. Autocorrelation analysis of the trajectory reveals the same “slow” and “fast” distance change as does experiment, but on a faster timescale; smoothing the trajectory in time shows that this ordering is robust and persists into the microsecond folding timescale. Structural investigation of the all-atom computational data suggests that helix 2 misfolds to produce a short-lived off-pathway trap, in agreement with the experimental finding that the 1–2 and 3–2 distances involving helix 2 contacts form a kinetic grouping distinct from 1 to 3. Our work demonstrates that comparison between experiment and simulation can be extended to several order parameters, providing a stronger mechanistic test. PMID:26080403

  14. Mapping fast protein folding with multiple-site fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Prigozhin, Maxim B; Chao, Shu-Han; Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-30

    Fast protein folding involves complex dynamics in many degrees of freedom, yet microsecond folding experiments provide only low-resolution structural information. We enhance the structural resolution of the five-helix bundle protein λ6-85 by engineering into it three fluorescent tryptophan-tyrosine contact probes. The probes report on distances between three different helix pairs: 1-2, 1-3, and 3-2. Temperature jump relaxation experiments on these three mutants reveal two different kinetic timescales: a slower timescale for 1-3 and a faster one for the two contacts involving helix 2. We hypothesize that these differences arise from a single folding mechanism that forms contacts on different timescales, and not from changes of mechanism due to adding the probes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the corresponding three distances in one published single-trajectory all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation of a similar mutant. Autocorrelation analysis of the trajectory reveals the same "slow" and "fast" distance change as does experiment, but on a faster timescale; smoothing the trajectory in time shows that this ordering is robust and persists into the microsecond folding timescale. Structural investigation of the all-atom computational data suggests that helix 2 misfolds to produce a short-lived off-pathway trap, in agreement with the experimental finding that the 1-2 and 3-2 distances involving helix 2 contacts form a kinetic grouping distinct from 1 to 3. Our work demonstrates that comparison between experiment and simulation can be extended to several order parameters, providing a stronger mechanistic test. PMID:26080403

  15. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  16. A Bright and Fast Red Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicator That Reports Neuronal Activity in Organotypic Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed S; Farhi, Samouil L; Zhao, Yongxin; Brinks, Daan; Zou, Peng; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A; Ballanyi, Klaus; Cohen, Adam E; Campbell, Robert E

    2016-02-24

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators based on green fluorescent proteins (FPs) or archaerhodopsin has emerged as a powerful approach for detecting the activity of many individual neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Relative to green FP-based voltage indicators, a bright red-shifted FP-based voltage indicator has the intrinsic advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background, and compatibility with blue-light-excitable channelrhodopsins. Here, we report a bright red fluorescent voltage indicator (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red; FlicR1) with properties that are comparable to the best available green indicators. To develop FlicR1, we used directed protein evolution and rational engineering to screen libraries of thousands of variants. FlicR1 faithfully reports single action potentials (∼3% ΔF/F) and tracks electrically driven voltage oscillations at 100 Hz in dissociated Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal neurons in single trial recordings. Furthermore, FlicR1 can be easily imaged with wide-field fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with a blue-shifted channelrhodopsin for all-optical electrophysiology, although blue light photoactivation of the FlicR1 chromophore presents a challenge for applications that require spatially overlapping yellow and blue excitation. PMID:26911693

  17. Non-invasive fluorescent-protein imaging of orthotopic pancreatic-cancer-patient tumorgraft progression in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Katz, Matthew; Fleming, Jason; Truty, Mark; Thomas, Ryan; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2012-08-01

    In order to individualize and therefore have more effective treatment for pancreatic cancer, we have developed a multicolor, imageable, orthotopic mouse model for individual patients with pancreatic cancer by passaging their tumors through transgenic nude mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP). The tumors acquired brightly fluorescent stroma from the transgenic host mice, which was stably associated with the tumors through multiple passages. In the present study, pancreatic cancer patient tumor specimens were initially established in NOD.CB17-Prkdc(scid)/NcrCrl (NOD/SCID) mice. The tumors were then passaged orthotopically into transgenic nude mice ubiquitously expressing GFP and subsequently to nude mice ubiquitously expressing RFP. The tumors, with very bright GFP and RFP stroma, were then orthotopically passaged to non-transgenic nude mice. It was possible to image the brightly fluorescent tumors non-invasively longitudinally as they progressed in the non-transgenic nude mice. This non-invasive imageable tumorgraft model will be valuable to screen for effective treatment options for individual patients with pancreatic cancer, as well as for the discovery of improved agents for this treatment-resistant disease.

  18. New cell line development for antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary cells using split green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The establishment of high producer is an important issue in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture considering increased heterogeneity by the random integration of a transfected foreign gene and the altered position of the integrated gene. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based cell line development is an efficient strategy for the selection of CHO cells in high therapeutic protein production. Results An internal ribosome entry site (IRES) was introduced for using two green fluorescence protein (GFP) fragments as a reporter to both antibody chains, the heavy chain and the light chain. The cells co-transfected with two GFP fragments showed the emission of green fluorescence by the reconstitution of split GFP. The FACS-sorted pool with GFP expression had a higher specific antibody productivity (qAb) than that of the unsorted pool. The qAb was highly correlated with the fluorescence intensity with a high correlation coefficient, evidenced from the analysis of median GFP and qAb in individual selected clones. Conclusions This study proved that the fragment complementation for split GFP could be an efficient indication for antibody production on the basis of high correlation of qAb with reconstitution of GFP. Taken together, we developed an efficient FACS-based screening method for high antibody-producing CHO cells with the benefits of the split GFP system. PMID:22587529

  19. High throughput screening using acoustic droplet ejection to combine protein crystals and chemical libraries on crystallization plates at high density.

    PubMed

    Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Mullen, Jeffrey D; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-07-01

    We describe a high throughput method for screening up to 1728 distinct chemicals with protein crystals on a single microplate. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) was used to co-position 2.5nL of protein, precipitant, and chemicals on a MiTeGen in situ-1 crystallization plate™ for screening by co-crystallization or soaking. ADE-transferred droplets follow a precise trajectory which allows all components to be transferred through small apertures in the microplate lid. The apertures were large enough for 2.5nL droplets to pass through them, but small enough so that they did not disrupt the internal environment created by the mother liquor. Using this system, thermolysin and trypsin crystals were efficiently screened for binding to a heavy-metal mini-library. Fluorescence and X-ray diffraction were used to confirm that each chemical in the heavy-metal library was correctly paired with the intended protein crystal. A fragment mini-library was screened to observe two known lysozyme ligands using both co-crystallization and soaking. A similar approach was used to identify multiple, novel thaumatin binding sites for ascorbic acid. This technology pushes towards a faster, automated, and more flexible strategy for high throughput screening of chemical libraries (such as fragment libraries) using as little as 2.5nL of each component.

  20. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  1. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development. PMID:21772029

  2. Expression, purification and some properties of fluorescent chimeras of human small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Datskevich, Petr N; Mymrikov, Evgeny V; Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Shemetov, Anton A; Sudnitsyna, Maria V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2012-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsp) are ubiquitously expressed in all human tissues and have an important housekeeping role in preventing the accumulation of aggregates of improperly folded or denatured proteins. They also participate in the regulation of the cytoskeleton, proliferation, apoptosis and many other vital processes. Fluorescent chimeras composed of sHsp and enhanced fluorescent proteins have been used to determine the intracellular locations of small heat shock proteins and to analyse the hetero-oligomeric complexes formed by different sHsp. However, the biochemical properties and chaperone-like activities of these chimeras have not been investigated. To determine the properties of these chimeras, we fused enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins (EYFP and ECFP) to the N-termini of four ubiquitously expressed human small heat shock proteins: HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, and HspB8. The eight fluorescent chimeras of small heat shock proteins and isolated fluorescent proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The chimeric proteins were isolated and purified via ammonium sulphate fractionation, ion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. This method provided 20-100 mg of fluorescent chimeras from 1L of bacterial culture. The spectral properties of the chimeras were similar to those of the isolated fluorescent proteins. The fusion of fluorescent proteins to HspB6 and HspB8, which typically form dimers, did not affect their quaternary structures. Oligomers of the fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB5 were less stable and contained fewer subunits than oligomers formed by the wild-type proteins. Fusion with EYFP decreased the chaperone-like activity of HspB5 and HspB6 whereas fusion with ECFP increased chaperone-like activity. All fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB8 had higher chaperone-like activity than the wild-type proteins. Thus, although fluorescent chimeras are useful for many purposes, the fluorescent proteins used to form these chimeras may

  3. A novel method for observing proteins in vivo using a small fluorescent label and multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Botchway, Stanley W; Barba, Ignasi; Jordan, Randolf; Harmston, Rebecca; Haggie, Peter M; Williams, Simon-Peter; Fulton, Alexandra M; Parker, Anthony W; Brindle, Kevin M

    2005-09-15

    A novel method for the fluorescence detection of proteins in cells is described in the present study. Proteins are labelled by the selective biosynthetic incorporation of 5-hydroxytryptophan and the label is detected via selective two-photon excitation of the hydroxyindole and detection of its fluorescence emission at 340 nm. The method is demonstrated in this paper with images of a labelled protein in yeast cells.

  4. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-12-01

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization, integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to replace conventional animal tests. Chemical methods are intended to characterize the potential of a sensitizer to induce earlier molecular initiating events. The presence of an electrophilic mechanistic domain is considered one of the essential chemical features to covalently bind to the biological target and induce further haptenation processes. Current in chemico assays rely on the quantification of unreacted model nucleophiles after incubation with the candidate sensitizer. In the current study, a new fluorescence-based method, 'HTS-DCYA assay', is proposed. The assay aims at the identification of reactive electrophiles based on their chemical reactivity toward a model fluorescent thiol. The reaction workflow enabled the development of a High Throughput Screening (HTS) method to directly quantify the reaction adducts. The reaction conditions have been optimized to minimize solubility issues, oxidative side reactions and increase the throughput of the assay while minimizing the reaction time, which are common issues with existing methods. Thirty-six chemicals previously classified with LLNA, DPRA or KeratinoSens™ were tested as a proof of concept. Preliminary results gave an estimated 82% accuracy, 78% sensitivity, 90% specificity, comparable to other in chemico methods such as Cys-DPRA. In addition to validated chemicals, six natural products were analyzed and a prediction of their sensitization potential is presented for the first time.

  5. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-12-01

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization, integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to replace conventional animal tests. Chemical methods are intended to characterize the potential of a sensitizer to induce earlier molecular initiating events. The presence of an electrophilic mechanistic domain is considered one of the essential chemical features to covalently bind to the biological target and induce further haptenation processes. Current in chemico assays rely on the quantification of unreacted model nucleophiles after incubation with the candidate sensitizer. In the current study, a new fluorescence-based method, 'HTS-DCYA assay', is proposed. The assay aims at the identification of reactive electrophiles based on their chemical reactivity toward a model fluorescent thiol. The reaction workflow enabled the development of a High Throughput Screening (HTS) method to directly quantify the reaction adducts. The reaction conditions have been optimized to minimize solubility issues, oxidative side reactions and increase the throughput of the assay while minimizing the reaction time, which are common issues with existing methods. Thirty-six chemicals previously classified with LLNA, DPRA or KeratinoSens™ were tested as a proof of concept. Preliminary results gave an estimated 82% accuracy, 78% sensitivity, 90% specificity, comparable to other in chemico methods such as Cys-DPRA. In addition to validated chemicals, six natural products were analyzed and a prediction of their sensitization potential is presented for the first time. PMID:26455772

  6. High-Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li; Omary, M Bishr

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high-throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green fluorescent protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug "hits" that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wild-type-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. "Hits" of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients.

  7. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  8. A Bright and Fast Red Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicator That Reports Neuronal Activity in Organotypic Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed S.; Farhi, Samouil L.; Zhao, Yongxin; Brinks, Daan; Zou, Peng; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Ballanyi, Klaus; Cohen, Adam E.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators based on green fluorescent proteins (FPs) or archaerhodopsin has emerged as a powerful approach for detecting the activity of many individual neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Relative to green FP-based voltage indicators, a bright red-shifted FP-based voltage indicator has the intrinsic advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background, and compatibility with blue-light-excitable channelrhodopsins. Here, we report a bright red fluorescent voltage indicator (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red; FlicR1) with properties that are comparable to the best available green indicators. To develop FlicR1, we used directed protein evolution and rational engineering to screen libraries of thousands of variants. FlicR1 faithfully reports single action potentials (∼3% ΔF/F) and tracks electrically driven voltage oscillations at 100 Hz in dissociated Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal neurons in single trial recordings. Furthermore, FlicR1 can be easily imaged with wide-field fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with a blue-shifted channelrhodopsin for all-optical electrophysiology, although blue light photoactivation of the FlicR1 chromophore presents a challenge for applications that require spatially overlapping yellow and blue excitation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Fluorescent-protein-based voltage indicators enable imaging of the electrical activity of many genetically targeted neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we describe the engineering of a bright red fluorescent protein-based voltage indicator designated as FlicR1 (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red). FlicR1 has sufficient speed and sensitivity to report single action potentials and voltage fluctuations at frequencies up to 100 Hz in single-trial recordings with wide-field microscopy. Because it is excitable with yellow light, FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with blue

  9. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M.; Specht, Christian G.; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  10. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  11. Two high throughput screening assays for Aberrant RNA-protein interactions in Myotonic Dystrophy Type-1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J.; Zheng, Wei; Thornton, Charles A.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type-1 (DM1), the most prevalent form of adult muscular dystrophy, is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3′ untranslated region of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. The pathogenic effects of the CTG expansion arise from the deleterious effects of the mutant transcript. RNA with expanded CUG tracts alters the activities of several RNA binding proteins, including muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1). MBNL1 becomes sequestered in nuclear foci in complex with the expanded CUG repeat RNA. The resulting loss of MBNL1 activity causes mis-regulated alternative splicing of multiple genes, leading to symptoms of DM1. The binding interaction between MBNL1 and mutant RNA could be a key step in the pathogenesis of DM1 and serves as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. We have developed two high throughput screen (HTS) suitable assays using both homogenous time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer (HTRF) and AlphaScreen technologies to detect the binding of a C-terminally His-tagged MBNL1 and a biotinylated (CUG)12 RNA. These assays are homogenous and successfully miniaturized to 1536-well plate format. Both assays were validated and show robust signal-to-basal ratios and Z’ factors. PMID:22218462

  12. A time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay suitable for high-throughput screening for inhibitors of immunoglobulin E-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beomkyu; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S; Eggel, Alexander; Vogel, Monique; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2012-12-15

    The interaction of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies with the high-affinity receptor, FcεRI, plays a central role in initiating most allergic reactions. The IgE-receptor interaction has been targeted for treatment of allergic diseases, and many high-affinity macromolecular inhibitors have been identified. Small molecule inhibitors would offer significant advantages over current anti-IgE treatment, but no candidate compounds have been identified and fully validated. Here, we report the development of a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay for monitoring the IgE-receptor interaction. The TR-FRET assay measures an increase in fluorescence intensity as a donor lanthanide fluorophore is recruited into complexes of site-specific Alexa Fluor 488-labeled IgE-Fc and His-tagged FcεRIα proteins. The assay can readily monitor classic competitive inhibitors that bind either IgE-Fc or FcεRIα in equilibrium competition binding experiments. Furthermore, the TR-FRET assay can also be used to follow the kinetics of IgE-Fc-FcεRIα dissociation and identify inhibitory ligands that accelerate the dissociation of preformed complexes, as demonstrated for an engineered DARPin (designed ankyrin repeat protein) inhibitor. The TR-FRET assay is suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS), as shown by performing a pilot screen of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Collection Library in a 384-well plate format.

  13. Novel multistep BRET-FRET energy transfer using nanoconjugates of firefly proteins, quantum dots, and red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rabeka; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2013-06-21

    Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from firefly luciferase to red fluorescent proteins using quantum dot or rod acceptor/donor linkers is described. The effect of morphology and tuned optical properties on the efficiency of this unique BRET-FRET system was evaluated.

  14. Evaluation of a novel portable x-ray fluorescence screening tool for detection of arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    McIver, David J; VanLeeuwen, John A; Knafla, Anthony L; Campbell, Jillian A; Alexander, Kevin M; Gherase, Mihai R; Guernsey, Judith R; Fleming, David E B

    2015-12-01

    A new portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) screening tool was evaluated for its effectiveness in arsenic (As) quantification in human finger and toe nails ([Formula: see text]). Nail samples were measured for total As concentration by XRF and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Using concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), kappa, diagnostic sensitivity (Sn) and specificity (Sp), and linear regression analyses, the concentration of As measured by XRF was compared to ICP-MS. The CCC peaked for scaled values of fingernail samples, at 0.424 (95% CI: 0.065-0.784). The largest kappa value, 0.400 (95% CI:  -0.282-1.000), was found at a 1.3 μg g(-1) cut-off concentration, for fingernails only, and the largest kappa at a clinically relevant cut-off concentration of 1.0 μg g(-1) was 0.237 (95% CI:  -0.068-0.543), again in fingernails. Analyses generally showed excellent XRF Sn (up to 100%, 95% CI: 48-100%), but low Sp (up to 30% for the same analysis, 95% CI: 14-50%). Portable XRF shows some potential for use as a screening tool with fingernail samples. The difference between XRF and ICP-MS measurements decreased as sample mass increased to 30 mg. While this novel method of As detection in nails has shown relatively high agreement in some scenarios, this portable XRF is not currently considered suitable as a substitute for ICP-MS. PMID:26536141

  15. Evaluation of a novel portable x-ray fluorescence screening tool for detection of arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    McIver, David J; VanLeeuwen, John A; Knafla, Anthony L; Campbell, Jillian A; Alexander, Kevin M; Gherase, Mihai R; Guernsey, Judith R; Fleming, David E B

    2015-12-01

    A new portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) screening tool was evaluated for its effectiveness in arsenic (As) quantification in human finger and toe nails ([Formula: see text]). Nail samples were measured for total As concentration by XRF and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Using concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), kappa, diagnostic sensitivity (Sn) and specificity (Sp), and linear regression analyses, the concentration of As measured by XRF was compared to ICP-MS. The CCC peaked for scaled values of fingernail samples, at 0.424 (95% CI: 0.065-0.784). The largest kappa value, 0.400 (95% CI:  -0.282-1.000), was found at a 1.3 μg g(-1) cut-off concentration, for fingernails only, and the largest kappa at a clinically relevant cut-off concentration of 1.0 μg g(-1) was 0.237 (95% CI:  -0.068-0.543), again in fingernails. Analyses generally showed excellent XRF Sn (up to 100%, 95% CI: 48-100%), but low Sp (up to 30% for the same analysis, 95% CI: 14-50%). Portable XRF shows some potential for use as a screening tool with fingernail samples. The difference between XRF and ICP-MS measurements decreased as sample mass increased to 30 mg. While this novel method of As detection in nails has shown relatively high agreement in some scenarios, this portable XRF is not currently considered suitable as a substitute for ICP-MS.

  16. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence. PMID:26246319

  17. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  18. Human alpha-fetal protein immunoassay using fluorescence suppression with fluorescent-bead/antibody conjugate and enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junhyoung; Shin, Yong-Beom; Lee, JaeJong; Kim, Min-Gon

    2015-09-15

    The aim of the study was to develop a simple and rapid immunoassay using fluorescent microbeads and enzyme-substrate reactions to measure alpha-fetal protein (AFP) concentrations. We demonstrated the functionality of the fluorescent immunosensor using antibody-conjugated fluorescent latex beads (AB-FLBs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to catalyze a reaction, where the products would precipitate and suppress the fluorescence of AB-FLBs. First, the AB-FLBs were incubated with antigen, biotinylated antibodies (bABs), and streptavidin-HRP (SAv-HRP) to form a sandwich-type immunoreaction. The mixture was then filtered through a membrane to concentrate the beads on a small area. After washing to remove unbound bABs and SAv-HRP, a chromogenic HRP substrate and H2O2 were added to form precipitates on the FLB surface. The suppression of the fluorescence was measured with a fluorescent image analyzer system. Under optimized conditions, AFP could be measured at concentrations as low as 1 pg mL(-1) with a dynamic range up to 100 ng mL(-1).

  19. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kennis, John T M

    2015-08-06

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600~700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  20. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction. PMID:26904821

  1. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction.

  2. X-ray crystal structure and properties of Phanta, a weakly fluorescent photochromic GFP-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Craig Don; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Olsen, Seth; Devenish, Rodney J.; Close, Devin W.; Bell, Toby D. M.; Bradbury, Andrew; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Prescott, Mark

    2015-04-29

    Phanta is a reversibly photoswitching chromoprotein (ΦF, 0.003), useful for pcFRET, that was isolated from a mutagenesis screen of the bright green fluorescent eCGP123 (ΦF, 0.8). We have investigated the contribution of substitutions at positions His193, Thr69 and Gln62, individually and in combination, to the optical properties of Phanta. Single amino acid substitutions at position 193 resulted in proteins with very low ΦF, indicating the importance of this position in controlling the fluorescence efficiency of the variant proteins. The substitution Thr69Val in Phanta was important for supressing the formation of a protonated chromophore species observed in some His193 substituted variants, whereas the substitution Gln62Met did not significantly contribute to the useful optical properties of Phanta. X-ray crystal structures for Phanta (2.3 Å), eCGP123T69V (2.0 Å) and eCGP123H193Q (2.2 Å) in their non-photoswitched state were determined, revealing the presence of a cis-coplanar chromophore. We conclude that changes in the hydrogen-bonding network supporting the cis-chromophore, and its contacts with the surrounding protein matrix, are responsible for the low fluorescence emission of eCGP123 variants containing a His193 substitution.

  3. X-Ray Crystal Structure and Properties of Phanta, a Weakly Fluorescent Photochromic GFP-Like Protein.

    PubMed

    Don Paul, Craig; Traore, Daouda A K; Olsen, Seth; Devenish, Rodney J; Close, Devin W; Bell, Toby D M; Bradbury, Andrew; Wilce, Matthew C J; Prescott, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Phanta is a reversibly photoswitching chromoprotein (ΦF, 0.003), useful for pcFRET, that was isolated from a mutagenesis screen of the bright green fluorescent eCGP123 (ΦF, 0.8). We have investigated the contribution of substitutions at positions His193, Thr69 and Gln62, individually and in combination, to the optical properties of Phanta. Single amino acid substitutions at position 193 resulted in proteins with very low ΦF, indicating the importance of this position in controlling the fluorescence efficiency of the variant proteins. The substitution Thr69Val in Phanta was important for supressing the formation of a protonated chromophore species observed in some His193 substituted variants, whereas the substitution Gln62Met did not significantly contribute to the useful optical properties of Phanta. X-ray crystal structures for Phanta (2.3 Å), eCGP123T69V (2.0 Å) and eCGP123H193Q (2.2 Å) in their non-photoswitched state were determined, revealing the presence of a cis-coplanar chromophore. We conclude that changes in the hydrogen-bonding network supporting the cis-chromophore, and its contacts with the surrounding protein matrix, are responsible for the low fluorescence emission of eCGP123 variants containing a His193 substitution.

  4. X-Ray Crystal Structure and Properties of Phanta, a Weakly Fluorescent Photochromic GFP-Like Protein

    PubMed Central

    Don Paul, Craig; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Olsen, Seth; Devenish, Rodney J.; Close, Devin W.; Bell, Toby D. M.; Bradbury, Andrew; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Prescott, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Phanta is a reversibly photoswitching chromoprotein (ΦF, 0.003), useful for pcFRET, that was isolated from a mutagenesis screen of the bright green fluorescent eCGP123 (ΦF, 0.8). We have investigated the contribution of substitutions at positions His193, Thr69 and Gln62, individually and in combination, to the optical properties of Phanta. Single amino acid substitutions at position 193 resulted in proteins with very low ΦF, indicating the importance of this position in controlling the fluorescence efficiency of the variant proteins. The substitution Thr69Val in Phanta was important for supressing the formation of a protonated chromophore species observed in some His193 substituted variants, whereas the substitution Gln62Met did not significantly contribute to the useful optical properties of Phanta. X-ray crystal structures for Phanta (2.3 Å), eCGP123T69V (2.0 Å) and eCGP123H193Q (2.2 Å) in their non-photoswitched state were determined, revealing the presence of a cis-coplanar chromophore. We conclude that changes in the hydrogen-bonding network supporting the cis-chromophore, and its contacts with the surrounding protein matrix, are responsible for the low fluorescence emission of eCGP123 variants containing a His193 substitution. PMID:25923520

  5. X-ray crystal structure and properties of Phanta, a weakly fluorescent photochromic GFP-like protein

    DOE PAGES

    Paul, Craig Don; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Olsen, Seth; Devenish, Rodney J.; Close, Devin W.; Bell, Toby D. M.; Bradbury, Andrew; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Prescott, Mark

    2015-04-29

    Phanta is a reversibly photoswitching chromoprotein (ΦF, 0.003), useful for pcFRET, that was isolated from a mutagenesis screen of the bright green fluorescent eCGP123 (ΦF, 0.8). We have investigated the contribution of substitutions at positions His193, Thr69 and Gln62, individually and in combination, to the optical properties of Phanta. Single amino acid substitutions at position 193 resulted in proteins with very low ΦF, indicating the importance of this position in controlling the fluorescence efficiency of the variant proteins. The substitution Thr69Val in Phanta was important for supressing the formation of a protonated chromophore species observed in some His193 substituted variants,more » whereas the substitution Gln62Met did not significantly contribute to the useful optical properties of Phanta. X-ray crystal structures for Phanta (2.3 Å), eCGP123T69V (2.0 Å) and eCGP123H193Q (2.2 Å) in their non-photoswitched state were determined, revealing the presence of a cis-coplanar chromophore. We conclude that changes in the hydrogen-bonding network supporting the cis-chromophore, and its contacts with the surrounding protein matrix, are responsible for the low fluorescence emission of eCGP123 variants containing a His193 substitution.« less

  6. Time-Domain Microfluidic Fluorescence Lifetime Flow Cytometry for High-Throughput Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5–5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving

  7. Time-domain microfluidic fluorescence lifetime flow cytometry for high-throughput Förster resonance energy transfer screening.

    PubMed

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-02-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5-5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving fluorescence

  8. [Ph-Sensor Properties of a Fluorescent Protein from Dendronephthya sp].

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, A A; Chertkova, R V; Martynov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescent proteins are now widely applicable for monitoring pH changes in live cells. Here, we have shown that a fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) exhibits a pronounced pH-sensitivity. Unlike most of known genetically encoded pH-sensors, fluorescence of the protein is not quenched upon medium acidification, but is shifting from the red to green spectral range. Therefore, quantitative measurements of intracellular pH are feasible by ratiometric comparison of emission intensities in the red and green spectral ranges, which makes DendFP advantageous compared with other genetically encoded pH-sensors. PMID:27125020

  9. Rapid diagnosis and quantification of herpes simplex virus with a green fluorescent protein reporter system.

    PubMed

    Kung, S H; Wang, Y C; Lin, C H; Kuo, R L; Liu, W T

    2000-11-01

    A genetically modified cell line (Vero-ICP10-EGFP) was constructed for detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) by a simple, rapid and direct method. The cell line was developed by stable transfection of Vero cell with a plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the promoter of the HSV-2 ICP10 gene. As early as 6 h after infection with HSV, fluorescence-emitting cells can be observed under a fluorescence microscope. A single infected cell emitting fluorescence can be observed with soft agar overlay by inverted fluorescence microscopy. No induction of detectable fluorescence was seen following infections with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), coxsackievirus A16 and enterovirus 71. Analysis by flow cytometry also demonstrated that intensity of the triggered fluorescence is proportional to the titer of HSV inoculated. Taken together, this novel GFP reporter system could become a useful means for rapid detection and quantification of HSV in clinical specimens.

  10. Polymersomes prepared from thermoresponsive fluorescent protein-polymer bioconjugates: capture of and report on drug and protein payloads.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin Ken; Laos, Alistair J; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Curmi, Paul M G; Gooding, J Justin; Marquis, Christopher P; Stenzel, Martina H; Thordarson, Pall

    2015-04-27

    Polymersomes provide a good platform for targeted drug delivery and the creation of complex (bio)catalytically active systems for research in synthetic biology. To realize these applications requires both spatial control over the encapsulation components in these polymersomes and a means to report where the components are in the polymersomes. To address these twin challenges, we synthesized the protein-polymer bioconjugate PNIPAM-b-amilFP497 composed of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and a green-fluorescent protein variant (amilFP497). Above 37 °C, this bioconjugate forms polymersomes that can (co-)encapsulate the fluorescent drug doxorubicin and the fluorescent light-harvesting protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET), we can distinguish the co-encapsulated PE545 protein inside the polymersome membrane while doxorubicin is found both in the polymersome core and membrane.

  11. Polymersomes prepared from thermoresponsive fluorescent protein-polymer bioconjugates: capture of and report on drug and protein payloads.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin Ken; Laos, Alistair J; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Curmi, Paul M G; Gooding, J Justin; Marquis, Christopher P; Stenzel, Martina H; Thordarson, Pall

    2015-04-27

    Polymersomes provide a good platform for targeted drug delivery and the creation of complex (bio)catalytically active systems for research in synthetic biology. To realize these applications requires both spatial control over the encapsulation components in these polymersomes and a means to report where the components are in the polymersomes. To address these twin challenges, we synthesized the protein-polymer bioconjugate PNIPAM-b-amilFP497 composed of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and a green-fluorescent protein variant (amilFP497). Above 37 °C, this bioconjugate forms polymersomes that can (co-)encapsulate the fluorescent drug doxorubicin and the fluorescent light-harvesting protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET), we can distinguish the co-encapsulated PE545 protein inside the polymersome membrane while doxorubicin is found both in the polymersome core and membrane. PMID:25736460

  12. Z-scan Fluorescence Profile Deconvolution of Cytosolic and Membrane-associated Protein Populations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Further, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 labeled with green fluorescent protein upon ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area to volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. PMID:25862080

  13. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence as a tool for food screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola; Dalipi, Rogerta; Bontempi, Elza; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-11-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the applications of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) in the field of food analysis. Elemental composition of food is of great importance, since food is the main source of essential, major and trace elements for animals and humans. Some potentially toxic elements, dangerous for human health may contaminate food, entering the food chain from the environment, processing, and storage. For this reason the elemental analysis of food is fundamental for safety assessment. Fast and sensitive analytical techniques, able to detect major and trace elements, are required as a result of the increasing demand on multi-elemental information and product screening. TXRF is suitable for elemental analysis of food, since it provides simultaneous multi-elemental identification in a wide dynamic range of concentrations. Several different matrices may be analyzed obtaining results with a good precision and accuracy. In this review, the most recent literature about the use of TXRF for the analysis of food is reported. The focus is placed on the applications within food quality monitoring of drinks, beverages, vegetables, fruits, cereals, animal derivatives and dietary supplements. Furthermore, this paper provides a critical outlook on the developments required to transfer these methods from research to the industrial and analytical laboratories contexts.

  14. Structural basis of enhanced photoconversion yield in green fluorescent protein-like protein Dendra2.

    PubMed

    Adam, Virgile; Nienhaus, Karin; Bourgeois, Dominique; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2009-06-01

    Dendra2 is an engineered, monomeric GFP-like protein that belongs to a subclass of fluorescent proteins undergoing irreversible photoconversion from a green- to a red-emitting state upon exposure to purple-blue light. This photoinduced process occurs only in the neutral state of the chromophore and is known to result from backbone cleavage accompanied by an extension of the delocalized pi-electron system. We have measured the X-ray structure of the green species of Dendra2 and performed a comprehensive characterization of the optical absorption and fluorescence properties of the protein in both its green and red forms. The structure, which is very similar to those reported for the closely related proteins EosFP and Kaede, revealed a local structural change involving mainly Arg66 and a water molecule W4, which are part of a charged and hydrogen-bonded cluster of amino acids and water molecules next to the chromophore. Unlike in EosFP and Kaede, Arg66 of Dendra2 does not contribute to negative charge stabilization on the imidazolinone ring by hydrogen bonding to the imidazolinone carbonyl. This structural change may explain the blue shift of the absorption and emission bands, as well as the markedly higher pKs of the hydroxyphenyl moiety of the chromophore, which were determined as 7.1 and 7.5 for the green and red species, respectively. The action spectrum of photoconversion coincides with the absorption band of the neutral species. Consequently, its 20-fold enhancement in Dendra2 at physiological pH accounts for the higher photoconversion yield of this protein as compared to EosFP.

  15. Structural basis for the fast maturation of Arthropoda green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Artem G; Pokross, Matthew E; Egorov, Nikolay S; Zaraisky, Andrey G; Yampolsky, Ilya V; Merzlyak, Ekaterina M; Shkoporov, Andrey N; Sander, Ian; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Chudakov, Dmitriy M

    2006-10-01

    Since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 1992, a family of known GFP-like proteins has been growing rapidly. Today, it includes more than a hundred proteins with different spectral characteristics cloned from Cnidaria species. For some of these proteins, crystal structures have been solved, showing diversity in chromophore modifications and conformational states. However, we are still far from a complete understanding of the origin, functions and evolution of the GFP family. Novel proteins of the family were recently cloned from evolutionarily distant marine Copepoda species, phylum Arthropoda, demonstrating an extremely rapid generation of fluorescent signal. Here, we have generated a non-aggregating mutant of Copepoda fluorescent protein and solved its high-resolution crystal structure. It was found that the protein beta-barrel contains a pore, leading to the chromophore. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this feature is critical for the fast maturation of the chromophore. PMID:16936637

  16. Beta-Barrel Scaffold of Fluorescent Proteins: Folding, Stability and Role in Chromophore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the current view of the interaction between the β-barrel scaffold of fluorescent proteins and their unique chromophore located in the internal helix. The chromophore originates from the polypeptide chain and its properties are influenced by the surrounding protein matrix of the β-barrel. On the other hand, it appears that a chromophore tightens the β-barrel scaffold and plays a crucial role in its stability. Furthermore, the presence of a mature chromophore causes hysteresis of protein unfolding and refolding. We survey studies measuring protein unfolding and refolding using traditional methods as well as new approaches, such as mechanical unfolding and reassembly of truncated fluorescent proteins. We also analyze models of fluorescent protein unfolding and refolding obtained through different approaches, and compare the results of protein folding in vitro to co-translational folding of a newly synthesized polypeptide chain. PMID:23351712

  17. Detection and identification of proteins using nanoparticle-fluorescent polymer `chemical nose' sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chang-Cheng; Miranda, Oscar R.; Gider, Basar; Ghosh, Partha S.; Kim, Ik-Bum; Erdogan, Belma; Krovi, Sai Archana; Bunz, Uwe H. F.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2007-05-01

    A sensor array containing six non-covalent gold nanoparticle-fluorescent polymer conjugates has been created to detect, identify and quantify protein targets. The polymer fluorescence is quenched by gold nanoparticles; the presence of proteins disrupts the nanoparticle-polymer interaction, producing distinct fluorescence response patterns. These patterns are highly repeatable and are characteristic for individual proteins at nanomolar concentrations, and can be quantitatively differentiated by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Based on a training matrix generated at protein concentrations of an identical ultraviolet absorbance at 280 nm (A280 = 0.005), LDA, combined with ultraviolet measurements, has been successfully used to identify 52 unknown protein samples (seven different proteins) with an accuracy of 94.2%. This work demonstrates the construction of novel nanomaterial-based protein detector arrays with potential applications in medical diagnostics.

  18. Two-Photon Fluorescence Anisotropy Imaging to Elucidate the Dynamics and the Stability of Immobilized Proteins.

    PubMed

    Orrego, Alejandro H; García, Carolina; Mancheño, José M; Guisán, Jose M; Lillo, M Pilar; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-01-28

    Time/spatial-resolved fluorescence determines anisotropy values of supported-fluorescent proteins through different immobilization chemistries, evidencing some of the molecular mechanisms that drive the stabilization of proteins at the interfaces with solid surfaces. Fluorescence anisotropy imaging provides a normalized protein mobility parameter that serves as a guide to study the effect of different immobilization parameters (length and flexibility of the spacer arm and multivalency of the protein-support interaction) on the final stability of the supported proteins. Proteins in a more constrained environment correspond to the most thermostable ones, as was shown by thermal inactivation studies. This work contributes to explain the experimental evidence found with conventional methods based on observable measurements; thus this advanced characterization technique provides reliable molecular information about the immobilized proteins with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. Such information has been very useful for fabricating highly stable heterogeneous biocatalysts with high interest in industrial developments.

  19. Protein-flexibility mediated coupling between photoswitching kinetics and surrounding viscosity of a photochromic fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kao, Ya-Ting; Zhu, Xinxin; Min, Wei

    2012-02-28

    Recent advances in fluorescent proteins (FPs) have generated a remarkable family of optical highlighters with special light responses. Among them, Dronpa exhibits a unique capability of reversible light-regulated on-off switching. However, the environmental dependence of this photochromism is largely unexplored. Herein we report that the photoswitching kinetics of the chromophore inside Dronpa is actually slowed down by increasing medium viscosity outside Dronpa. This finding is a special example of an FP where the environment can exert a hydrodynamic effect on the internal chromophore. We attribute this effect to protein-flexibility mediated coupling where the chromophore's cis-trans isomerization during photoswitching is accompanied by conformational motion of a part of the protein β-barrel whose dynamics should be hindered by medium friction. Consistent with this mechanism, the photoswitching kinetics of Dronpa-3, a structurally more flexible mutant, is found to exhibit a more pronounced viscosity dependence. Furthermore, we mapped out spatial distributions of microviscosity in live cells experienced by a histone protein using the photoswitching kinetics of Dronpa-3 fusion as a contrast mechanism. This unique reporter should provide protein-specific information about the crowded intracellular environments by offering a genetically encoded microviscosity probe, which did not exist with normal FPs before. PMID:22328153

  20. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  1. Protein flexibility oriented virtual screening strategy for JAK2 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiao; Yuan, Haoliang; Zhang, Yanmin; Xu, Jinxing; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Li, Hongmei; Jiang, Yulei; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-10-01

    JAK2 has been considered as an important target for the development of anti-cancer agents. In this study, considering the flexibility of its binding site, an integrated strategy combining Bayesian categorization modeling and ensemble docking was established. Four representative crystal structures were selected for ensemble docking by the hierarchical clustering of 34 crystal structures according to the volume overlaps of each structure. A retrospective virtual screening was performed to validate this integrated strategy. As the preliminary filtration, the Bayesian model enhanced the ratio of actives by reducing the large amount of decoys. After docking the remaining compounds, the comparison between the ensemble and individual results showed that the enrichment of ensemble docking improved significantly. The results of analysis on conformational changes of two top ranked active inhibitors when docking into different proteins indicated that compounds with flexible conformations well fitted the different binding site shapes were more likely to be potential JAK2 inhibitors. This high efficient strategy will facilitate virtual screening for novel JAK2 inhibitors and could be even applied in drug discovery against other targets.

  2. Evaluation of Chemical Fluorescent Dyes as a Protein Conjugation Partner for Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Stasevich, Timothy J.; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab) fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph) and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac). These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye∶protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green), Cy3 (red), and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red). PMID:25184362

  3. Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) and RFP-based biosensors for neuronal imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Lai, Tiffany; Campbell, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The inherent advantages of red-shifted fluorescent proteins and fluorescent protein-based biosensors for the study of signaling processes in neurons and other tissues have motivated the development of a plethora of new tools. Relative to green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and other blue-shifted alternatives, red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) provide the inherent advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescence, and deeper tissue penetration associated with longer wavelength excitation light. All other factors being the same, the multiple benefits of using RFPs make these tools seemingly ideal candidates for use in neurons and, ultimately, the brain. However, for many applications, the practical utility of RFPs still falls short of the preferred GFPs. We present an overview of RFPs and RFP-based biosensors, with an emphasis on their reported applications in neuroscience. PMID:26158012

  4. Automated protein-DNA interaction screening of Drosophila regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hens, Korneel; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Isakova, Alina; Iagovitina, Antonina; Massouras, Andreas; Bryois, Julien; Callaerts, Patrick; Celniker, Susan E; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has one of the best characterized metazoan genomes in terms of functionally annotated regulatory elements. To explore how these elements contribute to gene regulation, we need convenient tools to identify the proteins that bind to them. Here we describe the development and validation of a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid platform, which enables screening of DNA elements versus an array of full-length, sequence-verified clones containing over 85% of predicted Drosophila transcription factors. Using six well-characterized regulatory elements, we identified 33 transcription factor-DNA interactions of which 27 were previously unidentified. To simultaneously validate these interactions and locate the binding sites of involved transcription factors, we implemented a powerful microfluidics-based approach that enabled us to retrieve DNA-occupancy data for each transcription factor throughout the respective target DNA elements. Finally, we biologically validated several interactions and identified two new regulators of sine oculis gene expression and hence eye development.

  5. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Kim, Rosalind; Jancarik, Jamila

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  6. The role of protein characteristics in the formation and fluorescence of Au nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer; Qin, Ying; Crowley, Dorothy; Bonizzoni, Marco; Bao, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    Protein-encapsulated gold nanoclusters have shown many advantages over other gold nanocluster systems, including green synthesis, biocompatibility, high water solubility, and the ease of further conjugation. In this article, we systematically investigated the effects of the protein size and amino acid content on the formation and fluorescent properties of gold nanoclusters using four model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, trypsin, and pepsin). We discovered that the balance of amine and tyrosine/tryptophan containing residues was critical for the nanocluster formation. Protein templates with low cysteine contents caused blue shifts in the fluorescent emissions and difference in fluorescent lifetimes of the gold nanoclusters. Furthermore, the protein size was found to be a critical factor for the photostability and long-term stability of gold nanoclusters. The size of the protein also affected the Au nanocluster behaviour after immobilization.

  7. Fiber-optic system for monitoring fast photoactivation dynamics of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhiguo; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins is crucial to the realization of photoactivation localization microscopy. In contrast to those fluorescence-based approaches that require complex data processing and calibration procedures, here we report a simple and quantitative alternative, which relies on the measurement of small absorption spectra changes over time with a fiber-optic system. Using Dronpa as a representative highlighter protein, we have investigated the capacity of this system in monitoring the fast photoactivation process.

  8. Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN-binding protein from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Miyazaki F) and its site-directed mutated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chosrowjan, Haik; Taniguchi, Seiji; Mataga, Noboru; Tanaka, Fumio; Todoroki, Daisuke; Kitamura, Masaya

    2008-09-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN in FMN-binding protein (FMN-bp), and its mutated proteins, W32Y and W32A, were investigated by the fluorescence up-conversion method. Fluorescence lifetimes were 167 fs (96%) and 1.5 ps (4%) in wild-type FMN-bp (WT), and 3.4 ps (23%), 18.2 ps (74%), and 96 ps (3%) at 530 nm in W32Y, and 30.1 ps in W32A. The fluorescence lifetime of W32A, in which Trp-32 was absent, was about 140 times longer than that of WT. Tyr-32 in W32Y was not so effective quencher as Trp-32 in WT. This was explained in terms of different ionization potentials of quenchers and average donor-acceptor distances in the protein.

  9. Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interaction with Capillary Electrophoresis Frontal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Mi; Li, Qing; Wang, Renxiao; Kang, Jingwu

    2016-08-16

    A simple and effective method for identifying inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) was developed by using capillary electrophoresis frontal analysis (CE-FA). Antiapoptotic B-cell-2 (Bcl-2) family member Bcl-XL protein, a 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled peptide truncated from the BH3 domain of Bid (F-Bid) as the ligand, and a known Bcl-XL-Bid interaction inhibitor ABT-263 were employed as an experimental model for the proof of concept. In CE-FA, the free ligand is separated from the protein and protein-ligand complex to permit the measurement of the equilibrium concentration of the ligand, hence the dissociation constant of the protein-ligand complex. In the presence of inhibitors, formation of the protein-ligand complex is hindered, thereby the inhibition can be easily identified by the raised plateau height of the ligand and the decayed plateau of the complex. Further, we proposed an equation used to convert the IC50 value into the inhibition constant Ki value, which is more useful than the former for comparison. In addition, the sample pooling strategy was employed to improve the screening throughput more than 10 times. A small chemical library composed of synthetic compounds and natural extracts were screened with the method, two natural products, namely, demethylzeylasteral and celastrol, were identified as new inhibitors to block the Bcl-XL-Bid interaction. Cell-based assay was performed to validate the activity of the identified compounds. The result demonstrated that CE-FA represents a straightforward and robust technique for screening of PPI inhibitors. PMID:27425825

  10. Design of a sensitive fluorescent polarization immunoassay for rapid screening of milk for cephalexin.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, Natalia V; Eremin, Sergei A

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a sensitive, fast, and easily performed fluorescence polarization immunoassay for determination of cephalexin in milk. The experimental work was performed to increase sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, the structures of the tracers were varied by synthesis of both cephalexin (CEX) and cephalotin (CET) conjugates with a variety of fluorescent labels. Two rabbit antisera containing antibodies against cephalexin and cephalotin were tested in homologous and heterologous combinations with the tracers. For every working antibody-tracer combination, the analytical conditions and cross-reactivity for structural analogues-cephalosporins and other antibiotics that could also be present in milk-were determined. It was found that the highest sensitivity was achieved by use of the homologous pair CET-EDF-anti-CET antibody (limit of detection (LOD) 0.4 μg kg(-1) for standard solutions prepared in buffer), but this combination was not appropriate because of high cross-reactivity with CET. For subsequent experiments, therefore, CEX- EDF-anti-CEX antibody were chosen (LOD 0.8 μg kg(-1) for standard solutions prepared in buffer). Part of this manuscript is devoted to the variation of precipitation agents for pretreatment of milk before analysis; milk is an extremely complicated matrix. The optimum protein precipitation agent was methanol. This technique for cephalexin determination was characterized by a limit of detection of 1 μg kg(-1). The method was validated by using naturally contaminated and spiked milk samples. The results obtained corresponded very well with those obtained by HPLC, which was used as confirmation method. PMID:26416019

  11. The role of protein characteristics in the formation and fluorescence of Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer; Qin, Ying; Crowley, Dorothy; Bonizzoni, Marco; Bao, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    Protein-encapsulated gold nanoclusters have shown many advantages over other gold nanocluster systems, including green synthesis, biocompatibility, high water solubility, and the ease of further conjugation. In this article, we systematically investigated the effects of the protein size and amino acid content on the formation and fluorescent properties of gold nanoclusters using four model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, trypsin, and pepsin). We discovered that the balance of amine and tyrosine/tryptophan containing residues was critical for the nanocluster formation. Protein templates with low cysteine contents caused blue shifts in the fluorescent emissions and difference in fluorescent lifetimes of the gold nanoclusters. Furthermore, the protein size was found to be a critical factor for the photostability and long-term stability of gold nanoclusters. The size of the protein also affected the Au nanocluster behaviour after immobilization.Protein-encapsulated gold nanoclusters have shown many advantages over other gold nanocluster systems, including green synthesis, biocompatibility, high water solubility, and the ease of further conjugation. In this article, we systematically investigated the effects of the protein size and amino acid content on the formation and fluorescent properties of gold nanoclusters using four model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, trypsin, and pepsin). We discovered that the balance of amine and tyrosine/tryptophan containing residues was critical for the nanocluster formation. Protein templates with low cysteine contents caused blue shifts in the fluorescent emissions and difference in fluorescent lifetimes of the gold nanoclusters. Furthermore, the protein size was found to be a critical factor for the photostability and long-term stability of gold nanoclusters. The size of the protein also affected the Au nanocluster behaviour after immobilization. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available See DOI: 10

  12. Cytotoxicity screening of surfactant-based shampoos using a multiwell fluorescence scanner: Correlation with Draize eye scores.

    PubMed

    Merrick, P; Nieminen, A L; Harper, R A; Herman, B; Lemasters, J J

    1992-11-01

    The irritancy potential of seven shampoos was evaluated by a rapid cytotoxicity assay in cultured human keratinocytes and rat hepatocytes. Loss of cell viability was estimated from increases in propidium iodide fluorescence measured using a multiwell fluorescence scanner. The concentration of shampoo causing a 50% loss of cell viability after 15 min of incubation (V(50)) was determined by probit analysis. Log V(50) measured in human keratinocytes showed a strong negative correlation (r = -0.95; P <0.001) with Draize eye scores in rabbits. Log V(50) measured in rat hepatocytes did not show a statistically significant correlation with Draize eye scores. The results indicate that cytotoxicity screening of human keratinocytes using propidium iodide and a multiwell fluorescence scanner is highly predictive of Draize eye scores for surfactant-containing shampoos.

  13. Immediate screening of lead exposure in the workplace using portable X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Gorce, Jean-Philippe; Roff, Martin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (PXRF) equipped with a miniaturised X-ray tube producing a small 8 mm diameter X-ray beam required the validation of two new sampling protocols for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. First, lead in dust and fumes, collected by Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable samplers on 25 mm diameter membrane filters, is quantified using PXRF. To account for irregular dust deposition, the filters are rotated manually by quarter turns. Multiple PXRF readings are collected from the central region and from two locations in the outer region. The inner region is distinguishable from the outer region, but the two outer region locations are indistinguishable. High correlations (R2 > 0.99) are found between the PXRF results and historical results obtained using a reference method based on a laboratory wavelength-dispersive sequential XRF instrument (WDXRF) for lead loadings between 1–161 μg. The PXRF results from the outer regions of the filters show a bias of −13% with respect to the WDXRF. Once this bias is allowed for, 95% of all PXRF results lie within −28% and +38% of the WDXRF results. Neither instrument accounts for potential dust accumulation on the walls of the IOM sampler. Therefore, methods based on their use can only be considered semi-quantitative. Second, a protocol combining direct PXRF measurements on workplace surfaces with surface wipes is designed for immediate on-site quantification of removable surface lead residues. The quantification of such residues by this method is compared with subsequent off-site wet chemistry analysis of the surface wipes. The two methods show a good correlation (R2 ∼ 0.88). The ratio of the amount of removable residues determined by PXRF and wipe sampling is close to one with range 0.26–3.94. It is demonstrated that PXRF can be used as an effective tool for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. Although this

  14. Immediate screening of lead exposure in the workplace using portable X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Gorce, Jean-Philippe; Roff, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The use of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (PXRF) equipped with a miniaturised X-ray tube producing a small 8 mm diameter X-ray beam required the validation of two new sampling protocols for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. First, lead in dust and fumes, collected by Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable samplers on 25 mm diameter membrane filters, is quantified using PXRF. To account for irregular dust deposition, the filters are rotated manually by quarter turns. Multiple PXRF readings are collected from the central region and from two locations in the outer region. The inner region is distinguishable from the outer region, but the two outer region locations are indistinguishable. High correlations (R(2) > 0.99) are found between the PXRF results and historical results obtained using a reference method based on a laboratory wavelength-dispersive sequential XRF instrument (WDXRF) for lead loadings between 1-161 μg. The PXRF results from the outer regions of the filters show a bias of -13% with respect to the WDXRF. Once this bias is allowed for, 95% of all PXRF results lie within -28% and +38% of the WDXRF results. Neither instrument accounts for potential dust accumulation on the walls of the IOM sampler. Therefore, methods based on their use can only be considered semi-quantitative. Second, a protocol combining direct PXRF measurements on workplace surfaces with surface wipes is designed for immediate on-site quantification of removable surface lead residues. The quantification of such residues by this method is compared with subsequent off-site wet chemistry analysis of the surface wipes. The two methods show a good correlation (R(2) ∼ 0.88). The ratio of the amount of removable residues determined by PXRF and wipe sampling is close to one with range 0.26-3.94. It is demonstrated that PXRF can be used as an effective tool for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. Although this article focused on

  15. Immediate screening of lead exposure in the workplace using portable X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Gorce, Jean-Philippe; Roff, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The use of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (PXRF) equipped with a miniaturised X-ray tube producing a small 8 mm diameter X-ray beam required the validation of two new sampling protocols for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. First, lead in dust and fumes, collected by Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable samplers on 25 mm diameter membrane filters, is quantified using PXRF. To account for irregular dust deposition, the filters are rotated manually by quarter turns. Multiple PXRF readings are collected from the central region and from two locations in the outer region. The inner region is distinguishable from the outer region, but the two outer region locations are indistinguishable. High correlations (R(2) > 0.99) are found between the PXRF results and historical results obtained using a reference method based on a laboratory wavelength-dispersive sequential XRF instrument (WDXRF) for lead loadings between 1-161 μg. The PXRF results from the outer regions of the filters show a bias of -13% with respect to the WDXRF. Once this bias is allowed for, 95% of all PXRF results lie within -28% and +38% of the WDXRF results. Neither instrument accounts for potential dust accumulation on the walls of the IOM sampler. Therefore, methods based on their use can only be considered semi-quantitative. Second, a protocol combining direct PXRF measurements on workplace surfaces with surface wipes is designed for immediate on-site quantification of removable surface lead residues. The quantification of such residues by this method is compared with subsequent off-site wet chemistry analysis of the surface wipes. The two methods show a good correlation (R(2) ∼ 0.88). The ratio of the amount of removable residues determined by PXRF and wipe sampling is close to one with range 0.26-3.94. It is demonstrated that PXRF can be used as an effective tool for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. Although this article focused on

  16. Aptamer-based fluorescent screening assay for acetamiprid via inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiajia; Li, Ying; Wang, Luokai; Xu, Jingyue; Huang, Yanjun; Luo, Yeli; Shen, Fei; Sun, Chunyan; Meng, Rizeng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a novel aptamer-based fluorescent detection method for small molecules represented by acetamiprid based on the specific binding of aptamers with acetamiprid, and the inner filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs). When CdTe QDs were mixed with AuNPs, the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was significantly quenched via IFE. The IFE efficiency could be readily modulated by the absorption and the aggregation state of AuNPs. The presence of salt could easily induce the aggregation of AuNPs, resulting in the fluorescence recovery of the quenched QDs. Acetamiprid-binding aptamer (ABA) could adsorb on the negatively charged AuNPs through the coordination interaction to protect AuNPs from salt-induced aggregation, so the fluorescence of CdTe QDs would be quenched by the IFE of AuNPs. However, the specific binding of ABA with acetamiprid could release the ABA from the surfaces of AuNPs and decrease the salt tolerance of AuNPs, so the IFE-decreased fluorescence of CdTe QDs was regained with the presence of acetamiprid, and the fluorescence enhancement efficiency was driven by the concentration of acetamiprid. Based on this principle, the aptamer-based fluorescent method for acetamiprid has been established and optimized. The assay exhibited excellent selectivity towards acetamiprid over its analogues and other pesticides which may coexist with acetamiprid. Under the optimum experiment conditions, the established method could be applied for the determination of acetamiprid with a wide linear range from 0.05 to 1.0 μM, and a low detection limit of 7.29 nM (3σ). Furthermore, this IFE-based method has been successfully utilized to detect acetamiprid in six types of vegetables, and the results were in full agreement with those from HPLC and LC-MS. The proposed method displays remarkable advantages of high sensitivity, rapid analysis, excellent selectivity, and would be suitable for the practical application

  17. Screening for protein-DNA interactions by automatable DNA-protein interaction ELISA.

    PubMed

    Brand, Luise H; Henneges, Carsten; Schüssler, Axel; Kolukisaoglu, H Üner; Koch, Grit; Wallmeroth, Niklas; Hecker, Andreas; Thurow, Kerstin; Zell, Andreas; Harter, Klaus; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DBPs), such as transcription factors, constitute about 10% of the protein-coding genes in eukaryotic genomes and play pivotal roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by binding to short stretches of DNA. Despite their number and importance, only for a minor portion of DBPs the binding sequence had been disclosed. Methods that allow the de novo identification of DNA-binding motifs of known DBPs, such as protein binding microarray technology or SELEX, are not yet suited for high-throughput and automation. To close this gap, we report an automatable DNA-protein-interaction (DPI)-ELISA screen of an optimized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe library that allows the high-throughput identification of hexanucleotide DNA-binding motifs. In contrast to other methods, this DPI-ELISA screen can be performed manually or with standard laboratory automation. Furthermore, output evaluation does not require extensive computational analysis to derive a binding consensus. We could show that the DPI-ELISA screen disclosed the full spectrum of binding preferences for a given DBP. As an example, AtWRKY11 was used to demonstrate that the automated DPI-ELISA screen revealed the entire range of in vitro binding preferences. In addition, protein extracts of AtbZIP63 and the DNA-binding domain of AtWRKY33 were analyzed, which led to a refinement of their known DNA-binding consensi. Finally, we performed a DPI-ELISA screen to disclose the DNA-binding consensus of a yet uncharacterized putative DBP, AtTIFY1. A palindromic TGATCA-consensus was uncovered and we could show that the GATC-core is compulsory for AtTIFY1 binding. This specific interaction between AtTIFY1 and its DNA-binding motif was confirmed by in vivo plant one-hybrid assays in protoplasts. Thus, the value and applicability of the DPI-ELISA screen for de novo binding site identification of DBPs, also under automatized conditions, is a promising approach for a deeper understanding

  18. Screening for Protein-DNA Interactions by Automatable DNA-Protein Interaction ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Schüssler, Axel; Kolukisaoglu, H. Üner; Koch, Grit; Wallmeroth, Niklas; Hecker, Andreas; Thurow, Kerstin; Zell, Andreas; Harter, Klaus; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DBPs), such as transcription factors, constitute about 10% of the protein-coding genes in eukaryotic genomes and play pivotal roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by binding to short stretches of DNA. Despite their number and importance, only for a minor portion of DBPs the binding sequence had been disclosed. Methods that allow the de novo identification of DNA-binding motifs of known DBPs, such as protein binding microarray technology or SELEX, are not yet suited for high-throughput and automation. To close this gap, we report an automatable DNA-protein-interaction (DPI)-ELISA screen of an optimized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe library that allows the high-throughput identification of hexanucleotide DNA-binding motifs. In contrast to other methods, this DPI-ELISA screen can be performed manually or with standard laboratory automation. Furthermore, output evaluation does not require extensive computational analysis to derive a binding consensus. We could show that the DPI-ELISA screen disclosed the full spectrum of binding preferences for a given DBP. As an example, AtWRKY11 was used to demonstrate that the automated DPI-ELISA screen revealed the entire range of in vitro binding preferences. In addition, protein extracts of AtbZIP63 and the DNA-binding domain of AtWRKY33 were analyzed, which led to a refinement of their known DNA-binding consensi. Finally, we performed a DPI-ELISA screen to disclose the DNA-binding consensus of a yet uncharacterized putative DBP, AtTIFY1. A palindromic TGATCA-consensus was uncovered and we could show that the GATC-core is compulsory for AtTIFY1 binding. This specific interaction between AtTIFY1 and its DNA-binding motif was confirmed by in vivo plant one-hybrid assays in protoplasts. Thus, the value and applicability of the DPI-ELISA screen for de novo binding site identification of DBPs, also under automatized conditions, is a promising approach for a deeper understanding

  19. G protein-coupled receptor internalization assays in the high-content screening format.

    PubMed

    Haasen, Dorothea; Schnapp, Andreas; Valler, Martin J; Heilker, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    High-content screening (HCS), a combination of fluorescence microscopic imaging and automated image analysis, has become a frequently applied tool to study test compound effects in cellular disease-modeling systems. This chapter describes the measurement of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization in the HCS format using a high-throughput, confocal cellular imaging device. GPCRs are the most successful group of therapeutic targets on the pharmaceutical market. Accordingly, the search for compounds that interfere with GPCR function in a specific and selective way is a major focus of the pharmaceutical industry today. This chapter describes methods for the ligand-induced internalization of GPCRs labeled previously with either a fluorophore-conjugated ligand or an antibody directed against an N-terminal tag of the GPCR. Both labeling techniques produce robust assay formats. Complementary to other functional GPCR drug discovery assays, internalization assays enable a pharmacological analysis of test compounds. We conclude that GPCR internalization assays represent a valuable medium/high-throughput screening format to determine the cellular activity of GPCR ligands.

  20. Time and frequency-domain measurement of ground-state recovery times in red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Manna, Premashis; Jimenez, Ralph

    2015-04-16

    The field of bioimaging and biosensors has been revolutionized by the discovery of fluorescent proteins (FPs) and their use in live cells. FPs are characterized with rich photodynamics due to the presence of nonfluorescent or dark states which are responsible for fluorescence intermittency or "blinking", which has been exploited in several localization-based super-resolution techniques that surpass the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional microscopy. Molecules that convert to these dark states recover to the ground states either spontaneously or upon absorption of another photon, depending on the particular FP and the structural transition that is involved. In this work, we demonstrate time- and frequency-domain methods for the measurement of the ground-state recovery (GSR) times of FPs both in live cells and in solutions. In the time-domain method, we excited the sample with millisecond pulses at varying dark times to obtain percent-recovery. In the frequency-domain method, dark-state hysteresis was employed to obtain the positive phase shift or "phase advance". We extracted the GSR time constants from our measurements using calculations and simulations based on a three-state model system. The GSR time constants of the red FPs studied in these experiments fall in the range from μs to msec time-scales. We find that the time- and frequency-domain techniques are complementary to each other. While accurate GSR times can be extracted from the time-domain technique, frequency-domain measurements are primarily sensitive to the rates of dark-state conversion (DSC) processes. A correlation between GSR times, DSC, and photobleaching rates for the red FPs mCherry, TagRFP-T, and Kriek were observed. These time- and frequency-domain methods can be used in high-throughput screening and sorting of FPs clones based on GSR time constant and photostability and will therefore be valuable for the development of new photoswitchable or photoactivatable FPs.

  1. Anticytolytic screen identifies inhibitors of mycobacterial virulence protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Rybniker, Jan; Chen, Jeffrey M; Sala, Claudia; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Vocat, Anthony; Benjak, Andrej; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Zhang, Ming; Székely, Rita; Greff, Zoltán; Orfi, László; Szabadkai, István; Pató, János; Kéri, György; Cole, Stewart T

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires protein secretion systems like ESX-1 for intracellular survival and virulence. The major virulence determinant and ESX-1 substrate, EsxA, arrests phagosome maturation and lyses cell membranes, resulting in tissue damage and necrosis that promotes pathogen spread. To identify inhibitors of Mtb protein secretion, we developed a fibroblast survival assay exploiting this phenotype and selected molecules that protect host cells from Mtb-induced lysis without being bactericidal in vitro. Hit compounds blocked EsxA secretion and promoted phagosome maturation in macrophages, thus reducing bacterial loads. Target identification studies led to the discovery of BTP15, a benzothiophene inhibitor of the histidine kinase MprB that indirectly regulates ESX-1, and BBH7, a benzyloxybenzylidene-hydrazine compound. BBH7 affects Mtb metal-ion homeostasis and revealed zinc stress as an activating signal for EsxA secretion. This screening approach extends the target spectrum of small molecule libraries and will help tackle the mounting problem of antibiotic-resistant mycobacteria.

  2. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating. PMID:27225857

  3. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  4. Vectors for multi-color bimolecular fluorescence complementation to investigate protein-protein interactions in living plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Fang, Mei-Jane; Kuang, Lin-Yun; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2008-01-01

    Background The investigation of protein-protein interactions is important for characterizing protein function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) has recently gained interest as a relatively easy and inexpensive method to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells. BiFC uses "split YFP" tags on proteins to detect interactions: If the tagged proteins interact, they may bring the two split fluorophore components together such that they can fold and reconstitute fluorescence. The sites of interaction can be monitored using epifluorescence or confocal microscopy. However, "conventional" BiFC can investigate interactions only between two proteins at a time. There are instances when one may wish to offer a particular "bait" protein to several "prey" proteins simultaneously. Preferential interaction of the bait protein with one of the prey proteins, or different sites of interaction between the bait protein and multiple prey proteins, may thus be observed. Results We have constructed a series of gene expression vectors, based upon the pSAT series of vectors, to facilitate the practice of multi-color BiFC. The bait protein is tagged with the C-terminal portion of CFP (cCFP), and prey proteins are tagged with the N-terminal portions of either Venus (nVenus) or Cerulean (nCerulean). Interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nVenus-tagged proteins generates yellow fluorescence, whereas interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nCerulean-tagged proteins generates blue fluorescence. Additional expression of mCherry indicates transfected cells and sub-cellular structures. Using this system, we have determined in both tobacco BY-2 protoplasts and in onion epidermal cells that Agrobacterium VirE2 protein interacts with the Arabidopsis nuclear transport adapter protein importin α-1 in the cytoplasm, whereas interaction of VirE2 with a different importin α isoform, importin α-4, occurs predominantly in the nucleus. Conclusion Multi-color BiFC is a useful

  5. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein interacts with green fluorescent protein-tagged microtubule end-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Katrin; Sambade, Adrian; Boutant, Emmanuel; Didier, Pascal; Mély, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2008-06-01

    The targeting of the movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus to plasmodesmata involves the actin/endoplasmic reticulum network and does not require an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Nevertheless, the ability of MP to facilitate the cell-to-cell spread of infection is tightly correlated with interactions of the protein with microtubules, indicating that the microtubule system is involved in the transport of viral RNA. While the MP acts like a microtubule-associated protein able to stabilize microtubules during late infection stages, the protein was also shown to cause the inactivation of the centrosome upon expression in mammalian cells, thus suggesting that MP may interact with factors involved in microtubule attachment, nucleation, or polymerization. To further investigate the interactions of MP with the microtubule system in planta, we expressed the MP in the presence of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused microtubule end-binding protein 1a (EB1a) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtEB1a:GFP). The two proteins colocalize and interact in vivo as well as in vitro and exhibit mutual functional interference. These findings suggest that MP interacts with EB1 and that this interaction may play a role in the associations of MP with the microtubule system during infection.

  6. Effect of pH on the Heat-Induced Denaturation and Renaturation of Green Fluorescent Protein: A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Rosa V.; Sola, Hilda M.; Torres, Juan C.; Torres, Rafael E.; Guzman, Ernick E.

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence spectroscopy experiment is described where students integrated biochemistry and instrumental analysis, while characterizing the green fluorescent protein excitation and emission spectra in terms of its phenolic and phenolate chromophores. Students studied the combined effect of pH and temperature on the protein's fluorescence,…

  7. Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes for sensitive fluorescent assignment of protein inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Klingstedt, Therése; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nogalska, Anna; Prokop, Stefan; Häggqvist, Bo; Danielsson, Olof; Engel, W King; Askanas, Valerie; Heppner, Frank L; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2013-03-18

    Small hydrophobic ligands identifying intracellular protein deposits are of great interest, as protein inclusion bodies are the pathological hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Here we report that fluorescent amyloid ligands, termed luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), rapidly and with high sensitivity detect protein inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle tissue from patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). LCOs having a conjugated backbone of at least five thiophene units emitted strong fluorescence upon binding, and showed co-localization with proteins reported to accumulate in s-IBM protein inclusion bodies. Compared with conventional amyloid ligands, LCOs identified a larger fraction of immunopositive inclusion bodies. When the conjugated thiophene backbone was extended with terminal carboxyl groups, the LCO revealed striking spectral differences between distinct protein inclusion bodies. We conclude that 1) LCOs are sensitive, rapid and powerful tools for identifying protein inclusion bodies and 2) LCOs identify a wider range of protein inclusion bodies than conventional amyloid ligands.

  8. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify inhibitors of Cbl(TKB)-protein tyrosine kinase interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Eric A; Charvet, Casey D; Lokesh, G L; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2011-04-15

    The casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) proteins play an important role in regulating signal transduction pathways by functioning as E3 ubiquitin ligases. The Cbl proteins contain a conserved tyrosine kinase binding (TKB) domain that binds more than a dozen proteins, including protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The cell surface expression levels of the PTKs are regulated by Cbl-mediated ubiquitination, internalization, and degradation. Dysfunction in this signaling cascade has resulted in prolonged activation of the PTKs and, therefore, has been implicated in inflammatory diseases and various cancers. Due to this negative regulatory function, Cbl has been largely ignored as a therapeutic target. However, recent studies, such as the identification of (i) gain of function c-Cbl mutations in subsets of myeloid cancer and (ii) c-Cbl as a prostate basal cell marker that correlates with poor clinical outcome, suggest otherwise. Here we report the development of a competitive high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay in a 384-well format to identify inhibitors of Cbl(TKB). The high-throughput screen readiness of the assay was demonstrated by screening the Prestwick Chemical Library. PMID:21129358

  9. Fluorescent Ensemble Based on Bispyrene Fluorophore and Surfactant Assemblies: Sensing and Discriminating Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junmei; Ding, Liping; Bo, Yu; Fang, Yu

    2015-10-14

    A particular bispyrene fluorophore (1) with two pyrene moieties covalently linked via a hydrophilic spacer was synthesized. Fluorescence measurements reveal that the fluorescence emission of 1 could be well modulated by a cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Protein sensing studies illustrate that the selected ensemble based on 1/DTAB assemblies exhibits ratiometric responses to nonmetalloproteins and turn-off responses to metalloproteins, which can be used to differentiate the two types of proteins. Moreover, negatively charged nonmetalloproteins can be discriminated from the positively charged ones according to the difference in ratiometric responses. Fluorescence sensing studies with control bispyrenes indicate that the polarity of the spacer connecting two pyrene moieties plays an important role in locating bispyrene fluorophore in DTAB assemblies, which further influences its sensing behaviors to noncovalent interacting proteins. This study sheds light on the influence of the probe structure on the sensing performance of a fluorescent ensemble based on probe and surfactant assemblies.

  10. Polarization-dependent fluorescence of proteins bound to nanopore-confined lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.-Q.; Marek, A.; Smirnov, Alex I.; Grebel, H.

    2008-09-01

    Lipid bilayers are essential structural component of biological membranes of all the living species: from viruses and bacteria to plants and humans. Biophysical and biochemical properties of such membranes are important for understanding physical mechanisms responsible for drug targeting. Binding events between proteins and the membrane may be ascertained by introducing fluorescence markers (chromophores) to the proteins. Here we describe a novel biosensing platform designed to enhance signals of these fluorescence markers. Nanoporous aluminum oxide membranes with and without gold (Au) surface coating have been employed for optical detection of bound conjugated streptavidin to biotinylated lipid bilayers-a model system that mimics protein docking to the membrane surface. Unexpectedly, it was found that fluorescence signals from such structures vary when pumped with E-polarized and H-polarized incident optical beams. The origin of the observed polarization-dependent effects and the implications for enhanced fluorescence detection in a biochip format are being discussed.

  11. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging.

    PubMed

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-12-09

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M(-1)cm(-1), mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths.

  12. Control of the blue fluorescent protein with advanced evolutionary pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, Eric R. Mauring, Koit; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Krasnenko, Veera; Ye, Jing Yong; Baker, James R.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2008-11-28

    We demonstrate optical coherent control of the two-photon fluorescence of the blue fluorescent protein (BFP), which is of interest in investigations of protein-protein interactions. In addition to biological relevance, BFP represents an interesting target for coherent control from a chemical perspective due to its many components of highly nonexponential fluorescence decay and low quantum yield resulting from excited state isomerization. Using a genetic algorithm with a multiplicative (rather than ratiometric) fitness parameter, we are able to control the ratio of BFP fluorescence to second-harmonic generation without a considerable drop in the maximized signal. The importance of linear chirp and power-scaling on the discrimination process is investigated in detail.

  13. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice.

  14. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice. PMID:26549191

  15. Unraveling transcription factor interactions with heterochromatin protein 1 using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Hays, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The epigenetic control of heterochromatin deposition is achieved through a network of protein interactions mediated by the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). In earlier studies, we showed that the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, localizes to heterochromatin, and interacts with HP1α. Here, deletion and mutagenesis are combined with live-cell imaging approaches to characterize these protein interactions. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and cross-correlation (FCS and FCCS) revealed very different diffusion profiles for HP1α and the BZip protein, and co-expression studies indicated that the mobile fractions of these nuclear proteins diffuse independently of one another. The steady-state interactions of these proteins in regions of heterochromatin were monitored using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). A point mutation in HP1α, W174A, which disrupts the interactions with proteins containing the common PxVxL motif did not affect the interaction with the BZip protein. In contrast, the HP1α W41A mutation, which prevents binding to methylated histones, exhibited greatly reduced FRET efficiency when compared to the wild type HP1α or HP1αW174A. The functional significance of these interactions is discussed. PMID:23392382

  16. A Fluorescence-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Growth Inhibitors of the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas M; Richie, Daryl L; Tao, Jianshi

    2016-01-01

    Due to the advancements in modern medicine that have resulted in an increased number of immunocompromised individuals, the incidences and the associated mortality of invasive aspergillosis have continued to rise over the past three decades despite appropriate treatment. As a result, invasive aspergillosis has emerged as a leading cause of infection-related mortality in immunocompromised individuals. Utilizing the resazurin to resorufin conversion fluorescence readout to monitor cell viability, herein, we outline a high-throughput screening method amenable to profiling a large pharmaceutical library against the clinically relevant but less frequently screened fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. This enables the user to conduct high-throughput screening using a disease-relevant fungal growth assay and identify novel antifungal chemotypes as drug leads. PMID:27316995

  17. Fluorescence energy transfer monitoring of protein-protein interaction in human cells: the Cyclin T1-HIV1 Tat case.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Aldo; Cinelli, Riccardo A. G.; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Beltram, Fabio; Marcello, Alessandro; Tyagi, Mudit; Giacca, Mauro

    2001-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein promotes transcriptional elongation of viral RNAs. Here we show that human Cyclin T1 directly binds Tat in cultured cells. By mapping fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in different cellular compartments we shall present a quantitative analysis of this interaction. The matched tagging pair consists of two optically matched variants of the green fluorescent protein: the enhanced GFP and the blue fluorescent protein. Strong energy transfer was observed between Cyclin T1 and Tat both in the cytoplasm and in specific subnuclear regions. We shall argue that such high-resolution optical studies can provide significant new insight in molecular processes and demonstrate that, for the specific case-study presented, they lead to a model by which Tat recruits Cyclin T1 out of the nuclear compartments where the protein resides to promote transcriptional activation.

  18. High-Throughput Screening in Protein Engineering: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Magdalena; Telzerow, Aline; Quax, Wim J.; Boersma, Ykelien L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, protein engineering has established itself as an important tool for the development of enzymes and (therapeutic) proteins with improved characteristics. New mutagenesis techniques and computational design tools have greatly aided in the advancement of protein engineering. Yet, one of the pivotal components to further advance protein engineering strategies is the high-throughput screening of variants. Compartmentalization is one of the key features allowing miniaturization and acceleration of screening. This review focuses on novel screening technologies applied in protein engineering, highlighting flow cytometry- and microfluidics-based platforms. PMID:26492240

  19. Dual Screening of BPTF and Brd4 Using Protein-Observed Fluorine NMR Uncovers New Bromodomain Probe Molecules.

    PubMed

    Urick, Andrew K; Hawk, Laura M L; Cassel, Melissa K; Mishra, Neeraj K; Liu, Shuai; Adhikari, Neeta; Zhang, Wei; dos Santos, Camila O; Hall, Jennifer L; Pomerantz, William C K

    2015-10-16

    Bromodomain-containing protein dysregulation is linked to cancer, diabetes, and inflammation. Selective inhibition of bromodomain function is a newly proposed therapeutic strategy. We describe a (19)F NMR dual screening method for small molecule discovery using fluorinated tryptophan resonances on two bromodomain-containing proteins. The chemical shift dispersion of (19)F resonances within fluorine-labeled proteins enables the simultaneous analysis of two fluorinated bromodomains by NMR. A library of 229 small molecules was screened against the first bromodomain of Brd4 and the BPTF bromodomain. We report the first small molecule selective for BPTF over Brd4, termed AU1. The Kd = 2.8 μM for AU1, which is active in a cell-based reporter assay. No binding is detected with Brd4. Three new Brd4 inhibitors with submicromolar affinity were also discovered. Brd4 hits were validated in a thermal stability assay and potency determined via fluorescence anisotropy. The speed, ease of interpretation, and low protein concentration needed for protein-observed (19)F NMR experiments in a multiprotein format offers a new method to discover and characterize selective ligands for bromodomain-containing proteins.

  20. Fluorescent protein-scorpion toxin chimera is a convenient molecular tool for studies of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I.; Nekrasova, Oksana V.; Kudryashova, Kseniya S.; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Stepanov, Alexey V.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Grishin, Eugene V.; Feofanov, Alexey V.; Vassilevski, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels play a central role in a host of physiological and pathological processes and are the second largest target for existing drugs. There is an increasing need for reliable tools to detect and visualize particular ion channels, but existing solutions suffer from a number of limitations such as high price, poor specificity, and complicated protocols. As an alternative, we produced recombinant chimeric constructs (FP-Tx) consisting of fluorescent proteins (FP) fused with potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom (Tx). In particular, we used two FP, eGFP and TagRFP, and two Tx, OSK1 and AgTx2, to create eGFP-OSK1 and RFP-AgTx2. We show that these chimeras largely retain the high affinity of natural toxins and display selectivity to particular ion channel subtypes. FP-Tx are displaced by other potassium channel blockers and can be used as an imaging tool in ion channel ligand screening setups. We believe FP-Tx chimeras represent a new efficient molecular tool for neurobiology. PMID:27650866

  1. Fluorescent protein-scorpion toxin chimera is a convenient molecular tool for studies of potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kudryashova, Kseniya S; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Stepanov, Alexey V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Grishin, Eugene V; Feofanov, Alexey V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels play a central role in a host of physiological and pathological processes and are the second largest target for existing drugs. There is an increasing need for reliable tools to detect and visualize particular ion channels, but existing solutions suffer from a number of limitations such as high price, poor specificity, and complicated protocols. As an alternative, we produced recombinant chimeric constructs (FP-Tx) consisting of fluorescent proteins (FP) fused with potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom (Tx). In particular, we used two FP, eGFP and TagRFP, and two Tx, OSK1 and AgTx2, to create eGFP-OSK1 and RFP-AgTx2. We show that these chimeras largely retain the high affinity of natural toxins and display selectivity to particular ion channel subtypes. FP-Tx are displaced by other potassium channel blockers and can be used as an imaging tool in ion channel ligand screening setups. We believe FP-Tx chimeras represent a new efficient molecular tool for neurobiology. PMID:27650866

  2. Suramin inhibits helicase activity of NS3 protein of dengue virus in a fluorescence-based high throughput assay format.

    PubMed

    Basavannacharya, Chandrakala; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2014-10-24

    Dengue fever is a major health concern worldwide. The virus encoded non-structural protein 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein endowed with protease, helicase, nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) and RNA 5' triphosphatase (RTPase) activities. Helicase activity of NS3 catalyzes the unwinding of double stranded polynucleotides by utilizing the energy released from ATP hydrolysis. As this activity is essential for replication, NS3 helicase represents an attractive drug target for developing a dengue antiviral drug. Here, we report fluorescence based molecular beacon helicase assay using a duplex RNA substrate that contains a fluorophore on the 5' end and a quencher on the 3' end of one of the strands. The assay was optimized with respect to several parameters and adapted to 384-well high-throughput screening format, with an avera