Science.gov

Sample records for fluorescent protein yfp

  1. Anomalous Negative Fluorescence Anisotropy in Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP 10C): Quantitative Analysis of FRET in YFP Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinghua; Basran, Jaswir; Seward, Harriet E.; Childs, William; Bagshaw, Clive R.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2008-01-01

    YFP is widely used as a genetically-encoded fluorescent marker in biology. In the course of a comprehensive study of this protein, we observed an unusual, negative fluorescence anisotropy at pH 6.0 (McAnaney, T. B., Zeng, W., Doe, C. F. E., Bhanji, N., Wakelin, S., Pearson, D. S., Abbyad, P., Shi, X. H., Boxer, S. G., and Bagshaw, C. R. (2005), Biochemistry 44, 5510–5524). Here we report that the fluorescence anisotropy of YFP 10C depends on protein concentration in the low micromolar range that was not expected. We propose that the negative anisotropy is a result of unidirectional Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in a dimer of YFP, with the donor chromophore in the neutral form and the acceptor chromophore in the anionic form. This unusual mechanism is supported by studies of a monomeric YFP (A206K YFP) and transient-absorption spectroscopy of YFP 10C. A detailed analysis of the chromophore transition dipole moment direction is presented. The anisotropy and rate constant of this energy transfer are consistent with values produced by an analysis of the dimer structure observed in crystals. PMID:18027983

  2. Super-Resolution Imaging Conditions for enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) Demonstrated on DNA Origami Nanorulers.

    PubMed

    Jusuk, Ija; Vietz, Carolin; Raab, Mario; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Photostability is one of the crucial properties of a fluorophore which strongly influences the quality of single molecule-based super-resolution imaging. Enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) is one of the most widely used versions of fluorescent proteins in modern cell biology exhibiting fast intrinsic blinking and reversible photoactivation by UV light. Here, we developed an assay for studying photostabilization of single eYFP molecules with respect to fast blinking and demonstrated a 6-fold enhanced photostability of single eYFP molecules with a beneficial influence on the blinking kinetics under oxygen removal and addition of aliphatic thiols (dSTORM-buffer). Conjugation to single stranded DNA and immobilization via DNA hybridization on a DNA origami 12 helix bundle in aqueous solution allowed photophyiscal studies of eYFP at the single-molecule level and at close to physiological conditions. The benefit of improved photophysical properties for localization-based super-resolution microscopy is demonstrated and quantitatively characterized by imaging 12 helix bundle DNA origami nanorulers with binding sites at designed distances of 160 and 100 nm and by imaging microtubules in fixed mammalian Vero cells. PMID:26373229

  3. Super-Resolution Imaging Conditions for enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) Demonstrated on DNA Origami Nanorulers.

    PubMed

    Jusuk, Ija; Vietz, Carolin; Raab, Mario; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-09-16

    Photostability is one of the crucial properties of a fluorophore which strongly influences the quality of single molecule-based super-resolution imaging. Enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) is one of the most widely used versions of fluorescent proteins in modern cell biology exhibiting fast intrinsic blinking and reversible photoactivation by UV light. Here, we developed an assay for studying photostabilization of single eYFP molecules with respect to fast blinking and demonstrated a 6-fold enhanced photostability of single eYFP molecules with a beneficial influence on the blinking kinetics under oxygen removal and addition of aliphatic thiols (dSTORM-buffer). Conjugation to single stranded DNA and immobilization via DNA hybridization on a DNA origami 12 helix bundle in aqueous solution allowed photophyiscal studies of eYFP at the single-molecule level and at close to physiological conditions. The benefit of improved photophysical properties for localization-based super-resolution microscopy is demonstrated and quantitatively characterized by imaging 12 helix bundle DNA origami nanorulers with binding sites at designed distances of 160 and 100 nm and by imaging microtubules in fixed mammalian Vero cells.

  4. Super-Resolution Imaging Conditions for enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) Demonstrated on DNA Origami Nanorulers

    PubMed Central

    Jusuk, Ija; Vietz, Carolin; Raab, Mario; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Photostability is one of the crucial properties of a fluorophore which strongly influences the quality of single molecule-based super-resolution imaging. Enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) is one of the most widely used versions of fluorescent proteins in modern cell biology exhibiting fast intrinsic blinking and reversible photoactivation by UV light. Here, we developed an assay for studying photostabilization of single eYFP molecules with respect to fast blinking and demonstrated a 6-fold enhanced photostability of single eYFP molecules with a beneficial influence on the blinking kinetics under oxygen removal and addition of aliphatic thiols (dSTORM-buffer). Conjugation to single stranded DNA and immobilization via DNA hybridization on a DNA origami 12 helix bundle in aqueous solution allowed photophyiscal studies of eYFP at the single-molecule level and at close to physiological conditions. The benefit of improved photophysical properties for localization-based super-resolution microscopy is demonstrated and quantitatively characterized by imaging 12 helix bundle DNA origami nanorulers with binding sites at designed distances of 160 and 100 nm and by imaging microtubules in fixed mammalian Vero cells. PMID:26373229

  5. Mapping of fluorescent protein-expressing neurons and axon pathways in adult and developing Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Porrero, Cesar; Rubio-Garrido, Pablo; Avendaño, Carlos; Clascá, Francisco

    2010-07-23

    Transgenic mouse lines in which a fluorescent protein is constitutively expressed under the Thy1 gene promoter have become important models in cell biology and pathology studies of specific neuronal populations. As a result of positional insertion and/or copy number effects on the transgene, the populations expressing the fluorescent protein (eYFP+) vary markedly among the different mice lines. However, identification of the eYFP+ subpopulations has remained sketchy and fragmentary even for the most widely used lines such as Thy1-eYFP-H mice (Feng, G., Mellor, R.H., Bernstein, M., Keller-Peck, C., Nguyen, Q.T., Wallace, M., Nerbonne, J.M., Lichtman and J.W., Sanes. J.R. 2000. Imaging neuronal subsets in transgenic mice expressing multiple spectral variants of GFP. Neuron 28, 41-51). Here, we provide a comprehensive mapping of labeled cell types throughout the central nervous system in adult and postnatal (P0-P30) Thy1-eYFP-H mice. Cell type identification was based on somatodendritic morphology, axon trajectories, and, for cortical cells, retrograde labeling with Fast Blue to distinguish between subpopulations with different axonal targets. In the neocortex, eYFP+ cells are layers 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons, whose abundance and sublaminar distribution varies markedly between areas. Labeling is particularly prevalent in the corticospinal cells; as a result, the pyramidal pathway axons are conspicuously labeled down to the spinal cord. Large populations of hippocampal, subicular and amygdaloid projection neurons are eYFP+ as well. Additional eYFP+ cell groups are located in specific brainstem nuclei. Present results provide a comprehensive reference dataset for adult and developmental studies using the Thy1-eYFP-H mice strain, and show that this animal model may be particularly suitable for studies on the cell biology of corticospinal neurons.

  6. Perchlorate transport and inhibition of the sodium iodide symporter measured with the yellow fluorescent protein variant YFP-H148Q/I152L

    SciTech Connect

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Bernardo, Julie di; Romeo, Giovanni; Rhoden, Kerry J.

    2010-03-15

    Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant that impairs thyroid function by interacting with the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), the transporter responsible for iodide uptake in the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is well known as a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport by NIS, and recent evidence demonstrates that NIS can also transport perchlorate. In this study, we evaluated the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variant YFP-H148Q/I152L, as a genetically encodable biosensor of intracellular perchlorate concentration monitored by real-time fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence of recombinant YFP-H148Q/I152L was suppressed by perchlorate and iodide with similar affinities of 1.2 mM and 1.6 mM, respectively. Perchlorate suppressed YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 thyroid cells and NIS-expressing COS-7 cells, but had no effect on COS-7 cells lacking NIS. Fluorescence changes in FRTL-5 cells were Na{sup +}-dependent, consistent with the Na{sup +}-dependence of NIS activity. Perchlorate uptake in FRTL-5 cells resulted in 10-fold lower intracellular concentrations than iodide uptake, and was characterized by a higher affinity (K{sub m} 4.6 muM for perchlorate and 34.8 muM for iodide) and lower maximal velocity (V{sub max} 6.8 muM/s for perchlorate and 39.5 muM/s for iodide). Perchlorate also prevented iodide-induced changes in YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 cells, with half-maximal inhibition occurring at 1.1-1.6 muM. In conclusion, YFP-H148Q/I152L detects perchlorate accumulation by thyroid and other NIS-expressing cells, and reveals differences in the kinetics of perchlorate versus iodide transport by NIS.

  7. The yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-H) mouse reveals neuroprotection as a novel mechanism underlying chondroitinase ABC-mediated repair after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lucy M; Starkey, Michelle L; Akrimi, Sonia F; Davies, Meirion; McMahon, Stephen B; Bradbury, Elizabeth J

    2008-12-24

    Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) represents a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury due to its potent effects on restoring function to spinal-injured adult mammals. However, there is limited mechanistic insight as to the underlying effects of ChABC treatment, where the effects are mediated, and which signaling pathways are involved in ChABC-mediated repair. Here we use a transgenic (YFP-H) mouse to demonstrate that cortical layer V projection neurons undergo severe atrophy 4 weeks after thoracic dorsal column injury and that ChABC is neuroprotective for these neurons after ICV infusion. ChABC also prevented cell atrophy after localized delivery to the spinal cord, suggesting a possible retrograde neuroprotective effect mediated at the injury site. Furthermore, neuroprotection of corticospinal cell somata coincided with increased axonal sprouting in the spinal cord. In addition, Western blot analysis of a number of kinases important in survival and growth signaling revealed a significant increase in phosphorylated ERK1 at the spinal injury site after in vivo ChABC treatment, indicating that activated ERK may play a role in downstream repair processes after ChABC treatment. Total forms of PKC and AKT were also elevated, indicating that modification of the glial scar by ChABC promotes long-lasting signaling changes at the lesion site. Thus, using the YFP-H mouse as a novel tool to study degenerative changes and repair after spinal cord injury we demonstrate, for the first time, that ChABC treatment regulates multiple signaling cascades at the injury site and exerts protective effects on axotomized corticospinal projection neurons.

  8. Subcellular localisations of the CPTI collection of YFP-tagged proteins in Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lye, Claire M.; Naylor, Huw W.; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in the post-genomic area is to identify the function of the genes discovered, with many still uncharacterised in all metazoans. A first step is transcription pattern characterisation, for which we now have near whole-genome coverage in Drosophila. However, we have much more limited information about the expression and subcellular localisation of the corresponding proteins. The Cambridge Protein Trap Consortium generated, via piggyBac transposition, over 600 novel YFP-trap proteins tagging just under 400 Drosophila loci. Here, we characterise the subcellular localisations and expression patterns of these insertions, called the CPTI lines, in Drosophila embryos. We have systematically analysed subcellular localisations at cellularisation (stage 5) and recorded expression patterns at stage 5, at mid-embryogenesis (stage 11) and at late embryogenesis (stages 15-17). At stage 5, 31% of the nuclear lines (41) and 26% of the cytoplasmic lines (67) show discrete localisations that provide clues on the function of the protein and markers for organelles or regions, including nucleoli, the nuclear envelope, nuclear speckles, centrosomes, mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, lysosomes and peroxisomes. We characterised the membranous/cortical lines (102) throughout stage 5 to 10 during epithelial morphogenesis, documenting their apico-basal position and identifying those secreted in the extracellular space. We identified the tricellular vertices as a specialized membrane domain marked by the integral membrane protein Sidekick. Finally, we categorised the localisation of the membranous/cortical proteins during cytokinesis. PMID:25294944

  9. Evaluation of Injured Axons Using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in YFP-H Line Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Hideki; Oshima, Yusuke; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Matsuda, Seiji; Miura, Hiromasa; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of degeneration of injured axons is important for the development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. The aim of this study was to establish a method for time-lapse observation of injured axons in living animals after spinal cord contusion injury. YFP (yellow fluorescent protein)-H transgenic mice, which we used in this study, express fluorescence in their nerve fibers. Contusion damage to the spinal cord at the 11th vertebra was performed by IH (Infinite Horizon) impactor, which applied a pressure of 50 kdyn. The damaged spinal cords were re-exposed during the observation period under anesthesia, and then observed by two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, which can observe deep regions of tissues including spinal cord axons. No significant morphological change of injured axons was observed immediately after injury. Three days after injury, the number of axons decreased, and residual axons were fragmented. Seven days after injury, only fragments were present in the damaged tissue. No hind-limb movement was observed during the observation period after injury. Despite the immediate paresis of hind-limbs following the contusion injury, the morphological degeneration of injured axons was delayed. This method may help clarification of pathophysiology of axon degeneration and development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:26184175

  10. Evaluation of Injured Axons Using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in YFP-H Line Mice.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Hideki; Oshima, Yusuke; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Matsuda, Seiji; Miura, Hiromasa; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-07-13

    Elucidation of the process of degeneration of injured axons is important for the development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. The aim of this study was to establish a method for time-lapse observation of injured axons in living animals after spinal cord contusion injury. YFP (yellow fluorescent protein)-H transgenic mice, which we used in this study, express fluorescence in their nerve fibers. Contusion damage to the spinal cord at the 11th vertebra was performed by IH (Infinite Horizon) impactor, which applied a pressure of 50 kdyn. The damaged spinal cords were re-exposed during the observation period under anesthesia, and then observed by two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, which can observe deep regions of tissues including spinal cord axons. No significant morphological change of injured axons was observed immediately after injury. Three days after injury, the number of axons decreased, and residual axons were fragmented. Seven days after injury, only fragments were present in the damaged tissue. No hind-limb movement was observed during the observation period after injury. Despite the immediate paresis of hind-limbs following the contusion injury, the morphological degeneration of injured axons was delayed. This method may help clarification of pathophysiology of axon degeneration and development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  11. [Reabsorption of yellow fluorescent protein in the Rana temporaria kidney by receptor-mediated endocytosis].

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and the expression of the endocytic receptors, megalin and cubilin, were investigated in the renal proximal tubules (PT) in frogs Rana temporaria after parenteral YFP injections. The methods of confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used. The dynamics of YFP absorption was analyzed 2 h after injection. The logarithmic time dependence of the accumulation of YFP-containing endocytic vesicles in PT cells and the completion of absorption process 90-120 min after injection were shown. Unlike substantial megalin and cubilin expression 15-30 min after YFP introduction, immunolabeled endocytic receptors were not detected in PT cells after 2 h. The re-injection of YFP led to the appearance of apical endocytic vesicles containing megalin or cubilin colocalized with YFP. At the same time, the decrease of YFP uptake associated with reduction in the number of receptor-containing vesicles was demonstrated, suggesting a failure of megalin and cubilin expression. The decrease of absorption capacity of PT cells after YFP re-injection was similar to that found previously under conditions of the competitive absorption of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and YFP injected in different sequences. The data are the further demonstration of the proposed mechanism limiting the tubular protein absorption in the frog kidney and suggest the involvement of megalin and cubilin in uptake and vesicular transport of YFP.

  12. Dependence of fluorescent protein brightness on protein concentration in solution and enhancement of it

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Takamitsu J.; Fujita, Hideaki; Kitamura, Akira; Horio, Takashi; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Kinjo, Masataka; Sasaki, Akira; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Ichimura, Taro; Imada, Katsumi; Nagai, Takeharu; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been widely used in biology because of their compatibility and varied applications in living specimens. Fluorescent proteins are often undesirably sensitive to intracellular conditions such as pH and ion concentration, generating considerable issues at times. However, harnessing these intrinsic sensitivities can help develop functional probes. In this study, we found that the fluorescence of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) depends on the protein concentration in the solution and that this dependence can be enhanced by adding a glycine residue in to the YFP; we applied this finding to construct an intracellular protein-crowding sensor. A Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair, involving a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) insensitive to protein concentration and a glycine-inserted YFP, works as a genetically encoded probe to evaluate intracellular crowding. By measuring the fluorescence of the present FRET probe, we were able to detect dynamic changes in protein crowding in living cells. PMID:26956628

  13. A Laboratory Exercise for Visible Gel Filtration Chromatography Using Fluorescent Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified,…

  14. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  15. Fluorescent protein senses and reports mechanical damage in glass-fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Makyła, Katarzyna; Müller, Christoph; Lörcher, Samuel; Winkler, Thomas; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Eder, Michaela; Bruns, Nico

    2013-05-21

    Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is used as a mechanoresponsive layer at the fiber/resin interface in glass-fiber-reinforced composites. The protein loses its fluorescence when subjected to mechanical stress. Within the material, it reports interfacial shear debonding and barely visible impact damage by a transition from a fluorescent to a non-fluorescent state. PMID:23423911

  16. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations confirm that

  17. Absorption capacity of renal proximal tubular cells studied by combined injections of YFP and GFP in Rana temporaria L.

    PubMed

    Prutskova, N P; Seliverstova, E V

    2013-09-01

    The capacity for protein reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule (PT) was studied in Rana temporaria frogs by separate, simultaneous and sequential introduction of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). The uptake patterns of YFP and GFP in PT epithelial cells were investigated 15-120min after their bolus intravenous and intraperitoneal injection. As shown by confocal microscopy, the tubular uptake of YFP and GFP was time- and dose-dependent. These proteins are absorbed in similar way and can be accumulated in the same endocytic vesicles after their combined injections. When GFP was injected 30 and 90min before YFP, and vice versa, the number of vesicles with pre-injected protein increased and the percentage of vesicles with colocalized GFP and YFP reduced. At the same time, the uptake rate of a protein injected later progressively and significantly decreased. Subcellular localization of endocytic receptors, megalin and cubilin, in renal PT cells after intravenous YFP introduction were revealed by immunofluorescent microscopy. Colocalization of internalized YFP with megalin or cubilin in the endocytic vesicles was demonstrated. The data suggest the possibility of protein uptake by receptor-mediated endocytosis and the existence of a mechanism limiting the protein absorption rate in wintering frogs.

  18. A laboratory exercise for visible gel filtration chromatography using fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified, and used in a laboratory exercise to intuitively demonstrate GFC. Different bands, corresponding to RFP, RFP-CFP (RC), YFP-RFP-YFP (YRY), and pyruvate kinase II-GFP (PKG) were well separated on a Superdex 200 column from a 0.5-mL sample. Increasing the sample volume and changing the chromatographic resin to Sephadex G-100 resulted in lower resolution separation. Students enjoyed identifying combinations of colored proteins and found this exercise helpful for understanding the factors that affect GFC resolution. PMID:25400007

  19. Enteric plexuses of two choline-acetyltransferase transgenic mouse lines: chemical neuroanatomy of the fluorescent protein-expressing nerve cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Márta; Lawrence, J Josh; Gábriel, Robert

    2015-02-01

    We studied cholinergic circuit elements in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of two distinct transgenic mouse lines in which fluorescent protein expression was driven by the choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) promoter. In the first mouse line, green fluorescent protein was fused to the tau gene. This construct allowed the visualization of the fiber tracts and ganglia, however the nerve cells were poorly resolved. In the second mouse line (ChATcre-YFP), CRE/loxP recombination yielded cytosolic expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In these preparations the morphology of enteric neurons could be well studied. We also determined the neurochemical identity of ENS neurons in muscular and submucous layers using antibodies against YFP, calretinin (CALR), calbindin (CALB), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Confocal microscopic imaging was used to visualize fluorescently-conjugated secondary antibodies. In ChATcre-YFP preparations, YFP was readily apparent in somatodendritic regions of ENS neurons. In the myenteric plexus, YFP/CALR/VIP staining revealed that 34% of cholinergic cells co-labeled with CALR. Few single-stained CR-positive cells were observed. Neither YFP nor CALR co-localized with VIP. In GFP/CALB/CALR staining, all co-localization combinations were represented. In the submucosal plexus, YFP/CALR/VIP staining revealed discrete neuronal populations. However, in separate preparations, double labeling was observed for YFP/CALR and CALR/VIP. In YFP/CALR/CALB staining, all combinations of double staining and triple labeling were verified. In conclusion, the neurochemical coding of ENS neurons in these mouse lines is consistent with many observations in non-transgenic animals. Thus, they provide useful tools for physiological and pharmacological studies on distinct neurochemical subtypes of ENS neurons.

  20. Semi-automated, Quantitative Analysis of Retinal Ganglion Cell Morphology in Mice Selectively Expressing Yellow Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Oglesby, Ericka; Quigley, Harry A.; Zack, Donald J.; Cone, Frances E.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Tian, Jing; Pease, Mary E.; Kalesnykas, Giedrius

    2012-01-01

    The development of transgenic mouse lines that selectively label a subset of neurons provides unique opportunities to study detailed neuronal morphology and morphological changes under experimental conditions. In the present study, a mouse line in which a small number of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under control of the Thy-1 promoter was used (Feng et al., 2000). We characterized the number, distribution by retinal region and eccentricity of YFP-labeled RGCs using fluorescence microscopy and StereoInvestigator software (MicroBrightField, VT, USA). Then, we captured images of 4–6 YFP-expressing RGCs from each of 8 retinal regions by confocal microscopy, producing 3-dimensional and flattened data sets. A new semi-automated method to quantify the soma size, dendritic length and dendritic arbor complexity was developed using MetaMorph software (Molecular Devices, PA, USA). Our results show that YFP is expressed in 0.2% of all RGCs. Expression of YFP was not significantly different in central versus peripheral retina, but there were higher number of YFP expressing RGCs in the temporal quadrant than in the nasal. By confocal-based analysis, 58% of RGCs expressing YFP did so at a high level, with the remainder distributed in decreasing levels of brightness. Variability in detailed morphometric parameters was as great between two fellow retinas as in retinas from different mice. The analytic methods developed for this selective YFP expressing RGC model permit quantitative comparisons of parameters relevant to neuronal injury. PMID:22210127

  1. A case of mistaken identity: CD11c-eYFP(+) cells in the normal mouse brain parenchyma and neural retina display the phenotype of microglia, not dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Dando, Samantha J; Naranjo Golborne, Cecilia; Chinnery, Holly R; Ruitenberg, Marc J; McMenamin, Paul G

    2016-08-01

    Under steady-state conditions the central nervous system (CNS) is traditionally thought to be devoid of antigen presenting cells; however, putative dendritic cells (DCs) expressing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) are present in the retina and brain parenchyma of CD11c-eYFP mice. We previously showed that these mice carry the Crb1(rd8) mutation, which causes retinal dystrophic lesions; therefore we hypothesized that the presence of CD11c-eYFP(+) cells within the CNS may be due to pathology associated with the Crb1(rd8) mutation. We generated CD11c-eYFP Crb1(wt/wt) mice and compared the distribution and immunophenotype of CD11c-eYFP(+) cells in CD11c-eYFP mice with and without the Crb1(rd8) mutation. The number and distribution of CD11c-eYFP(+) cells in the CNS was similar between CD11c-eYFP Crb1(wt/wt) and CD11c-eYFP Crb1(rd8/rd8) mice. CD11c-eYFP(+) cells were distributed throughout the inner retina, and clustered in brain regions that receive input from the external environment or lack a blood-brain barrier. CD11c-eYFP(+) cells within the retina and cerebral cortex of CD11c-eYFP Crb1(wt/wt) mice expressed CD11b, F4/80, CD115 and Iba-1, but not DC or antigen presentation markers, whereas CD11c-eYFP(+) cells within the choroid plexus and pia mater expressed CD11c, I-A/I-E, CD80, CD86, CD103, DEC205, CD8α and CD135. The immunophenotype of CD11c-eYFP(+) cells and microglia within the CNS was similar between CD11c-eYFP Crb1(wt/wt) and CD11c-eYFP Crb1(rd8/rd8) mice; however, CD11c and I-A/I-E expression was significantly increased in CD11c-eYFP Crb1(rd8/rd8) mice. This study demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of CNS CD11c-eYFP(+) cells do not display the phenotype of DCs or their precursors and are most likely a subpopulation of microglia. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1331-1349.

  2. Engineering fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Nagai, Takeharu; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victora (GFP) and GFP-like proteins from Anthozoa species encode light-absorbing chromophores intrinsically within their respective protein sequences. Recent studies have made progress in obtaining bright variants of these proteins which develop chromophores quickly and efficiently, as well as novel fluorescent proteins that photoactivate or photoconvert, i.e., become fluorescent or change colors upon illumination at specific wavelengths. Also, monomeric versions of these proteins have been engineered for fusion protein applications. Simple GFP variants and circularly permuted GFP variants have been used to develop fluorescent probes that sense physiological signals such as membrane potential and concentrations of free calcium. Further molecular characterization of the structure and maturation of these proteins is in progress, aimed at providing information for rational design of variants with desired fluorescence properties.

  3. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  4. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Concatenation of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins for efficient resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Shimozono, Satoshi; Hosoi, Haruko; Mizuno, Hideaki; Fukano, Takashi; Tahara, Tahei; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2006-05-23

    Highly efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer between cyan(CFP) and yellow fluorescent proteins (YFP), the cyan- and yellow-emitting variants of the Aequorea green fluorescent protein, respectively, was achieved by tightly concatenating the two proteins. After the C-terminus of CFP and the N-terminus of YFP were truncated by 11 and 5 amino acids, respectively, the proteins were fused through a leucine-glutamate dipeptide. The resulting chimeric protein, which we called Cy11.5, exhibited a simple emission spectrum that peaked at 527 nm when the protein was excited at 436 nm. The time-resolved emission of Cy11.5 was measured using a streak camera. After excitation of Cy11.5 with a 400 nm ultrashort pulse, a fast decay of the CFP emission and a concomitant rise of the YFP emission were observed with a lifetime of 66 ps. By contrast, the emission from CFP alone showed a decay component with a lifetime of 2.9 ns. We concluded that in fully folded Cy11.5 molecules, intramolecular FRET occurred with an efficiency of 98%. Importantly, most Cy11.5 molecules were properly folded, and the protein was highly resistant to all of the tested proteases. In living cells, therefore, Cy11.5 behaved as a single fluorescent protein with a broad excitation spectrum. Moreover, Cy11.5 was used as an optical highlighter after photobleaching of YFP. When HeLa cells expressing Cy11.5 were irradiated at 514.5 nm, a 10-fold increase in the 475 nm fluorescence intensity was observed. These features make Cy11.5 useful as an optical highlighter and a new-colored fluorescent protein for multicolor imaging.

  7. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z. Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Lukyanov, Sergey; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λ{sub em}{sup max} ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  8. Probing Alzheimer amyloid peptide aggregation using a cell-free fluorescent protein refolding method.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Pharhad Eli; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2009-08-01

    Fibrillation of the Alzheimer beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and (or) formation of toxic oligomers are key pathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Several strategies have been introduced to identify small molecule aggregation inhibitors, and based on these methods, a number of aggregation inhibitors have been identified. However, most of these methods use chemically synthesized Abeta42 peptides, which are difficult to maintain in a monomeric state at neutral pH where anti-aggregation screening is usually carried out. We have developed a cell-free Abeta42 aggregation assay based on fluorescence protein refolding. This assay utilizes nanomolar concentrations of protein. We genetically fused Abeta42 to the N-terminus of vYFP, a variant of of GFP, and expressed and purified the folded fusion protein. The refolding efficiency of Abeta42-vYFP fusion was inversely correlated with the solubility of Abeta42. Using fluorescence to monitor refolding of Abeta42-vYFP, we confirmed that Zn2+ binds to Abeta42 and increases its aggregation. The IC50 value estimated for Zn binding is 3.03 +/- 0.65 micromol/L. We also show that this technique is capable of monitoring the aggregation of chemically synthesized Abeta42.

  9. An improved cyan fluorescent protein variant useful for FRET.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Mark A; Springer, Gerald H; Granada, Butch; Piston, David W

    2004-04-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins to report biochemical phenomena in living cells. Most commonly, the enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) is used as the donor fluorophore, coupled with one of several yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variants as the acceptor. ECFP is used despite several spectroscopic disadvantages, namely a low quantum yield, a low extinction coefficient and a fluorescence lifetime that is best fit by a double exponential. To improve the characteristics of ECFP for FRET measurements, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to overcome these disadvantages. The resulting variant, which we named Cerulean (ECFP/S72A/Y145A/H148D), has a greatly improved quantum yield, a higher extinction coefficient and a fluorescence lifetime that is best fit by a single exponential. Cerulean is 2.5-fold brighter than ECFP and replacement of ECFP with Cerulean substantially improves the signal-to-noise ratio of a FRET-based sensor for glucokinase activation. PMID:14990965

  10. Plasmon-enhanced emission from single fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donehue, Jessica E.; Haas, Beth L.; Wertz, Esther; Talicska, Courtney N.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we use evaporated gold nanoparticle films (GNPFs) as substrates for plasmon-enhanced imaging of two fluorescent proteins (FPs): mCherry and YFP. Through single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy, we show enhancement of single FP emission in the presence of GNPFs. The gold-coupled FPs demonstrate emission up to four times brighter and seven times longer lived, yielding order-of-magnitude enhancements in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracies for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, we introduce preliminary results for enhancement of mCherry-labeled TcpP membrane proteins inside live Vibrio cholerae cells coupled to GNPFs. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  11. Mannose-6-phosphate facilitates early peripheral nerve regeneration in thy-1-YFP-H mice.

    PubMed

    Harding, A J; Christmas, C R; Ferguson, M W J; Loescher, A R; Robinson, P P; Boissonade, F M

    2014-10-24

    The formation of scar tissue following nerve injury has been shown to adversely affect nerve regeneration and evidence suggests that mannose-6-phosphate (M6P), a potential scar reducing agent that affects transforming growth factor (TGF)-β activation, may enhance nerve regeneration. In this study we utilized thy-1-YFP-H mice - a transgenic strain expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) within a subset of axons - to enable visual analysis of axons regenerating through a nerve graft. Using this strain of mouse we have developed analysis techniques to visualize and quantify regeneration of individual axons across the injury site following the application of either M6P or vehicle to the site of nerve injury. No significant differences were found in the proportion of axons regenerating through the graft between M6P- and vehicle-treated grafts at any point along the graft length. Maximal sprouting occurred at 1.0mm from the proximal graft ending in both groups. The maximum change in sprouting levels for both treatment groups occurred between the graft start and 0.5-mm interval for both treatment groups. The difference between repair groups was significant at this point with a greater increase seen in the vehicle group than the M6P group. The average length of axons regenerating across the initial graft entry was significantly shorter in M6P- than in vehicle-treated grafts, indicating that they encountered less impedance. Application of M6P appears to reduce the disruption of regenerating axons and may therefore facilitate quicker recovery; this is likely to result from altered scar tissue formation in M6P grafts in the early stages of recovery. This study also establishes the usefulness of our methods of analysis using the thy-1-YFP-H mouse strain to visualize and quantify regeneration at the level of the individual axon.

  12. Analysis of cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of apple latent spherical virus in infected plants using green, cyan, and yellow fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsubasa; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) expressing green, cyan, and yellow fluorescent proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) was constructed and used to analyze the local and systemic movement of the virus in infected plants. In Chenopodium quinoa plants inoculated with GFP-ALSV, the infection foci first appeared as small fluorescent spots 2-3 days post inoculation (dpi). The GFP spots expanded as rings from 5 dpi, then fused to each other, and most fluorescence faded out at 10-12 dpi. In upper uninoculated leaves, GFP fluorescence was first observed 6-7 dpi on the basal area of mature leaves and on the entire area of young developing leaves. The appearance of fluorescent flecks on young leaves was first found on and near the class III and IV veins. ALSV labeled with two different fluorescent proteins (CFP-ALSV and YFP-ALSV) were used to investigate the distribution of identical, but differently labeled viruses in mixed infection. Fluorescence from CFP and YFP was in each case observed in separate areas in both inoculated and upper uninoculated leaves, indicating that populations of identical, but differently labeled viruses were replicated and distributed in discrete areas of infected leaves.

  13. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment.

  14. Lighting the Way to Protein-Protein Interactions: Recommendations on Best Practices for Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation Analyses[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to detect and verify interactions between proteins in vivo have become invaluable tools in functional genomic research. While many of the initially developed interaction assays (e.g., yeast two-hybrid system and split-ubiquitin assay) usually are conducted in heterologous systems, assays relying on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC; also referred to as split-YFP assays) are applicable to the analysis of protein-protein interactions in most native systems, including plant cells. Like all protein-protein interaction assays, BiFC can produce false positive and false negative results. The purpose of this commentary is to (1) highlight shortcomings of and potential pitfalls in BiFC assays, (2) provide guidelines for avoiding artifactual interactions, and (3) suggest suitable approaches to scrutinize potential interactions and validate them by independent methods. PMID:27099259

  15. Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cranfill, Paula J; Sell, Brittney R; Baird, Michelle A; Allen, John R; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-07-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FPs) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has unique properties. Thus, there is no single 'best' FP for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for a given application, we have quantitatively characterized the brightness, photostability, pH stability and monomeric properties of more than 40 FPs to enable straightforward and direct comparison between them. We focus on popular and/or top-performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  16. Evidence for extended YFP-EGFR dimers in the absence of ligand on the surface of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozer, Noga; Henderson, Christine; Jackson, Jacob T.; Nice, Edouard C.; Burgess, Antony W.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the erbB tyrosine kinase family of receptors. Structural studies have revealed two distinct conformations of the ectodomain of the EGFR: a compact, tethered, conformation and an untethered extended conformation. In the context of a monomer-dimer transition model, ligand binding is thought to untether the monomeric receptor leading to exposure of a dimerization arm which then facilitates receptor dimerization, kinase activation and signaling. For receptors directed orthogonal to the local plane of the membrane surface, this would lead to a large change in the distance of the receptor N-terminus from the membrane surface. To investigate this experimentally, we produced stable BaF/3 cell lines expressing a biochemically functional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-EGFR chimera and determined the vertical separation of the N-terminal YFP tag from the membrane using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques. Homo-FRET/rFLIM was employed to determine the presence of unliganded dimers and to measure the average distance between the N-terminal tags in those dimers. The results suggest that EGF-induced activation occurs within or between pre-formed and extended dimers with very little change in the extension of the N-terminii from the membrane surface. These results provide constraints on possible models for EGFR activation.

  17. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  18. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Ian B; Bosse, Jens B; Engel, Esteban A; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-11-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  19. Photoconversion in orange and red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Hazelwood, Kristin L; Murphy, Christopher S; Davidson, Michael W; Piston, David W

    2009-05-01

    We found that photoconversion is fairly common among orange and red fluorescent proteins, as in a screen of 12 proteins, 8 exhibited photoconversion. Specifically, three red fluorescent proteins could be switched to a green state, and two orange variants could be photoconverted to a far-red state. The orange proteins are ideal for dual-probe highlighter applications, and they exhibited the most red-shifted excitation of all fluorescent proteins described to date.

  20. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  1. A novel method to visually determine the intracellular pH of xenografted tumor in vivo by utilizing fluorescent protein as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    The alkalization of intracellular pH (pHin) advances together with enhancement of aerobic glycolysis within tumor cells (the Warburg effect), and that is responsible for the progression of tumor malignancy together with hypoxia and angiogenesis. But how they correlate each other during tumor growth is poorly understood, partly due to the lack of suitable imaging methods. In present study, we propose a novel method to visually determine the pHin of tumor xenograft model from fluorescent image ratios. We utilized tandemly-linked two fluorescent proteins as a pH indicator; yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, pH sensitive) as an indicator, and red fluorescent protein (RFP, pH insensitive) as a reference. This method can eliminate the influence of optical factors from tissue as well as of the diverse expression level of pH indicator in the grafted cells. In addition, that can be operated by filter-based fluorescent imagers that are generally used in small animal study. The efficacy of the pH indicator, RFP-YFP, was confirmed by studies using recombinant protein in vitro and HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP in vivo. Furthermore, we prepared nude mice subcutaneously xenografted HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP cells as tumor model. The image ratios (YFP/RFP) of the tumor at the day 5 after surgery clearly showed the heterogeneous distribution of diverse pHin cells in the tumor tissue. Concomitantly acquired angiography using near-infrared fluorescence (680 nm for emission) also indicated that the relative alkaline pHin cells located in the region far from tumor vessels in which tumor aerobic glycolysis would be facilitated by progression of hypoxia and nutrient starvation. Applying the present method for a multi-wavelength imaging concerning pO2 and/or nutrient starvation states in addition to pHin and angiogenesis would provide valuable information about complicated alteration of tumoral cell states during tumorigenesis.

  2. In vivo nonlinear imaging of corneal structures with special focus on BALB/c and streptozotocin-diabetic Thy1-YFP mice.

    PubMed

    Ehmke, Tobias; Leckelt, Janine; Reichard, Maria; Weiss, Heike; Hovakimyan, Marina; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Stachs, Oliver; Baltrusch, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Two-photon microscopy (TPM) allows high contrast imaging at a subcellular resolution scale. In this work, the microscopy technique was applied to visualize corneal structures in two mouse models (BALB/c and B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-YFP)16Jrs/J) in vivo. In particular, the transgenic Thy1-YFP mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in all motor and sensory neurons had been used for investigating the nerve fiber density in healthy and streptozotocin-diabetic mice. This model is clinically relevant since patients suffering from diabetes mellitus have a high risk to develop small fiber neuropathy. Nonlinear laser scanning microscopy displayed a reduction of nerve fiber density in streptozotocin-diabetic versus healthy mice and confirmed data obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In recent years, corneal CLSM was proved to be an appropriate non-invasive tool for an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. Nevertheless, validation of the CLSM method for the clinical routine is currently a matter of investigation and requires confirmation by further studies and complementary techniques. Thus, the present study provides further evidence of corneal confocal microscopy as a promising technique for non-invasive detection of diabetic neuropathy. Information derived from these experiments may become clinically relevant and help to develop new drugs for treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26677758

  3. Blue protein with red fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Swagatha; Yu, Chi-Li; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Sudha, Sai; Pal, Samir Kumar; Schaefer, Wayne F.; Gibson, David T.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The walleye (Sander vitreus) is a golden yellow fish that inhabits the Northern American lakes. The recent sightings of the blue walleye and the correlation of its sighting to possible increased UV radiation have been proposed earlier. The underlying molecular basis of its adaptation to increased UV radiation is the presence of a protein (Sandercyanin)–ligand complex in the mucus of walleyes. Degradation of heme by UV radiation results in the formation of Biliverdin IXα (BLA), the chromophore bound to Sandercyanin. We show that Sandercyanin is a monomeric protein that forms stable homotetramers on addition of BLA to the protein. A structure of the Sandercyanin–BLA complex, purified from the fish mucus, reveals a glycosylated protein with a lipocalin fold. This protein–ligand complex absorbs light in the UV region (λmax of 375 nm) and upon excitation at this wavelength emits in the red region (λmax of 675 nm). Unlike all other known biliverdin-bound fluorescent proteins, the chromophore is noncovalently bound to the protein. We provide here a molecular rationale for the observed spectral properties of Sandercyanin. PMID:27688756

  4. Real-time detection of cellular death receptor-4 activation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Gandhok, Harmeet; Zeng, Ling Ge; Waqas, Sidra; Jiang, Xuejun; Wang, Sihong

    2013-05-01

    Targeted therapy involving the activation of death receptors DR4 and/or DR5 by its ligand, TRAIL, can selectively induce apoptosis in certain tumor cells. In order to profile the dynamic activation or trimerization of TRAIL-DR4 in live cells in real-time, the development of an apoptosis reporter cell line is essential. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology via a FRET pair, cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescence protein (YFP), was used in this study. DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP were stably expressed in human lung cancer PC9 cells. Flow cytometer sorting and limited dilution coupled with fluorescence microscopy were used to select a monoclonal reporter cell line with high and compatible expression levels of DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP. FRET experiments were conducted and FRET efficiencies were monitored according to the Siegel's YFP photobleaching FRET protocol. Upon TRAIL induction a significant increase in FRET efficiencies from 5% to 9% demonstrated the ability of the DR4-CFP/YFP reporter cell line in monitoring the dynamic activation of TRAIL pathways. 3D reconstructed confocal images of DR4-CFP/YFP reporter cells exhibited a colocalized expression of DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP mainly on cell membranes. FRET results obtained during this study complements the use of epi-fluorescence microscopy for FRET analysis. The real-time FRET analysis allows the dynamic profiling of the activation of TRAIL pathways by using the time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Therefore, DR4-CFP/YFP PC9 reporter cells along with FRET technology can be used as a tool for anti-cancer drug screening to identify compounds that are capable of activating TRAIL pathways.

  5. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  6. Transgenic maize lines with cell-type specific expression of fluorescent proteins in plastids.

    PubMed

    Sattarzadeh, Amir; Fuller, Jonathan; Moguel, Salvador; Wostrikoff, Katia; Sato, Shirley; Covshoff, Sarah; Clemente, Tom; Hanson, Maureen; Stern, David B

    2010-02-01

    Plastid number and morphology vary dramatically between cell types and at different developmental stages. Furthermore, in C4 plants such as maize, chloroplast ultrastructure and biochemical functions are specialized in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which differentiate acropetally from the proplastid form in the leaf base. To develop visible markers for maize plastids, we have created a series of stable transgenics expressing fluorescent proteins fused to either the maize ubiquitin promoter, the mesophyll-specific phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepC) promoter, or the bundle sheath-specific Rubisco small subunit 1 (RbcS) promoter. Multiple independent events were examined and revealed that maize codon-optimized versions of YFP and GFP were particularly well expressed, and that expression was stably inherited. Plants carrying PepC promoter constructs exhibit YFP expression in mesophyll plastids and the RbcS promoter mediated expression in bundle sheath plastids. The PepC and RbcS promoter fusions also proved useful for identifying plastids in organs such as epidermis, silks, roots and trichomes. These tools will inform future plastid-related studies of wild-type and mutant maize plants and provide material from which different plastid types may be isolated. PMID:20051034

  7. Transgenic maize lines with cell-type specific expression of fluorescent proteins in plastids.

    PubMed

    Sattarzadeh, Amir; Fuller, Jonathan; Moguel, Salvador; Wostrikoff, Katia; Sato, Shirley; Covshoff, Sarah; Clemente, Tom; Hanson, Maureen; Stern, David B

    2010-02-01

    Plastid number and morphology vary dramatically between cell types and at different developmental stages. Furthermore, in C4 plants such as maize, chloroplast ultrastructure and biochemical functions are specialized in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which differentiate acropetally from the proplastid form in the leaf base. To develop visible markers for maize plastids, we have created a series of stable transgenics expressing fluorescent proteins fused to either the maize ubiquitin promoter, the mesophyll-specific phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepC) promoter, or the bundle sheath-specific Rubisco small subunit 1 (RbcS) promoter. Multiple independent events were examined and revealed that maize codon-optimized versions of YFP and GFP were particularly well expressed, and that expression was stably inherited. Plants carrying PepC promoter constructs exhibit YFP expression in mesophyll plastids and the RbcS promoter mediated expression in bundle sheath plastids. The PepC and RbcS promoter fusions also proved useful for identifying plastids in organs such as epidermis, silks, roots and trichomes. These tools will inform future plastid-related studies of wild-type and mutant maize plants and provide material from which different plastid types may be isolated.

  8. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Yi; Zhang Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2008-11-28

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure.

  9. Site-specific immobilization and micrometer and nanometer scale photopatterning of yellow fluorescent protein on glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Nicholas P; Tucker, Jaimey D; Davison, Paul A; Timney, John A; Hunter, C Neil; Leggett, Graham J

    2009-01-28

    A simple method is described for the site-specific attachment of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to glass surfaces on length scales ranging from tens of micrometers to ca. 200 nm. 3-Mercaptopropyl(triethoxy silane) is adsorbed onto a glass substrate and subsequently derivatized using a maleimide-functionalized oligomer of ethylene glycol. The resulting protein-resistant surface is patterned by exposure to UV light, causing photochemical degradation of the oligo(ethylene glycol) units to yield aldehyde groups in exposed regions. These are covalently bound to N-(5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)iminoacetic acid, yielding a nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-functionalized surface, which following complexation with Ni(2+), is coupled to His-tagged YFP. Using scanning near-field photolithography, in which a UV laser coupled to a scanning near-field optical microscope is utilized as the light source for photolithography, it is possible to fabricate lines of protein smaller than 200 nm, in which the biomolecules remain strongly optically active, facilitating the acquisition of diffraction-limited fluorescence images by confocal microscopy.

  10. Coral Fluorescent Proteins as Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Caroline V.; Modi, Chintan K.; Mydlarz, Laura D.

    2009-01-01

    Background A wide array of fluorescent proteins (FP) is present in anthozoans, although their biochemical characteristics and function in host tissue remain to be determined. Upregulation of FP's frequently occurs in injured or compromised coral tissue, suggesting a potential role of coral FPs in host stress responses. Methodology/Principal Findings The presence of FPs was determined and quantified for a subsample of seven healthy Caribbean coral species using spectral emission analysis of tissue extracts. FP concentration was correlated with the in vivo antioxidant potential of the tissue extracts by quantifying the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging rates. FPs of the seven species varied in both type and abundance and demonstrated a positive correlation between H2O2 scavenging rate and FP concentration. To validate this data, the H2O2 scavenging rates of four pure scleractinian FPs, cyan (CFP), green (GFP), red (RFP) and chromoprotein (CP), and their mutant counterparts (without chromophores), were investigated. In vitro, each FP scavenged H2O2 with the most efficient being CP followed by equivalent activity of CFP and RFP. Scavenging was significantly higher in all mutant counterparts. Conclusions/Significance Both naturally occurring and pure coral FPs have significant H2O2 scavenging activity. The higher scavenging rate of RFP and the CP in vitro is consistent with observed increases of these specific FPs in areas of compromised coral tissue. However, the greater scavenging ability of the mutant counterparts suggests additional roles of scleractinian FPs, potentially pertaining to their color. This study documents H2O2 scavenging of scleractinian FPs, a novel biochemical characteristic, both in vivo across multiple species and in vitro with purified proteins. These data support a role for FPs in coral stress and immune responses and highlights the multi-functionality of these conspicuous proteins. PMID:19806218

  11. A novel fluorescent sensor for measurement of CFTR function by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis. CFTR-dependent iodide transport measured by fluorescent quenching of ectopically expressed halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is widely being used to study CFTR function by microscopy or plate readers. Since YFP fluorescence in these systems is dependent on YFP expression levels and iodide concentration, differences in sensor expression level between experimental units are normalized at the start of each experiment. To allow accurate measurement of CFTR function by flow cytometry, we reasoned that co-expression of an iodide insensitive fluorescent protein would allow for normalization of sensor expression levels and more accurate quantification of CFTR function. Our data indicated that dsRed and mKate fluorescence are iodide insensitive, and we determined an optimal format for co-expression of these fluorescent proteins with halide-sensitive YFP. We showed using microscopy that ratiometric measurement (YFP/mKate) corrects for differences in sensor expression levels. Ratiometric measurements were essential to accurately measure CFTR function by flow cytometry that we here describe for the first time. Mixing of wild type or mutant CFTR expressing cells indicated that addition of approximately 10% of wild type CFTR expressing cells could be distinguished by ratiometric YFP quenching. Flow cytometric ratiometric YFP quenching also allowed us to study CFTR mutants associated with differential residual function upon ectopic expression. Compared with conventional plate-bound CFTR function assays, the flow cytometric approach described here can be used to study CFTR function in suspension cells. It may be further adapted to study CFTR function in heterologous cell populations using cell surface markers and selection of cells that display high CFTR function by cell sorting.

  12. Vectors for multi-color bimolecular fluorescence complementation to investigate protein-protein interactions in living plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Fang, Mei-Jane; Kuang, Lin-Yun; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2008-01-01

    Background The investigation of protein-protein interactions is important for characterizing protein function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) has recently gained interest as a relatively easy and inexpensive method to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells. BiFC uses "split YFP" tags on proteins to detect interactions: If the tagged proteins interact, they may bring the two split fluorophore components together such that they can fold and reconstitute fluorescence. The sites of interaction can be monitored using epifluorescence or confocal microscopy. However, "conventional" BiFC can investigate interactions only between two proteins at a time. There are instances when one may wish to offer a particular "bait" protein to several "prey" proteins simultaneously. Preferential interaction of the bait protein with one of the prey proteins, or different sites of interaction between the bait protein and multiple prey proteins, may thus be observed. Results We have constructed a series of gene expression vectors, based upon the pSAT series of vectors, to facilitate the practice of multi-color BiFC. The bait protein is tagged with the C-terminal portion of CFP (cCFP), and prey proteins are tagged with the N-terminal portions of either Venus (nVenus) or Cerulean (nCerulean). Interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nVenus-tagged proteins generates yellow fluorescence, whereas interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nCerulean-tagged proteins generates blue fluorescence. Additional expression of mCherry indicates transfected cells and sub-cellular structures. Using this system, we have determined in both tobacco BY-2 protoplasts and in onion epidermal cells that Agrobacterium VirE2 protein interacts with the Arabidopsis nuclear transport adapter protein importin α-1 in the cytoplasm, whereas interaction of VirE2 with a different importin α isoform, importin α-4, occurs predominantly in the nucleus. Conclusion Multi-color BiFC is a useful

  13. Fluorescent protein methods: strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins such as the "green fluorescent protein" (GFP) are popular tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, because as genetically encoded markers they are easy to introduce. Furthermore, they can be used in a living animal without the need for extensive sample preparation, because C. elegans is transparent and small enough so that entire animals can be imaged directly. Consequently, fluorescent proteins have emerged as the method of choice to study gene expression in C. elegans and reporter constructs for thousands of genes are currently available. When fused to a protein of interest, fluorescent proteins allow the imaging of its subcellular localization in vivo, offering a powerful alternative to antibody staining techniques. Fluorescent proteins can be employed to label cellular and subcellular structures and as indicators for cell physiological parameters like calcium concentration. Genetic screens relying on fluorescent proteins to visualize anatomical structures and recent progress in automation techniques have tremendously expanded their potential uses. This chapter presents tools and techniques related to the use of fluorescent proteins, discusses their advantages and shortcomings, and provides practical considerations for various applications. PMID:22226521

  14. Green fluorescent protein as a quantitative tool.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Billups, B; Guthrie, P B; Rogers, J H; Muir, E M; Parks, T N; Kater, S B

    2000-02-15

    Manipulating the expression of a protein can provide a powerful tool for understanding its function, provided that the protein is expressed at physiologically-significant concentrations. We have developed a simple method to measure (1) the concentration of an overexpressed protein in single cells and (2) the covariation of particular physiological properties with a protein's expression. As an example of how this method can be used, teratocarcinoma cells were transfected with the neuron-specific calcium binding protein calretinin (CR) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). By measuring GFP fluorescence in microcapillaries, we created a standard curve for GFP fluorescence that permitted quantification of CR concentrations in individual cells. Fura-2 measurements in the same cells showed a strong positive correlation between CR-GFP fusion protein expression levels and calcium clearance capacity. This method should allow reliable quantitative analysis of GFP fusion protein expression.

  15. Mapping membrane protein structure with fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins regulate many cellular processes including signaling cascades, ion transport, membrane fusion, and cell-to-cell communications. Understanding the architecture and conformational fluctuations of these proteins is critical to understanding their regulation and functions. Fluorescence methods including intensity mapping, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and photo-induced electron transfer, allow for targeted measurements of domains within membrane proteins. These methods can reveal how a protein is structured and how it transitions between different conformational states. Here, I will review recent work done using fluorescence to map the structures of membrane proteins, focusing on how each of these methods can be applied to understanding the dynamic nature of individual membrane proteins and protein complexes. PMID:22445227

  16. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N.

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  17. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from cyan to yellow fluorescent protein detected by acceptor photobleaching using confocal microscopy and a single laser.

    PubMed

    Karpova, T S; Baumann, C T; He, L; Wu, X; Grammer, A; Lipsky, P; Hager, G L; McNally, J G

    2003-01-01

    One manifestation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is an increase in donor fluorescence after photobleaching the acceptor. Published acceptor-photobleaching methods for FRET have mainly used wide-field microscopy. A laser scanning confocal microscope enables faster and targeted bleaching within the field of view, thereby improving speed and accuracy. Here we demonstrate the approach with CFP and YFP, the most versatile fluorescent markers now available for FRET. CFP/YFP FRET imaging has been accomplished with a single laser (argon) available on virtually all laser-scanning confocal microscopes. Accordingly, we also describe the conditions that we developed for dual imaging of CFP and YFP with the 458 and 514 argon lines. We detect FRET in a CFP/YFP fusion and also between signalling molecules (TNF-Receptor-Associated-Factors or TRAFs) that are known to homo- and heterotrimerize. Importantly, we demonstrate that appropriate controls are essential to avoid false positives in FRET by acceptor photobleaching. We use two types of negative control: (a) an internal negative control (non-bleached areas of the cell) and (b) cells with donor in the absence of the acceptor (CFP only). We find that both types of negative control can yield false FRET. Given this false FRET background, we describe a method for distinguishing true positive signals. In summary, we extensively characterize a simple approach to FRET that should be adaptable to most laser-scanning confocal microscopes, and demonstrate its feasibility for detecting FRET between several CFP/YFP partners.

  19. Fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Daniel Aaron; Melikov, Rustamzhon; Conkar, Deniz; Nur Firat-Karalar, Elif; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2016-11-01

    The usage time of displays (e.g., TVs, mobile phones, etc) is in general shorter than their functional life time, which worsens the electronic waste (e-waste) problem around the world. The integration of biomaterials into electronics can help to reduce the e-waste problem. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs to use as a backlight source for liquid crystal (LC) displays for the first time. We express and purify enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and monomeric Cherry protein (mCherry), and afterward we integrate these proteins as a wavelength-converter on a blue LED chip. The protein-integrated backlight exhibits a high luminous efficacy of 248 lm/Wopt and the area of the gamut covers 80% of the NTSC color gamut. The resultant colors and objects in the image on the display can be well observed and distinguished. Therefore, fluorescent proteins show promise for display applications.

  20. Multi-color femtosecond source for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescent proteins in two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Wu, Juwell; Horton, Nicholas G.; Lin, Charles P.; Xu, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous imaging of cells expressing multiple fluorescent proteins (FPs) is of particular interest in applications such as mapping neural circuits, tracking multiple immune cell populations, etc. To visualize both in vivo and ex vivo tissue morphology and physiology at a cellular level deep within scattering tissues, two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM) is a powerful tool that has found wide applications. However, simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs with 2PM is greatly hampered by the lack of proper ultrafast lasers offering multi-color femtosecond pulses, each targeting the two-photon absorption peak of a different FP. Here we demonstrate simultaneous two-photon fluorescence excitation of RFP, YFP, and CFP in human melanoma cells engineered to express a "rainbow" pallet of colors, using a novel fiber-based source with energetic, three-color femtosecond pulses. The three-color pulses, centered at 775 nm, 864 nm and 950 nm, are obtained through second harmonic generation of the 1550 nm pump laser and SHG of the solitons at 1728 nm and 1900 nm generated through soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) of the pump laser in a large-mode-area (LMA) fiber. The resulting wavelengths are well matched to the two-photon absorption peaks of the three FPs for efficient excitation. Our results demonstrate that multi-color femtosecond pulse generation using SSFS and a turn-key, fiber-based femtosecond laser can fulfill the requirements for simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs in 2PM, opening new opportunities for a wide range of biological applications where non-invasive, high-resolution imaging of multiple fluorescent indicators is required.

  1. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  2. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  3. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  4. A dark green fluorescent protein as an acceptor for measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Shibata, Akihiro C. E.; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) is a powerful method for visualization of intracellular signaling activities such as protein-protein interactions and conformational changes of proteins. Here, we developed a dark green fluorescent protein (ShadowG) that can serve as an acceptor for FLIM-FRET. ShadowG is spectrally similar to monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and has a 120-fold smaller quantum yield. When FRET from mEGFP to ShadowG was measured using an mEGFP-ShadowG tandem construct with 2-photon FLIM-FRET, we observed a strong FRET signal with low cell-to-cell variability. Furthermore, ShadowG was applied to a single-molecule FRET sensor to monitor a conformational change of CaMKII and of the light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain in HeLa cells. These sensors showed reduced cell-to-cell variability of both the basal fluorescence lifetime and response signal. In contrast to mCherry- or dark-YFP-based sensors, our sensor allowed for precise measurement of individual cell responses. When ShadowG was applied to a separate-type Ras FRET sensor, it showed a greater response signal than did the mCherry-based sensor. Furthermore, Ras activation and translocation of its effector ERK2 into the nucleus could be observed simultaneously. Thus, ShadowG is a promising FLIM-FRET acceptor. PMID:26469148

  5. A dark green fluorescent protein as an acceptor for measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Shibata, Akihiro C E; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-10-15

    Measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) is a powerful method for visualization of intracellular signaling activities such as protein-protein interactions and conformational changes of proteins. Here, we developed a dark green fluorescent protein (ShadowG) that can serve as an acceptor for FLIM-FRET. ShadowG is spectrally similar to monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and has a 120-fold smaller quantum yield. When FRET from mEGFP to ShadowG was measured using an mEGFP-ShadowG tandem construct with 2-photon FLIM-FRET, we observed a strong FRET signal with low cell-to-cell variability. Furthermore, ShadowG was applied to a single-molecule FRET sensor to monitor a conformational change of CaMKII and of the light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain in HeLa cells. These sensors showed reduced cell-to-cell variability of both the basal fluorescence lifetime and response signal. In contrast to mCherry- or dark-YFP-based sensors, our sensor allowed for precise measurement of individual cell responses. When ShadowG was applied to a separate-type Ras FRET sensor, it showed a greater response signal than did the mCherry-based sensor. Furthermore, Ras activation and translocation of its effector ERK2 into the nucleus could be observed simultaneously. Thus, ShadowG is a promising FLIM-FRET acceptor.

  6. Use of fluorescent Ca2+ dyes with green fluorescent protein and its variants: problems and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S; Ibrahim, O; O'luanaigh, N; Williams, H; Cockcroft, S

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes, and green fluorescent protein and its variants, can be used together. We find that the most commonly used fluorescent protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), seriously contaminates fura 2 signals. We suggest two alternative combinations for which there is no detectable contamination of the Ca(2+) indicator signal by the fluorescent protein. Blue fluorescent protein can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura Red; EGFP can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator X-Rhod 1. The use of these combinations will permit the accurate measurement of Ca(2+) signals in cells transfected with fluorescent proteins. PMID:11368760

  7. Diversity and evolution of coral fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Naila O; Konzen, Karen A; Field, Steven F; Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Hunt, Marguerite E; Beltran-Ramirez, Victor; Miller, David J; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Salih, Anya; Matz, Mikhail V

    2008-07-16

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red) and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a "chromo-red" color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae) and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae), both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria). The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of structural

  8. Diversity and Evolution of Coral Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alieva, Naila O.; Konzen, Karen A.; Field, Steven F.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Hunt, Marguerite E.; Beltran-Ramirez, Victor; Miller, David J.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Salih, Anya; Matz, Mikhail V.

    2008-01-01

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red) and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a “chromo-red” color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae) and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae), both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria). The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of structural

  9. Imaging the environment of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Klaus; Siegel, Jan; Phillips, David; French, Paul M W; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Webb, Stephen E D; Davis, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    An emerging theme in cell biology is that cell surface receptors need to be considered as part of supramolecular complexes of proteins and lipids facilitating specific receptor conformations and distinct distributions, e.g., at the immunological synapse. Thus, a new goal is to develop bioimaging that not only locates proteins in live cells but can also probe their environment. Such a technique is demonstrated here using fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP). We first show, by time-correlated single-photon counting, that the fluorescence decay of GFP depends on the local refractive index. This is in agreement with the Strickler Berg formula, relating the Einstein A and B coefficients for absorption and spontaneous emission in molecules. We then quantitatively image, by wide-field time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging, the refractive index of the environment of GFP. This novel approach paves the way for imaging the biophysical environment of specific GFP-tagged proteins in live cells. PMID:12496126

  10. Imaging Erg and Jun transcription factor interaction in living cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Camuzeaux, Barbara; Heliot, Laurent; Coll, Jean . E-mail: martine.duterque@ibl.fr

    2005-07-15

    Physical interactions between transcription factors play important roles in modulating gene expression. Previous in vitro studies have shown a transcriptional synergy between Erg protein, an Ets family member, and Jun/Fos heterodimer, members of the bZip family, which requires direct Erg-Jun protein interactions. Visualization of protein interactions in living cells is a new challenge in biology. For this purpose, we generated fusion proteins of Erg, Fos, and Jun with yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins, YFP and CFP, respectively. After transient expression in HeLa cells, interactions of the resulting fusion proteins were explored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy (FRET) in fixed and living cells. FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun was monitored by using photobleaching FRET and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Both techniques revealed the occurrence of intermolecular FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun. This is stressed by loss of FRET with an YFP-Erg version carrying a point mutation in its ETS domain. These results provide evidence for the interaction of Erg and Jun proteins in living cells as a critical prerequisite of their transcriptional synergy, but also for the essential role of the Y371 residue, conserved in most Ets proteins, in this interaction.

  11. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    One of the most powerful and versatile methods for studying molecules in solution is fluorescence. Crystallization typically takes place in a concentrated solution environment, whereas fluorescence typically has an upper concentration limit of approximately 1 x 10(exp -5)M, thus intrinsic fluorescence cannot be employed, but a fluorescent probe must be added to a sub population of the molecules. However the fluorescent species cannot interfere with the self-assembly process. This can be achieved with macromolecules, where fluorescent probes can be covalently attached to a sub population of molecules that are subsequently used to track the system as a whole. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process of tetragonal lysozyme crystal nucleation, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P432121 space group. FRET studies are being carried out between cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex 376 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex 425 nm, Em 520 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R0 for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approximately 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 43 helix. The short CB-lys lifetime (approximately 5 ns), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules ((sup 3) 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a second, shorter lifetime (approximately 0.2 ns). Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with a model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and grow, and the relevance of that model to microgravity protein crystal growth

  12. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers

    PubMed Central

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. PMID:26609072

  13. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs.

    PubMed

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies.

  14. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  15. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs.

    PubMed

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  16. A bright monomeric green fluorescent protein derived from Branchiostoma lanceolatum

    PubMed Central

    Shaner, Nathan C.; Lambert, Gerard G.; Chammas, Andrew; Ni, Yuhui; Cranfill, Paula J.; Baird, Michelle A.; Sell, Brittney R.; Allen, John R.; Day, Richard N.; Israelsson, Maria; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Jiwu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of fluorescent proteins spanning the entire visual spectrum, the bulk of modern imaging experiments continue to rely on variants of the green fluorescent protein derived from Aequorea victoria. Meanwhile, a great deal of recent effort has been devoted to engineering and improving red fluorescent proteins, and relatively little attention has been given to green and yellow variants. Here we report a novel monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein, mNeonGreen, which is derived from a tetrameric fluorescent protein from the cephalochordate Branchiostoma lanceolatum. This fluorescent protein is the brightest monomeric green or yellow fluorescent protein yet described, performs exceptionally well as a fusion tag for traditional imaging as well as stochastic single-molecule superresolution imaging, and is an excellent FRET acceptor for the newest generation of cyan fluorescent proteins. PMID:23524392

  17. Fluorescent reporters for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Malone, Cheryl L; Boles, Blaise R; Lauderdale, Katherine J; Thoendel, Matthew; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R

    2009-06-01

    With the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus as a prominent pathogen in community and healthcare settings, there is a growing need for effective reporter tools to facilitate physiology and pathogenesis studies. Fluorescent proteins are ideal as reporters for their convenience in monitoring gene expression, performing host interaction studies, and monitoring biofilm growth. We have developed a suite of fluorescent reporter plasmids for labeling S. aureus cells. These plasmids encode either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or higher wavelength reporter variants for yellow (YFP) and red (mCherry) labeling. The reporters were placed under control of characterized promoters to enable constitutive or inducible expression. Additionally, plasmids were assembled with fluorescent reporters under control of the agr quorum-sensing and sigma factor B promoters, and the fluorescent response with wildtype and relevant mutant strains was characterized. Interestingly, reporter expression displayed a strong dependence on ribosome binding site (RBS) sequence, with the superoxide dismutase RBS displaying the strongest expression kinetics of the sequences examined. To test the robustness of the reporter plasmids, cell imaging was performed with fluorescence microscopy and cell populations were separated using florescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), demonstrating the possibilities of simultaneous monitoring of multiple S. aureus properties. Finally, a constitutive YFP reporter displayed stable, robust labeling of biofilm growth in a flow-cell apparatus. This toolbox of fluorescent reporter plasmids will facilitate cell labeling for a variety of different experimental applications. PMID:19264102

  18. Constitutive expression of fluorescent protein by Aspergillus var. niger and Aspergillus carbonarius to monitor fungal colonization in maize plants.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Edwin Rene; Glenn, Anthony Elbie; Hinton, Dorothy Mae; Bacon, Charles Wilson

    2013-09-01

    Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius are two species in the Aspergillus section Nigri (black-spored aspergilli) frequently associated with peanut (Arachis hypogea), maize (Zea mays), and other plants as pathogens. These infections are symptomless and as such are major concerns since some black aspergilli produce important mycotoxins, ochratoxins A, and the fumonisins. To facilitate the study of the black aspergilli-maize interactions with maize during the early stages of infections, we developed a method that used the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) and the monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) to transform A. niger and A. carbonarius, respectively. The results were constitutive expressions of the fluorescent genes that were stable in the cytoplasms of hyphae and conidia under natural environmental conditions. The hyphal in planta distribution in 21-day-old seedlings of maize were similar wild type and transformants of A. niger and A. carbonarius. The in planta studies indicated that both wild type and transformants internally colonized leaf, stem and root tissues of maize seedlings, without any visible disease symptoms. Yellow and red fluorescent strains were capable of invading epidermal cells of maize roots intercellularly within the first 3 days after inoculation, but intracellular hyphal growth was more evident after 7 days of inoculation. We also tested the capacity of fluorescent transformants to produce ochratoxin A and the results with A. carbonarius showed that this transgenic strain produced similar concentrations of this secondary metabolite. This is the first report on the in planta expression of fluorescent proteins that should be useful to study the internal plant colonization patterns of two ochratoxigenic species in the Aspergillus section Nigri.

  19. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  20. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  1. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-03-18

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications.

  2. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  3. A Recombinant Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Line Stably Expressing Halide-Sensitive YFP-I152L for GABAAR and GlyR-Targeted High-Throughput Drug Screening and Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, Katharina; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    GABAARs and GlyRs are considered attractive drug targets for therapeutic intervention and are also increasingly recognized in the context of in vitro neurotoxicity (NT) and developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing. However, systematic human-specific GABAAR and GlyR-targeted drug screening and toxicity testing is hampered due to lack of appropriate in vitro models that express native GABAARs and GlyRs. We have established a human pluripotent stem cell line (NT2) stably expressing YFP-I152L, a halide-sensitive variant of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), allowing for fluorescence-based functional analysis of chloride channels. Upon stimulation with retinoic acid, NT2 cells undergo neuronal differentiation and allow pharmacological and toxicological evaluation of native GABAARs and GlyRs at different stages of brain maturation. We applied the cell line in concentration-response experiments with the neurotransmitters GABA and glycine as well as with the drugs strychnine, picrotoxin, fipronil, lindane, bicuculline, and zinc and demonstrate that the established in vitro model is applicable to GABAAR and GlyR-targeted pharmacological and toxicological profiling. We quantified the proportion of GABAAR and GlyR-sensitive cells, respectively, and identified percentages of approximately 20% each within the overall populations, rendering the cells a suitable model for systematic in vitro GABAAR and GlyR-targeted screening in the context of drug development and NT/DNT testing. PMID:27445687

  4. A Recombinant Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Line Stably Expressing Halide-Sensitive YFP-I152L for GABAAR and GlyR-Targeted High-Throughput Drug Screening and Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzel, Katharina; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    GABAARs and GlyRs are considered attractive drug targets for therapeutic intervention and are also increasingly recognized in the context of in vitro neurotoxicity (NT) and developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing. However, systematic human-specific GABAAR and GlyR-targeted drug screening and toxicity testing is hampered due to lack of appropriate in vitro models that express native GABAARs and GlyRs. We have established a human pluripotent stem cell line (NT2) stably expressing YFP-I152L, a halide-sensitive variant of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), allowing for fluorescence-based functional analysis of chloride channels. Upon stimulation with retinoic acid, NT2 cells undergo neuronal differentiation and allow pharmacological and toxicological evaluation of native GABAARs and GlyRs at different stages of brain maturation. We applied the cell line in concentration-response experiments with the neurotransmitters GABA and glycine as well as with the drugs strychnine, picrotoxin, fipronil, lindane, bicuculline, and zinc and demonstrate that the established in vitro model is applicable to GABAAR and GlyR-targeted pharmacological and toxicological profiling. We quantified the proportion of GABAAR and GlyR-sensitive cells, respectively, and identified percentages of approximately 20% each within the overall populations, rendering the cells a suitable model for systematic in vitro GABAAR and GlyR-targeted screening in the context of drug development and NT/DNT testing. PMID:27445687

  5. Generation of red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Teoan; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) share many common genetic diseases with humans and development of disease models using a transgenic approach has long been awaited. However, due to the technical difficulty in obtaining fertilizable eggs and the unavailability of embryonic stem cells, no transgenic dog has been generated. Canine fetal fibroblasts were stably transfected with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene-expressing construct using retrovirus gene delivery method. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was then employed to replace the nucleus of an oocyte with the nucleus of the RFP-fibroblasts. Using this approach, we produced the first generation of transgenic dogs with four female and two male expressing RFP.

  6. Photoactivation and imaging of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Patterson, George H

    2011-07-01

    A major advance in the microscopic study of cells and tissues is the introduction of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, which can specifically mark proteins of interest within a living cell. Fluorescent proteins are now available that allow a pool of molecules to be "turned on" by photoactivation. This unit discusses technical aspects for the general use of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins and introduces some specific applications in the concluding remarks.

  7. Proton Pathways in Green Fluorescence Protein

    PubMed Central

    Agmon, Noam

    2005-01-01

    Proton pathways in green fluorescent protein (GFP) are more extended than previously reported. In the x-ray data of wild-type GFP, a two-step exit pathway exists from the active site to the protein surface, controlled by a threonine switch. A proton entry pathway begins at a glutamate-lysine cluster around Glu-5, and extends all the way to the buried Glu-222 near the active site. This structural evidence suggests that GFP may function as a portable light-driven proton-pump, with proton emitted in the excited state through the switchable exit pathway, and replenished from Glu-222 and the Glu-5 entry pathway in the ground state. PMID:15681647

  8. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence can be used to study protein crystal nucleation through methods such as anisotropy, quenching, and resonance energy transfer (FRET), to follow pH and ionic strength changes, and follow events occurring at the growth interface. We have postulated, based upon a range of experimental evidence that the growth unit of tetragonal hen egg white lysozyme is an octamer. Several fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme have been prepared. The fluorescent probes lucifer yellow (LY), cascade blue, and 5-((2-aminoethyl)aminonapthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS), have been covalently attached to ASP 101. All crystallize in the characteristic tetragonal form, indicating that the bound probes are likely laying within the active site cleft. Crystals of the LY and EDANS derivatives have been found to diffract to at least 1.7 A. A second group of derivatives is to the N-terminal amine group, and these do not crystallize as this site is part of the contact region between the adjacent 43 helix chains. However derivatives at these sites would not interfere with formation of the 43 helices in solution. Preliminary FRET studies have been carried out using N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and LY (Ex -425 nm, Em 525 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1 M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10(exp -5) M respectively). The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence intensity of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations reflected in the lower solubility. The calculated average distance between any two protein molecules at 5 x 10(exp -6) M is approximately 70nm, well beyond the

  9. Phycobiliprotein fusion proteins: versatile intensely fluorescent constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping A.; Tooley, Aaron J.

    2004-06-01

    Since 1982, phycobiliproteins have served as fluorescent labels in a wide variety of cell and molecule analyses. The exceptional spectroscopic properties of these labels include very high absorbance coefficients and quantum yields, and large Stokes shifts. The spectroscopic diversity of these reagents is restricted to a subset of naturally occurring phycobiliproteins with stable assembly states in vitro, whose target specificity is generated by chemical conjugation to proteins or small molecules. The latter step generates heterogeneity. These limitations have been overcome by expressing various recombinant phycobiliprotein constructs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Modular recombinant phycobiliprotein-based labels were constructed with some or all of the following features (a) an affinity purification tag; (b) a stable oligomerization domain (to maintain stable higher order assemblies of the phycobiliprotein monomers at very low protein concentration); (c) a biospecific recognition domain. Such phycobiliprotein constructs are readily purified from crude cell extracts by affinity chromatography and used directly as fluorescent labels. To generate constructs for intracellular in vivo labeling, the entire pathways for the biosynthesis of the His-tagged holo- α (phycocyanobilin-bearing) subunit of phycocyanin (emission max. 641 nm) and of the His-tagged holo-α (phycobiliviolin-bearing) subunit of phycoerythrocyanin (emission max. 582 nm) were reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

  10. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  11. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  12. Recent advances on in vivo imaging with fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In vivo imaging with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and other fluorescent proteins is revolutionizing cancer biology and other fields of in vivo biology (Hoffman, 2005; Hoffman and Yang, 2006a,b,c). Our laboratory pioneered the use of GFP for in vivo imaging in 1997 (Chishima et al., 1997). This chapter highlights recent developments from our laboratory on both macro and micro in vivo imaging by using fluorescent proteins.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of enhanced green fluorescent protein in protein aggregates with expanded polyglutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is one of the characteristic steps in a number of neurodegenerative diseases eventually leading to neuronal death and thorough study of aggregation is required for the development of effective therapy. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the fluorescence dynamics of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in fusion with the polyQ-expanded polyglutamine stretch. At the expansion of polyQ above 39 residues, it has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregates, and is responsible for Huntington's disease. The results of the experiments show that expression of the eGFP in fusion with the 97Q protein leads to the decrease of the eGFP fluorescence lifetime by ~300 ps. This phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells, where the aggregation in polyQ is prevented. We demonstrate that the lifetime decrease observed is related to the aggregation per se and discuss the possible role of refractive index and homo-FRET in these dynamics.

  14. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Red Fluorescent Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konold, Patrick Eugene

    Red-emitting homologues (RFPs) of the native Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with emission wavelengths beyond 650 nm are desirable probes for in vivo imaging experiments. They offer the potential for deeper tissue penetration and lower background scatter given a cleaner spectral window. However, bioimaging applications are hindered by poor photophysics ( e.g. low fluorescence quantum yield, high photobleaching), which limits experimental resolution and represents a significant obstacle towards utilization for low copy-number, long-duration imaging applications. In this thesis, a variety of femtosecond nonlinear electronic spectroscopies were employed jointly with site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the photophysical properties of RFPs. In one study, the molecular mechanism of red emission was pursued in two notable RFPs, mPlum and TagRFP675. Solvation dynamics observed with time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy were interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations to indicate that their red-emission is correlated with the ability of specific chromophore-sidechain hydrogen-bonding interactions to interconvert between direct and water-mediated states. In a second set of studies, two-dimensional double quantum coherence spectroscopy was used to probe the electronic transitions of mPlum. It was discovered that it displayed a response distinctly different from an organic dye in bulk solvent. Modeling indicate of these spectra indicate the spectral features may be attributed to the existence of multiple high-lying (n>1) excited states. The results provide new insight into the electronic structure of these widely used fluorescent probes.

  15. Cell tracking using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Kohei; Tsujii, Hitomi; Omura, Tomomi

    2006-01-01

    The tracking of cell fate, shape and migration is an essential component in the study of the development of multicellular organisms. Here we report a protocol that uses the protein Kaede, which is fluorescent green after synthesis but can be photoconverted red by violet or UV light. We have used Kaede along with confocal laser scanning microscopy to track labeled cells in a pattern of interest in zebrafish embryos. This technique allows the visualization of cell movements and the tracing of neuronal shapes. We provide illustrative examples of expression by mRNA injection, mosaic expression by DNA injection, and the creation of permanent transgenic fish with the UAS-Gal4 system to visualize morphogenetic processes such as neurulation, placode formation and navigation of early commissural axons in the hindbrain. The procedure can be adapted to other photoconvertible and reversible fluorescent molecules, including KikGR and Dronpa; these molecules can be used in combination with two-photon confocal microscopy to specifically highlight cells buried in tissues. The total time needed to carry out the protocol involving transient expression of Kaede by injection of mRNA or DNA, photoconversion and imaging is 2-8 d.

  16. Designed Modular Proteins as Scaffolds To Stabilize Fluorescent Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Couleaud, Pierre; Adan-Bermudez, Sergio; Aires, Antonio; Mejías, Sara H; Sot, Begoña; Somoza, Alvaro; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2015-12-14

    Proteins have been used as templates to stabilize fluorescent metal nanoclusters thus obtaining stable fluorescent structures, and their fluorescent properties being modulated by the type of protein employed. Designed consensus tetratricopeptide repeat (CTPR) proteins are suited candidates as templates for the stabilization of metal nanoclusters due to their modular structural and functional properties. Here, we have studied the ability of CTPR proteins to stabilize fluorescent gold nanoclusters giving rise to designed functional hybrid nanostructures. First, we have investigated the influence of the number of CTPR units, as well as the presence of cysteine residues in the CTPR protein, on the fluorescent properties of the protein-stabilized gold nanoclusters. Synthetic protocols to retain the protein structure and function have been developed, since the structural and functional integrity of the protein template is critical for further applications. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, a CTPR module with specific binding capabilities has been used to stabilize gold nanoclusters with positive results. Remarkably, the protein-stabilized gold nanocluster obtained combines both the fluorescence properties of the nanoclusters and the functional properties of the protein. The fluorescence changes in nanoclusters fluorescence have been successfully used as a sensor to detect when the specific ligand was recognized by the CTPR module.

  17. Quantitation of carcinogen bound protein adducts by fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liang-Shang; Otteson, Michael S.; Doxtader, Mark M.; Skipper, Paul L.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    A highly significant correlation of aflatoxin B 1 serum albumin adduct level with daily aflatoxin B 1 intake was observed in a molecular epidemiological study of aflatoxin carcinogenesis which used conventional fluorescence spectroscopy methods for adduct quantitation. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence techniques have been employed to quantitate antibenzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide derived globin peptide adducts. Fast and efficient methods to isolate the peptide adducts as well as eliminate protein fluorescence background are described. A detection limit of several femtomoles has been achieved. Experimental and technical considerations of low temperature synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence line narrowing to improve the detection sensitivities are also presented.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  19. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Steven H D; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M

    2010-04-22

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals.

  20. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Steven H. D.; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals. PMID:20018790

  1. Fluorescent-protein-based probes: general principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-01-01

    An important application of fluorescent proteins is to derive genetically encoded fluorescent probes that can actively respond to cellular dynamics such as pH change, redox signaling, calcium oscillation, enzyme activities, and membrane potential. Despite the large diverse group of fluorescent-protein-based probes, a few basic principles have been established and are shared by most of these probes. In this article, the focus is on these general principles and strategies that guide the development of fluorescent-protein-based probes. A few examples are provided in each category to illustrate the corresponding principles. Since these principles are quite straightforward, others may adapt them to create fluorescent probes for their own interest. Hopefully, the development of the ever-growing family of fluorescent-protein-based probes will no longer be limited to a small number of laboratories specialized in senor development, leading to the situation that biological studies will be bettered assisted by genetically encoded sensors.

  2. Toward fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Patricia R.; Jones, Anita C.; Baxter, Robert L.; Baxter, Helen C.; Whittaker, A. Gavin; Campbell, Gaynor A.

    2004-06-01

    Prion proteins are the infectious agents that cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) in humans. These proteins are particularly resistant to normal sterilization procedures, and the theoretical risk of prion transmission via surgical instruments is of current public and professional concern. We are currently investigating fluorescence methods for the detection of proteins on surfaces, with a view to developing an optical-fiber-based system for routine, online monitoring of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments, in hospital sterilization departments. This paper presents preliminary results on the detection of femtomole amounts of fluorescently labelled protein on surgical steel and discusses some of the problems involved in the detection of fluorescence from metal samples.

  3. Fluorescence study of Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Wasylewski, M; Małecki, J; Wasylewski, Z

    1995-07-01

    Time-resolved, steady-state fluorescence and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD) have been used to resolve the fluorescence contributions of the two tryptophan residues, Trp-13 and Trp-85, in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). The iodide and acrylamide quenching data show that in CRP one tryptophan residue, Trp-85, is buried within the protein matrix and the other, Trp-13, is moderately exposed on the surface of the protein. Fluorescence-quenching-resolved spectra show that Trp-13 has emission at about 350 nm and contributes 76-83% to the total fluorescence emission. The Trp-85, unquenchable by iodide and acrylamide, has the fluorescence emission at about 337 nm. The time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that Trp-13 has a longer fluorescence decay time. The Trp-85 exhibits a shorter fluorescence decay time. In the CRP-cAMP complex the Trp-85, previously buried in the apoprotein becomes totally exposed to the iodide and acrylamide quenchers. The FDCD spectra indicate that in the CRP-cAMP complex Trp-85 remains in the same environment as in the protein alone. It has been proposed that the binding of cAMP to CRP is accompanied by a hinge reorientation of two protein domains. This allows for penetration of the quencher molecules into the Trp-85 residue previously buried in the protein matrix. PMID:8590598

  4. Identification of a Fluorescent Protein from Rhacostoma Atlantica.

    PubMed

    Tota, Michael R; Allen, Jeanna M; Karolin, Jan O; Geddes, Chris D; Ward, William W

    2016-09-01

    We have cloned a novel fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Rhacostoma atlantica. The closest known related fluorescent protein is the Phialidium yellow fluorescent protein, with only a 55% amino acid sequence identity. A somewhat unusual alanine-tyrosine-glycine amino acid sequence forms the presumed chromophore of the novel protein. The protein has an absorption peak at 466 nm and a fluorescence emission peak at 498 nm. The fluorescence quantum yield was measured to be 0.77 and the extinction coefficient is 58 200 M(-1) cm(-1) . Several mutations were identified that shift the absorption peak to about 494 nm and the emission peak to between 512 and 514 nm. PMID:27288884

  5. Screening for in planta protein-protein interactions combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation with flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Understanding protein and gene function requires identifying interaction partners using biochemical, molecular or genetic tools. In plants, searching for novel protein-protein interactions is limited to protein purification assays, heterologous in vivo systems such as the yeast-two-hybrid or mutant screens. Ideally one would be able to search for novel protein partners in living plant cells. We demonstrate that it is possible to screen for novel protein-protein interactions from a random library in protoplasted Arabidopsis plant cells and recover some of the interacting partners. Our screen is based on capturing the bi-molecular complementation of mYFP between an YN-bait fusion partner and a completely random prey YC-cDNA library with FACS. The candidate interactions were confirmed using in planta BiFC assays and in planta FRET-FLIM assays. From this work, we show that the well characterized protein Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase 3 (CPK3) interacts with APX3, HMGB5, ORP2A and a ricin B-related lectin domain containing protein At2g39050. This is one of the first randomin planta screens to be successfully employed. PMID:22789293

  6. High expression of green fluorescent protein in Pichia pastoris leads to formation of fluorescent particles.

    PubMed

    Lenassi Zupan, Ana; Trobec, Sonja; Gaberc-Porekar, Vladka; Menart, Viktor

    2004-04-01

    Wild type gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was stably integrated into the Pichia pastoris genome and yielded an expression level of over 40% of total cellular protein. The high cytoplasmic concentration of fluorescent (properly folded and processed) GFP caused the formation of fluorescent spherical structures, which could be observed by fluorescence or confocal microscopy after controlled permeabilization of the yeast cells with 0.2% N-lauroyl sarcosine (NLS). Fluorescent GFP particles were also isolated after removal of the cell wall and found to be quite resistant to 0.2% N-lauroyl sarcosine. SDS-PAGE analysis of the isolated fluorescent particles revealed the presence of an 80 kDa protein (alcohol oxidase) and GFP (30%). We conclude that GFP is able to enter spontaneously into the peroxisomes and is inserted into densely packed layers of alcohol oxidase. Consequently, the formation of similar fluorescent particles can also be expected in other organisms when using high-level expression systems. As GFP is widely used in fusion with other proteins as a reporter for protein localization and for many other applications in biotechnology, care must be taken to avoid false interpretations of targeting or trafficking mechanisms inside the cells. In addition, when whole cells or cytoplasmic fractions are used for the quantitative determination of GFP levels, incorrect and misleading values of GFP could be obtained due to the formation of fluorescent particles containing material inside which is not available for fluorescence measurements.

  7. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  8. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Gaffney, Jean P; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  9. Rapid caspase-3 activation during apoptosis revealed using fluorescence-resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tyas, Lorraine; Brophy, Victoria A.; Pope, Andrew; Rivett, A. Jennifer; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2000-01-01

    Caspase-3 is a crucial component of the apoptotic machinery in many cell types. Here, we report the timescale of caspase-3 activation in single living cells undergoing apoptosis. This was achieved by measuring the extent of fluorescence resonance energy transfer within a recombinant substrate containing cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) linked by a short peptide possessing the caspase-3 cleavage sequence, DEVD, to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP; i.e. CFP–DEVD–YFP). We demonstrate that, once initiated, the activation of caspase-3 is a very rapid process, taking 5 min or less to reach completion. Furthermore, this process occurs almost simultaneously with a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential. These events occur just prior to the characteristic morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Our results clearly demonstrate that, once initiated, the commitment of cells to apoptosis is a remarkably rapid event when visualized at the single cell level. PMID:11256610

  10. Microscopie de fluorescence de protéines autofluorescentes uniques pour la biologie cellulaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cognet, Laurent; Coussen, Françoise; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent proteins. Single-molecule experiments performed in live cells using eGFP and preferably eYFP fusion proteins are reviewed. Finally, the first use at the single-molecule level of citrine, a more photostable variant of the eYFP is reported when fused to a receptor for neurotransmitter in live cells. To cite this article: L. Cognet et al., C. R. Physique 3 (2002) 645-656.

  11. Guide to Red Fluorescent Proteins and Biosensors for Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first red fluorescent protein (RFP), named DsRed, 12 years ago, a wide pallet of red-shifted fluorescent proteins has been cloned and biotechnologically developed into monomeric fluorescent probes for optical microscopy. Several new types of monomeric RFPs that change the emission wavelength either with time, called fluorescent timers, or after a brief irradiation with violet light, known as photoactivatable proteins, have been also engineered. Moreover, RFPs with a large Stokes shift of fluorescence emission have been recently designed. Because of their distinctive excitation and fluorescence detection conditions developed specifically for microscopy, these fluorescent probes can be suboptimal for flow cytometry. Here, we have selected and summarized the advanced orange, red, and far-red fluorescent proteins with the properties specifically required for the flow cytometry applications. Their effective brightness was calculated for the laser sources available for the commercial flow cytometers and sorters. Compatibility of the fluorescent proteins of different colors in a multiparameter flow cytometry was determined. Novel FRET pairs, utilizing RFPs, RFP-based intracellular biosensors, and their application to a high-throughput screening, are also discussed. PMID:21704849

  12. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  13. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  14. Noninvasive Evaluation of Heavy Metal Uptake and Storage in Micoralgae Using a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Heavy Metal Biosensor1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Sathish; Torres, Moacir; Falcao, Vanessa; Ewalt Gray, Jaime; Coury, Daniel A.; Colepicolo, Pio; Sayre, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based heavy metal biosensor for the quantification of bioavailable free heavy metals in the cytoplasm of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The biosensor is composed of an end-to-end fusion of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), chicken metallothionein II (MT-II), and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In vitro measurements of YFP/CFP fluorescence emission ratios indicated that the addition of metals to the purified biosensor enhanced FRET between CFP and YFP, consistent with heavy metal-induced folding of MT-II. A maximum YFP/CFP FRET ratio of 2.8 was observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of heavy metals. The sensitivity of the biosensor was greatest for Hg2+ followed by Cd2+ ≈ Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Cu2+. The heavy metal biosensor was unresponsive to metals that do not bind to MT-II (Na+ and Mg2+). When expressed in C. reinhardtii, we observed a differential metal-dependent response to saturating external concentrations (1.6 mm) of heavy metals (Pb2+ > Cd2+) that was unlike that observed for the isolated biosensor (in vitro). Significantly, analysis of metal uptake kinetics indicated that equilibration of the cytoplasm with externally applied heavy metals occurred within seconds. Our results also indicated that algae have substantial buffering capacity for free heavy metals in their cytosol, even at high external metal concentrations. PMID:24368336

  15. Noninvasive evaluation of heavy metal uptake and storage in micoralgae using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based heavy metal biosensor.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Sathish; Torres, Moacir; Falcao, Vanessa; Ewalt Gray, Jaime; Coury, Daniel A; Colepicolo, Pio; Sayre, Richard

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based heavy metal biosensor for the quantification of bioavailable free heavy metals in the cytoplasm of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The biosensor is composed of an end-to-end fusion of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), chicken metallothionein II (MT-II), and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In vitro measurements of YFP/CFP fluorescence emission ratios indicated that the addition of metals to the purified biosensor enhanced FRET between CFP and YFP, consistent with heavy metal-induced folding of MT-II. A maximum YFP/CFP FRET ratio of 2.8 was observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of heavy metals. The sensitivity of the biosensor was greatest for Hg2+ followed by Cd2+≈Pb2+>Zn2+>Cu2+. The heavy metal biosensor was unresponsive to metals that do not bind to MT-II (Na+ and Mg2+). When expressed in C. reinhardtii, we observed a differential metal-dependent response to saturating external concentrations (1.6 mm) of heavy metals (Pb2+>Cd2+) that was unlike that observed for the isolated biosensor (in vitro). Significantly, analysis of metal uptake kinetics indicated that equilibration of the cytoplasm with externally applied heavy metals occurred within seconds. Our results also indicated that algae have substantial buffering capacity for free heavy metals in their cytosol, even at high external metal concentrations.

  16. Green Fluorescent Protein with Anionic Tryptophan-Based Chromophore and Long Fluorescence Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Lidsky, Peter V.; Gorbachev, Dmitry A.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu.; Pereverzeva, Alina R.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Zherdeva, Victoria V.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Bommarius, Andreas S.; Sharonov, George V.; Lindquist, Jake R.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP—the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins. PMID:26200874

  17. AtRAB-H1b and AtRAB-H1c GTPases, homologues of the yeast Ypt6, target reporter proteins to the Golgi when expressed in Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jorunn Nergaard; Chow, Cheung-Ming; Moore, Ian; Hawes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Ypt/Rab GTPases act as key regulators of intracellular traffic through the conformational differences exhibited by their GTP or GDP-bound forms. In this paper, two Arabidopsis Ypt6 homologues, AtRAB-H1(b) and AtRAB-H1(c) were characterized and compared. Using a live cell imaging approach, it is shown that yellow fluorescent protein-fusions (YFP) of AtRAB-H1(b) and AtRAB-H1(c) locate to the Golgi and to the cytosol in both Nicotiana tabacum and in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, YFP-AtRAB-H1(b) targets an as yet unknown compartment not labelled by YFP-AtRAB-H1(c) or Golgi markers. It is also shown that the subcellular location of YFP-AtRAB-H1(b) and YFP-AtRAB-H1(c) is affected by the state of GTP-binding and that expression of a GTP-deficient mutant results in increased apoplastic fluorescence of a secretory form of YFP.

  18. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  19. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding. PMID:23056480

  20. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  1. A never ending race for new and improved fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins are now used as tools for research in all organisms. There has been massive progress over the past 15 years in creating a palette of fluorescent proteins with a wide spectrum of specific properties. One of the big challenges is to decide which variant may be best for a certain application. A recent article by Mann et al. in BMC Biotechnology describes a new orange fluorescent protein in plants. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6750/12/17 PMID:22554191

  2. Ultraviolet fluorescence of coelenteramide and coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins. Experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Roza R; Tomilin, Felix N; Kuzubov, Alexander A; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S

    2016-09-01

    Coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins are products of bioluminescent reactions of marine coelenterates. They are called 'discharged photoproteins'. Their light-induced fluorescence spectra are variable, depending considerably on external conditions. Current work studies a dependence of light-induced fluorescence spectra of discharged photoproteins obelin, aequorin, and clytin on excitation energy. It was demonstrated that photoexcitation to the upper electron-excited states (260-300nm) of the discharged photoproteins initiates a fluorescence peak in the near UV region, in addition to the blue-green emission. To characterize the UV fluorescence, the light-induced fluorescence spectra of coelenteramide (CLM), fluorophore of the discharged photoproteins, were studied in methanol solution. Similar to photoproteins, the CLM spectra depended on photoexcitation energy; the additional peak (330nm) in the near UV region was observed in CLM fluorescence at higher excitation energy (260-300nm). Quantum chemical calculations by time depending method with B3LYP/cc-pVDZ showed that the conjugated pyrazine-phenolic fragment and benzene moiety of CLM molecule are responsible for the additional UV fluorescence peak. Quantum yields of CLM fluorescence in methanol were 0.028±0.005 at 270-340nm photoexcitation. A conclusion was made that the UV emission of CLM might contribute to the UV fluorescence of the discharged photoproteins. The study develops knowledge on internal energy transfer in biological structures - complexes of proteins with low-weight aromatic molecules. PMID:27400455

  3. LucY: A Versatile New Fluorescent Reporter Protein

    PubMed Central

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrast to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions. PMID:25906065

  4. LucY: A versatile new fluorescent reporter protein

    SciTech Connect

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2015-04-23

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrast to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.

  5. LucY: A versatile new fluorescent reporter protein

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2015-04-23

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrastmore » to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.« less

  6. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  7. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D is superior to paraformaldehyde fixation for measuring FRET between fluorescent protein-tagged Golgi components.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Christian Peter; Vereb, György; Geshi, Naomi; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Protein-protein interaction at the organelle level can be analyzed by using tagged proteins and assessing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent donor and acceptor proteins. Such studies are able to uncover partners in the regulation of proteins and enzymes. However, any organelle movement is an issue for live FRET microscopy, as the observed organelle must not change position during measurement. One of the mobile organelles in plants is the Golgi apparatus following cytoplasmic streaming. It is involved in the decoration of proteins and processing of complex glycan structures for the cell wall. Understanding of these processes is still limited, but evidence is emerging that protein-protein interaction plays a key role in the function of this organelle. In the past, mobile organelles were usually immobilized with paraformaldehyde (PFA) for FRET-based interaction studies. Here, we show that the actin inhibitor Cytochalasin D (CytD) is superior to PFA for immobilization of Golgi stacks in plant cells. Two glycosyltransferases known to interact were tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), respectively, coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and analyzed using confocal microscopy and spectral imaging. Fixation with PFA leads to reduced emission intensity when compared to CytD treatment. Furthermore, the calculated FRET efficiency was significantly higher with CytD than with PFA. The documented improvements are beneficial for all methods measuring FRET, where immobilization of the investigated molecules is necessary. It can be expected that FRET measurement in organelles of animal cells will also benefit from the use of inhibitors acting on the cytoskeleton.

  8. Quantification of photosensitized singlet oxygen production by a fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Ragàs, Xavier; Cooper, Laurie P; White, John H; Nonell, Santi; Flors, Cristina

    2011-01-17

    Fluorescent proteins are increasingly becoming actuators in a range of cell biology techniques. One of those techniques is chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI), which is employed to specifically inactivate the function of target proteins or organelles by producing photochemical damage. CALI is achieved by the irradiation of dyes that are able to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). The combination of CALI and the labelling specificity that fluorescent proteins provide is useful to avoid uncontrolled photodamage, although the inactivation mechanisms by ROS are dependent on the fluorescent protein and are not fully understood. Herein, we present a quantitative study of the ability of the red fluorescent protein TagRFP to produce ROS, in particular singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). TagRFP is able to photosensitize (1)O(2) with an estimated quantum yield of 0.004. This is the first estimation of a quantum yield of (1)O(2) production value for a GFP-like protein. We also find that TagRFP has a short triplet lifetime compared to EGFP, which reflects relatively high oxygen accessibility to the chromophore. The insight into the structural and photophysical properties of TagRFP has implications in improving fluorescent proteins for fluorescence microscopy and CALI. PMID:21226197

  9. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system.

  10. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system. PMID:23996319

  11. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Pedelacq,J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP.

  12. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  13. Latest methods of fluorescence-based protein crystal identification

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Arne; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-28

    Fluorescence, whether intrinsic or by using trace fluorescent labeling, can be a powerful aid in macromolecule crystallization. Its use in screening for crystals is discussed here. Successful protein crystallization screening experiments are dependent upon the experimenter being able to identify positive outcomes. The introduction of fluorescence techniques has brought a powerful and versatile tool to the aid of the crystal grower. Trace fluorescent labeling, in which a fluorescent probe is covalently bound to a subpopulation (<0.5%) of the protein, enables the use of visible fluorescence. Alternatively, one can avoid covalent modification and use UV fluorescence, exploiting the intrinsic fluorescent amino acids present in most proteins. By the use of these techniques, crystals that had previously been obscured in the crystallization drop can readily be identified and distinguished from amorphous precipitate or salt crystals. Additionally, lead conditions that may not have been obvious as such under white-light illumination can be identified. In all cases review of the screening plate is considerably accelerated, as the eye can quickly note objects of increased intensity.

  14. Molecular spies for bioimaging--fluorescent protein-based probes.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Niino, Yusuke

    2015-05-21

    Convergent advances in optical imaging and genetic engineering have fueled the development of new technologies for biological visualization. Those technologies include genetically encoded indicators based on fluorescent proteins (FPs) for imaging ions, molecules, and enzymatic activities "to spy on cells," as phrased by Roger Tsien, by sneaking into specific tissues, cell types, or subcellular compartments, and reporting on specific intracellular activities. Here we review the current range of unimolecular indicators whose working principle is the conversion of a protein conformational change into a fluorescence signal. Many of the indicators have been developed from fluorescence resonance energy transfer- and single-FP-based approaches. PMID:26000848

  15. Far-red fluorescent tag for protein labelling.

    PubMed

    Fradkov, Arkady F; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Staroverov, Dmitry B; Bulina, Maria E; Yanushevich, Yurii G; Martynov, Vladimir I; Lukyanov, Sergey; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2002-11-15

    Practical applications of green fluorescent protein ('GFP')-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) from species of the class Anthozoa (sea anemones, corals and sea pens) are strongly restricted owing to their oligomeric nature. Here we suggest a strategy to overcome this problem by the use of two covalently linked identical red FPs as non-oligomerizing fusion tags. We have applied this approach to the dimeric far-red fluorescent protein HcRed1 and have demonstrated superiority of the tandem tag in the in vivo labelling of fine cytoskeletal structures and tiny nucleoli. In addition, a possibility of effective fluorescence resonance energy transfer ('FRET') between enhanced yellow FP mutant ('EYFP') and tandem HcRed1 was demonstrated in a protease assay.

  16. Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins from the anthozoan Corynactis californica.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Keenan, Robert J; McCord, Robert; Matysik, Artur; Christianson, Lynne M; Haddock, Steven H D

    2008-01-01

    Color morphs of the temperate, nonsymbiotic corallimorpharian Corynactis californica show variation in pigment pattern and coloring. We collected seven distinct color morphs of C. californica from subtidal locations in Monterey Bay, California, and found that tissue- and color-morph-specific expression of at least six different genes is responsible for this variation. Each morph contains at least three to four distinct genetic loci that code for these colors, and one morph contains at least five loci. These genes encode a subfamily of new GFP-like proteins, which fluoresce across the visible spectrum from green to red, while sharing between 75% to 89% pairwise amino-acid identity. Biophysical characterization reveals interesting spectral properties, including a bright yellow protein, an orange protein, and a red protein exhibiting a "fluorescent timer" phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the FP genes from this species evolved together but that diversification of anthozoan fluorescent proteins has taken place outside of phylogenetic constraints, especially within the Corallimorpharia. The discovery of more examples of fluorescent proteins in a non-bioluminescent, nonsymbiotic anthozoan highlights possibilities of adaptive ecological significance unrelated to light regulation for algal symbionts. The patterns and colors of fluorescent proteins in C. californica and similar species may hold meaning for organisms that possess the visual pigments to distinguish them. PMID:18330643

  17. Measuring and Sorting Cell Populations Expressing Isospectral Fluorescent Proteins with Different Fluorescence Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Naivar, Mark; Houston, Jessica P.; Brent, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs) fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP) and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼1.5 ns vs ∼3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a “pseudophasor” that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation. PMID:25302964

  18. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  19. Rational design of enhanced photoresistance in a photoswitchable fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chenxi; Byrdin, Martin; El Khatib, Mariam; Henry, Xavier; Adam, Virgile; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are particularly susceptible to photobleaching, the permanent loss of fluorescence emission resulting from photodestruction of the chromophore. In the case of Reversibly Switchable Fluorescent Proteins (RSFPs), which can be switched back and forth between a non-fluorescent and a fluorescent state, the achievable number of switching cycles is limited by photobleaching, a process known as photofatigue. Photofatigue has become a crucial limitation in a number of advanced applications based on repeated photoswitching of RSFPs, notably in the field of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, based on our previous structural investigation of photobleaching mechanisms in IrisFP, an RSFP also capable of green-to-red photoconversion, we present the rational design of a single-mutant IrisFP-M159A that displays considerably enhanced photostability. The results suggest that, under moderate illumination intensities, photobleaching of IrisFP-like Anthozoan fluorescent proteins such as EosFP, Dendra or Dronpa derivatives is mainly driven by an oxygen-dependent mechanism resulting in the irreversible sulfoxidation of methionine 159. The photofatigue decay profiles of IrisFP and its photoresistant mutant IrisFP-M159A were investigated in different experimental conditions, in vitro and in cellulo. Although the performance of the mutant was found to be always superior, the results showed switching behaviors strongly dependent on the nanoenvironment. Thus, in general, assessment of photostability and switching properties of RSFPs should be carried out in real experimental conditions.

  20. Fluorescent Protein-Based Ca2+ Sensor Reveals Global, Divalent Cation-Dependent Conformational Changes in Cardiac Troponin C

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Myriam A.; Pinto, Jose R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is a key effector in cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling as the Ca2+ sensing subunit responsible for controlling contraction. In this study, we generated several FRET sensors for divalent cations based on cTnC flanked by a donor fluorescent protein (CFP) and an acceptor fluorescent protein (YFP). The sensors report Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding, and relay global structural information about the structural relationship between cTnC’s N- and C-domains. The sensors were first characterized using end point titrations to decipher the response to Ca2+ binding in the presence or absence of Mg2+. The sensor that exhibited the largest responses in end point titrations, CTV-TnC, (Cerulean, TnC, and Venus) was characterized more extensively. Most of the divalent cation-dependent FRET signal originates from the high affinity C-terminal EF hands. CTV-TnC reconstitutes into skinned fiber preparations indicating proper assembly of troponin complex, with only ~0.2 pCa unit rightward shift of Ca2+-sensitive force development compared to WT-cTnC. Affinity of CTV-TnC for divalent cations is in agreement with known values for WT-cTnC. Analytical ultracentrifugation indicates that CTV-TnC undergoes compaction as divalent cations bind. C-terminal sites induce ion-specific (Ca2+ versus Mg2+) conformational changes in cTnC. Our data also provide support for the presence of additional, non-EF-hand sites on cTnC for Mg2+ binding. In conclusion, we successfully generated a novel FRET-Ca2+ sensor based on full length cTnC with a variety of cellular applications. Our sensor reveals global structural information about cTnC upon divalent cation binding. PMID:27736894

  1. Protein specific fluorescent microspheres for labelling a protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, stable and biocompatible microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing an acrylic monomer containing a covalent bonding group such as hydroxyl, amine or carboxyl, for example, hydroxyethylmethacrylate, with an addition polymerizable fluorescent comonomer such as dansyl allyl amine. A lectin or antibody is bound to the covalent site to provide cell specificity. When the microspheres are added to a cell suspension the marked microspheres will specifically label a cell membrane by binding to a specific receptor site thereon. The labeled membrane can then be detected by fluorescence of the fluorescent monomer.

  2. A novel fluorescent histamine H1 receptor antagonist demonstrates the advantage of using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study the binding of lipophilic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Rachel H; Briddon, Stephen J; Hill, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Fluorescent ligands facilitate the study of ligand–receptor interactions at the level of single cells and individual receptors. Here, we describe a novel fluorescent histamine H1 receptor antagonist (mepyramine-BODIPY630-650) and use it to monitor the membrane diffusion of the histamine H1 receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The human histamine H1 receptor fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) was transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells. The time course of binding of mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 to the H1 receptor was determined by confocal microscopy. Additionally, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to characterize the diffusion coefficient of the H1 receptor in cell membranes both directly (YFP fluorescence) and in its antagonist-bound state (with mepyramine-BODIPY630-650). KEY RESULTS Mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 was a high-affinity antagonist at the histamine H1 receptor. Specific membrane binding, in addition to significant intracellular uptake of the fluorescent ligand, was detected by confocal microscopy. However, FCS was able to quantify the receptor-specific binding in the membrane, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the antagonist–H1 receptor–YFP complexes, which was significantly slower than when determined directly using YFP. FCS also detected specific binding of mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 to the endogenous H1 receptor in HeLa cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 is a useful tool for localizing the H1 receptor using confocal microscopy. However, its use in conjunction with FCS allows quantification of ligand binding at the membrane, as well as determining receptor diffusion in the absence of significant bleaching effects. Finally, these methods can be successfully extended to endogenously expressed untagged receptors in HeLa cells. PMID:21880035

  3. Exploiting fluorescence for multiplex immunoassays on protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Andrea; Matkó, János; Prechl, József

    2014-09-01

    Protein microarray technology is becoming the method of choice for identifying protein interaction partners, detecting specific proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, or for characterizing protein interactions and serum antibodies in a massively parallel manner. Availability of the well-established instrumentation of DNA arrays and development of new fluorescent detection instruments promoted the spread of this technique. Fluorescent detection has the advantage of high sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and wide dynamic range required by most measurements. Fluorescence through specifically designed probes and an increasing variety of detection modes offers an excellent tool for such microarray platforms. Measuring for example the level of antibodies, their isotypes and/or antigen specificity simultaneously can offer more complex and comprehensive information about the investigated biological phenomenon, especially if we take into consideration that hundreds of samples can be measured in a single assay. Not only body fluids, but also cell lysates, extracted cellular components, and intact living cells can be analyzed on protein arrays for monitoring functional responses to printed samples on the surface. As a rapidly evolving area, protein microarray technology offers a great bulk of information and new depth of knowledge. These are the features that endow protein arrays with wide applicability and robust sample analyzing capability. On the whole, protein arrays are emerging new tools not just in proteomics, but glycomics, lipidomics, and are also important for immunological research. In this review we attempt to summarize the technical aspects of planar fluorescent microarray technology along with the description of its main immunological applications.

  4. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  5. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  6. Enhanced Archaerhodopsin Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yiyang; Li, Jin Zhong; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    A longstanding goal in neuroscience has been to develop techniques for imaging the voltage dynamics of genetically defined subsets of neurons. Optical sensors of transmembrane voltage would enhance studies of neural activity in contexts ranging from individual neurons cultured in vitro to neuronal populations in awake-behaving animals. Recent progress has identified Archaerhodopsin (Arch) based sensors as a promising, genetically encoded class of fluorescent voltage indicators that can report single action potentials. Wild-type Arch exhibits sub-millisecond fluorescence responses to trans-membrane voltage, but its light-activated proton pump also responds to the imaging illumination. An Arch mutant (Arch-D95N) exhibits no photocurrent, but has a slower, ~40 ms response to voltage transients. Here we present Arch-derived voltage sensors with trafficking signals that enhance their localization to the neural membrane. We also describe Arch mutant sensors (Arch-EEN and -EEQ) that exhibit faster kinetics and greater fluorescence dynamic range than Arch-D95N, and no photocurrent at the illumination intensities normally used for imaging. We benchmarked these voltage sensors regarding their spike detection fidelity by using a signal detection theoretic framework that takes into account the experimentally measured photon shot noise and optical waveforms for single action potentials. This analysis revealed that by combining the sequence mutations and enhanced trafficking sequences, the new sensors improved the fidelity of spike detection by nearly three-fold in comparison to Arch-D95N. PMID:23840563

  7. A practical teaching course in directed protein evolution using the green fluorescent protein as a model.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain reaction. Screening of bacterial colonies transformed with random mutant libraries identified GFP variants with increased fluorescence yields. Mapping the three-dimensional structure of these mutants demonstrated how alterations in structural features such as the environment around the fluorophore and properties of the protein surface can influence functional properties such as the intensity of fluorescence and protein solubility.

  8. Expansion Microscopy with Conventional Antibodies and Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chozinski, Tyler J.; Halpern, Aaron R.; Okawa, Haruhisa; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Tremel, Grant J.; Wong, Rachel O.L.; Vaughan, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Expansion microscopy is a recently introduced technique in which fluorophores on fixed specimens are linked to a swellable polymer that is physically expanded to enable super-resolution microscopy with ordinary microscopes. We have developed and characterized new methods for linking fluorophores to the polymer that now enable expansion microscopy with conventional fluorescently-labeled antibodies and fluorescent proteins. Our methods simplify the procedure, expand the palette of compatible labels, and will aid in rapid dissemination of the technique. PMID:27064647

  9. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy.

  10. Tracking the biogenesis and inheritance of subpellicular microtubule in Trypanosoma brucei with inducible YFP-α-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Omar; Lim, Li-Fern; He, Cynthia Y

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton forms the most prominent structural system in Trypanosoma brucei, undergoing extensive modifications during the cell cycle. Visualization of tyrosinated microtubules leads to a semiconservative mode of inheritance, whereas recent studies employing microtubule plus end tracking proteins have hinted at an asymmetric pattern of cytoskeletal inheritance. To further the knowledge of microtubule synthesis and inheritance during T. brucei cell cycle, the dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton was visualized by inducible YFP-α-tubulin expression. During new flagellum/flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) biogenesis and cell growth, YFP-α-tubulin was incorporated mainly between the old and new flagellum/FAZ complexes. Cytoskeletal modifications at the posterior end of the cells were observed with EB1, a microtubule plus end binding protein, particularly during mitosis. Additionally, the newly formed microtubules segregated asymmetrically, with the daughter cell inheriting the new flagellum/FAZ complex retaining most of the new microtubules. Together, our results suggest an intimate connection between new microtubule formation and new FAZ assembly, consequently leading to asymmetric microtubule inheritance and cell division.

  11. Studies on interaction of cucurbit aphid-borne yellow virus proteins using yeast two-hybrid system and bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Chen, X H; Xiang, H Y; Wang, Z; Zhang, Y J; Han, C G; Li, D W; Yu, J L; Cheng, Y Q

    2011-01-01

    In this article, yeast two-hybrid system (YTHS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) were used to analyze the interactions of cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV)-encoded proteins. P0, P1, P1-2, P3, P4, and P5 were tested by YTHS in all possible pairwise combinations, and only P3/P3 interaction was detected. Results obtained by BiFC further confirmed the self-interaction of P3, and the subcellular localization of reconstituted YFP fluorescence was observed mainly in nuclei of Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells. Domains involved in P3/P3 self-interaction were analyzed by YTHS and BiFC using deletion mutants. The results showed that R domain (residues 1-61) in the N-terminus could self-interact, and it also interacted with the S domain (residues 62-199) in the C-terminus of P3. The present work would serve as a molecular basis for further characterization of CABYV proteins, and the regions involved in P3/P3 self-interaction could provide the clue for understanding the capsid assembly pathway of CABYV. PMID:21978157

  12. A palette of fluorescent proteins optimized for diverse cellular environments

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Markwardt, Michele L.; Rizzo, Mark; Guo, Feng; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    To perform quantitative live cell imaging, investigators require fluorescent reporters that accurately report protein localization and levels, while minimally perturbing the cell. Yet, within the biochemically distinct environments of cellular organelles, popular fluorescent proteins (FPs), including EGFP, can be unreliable for quantitative imaging, resulting in underestimation of protein levels and incorrect localization. Specifically, within the secretory pathway, significant populations of FPs misfold and fail to fluoresce due to non-native disulphide bond formation. Furthermore, transmembrane FP fusion constructs can disrupt organelle architecture due to oligomerizing tendencies of numerous common FPs. Here, we describe a powerful set of bright and inert FPs optimized for use in multiple cellular compartments, especially oxidizing environments and biological membranes. Also, we provide new insights into use of red FPs in the secretory pathway. Our monomeric "oxFPs" finally resolve long standing, underappreciated, and important problems of cell biology and should be useful for a number of applications. PMID:26158227

  13. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging of a single living cell using green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Kay, Steve A.; Day, Richard N.

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging microscopy is a unique tool to visualize the spatiotemporal dynamics of protein interactions in living cells. Genetic vectors that encode protein fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP) provide a method for imaging protein localization in living cells. We used FRET to study dimerization of the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1 fused to GFP and BFP. A fusion protein containing GFP separated from BFP by 29 amino acids served as a positive control for FRET. Transcriptional activity of the GFP- and BFP-Pit-1 fusion proteins was demonstrated by their ability to activate the prolactin gene promoter. Using optimized excitation and emission filters, cells expressing the fluorescently-tagged Pit-1 proteins were imaged with a back- thinned, back-illuminated CCD chip that has about 50% quantum efficiency in the blue range. 2D FRET images acquired at the focal plane demonstrated Pit-1 protein associations in the nucleus of living cells. The significance of 2- and 3-D energy transfer imaging from these living cells is discussed.

  14. Heterogeneity and restricted state selection in FRET with fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacker, T. S.; Duchen, M. R.; Bain, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Most fluorescent proteins exhibit multi-exponential fluorescence decays, indicating the presence of a heterogeneous excited state population. In the analysis of FRET to and between fluorescent proteins, it is often convenient to assume that a single interaction pathway is involved. However, in recent work we have shown that this assumption does not hold. Moreover, certain pathways can be highly constrained, leading to the potential misinterpretation of experimental data concerning protein-protein interactions. FRET and single-photon absorption both obey the same global electric dipole selection rules but differ greatly in the mechanism of the acceptor photoselection. In an isotropic medium, single-photon excitation accesses all acceptor transition dipole moment orientations with an equal probability. However, the FRET rate depends on the relative orientation of the donor and acceptor through the κ2 orientation parameter. We show how time- and spectrally- resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay measurements following direct acceptor excitation, combined with those of the interacting FRET pair, can be used to identify restricted FRET state selection and thus provide accurate measurements of protein-protein interaction dynamics.

  15. Monomeric red fluorescent proteins with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Hulit, James; Subach, Oksana M; Wu, Bin; Abdulla, Arian; Segall, Jeffrey E; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-03-23

    Two-photon microscopy has advanced fluorescence imaging of cellular processes in living animals. Fluorescent proteins in the blue-green wavelength range are widely used in two-photon microscopy; however, the use of red fluorescent proteins is limited by the low power output of Ti-Sapphire lasers above 1,000 nm. To overcome this limitation we have developed two red fluorescent proteins, LSS-mKate1 and LSS-mKate2, which possess large Stokes shifts with excitation/emission maxima at 463/624 and 460/605 nm, respectively. These LSS-mKates are characterized by high pH stability, photostability, rapid chromophore maturation, and monomeric behavior. They lack absorbance in the green region, providing an additional red color to the commonly used red fluorescent proteins. Substantial overlap between the two-photon excitation spectra of the LSS-mKates and blue-green fluorophores enables multicolor imaging using a single laser. We applied this approach to a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer to intravitally study the motility and Golgi-nucleus alignment of tumor cells as a function of their distance from blood vessels. Our data indicate that within 40 mum the breast cancer cells show significant polarization towards vessels in living mice.

  16. Integrated imaging instrument for self-calibrated fluorescence protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddington, A. P.; Monroe, M. R.; Ünlü, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Protein microarrays, or multiplexed and high-throughput assays, monitor multiple protein binding events to facilitate the understanding of disease progression and cell physiology. Fluorescence imaging is a popular method to detect proteins captured by immobilized probes with high sensitivity and specificity. Reliability of fluorescence assays depends on achieving minimal inter- and intra-assay probe immobilization variation, an ongoing challenge for protein microarrays. Therefore, it is desirable to establish a label-free method to quantify the probe density prior to target incubation to calibrate the fluorescence readout. Previously, a silicon oxide on silicon chip design was introduced to enhance the fluorescence signal and enable interferometric imaging to self-calibrate the signal with the immobilized probe density. In this paper, an integrated interferometric reflectance imaging sensor and wide-field fluorescence instrument is introduced for sensitive and calibrated microarray measurements. This platform is able to analyze a 2.5 mm × 3.4 mm area, or 200 spots (100 μm diameter with 200 μm pitch), in a single field-of-view.

  17. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  18. On the Design of Low-Cost Fluorescent Protein Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, Leah

    , magnetic beads, nanoparticles or quantum dots designed to form covalent bonds with amino groups, sulfhydryl groups, carboxylic groups and other reactive functionalities in amino acids. It is not uncommon to conduct combinations of techniques, for example, the introduction of fluorescent labels or probes to proteins require in many cases, site-directed mutagenesis followed by covalent bonding of the fluorescent dye. Accordingly, two or more proteins can be combined to create hybrid or fusion proteins with multiple or altered functions. Indeed, research involving the green fluorescent protein and fluorescent proteins of a variety of colors has expanded by leaps and bounds in the last decade. Because these fluorescent proteins can be genetically encoded in cells, it is possible to observe various cellular processes in vivo. However, this topic has been reviewed extensively in the literature and, thus, will not be expounded on in this chapter.

  19. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  20. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  1. Fluorescence-based multiplex protein detection using optically encoded microbeads.

    PubMed

    Jun, Bong-Hyun; Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong

    2012-01-01

    Potential utilization of proteins for early detection and diagnosis of various diseases has drawn considerable interest in the development of protein-based multiplex detection techniques. Among the various techniques for high-throughput protein screening, optically-encoded beads combined with fluorescence-based target monitoring have great advantages over the planar array-based multiplexing assays. This review discusses recent developments of analytical methods of screening protein molecules on microbead-based platforms. These include various strategies such as barcoded microbeads, molecular beacon-based techniques, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based techniques. Their applications for label-free protein detection are also addressed. Especially, the optically-encoded beads such as multilayer fluorescence beads and SERS-encoded beads are successful for generating a large number of coding.

  2. The photochemistry of fluorescent proteins: implications for their biological applications.

    PubMed

    Seward, Harriet E; Bagshaw, Clive R

    2009-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria, its relatives and derivatives are ubiquitous in their use as biological probes. In this tutorial review, we discuss the photochemistry of this fascinating class of proteins and illustrate some of their advantages and drawbacks in a range of applications. In particular, we focus on the ionisation states of the chromophore and how they are affected by internal and external proton transfer. Light-induced reversible and irreversible events are discussed in terms of the underlying chromophore structure. These phenomena have an influence on the interpretation of FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer), FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching), as well as single molecule studies.

  3. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein-protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces.

  4. Detection of botulinum toxins: micromechanical and fluorescence-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Parpura, Vladimir; Chapman, Edwin R

    2005-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most lethal of known human toxins, exerting their actions by cleaving the soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) required for neurotransmitter release. Early detection of these toxins is important for appropriate medical treatment. To detect BoNT activity, traditional assays monitor the effects of the toxins on a mammalian organism (observing signs of botulism in mice), or identify cleaved substrate molecules (electrophoresis and immunoblot). Similarly, enzyme-linked assays were used for screening potential toxin inhibitors in vitro in attempt to select antitoxins that could be used for therapeutic purposes. Here we review two recently developed sensor systems for detection of toxin activity in vitro and in living cells. In vitro detection was carried out using a micromechanosensor that relies on the attachment of a bead to the micromachined cantilever through the interactions between SNARE proteins, with synaptobrevin 2 deposited onto beads and syntaxin 1A deposited onto cantilevers. The presence of toxin is indicated by the detachment of the bead, resulting from cleavage of synaptobrevin 2. Additional in vitro detection is possible using fluorescent sensors constructed by inserting linkers, containing fragments of SNARE proteins acting as toxin substrates, between cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP and YFP). Toxins cause the cleavage of these linkers and thereby abolish fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CFP and YFP. This approach, combined with an additional sensor based on subcellular redistribution of YFP fluorescence in cells, was used for cell-based screening of toxin activity.

  5. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques.

  6. Understanding Protein Folding from Advances of Fluorescence Energy Transfer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcherkasskaya, Olga; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2001-03-01

    A multi-site fluorescence energy transfer method was developed for the study of protein folding. Technique uses "tyrosine-phenylalanine" substitution mutagenesis to place the "tyrosine-guest" into positions of interest into the protein structure. Tetranitromethane modification of the tyrosine-guest renders this amino acid an acceptor of the tryptophan fluorescence. This approach can be applied to any protein system, and, most importantly, does not require single- or double-labeling of the protein molecule by a donor and/or an acceptor fluorophore. It is equally suited for equilibrium as well as kinetic studies of folding. We tested the methodology to monitor the equilibrium (un)folding of the immunoglobulin binding domain B1 of streptococcal protein G (GB1) induced by guanidine hydrochloride. Wild-type GB1 contains three tyrosines located at positions 3, 33, 45 and a single tryptophan residue at position 43. Two of the three tyrosines were replaced in turn, thereby allowing us to measure the energy transfer from Trp43 to each particular tyrosine. Overall, multi-parametrical experiments on GB1 including circular dichroism, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, as well as fluorescence energy transfer revealed the existence of highly stable unfolded intermediates, which precede the formation of the rigid (native) secondary structure.

  7. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    PubMed

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders.

  8. Fluorescent Protein Nanowire-Mediated Protein Microarrays for Multiplexed and Highly Sensitive Pathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Men, Dong; Zhou, Juan; Li, Wei; Leng, Yan; Chen, Xinwen; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Xian-En

    2016-07-13

    Protein microarrays are powerful tools for high-throughput and simultaneous detection of different target molecules in complex biological samples. However, the sensitivity of conventional fluorescence-labeling protein detection methods is limited by the availability of signal molecules for binding to the target molecule. Here, we built a multifunctional fluorescent protein nanowire (FNw) by harnessing self-assembly of yeast amyloid protein. The FNw integrated a large number of fluorescent molecules, thereby enhancing the fluorescent signal output in target detection. The FNw was then combined with protein microarray technology to detect proteins derived from two pathogens, including influenza virus (hemagglutinin 1, HA1) and human immunodeficiency virus (p24 and gp120). The resulting detection sensitivity achieved a 100-fold improvement over a commercially available detection reagent. PMID:27315221

  9. Measuring initiator caspase activation by bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Melissa J; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Initiator caspases, including caspase-2, -8, and -9, are activated by the proximity-driven dimerization that occurs after their recruitment to activation platforms. Here we describe the use of caspase bimolecular fluorescence complementation (caspase BiFC) to measure this induced proximity. BiFC assays rely on the use of a split fluorescent protein to identify protein-protein interactions in cells. When fused to interacting proteins, the fragments of the split fluorescent protein (which do not fluoresce on their own) can associate and fluoresce. In this protocol, we use the fluorescent protein Venus, a brighter and more photostable variant of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), to detect the induced proximity of caspase-2. Plasmids encoding two fusion products (caspase-2 fused to either the amino- or carboxy-terminal halves of Venus) are transfected into cells. The cells are then treated with an activating (death) stimulus. The induced proximity (and subsequent activation) of caspase-2 in the cells is visualized as Venus fluorescence. The proportion of Venus-positive cells at a single time point can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. Alternatively, the increase in fluorescence intensity over time can be evaluated by time-lapse confocal microscopy. The caspase BiFC strategy described here should also work for other initiator caspases, such as caspase-8 or -9, as long as the correct controls are used. PMID:25561623

  10. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein–protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces. PMID:25972078

  11. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range. PMID:26145791

  12. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  13. Determination of proteins by fluorescence quenching of Magdala Red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wen-wu; Gong, Guo-quan; Song, Yu-min

    2000-04-01

    Magdala Red (MR) binding to protein causes a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of MR at 556 nm. Based on this, a new quantitative determination method for proteins is developed. The linear range of this assay is 0.1-4.0 μg ml -1 of Bovine Serum albumin (BSA). The measurements can be made easily on a common fluorimeter. The reaction between MR and proteins is completed in 1 min, and the fluorescence intensity is stable for at least 2 h. There is little or no interference from amino acids and most metal ions. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of protein in milk powder and soybean milk powder and the results are in agreement with the results by the other methods.

  14. Red fluorescent protein with reversibly photoswitchable absorbance for photochromic FRET

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Fedor V.; Zhang, Lijuan; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed the first red fluorescent protein, named rsTagRFP, which possesses reversibly photoswitchable absorbance spectra. Illumination with blue and yellow light switches rsTagRFP into a red fluorescent state (ON state) or non-fluorescent state (OFF state), respectively. The ON and OFF states exhibit absorbance maxima at 567 and 440 nm, respectively. Due to the photoswitchable absorbance, rsTagRFP can be used as an acceptor for a photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer (pcFRET). The photochromic acceptor facilitates determination of a protein-protein interaction by providing an internal control for FRET. Using pcFRET with EYFP as a donor we observed an interaction between epidermal growth factor receptor and growth factor receptor-binding protein 2 in live cells by detecting the modulation of both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the EYFP donor upon the ON-OFF photoswitching of the rsTagRFP acceptor. PMID:20659687

  15. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  16. Electrotransformation of Bacillus mojavensis with fluorescent protein markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gram-positive endophytic bacteria are difficult to transform. To study endophytic interactions between Bacillus mojavensis and maize, a method was developed to transform this species by electroporation with three fluorescent protein expressing integrative plasmids: pSG1154, pSG1192, and pSG1193. The...

  17. The visible touch: in planta visualization of protein-protein interactions by fluorophore-based methods

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Riyaz A; Lahaye, Thomas; Panstruga, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Non-invasive fluorophore-based protein interaction assays like fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC, also referred to as "split YFP") have been proven invaluable tools to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Both methods are now frequently used in the plant sciences and are likely to develop into standard techniques for the identification, verification and in-depth analysis of polypeptide interactions. In this review, we address the individual strengths and weaknesses of both approaches and provide an outlook about new directions and possible future developments for both techniques. PMID:16800872

  18. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  19. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  20. Fluorescence quenching in proteins: some applications to protein-DNA and protein-lipid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Jay R.; Chen, Raymond F.; Porter, D. K.; Hensley, Preston; Han, Myun K.; Kim, S. J.; Wilson, Samuel H.; Clague, M.; Williamson, Cynthia K.

    1992-04-01

    The authors outline some examples of the advantages found in subdividing overall quenching into heterogeneous contributions. Subdivision is accomplished by overdetermination (global) and association (DAS, decay associated spectral) methods. In some cases, the subdivision of fluorescence leads to the unique identification of different fluorophores in different sites. Alternatively, the recovered components may reflect conformational heterogeneity at each site. For intrinsic protein fluorescence, it is often noted in the literature that single Trp proteins may be multiexponential. Genetic substitution in multi-Trp proteins, however, often leads to very strong (if not complete) lifetime-to-Trp assignment. Even if a single Trp experiences two or more microenvironments, it can be a useful reporter. The linkage of multiple lifetimes and amplitudes to changes in global conformation often reveals a more `sensitive' subpopulation or lifetime component that becomes a better indicator for important conformational states than aggregate intensity can provide. This has proven useful in studying pH transitions of proteins both in solution and embedded in membranes. Energy transfer is particularly useful in differentiating sites at different distances. Further, the disclosure of heterogeneity in distance is clearly superior to the reporting of a mean distance. This report surveys several systems that have been examined via emission DAS techniques, showing how each protein is better understood when viewed in terms of discrete spectral contributions. We conclude with an overview and some details about our construction of an EDAS (excitation-DAS) instrument; i.e., how excitation scans can be incorporated into a time-resolved instrument.

  1. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Meer, Margarita V; Usmanova, Dinara R; Mishin, Alexander S; Sharonov, George V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bozhanova, Nina G; Baranov, Mikhail S; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Vlasov, Peter K; Egorov, Evgeny S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Tawfik, Dan S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2016-05-19

    Fitness landscapes depict how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level and form the basis of our understanding of many areas of biology, yet their properties remain elusive. Previous studies have analysed specific genes, often using their function as a proxy for fitness, experimentally assessing the effect on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence or in different sequences. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here we visualize an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function (fluorescence) of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We show that the fitness landscape of avGFP is narrow, with 3/4 of the derivatives with a single mutation showing reduced fluorescence and half of the derivatives with four mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations and mostly occurred through the cumulative effect of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease in protein stability and a concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for several fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design.

  2. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Meer, Margarita V; Usmanova, Dinara R; Mishin, Alexander S; Sharonov, George V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bozhanova, Nina G; Baranov, Mikhail S; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Vlasov, Peter K; Egorov, Evgeny S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Tawfik, Dan S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2016-05-19

    Fitness landscapes depict how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level and form the basis of our understanding of many areas of biology, yet their properties remain elusive. Previous studies have analysed specific genes, often using their function as a proxy for fitness, experimentally assessing the effect on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence or in different sequences. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here we visualize an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function (fluorescence) of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We show that the fitness landscape of avGFP is narrow, with 3/4 of the derivatives with a single mutation showing reduced fluorescence and half of the derivatives with four mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations and mostly occurred through the cumulative effect of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease in protein stability and a concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for several fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design. PMID:27193686

  3. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain…

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Spatial Protein-protein Proximity in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Liu, Yi-Kuang; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Stefani, Enrico

    2009-02-01

    To quantify spatial protein-protein proximity (colocalization) in fluorescence microscopic images, cross-correlation and autocorrelation functions were decomposed into fast and slowly decaying components. The fast component results from clusters of proteins specifically labeled and the slow one from background/image heterogeneity. We show that the calculation of the protein-protein proximity index and the correlation coefficient are more reliably determined by extracting the fast-decaying component.

  5. [Isolation and purification of enhanced green fluorescent protein using chromatography].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qinghua; Song, Shuliang; Liang, Hao; Wang, Weili; Ji, Aiguo

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is a common biological marker. In this research, on the foundation of successful clone and expression of EGFP, a two-step chromatographic method was established to separate and purify EGFP, which includes the use of HisTrap HP immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and Sephadex G-10 HR size exclusion chromatography in sequence. Sephacryl S-300 HR size exclusion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were used to check out the purity of EGFP. At last, it was found that EGFP still had fluorescent activity using fluorescence spectrophotometric detection and Native-PAGE detection. This method can effectively separate the active EGFP. The purity of the obtained EGFP was more than 98%.

  6. Exploring color tuning strategies in red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Hense, Anika; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Red-emitting fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with fluorescence emission above 600 nm are advantageous for cell and tissue imaging applications for various reasons. Fluorescence from an RFP is well separated from cellular autofluorescence, which is in the green region of the spectrum, and red light is scattered less, which allows thicker specimens to be imaged. Moreover, the phototoxic response of cells is lower for red than blue or green light exposure. Further red-shifted FP variants can be obtained by genetic modifications causing an extension of the conjugated π-electron system of the chromophore, or by placing amino acids near the chromophore that stabilize its excited state or destabilize its ground state. We have selected the tetrameric RFP eqFP611 from Entacmaea quadricolor as a lead structure and discuss several rational design trials to generate RFP variants with improved photochemical properties.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Highly Charged Green Fluorescent Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Phillips, J L; Colvin, M E

    2009-03-26

    A recent experimental study showed that green fluorescent protein (GFP) that has been mutated to have ultra-high positive or negative net charges, retain their native structure and fluorescent properties while gaining resistance to aggregation under denaturing conditions. These proteins also provide an ideal test case for studying the effects of surface charge on protein structure and dynamics. They have performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the near-neutral wildtype GFP and mutants with net charges of -29 and +35. They analyzed the resulting trajectories to quantify differences in structure and dynamics between the three GFPs. This analyses shows that all three proteins are stable over the MD trajectory, with the near-neutral wild type GFP exhibiting somewhat more flexibility than the positive or negative GFP mutants, as measured by the order parameter and changes in phi-psi angles. There are more dramatic differences in the properties of the water and counter ions surrounding the proteins. The water diffusion constant near the protein surface is closer to the value for bulk water in the positively charged GFP than in the other two proteins. Additionally, the positively charged GFP shows a much greater clustering of the counter ions (CL-) near its surface than corresponding counter ions (Na+) near the negatively charged mutant.

  8. Nucleic acid-based fluorescence sensors for detecting proteins.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Ewa; Heyduk, Tomasz

    2005-02-15

    We report here development of a rapid, homogeneous, aptamer-based fluorescence assay ("molecular beacons") for detecting proteins. The assay involves protein-induced coassociation of two aptamers recognizing two distinct epitopes of the protein. The aptamers contain short fluorophore-labeled complementary "signaling" oligonucleotides attached to the aptamer by non-DNA linker. Coassociation of the two aptamers with the protein results in bringing the two "signaling" oligonucleotides into proximity, producing a large change of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the fluorophores. We used thrombin as a model system to provide proof-of-principle evidence validating this molecular beacon design. Thrombin beacon was capable of detecting the protein with high selectivity (also in complex biological mixtures), picomolar sensitivity, and high signal-to-background ratio. This is a homogeneous assay requiring no sample manipulation. Since the design of molecular beacons described here is not limited to any specific protein, it will be possible to develop these beacons to detect a variety of target proteins of biomedical importance.

  9. Dual-color fluorescence imaging of tumor/host interaction with green and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Baranov, Eugene; Wang, Jin Wei; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2004-06-01

    Dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing transgenic mice has been shown to be a powerful technology to study tumor-host interaction. Host animals include mice which express the GFP transgene in essentially all cells as well as animals in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP. The general GFP-transgenic mouse is available in both the normal and athymic nude (nu/nu) background. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma interaction especially tumor induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. GFP-expressing tumor vasculature could be visualized interacting with the RFP-expressing tumor cells transplanted to the nestin-driven GFP transgenic mice which expressed nestin-GFP in nascent blood vessels was shown as a marker of nascent tumor angiogenesis. Dual-color fluorescence imaging, which visualizes the tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh tissues, dramatically expanding previous studies in fixed and stained preparations (1).

  10. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  11. Orange fluorescent proteins constructed from cyanobacteriochromes chromophorylated with phycoerythrobilin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Fang; Xu, Jin-Guo; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Zhou, Ming

    2014-05-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are a structurally and spectrally highly diverse class of phytochrome-related photosensory biliproteins. They contain one or more GAF domains that bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) autocatalytically; some of these proteins are also capable of further modifying PCB to phycoviolobilin or rubins. We tested the chromophorylation with the non-photochromic phycoerythrobilin (PEB) of 16 cyanobacteriochrome GAFs from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, of Slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and of Tlr0911 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1. Nine GAFs could be autocatalytically chromophorylated in vivo/in E. coli with PEB, resulting in highly fluorescent biliproteins with brightness comparable to that of fluorescent proteins like GFP. In several GAFs, PEB was concomitantly converted to phycourobilin (PUB) during binding. This not only shifted the spectra, but also increased the Stokes shift. The chromophorylated GAFs could be oligomerized further by attaching a GCN4 leucine zipper domain, thereby enhancing the absorbance and fluorescence of the complexes. The presence of both PEB and PUB makes these oligomeric GAF-"bundles" interesting models for energy transfer akin to the antenna complexes found in cyanobacterial phycobilisomes. The thermal and photochemical stability and their strong brightness make these constructs promising orange fluorescent biomarkers. PMID:24604419

  12. Protein-protein interactions visualized by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in tobacco protoplasts and leaves.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Regina; Schwenkert, Serena

    2014-03-09

    Many proteins interact transiently with other proteins or are integrated into multi-protein complexes to perform their biological function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is an in vivo method to monitor such interactions in plant cells. In the presented protocol the investigated candidate proteins are fused to complementary halves of fluorescent proteins and the respective constructs are introduced into plant cells via agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Subsequently, the proteins are transiently expressed in tobacco leaves and the restored fluorescent signals can be detected with a confocal laser scanning microscope in the intact cells. This allows not only visualization of the interaction itself, but also the subcellular localization of the protein complexes can be determined. For this purpose, marker genes containing a fluorescent tag can be coexpressed along with the BiFC constructs, thus visualizing cellular structures such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, the Golgi apparatus or the plasma membrane. The fluorescent signal can be monitored either directly in epidermal leaf cells or in single protoplasts, which can be easily isolated from the transformed tobacco leaves. BiFC is ideally suited to study protein-protein interactions in their natural surroundings within the living cell. However, it has to be considered that the expression has to be driven by strong promoters and that the interaction partners are modified due to fusion of the relatively large fluorescence tags, which might interfere with the interaction mechanism. Nevertheless, BiFC is an excellent complementary approach to other commonly applied methods investigating protein-protein interactions, such as coimmunoprecipitation, in vitro pull-down assays or yeast-two-hybrid experiments.

  13. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate.

  14. The fluorescent protein palette: tools for cellular imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding family of fluorescent proteins (FPs) that have become essential tools for studies of cell biology and physiology. Here, we describe the characteristics of the genetically encoded fluorescent markers that now span the visible spectrum from deep blue to deep red. We identify some of the novel FPs that have unusual characteristics that make them useful reporters of the dynamic behaviors of proteins inside cells, and describe how many different optical methods can be combined with the FPs to provide quantitative measurements in living systems. “If wood is rubbed with the Pulmo marinus, it will have all the appearance of being on fire; so much so, indeed, that a walking-stick, thus treated, will light the way like a torch” (translation of Pliny the Elder from John Bostock, 1855). PMID:19771335

  15. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-10-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies.

  16. Improved "optical highlighter" probes derived from discosoma red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lisbeth C; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2005-02-01

    The tetrameric red fluorescent protein, DsRed, undergoes a rapid red to green color change evoked by short wavelength (lambda < 760 nm) femtosecond irradiation--a phenomenon that underpins the application of DsRed as an "optical highlighter" probe for tracking live cells, organelles, and fusion proteins. This color change results from selective bleaching of the "mature" red-emitting species of DsRed and an enhancement of emission from the "immature" green species, likely caused by dequenching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring within the protein tetramer. Here, we have examined the role of residues known to influence the rate and completeness of chromophore maturation on the cellular and biophysical properties of DsRed mutants. Surprisingly, a single amino acid mutation (N42Q) with increased basal green emission yet rapid chromophore maturation displayed a multiphoton-evoked color change that was brighter, more consistent, more vivid, and easier to evoke than DsRed, despite the larger proportion of green chromophores. Rapidly maturing mutants with more complete chromophore maturation, exhibited little color change and increased resistance to multiphoton bleaching. We describe improved optical and cell biological properties for two DsRed-derived variants which we showcase in photolabeling studies, and discuss these data in terms of implications for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probes.

  17. Differential rates of gene expression monitored by green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canghai; Albano, C Renee; Bentley, William E; Rao, Govind

    2002-08-20

    The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene has made a broad impact in several areas, especially in studies of protein trafficking, localization, and expression analysis. GFP's many advantages are that it is small, autocatalytic, and does not require fixation, cell disruption, or the addition of cofactors or substrates. Two characteristics of GFP, extreme stability and chromophore cyclization lag time, pose a hindrance to the application of GFP as a real-time gene expression reporter in bioprocess applications. In this report, we present analytical methods that overcome these problems and enable the temporal visualization of discrete gene regulatory events. The approach we present measures the rate of change in GFP fluorescence, which in turn reflects the rate of gene expression. We conducted fermentation and microplate experiments using a protein synthesis inhibitor to illustrate the feasibility of this system. Additional experiments using the classic gene regulation of the araBAD operon show the utility of GFP as a near real-time indicator of gene regulation. With repetitive induction and repression of the arabinose promoter, the differential rate of GFP fluorescence emission shows corresponding cyclical changes during the culture.

  18. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions. PMID:26394862

  19. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions.

  20. Monitoring mRNA and protein levels in bulk and in model vesicle-based artificial cells.

    PubMed

    van Nies, Pauline; Canton, Alicia Soler; Nourian, Zohreh; Danelon, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    With rising interest in utilizing cell-free gene expression systems in bottom-up synthetic biology projects, novel labeling tools need to be developed to accurately report the dynamics and performance of the biosynthesis machinery operating in various reaction conditions. Monitoring the transcription activity has been simplified by the Spinach technology, an RNA aptamer that emits fluorescence upon binding to a small organic dye. Recently, we tracked the fluorescence of Spinach-tagged messenger RNA (mRNA) and its translation product the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), both synthesized in the protein synthesis using recombinant elements system from a DNA template. Building on our previous study, we describe here an improved Spinach reporter with modified flanking sequences that confer higher propensity for aptamer folding and, thus, enhanced fluorescence brightness. Hence, the kinetics of mRNA and YFP production could be simultaneously monitored with unprecedented sensitivity. A combination of methodologies, comprising RNA gel analysis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, absorbance measurements, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, was used to convert fluorescence intensity units into absolute concentrations of transcript and YFP translational product. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the new Spinach construct greatly enhanced mRNA detection when gene expression was confined inside self-assembled lipid vesicles. Therefore, we argue that this assay could be used to evaluate systematically the performance of transcription and translation in model vesicle-based artificial cells.

  1. A fluorescent tool set for yeast Atg proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Song, Jing-Zhen; Shan, Mei-Hua; Li, Shi-Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Hui; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Yue; Lin, Jianping; Xie, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells is instrumental in deciphering the molecular details of autophagy. To facilitate the routine examination of yeast Atg proteins under diverse conditions, here we provide a comprehensive tool set, including (1) plasmids for the expression of GFP chimeras at endogenous levels for most Atg proteins, (2) RFP-Atg8 constructs with improved properties as a PAS marker, and (3) plasmids for the complementation of common yeast auxotrophic markers. We hope that the availability of this tool set will further accelerate yeast autophagy research. PMID:25998947

  2. Synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters using egg white proteins.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Dickson; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) have gained interest during the recent years because of their low toxicity and finer size for the bioimaging and biolabeling applications in comparison to the semiconductor quantum dot analogues. Diverse materials such as sulfur compounds, peptides, dendrimers, proteins, etc., are exploited for the preparation of AuNCs. Henceforth, highly fluorescent, water-soluble, and few atom-containing gold nanoclusters are created using a rapid, straightforward, and green method. In this regard for the first time chicken egg white (CEW), one of the most unique materials, is utilized in an aqueous solution under basic conditions at physiological temperature for the preparation of AuNCs. Tyrosine and tryptophan amino acid residues are responsible for the conversion of Au ions to Au(0) under alkaline condtions. CEW contains four major proteins of which the main constituent protein, ovalbumin also leads to the formation of the AuNCs with a higher fluorescence emission compared to the CEW. The ratios between the different reaction partners are very crucial, along with temperature and time for the preparation of AuNCs with high photoluminescence emission. The limited vibrational motion of the proteins under alkaline condition and the bulkiness of the proteins help in the formation of AuNCs.

  3. Fluorescent biphenyl derivatives of phenylalanine suitable for protein modification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengxi; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Wang, Lin; Jin, Yuguang; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-11-26

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that structurally compact fluorophores incorporated into the side chains of amino acids could be introduced into dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) with minimal disruption of protein structure or function, even when the site of incorporation was within a folded region of the protein. The modified proteins could be employed for FRET measurements, providing sensitive monitors of changes in protein conformation. The very favorable results achieved in that study encouraged us to prepare additional fluorescent amino acids of potential utility for studying protein dynamics. Presently, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of four positional isomers of biphenyl-phenylalanine, all of which were found to exhibit potentially useful fluorescent properties. All four phenylalanine derivatives were used to activate suppressor tRNA transcripts and incorporated into multiple positions of ecDHFR. All phenylalanine derivatives were incorporated with good efficiency into position 16 of ecDHFR and afforded modified proteins that consumed NADPH at rates up to about twice the rate measured for wild type. This phenomenon has been noted on a number of occasions previously and shown to be due to an increase in the off-rate of tetrahydrofolate from the enzyme, altering a step that is normally rate limiting. When introduced into sterically accessible position 49, the four phenylalanine derivatives afforded DHFRs having catalytic function comparable to wild type. The four phenylalanine derivatives were also introduced into position 115 of ecDHFR, which is known to be a folded region of the protein less tolerant of structural alteration. As anticipated, significant differences were noted in the catalytic efficiencies of the derived proteins. The ability of two of the sizable biphenyl-phenylalanine derivatives to be accommodated at position 115 with minimal perturbation of DHFR function is attributed to rotational

  4. Fluorescence, polarized fluorescence, and Brewster angle microscopy of palmitic acid and lung surfactant protein B monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, M M; Lee, K Y; Waring, A; Zasadzinski, J A

    1997-01-01

    Fluorescence, polarized fluorescence, and Brewster angle microscopy reveal that human lung surfactant protein SP-B and its amino terminus (SP-B[1-25]) alter the phase behavior of palmitic acid monolayers by inhibiting the formation of condensed phases and creating a new fluid protein-rich phase. This fluid phase forms a network that separates condensed phase domains at coexistence and persists to high surface pressures. The network changes the monolayer collapse mechanism from heterogeneous nucleation/growth and fracturing processes to a more homogeneous process through isolating individual condensed phase domains. This results in higher surface pressures at collapse, and monolayers easier to respread on expansion, factors essential to the in vivo function of lung surfactant. The network is stabilized by a low-line tension between the coexisting phases, as confirmed by the observation of extended linear domains, or "stripe" phases, and a Gouy-Chapman analysis of protein-containing monolayers. Comparison of isotherm data and observed morphologies of monolayers containing SP-B(1-25) with those containing the full SP-B sequence show that the shortened peptide retains most of the native activity of the full-length protein, which may lead to cheaper and more effective synthetic replacement formulations. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:9168053

  5. Prolonged irradiation of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein or Cerulean can invalidate Forster resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Birgit; Zimmer, Thomas; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; König, Karsten; Benndorf, Klaus; Biskup, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants have proven to be a good and convenient fluorescent label for proteins: GFP and other visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) can be fused selectively to the protein of interest by simple cloning techniques and develop fluorescence without additional cofactors. Among the steadily growing collection of VFPs, several pairs can be chosen that can serve as donor and acceptor fluorophores in Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. Among them, the cyan fluorescent proteins (ECFP/Cerulean) and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) are most commonly used. We show that ECFP and Cerulean have some disadvantages despite their common use: Upon irradiation with light intensities that are commonly used for intensity- and lifetime-based FRET measurements, both the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence lifetime of ECFP and Cerulean decrease. This can hamper both intensity- and lifetime-based FRET measurements and emphasizes the need for control measurements to exclude these artifacts. PMID:18601529

  6. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  7. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  8. Development of Fluorescent Protein Probes Specific for Parallel DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Dang, Dung Thanh; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-01-01

    We have developed fluorescent protein probes specific for parallel G-quadruplexes by attaching cyan fluorescent protein to the G-quadruplex-binding motif of the RNA helicase RHAU. Fluorescent probes containing RHAU peptide fragments of different lengths were constructed, and their binding to G-quadruplexes was characterized. The selective recognition and discrimination of G-quadruplex topologies by the fluorescent protein probes was easily detected by the naked eye or by conventional gel imaging.

  9. Novel, fluorescent, SSB protein chimeras with broad utility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Choi, Meerim; Stanenas, Adam G; Byrd, Alicia K; Raney, Kevin D; Cohan, Christopher; Bianco, Piero R

    2011-06-01

    The Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) is a central player in DNA metabolism where it organizes genome maintenance complexes and stabilizes single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates generated during DNA processing. Due to the importance of SSB and to facilitate real-time studies, we developed a dual plasmid expression system to produce novel, chimeric SSB proteins. These chimeras, which contain mixtures of histidine-tagged and fluorescent protein(FP)-fusion subunits, are easily purified in milligram quantities and used without further modification, a significant enhancement over previous methods to produce fluorescent SSB. Chimeras retain the functionality of wild type in all assays, demonstrating that SSB function is unaffected by the FPs. We demonstrate the power and utility of these chimeras in single molecule studies providing a great level of insight into the biochemical mechanism of RecBCD. We also utilized the chimeras to show for the first time that RecG and SSB interact in vivo. Consequently, we anticipate that the chimeras described herein will facilitate in vivo, in vitro and single DNA molecule studies using proteins that do not require further modification prior to use.

  10. Application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in protein studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Since the physical process of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was elucidated more than six decades ago, this peculiar fluorescence phenomenon has turned into a powerful tool for biomedical research due to its compatibility in scale with biological molecules as well as rapid developments in novel fluorophores and optical detection techniques. A wide variety of FRET approaches have been devised, each with its own advantages and drawbacks. Especially in the last decade or so, we are witnessing a flourish of FRET applications in biological investigations, many of which exemplify clever experimental design and rigorous analysis. Here we review the current stage of FRET methods development with the main focus on its applications in protein studies in biological systems, by summarizing the basic components of FRET techniques, most established quantification methods, as well as potential pitfalls, illustrated by example applications. PMID:25368432

  11. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hau B.; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O.; Terwilliger, Thomas C. Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2013-12-01

    A strategy using a new split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a modular binding partner to form stable protein complexes with a target protein is presented. The modular split GFP may open the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants. A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  12. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOEpatents

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  13. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Cis-trans photoisomerization of fluorescent-protein chromophores.

    PubMed

    Voliani, Valerio; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Nifosì, Riccardo; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Grandi, Elena; Viappiani, Cristiano; Beltram, Fabio

    2008-08-28

    Photochromic variants of fluorescent proteins are opening the way to a number of opportunities for high-sensitivity regioselective studies in the cellular environment and may even lead to applications in information and communication technology. Yet, the detailed photophysical processes at the basis of photoswitching have not been fully clarified. In this paper, we used synthetic FP chromophores to clarify the photophysical processes associated with the photochromic behavior. In particular, we investigated the spectral modification of synthetic chromophore analogues of wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP), Y66F GFP (BFPF), and Y66W GFP (CFP) upon irradiation in solutions of different polarities. We found that the cis-trans photoisomerization mechanism can be induced in all the chromophores. The structural assignments were carried out both by NMR measurements and DFT calculations. Remarkably, we determined for the first time the spectra of neutral trans isomers in different solvents. Finally, we calculated the photoconversion quantum yields by absorption measurements under continuous illumination at different times and by a nanosecond laser-flash photolysis method. Our results indicate that cis-trans photoisomerization is a general mechanism of FP chromophores whose efficiency is modulated by the detailed mutant-specific protein environment. PMID:18671358

  17. Engineering fluorescent protein substrates for the AAA+ Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Nager, Andrew R; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2013-04-01

    AAA+ proteases, such as Escherichia coli Lon, recognize protein substrates by binding to specific peptide degrons and then unfold and translocate the protein into an internal degradation chamber for proteolysis. For some AAA+ proteases, attaching specific degrons to the N- or C-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) generates useful substrates, whose unfolding and degradation can be monitored by loss of fluorescence, but Lon fails to degrade appropriately tagged GFP variants at a significant rate. Here, we demonstrate that Lon catalyzes robust unfolding and degradation of circularly permuted variants of GFP with a β20 degron appended to the N terminus or a sul20 degron appended to the C terminus. Lon degradation of non-permuted GFP-sul20 is very slow, in part because the enzyme cannot efficiently extract the degron-proximal C-terminal β-strand to initiate denaturation. The circularly permuted GFP substrates described here allow convenient high-throughput assays of the kinetics of Lon degradation in vitro and also permit assays of Lon proteolysis in vivo.

  18. Intracellular pH measurements made simple by fluorescent protein probes and the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Antonella; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Storti, Barbara; Beltram, Fabio; Bizzarri, Ranieri

    2012-05-25

    A versatile pH-dependent fluorescent protein was applied to intracellular pH measurements by means of the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging. By this fit-less method we obtain intracellular pH maps under resting or altered physiological conditions by single-photon confocal or two-photon microscopy.

  19. Electrodynamic theory of fluorescence polarization of solutions: theory and application to the determination of protein-protein separation.

    PubMed

    Collett, Edward; Schaefer, Beth

    2009-03-10

    The phenomenon of the fluorescence polarization of solutions has found numerous applications in biophysics, biochemistry, immunology, and diagnostic and clinical medicine. The current theory to explain the phenomenon of fluorescence polarization in solutions was developed by F. Perrin in 1926. Perrin based his theory on the belief that fluorescence polarization is a manifestation of rotational Brownian motion. Fluorescence polarization, however, is an electromagnetic radiation phenomenon. Using Maxwell's equations, suitably modified to account for the quantum behavior of fluorescence, E. Collett developed a theory of fluorescence polarization (the electrodynamic theory) based on a model of dipole-dipole interactions. The electrodynamic theory is used to investigate protein-protein assays to determine the minimum and maximum binding distances between the proteins for (1) an estrogen receptor DNA bound to a fluorescein labeled estrogen response element and (2) a green fluorescent protein chimera of S-peptide (S65T-His6) bound to a free S-protein. PMID:19277089

  20. Imaging fluorescently tagged Phytophthora effector proteins inside infected plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Boevink, Petra C; Birch, Paul R J; Whisson, Stephen C

    2011-01-01

    Assays to determine the role of pathogen effectors within an infected plant cell are yielding valuable information about which host processes are targeted to allow successful pathogen colonization. However, this does not necessarily inform on the cellular location of these interactions, or if these effector-virulence target interactions occur only in the presence of the pathogen. Here, we describe techniques to allow the subcellular localization of pathogen effectors inside infected plant cells or tissues, based largely on infiltration of plant tissue by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and its delivery of DNA encoding fluorescent protein-tagged effectors, and subsequent confocal microscopy. PMID:21359810

  1. Evaluating Baculovirus Infection Using Green Fluorescent Protein and Variants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Cha, Hyung Joon; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    By use of a strategy incorporating the green fluorescent protein (GFP), facile and rapid monitoring and visualization of baculovirus infection in insect cells is possible in vivo. This chapter describes two techniques for simple determination of virus titer in the baculovirus expression system using GFP co-expression and rapid monitoring of Sf-9 insect cell infection using a combination of GFP and the early-to-late (ETL) promoter of the virus vector. Because of its early appearance, GFP, when placed under the control of ETL promoter, will facilitate vector construction, virus isolation, and titer determination.

  2. Expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein in Bacillus methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Nilasari, Dewi; Dover, Nir; Rech, Sabine; Komives, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts are used in a wide range of industries to produce large scale quantities of proteins, amino acids, and commodity chemicals. While the majority of these processes use glucose or other low-cost sugars as the substrate, Bacillus methanolicus is one example of a biocatalyst that has shown sustained growth on methanol as a carbon source at elevated temperature (50-53°C optimum) resulting in reduced feed and utility costs. Specifically, the complete chemical process enabled by this approach takes methane from natural gas, and following a low-cost conversion to methanol, can be used for the production of high value products. In this study, production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by B. methanolicus is explored. A plasmid was constructed that incorporates the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh) promoter of B. methanolicus MGA3 together with the GFPuv gene. The plasmid, pNW33N, was shown to be effective for expression in other Bacillus strains, although not previously in B. methanolicus. A published electroporation protocol for transformation of B. methanolicus was modified to result in expression of GFP using plasmid pNW33N-mdh-GFPuv (pNmG). Transformation was confirmed by both agarose gel electrophoresis and by observation of green fluorescence under UV light exposure. The mass yield of cells and protein were measured in shake flask experiments. The optimum concentration of methanol for protein production was found to be at 200 mM. Higher concentrations than 200 mM resulted in slightly higher biomass production but lower amounts of recombinant protein. PMID:22275315

  3. Analysis of protein-ligand interactions by fluorescence polarization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ana M.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of the associations between biomolecules is required both to predict and understand the interactions that underpin all biological activity. Fluorescence polarization (FP) provides a non-disruptive means of measuring the association of a fluorescent ligand with a larger molecule. We describe an FP assay in which binding of fluorescein-labelled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to N-terminal fragments of IP3 receptors can be characterised at different temperatures and in competition with other ligands. The assay allows the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) changes of ligand binding to be determined. The method is applicable to any purified ligand-binding site for which an appropriate fluorescent ligand is available. FP can be used to measure low-affinity interactions in real-time without use of radioactive materials, it is non-destructive, and with appropriate care it can resolve ΔH° and ΔS°. The first part of the protocol, protein preparation, may take several weeks, while the FP measurements, once they have been optimised, would normally take 1-6 h. PMID:21372817

  4. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  5. Green Fluorescent Protein-based Expression Screening of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Louise E.; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  6. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  7. Binding phenomena and fluorescence quenching. II: Photophysics of aromatic residues and dependence of fluorescence spectra on protein conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callis, Patrik R.

    2014-12-01

    The three amino acids with aromatic ring side chains-phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and especially tryptophan (Trp) have played a long and productive role in helping unlock the secrets of protein behavior by optical spectroscopy (absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, etc.) In principle, an appropriately placed Trp will undergo fluorescence wavelength and/or intensity changes upon whatever functional process a protein performs. Although perceived to be enigmatic and not well understood, Trp is arguably now better understood than many of the extrinsic probes currently in use. Basic principles of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching and wavelength shifts in proteins are presented, with strong emphasis on the importance of electrostatics. The condensed description of findings from recent experiments and simulations of tryptophan fluorescence and intrinsic quenching in proteins is designed to help authors in planning and interpreting experimental results of ligand binding studies.

  8. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ropp, J.D.; Cuthbertson, R.A.; Donahue, C.J.; Wolfgang-Kimball, D.

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types. The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP`s bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T- GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  9. A continuous fluorescent assay for protein prenyltransferases measuring diphosphate release.

    PubMed

    Pais, June E; Bowers, Katherine E; Stoddard, Andrea K; Fierke, Carol A

    2005-10-15

    Protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I catalyze the transfer of a 15- and a 20-carbon prenyl group, respectively, from a prenyl diphosphate to a cysteine residue at the carboxyl terminus of target proteins, with the concomitant release of diphosphate. Common substrates include oncogenic Ras proteins, which are implicated in up to 30% of all human cancers, making prenyltransferases a viable target for chemotherapeutic drugs. A coupled assay has been developed to measure the rate constant of diphosphate (PPi) dissociation during the prenyltransferase reaction under both single and multiple turnover conditions. In this assay, the PPi group produced in the prenyltransferase reaction is rapidly cleaved by inorganic pyrophosphatase to form phosphate (Pi), which is then bound by a coumarin-labeled phosphate binding protein from Escherichia coli, resulting in a fluorescence increase. The observed rate constant for PPi release is equal to the rate constant of prenylation of the peptide, as measured by other assays, so that this nonradioactive assay can be used to measure prenyltransferase activity under either single or multiple turnover conditions. This assay can be adapted for high-throughput screening for potential prenyltransferase substrates and inhibitors.

  10. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins. PMID:27451201

  11. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins.

  12. Fluorescent Probe Encapsulated in SNAP-Tag Protein Cavity To Eliminate Nonspecific Fluorescence and Increase Detection Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Syun; Gao, Ruo-Cing; Wu, Ting-Wei; Cho, Chien; Tan, Kui-Thong

    2016-08-17

    Despite the promising improvements made recently on fluorescence probes for the detection of enzymes and reactive small molecules, two fundamental problems remain: weaker fluorescence of many dyes in aqueous buffers and strong nonspecific signals in samples containing high protein levels. In this paper, we introduce a novel fluorescent probe encapsulated in protein cavity (FPEPC) concept as demonstrated by SNAP-tag protein and three environment-sensitive fluorescence probes to overcome these two problems. The probes were constructed by following the current probe design for enzymes and reactive small molecules but with an additional benzylguanine moiety for selective SNAP-tag conjugation. The SNAP-tag conjugated probes achieved quantitative nitroreductase and hydrogen sulfide detection in blood plasma, whereas analyte concentrations were overestimated up to 700-fold when bare fluorescent probes were employed for detection. Furthermore, detection sensitivity was increased dramatically, as our probes displayed 390-fold fluorescence enhancement upon SNAP-tag conjugation, in stark contrast to the weak fluorescence of the free probes in aqueous solutions. Compared with the conventional approaches where fluorescent probes are encapsulated into polymers and nanoparticles, our simple and general approach successfully overcame many key issues such as dye leakage, long preparation steps, inconsistent dye-host ratios, difficulty in constructing in situ in a complex medium, and limited application to detect only small metabolites. PMID:27463260

  13. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  14. Three-dimensional superresolution colocalization of intracellular protein superstructures and the cell surface in live Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Lew, Matthew D; Lee, Steven F; Ptacin, Jerod L; Lee, Marissa K; Twieg, Robert J; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W E

    2011-11-15

    Recently, single-molecule imaging and photocontrol have enabled superresolution optical microscopy of cellular structures beyond Abbe's diffraction limit, extending the frontier of noninvasive imaging of structures within living cells. However, live-cell superresolution imaging has been challenged by the need to image three-dimensional (3D) structures relative to their biological context, such as the cellular membrane. We have developed a technique, termed superresolution by power-dependent active intermittency and points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography (SPRAIPAINT) that combines imaging of intracellular enhanced YFP (eYFP) fusions (SPRAI) with stochastic localization of the cell surface (PAINT) to image two different fluorophores sequentially with only one laser. Simple light-induced blinking of eYFP and collisional flux onto the cell surface by Nile red are used to achieve single-molecule localizations, without any antibody labeling, cell membrane permeabilization, or thiol-oxygen scavenger systems required. Here we demonstrate live-cell 3D superresolution imaging of Crescentin-eYFP, a cytoskeletal fluorescent protein fusion, colocalized with the surface of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus using a double-helix point spread function microscope. Three-dimensional colocalization of intracellular protein structures and the cell surface with superresolution optical microscopy opens the door for the analysis of protein interactions in living cells with excellent precision (20-40 nm in 3D) over a large field of view (12 12 μm).

  15. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  16. Stress-induced localization of HSPA6 (HSP70B') and HSPA1A (HSP70-1) proteins to centrioles in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Khalouei, Sam; Chow, Ari M; Brown, Ian R

    2014-05-01

    The localization of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged HSP70 proteins was employed to identify stress-sensitive sites in human neurons following temperature elevation. Stable lines of human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells were established that expressed YFP-tagged protein products of the human inducible HSP70 genes HSPA6 (HSP70B') and HSPA1A (HSP70-1). Following a brief period of thermal stress, YFP-tagged HSPA6 and HSPA1A rapidly appeared at centrioles in the cytoplasm of human neuronal cells, with HSPA6 demonstrating a more prolonged signal compared to HSPA1A. Each centriole is composed of a distal end and a proximal end, the latter linking the centriole doublet. The YFP-tagged HSP70 proteins targeted the proximal end of centrioles (identified by γ-tubulin marker) rather than the distal end (centrin marker). Centrioles play key roles in cellular polarity and migration during neuronal differentiation. The proximal end of the centriole, which is involved in centriole stabilization, may be stress-sensitive in post-mitotic, differentiating human neurons.

  17. Analysis of green fluorescent protein bioluminescence in vivo and in vitro using a glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, L.; Mandujano, L. A.; Cuevas, J.; Reyes, P. G.; Osorio-González, D.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of fluorescent proteins has been a revolution in cell biology and related sciences because of their many applications, mainly emphasizing their use as cellular markers. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used as it requires no cofactors to generate fluorescence and retains this property into any organism when it is expressed by recombinant DNA techniques, which is a great advantage. In this work, we analyze the emission spectra of recombinant green fluorescent protein in vivo and in vitro exposed to a glow discharge plasma of nitrogen in order to relate electron temperature to fluorescence intensity.

  18. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  19. Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2007-09-18

    The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime images of different green fluorescent proteins in fly brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Sih-Yu; Lin, Y. Y.; Chiang, A. S.; Huang, Y. C.

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of learning and memory are the most important functions in an animal brain. Investigating neuron circuits and network maps in a brain is the first step toward understanding memory and learning behavior. Since Drosophila brain is the major model for understanding brain functions, we measure the florescence lifetimes of different GFP-based reporters expressed in a fly brain. In this work, two Gal4 drivers, OK 107 and MZ 19 were used. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]) concentration is an importation indicator of neuronal activity. Therefore, several groups have developed GFP-based calcium sensors, among which G-CaMP is the most popular and reliable. The fluorescence intensity of G-CaMP will increase when it binds to calcium ion; however, individual variation from different animals prevents quantitative research. In this work, we found that the florescence lifetime of G-CaMP will shrink from 1.8 ns to 1.0 ns when binding to Ca2+. This finding can potentially help us to understand the neuron circuits by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a light-activated ion-channel protein on a neuron cell membrane. In this work, we express ChR2 and G-CaMP in a fly brain. Using a pulsed 470-nm laser to activate the neurons, we can also record the fluorescence lifetime changes in the structure. Hence, we can trace and manipulate a specific circuit in this animal. This method provides more flexibility in brain research.

  1. Quantitative Determination of Spatial Protein-Protein Correlations in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Ou, Jimmy; Lu, Rong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To quantify spatial protein-protein proximity (colocalization) in paired microscopic images of two sets of proteins labeled by distinct fluorophores, we showed that the cross-correlation and the autocorrelation functions of image intensity consisted of fast and slowly decaying components. The fast component resulted from clusters of proteins specifically labeled, and the slow component resulted from image heterogeneity and a broadly-distributed background. To better evaluate spatial proximity between the two specifically labeled proteins, we extracted the fast-decaying component by fitting the sharp peak in correlation functions to a Gaussian function, which was then used to obtain protein-protein proximity index and the Pearson's correlation coefficient. We also employed the median-filter method as a universal approach for background reduction to minimize nonspecific fluorescence. We illustrated our method by analyzing computer-simulated images and biological images. PMID:20141764

  2. Probing protein targeting to plasmodesmata using fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathryn M; MacKenzie, Katrin M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) involves the irreversible bleaching of a fluorescent protein within a specific area of the cell using a high-intensity laser. The recovery of fluorescence represents the movement of new protein into this area and can therefore be used to investigate factors involved in this movement. Here we describe a FRAP method to investigate the effect of a range of pharmacological agents on the targeting of Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein to plasmodesmata. PMID:25287209

  3. Highly Fluorescent Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Analogues Made by Decorating the Imidazolone Ring.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sara; Martínez-López, David; Morón, María; Sucunza, David; Sampedro, Diego; Domingo, Alberto; Salgado, Antonio; Vaquero, Juan J

    2015-12-14

    The synthesis and photophysical behavior of an unexplored family of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophore analogues is reported. The compound (Z)-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1-propyl-2-(propylamino)-1H-imidazol-5(4 H)-one (p-HBDNI, 2 a) exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence properties relative to the parent compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2,3-dimethyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one (p-HBDI, 1). p-HBDNI was considered as a model system and the photophysical properties of other novel 2-amino-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one derivatives were evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations were carried out to rationalize the results. The analogue AIDNI (2 c), in which the 4-hydroxybenzyl group of p-HBDNI was replaced by an azaindole group, showed improved photophysical properties and potential for cell staining. The uptake and intracellular distribution of 2 c in living cells was investigated by confocal microscopy imaging.

  4. Protein fragment bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses for the in vivo study of protein-protein interactions and cellular protein complex localizations

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Schlücking, Kathrin; Schroeder, Julian I.; Kudla, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Summary The analyses of protein-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes including signal transduction, protein trafficking and movement. Protein fragment complementation assays are based on the reconstitution of protein function when non-active protein fragments are brought together by interacting proteins that were genetically fused to these protein fragments. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) relies on the reconstitution of fluorescent proteins and enables both the analysis of protein-protein interactions and the visualization of protein complex formations in vivo. Transient expression of proteins is a convenient approach to study protein functions in planta or in other organisms, and minimizes the need for time-consuming generation of stably expressing transgenic organisms. Here we describe protocols for BiFC analyses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves transiently transformed by Agrobacterium infiltration. Further we discuss different BiFC applications and provide examples for proper BiFC analyses in planta. PMID:24057390

  5. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  6. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-01-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters. PMID:27181496

  7. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  8. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; et al

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction ofmore » high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.« less

  9. Translocation of green fluorescent protein to cyanobacterial periplasm using ice nucleation protein.

    PubMed

    Chungjatupornchai, Wipa; Fa-aroonsawat, Sirirat

    2009-04-01

    The translocation of proteins to cyanobacterial cell envelope is made complex by the presence of a highly differentiated membrane system. To investigate the protein translocation in cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 using the truncated ice nucleation protein (InpNC) from Pseudomonas syringae KCTC 1832, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused in frame to the carboxyl-terminus of InpNC. The fluorescence of GFP was found almost entirely as a halo in the outer regions of cells which appeared to correspond to the periplasm as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy, however, GFP was not displayed on the outermost cell surface. Western blotting analysis revealed that InpNC-GFP fusion protein was partially degraded. The N-terminal domain of InpNC may be susceptible to protease attack; the remaining C-terminal domain conjugated with GFP lost the ability to direct translocation across outer membrane and to act as a surface display motif. The fluorescence intensity of cells with periplasmic GFP was approximately 6-fold lower than that of cells with cytoplasmic GFP. The successful translocation of the active GFP to the periplasm may provide a potential means to study the property of cyanobacterial periplasmic substances in response to environmental changes in a non-invasive manner. PMID:19412603

  10. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  11. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Pardo Garcia, Alan; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them. PMID:26501285

  12. From jellyfish to biosensors: the use of fluorescent proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ute; Larrieu, Antoine; Wells, Darren M

    2013-01-01

    The milestone discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, its optimisation for efficient use in plantae, and subsequent improvements in techniques for fluorescent detection and quantification have changed plant molecular biology research dramatically. Using fluorescent protein tags allows the temporal and spatial monitoring of dynamic expression patterns at tissue, cellular and subcellular scales. Genetically-encoded fluorescence has become the basis for applications such as cell-type specific transcriptomics, monitoring cell fate and identity during development of individual organs or embryos, and visualising protein-protein interactions in vivo. In this article, we will give an overview of currently available fluorescent proteins, their applications in plant research, the techniques used to analyse them and, using the recent development of an auxin sensor as an example, discuss the design principles and prospects for the next generation of fluorescent plant biosensors. PMID:24166435

  13. Dual fluorescence detection of protein and RNA in Drosophila tissues

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Hila; D’Alterio, Cecilia; Loza-Coll, Mariano; Jones, D Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Detection of RNAs by in situ hybridization (ISH) is a well-established technique that permits the study of specific RNA expression patterns in tissues; however, not all tissues are equally amenable to staining using the same procedure. Here we describe a protocol that combines whole-mount immunofluorescence (IF) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the simultaneous detection of specific RNA transcripts and proteins, greatly enhancing the spatial resolution of RNA expression in complex, intact fly tissues. To date, we have successfully used this protocol in adult testis, larval male gonads, adult intestine and Malpighian tubules. IF is conducted in RNase-free solutions, prior to the harsh conditions of FISH, in order to preserve protein antigenicity within dissected tissues. Separate protocols are described for mRNA and miRNA detection, which are based on robust digoxigenin (DIG) RNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes, respectively. The combined IF-FISH procedure can be completed in 2 d for miRNA detection and 4 d for mRNA detection. Although optimized for Drosophila, this IF-FISH protocol should be adaptable to a wide variety of organisms, tissues, antibodies and probes, thus providing a reliable and simple means to compare RNA and protein abundance and localization. PMID:22976352

  14. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    PubMed Central

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallo­graphic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate. PMID:19690368

  15. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors: resolving spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling

    PubMed Central

    DiPilato, Lisa M.; Zhang, Jin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cellular processes are orchestrated by the precise coordination and regulation of molecular events in the cell. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors coupled with live-cell imaging have enabled the visualization of these events in real time and helped shape some of the current concepts of signal transduction, such as spatial compartmentation. The quantitative information produced by these tools has been incorporated into mathematical models that are capable of predicting highly complex and dynamic behaviors of cellular signaling networks, thus providing a systems level understanding of how pathways interact to produce a functional response. Finally, with technological advances in high throughput and in vivo imaging, these molecular tools promise to continually engender significant contributions to our understanding of cellular processes under normal and diseased conditions. PMID:19910237

  16. Ultra-sensitive fluorescent proteins for imaging neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsai-Wen; Wardill, Trevor J.; Sun, Yi; Pulver, Stefan R.; Renninger, Sabine L.; Baohan, Amy; Schreiter, Eric R.; Kerr, Rex A.; Orger, Michael B.; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L.; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fluorescent calcium sensors are widely used to image neural activity. Using structure-based mutagenesis and neuron-based screening, we developed a family of ultra-sensitive protein calcium sensors (GCaMP6) that outperformed other sensors in cultured neurons and in zebrafish, flies, and mice in vivo. In layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of the mouse visual cortex, GCaMP6 reliably detected single action potentials in neuronal somata and orientation-tuned synaptic calcium transients in individual dendritic spines. The orientation tuning of structurally persistent spines was largely stable over timescales of weeks. Orientation tuning averaged across spine populations predicted the tuning of their parent cell. Although the somata of GABAergic neurons showed little orientation tuning, their dendrites included highly tuned dendritic segments (5 - 40 micrometers long). GCaMP6 sensors thus provide new windows into the organization and dynamics of neural circuits over multiple spatial and temporal scales. PMID:23868258

  17. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors: resolving spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling.

    PubMed

    DiPilato, Lisa M; Zhang, Jin

    2010-02-01

    Cellular processes are orchestrated by the precise coordination and regulation of molecular events in the cell. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors coupled with live-cell imaging have enabled the visualization of these events in real time and helped shape some of the current concepts of signal transduction, such as spatial compartmentation. The quantitative information produced by these tools has been incorporated into mathematical models that are capable of predicting highly complex and dynamic behaviors of cellular signaling networks, thus providing a systems level understanding of how pathways interact to produce a functional response. Finally, with technological advances in high-throughput and in vivo imaging, these molecular tools promise to continually engender significant contributions to our understanding of cellular processes under normal and diseased conditions.

  18. Characterization of nuclear localization and export signals of the major tegument protein VP8 of bovine herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunfu; Brownlie, Robert; Babiuk, Lorne A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2004-07-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) VP8 is found in the nucleus immediately after infection. Transient expression of VP8 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in COS-7 cells confirmed the nuclear localization of VP8 in the absence of other viral proteins. VP8 has four putative nuclear localization signals (NLS). Deletion of pat4 ((51)RRPR(54)) or pat7 ((48)PRVRRPR(54)) NLS2 abrogated nuclear accumulation, whereas deletion of (48)PRV(50) did not, so pat4 NLS2 is critical for nuclear localization of VP8. Furthermore, NLS1 ((11)RRPRR(15)), pat4 NLS2, and pat7 NLS2 were all capable of transporting the majority of YFP to the nucleus. Finally, a 12-amino-acid peptide with the sequence RRPRRPRVRRPR directed all of YFP into the nucleus, suggesting that reiteration of the RRPR motif makes the nuclear localization more efficient. Heterokaryon assays demonstrated that VP8 is also capable of shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cell. Deletion mutant analysis revealed that this property is attributed to a leucine-rich nuclear export sequence (NES) consisting of amino acids (485)LSAYLTLFVAL(495). This leucine-rich NES caused transport of YFP to the cytoplasm. These results demonstrate that VP8 shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm.

  19. A fluorescent reporter for mapping cellular protein-protein interactions in time and space.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Daniel; Neller, Joachim; Kestler, Hans A; Kraus, Johann; Dünkler, Alexander; Johnsson, Nils

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a fluorescent reporter for monitoring protein-protein interactions in living cells. The method is based on the Split-Ubiquitin method and uses the ratio of two auto-fluorescent reporter proteins as signal for interaction (SPLIFF). The mating of two haploid yeast cells initiates the analysis and the interactions are followed online by two-channel time-lapse microscopy of the diploid cells during their first cell cycle. Using this approach we could with high spatio-temporal resolution visualize the differences between the interactions of the microtubule binding protein Stu2p with two of its binding partners, monitor the transient association of a Ran-GTPase with its receptors at the nuclear pore, and distinguish between protein interactions at the polar cortical domain at different phases of polar growth. These examples further demonstrate that protein-protein interactions identified from large-scale screens can be effectively followed up by high-resolution single-cell analysis. PMID:23511205

  20. Characterization of a novel component of the peroxisomal protein import apparatus using fluorescent peroxisomal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, J E; Keller, G A; Morrell, J C; Mihalik, S J; Smith, B; Cregg, J M; Gould, S J

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent peroxisomal probes were developed by fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the matrix peroxisomal targeting signals PTS1 and PTS2, as well as to an integral peroxisomal membrane protein (IPMP). These proteins were used to identify and characterize novel peroxisome assembly (pas) mutants in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mutant cells lacking the PAS10 gene mislocalized both PTS1-GFP and PTS2-GFP to the cytoplasm but did incorporate IPMP-GFP into peroxisome membranes. Similar distributions were observed for endogenous peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. While peroxisomes from translocation-competent pas mutants sediment in sucrose gradients at the density of normal peroxisomes, >98% of peroxisomes from pas10 cells migrated to a much lower density and had an extremely low ratio of matrix:membrane protein. These data indicate that Pas10p plays an important role in protein translocation across the peroxisome membrane. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that Pas10p is an integral protein of the peroxisome membrane. In addition, Pas10p contains a cytoplasmically-oriented C3HC4 zinc binding domain that is essential for its biological activity. Images PMID:8670828

  1. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies. PMID:27748381

  2. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  3. Gateway Vectors for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Protein-Protein Interactions in Plant Cells Using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation.

    PubMed

    Kamigaki, Akane; Nito, Kazumasa; Hikino, Kazumi; Goto-Yamada, Shino; Nishimura, Mikio; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Mano, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is widely used to detect protein-protein interactions, because it is technically simple, convenient, and can be adapted for use with conventional fluorescence microscopy. We previously constructed enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-based Gateway cloning technology-compatible vectors. In the current study, we generated new Gateway cloning technology-compatible vectors to detect BiFC-based multiple protein-protein interactions using N- and C-terminal fragments of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1). Using a combination of N- and C-terminal fragments from ECFP, EGFP and EYFP, we observed a shift in the emission wavelength, enabling the simultaneous detection of multiple protein-protein interactions. Moreover, we developed these vectors as binary vectors for use in Agrobacterium infiltration and for the generate transgenic plants. We verified that the binary vectors functioned well in tobacco cells. The results demonstrate that the BiFC vectors facilitate the design of various constructions and are convenient for the detection of multiple protein-protein interactions simultaneously in plant cells. PMID:27490375

  4. Developing Fast Fluorescent Protein Voltage Sensors by Optimizing FRET Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Uhna; Sepehri-Rad, Masoud; Piao, Hong Hua; Jin, Lei; Hughes, Thomas; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Baker, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based protein voltage sensors can be useful for monitoring neuronal activity in vivo because the ratio of signals between the donor and acceptor pair reduces common sources of noise such as heart beat artifacts. We improved the performance of FRET based genetically encoded Fluorescent Protein (FP) voltage sensors by optimizing the location of donor and acceptor FPs flanking the voltage sensitive domain of the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase. First, we created 39 different “Nabi1” constructs by positioning the donor FP, UKG, at 8 different locations downstream of the voltage-sensing domain and the acceptor FP, mKO, at 6 positions upstream. Several of these combinations resulted in large voltage dependent signals and relatively fast kinetics. Nabi1 probes responded with signal size up to 11% ΔF/F for a 100 mV depolarization and fast response time constants both for signal activation (~2 ms) and signal decay (~3 ms). We improved expression in neuronal cells by replacing the mKO and UKG FRET pair with Clover (donor FP) and mRuby2 (acceptor FP) to create Nabi2 probes. Nabi2 probes also had large signals and relatively fast time constants in HEK293 cells. In primary neuronal culture, a Nabi2 probe was able to differentiate individual action potentials at 45 Hz. PMID:26587834

  5. Photoswitchable red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; English, Brian P; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Xiao, Hui; Almo, Steven C; Singer, Robert H; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2014-10-23

    A subclass of fluorescent proteins (FPs), large Stokes shift (LSS) FP, are characterized by increased spread between excitation and emission maxima. We report a photoswitchable variant of a red FP with an LSS, PSLSSmKate, which initially exhibits excitation and emission at 445 and 622 nm, but violet irradiation photoswitches PSLSSmKate into a common red form with excitation and emission at 573 and 621 nm. We characterize spectral, photophysical, and biochemical properties of PSLSSmKate in vitro and in mammalian cells and determine its crystal structure in the LSS form. Mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and spectroscopy of PSLSSmKate allow us to propose molecular mechanisms for the LSS, pH dependence, and light-induced chromophore transformation. We demonstrate the applicability of PSLSSmKate to superresolution photoactivated localization microscopy and protein dynamics in live cells. Given its promising properties, we expect that PSLSSmKate-like phenotype will be further used for photoactivatable imaging and tracking multiple populations of intracellular objects.

  6. Developing Fast Fluorescent Protein Voltage Sensors by Optimizing FRET Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sung, Uhna; Sepehri-Rad, Masoud; Piao, Hong Hua; Jin, Lei; Hughes, Thomas; Cohen, Lawrence B; Baker, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based protein voltage sensors can be useful for monitoring neuronal activity in vivo because the ratio of signals between the donor and acceptor pair reduces common sources of noise such as heart beat artifacts. We improved the performance of FRET based genetically encoded Fluorescent Protein (FP) voltage sensors by optimizing the location of donor and acceptor FPs flanking the voltage sensitive domain of the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase. First, we created 39 different "Nabi1" constructs by positioning the donor FP, UKG, at 8 different locations downstream of the voltage-sensing domain and the acceptor FP, mKO, at 6 positions upstream. Several of these combinations resulted in large voltage dependent signals and relatively fast kinetics. Nabi1 probes responded with signal size up to 11% ΔF/F for a 100 mV depolarization and fast response time constants both for signal activation (~2 ms) and signal decay (~3 ms). We improved expression in neuronal cells by replacing the mKO and UKG FRET pair with Clover (donor FP) and mRuby2 (acceptor FP) to create Nabi2 probes. Nabi2 probes also had large signals and relatively fast time constants in HEK293 cells. In primary neuronal culture, a Nabi2 probe was able to differentiate individual action potentials at 45 Hz. PMID:26587834

  7. Microfluidics-Based Selection of Red-Fluorescent Proteins with Decreased Rates of Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Lubbeck, Jennifer L.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Regmi, Chola K.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.; Jimenez, Ralph; Palmer, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins offer exceptional labeling specificity in living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, their photophysical properties remain far from ideal for long-term imaging of low-abundance cellular constituents, in large part because of their poor photostability. Despite widespread engineering efforts, improving the photostability of fluorescent proteins remains challenging due to lack of appropriate high-throughput selection methods. Here, we use molecular dynamics guided mutagenesis in conjunction with a recently developed microfluidic-based platform, which sorts cells based on their fluorescence photostability, to identify red fluorescent proteins with decreased photobleaching from a HeLa cell-based library. The identified mutant, named Kriek, has 2.5- and 4-fold higher photostability than its progenitor, mCherry, under widefield and confocal illumination, respectively. Furthermore, the results provide insight into mechanisms for enhancing photostability and their connections with other photophysical processes, thereby providing direction for ongoing development of fluorescent proteins with improved single-molecule and low-copy imaging capabilities. Insight, innovation, integration Fluorescent proteins enable imaging in situ, throughout the visible spectrum, with superb molecular specificity and single-molecule sensitivity. Unfortunately, when compared to leading small-molecule fluorophores (e.g., Cy3), fluorescent proteins, suffer from accelerated photobleaching and poor integrated photon output. This results from a lack of appropriate high-throughput methods for improving the photostability of fluorescent proteins, as well as a poor molecular understanding of fluorescent protein photobleaching. Here, we report the first application of a recently developed microfluidic cell-sorter to identify fluorescent proteins from a mCherry-derived library with improved photostability. The results provide insight into fluorescent protein photophysics, greatly

  8. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hau B; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-12-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10-11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1-9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10-11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1-9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  9. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hau B.; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-­strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization. PMID:24311592

  10. Detection of constitutive heterodimerization of the integrin Mac-1 subunits by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Guo; Yang Huayan; Wang Chen; Zhang Feng; You Zhendong; Wang Guiying; He Cheng; Chen Yizhang . E-mail: yzchen0928@yahoo.com; Xu Zhihan . E-mail: zzxu@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2006-08-04

    Macrophage differentiation antigen associated with complement three receptor function (Mac-1) belongs to {beta}{sub 2} subfamily of integrins that mediate important cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Biochemical studies have indicated that Mac-1 is a constitutive heterodimer in vitro. Here, we detected the heterodimerization of Mac-1 subunits in living cells by means of two fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques (fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy) and our results demonstrated that there is constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits and this constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits is cell-type independent. Through FRET imaging, we found that heterodimers of Mac-1 mainly localized in plasma membrane, perinuclear, and Golgi area in living cells. Furthermore, through analysis of the estimated physical distances between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fused to Mac-1 subunits, we suggested that the conformation of Mac-1 subunits is not affected by the fusion of CFP or YFP and inferred that Mac-1 subunits take different conformation when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, respectively.

  11. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  12. Molecular recognition of DNA-protein complexes: a straightforward method combining scanning force and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Humberto; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2010-06-01

    Combining scanning force and fluorescent microscopy allows simultaneous identification of labeled biomolecules and analysis of their nanometer level architectural arrangement. Fluorescent polystyrene nano-spheres were used as reliable objects for alignment of optical and topographic images. This allowed the precise localization of different fluorescence particles within complex molecular assemblies whose structure was mapped in nanometer detail topography. Our experiments reveal the versatility of this method for analysis of proteins and protein-DNA complexes.

  13. Protein-based fluorescent metal nanoclusters for small molecular drug screening.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; New, Siu Yee; Xie, Jianping; Su, Xiaodi; Tan, Yen Nee

    2014-11-18

    A facile drug screening method based on synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters inside albumin proteins loaded with small molecular drugs and comparing the relative fluorescence intensities of the resultant gold nanoclusters has been developed and successfully applied for the quantitative measurement of drug-protein binding constants. PMID:25253537

  14. How to Illustrate Ligand-Protein Binding in a Class Experiment: An Elementary Fluorescent Assay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Alain; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment (taking approximately five hours) which illustrates the binding of a small molecule to a protein. By using an appropriate fluorescent ligand and a given protein, the fluorescent probe technique is applied to measure the number of bonding sites, and number of site classes, and their association constants. (JN)

  15. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes. PMID:27515076

  16. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family.

    PubMed

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments. PMID:27604321

  17. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  18. A novel fluorescent protein from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica (Anthozoa: Actiniaria).

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kenta; Shimada, Eriko; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Tsuruwaka, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A fluorescent protein was identified and cloned from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica. Bioluminescence and fluorescence expression were examined by direct observations of live specimens and RNA-Seq analysis. Both approaches revealed a novel green fluorescent protein in the tentacles of the anemone, but bioluminescence was not observed. Behavioural observations revealed that a blue light excited the fluorescence in the tentacles, and initiated a behavioural response whereby the fluorescent tentacles became fully exposed to the blue light. The excitation and emission peaks of C. japonica's fluorescent protein were at 500 and 510 nm, respectively, which were greener than those reported in homologs. Furthermore, this protein was highly tolerant of increased temperatures and repeated freeze-thaw treatments. The current study presents an example of fluorescence in a deep-sea cnidarian, demonstrating that fluorescent proteins could have important roles, regardless of the presence or absence of strong sunlight. It also demonstrates that this deep-sea fluorescent protein has unique characteristics, including high stability, perhaps as an adaptation to the extreme environment. PMID:27002644

  19. A novel fluorescent protein from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica (Anthozoa: Actiniaria)

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Kenta; Shimada, Eriko; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Tsuruwaka, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A fluorescent protein was identified and cloned from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica. Bioluminescence and fluorescence expression were examined by direct observations of live specimens and RNA-Seq analysis. Both approaches revealed a novel green fluorescent protein in the tentacles of the anemone, but bioluminescence was not observed. Behavioural observations revealed that a blue light excited the fluorescence in the tentacles, and initiated a behavioural response whereby the fluorescent tentacles became fully exposed to the blue light. The excitation and emission peaks of C. japonica’s fluorescent protein were at 500 and 510 nm, respectively, which were greener than those reported in homologs. Furthermore, this protein was highly tolerant of increased temperatures and repeated freeze–thaw treatments. The current study presents an example of fluorescence in a deep-sea cnidarian, demonstrating that fluorescent proteins could have important roles, regardless of the presence or absence of strong sunlight. It also demonstrates that this deep-sea fluorescent protein has unique characteristics, including high stability, perhaps as an adaptation to the extreme environment. PMID:27002644

  20. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION (BiFC) ANALYSIS AS A PROBE OF PROTEIN INTERACTIONS IN LIVING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kerppola, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    Protein interactions are a fundamental mechanism for the generation of biological regulatory specificity. The study of protein interactions in living cells is of particular significance because the interactions that occur in a particular cell depend on the full complement of proteins present in the cell and the external stimuli that influence the cell. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables direct visualization of protein interactions in living cells. The BiFC assay is based on the association between two non-fluorescent fragments of a fluorescent protein when they are brought in proximity to each other by an interaction between proteins fused to the fragments. Numerous protein interactions have been visualized using the BiFC assay in many different cell types and organisms. The BiFC assay is technically straightforward and can be performed using standard molecular biology and cell culture reagents and a regular fluorescence microscope or flow cytometer. PMID:18573091

  1. Microspectroscopic imaging tracks the intracellular processing of a signal transduction protein: fluorescent-labeled protein kinase C beta I.

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaens, P I; Jovin, T M

    1996-01-01

    We have devised a microspectroscopic strategy for assessing the intracellular (re)distribution and the integrity of the primary structure of proteins involved in signal transduction. The purified proteins are fluorescent-labeled in vitro and reintroduced into the living cell. The localization and molecular state of fluorescent-labeled protein kinase C beta I isozyme were assessed by a combination of quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, and novel determinations of fluorescence resonance energy transfer based on photobleaching digital imaging microscopy. The intensity and fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency images demonstrate the rapid nuclear translocation and ensuing fragmentation of protein kinase C beta I in BALB/c3T3 fibroblasts upon phorbol ester stimulation, and suggest distinct, compartmentalized roles for the regulatory and catalytic fragments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8710884

  2. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-11-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. PMID:26351203

  3. Automated Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images to Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Venkatraman, S.; Doktycz, M. J.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protein interactions is important for elucidating biological networks. One obstacle in comprehensive interaction studies is the analyses of large datasets, particularly those containing images. Development of an automated system to analyze an image-based protein interaction dataset is needed. Such an analysis system is described here, to automatically extract features from fluorescence microscopy images obtained from a bacterial protein interaction assay. These features are used to relay quantitative values that aid in the automated scoring of positive interactions. Experimental observations indicate that identifying at least 50% positive cells in an image is sufficient to detect a protein interaction.more » Based on this criterion, the automated system presents 100% accuracy in detecting positive interactions for a dataset of 16 images. Algorithms were implemented using MATLAB and the software developed is available on request from the authors.« less

  4. Determination of proteins at nanogram levels by synchronous fluorescence scan technique with a novel composite nanoparticle as a fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Guangfeng; Li, Ling; Xu, Fagong

    2004-09-01

    A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method and applied as a protein fluorescence probe. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (--COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the composite nanoparticles is significantly increased in the presence of trace protein at pH 6.90. Based on this, a new synchronous fluorescence scan (SFS) analysis was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA, and human gamma-IgG. When Delta lambda = 280 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 290 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The linear range is 0.1-10 microg ml(-1) for HSA, 0.09-8.0 microg ml(-1) for BSA, and 0.08-15 microg ml(-1) for human gamma-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are satisfactory. PMID:15294230

  5. Determination of proteins at nanogram levels by synchronous fluorescence scan technique with a novel composite nanoparticle as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Guangfeng; Li, Ling; Xu, Fagong

    2004-09-01

    A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method and applied as a protein fluorescence probe. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the composite nanoparticles is significantly increased in the presence of trace protein at pH 6.90. Based on this, a new synchronous fluorescence scan (SFS) analysis was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA, and human γ-IgG. When Δ λ=280 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 290 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The linear range is 0.1-10 μg ml -1 for HSA, 0.09-8.0 μg ml -1 for BSA, and 0.08-15 μg ml -1 for human γ-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are satisfactory.

  6. Mapping fast protein folding with multiple-site fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Chao, Shu-Han; Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Fast protein folding involves complex dynamics in many degrees of freedom, yet microsecond folding experiments provide only low-resolution structural information. We enhance the structural resolution of the five-helix bundle protein λ6–85 by engineering into it three fluorescent tryptophan–tyrosine contact probes. The probes report on distances between three different helix pairs: 1–2, 1–3, and 3–2. Temperature jump relaxation experiments on these three mutants reveal two different kinetic timescales: a slower timescale for 1–3 and a faster one for the two contacts involving helix 2. We hypothesize that these differences arise from a single folding mechanism that forms contacts on different timescales, and not from changes of mechanism due to adding the probes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the corresponding three distances in one published single-trajectory all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation of a similar mutant. Autocorrelation analysis of the trajectory reveals the same “slow” and “fast” distance change as does experiment, but on a faster timescale; smoothing the trajectory in time shows that this ordering is robust and persists into the microsecond folding timescale. Structural investigation of the all-atom computational data suggests that helix 2 misfolds to produce a short-lived off-pathway trap, in agreement with the experimental finding that the 1–2 and 3–2 distances involving helix 2 contacts form a kinetic grouping distinct from 1 to 3. Our work demonstrates that comparison between experiment and simulation can be extended to several order parameters, providing a stronger mechanistic test. PMID:26080403

  7. Mapping fast protein folding with multiple-site fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Prigozhin, Maxim B; Chao, Shu-Han; Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-30

    Fast protein folding involves complex dynamics in many degrees of freedom, yet microsecond folding experiments provide only low-resolution structural information. We enhance the structural resolution of the five-helix bundle protein λ6-85 by engineering into it three fluorescent tryptophan-tyrosine contact probes. The probes report on distances between three different helix pairs: 1-2, 1-3, and 3-2. Temperature jump relaxation experiments on these three mutants reveal two different kinetic timescales: a slower timescale for 1-3 and a faster one for the two contacts involving helix 2. We hypothesize that these differences arise from a single folding mechanism that forms contacts on different timescales, and not from changes of mechanism due to adding the probes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the corresponding three distances in one published single-trajectory all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation of a similar mutant. Autocorrelation analysis of the trajectory reveals the same "slow" and "fast" distance change as does experiment, but on a faster timescale; smoothing the trajectory in time shows that this ordering is robust and persists into the microsecond folding timescale. Structural investigation of the all-atom computational data suggests that helix 2 misfolds to produce a short-lived off-pathway trap, in agreement with the experimental finding that the 1-2 and 3-2 distances involving helix 2 contacts form a kinetic grouping distinct from 1 to 3. Our work demonstrates that comparison between experiment and simulation can be extended to several order parameters, providing a stronger mechanistic test. PMID:26080403

  8. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  9. Antibody Labeling with Fluorescent Dyes Using Magnetic Protein A and Protein G Beads.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies labeled with small molecules like fluorescent dyes, cytotoxic drugs, and radioactive tracers are essential tools in biomedical research, immunodiagnostics and more recently as therapeutic agents. Traditional methods for labeling antibodies with small molecules require purified antibodies at relatively high concentration, involve multiple dialysis steps and have limited throughput. However, several applications, including the field of Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs), will benefit from new methods that will allow labeling of antibodies directly from cell media. Such methods may allow antibodies to be screened in biologically relevant assays, for example, the receptor-mediated antibody internalization assay in the case of ADCs. Here, we describe a method (on-bead method) that enables labeling of small amounts of antibodies directly from cell media. This approach utilizes high capacity magnetic Protein A and Protein G affinity beads to capture antibodies from the cell media followed by labeling with small molecules using either amine or thiol chemistry and subsequent elution of the labeled antibodies. Taking fluorescent dyes as surrogates for small molecules, we demonstrate the on-bead labeling of three different mouse antibodies directly from cell media using both amine and thiol labeling chemistry. The high binding affinity of antibodies to Protein A and Protein G ensures high recoveries as well as high purity of the labeled antibodies. In addition, use of magnetic beads allows multiple samples to be handled manually, thereby significantly improving labeling throughput. PMID:27685323

  10. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  11. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development. PMID:21772029

  12. Expression, purification and some properties of fluorescent chimeras of human small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Datskevich, Petr N; Mymrikov, Evgeny V; Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Shemetov, Anton A; Sudnitsyna, Maria V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2012-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsp) are ubiquitously expressed in all human tissues and have an important housekeeping role in preventing the accumulation of aggregates of improperly folded or denatured proteins. They also participate in the regulation of the cytoskeleton, proliferation, apoptosis and many other vital processes. Fluorescent chimeras composed of sHsp and enhanced fluorescent proteins have been used to determine the intracellular locations of small heat shock proteins and to analyse the hetero-oligomeric complexes formed by different sHsp. However, the biochemical properties and chaperone-like activities of these chimeras have not been investigated. To determine the properties of these chimeras, we fused enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins (EYFP and ECFP) to the N-termini of four ubiquitously expressed human small heat shock proteins: HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, and HspB8. The eight fluorescent chimeras of small heat shock proteins and isolated fluorescent proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The chimeric proteins were isolated and purified via ammonium sulphate fractionation, ion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. This method provided 20-100 mg of fluorescent chimeras from 1L of bacterial culture. The spectral properties of the chimeras were similar to those of the isolated fluorescent proteins. The fusion of fluorescent proteins to HspB6 and HspB8, which typically form dimers, did not affect their quaternary structures. Oligomers of the fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB5 were less stable and contained fewer subunits than oligomers formed by the wild-type proteins. Fusion with EYFP decreased the chaperone-like activity of HspB5 and HspB6 whereas fusion with ECFP increased chaperone-like activity. All fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB8 had higher chaperone-like activity than the wild-type proteins. Thus, although fluorescent chimeras are useful for many purposes, the fluorescent proteins used to form these chimeras may

  13. A novel method for observing proteins in vivo using a small fluorescent label and multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Botchway, Stanley W; Barba, Ignasi; Jordan, Randolf; Harmston, Rebecca; Haggie, Peter M; Williams, Simon-Peter; Fulton, Alexandra M; Parker, Anthony W; Brindle, Kevin M

    2005-09-15

    A novel method for the fluorescence detection of proteins in cells is described in the present study. Proteins are labelled by the selective biosynthetic incorporation of 5-hydroxytryptophan and the label is detected via selective two-photon excitation of the hydroxyindole and detection of its fluorescence emission at 340 nm. The method is demonstrated in this paper with images of a labelled protein in yeast cells.

  14. Domain organization of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel complex examined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhen; Makhina, Elena N; Masia, Ricard; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Formanack, Mary Lynn; Nichols, Colin G

    2013-02-01

    K(ATP) channels link cell metabolism to excitability in many cells. They are formed as tetramers of Kir6.2 subunits, each associated with a SUR1 subunit. We used mutant GFP-based FRET to assess domain organization in channel complexes. Full-length Kir6.2 subunits were linked to YFP or cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) at N or C termini, and all such constructs, including double-tagged YFP-Kir6.2-CFP (Y6.2C), formed functional K(ATP) channels. In intact COSm6 cells, background emission of YFP excited by 430-nm light was ∼6%, but the Y6.2C construct expressed alone exhibited an apparent FRET efficiency of ∼25%, confirmed by trypsin digestion, with or without SUR1 co-expression. Similar FRET efficiency was detected in mixtures of CFP- and YFP-tagged full-length Kir6.2 subunits and transmembrane domain only constructs, when tagged at the C termini but not at the N termini. The FRET-reported Kir6.2 tetramer domain organization was qualitatively consistent with Kir channel crystal structures: C termini and M2 domains are centrally located relative to N termini and M1 domains, respectively. Additional FRET analyses were performed on cells in which tagged full-length Kir6.2 and tagged SUR1 constructs were co-expressed. These analyses further revealed that 1) NBD1 of SUR1 is closer to the C terminus of Kir6.2 than to the N terminus; 2) the Kir6.2 cytoplasmic domain is not essential for complexation with SUR1; and 3) the N-terminal half of SUR1 can complex with itself in the absence of either the C-terminal half or Kir6.2.

  15. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M.; Specht, Christian G.; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  16. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  17. Novel multistep BRET-FRET energy transfer using nanoconjugates of firefly proteins, quantum dots, and red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rabeka; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2013-06-21

    Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from firefly luciferase to red fluorescent proteins using quantum dot or rod acceptor/donor linkers is described. The effect of morphology and tuned optical properties on the efficiency of this unique BRET-FRET system was evaluated.

  18. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence. PMID:26246319

  19. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  20. Human alpha-fetal protein immunoassay using fluorescence suppression with fluorescent-bead/antibody conjugate and enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junhyoung; Shin, Yong-Beom; Lee, JaeJong; Kim, Min-Gon

    2015-09-15

    The aim of the study was to develop a simple and rapid immunoassay using fluorescent microbeads and enzyme-substrate reactions to measure alpha-fetal protein (AFP) concentrations. We demonstrated the functionality of the fluorescent immunosensor using antibody-conjugated fluorescent latex beads (AB-FLBs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to catalyze a reaction, where the products would precipitate and suppress the fluorescence of AB-FLBs. First, the AB-FLBs were incubated with antigen, biotinylated antibodies (bABs), and streptavidin-HRP (SAv-HRP) to form a sandwich-type immunoreaction. The mixture was then filtered through a membrane to concentrate the beads on a small area. After washing to remove unbound bABs and SAv-HRP, a chromogenic HRP substrate and H2O2 were added to form precipitates on the FLB surface. The suppression of the fluorescence was measured with a fluorescent image analyzer system. Under optimized conditions, AFP could be measured at concentrations as low as 1 pg mL(-1) with a dynamic range up to 100 ng mL(-1).

  1. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kennis, John T M

    2015-08-06

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600~700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  2. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction. PMID:26904821

  3. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction.

  4. Attenuation-based dual-fluorescent-protein reporter for screening translation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Osterman, Ilya A; Prokhorova, Irina V; Sysoev, Vasily O; Boykova, Yulia V; Efremenkova, Olga V; Svetlov, Maxim S; Kolb, Vyacheslav A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Sergiev, Petr V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2012-04-01

    A reporter construct was created on the basis of the transcription attenuator region of the Escherichia coli tryptophan operon. Dual-fluorescent-protein genes for red fluorescent protein and cerulean fluorescent protein were used as a sensor and internal control of gene expression. The sequence of the attenuator was modified to avoid tryptophan sensitivity while preserving sensitivity to ribosome stalling. Antimicrobial compounds which cause translation arrest at the stage of elongation induce the reporter both in liquid culture and on an agar plate. This reporter could be used for high-throughput screening of translation inhibitors. PMID:22252829

  5. [Ph-Sensor Properties of a Fluorescent Protein from Dendronephthya sp].

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, A A; Chertkova, R V; Martynov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescent proteins are now widely applicable for monitoring pH changes in live cells. Here, we have shown that a fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) exhibits a pronounced pH-sensitivity. Unlike most of known genetically encoded pH-sensors, fluorescence of the protein is not quenched upon medium acidification, but is shifting from the red to green spectral range. Therefore, quantitative measurements of intracellular pH are feasible by ratiometric comparison of emission intensities in the red and green spectral ranges, which makes DendFP advantageous compared with other genetically encoded pH-sensors. PMID:27125020

  6. Rapid diagnosis and quantification of herpes simplex virus with a green fluorescent protein reporter system.

    PubMed

    Kung, S H; Wang, Y C; Lin, C H; Kuo, R L; Liu, W T

    2000-11-01

    A genetically modified cell line (Vero-ICP10-EGFP) was constructed for detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) by a simple, rapid and direct method. The cell line was developed by stable transfection of Vero cell with a plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the promoter of the HSV-2 ICP10 gene. As early as 6 h after infection with HSV, fluorescence-emitting cells can be observed under a fluorescence microscope. A single infected cell emitting fluorescence can be observed with soft agar overlay by inverted fluorescence microscopy. No induction of detectable fluorescence was seen following infections with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), coxsackievirus A16 and enterovirus 71. Analysis by flow cytometry also demonstrated that intensity of the triggered fluorescence is proportional to the titer of HSV inoculated. Taken together, this novel GFP reporter system could become a useful means for rapid detection and quantification of HSV in clinical specimens.

  7. Polymersomes prepared from thermoresponsive fluorescent protein-polymer bioconjugates: capture of and report on drug and protein payloads.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin Ken; Laos, Alistair J; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Curmi, Paul M G; Gooding, J Justin; Marquis, Christopher P; Stenzel, Martina H; Thordarson, Pall

    2015-04-27

    Polymersomes provide a good platform for targeted drug delivery and the creation of complex (bio)catalytically active systems for research in synthetic biology. To realize these applications requires both spatial control over the encapsulation components in these polymersomes and a means to report where the components are in the polymersomes. To address these twin challenges, we synthesized the protein-polymer bioconjugate PNIPAM-b-amilFP497 composed of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and a green-fluorescent protein variant (amilFP497). Above 37 °C, this bioconjugate forms polymersomes that can (co-)encapsulate the fluorescent drug doxorubicin and the fluorescent light-harvesting protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET), we can distinguish the co-encapsulated PE545 protein inside the polymersome membrane while doxorubicin is found both in the polymersome core and membrane.

  8. Polymersomes prepared from thermoresponsive fluorescent protein-polymer bioconjugates: capture of and report on drug and protein payloads.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin Ken; Laos, Alistair J; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Curmi, Paul M G; Gooding, J Justin; Marquis, Christopher P; Stenzel, Martina H; Thordarson, Pall

    2015-04-27

    Polymersomes provide a good platform for targeted drug delivery and the creation of complex (bio)catalytically active systems for research in synthetic biology. To realize these applications requires both spatial control over the encapsulation components in these polymersomes and a means to report where the components are in the polymersomes. To address these twin challenges, we synthesized the protein-polymer bioconjugate PNIPAM-b-amilFP497 composed of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and a green-fluorescent protein variant (amilFP497). Above 37 °C, this bioconjugate forms polymersomes that can (co-)encapsulate the fluorescent drug doxorubicin and the fluorescent light-harvesting protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET), we can distinguish the co-encapsulated PE545 protein inside the polymersome membrane while doxorubicin is found both in the polymersome core and membrane. PMID:25736460

  9. Z-scan Fluorescence Profile Deconvolution of Cytosolic and Membrane-associated Protein Populations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Further, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 labeled with green fluorescent protein upon ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area to volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. PMID:25862080

  10. Structural basis of enhanced photoconversion yield in green fluorescent protein-like protein Dendra2.

    PubMed

    Adam, Virgile; Nienhaus, Karin; Bourgeois, Dominique; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2009-06-01

    Dendra2 is an engineered, monomeric GFP-like protein that belongs to a subclass of fluorescent proteins undergoing irreversible photoconversion from a green- to a red-emitting state upon exposure to purple-blue light. This photoinduced process occurs only in the neutral state of the chromophore and is known to result from backbone cleavage accompanied by an extension of the delocalized pi-electron system. We have measured the X-ray structure of the green species of Dendra2 and performed a comprehensive characterization of the optical absorption and fluorescence properties of the protein in both its green and red forms. The structure, which is very similar to those reported for the closely related proteins EosFP and Kaede, revealed a local structural change involving mainly Arg66 and a water molecule W4, which are part of a charged and hydrogen-bonded cluster of amino acids and water molecules next to the chromophore. Unlike in EosFP and Kaede, Arg66 of Dendra2 does not contribute to negative charge stabilization on the imidazolinone ring by hydrogen bonding to the imidazolinone carbonyl. This structural change may explain the blue shift of the absorption and emission bands, as well as the markedly higher pKs of the hydroxyphenyl moiety of the chromophore, which were determined as 7.1 and 7.5 for the green and red species, respectively. The action spectrum of photoconversion coincides with the absorption band of the neutral species. Consequently, its 20-fold enhancement in Dendra2 at physiological pH accounts for the higher photoconversion yield of this protein as compared to EosFP.

  11. Structural basis for the fast maturation of Arthropoda green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Artem G; Pokross, Matthew E; Egorov, Nikolay S; Zaraisky, Andrey G; Yampolsky, Ilya V; Merzlyak, Ekaterina M; Shkoporov, Andrey N; Sander, Ian; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Chudakov, Dmitriy M

    2006-10-01

    Since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 1992, a family of known GFP-like proteins has been growing rapidly. Today, it includes more than a hundred proteins with different spectral characteristics cloned from Cnidaria species. For some of these proteins, crystal structures have been solved, showing diversity in chromophore modifications and conformational states. However, we are still far from a complete understanding of the origin, functions and evolution of the GFP family. Novel proteins of the family were recently cloned from evolutionarily distant marine Copepoda species, phylum Arthropoda, demonstrating an extremely rapid generation of fluorescent signal. Here, we have generated a non-aggregating mutant of Copepoda fluorescent protein and solved its high-resolution crystal structure. It was found that the protein beta-barrel contains a pore, leading to the chromophore. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this feature is critical for the fast maturation of the chromophore. PMID:16936637

  12. Beta-Barrel Scaffold of Fluorescent Proteins: Folding, Stability and Role in Chromophore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the current view of the interaction between the β-barrel scaffold of fluorescent proteins and their unique chromophore located in the internal helix. The chromophore originates from the polypeptide chain and its properties are influenced by the surrounding protein matrix of the β-barrel. On the other hand, it appears that a chromophore tightens the β-barrel scaffold and plays a crucial role in its stability. Furthermore, the presence of a mature chromophore causes hysteresis of protein unfolding and refolding. We survey studies measuring protein unfolding and refolding using traditional methods as well as new approaches, such as mechanical unfolding and reassembly of truncated fluorescent proteins. We also analyze models of fluorescent protein unfolding and refolding obtained through different approaches, and compare the results of protein folding in vitro to co-translational folding of a newly synthesized polypeptide chain. PMID:23351712

  13. Detection and identification of proteins using nanoparticle-fluorescent polymer `chemical nose' sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chang-Cheng; Miranda, Oscar R.; Gider, Basar; Ghosh, Partha S.; Kim, Ik-Bum; Erdogan, Belma; Krovi, Sai Archana; Bunz, Uwe H. F.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2007-05-01

    A sensor array containing six non-covalent gold nanoparticle-fluorescent polymer conjugates has been created to detect, identify and quantify protein targets. The polymer fluorescence is quenched by gold nanoparticles; the presence of proteins disrupts the nanoparticle-polymer interaction, producing distinct fluorescence response patterns. These patterns are highly repeatable and are characteristic for individual proteins at nanomolar concentrations, and can be quantitatively differentiated by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Based on a training matrix generated at protein concentrations of an identical ultraviolet absorbance at 280 nm (A280 = 0.005), LDA, combined with ultraviolet measurements, has been successfully used to identify 52 unknown protein samples (seven different proteins) with an accuracy of 94.2%. This work demonstrates the construction of novel nanomaterial-based protein detector arrays with potential applications in medical diagnostics.

  14. Two-Photon Fluorescence Anisotropy Imaging to Elucidate the Dynamics and the Stability of Immobilized Proteins.

    PubMed

    Orrego, Alejandro H; García, Carolina; Mancheño, José M; Guisán, Jose M; Lillo, M Pilar; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-01-28

    Time/spatial-resolved fluorescence determines anisotropy values of supported-fluorescent proteins through different immobilization chemistries, evidencing some of the molecular mechanisms that drive the stabilization of proteins at the interfaces with solid surfaces. Fluorescence anisotropy imaging provides a normalized protein mobility parameter that serves as a guide to study the effect of different immobilization parameters (length and flexibility of the spacer arm and multivalency of the protein-support interaction) on the final stability of the supported proteins. Proteins in a more constrained environment correspond to the most thermostable ones, as was shown by thermal inactivation studies. This work contributes to explain the experimental evidence found with conventional methods based on observable measurements; thus this advanced characterization technique provides reliable molecular information about the immobilized proteins with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. Such information has been very useful for fabricating highly stable heterogeneous biocatalysts with high interest in industrial developments.

  15. Very Bright Green Fluorescent Proteins from the Pontellid Copepod Pontella mimocerami

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Marguerite E.; Scherrer, Michael P.; Ferrari, Frank D.; Matz, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluorescent proteins (FP) homologous to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria have revolutionized biomedical research due to their usefulness as genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Fluorescent proteins from copepods are particularly promising due to their high brightness and rapid fluorescence development. Results Here we report two novel FPs from Pontella mimocerami (Copepoda, Calanoida, Pontellidae), which were identified via fluorescence screening of a bacterial cDNA expression library prepared from the whole-body total RNA of the animal. The proteins are very similar in sequence and spectroscopic properties. They possess high molar extinction coefficients (79,000 M−1 cm−) and quantum yields (0.92), which make them more than two-fold brighter than the most common FP marker, EGFP. Both proteins form oligomers, which we were able to counteract to some extent by mutagenesis of the N-terminal region; however, this particular modification resulted in substantial drop in brightness. Conclusions The spectroscopic characteristics of the two P. mimocerami proteins place them among the brightest green FPs ever described. These proteins may therefore become valuable additions to the in vivo imaging toolkit. PMID:20644720

  16. Protein-flexibility mediated coupling between photoswitching kinetics and surrounding viscosity of a photochromic fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kao, Ya-Ting; Zhu, Xinxin; Min, Wei

    2012-02-28

    Recent advances in fluorescent proteins (FPs) have generated a remarkable family of optical highlighters with special light responses. Among them, Dronpa exhibits a unique capability of reversible light-regulated on-off switching. However, the environmental dependence of this photochromism is largely unexplored. Herein we report that the photoswitching kinetics of the chromophore inside Dronpa is actually slowed down by increasing medium viscosity outside Dronpa. This finding is a special example of an FP where the environment can exert a hydrodynamic effect on the internal chromophore. We attribute this effect to protein-flexibility mediated coupling where the chromophore's cis-trans isomerization during photoswitching is accompanied by conformational motion of a part of the protein β-barrel whose dynamics should be hindered by medium friction. Consistent with this mechanism, the photoswitching kinetics of Dronpa-3, a structurally more flexible mutant, is found to exhibit a more pronounced viscosity dependence. Furthermore, we mapped out spatial distributions of microviscosity in live cells experienced by a histone protein using the photoswitching kinetics of Dronpa-3 fusion as a contrast mechanism. This unique reporter should provide protein-specific information about the crowded intracellular environments by offering a genetically encoded microviscosity probe, which did not exist with normal FPs before. PMID:22328153

  17. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  18. Evaluation of Chemical Fluorescent Dyes as a Protein Conjugation Partner for Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Stasevich, Timothy J.; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab) fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph) and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac). These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye∶protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green), Cy3 (red), and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red). PMID:25184362

  19. Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) and RFP-based biosensors for neuronal imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Lai, Tiffany; Campbell, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The inherent advantages of red-shifted fluorescent proteins and fluorescent protein-based biosensors for the study of signaling processes in neurons and other tissues have motivated the development of a plethora of new tools. Relative to green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and other blue-shifted alternatives, red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) provide the inherent advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescence, and deeper tissue penetration associated with longer wavelength excitation light. All other factors being the same, the multiple benefits of using RFPs make these tools seemingly ideal candidates for use in neurons and, ultimately, the brain. However, for many applications, the practical utility of RFPs still falls short of the preferred GFPs. We present an overview of RFPs and RFP-based biosensors, with an emphasis on their reported applications in neuroscience. PMID:26158012

  20. The role of protein characteristics in the formation and fluorescence of Au nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer; Qin, Ying; Crowley, Dorothy; Bonizzoni, Marco; Bao, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    Protein-encapsulated gold nanoclusters have shown many advantages over other gold nanocluster systems, including green synthesis, biocompatibility, high water solubility, and the ease of further conjugation. In this article, we systematically investigated the effects of the protein size and amino acid content on the formation and fluorescent properties of gold nanoclusters using four model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, trypsin, and pepsin). We discovered that the balance of amine and tyrosine/tryptophan containing residues was critical for the nanocluster formation. Protein templates with low cysteine contents caused blue shifts in the fluorescent emissions and difference in fluorescent lifetimes of the gold nanoclusters. Furthermore, the protein size was found to be a critical factor for the photostability and long-term stability of gold nanoclusters. The size of the protein also affected the Au nanocluster behaviour after immobilization.

  1. Fiber-optic system for monitoring fast photoactivation dynamics of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhiguo; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins is crucial to the realization of photoactivation localization microscopy. In contrast to those fluorescence-based approaches that require complex data processing and calibration procedures, here we report a simple and quantitative alternative, which relies on the measurement of small absorption spectra changes over time with a fiber-optic system. Using Dronpa as a representative highlighter protein, we have investigated the capacity of this system in monitoring the fast photoactivation process.

  2. Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN-binding protein from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Miyazaki F) and its site-directed mutated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chosrowjan, Haik; Taniguchi, Seiji; Mataga, Noboru; Tanaka, Fumio; Todoroki, Daisuke; Kitamura, Masaya

    2008-09-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN in FMN-binding protein (FMN-bp), and its mutated proteins, W32Y and W32A, were investigated by the fluorescence up-conversion method. Fluorescence lifetimes were 167 fs (96%) and 1.5 ps (4%) in wild-type FMN-bp (WT), and 3.4 ps (23%), 18.2 ps (74%), and 96 ps (3%) at 530 nm in W32Y, and 30.1 ps in W32A. The fluorescence lifetime of W32A, in which Trp-32 was absent, was about 140 times longer than that of WT. Tyr-32 in W32Y was not so effective quencher as Trp-32 in WT. This was explained in terms of different ionization potentials of quenchers and average donor-acceptor distances in the protein.

  3. The role of protein characteristics in the formation and fluorescence of Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer; Qin, Ying; Crowley, Dorothy; Bonizzoni, Marco; Bao, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    Protein-encapsulated gold nanoclusters have shown many advantages over other gold nanocluster systems, including green synthesis, biocompatibility, high water solubility, and the ease of further conjugation. In this article, we systematically investigated the effects of the protein size and amino acid content on the formation and fluorescent properties of gold nanoclusters using four model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, trypsin, and pepsin). We discovered that the balance of amine and tyrosine/tryptophan containing residues was critical for the nanocluster formation. Protein templates with low cysteine contents caused blue shifts in the fluorescent emissions and difference in fluorescent lifetimes of the gold nanoclusters. Furthermore, the protein size was found to be a critical factor for the photostability and long-term stability of gold nanoclusters. The size of the protein also affected the Au nanocluster behaviour after immobilization.Protein-encapsulated gold nanoclusters have shown many advantages over other gold nanocluster systems, including green synthesis, biocompatibility, high water solubility, and the ease of further conjugation. In this article, we systematically investigated the effects of the protein size and amino acid content on the formation and fluorescent properties of gold nanoclusters using four model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, trypsin, and pepsin). We discovered that the balance of amine and tyrosine/tryptophan containing residues was critical for the nanocluster formation. Protein templates with low cysteine contents caused blue shifts in the fluorescent emissions and difference in fluorescent lifetimes of the gold nanoclusters. Furthermore, the protein size was found to be a critical factor for the photostability and long-term stability of gold nanoclusters. The size of the protein also affected the Au nanocluster behaviour after immobilization. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available See DOI: 10

  4. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Microscopy for Measuring Chromatin Complex Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Alessandro; Zippo, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form regulatory complexes that modify the chromatin structure and silence their target genes. Recent works have found that the composition of Polycomb complexes is highly dynamic. Defining the different protein components of each complex is fundamental for better understanding their biological functions. Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool to measure protein-protein interactions, in nanometer order and in their native cellular environment. Here we describe the preparation and execution of a typical FRET experiment using CFP-tagged protein as donor and YFP-tagged protein as acceptor. We further show that FRET can be used in a competition assay to measure binding affinities of different components of the same chromatin complex. PMID:27659982

  5. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating. PMID:27225857

  6. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  7. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Based on Interaction of PII and PipX Proteins Provides a Robust and Specific Biosensor for 2-Oxoglutarate, a Central Metabolite and a Signaling Molecule.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Lin; Bernard, Christophe S; Hubert, Pierre; My, Laetitia; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-12-26

    2-Oxoglutarate is a central metabolite and a signalling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The cellular levels of 2-oxoglutarate vary rapidly in response to environmental changes, but an easy and reliable approach is lacking for the measurement of 2-oxoglutarate. Here we report a biosensor of 2-oxoglutarate based on the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dissociation of the PII-PipX protein complex from cyanobacteria. Fusions of PII and PipX to either CFP or YFP could form a complex and their interaction could be detected by FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer). Mutations in PII or PipX that affect their interaction strongly decrease the FRET signal. Furthermore, the FRET signal is negatively affected, in a specific and concentration-dependent manner, by the presence of 2-oxoglutarate. This 2-oxoglutarate biosensor responds specifically and rapidly to a large range of 2-oxoglutarate levels, and is highly robust under different conditions, including in bacterial cell extracts. We further used this biosensor to study the interaction between PII and its effectors, and our data indicate that excess in Mg(2+) ions is a key factor for PII to respond efficiently to an increase in 2-oxoglutarate levels. This study paves the way for probing the dynamics of 2-oxoglutarate in various organisms and provides a valuable tool for the understanding of the molecular mechanism in metabolic regulation. PMID:24373496

  8. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein interacts with green fluorescent protein-tagged microtubule end-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Katrin; Sambade, Adrian; Boutant, Emmanuel; Didier, Pascal; Mély, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2008-06-01

    The targeting of the movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus to plasmodesmata involves the actin/endoplasmic reticulum network and does not require an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Nevertheless, the ability of MP to facilitate the cell-to-cell spread of infection is tightly correlated with interactions of the protein with microtubules, indicating that the microtubule system is involved in the transport of viral RNA. While the MP acts like a microtubule-associated protein able to stabilize microtubules during late infection stages, the protein was also shown to cause the inactivation of the centrosome upon expression in mammalian cells, thus suggesting that MP may interact with factors involved in microtubule attachment, nucleation, or polymerization. To further investigate the interactions of MP with the microtubule system in planta, we expressed the MP in the presence of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused microtubule end-binding protein 1a (EB1a) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtEB1a:GFP). The two proteins colocalize and interact in vivo as well as in vitro and exhibit mutual functional interference. These findings suggest that MP interacts with EB1 and that this interaction may play a role in the associations of MP with the microtubule system during infection.

  9. Effect of pH on the Heat-Induced Denaturation and Renaturation of Green Fluorescent Protein: A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Rosa V.; Sola, Hilda M.; Torres, Juan C.; Torres, Rafael E.; Guzman, Ernick E.

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence spectroscopy experiment is described where students integrated biochemistry and instrumental analysis, while characterizing the green fluorescent protein excitation and emission spectra in terms of its phenolic and phenolate chromophores. Students studied the combined effect of pH and temperature on the protein's fluorescence,…

  10. Fluorescence-Detectino Size-Exclusion Chromatography for Precrystallization Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate,T.; Gouaux, E.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of well-ordered crystals of membrane proteins is a bottleneck for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Nevertheless, one can increase the probability of successful crystallization by precrystallization screening, a process by which one analyzes the monodispersity and stability of the protein-detergent complex. Traditionally, this has required microgram to milligram quantities of purified protein and a concomitant investment of time and resources. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient precrystallization screening strategy in which the target protein is covalently fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the resulting unpurified protein is analyzed by fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC). This strategy requires only nanogram quantities of unpurified protein and allows one to evaluate localization and expression level, the degree of monodispersity, and the approximate molecular mass. We show the application of this precrystallization screening to four membrane proteins derived from prokaryotic or eukaryotic organisms.

  11. Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes for sensitive fluorescent assignment of protein inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Klingstedt, Therése; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nogalska, Anna; Prokop, Stefan; Häggqvist, Bo; Danielsson, Olof; Engel, W King; Askanas, Valerie; Heppner, Frank L; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2013-03-18

    Small hydrophobic ligands identifying intracellular protein deposits are of great interest, as protein inclusion bodies are the pathological hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Here we report that fluorescent amyloid ligands, termed luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), rapidly and with high sensitivity detect protein inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle tissue from patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). LCOs having a conjugated backbone of at least five thiophene units emitted strong fluorescence upon binding, and showed co-localization with proteins reported to accumulate in s-IBM protein inclusion bodies. Compared with conventional amyloid ligands, LCOs identified a larger fraction of immunopositive inclusion bodies. When the conjugated thiophene backbone was extended with terminal carboxyl groups, the LCO revealed striking spectral differences between distinct protein inclusion bodies. We conclude that 1) LCOs are sensitive, rapid and powerful tools for identifying protein inclusion bodies and 2) LCOs identify a wider range of protein inclusion bodies than conventional amyloid ligands.

  12. Fluorescent Ensemble Based on Bispyrene Fluorophore and Surfactant Assemblies: Sensing and Discriminating Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junmei; Ding, Liping; Bo, Yu; Fang, Yu

    2015-10-14

    A particular bispyrene fluorophore (1) with two pyrene moieties covalently linked via a hydrophilic spacer was synthesized. Fluorescence measurements reveal that the fluorescence emission of 1 could be well modulated by a cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Protein sensing studies illustrate that the selected ensemble based on 1/DTAB assemblies exhibits ratiometric responses to nonmetalloproteins and turn-off responses to metalloproteins, which can be used to differentiate the two types of proteins. Moreover, negatively charged nonmetalloproteins can be discriminated from the positively charged ones according to the difference in ratiometric responses. Fluorescence sensing studies with control bispyrenes indicate that the polarity of the spacer connecting two pyrene moieties plays an important role in locating bispyrene fluorophore in DTAB assemblies, which further influences its sensing behaviors to noncovalent interacting proteins. This study sheds light on the influence of the probe structure on the sensing performance of a fluorescent ensemble based on probe and surfactant assemblies.

  13. Polarization-dependent fluorescence of proteins bound to nanopore-confined lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.-Q.; Marek, A.; Smirnov, Alex I.; Grebel, H.

    2008-09-01

    Lipid bilayers are essential structural component of biological membranes of all the living species: from viruses and bacteria to plants and humans. Biophysical and biochemical properties of such membranes are important for understanding physical mechanisms responsible for drug targeting. Binding events between proteins and the membrane may be ascertained by introducing fluorescence markers (chromophores) to the proteins. Here we describe a novel biosensing platform designed to enhance signals of these fluorescence markers. Nanoporous aluminum oxide membranes with and without gold (Au) surface coating have been employed for optical detection of bound conjugated streptavidin to biotinylated lipid bilayers-a model system that mimics protein docking to the membrane surface. Unexpectedly, it was found that fluorescence signals from such structures vary when pumped with E-polarized and H-polarized incident optical beams. The origin of the observed polarization-dependent effects and the implications for enhanced fluorescence detection in a biochip format are being discussed.

  14. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging.

    PubMed

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-12-09

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M(-1)cm(-1), mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths.

  15. Control of the blue fluorescent protein with advanced evolutionary pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, Eric R. Mauring, Koit; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Krasnenko, Veera; Ye, Jing Yong; Baker, James R.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2008-11-28

    We demonstrate optical coherent control of the two-photon fluorescence of the blue fluorescent protein (BFP), which is of interest in investigations of protein-protein interactions. In addition to biological relevance, BFP represents an interesting target for coherent control from a chemical perspective due to its many components of highly nonexponential fluorescence decay and low quantum yield resulting from excited state isomerization. Using a genetic algorithm with a multiplicative (rather than ratiometric) fitness parameter, we are able to control the ratio of BFP fluorescence to second-harmonic generation without a considerable drop in the maximized signal. The importance of linear chirp and power-scaling on the discrimination process is investigated in detail.

  16. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice.

  17. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice. PMID:26549191

  18. Unraveling transcription factor interactions with heterochromatin protein 1 using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Hays, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The epigenetic control of heterochromatin deposition is achieved through a network of protein interactions mediated by the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). In earlier studies, we showed that the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, localizes to heterochromatin, and interacts with HP1α. Here, deletion and mutagenesis are combined with live-cell imaging approaches to characterize these protein interactions. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and cross-correlation (FCS and FCCS) revealed very different diffusion profiles for HP1α and the BZip protein, and co-expression studies indicated that the mobile fractions of these nuclear proteins diffuse independently of one another. The steady-state interactions of these proteins in regions of heterochromatin were monitored using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). A point mutation in HP1α, W174A, which disrupts the interactions with proteins containing the common PxVxL motif did not affect the interaction with the BZip protein. In contrast, the HP1α W41A mutation, which prevents binding to methylated histones, exhibited greatly reduced FRET efficiency when compared to the wild type HP1α or HP1αW174A. The functional significance of these interactions is discussed. PMID:23392382

  19. Fluorescence energy transfer monitoring of protein-protein interaction in human cells: the Cyclin T1-HIV1 Tat case.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Aldo; Cinelli, Riccardo A. G.; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Beltram, Fabio; Marcello, Alessandro; Tyagi, Mudit; Giacca, Mauro

    2001-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein promotes transcriptional elongation of viral RNAs. Here we show that human Cyclin T1 directly binds Tat in cultured cells. By mapping fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in different cellular compartments we shall present a quantitative analysis of this interaction. The matched tagging pair consists of two optically matched variants of the green fluorescent protein: the enhanced GFP and the blue fluorescent protein. Strong energy transfer was observed between Cyclin T1 and Tat both in the cytoplasm and in specific subnuclear regions. We shall argue that such high-resolution optical studies can provide significant new insight in molecular processes and demonstrate that, for the specific case-study presented, they lead to a model by which Tat recruits Cyclin T1 out of the nuclear compartments where the protein resides to promote transcriptional activation.

  20. Hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, David M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Carson, Bryan; Branda, Catherine; Poschet, Jens F.; Rebeil, Roberto; Tian, Bing; Liu, Ping; Brasier, Allan R.

    2007-09-01

    Confocal fluorescence imaging of biological systems is an important method by which researchers can investigate molecular processes occurring in live cells. We have developed a new 3D hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscope that can further enhance the usefulness of fluorescence microscopy in studying biological systems. The new microscope can increase the information content obtained from the image since, at each voxel, the microscope records 512 wavelengths from the emission spectrum (490 to 800 nm) while providing optical sectioning of samples with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. When coupled with multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analyses, the microscope can resolve multiple spatially and spectrally overlapped emission components, thereby greatly increasing the number of fluorescent labels, relative to most commercial microscopes, that can be monitored simultaneously. The MCR algorithm allows the "discovery" of all emitting sources and estimation of their relative concentrations without cross talk, including those emission sources that might not have been expected in the imaged cells. In this work, we have used the new microscope to obtain time-resolved hyperspectral images of cellular processes. We have quantitatively monitored the translocation of the GFP-labeled RelA protein (without interference from autofluorescence) into and out of the nucleus of live HeLa cells in response to continuous stimulation by the cytokine, TNFα. These studies have been extended to imaging live mouse macrophage cells with YFP-labeled RelA and GFP-labeled IRF3 protein. Hyperspectral imaging coupled with MCR analysis makes possible, for the first time, quantitative analysis of GFP, YFP, and autofluorescence without concern for cross-talk between emission sources. The significant power and quantitative capabilities of the new hyperspectral imaging system are further demonstrated with the imaging of a simple fluorescence dye (SYTO 13) traditionally used to stain the

  1. Dynamic Filament Formation by a Divergent Bacterial Actin-Like ParM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brzoska, Anthony J.; Jensen, Slade O.; Barton, Deborah A.; Davies, Danielle S.; Overall, Robyn L.; Skurray, Ronald A.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    Actin-like proteins (Alps) are a diverse family of proteins whose genes are abundant in the chromosomes and mobile genetic elements of many bacteria. The low-copy-number staphylococcal multiresistance plasmid pSK41 encodes ParM, an Alp involved in efficient plasmid partitioning. pSK41 ParM has previously been shown to form filaments in vitro that are structurally dissimilar to those formed by other bacterial Alps. The mechanistic implications of these differences are not known. In order to gain insights into the properties and behavior of the pSK41 ParM Alp in vivo, we reconstituted the parMRC system in the ectopic rod-shaped host, E. coli, which is larger and more genetically amenable than the native host, Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence microscopy showed a functional fusion protein, ParM-YFP, formed straight filaments in vivo when expressed in isolation. Strikingly, however, in the presence of ParR and parC, ParM-YFP adopted a dramatically different structure, instead forming axial curved filaments. Time-lapse imaging and selective photobleaching experiments revealed that, in the presence of all components of the parMRC system, ParM-YFP filaments were dynamic in nature. Finally, molecular dissection of the parMRC operon revealed that all components of the system are essential for the generation of dynamic filaments. PMID:27310470

  2. Fluorescent probe for high-throughput screening of membrane protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Backmark, A E; Olivier, N; Snijder, A; Gordon, E; Dekker, N; Ferguson, A D

    2013-01-01

    Screening of protein variants requires specific detection methods to assay protein levels and stability in crude mixtures. Many strategies apply fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to qualitatively monitor expression, stability, and monodispersity. However, GFP fusion proteins have several important disadvantages; including false-positives, protein aggregation after proteolytic removal of GFP, and reductions in protein yields without the GFP fusion. Here we describe a FSEC screening strategy based on a fluorescent multivalent NTA probe that interacts with polyhistidine-tags on target proteins. This method overcomes the limitations of GFP fusion proteins, and can be used to rank protein production based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. Domain boundaries of the human G-protein coupled adenosine A2a receptor were readily identified from crude detergent-extracts of a library of construct variants transiently produced in suspension-adapted HEK293-6E cells. Well expressing clones of MraY, an important bacterial infection target, could be identified from a library of 24 orthologs. This probe provides a highly sensitive tool to detect target proteins to expression levels down to 0.02 mg/L in crude lysate, and requires minimal amounts of cell culture. PMID:23776061

  3. Optical properties of green fluorescent proteins and their applications on virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja-Yun; Kao, Chia-Yun; Chen, Ying-Ju; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Hsu, I.-Jen

    2007-07-01

    Exogenous fluorescent agents such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) have been widely used as biological indicators in bioimaging techniques. Although GFP and its mutants have been used in many applications, their optical properties have not been completely investigated, especially when they are under various environmental conditions. In this research, we developed a spectrum-analyzing system to investigate the fluorescent properties of GFP in the environments of different temperatures. We found that the fluorescent spectrum of GFP consisted of two components that might come from the transitions between different electronic energy states where the quantum efficiencies of the two components varied with different temperature. This effect was expected to come from the thermal effect on the electron populations in the molecular energy states of GFP. Furthermore, GFP was used as fluorescent marker to monitor the infection process of cells by viruses with a dynamic spectral imaging system. The recombinant baculoviruses containing the red and green fluorescent protein gene that can simultaneously produce dual fluorescence were used as vectors in insect cells. The system was used to monitor the spatial distribution of fluorescent spectra of cells infected by virus during the process of infection.

  4. Effect of Fluorescently Labeling Protein Probes on Kinetics of Protein-Ligand Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.S.; Landry, J.P.; Fei, Y.Y.; Luo, J.T.; Wang, X.B.; Lam, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Un-labeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured kon and koff for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as KD = koff/kon, for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3 ~ 4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye; and (2) KD for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  5. Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y S; Landry, J P; Fei, Y Y; Zhu, X D; Luo, J T; Wang, X B; Lam, K S

    2008-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Unlabeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured k(on) and k(off) for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as K(D) = k(off)/k(on), for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3-4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye and (2) K(D) for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  6. Novel multistep BRET-FRET energy transfer using nanoconjugates of firefly proteins, quantum dots, and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Rabeka; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M.; Branchini, Bruce R.; Maye, Mathew M.

    2013-05-01

    Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from firefly luciferase to red fluorescent proteins using quantum dot or rod acceptor/donor linkers is described. The effect of morphology and tuned optical properties on the efficiency of this unique BRET-FRET system was evaluated.Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from firefly luciferase to red fluorescent proteins using quantum dot or rod acceptor/donor linkers is described. The effect of morphology and tuned optical properties on the efficiency of this unique BRET-FRET system was evaluated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, Fig. S1 and Table S1-S4. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01842c

  7. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  8. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay for protein-protein interaction in onion cells using the helios gene gun.

    PubMed

    Hollender, Courtney A; Liu, Zhongchi

    2010-06-12

    Investigation of gene function in diverse organisms relies on knowledge of how the gene products interact with each other in their normal cellular environment. The Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay(1) allows researchers to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells and has become an essential research tool. This assay is based on the facilitated association of two fragments of a fluorescent protein (GFP) that are each fused to a potential interacting protein partner. The interaction of the two protein partners would facilitate the association of the N-terminal and C-terminal fragment of GFP, leading to fluorescence. For plant researchers, onion epidermal cells are an ideal experimental system for conducting the BiFC assay because of the ease in obtaining and preparing onion tissues and the direct visualization of fluorescence with minimal background fluorescence. The Helios Gene Gun (BioRad) is commonly used for bombarding plasmid DNA into onion cells. We demonstrate the use of Helios Gene Gun to introduce plasmid constructs for two interacting Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors, SEUSS (SEU) and LEUNIG HOMOLOG (LUH)(2) and the visualization of their interactions mediated by BiFC in onion epidermal cells.

  9. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay for Protein-Protein Interaction in Onion Cells Using the Helios Gene Gun

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Courtney A.; Liu, Zhongchi

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of gene function in diverse organisms relies on knowledge of how the gene products interact with each other in their normal cellular environment. The Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay1 allows researchers to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells and has become an essential research tool. This assay is based on the facilitated association of two fragments of a fluorescent protein (GFP) that are each fused to a potential interacting protein partner. The interaction of the two protein partners would facilitate the association of the N-terminal and C-terminal fragment of GFP, leading to fluorescence. For plant researchers, onion epidermal cells are an ideal experimental system for conducting the BiFC assay because of the ease in obtaining and preparing onion tissues and the direct visualization of fluorescence with minimal background fluorescence. The Helios Gene Gun (BioRad) is commonly used for bombarding plasmid DNA into onion cells. We demonstrate the use of Helios Gene Gun to introduce plasmid constructs for two interacting Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors, SEUSS (SEU) and LEUNIG HOMOLOG (LUH)2 and the visualization of their interactions mediated by BiFC in onion epidermal cells. PMID:20567209

  10. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay for protein-protein interaction in onion cells using the helios gene gun.

    PubMed

    Hollender, Courtney A; Liu, Zhongchi

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of gene function in diverse organisms relies on knowledge of how the gene products interact with each other in their normal cellular environment. The Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay(1) allows researchers to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells and has become an essential research tool. This assay is based on the facilitated association of two fragments of a fluorescent protein (GFP) that are each fused to a potential interacting protein partner. The interaction of the two protein partners would facilitate the association of the N-terminal and C-terminal fragment of GFP, leading to fluorescence. For plant researchers, onion epidermal cells are an ideal experimental system for conducting the BiFC assay because of the ease in obtaining and preparing onion tissues and the direct visualization of fluorescence with minimal background fluorescence. The Helios Gene Gun (BioRad) is commonly used for bombarding plasmid DNA into onion cells. We demonstrate the use of Helios Gene Gun to introduce plasmid constructs for two interacting Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors, SEUSS (SEU) and LEUNIG HOMOLOG (LUH)(2) and the visualization of their interactions mediated by BiFC in onion epidermal cells. PMID:20567209

  11. Photoconversion of purified fluorescent proteins and dual-probe optical highlighting in live cells.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Piston, David

    2010-01-01

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pc-FPs) are a class of fluorescent proteins with "optical highlighter" capability, meaning that the color of fluorescence can be changed by exposure to light of a specific wavelength. Optical highlighting allows noninvasive marking of a subpopulation of fluorescent molecules, and is therefore ideal for tracking single cells or organelles. Critical parameters for efficient photoconversion are the intensity and the exposure time of the photoconversion light. If the intensity is too low, photoconversion will be slow or not occur at all. On the other hand, too much intensity or too long exposure can photobleach the protein and thereby reduce the efficiency of photoconversion. This protocol describes a general approach how to set up a confocal laser scanning microscope for pc-FP photoconversion applications. First, we describe a procedure for preparing purified protein droplet samples. This sample format is very convenient for studying the photophysical behavior of fluorescent proteins under the microscope. Second, we will use the protein droplet sample to show how to configure the microscope for photoconversion. And finally, we will show how to perform optical highlighting in live cells, including dual-probe optical highlighting with mOrange2 and Dronpa. PMID:20613710

  12. Photoconversion of purified fluorescent proteins and dual-probe optical highlighting in live cells.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Piston, David

    2010-06-26

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pc-FPs) are a class of fluorescent proteins with "optical highlighter" capability, meaning that the color of fluorescence can be changed by exposure to light of a specific wavelength. Optical highlighting allows noninvasive marking of a subpopulation of fluorescent molecules, and is therefore ideal for tracking single cells or organelles. Critical parameters for efficient photoconversion are the intensity and the exposure time of the photoconversion light. If the intensity is too low, photoconversion will be slow or not occur at all. On the other hand, too much intensity or too long exposure can photobleach the protein and thereby reduce the efficiency of photoconversion. This protocol describes a general approach how to set up a confocal laser scanning microscope for pc-FP photoconversion applications. First, we describe a procedure for preparing purified protein droplet samples. This sample format is very convenient for studying the photophysical behavior of fluorescent proteins under the microscope. Second, we will use the protein droplet sample to show how to configure the microscope for photoconversion. And finally, we will show how to perform optical highlighting in live cells, including dual-probe optical highlighting with mOrange2 and Dronpa.

  13. Vibrio azureus emits blue-shifted light via an accessory blue fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Susumu; Karatani, Hajime; Wada, Minoru; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2012-04-01

    Luminous marine bacteria usually emit bluish-green light with a peak emission wavelength (λ(max) ) at about 490 nm. Some species belonging to the genus Photobacterium are exceptions, producing an accessory blue fluorescent protein (lumazine protein: LumP) that causes a blue shift, from λ(max)  ≈ 490 to λ(max)  ≈ 476 nm. However, the incidence of blue-shifted light emission or the presence of accessory fluorescent proteins in bacteria of the genus Vibrio has never been reported. From our spectral analysis of light emitted by 16 luminous strains of the genus Vibrio, it was revealed that most strains of Vibrio azureus emit a blue-shifted light with a peak at approximately 472 nm, whereas other Vibrio strains emit light with a peak at around 482 nm. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism underlying this blue shift in V. azureus NBRC 104587(T) . Here, we describe the blue-shifted light emission spectra and the isolation of a blue fluorescent protein. Intracellular protein analyses showed that this strain had a blue fluorescent protein (that we termed VA-BFP), the fluorescent spectrum of which was almost identical to that of the in vivo light emission spectrum of the strain. This result strongly suggested that VA-BFP was responsible for the blue-shifted light emission of V. azureus.

  14. Strengths and Weaknesses of Recently Engineered Red Fluorescent Proteins Evaluated in Live Cells Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community is still looking for a bright, stable red fluorescent protein (FP) as functional as the current best derivatives of green fluorescent protein (GFP). The red FPs exploit the reduced background of cells imaged in the red region of the visible spectrum, but photophysical short comings have limited their use for some spectroscopic approaches. Introduced nearly a decade ago, mCherry remains the most often used red FP for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other single molecule techniques, despite the advent of many newer red FPs. All red FPs suffer from complex photophysics involving reversible conversions to a dark state (flickering), a property that results in fairly low red FP quantum yields and potential interference with spectroscopic analyses including FCS. The current report describes assays developed to determine the best working conditions for, and to uncover the shortcoming of, four recently engineered red FPs for use in FCS and other diffusion and spectroscopic studies. All five red FPs assayed had potential shortcomings leading to the conclusion that the current best red FP for FCS is still mCherry. The assays developed here aim to enable the rapid evaluation of new red FPs and their smooth adaptation to live cell spectroscopic microscopy and nanoscopy. PMID:24129172

  15. Measurement of protein-like fluorescence in river and waste water using a handheld spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andy; Ward, David; Lieten, Shakti H; Periera, Ryan; Simpson, Ellie C; Slater, Malcolm

    2004-07-01

    Protein-like fluorescence intensity in rivers increases with increasing anthropogenic DOM inputs from sewerage and farm wastes. Here, a portable luminescence spectrophotometer was used to investigate if this technology could be used to provide both field scientists with a rapid pollution monitoring tool and process control engineers with a portable waste water monitoring device, through the measurement of river and waste water tryptophan-like fluorescence from a range of rivers in NE England and from effluents from within two waste water treatment plants. The portable spectrophotometer determined that waste waters and sewerage effluents had the highest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, urban streams had an intermediate tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, and the upstream river samples of good water quality the lowest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity. Replicate samples demonstrated that fluorescence intensity is reproducible to +/- 20% for low fluorescence, 'clean' river water samples and +/- 5% for urban water and waste waters. Correlations between fluorescence measured by the portable spectrophotometer with a conventional bench machine were 0.91; (Spearman's rho, n = 143), demonstrating that the portable spectrophotometer does correlate with tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity measured using the bench spectrophotometer.

  16. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  17. Reactive oxygen species in photochemistry of the red fluorescent protein "Killer Red".

    PubMed

    Vegh, Russell B; Solntsev, Kyril M; Kuimova, Marina K; Cho, Soohee; Liang, Yue; Loo, Bernard L W; Tolbert, Laren M; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2011-05-01

    The fluorescent protein aptly named "Killer Red" (KRed) is capable of killing transfected cells and inactivating fused proteins upon exposure to visible light in the presence of oxygen. We have investigated the source of the bioactive species through a variety of photophysical and photochemical techniques. Our results indicate a Type I (electron transfer mediated) photosensitizing mechanism.

  18. Reengineering of a fluorescent zinc sensor protein yields the first genetically encoded cadmium probe.

    PubMed

    Vinkenborg, Jan L; van Duijnhoven, Sander M J; Merkx, Maarten

    2011-11-21

    Introduction of a (Cys)(4) metal binding site at the dimerization interface of two fluorescent protein domains yields a chelating FRET sensor protein that shows a 2500-fold selectivity for Cd(2+) over Zn(2+) by taking advantage of their different ionic radii. PMID:21986860

  19. GFP Tagging of Sieve Element Occlusion (SEO) Proteins Results in Green Fluorescent Forisomes

    PubMed Central

    Pélissier, Hélène C.; Peters, Winfried S.; Collier, Ray; van Bel, Aart J. E.; Knoblauch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Forisomes are Ca2+-driven, ATP-independent contractile protein bodies that reversibly occlude sieve elements in faboid legumes. They apparently consist of at least three proteins; potential candidates have been described previously as ‘FOR’ proteins. We isolated three genes from Medicago truncatula that correspond to the putative forisome proteins and expressed their green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion products in Vicia faba and Glycine max using the composite plant methodology. In both species, expression of any of the constructs resulted in homogenously fluorescent forisomes that formed sieve tube plugs upon stimulation; no GFP fluorescence occurred elsewhere. Isolated fluorescent forisomes reacted to Ca2+ and chelators by contraction and expansion, respectively, and did not lose fluorescence in the process. Wild-type forisomes showed no affinity for free GFP in vitro. The three proteins shared numerous conserved motifs between themselves and with hypothetical proteins derived from the genomes of M. truncatula, Vitis vinifera and Arabidopsis thaliana. However, they showed neither significant similarities to proteins of known function nor canonical metal-binding motifs. We conclude that ‘FOR’-like proteins are components of forisomes that are encoded by a well-defined gene family with relatives in taxa that lack forisomes. Since the mnemonic FOR is already registered and in use for unrelated genes, we suggest the acronym SEO (sieve element occlusion) for this family. The absence of binding sites for divalent cations suggests that the Ca2+ binding responsible for forisome contraction is achieved either by as yet unidentified additional proteins, or by SEO proteins through a novel, uncharacterized mechanism. PMID:18784195

  20. An arsenic fluorescent compound as a novel probe to study arsenic-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Femia, A Lis; Temprana, C Facundo; Santos, Javier; Carbajal, María Laura; Amor, María Silvia; Grasselli, Mariano; Alonso, Silvia Del V

    2012-12-01

    Arsenic-binding proteins are under continuous research. Their identification and the elucidation of arsenic/protein interaction mechanisms are important because the biological effects of these complexes may be related not only to arsenic but also to the arsenic/protein structure. Although many proteins bearing a CXXC motif have been found to bind arsenic in vivo, new tools are necessary to identify new arsenic targets and allow research on protein/arsenic complexes. In this work, we analyzed the performance of the fluorescent compound APAO-FITC (synthesized from p-aminophenylarsenoxide, APAO, and fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC) in arsenic/protein binding assays using thioredoxin 1 (Trx) as an arsenic-binding protein model. The Trx-APAO-FITC complex was studied through different spectroscopic techniques involving UV-Vis, fluorescence, atomic absorption, infrared and circular dichroism. Our results show that APAO-FITC binds efficiently and specifically to the Trx binding site, labeling the protein fluorescently, without altering its structure and activity. In summary, we were able to study a protein/arsenic complex model, using APAO-FITC as a labeling probe. The use of APAO-FITC in the identification of different protein and cell targets, as well as in in vivo biodistribution studies, conformational studies of arsenic-binding proteins, and studies for the design of drug delivery systems for arsenic anti-cancer therapies, is highly promising.

  1. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  2. Drug/protein interactions studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Vayá, Ignacio; Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. C.; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2014-09-01

    We report here on a recent time-resolved fluorescence study [1] of the interaction between flurbiprofen (FBP), a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and human serum albumin (HSA), the main transport protein in the human body. We compare the results obtained for the drug-protein complex with those of various covalently linked flurbiprofentryptophan dyads having well-defined geometries. In all cases stereoselective dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed, varying greatly from one system to another. In addition, the fluorescence anisotropy decays also display a clear stereoselectivity. For the drug-protein complexes, this can be interpreted in terms of the protein microenvironment playing a significant role in the conformational relaxation of FBP, which is more restricted in the case of the (R)- enantiomer.

  3. Quantitative GFP fluorescence as an indicator of recombinant protein synthesis in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Richards, H A; Halfhill, M D; Millwood, R J; Stewart, C N

    2003-09-01

    The utility of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for biological research is evident. A fluorescence-based method was developed to quantify GFP levels in transgenic plants and protein extracts. Fluorescence intensity was linear with increasing levels of GFP over a range that encompasses transgene expression in plants by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Standard curves were used to estimate GFP concentration in planta and in protein extracts. These values were consistent with ELISA measurements of GFP in protein extracts from transgenic plants, indicating that the technique is a reliable measure of recombinant GFP expression. The levels of in planta GFP expression in both homozygous and hemizygous plants was then estimated. Homozygous transgenic plants expressed twice the amount of GFP than hemizygous plants, suggesting additive transgene expression. This methodology may be useful to simplify the characterization of transgene expression in plants.

  4. Cholesterol determination using protein-templated fluorescent gold nanocluster probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Baker, Gary A

    2013-11-12

    We describe the development of a fluorescent biosensor platform for soluble cholesterol based on bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanocluster probes co-dissolved with cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) in a surfactant emulsion system. Selective enzymatic oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one by ChOx produces stoichiometric amounts of H2O2 by-product, generating a quenching response signaling the presence of cholesterol at clinically relevant levels (LOD ∼12 μM).

  5. Quantitative analysis of neuropeptide Y receptor association with β-arrestin2 measured by bimolecular fluorescence complementation

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, LE; Briddon, SJ; Hill, SJ; Holliday, ND

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: β-Arrestins are critical scaffold proteins that shape spatiotemporal signalling from seven transmembrane domain receptors (7TMRs). Here, we study the association between neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors and β-arrestin2, using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) to directly report underlying protein–protein interactions. Experimental approach: Y1 receptors were tagged with a C-terminal fragment, Yc, of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and β-arrestin2 fused with the complementary N-terminal fragment, Yn. After Y receptor–β-arrestin association, YFP fragment refolding to regenerate fluorescence (BiFC) was examined by confocal microscopy in transfected HEK293 cells. Y receptor/β-arrestin2 BiFC responses were also quantified by automated imaging and granularity analysis. Key results: NPY stimulation promoted association between Y1–Yc and β-arrestin2–Yn, and the specific development of BiFC in intracellular compartments, eliminated when using non-interacting receptor and arrestin mutants. Responses developed irreversibly and were slower than for downstream Y1 receptor–YFP internalization, a consequence of delayed maturation and stability of complemented YFP. However, β-arrestin2 BiFC measurements delivered appropriate ligand pharmacology for both Y1 and Y2 receptors, and demonstrated higher affinity of Y1 compared to Y2 receptors for β-arrestin2. Receptor mutagenesis combined with β-arrestin2 BiFC revealed that alternative arrangements of Ser/Thr residues in the Y1 receptor C tail could support β-arrestin2 association, and that Y2 receptor–β-arrestin2 interaction was enhanced by the intracellular loop mutation H155P. Conclusions and implications: The BiFC approach quantifies Y receptor ligand pharmacology focused on the β-arrestin2 pathway, and provides insight into mechanisms of β-arrestin2 recruitment by activated and phosphorylated 7TMRs, at the level of protein–protein interaction. PMID:20438572

  6. Photo-convertible fluorescent proteins as tools for fresh insights on subcellular interactions in plants.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, N; Jaipargas, E-A; Wozny, M R; Barton, K A; Mathur, N; Delfosse, K; Mathur, J

    2016-08-01

    Optical highlighters comprise photo-activatable, photo-switchable and photo-convertible fluorescent proteins and are relatively recent additions to the toolbox utilized for live cell imaging research. Here, we provide an overview of four photo-convertible fluorescent proteins (pcFP) that are being used in plant cell research: Eos, Kaede, Maple and Dendra2. Each of these proteins has a significant advantage over other optical highlighters since their green fluorescent nonconverted forms and red fluorescent converted forms are generally clearly visible at expression levels that do not appear to interfere with subcellular dynamics and plant development. These proteins have become increasingly useful for understanding the role of transient and sustained interactions between similar organelles. Tracking of single organelles after green-to-red conversion has provided novel insights on plastids and their stroma-filled extensions and on the formation of mega-mitochondria. Similarly colour recovery after photo-conversion has permitted the estimation of nuclear endo-reduplication events and is being developed further to image protein trafficking within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. We have also applied photo-convertible proteins to create colour-differentiation between similar cell types to follow their development. Both the green and red fluorescent forms of these proteins are compatible with other commonly used single coloured FPs. This has allowed us to develop simultaneous visualization schemes for up to five types of organelles and investigate organelle interactivity. The advantages and caveats associated with the use of photo-convertible fluorescent proteins are discussed.

  7. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Assessment of Subcellular Localization in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Evan P S; Owens, Jake L; Hockerman, Gregory H; Hu, Chang-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a fluorescence imaging technique used to visualize protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in live cells and animals. One unique application of BiFC is to reveal subcellular localization of PPIs. The superior signal-to-noise ratio of BiFC in comparison with fluorescence resonance energy transfer or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer enables its wide applications. Here, we describe how confocal microscopy can be used to detect and quantify PPIs and their subcellular localization. We use basic leucine zipper transcription factor proteins as an example to provide a step-by-step BiFC protocol using a Nikon A1 confocal microscope and NIS-Elements imaging software. The protocol given below can be readily adapted for use with other confocal microscopes or imaging software. PMID:27515079

  8. Protein binding-induced surfactant aggregation variation: a new strategy of developing fluorescent aqueous sensor for proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenting; Ding, Liping; Cao, Jianhua; Liu, Lili; Wei, Yuting; Fang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Novel strategies of developing fluorescent sensors for proteins are highly demanded. In this work, we particularly synthesized a cholesterol-derivatized pyrene probe. Its fluorescence emission is effectively tuned by the aggregation state of a cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). The used probe/DTAB assemblies exhibit highly sensitive ratiometric responses to pepsin and ovalbumin egg (o-egg) with detection limits of 4.8 and 18.9 nM, respectively. The fluorescence changes indicate the protein-surfactant interaction leads to further aggregation of DTAB assemblies. The results from Tyndall effect and dynamic light scattering verify this assumption. The responses to pepsin and o-egg are due to their strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interaction with DTAB assemblies at pH 7.4. The present noncovalent supramolecular sensor represents a novel and simple strategy for sensing proteins, which is based on the encapsulated fluorophore probing the aggregation variation of the surfactant assemblies.

  9. Smart fluorescent proteins: innovation for barrier-free superresolution imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Nagai, Takeharu

    2013-05-01

    During the past decade, several novel fluorescence microscopy techniques have emerged that achieve incredible spatial and temporal resolution beyond the diffraction limit. These microscopy techniques depend on altered optical setups, unique fluorescent probes, or post-imaging analysis. Many of these techniques also depend strictly on the use of unique fluorescent proteins (FPs) with special photoswitching properties. These photoswitchable FPs are capable of switching between two states in response to light. All localization precision and patterned illumination techniques-such as photo-activation localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, reversible saturable optically linear transitions, and saturated structured illumination microscopy-take advantage of these inherent switching properties to achieve superior spatial resolution. This review provides extensive analysis of the positive and negative aspects of photoswitchable FPs, highlighting their application in diffraction-unlimited imaging and suggesting the most suitable fluorescent proteins for superresolution imaging.

  10. Multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of biliverdins and their protein-associated complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chin-Jie; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether endogenous biliverdins can serve as a fluorescence metabolic marker in cancer diagnosis, we measured their multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes with femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser. Excited at 1230nm, the two-photon fluorescence of biliverdins peaks around 670nm. The corresponding lifetime (<100ps) was much shorter than those of porphyrins (~10ns), which is another commonly present metabolites in living cells. Further mixing biliverdins with proteins like fetal bovine serum (FBS), biliverdins reductase A (BVRA), or heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the yields of red autofluorescences didn't change a lot, but the corresponding lifetimes with HO-1 and BSA were lengthened to 200~300ps. This indicates that biliverdin can have an association with these proteins and change its lifetime. These spectral and temporal characteristics of fluorescence make biliverdin a potential marker fluorophore for hyperspectral diagnosis on the heme catabolism in human cells or tissues.

  11. Fluorescent dye conjugates of rabbit arylsulfatase A as a biological tracer for protein endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Waheed, Abdul; Ahmad, Faizan; Van Etten, Robert L

    2013-06-01

    Fluorescent dye conjugates of arylsulfatase A (ASA) from rabbit liver were prepared at pH 9.0 in 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate buffer. The modification of amino or sulphadryl groups by dichlorotriazinylamino-fluorescein or Lucifer yellow fluorescent dyes did not alter the characteristic features of the enzyme molecule such as enzyme activity, dimerization of the protein molecule at pH 4.5 and anomalous kinetics of the native enzyme. The fluorescence intensity of the Lucifer yellow enzyme conjugates were quenched when the pH of the protein solution was changed from pH 7.5 to 4.5. Therefore, the Lucifer yellow enzyme conjugate can be used to study the kinetics of pH-dependent association and dissociation of the ASA. Availability of such fluorescent dyes conjugates of ASA or other lysosomal enzyme may be used as a biological tracer to study the receptor dependent endocytosis of enzyme molecules. PMID:23636651

  12. Dipolar relaxation within the protein matrix of the green fluorescent protein: a red edge excitation shift study.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-12-27

    The fluorophore in green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in a highly constrained environment, protected from the bulk solvent by the barrel-shaped protein matrix. We have used the wavelength-selective fluorescence approach (red edge excitation shift, REES) to monitor solvent (environment) dynamics around the fluorophore in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under various conditions. Our results show that EGFP displays REES in buffer and glycerol, i.e., the fluorescence emission maxima exhibit a progressive shift toward the red edge, as the excitation wavelength is shifted toward the red edge of the absorption spectrum. Interestingly, EGFP displays REES when incorporated in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), independent of the hydration state. We interpret the observed REES to the constrained environment experienced by the EGFP fluorophore in the rigid protein matrix, rather than to the dynamics of the bulk solvent. These results are supported by the temperature dependence of REES and characteristic wavelength-dependent changes in fluorescence anisotropy.

  13. Protistan grazing analysis by flow cytometry using prey labeled by in vivo expression of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yutao; O'Kelly, Charles; Sieracki, Michael; Distel, Daniel L

    2003-11-01

    Selective grazing by protists can profoundly influence bacterial community structure, and yet direct, quantitative observation of grazing selectivity has been difficult to achieve. In this investigation, flow cytometry was used to study grazing by the marine heterotrophic flagellate Paraphysomonas imperforata on live bacterial cells genetically modified to express the fluorescent protein markers green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP). Broad-host-range plasmids were constructed that express fluorescent proteins in three bacterial prey species, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas putida. Micromonas pusilla, an alga with red autofluorescence, was also used as prey. Predator-prey interactions were quantified by using a FACScan flow cytometer and analyzed by using a Perl program described here. Grazing preference of P. imperforata was influenced by prey type, size, and condition. In competitive feeding trials, P. imperforata consumed algal prey at significantly lower rates than FP (fluorescent protein)-labeled bacteria of similar or different size. Within-species size selection was also observed, but only for P. putida, the largest prey species examined; smaller cells of P. putida were grazed preferentially. No significant difference in clearance rate was observed between GFP- and RFP-labeled strains of the same prey species or between wild-type and GFP-labeled strains. In contrast, the common chemical staining method, 5-(4,6-dichloro-triazin-2-yl)-amino fluorescein hydrochloride, depressed clearance rates for bacterial prey compared to unlabeled or RFP-labeled cells.

  14. Mass spectrometric imaging of red fluorescent protein in breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Heeren, Ron M A; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters. PMID:23184411

  15. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Red Fluorescent Protein in Breast Tumor Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T.; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters.

  16. Analysis of the expression patterns, subcellular localisations and interaction partners of Drosophila proteins using a pigP protein trap library

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Nick; Rees, Johanna S.; Roote, John; Ryder, Ed; Armean, Irina M.; Johnson, Glynnis; Drummond, Emma; Spriggs, Helen; Drummond, Jenny; Magbanua, Jose P.; Naylor, Huw; Sanson, Bénédicte; Bastock, Rebecca; Huelsmann, Sven; Trovisco, Vitor; Landgraf, Matthias; Knowles-Barley, Seymour; Armstrong, J. Douglas; White-Cooper, Helen; Hansen, Celia; Phillips, Roger G.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Russell, Steven; St Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Although we now have a wealth of information on the transcription patterns of all the genes in the Drosophila genome, much less is known about the properties of the encoded proteins. To provide information on the expression patterns and subcellular localisations of many proteins in parallel, we have performed a large-scale protein trap screen using a hybrid piggyBac vector carrying an artificial exon encoding yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and protein affinity tags. From screening 41 million embryos, we recovered 616 verified independent YFP-positive lines representing protein traps in 374 genes, two-thirds of which had not been tagged in previous P element protein trap screens. Over 20 different research groups then characterized the expression patterns of the tagged proteins in a variety of tissues and at several developmental stages. In parallel, we purified many of the tagged proteins from embryos using the affinity tags and identified co-purifying proteins by mass spectrometry. The fly stocks are publicly available through the Kyoto Drosophila Genetics Resource Center. All our data are available via an open access database (Flannotator), which provides comprehensive information on the expression patterns, subcellular localisations and in vivo interaction partners of the trapped proteins. Our resource substantially increases the number of available protein traps in Drosophila and identifies new markers for cellular organelles and structures. PMID:25294943

  17. Analyzing the Homeostasis of Signaling Proteins by a Combination of Western Blot and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yi-Da; Sinzinger, Michael D.; Bovee-Geurts, Petra; Krause, Marina; Dinkla, Sip; Joosten, Irma; Koopman, Werner J.; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J.W.; Brock, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The determination of intracellular protein concentrations is a prerequisite for understanding protein interaction networks in systems biology. Today, protein quantification is based either on mass spectrometry, which requires large cell numbers and sophisticated measurement protocols, or on quantitative Western blotting, which requires the expression and purification of a recombinant protein as a reference. Here, we present a method that uses a transiently expressed fluorescent fusion protein of the protein-of-interest as an easily accessible reference in small volumes of crude cell lysates. The concentration of the fusion protein is determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and this concentration is used to calibrate the intensity of bands on a Western blot. We applied this method to address cellular protein homeostasis by determining the concentrations of the plasma membrane-located transmembrane scaffolding protein LAT and soluble signaling proteins in naïve T cells and transformed T-cell lymphoma (Jurkat) cells (with the latter having nine times the volume of the former). Strikingly, the protein numbers of soluble proteins scaled with the cell volume, whereas that of the transmembrane protein LAT scaled with the membrane surface. This leads to significantly different stoichiometries of signaling proteins in transformed and naïve cells in concentration ranges that may translate directly into differences in complex formation. PMID:22261070

  18. Phagocytic mechanism of live neutrophilic granulocyte with green fluorescent protein gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shaoqun; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Wei; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhi

    1999-09-01

    The whole process of neutrophilic granulocyte phagocytosis of E.Coli BL21-expressed green fluorescent protein gene was recorded with CCD coupled fluorescence microscopy in a real-time. This process contains of three stages: adhesion, ingestion, and exocytosis. The properties of each stages of phagocytosis were analyzed. The method opened new perspective in continuously observing the specific and non-specific immunity mechanism on alive cell.

  19. Expression Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins by Fusion to Fluorescent Reporters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Järvinen, Valtteri; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Owens, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The production of recombinant integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to their relatively low levels of expression. To address this problem, screening strategies have been developed to identify the optimal membrane sequence and expression host for protein production. A common approach is to genetically fuse the membrane protein to a fluorescent reporter, typically Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) enabling expression levels, localization and detergent solubilisation to be assessed. Initially developed for screening the heterologous expression of bacterial membrane proteins in Escherichia coli, the method has been extended to eukaryotic hosts, including insect and mammalian cells. Overall, GFP-based expression screening has made a major impact on the number of membrane protein structures that have been determined in the last few years. PMID:27553231

  20. Locating the nucleation sites for protein encapsulated gold nanoclusters: a molecular dynamics and fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Russell, B A; Kubiak-Ossowska, K; Mulheran, P A; Birch, D J S; Chen, Y

    2015-09-14

    Fluorescent gold nanoclusters encapsulated by proteins have attracted considerable attention in recent years for their unique properties as new fluorescence probes for biological sensing and imaging. However, fundamental questions, such as the nucleation sites of gold nanoclusters within proteins and the fluorescence mechanism remain unsolved. Here we present a study of the location of gold nanoclusters within bovine serum albumin (BSA) combining both fully atomistic molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The MD simulations show gold clusters growing close to a number of cysteine sites across all three domains of BSA, although just two major sites in domains IIB and IA were found to accommodate large clusters comprising more than 12 atoms. The dependence of the fluorescence on pH is found to be compatible with possible nucleation sites in domains IIB and IA. Furthermore, the energy transfer between tryptophan and gold nanoclusters reveals a separation of 29.7 Å, further indicating that gold nanoclusters were most likely located in the major nucleation site in domain IIB. The disclosure of the precise location of the gold nanoclusters and their surrounding amino acid residues should help better understanding of their fluorescence mechanism and aid their optimization as fluorescent nanoprobes.

  1. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy of quantum dot labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Dukes, Madeline J; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, the microchip with the labeled cells and one with a spacer are assembled in a special microfluidic device and imaged with STEM.

  2. A fast- and positively photoswitchable fluorescent protein for ultralow-laser-power RESOLFT nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamanaka, Masahito; Matsuda, Tomoki; Agetsuma, Masakazu; Nakano, Masahiro; Fujita, Katsumasa; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence nanoscopy has revolutionized our ability to visualize biological structures not resolvable by conventional microscopy. However, photodamage induced by intense light exposure has limited its use in live specimens. Here we describe Kohinoor, a fast-switching, positively photoswitchable fluorescent protein, and show that it has high photostability over many switching repeats. With Kohinoor, we achieved super-resolution imaging of live HeLa cells using biocompatible, ultralow laser intensity (0.004 J/cm(2)) in reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition (RESOLFT) nanoscopy.

  3. Live-cell FRET imaging reveals clustering of the prion protein at the cell surface induced by infectious prions.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Paulo, Pedro M R; Tavares, Catarina; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P

    2014-07-01

    Prion diseases are associated to the conversion of the prion protein into a misfolded pathological isoform. The mechanism of propagation of protein misfolding by protein templating remains largely unknown. Neuroblastoma cells were transfected with constructs of the prion protein fused to both CFP-GPI-anchored and to YFP-GPI-anchored and directed to its cell membrane location. Live-cell FRET imaging between the prion protein fused to CFP or YFP was measured giving consistent values of 10±2%. This result was confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and indicates intermolecular interactions between neighbor prion proteins. In particular, considering that a maximum FRET efficiency of 17±2% was determined from a positive control consisting of a fusion CFP-YFP-GPI-anchored. A stable cell clone expressing the two fusions containing the prion protein was also selected to minimize cell-to-cell variability. In both, stable and transiently transfected cells, the FRET efficiency consistently increased in the presence of infectious prions - from 4±1% to 7±1% in the stable clone and from 10±2% to 16±1% in transiently transfected cells. These results clearly reflect an increased clustering of the prion protein on the membrane in the presence of infectious prions, which was not observed in negative control using constructs without the prion protein and upon addition of non-infected brain. Our data corroborates the recent view that the primary site for prion conversion is the cell membrane. Since our fluorescent cell clone is not susceptible to propagate infectivity, we hypothesize that the initial event of prion infectivity might be the clustering of the GPI-anchored prion protein.

  4. Localization of proteins and organelles using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Farre, Jean-Claude; Shirahama-Noda, Kanae; Zhang, Lan; Booher, Keith; Subramani, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes the different methods used for localization of proteins and organelles in Pichia pastoris. A series of plasmids and a modified immunofluorescence protocol for localization and co-localization of proteins and organelles are described. Also included are protocols for the labeling of different subcellular organelles with vital stains.

  5. Improving recombinant protein production in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast using vivid Verde Fluorescent Protein as a reporter.

    PubMed

    Braun-Galleani, Stephanie; Baganz, Frank; Purton, Saul

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae have potential as platforms for the synthesis of high-value recombinant proteins due to their many beneficial attributes including ease of cultivation, lack of pathogenic agents, and low-cost downstream processing. However, current recombinant protein levels are low compared to other microbial platforms and stable insertion of transgenes is available in only a few microalgal species. We have explored different strategies aimed at increasing growth rate and recombinant protein production in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast. A novel fluorescent protein (vivid Verde Fluorescent Protein, VFP) was expressed under the control of the native atpA promoter/5'UTR element. VFP levels were detected by western blotting, with increased protein levels observed when co-expressed with a gene encoding the Escherichia coli Spy chaperone. We used these transformant lines to study the effect of temperature, light and media on recombinant protein production and cell growth. VFP levels and fluorescence, assessed by flow cytometry, allowed a determination of improved cultivation conditions as 30°C under mixotrophic mode. These conditions were tested for the accumulation of an antimicrobial endolysin (Cpl-1) of potential commercial interest, observing that the outcome obtained for VFP could not be easily replicated for Cpl-1. This study suggests that recombinant protein expression is product-specific and needs to be optimized individually. PMID:26098300

  6. Improving recombinant protein production in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast using vivid Verde Fluorescent Protein as a reporter

    PubMed Central

    Baganz, Frank; Purton, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microalgae have potential as platforms for the synthesis of high‐value recombinant proteins due to their many beneficial attributes including ease of cultivation, lack of pathogenic agents, and low‐cost downstream processing. However, current recombinant protein levels are low compared to other microbial platforms and stable insertion of transgenes is available in only a few microalgal species. We have explored different strategies aimed at increasing growth rate and recombinant protein production in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast. A novel fluorescent protein (vivid Verde Fluorescent Protein, VFP) was expressed under the control of the native atpA promoter/5'UTR element. VFP levels were detected by western blotting, with increased protein levels observed when co‐expressed with a gene encoding the Escherichia coli Spy chaperone. We used these transformant lines to study the effect of temperature, light and media on recombinant protein production and cell growth. VFP levels and fluorescence, assessed by flow cytometry, allowed a determination of improved cultivation conditions as 30°C under mixotrophic mode. These conditions were tested for the accumulation of an antimicrobial endolysin (Cpl‐1) of potential commercial interest, observing that the outcome obtained for VFP could not be easily replicated for Cpl‐1. This study suggests that recombinant protein expression is product‐specific and needs to be optimized individually. PMID:26098300

  7. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  8. Photoacoustic imaging of the near-infrared fluorescent protein iRFP in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Arie; Filonov, Grigory S.; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Genetically encoded probes powerfully and non-invasively target specific tissues, cells, and subcellular locations. iRFP, a novel near-infrared fluorescent protein with low quantum yield whose absorption and fluorescence maxima are located at wavelengths longer than the Q-band of hemoglobin absorption, is ideal for PAT. Here, we report on an in vitro comparison of iRFP with other far-red fluorescent proteins, and its use in imaging a mouse tumor xenograft model. In an in vivo experiment, we stably transfected iRFP into MTLn3 adenocarcinoma cells and injected them into the mammary fat pad of female SCID/NCr mice, then imaged the resulting tumors two and three weeks post injection. The contrast increase from the protein expression was high enough to clearly separate the tumor region from the rest of the animal.

  9. Polarization-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for studying structural properties of proteins in living cell

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Makoto; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Ishikawa, Hideto; Mikuni, Shintaro; Fukushima, Ryousuke; Kinjo, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Rotational diffusion measurement is predicted as an important method in cell biology because the rotational properties directly reflect molecular interactions and environment in the cell. To prove this concept, polarization-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (pol-FCS) measurements of purified fluorescent proteins were conducted in viscous solution. With the comparison between the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients obtained from pol-FCS measurements, the hydrodynamic radius of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was estimated as a control measurement. The orientation of oligomer EGFP in living cells was also estimated by pol-FCS and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The results of this pol-FCS experiment indicate that this method allows an estimation of the molecular orientation using the characteristics of rotational diffusion. Further, it can be applied to analyze the degree of molecular orientation and multimerization or detection of tiny aggregation of aggregate-prone proteins. PMID:27489044

  10. Fluorescence Anisotropy Reveals Order and Disorder of Protein Domains in the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kampmann, Martin; Atkinson, Claire E.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new approach for studying individual protein domains within the nuclear pore complex (NPC) using fluorescence polarization microscopy. The NPC is a large macromolecular complex, the size and complexity of which presents experimental challenges. Using fluorescence anisotropy and exploiting the symmetry of the NPC and its organization in the nuclear envelope, we have resolved order and disorder of individual protein domains. Fluorescently tagging specific domains of individual nucleoporins revealed both rigid and flexible domains: the tips of the FG domains are disordered, whereas the NPC-anchored domains are ordered. Our technique allows the collection of structural information in vivo, providing the ability to probe the organization of protein domains within the NPC. This has particular relevance for the FG domain nucleoporins, which are crucial for nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:20858414

  11. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  12. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants. PMID:27041337

  13. Fluorescent Proteins as Biomarkers and Biosensors: Throwing Color Lights on Molecular and Cellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Turoverov, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea victoria is the most extensively studied and widely used in cell biology protein. GFP-like proteins constitute a fast growing family as several naturally occurring GFP-like proteins have been discovered and enhanced mutants of Aequorea GFP have been created. These mutants differ from wild-type GFP by conformational stability, quantum yield, spectroscopic properties (positions of absorption and fluorescence spectra) and by photochemical properties. GFP-like proteins are very diverse, as they can be not only green, but also blue, orange-red, far-red, cyan, and yellow. They also can have dual-color fluorescence (e.g., green and red) or be non-fluorescent. Some of them possess kindling property, some are photoactivatable, and some are photoswitchable. This review is an attempt to characterize the main color groups of GFP-like proteins, describe their structure and mechanisms of chromophore formation, systemize data on their conformational stability and summarize the main trends of their utilization as markers and biosensors in cell and molecular biology. PMID:18691124

  14. Use of mCherryOpt Fluorescent Protein in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Ransom, Eric M; Weiss, David S; Ellermeier, Craig D

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe protocols for using the red fluorescent protein mCherryOpt in Clostridium difficile. The protocols can be readily adapted to similar fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP). There are three critical considerations for using FPs in C. difficile. (1) Choosing the right color: Blue and (especially) red are preferred because C. difficile exhibits considerable yellow-green autofluorescence. (2) Codon optimization: Most FP genes in general circulation have a GC content of ~60 %, so they are not well expressed in low-GC bacteria. (3) Fixing anaerobically grown cells prior to exposure to O2: The FPs under consideration here are non-fluorescent when produced anaerobically because O2 is required to introduce double bonds into the chromophore. Fixation prevents C. difficile cells from becoming degraded during the several hours required for chromophore maturation after cells are exposed to air. Fixation can probably be omitted for studies in which maintaining cellular architecture is not important, such as using mCherryOpt to monitor gene expression. PMID:27507333

  15. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Three-Way FRET Microscopy Improves Imaging of Multiple Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Brandon L.; Hoppe, Adam D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is a powerful tool for imaging the interactions between fluorescently tagged proteins in two-dimensions. For FRET microscopy to reach its full potential, it must be able to image more than one pair of interacting molecules and image degradation from out-of-focus light must be reduced. Here we extend our previous work on the application of maximum likelihood methods to the 3-dimensional reconstruction of 3-way FRET interactions within cells. We validated the new method (3D-3Way FRET) by simulation and fluorescent protein test constructs expressed in cells. In addition, we improved the computational methods to create a 2-log reduction in computation time over our previous method (3DFSR). We applied 3D-3Way FRET to image the 3D subcellular distributions of HIV Gag assembly. Gag fused to three different FPs (CFP, YFP, and RFP), assembled into viral-like particles and created punctate FRET signals that become visible on the cell surface when 3D-3Way FRET was applied to the data. Control experiments in which YFP-Gag, RFP-Gag and free CFP were expressed, demonstrated localized FRET between YFP and RFP at sites of viral assembly that were not associated with CFP. 3D-3Way FRET provides the first approach for quantifying multiple FRET interactions while improving the 3D resolution of FRET microscopy data without introducing bias into the reconstructed estimates. This method should allow improvement of widefield, confocal and superresolution FRET microscopy data. PMID:27023704

  16. Responses of Jatropha curcas seedlings to cold stress: photosynthesis-related proteins and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming-Juan; Yang, Ping-Fang; Shen, Shi-Hua

    2007-11-01

    Photosynthesis-related proteins and PSII functions of Jatropha curcas seedlings under cold stress were studied using proteomic and chlorophyll fluorescence approaches. The results of chlorophyll fluorescence measurement indicated that electron transport flux per reaction center (ET(o)/RC) and performance index (PI(ABS)) were relatively sensitive to low temperature, especially at early stage of cold stress. The increase in O-J phase and decrease in J-I phase of chlorophyll fluorescence transient indicated a protection mechanism of J. curcas to photoinhibition at early stage of cold stress. Eight photosynthesis-related proteins significantly changed during cold stress were identified using liquid chromatography MS/MS. Results of correlation analyses between photosynthesis-related proteins and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters indicated that (1) ATP synthase and Rieske FeS protein were significantly correlated with electron transport of reaction center in PSII; (2) precursor for 33-kDa protein was positively correlated with fluorescence quenching of the O-J and J-I phases and PI(ABS) during cold stress, which implies that it might be related to multiple process in PSII; (3) contrary correlations were found between F(J) - F(o) and two enzymes in the Calvin cycle, and the relations between these proteins and PSII function were unclear. The combined study using proteomic approaches and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated that the early-stage (0-12 h) acclimation of PSII and the late-stage (after 24 h) H(2)O(2) scavenging might be involved in the cold response mechanisms of J. curcas seedlings.

  17. Oxygen-independent FbFP: Fluorescent sentinel and oxygen sensor component in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Eichhof, Isabel; Ernst, Joachim F

    2016-07-01

    FMN-binding fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) outperform GFP and its derivatives because of their oxygen-independence, small size and rapid maturation. FbFPs have been used successfully as reliable reporters of gene expression in the cytoplasm of pro- and eukaryotes. Here we extend previous findings on the codon-adapted CaFbFP variant, which functions in the apathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. In both fungal species, CaFbFP could be targeted to the nucleus and the cell wall by endogenous signals (H2B-/Aga2-fusions) demonstrating its use as a fluorescent beacon in these relevant cellular locations. Transformants of both fungal species producing a CaFbFP-YFP fusion (YFOS) showed variable energy transfer from CaFbFP to YFP (FRET) that depended in its extent on external O2 concentrations. Applications as fluorescent sentinel and oxygen biosensor expand the FbFP toolbox to study oxygen-independent cellular processes under hypoxia. PMID:27126475

  18. Oxygen-independent FbFP: Fluorescent sentinel and oxygen sensor component in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Eichhof, Isabel; Ernst, Joachim F

    2016-07-01

    FMN-binding fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) outperform GFP and its derivatives because of their oxygen-independence, small size and rapid maturation. FbFPs have been used successfully as reliable reporters of gene expression in the cytoplasm of pro- and eukaryotes. Here we extend previous findings on the codon-adapted CaFbFP variant, which functions in the apathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. In both fungal species, CaFbFP could be targeted to the nucleus and the cell wall by endogenous signals (H2B-/Aga2-fusions) demonstrating its use as a fluorescent beacon in these relevant cellular locations. Transformants of both fungal species producing a CaFbFP-YFP fusion (YFOS) showed variable energy transfer from CaFbFP to YFP (FRET) that depended in its extent on external O2 concentrations. Applications as fluorescent sentinel and oxygen biosensor expand the FbFP toolbox to study oxygen-independent cellular processes under hypoxia.

  19. Fluorescent In Situ Folding Control for Rapid Optimization of Cell-Free Membrane Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Lucks, Annika; Bock, Sinja; Wu, Binghua; Beitz, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Cell-free synthesis is an open and powerful tool for high-yield protein production in small reaction volumes predestined for high-throughput structural and functional analysis. Membrane proteins require addition of detergents for solubilization, liposomes, or nanodiscs. Hence, the number of parameters to be tested is significantly higher than with soluble proteins. Optimization is commonly done with respect to protein yield, yet without knowledge of the protein folding status. This approach contains a large inherent risk of ending up with non-functional protein. We show that fluorophore formation in C-terminal fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP) indicates the folding state of a membrane protein in situ, i.e. within the cell-free reaction mixture, as confirmed by circular dichroism (CD), proteoliposome reconstitution and functional assays. Quantification of protein yield and in-gel fluorescence intensity imply suitability of the method for membrane proteins of bacterial, protozoan, plant, and mammalian origin, representing vacuolar and plasma membrane localization, as well as intra- and extracellular positioning of the C-terminus. We conclude that GFP-fusions provide an extension to cell-free protein synthesis systems eliminating the need for experimental folding control and, thus, enabling rapid optimization towards membrane protein quality. PMID:22848743

  20. New red-fluorescent calcium indicators for optogenetics, photoactivation and multi-color imaging.

    PubMed

    Oheim, Martin; van 't Hoff, Marcel; Feltz, Anne; Zamaleeva, Alsu; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Collot, Mayeul

    2014-10-01

    Most chemical and, with only a few exceptions, all genetically encoded fluorimetric calcium (Ca(2+)) indicators (GECIs) emit green fluorescence. Many of these probes are compatible with red-emitting cell- or organelle markers. But the bulk of available fluorescent-protein constructs and transgenic animals incorporate green or yellow fluorescent protein (GFP and YFP respectively). This is, in part, not only heritage from the tendency to aggregate of early-generation red-emitting FPs, and due to their complicated photochemistry, but also resulting from the compatibility of green-fluorescent probes with standard instrumentation readily available in most laboratories and core imaging facilities. Photochemical constraints like limited water solubility and low quantum yield have contributed to the relative paucity of red-emitting Ca(2+) probes compared to their green counterparts, too. The increasing use of GFP and GFP-based functional reporters, together with recent developments in optogenetics, photostimulation and super-resolution microscopies, has intensified the quest for red-emitting Ca(2+) probes. In response to this demand more red-emitting chemical and FP-based Ca(2+)-sensitive indicators have been developed since 2009 than in the thirty years before. In this topical review, we survey the physicochemical properties of these red-emitting Ca(2+) probes and discuss their utility for biological Ca(2+) imaging. Using the spectral separability index Xijk (Oheim M., 2010. Methods in Molecular Biology 591: 3-16) we evaluate their performance for multi-color excitation/emission experiments, involving the identification of morphological landmarks with GFP/YFP and detecting Ca(2+)-dependent fluorescence in the red spectral band. We also establish a catalog of criteria for evaluating Ca(2+) indicators that ideally should be made available for each probe. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium signaling in health and disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck

  1. Imaging of green fluorescent protein in live plant by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Tao; Sun, Jialin; Guo, Jihua; Zhao, Jun

    2002-04-01

    An auxin/IAA induced in vivo green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a living plant Arabidopsis root has been studied by a scanning near-field microscope in transmission mode. The promising near-field images of the inducible GFPs at sub- surface of a plant cell suggest that they may locate proximity to the cell wall, i.e. both sides of and in the cytoplasm membrane. The clear and faint fluorescent spots with 1-3 micrometers showed that the proteins localized nearer and farther to the cell wall, respectively. All GFP molecules gathered together in a cell, and no individual GFP was observed in the experiment.

  2. A novel pair of split venus fragments to detect protein-protein interactions by in vitro and in vivo bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical components of almost every cellular process. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method has been used to detect protein-protein interactions in both living cells and cell-free systems. The BiFC method is based on the principle that a fluorescent protein is reassembled from its two complementary non-fluorescent fragments when an interaction occurs between two proteins, each one fused to each fragment. In vivo and in vitro BiFC assays, which use a new pair of split Venus fragments composed of VN210 (amino acids 1-210) and VC210 (amino acids 210-238), are useful tools to detect and quantify various protein-protein interactions (including the cofilin-actin and Ras-Raf interactions) with high specificity and low background fluorescence. Moreover, these assays can be applied to screen small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  3. Strep-tag II Mutant Maltose-binding Protein for Reagentless Fluorescence Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hasmoni, Siti Halimah; Mau, Goh Kian; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Cass, Anthony; Shahir, Shafinaz

    2016-01-01

    Maltose-binding protein (MBP) is a periplasmic binding protein found in Gram negative bacteria. MBP is involved in maltose transport and bacterial chemotaxis; it binds to maltose and maltodextrins comprising α(1–4)-glucosidically linked linear glucose polymers and α(1–4)-glucosidically linked cyclodextrins. Upon ligand binding, MBP changes its conformation from an open to a closed form. This molecular recognition—transducing a ligand-binding event into a physical one—renders MBP an ideal candidate for biosensor development. Here, we describe the construction of a Strep-tag II mutant MBP for reagentless fluorescence sensing. malE, which encodes MBP, was amplified. A cysteine residue was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis to ensure a single label attachment at a specific site with a thiol-specific fluorescent probe. An environmentally sensitive fluorophore (IANBD amide) was covalently attached to the introduced thiol group and analysed by fluorescence sensing. The tagged mutant MBP (D95C) was purified (molecular size, ∼42 kDa). The fluorescence measurements of the IANBD-labelled Strep-tag II–D95C in the solution phase showed an appreciable change in fluorescence intensity (dissociation constant, 7.6±1.75 μM). Our mutant MBP retains maltose-binding activity and is suitable for reagentless fluorescence sensing. PMID:27019682

  4. Correlative in-resin super-resolution and electron microscopy using standard fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Errin; Seiradake, Elena; Jones, E. Yvonne; Davis, Ilan; Grünewald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a method for correlative in-resin super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) of biological structures in mammalian culture cells. Cryo-fixed resin embedded samples offer superior structural preservation, performing in-resin super-resolution, however, remains a challenge. We identified key aspects of the sample preparation procedure of high pressure freezing, freeze substitution and resin embedding that are critical for preserving fluorescence and photo-switching of standard fluorescent proteins, such as mGFP, mVenus and mRuby2. This enabled us to combine single molecule localization microscopy with transmission electron microscopy imaging of standard fluorescent proteins in cryo-fixed resin embedded cells. We achieved a structural resolution of 40–50 nm (~17 nm average single molecule localization accuracy) in the fluorescence images without the use of chemical fixation or special fluorophores. Using this approach enabled the correlation of fluorescently labeled structures to the ultrastructure in the same cell at the nanometer level and superior structural preservation. PMID:25823571

  5. The profiles of red fluorescent proteins with antinucleopolyhedrovirus activity in races of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sunagar, Santosh G; Savanurmath, Chandrashekhar J; Hinchigeri, Shivayogeppa B

    2011-12-01

    Partially purified red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) secured from the gut juice of 5th-instar multivoltine and bivoltine silkworm races were observed as several bands in electrophoretograms and chromatographic eluates. Interestingly, different races of silkworms had varying numbers of fluorescent protein bands: 11 in Pure Mysore (resistant), 11 in Nistari (resistant), 4 in CSR(2) (moderately susceptible) and 1 in NB(4)D(2) (highly susceptible). Bioassay experiments indicated that the fluorescent bands had antinucleopolyhedrovirus (antiNPV) activity. The molar extinction coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields of all RFPs were estimated. The purified tetrapyrroles were characterized by UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectral analyses. All tetrapyrrole moieties associated with RFPs were found to be different and characteristic of the fluorescent bands. The resulting qualitative and quantitative differences among the individual RFPs from various races of silkworm were related to the susceptibilities of the silkworms to the viral disease. Moreover, light was found to be essential for the synthesis of RFPs, and, therefore, the role of light in the synthesis of RFPs was evaluated. Thus, this work may elucidate the process of RFP synthesis in silkworm, which may be used as a biomarker to measure the degree of susceptibility of silkworm races to NPV. Therefore, the characteristic band pattern may be used as an indicator to define the relative resistance of a race towards the specific virus.

  6. Strep-tag II Mutant Maltose-binding Protein for Reagentless Fluorescence Sensing.

    PubMed

    Hasmoni, Siti Halimah; Mau, Goh Kian; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Cass, Anthony; Shahir, Shafinaz

    2016-02-01

    Maltose-binding protein (MBP) is a periplasmic binding protein found in Gram negative bacteria. MBP is involved in maltose transport and bacterial chemotaxis; it binds to maltose and maltodextrins comprising α(1-4)-glucosidically linked linear glucose polymers and α(1-4)-glucosidically linked cyclodextrins. Upon ligand binding, MBP changes its conformation from an open to a closed form. This molecular recognition-transducing a ligand-binding event into a physical one-renders MBP an ideal candidate for biosensor development. Here, we describe the construction of a Strep-tag II mutant MBP for reagentless fluorescence sensing. malE, which encodes MBP, was amplified. A cysteine residue was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis to ensure a single label attachment at a specific site with a thiol-specific fluorescent probe. An environmentally sensitive fluorophore (IANBD amide) was covalently attached to the introduced thiol group and analysed by fluorescence sensing. The tagged mutant MBP (D95C) was purified (molecular size, ∼42 kDa). The fluorescence measurements of the IANBD-labelled Strep-tag II-D95C in the solution phase showed an appreciable change in fluorescence intensity (dissociation constant, 7.6±1.75 μM). Our mutant MBP retains maltose-binding activity and is suitable for reagentless fluorescence sensing.

  7. A multidimensional screening method for the selection of two-photon enhanced fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb; Barnett, Lauren; Rebane, Aleksander; Hughes, Thomas; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhailov, Alexandr

    2014-03-01

    Two-photon excitation of fluorescent proteins (FPs) is widely used in imaging whole organisms or living tissues. Many different FPs are now available but these proteins have only been optimized for their one-photon properties. We have developed a technique for screening entire libraries of E. coli colonies expressing FPs that utilizes multiple wavelengths of linear excitation as well as two-photon excitation. Single mutations in a particular protein that affect one or twophoton properties are easily identified, providing new views of structure/function relationships. An amplified femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and a spectrally filtered lamp source are used to acquire the fluorescence signals of up to ~1000 E. coli colonies on a standard Petri dish. Automation of the analysis and acquisition of the fluorescent signals makes it feasible to rapidly screen tens of thousands of colonies. In a proof of principle experiment with the commonly used EGFP, we used two rounds of error prone PCR and selection to evolve new proteins with shifted absorption and increased two-photon cross sections at 790nm. This method of screening, coupled with careful measurements of photo bleaching dynamics and two-photon cross sections, should make it possible to optimize a wide variety of fluorescent proteins and biosensors for use in two-photon microscopes.

  8. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely ‘paints’ entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  9. FRET-based localization of fluorescent protein insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Raina, Shweta A; Tsai, Jeffrey; Samsó, Montserrat; Fessenden, James D

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM) maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP) insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1), a large intracellular Ca(2+) release channel that plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. A series of full-length His-tagged GFP-RyR1 fusion constructs were created, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells and then complexed with Cy3NTA, a His-tag specific FRET acceptor. FRET efficiency values measured from each GFP donor to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag acceptor site were converted into intermolecular distances and the positions of each inserted GFP were then triangulated relative to a previously published X-ray crystal structure of a 559 amino acid RyR1 fragment. We observed that the chromophoric centers of fluorescent proteins inserted into RyR1 can be located as far as 45 Å from their insertion sites and that the fused proteins can also be located in internal cavities within RyR1. These findings should prove useful in interpreting structural results obtained in cryo EM maps using fusions of small fluorescent proteins. More accurate point-to-point distance information may be obtained using complementary orthogonal labeling systems that rely on fluorescent probes that bind directly to amino acid side chains.

  10. Spectral Confocal Imaging of Fluorescently tagged Nicotinic Receptors in Knock-in Mice with Chronic Nicotine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Renda, Anthony; Nashmi, Raad

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels in the central nervous system (CNS) are implicated in numerous conditions with serious medical and social consequences. For instance, addiction to nicotine via tobacco smoking is a leading cause of premature death worldwide (World Health Organization) and is likely caused by an alteration of ion channel distribution in the brain1. Chronic nicotine exposure in both rodents and humans results in increased numbers of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brain tissue1-3. Similarly, alterations in the glutamatergic GluN1 or GluA1 channels have been implicated in triggering sensitization to other addictive drugs such as cocaine, amphetamines and opiates4-6. Consequently, the ability to map and quantify distribution and expression patterns of specific ion channels is critically important to understanding the mechanisms of addiction. The study of brain region-specific effects of individual drugs was advanced by the advent of techniques such as radioactive ligands. However, the low spatial resolution of radioactive ligand binding prevents the ability to quantify ligand-gated ion channels in specific subtypes of neurons. Genetically encoded fluorescent reporters, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its many color variants, have revolutionized the field of biology7.By genetically tagging a fluorescent reporter to an endogenous protein one can visualize proteins in vivo7-10. One advantage of fluorescently tagging proteins with a probe is the elimination of antibody use, which have issues of nonspecificity and accessibility to the target protein. We have used this strategy to fluorescently label nAChRs, which enabled the study of receptor assembly using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in transfected cultured cells11.More recently, we have used the knock-in approach to engineer mice with yellow fluorescent protein tagged α4 nAChR subunits (α4YFP), enabling precise quantification of the receptor ex vivo at submicrometer

  11. Spectral confocal imaging of fluorescently tagged nicotinic receptors in knock-in mice with chronic nicotine administration.

    PubMed

    Renda, Anthony; Nashmi, Raad

    2012-02-10

    Ligand-gated ion channels in the central nervous system (CNS) are implicated in numerous conditions with serious medical and social consequences. For instance, addiction to nicotine via tobacco smoking is a leading cause of premature death worldwide (World Health Organization) and is likely caused by an alteration of ion channel distribution in the brain. Chronic nicotine exposure in both rodents and humans results in increased numbers of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brain tissue. Similarly, alterations in the glutamatergic GluN1 or GluA1 channels have been implicated in triggering sensitization to other addictive drugs such as cocaine, amphetamines and opiates. Consequently, the ability to map and quantify distribution and expression patterns of specific ion channels is critically important to understanding the mechanisms of addiction. The study of brain region-specific effects of individual drugs was advanced by the advent of techniques such as radioactive ligands. However, the low spatial resolution of radioactive ligand binding prevents the ability to quantify ligand-gated ion channels in specific subtypes of neurons. Genetically encoded fluorescent reporters, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its many color variants, have revolutionized the field of biology. By genetically tagging a fluorescent reporter to an endogenous protein one can visualize proteins in vivo. One advantage of fluorescently tagging proteins with a probe is the elimination of antibody use, which have issues of nonspecificity and accessibility to the target protein. We have used this strategy to fluorescently label nAChRs, which enabled the study of receptor assembly using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in transfected cultured cells. More recently, we have used the knock-in approach to engineer mice with yellow fluorescent protein tagged α4 nAChR subunits (α4YFP), enabling precise quantification of the receptor ex vivo at submicrometer resolution in CNS

  12. Process monitoring the inactivation of ricin and model proteins by disinfectants using fluorescence and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Kenneth D; Gaigalas, Adolfas; Almeida, Jamie L

    2008-01-01

    It is important to develop rapid and reliable processes to monitor the decontamination of toxins released to the environment. The inactivation of the protein toxin ricin by the disinfectants bleach (sodium hypochlorite) and monochloramine was measured by the effect on mammalian cell cytotoxicity. The effect of the disinfectants on the native fluorescence (due mainly to tryptophan and to a lesser extent tyrosine) of ricin was also measured in parallel. Reactions of the disinfectants resulted in a decrease in the native fluorescence that was measured in real time in a noninvasive manner. We compared the inactivation of two well-characterized model enzymes to the behavior of ricin. The model enzymes studied were lysozyme, a small basic enzyme stabilized with internal disulfide bonds, and heart-muscle-type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a large protein composed of four subunits. The biological activities of the model enzymes were measured in parallel with their fluorescence. Gel electrophoresis showed a large number of modifications of the proteins caused by the disinfectants reflected in changes in mobility and the formation of higher-order aggregates. Size-exclusion chromatography showed that the disinfectants did not break down the subunit structure of ricin but instead resulted in an increased size and heterogeneity of the protein. Size-exclusion chromatography of LDH indicated that the subunits were dissociated and that higher-order aggregates were also formed. Bleach caused a rapid inactivation of biological activity correlated with a rapid decrease in the fluorescence. Monochloramine required much higher concentrations for significant effects and the kinetics of the reactions were slow, with half-life values of the decrease on the order of minutes. Each protein showed individual differences in responses to the disinfectants, but there was a consistent correlation between the loss of fluorescence and the decrease in biological activity. These results indicate that

  13. Process monitoring the inactivation of ricin and model proteins by disinfectants using fluorescence and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Kenneth D; Gaigalas, Adolfas; Almeida, Jamie L

    2008-01-01

    It is important to develop rapid and reliable processes to monitor the decontamination of toxins released to the environment. The inactivation of the protein toxin ricin by the disinfectants bleach (sodium hypochlorite) and monochloramine was measured by the effect on mammalian cell cytotoxicity. The effect of the disinfectants on the native fluorescence (due mainly to tryptophan and to a lesser extent tyrosine) of ricin was also measured in parallel. Reactions of the disinfectants resulted in a decrease in the native fluorescence that was measured in real time in a noninvasive manner. We compared the inactivation of two well-characterized model enzymes to the behavior of ricin. The model enzymes studied were lysozyme, a small basic enzyme stabilized with internal disulfide bonds, and heart-muscle-type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a large protein composed of four subunits. The biological activities of the model enzymes were measured in parallel with their fluorescence. Gel electrophoresis showed a large number of modifications of the proteins caused by the disinfectants reflected in changes in mobility and the formation of higher-order aggregates. Size-exclusion chromatography showed that the disinfectants did not break down the subunit structure of ricin but instead resulted in an increased size and heterogeneity of the protein. Size-exclusion chromatography of LDH indicated that the subunits were dissociated and that higher-order aggregates were also formed. Bleach caused a rapid inactivation of biological activity correlated with a rapid decrease in the fluorescence. Monochloramine required much higher concentrations for significant effects and the kinetics of the reactions were slow, with half-life values of the decrease on the order of minutes. Each protein showed individual differences in responses to the disinfectants, but there was a consistent correlation between the loss of fluorescence and the decrease in biological activity. These results indicate that

  14. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-09-13

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent "on" to "off" state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm(2)) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view.

  15. Quantitative single-molecule detection of protein based on DNA tetrahedron fluorescent nanolabels.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    A highly sensitive method for single-molecule quantitative detection of human IgG is presented by the employment of a new fluorescent nanolabel. In this method, fluorescent nanolabels were assembled by inserting SYBR Green I into DNA tetrahedron nanostructure. The bio-nanolabels were attached to the streptavidin-antihuman antibody by a specific reaction between biotin and streptavidin. The antibody was combined with the target antigen, human IgG, which was immobilized on the silanized glass subtrate surface. Finally, epi-fluorescence microscopy (EFM) coupled with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device was employed for fluorescence imaging. The fluorescent spots corresponding to single protein molecule on images were counted and further used for the quantitative detection. It was found that the new nanolabel shows good photostability, biocompatiblity and exhibits no blinking compared to traditional labels like fluorescence dyes and quantum dot (QDs). In addition, the number of fluorescence spots on the images has a linear relationship with the concentration of human IgG in the range of 3.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-12)mol L(-1). What is more, this method showed an excellent specificity and a low matrix effect.

  16. [Identification and expressional analysis of green fluorescent protein genes in amphioxus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Wei-Ye; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2012-06-01

    Endogenous green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have recently been found in amphioxus, where different characteristics of light production in different development stages and between different individuals have manifested. We identified the GFP genes in an amphioxus species Branchiostoma belcheri and monitored real time fluorescence signals of GFPs during different developmental stages to provide an insight on the GFP function in amphioxus. We found there are at least 12 endogenous GFP genes in amphioxus genome, and fluorescent expression changes in body position during different developmental stages. Additionally, GFP expression after metamorphosis development differed significantly among different amphioxus individuals, suggesting that there are multiple GFP homologous genes responsible for fluorescent expression. Expression levels of these genes varied significantly during different developmental stages, indicating that different GFP genes may have their unique functions in the development of amphioxus during specific phases of growth.

  17. [Protein fluorescence of photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    Zakharova, N I; Permiakov, E A; Fabian, M; Kononenko, A A; Chamorovskiĭ, S K

    1984-01-01

    Luminescence emitted by tryptophan residues of reaction center (RC) preparations was studied. The RG preparations were isolated from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides by treatment with lauryl dimethyl amine oxide (LDAO). After excitation at lambda 280 nm the quantum yield of luminescence is 0,02. It is shown that 60% of tryptophanyls are located inside the protein globule in the surrounding of relaxating polar groups and the rest approximately 40% on the outer surface of the globule--predominantly in the positively charged region of the LDAO-RC protein--in the surrounding of protein-bound water molecules. There is a correlation between the pH dependencies of the position of the peak of luminescence from tryptophanyls and effectivity of electron transfer from the primary (quinone) to secondary acceptor. The two parameters are invariant at pH from 7 to 9 and vary at pH less than 7 and pH greater than 9. The phenomena responsible for the observed correlation are discussed on the basis of pH-dependent changes in the RC protein which govern electron transport activity at the reaction center.

  18. Quantum dot-fluorescent protein FRET probes for sensing intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Allison M; Rhee, Won Jong; Sotto, David; Dublin, Steven N; Bao, Gang

    2012-04-24

    Intracellular pH (pH(i)) plays a critical role in the physiological and pathophysiological processes of cells, and fluorescence imaging using pH-sensitive indicators provides a powerful tool to assess the pH(i) of intact cells and subcellular compartments. Here we describe a nanoparticle-based ratiometric pH sensor, comprising a bright and photostable semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins (FPs), exhibiting dramatically improved sensitivity and photostability compared to BCECF, the most widely used fluorescent dye for pH imaging. We found that Förster resonance energy transfer between the QD and multiple FPs modulates the FP/QD emission ratio, exhibiting a >12-fold change between pH 6 and 8. The modularity of the probe enables customization to specific biological applications through genetic engineering of the FPs, as illustrated by the altered pH range of the probe through mutagenesis of the fluorescent protein. The QD-FP probes facilitate visualization of the acidification of endosomes in living cells following polyarginine-mediated uptake. These probes have the potential to enjoy a wide range of intracellular pH imaging applications that may not be feasible with fluorescent proteins or organic fluorophores alone.

  19. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496–502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  20. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496-502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  1. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a method to calculate the dimerization strength of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins.

    PubMed

    Centonze, Victoria E.; Firulli, Beth A.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2004-01-01

    Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation play a vital role in the regulation of protein function. In our study of the basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor HAND1, we show that HAND1 is phosphorylated during the trophoblast giant cell differentiation on residues residing in Helix I of the bHLH domain. Our hypothesis is that these modifications result in changes in HAND1 dimerization affinities with other bHLH factors. To test this idea, we employed FRET to measure the protein-protein interactions of HAND1 and HAND1 point mutants in HEK293 cells using YFP and CFP fusion proteins and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  2. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair for fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOEpatents

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2010-08-17

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  3. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in preimplantation mouse embryos using green fluorescent protein reporter.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Serguei Yuri; Tokunaga, Tomoyuki; Schultz, Richard M; Furukawa, Tsutomu; Nagai, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Manabu; Hosoe, Misa; Yakovlev, Alexander F; Takahashi, Seiya; Izaike, Yoshiaki

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a method to monitor noninvasively, quantitatively, and in real-time transcription in living preimplantation mouse embryos by measuring expression of a short half-life form of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) following microinjection of a plasmid-borne EGFP reporter gene. A standard curve was established by injecting known amounts of recombinant green fluorescent protein, and transcriptional activity was then determined by interpolating the amount of fluorescence in the DNA-injected embryos. This approach permitted multiple measurements in single embryos with no significant detrimental effect on embryonic development as long as light exposure was brief (<30 sec) and no more than two measurements were made each day. This method should facilitate analysis of the regulation of gene expression in preimplantation embryos; in particular, during the maternal-to-zygotic transition, and in other species in which limited numbers of embryos are available. PMID:12080029

  4. Visible-wavelength two-photon excitation microscopy for fluorescent protein imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Saito, Kenta; Smith, Nicholas I.; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Uegaki, Kumiko; Yonemaru, Yasuo; Mochizuki, Kentaro; Kawata, Satoshi; Nagai, Takeharu; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-10-01

    The simultaneous observation of multiple fluorescent proteins (FPs) by optical microscopy is revealing mechanisms by which proteins and organelles control a variety of cellular functions. Here we show the use of visible-light based two-photon excitation for simultaneously imaging multiple FPs. We demonstrated that multiple fluorescent targets can be concurrently excited by the absorption of two photons from the visible wavelength range and can be applied in multicolor fluorescence imaging. The technique also allows simultaneous single-photon excitation to offer simultaneous excitation of FPs across the entire range of visible wavelengths from a single excitation source. The calculation of point spread functions shows that the visible-wavelength two-photon excitation provides the fundamental improvement of spatial resolution compared to conventional confocal microscopy.

  5. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Kunio; Kinpara, Takeshi; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2002-05-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 μm, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 μm. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  6. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background. PMID:26991398

  7. Nonlinear Structured Illumination Using a Fluorescent Protein Activating at the Readout Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Wenya; Kielhorn, Martin; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a wide-field technique in fluorescence microscopy that provides fast data acquisition and two-fold resolution improvement beyond the Abbe limit. We observed a further resolution improvement using the nonlinear emission response of a fluorescent protein. We demonstrated a two-beam nonlinear structured illumination microscope by introducing only a minor change into the system used for linear SIM (LSIM). To achieve the required nonlinear dependence in nonlinear SIM (NL-SIM) we exploited the photoswitching of the recently introduced fluorophore Kohinoor. It is particularly suitable due to its positive contrast photoswitching characteristics. Contrary to other reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins which only have high photostability in living cells, Kohinoor additionally showed little degradation in fixed cells over many switching cycles. PMID:27783656

  8. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background.

  9. Secretion of human interleukin-2 fused with green fluorescent protein in recombinant Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung Joon; Dalal, Nimish N; Bentley, William E

    2005-07-01

    Methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is convenient for the expression of eukaryotic foreign proteins owing to its potential for posttranslational modifications, protein folding, and facile culturing. In this work, human interleukin (hIL)-2 was successfully produced as a secreted fusion form in recombinant P. pastoris. By employing green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a monitoring fusion partner, clear identification of fusion protein expression and quantification of intracellular hIL-2 were possible even though there was no correlation between culture supernatant fluorescence and secreted hIL-2 owing to high media interference. Importantly, by the addition of casamino acids in basal medium, we were able to enhance threefold amount of secreted hIL-2, which was present both as a fusion and as a clipped fragment. PMID:16014994

  10. “Turn-On” Protein Fluorescence: In Situ Formation of Cyanine Dyes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein reengineering of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABPII) has yielded a genetically addressable system, capable of binding a profluorophoric chromophore that results in fluorescent protein/chromophore complexes. These complexes exhibit far-red emission, with high quantum efficiencies and brightness and also exhibit excellent pH stability spanning the range of 2–11. In the course of this study, it became evident that single mutations of L121E and R59W were most effective in improving the fluorescent characteristics of CRABPII mutants as well as the kinetics of complex formation. The readily crystallizable nature of these proteins was invaluable to provide clues for the observed spectroscopic behavior that results from single mutation of key residues. PMID:25534273

  11. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix.

  12. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix. PMID:10333299

  13. "Turn-on" protein fluorescence: in situ formation of cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Ipek; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Berbasova, Tetyana; Nosrati, Meisam; Jia, Xiaofei; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Wang, Wenjing; Santos, Elizabeth M; Geiger, James H; Borhan, Babak

    2015-01-28

    Protein reengineering of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABPII) has yielded a genetically addressable system, capable of binding a profluorophoric chromophore that results in fluorescent protein/chromophore complexes. These complexes exhibit far-red emission, with high quantum efficiencies and brightness and also exhibit excellent pH stability spanning the range of 2-11. In the course of this study, it became evident that single mutations of L121E and R59W were most effective in improving the fluorescent characteristics of CRABPII mutants as well as the kinetics of complex formation. The readily crystallizable nature of these proteins was invaluable to provide clues for the observed spectroscopic behavior that results from single mutation of key residues. PMID:25534273

  14. Using fluorescent proteins to study mRNA trafficking in living cells.

    PubMed

    Querido, Emmanuelle; Chartrand, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    This chapter presents the MS2-GFP system, a method to study the trafficking of RNA molecules in living cells. This system is based on two components: a fusion of the MS2 coat protein to a fluorescent protein and a reporter mRNA containing multimers of the RNA stem-loop recognized by the MS2 coat protein. The MS2-GFP protein bound to the RNA stem-loops acts as a beacon that allows the detection of this mRNA within a cell by epifluorescence or confocal microscopy. This chapter focuses on the use of this system in mammalian fibroblast cells and in yeast cells, and discusses several technical considerations of the MS2-GFP system. Detailed protocols for validating the MS2-GFP signal in fixed cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization of the target RNA using fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes are also provided.

  15. Distance Mapping in Proteins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy: Tyrosine, like Tryptophan, Quenches Bimane Fluorescence in a Distance-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan-induced quenching of fluorophores (TrIQ) uses intramolecular fluorescence quenching to assess distances in proteins too small (<15 Å) to be easily probed by traditional Forster resonance energy transfer methods. A powerful aspect of TrIQ is its ability to obtain an ultrafast snapshot of a protein conformation, by identifying “static quenching” (contact between the Trp and probe at the moment of light excitation). Here we report new advances in this site-directed fluorescence labeling (SDFL) approach, gleaned from recent studies of T4 lysozyme (T4L). First, we show that like TrIQ, tyrosine-induced quenching (TyrIQ) occurs for the fluorophore bimane in a distance-dependent fashion, although with some key differences. The Tyr “sphere of quenching” for bimane (≤10 Å) is smaller than for Trp (≤15 Å, Cα–Cα distance), and the size difference between the quenching residue (Tyr) and control (Phe) differs by only a hydroxyl group. Second, we show how TrIQ and TyrIQ can be used together to assess the magnitude and energetics of a protein movement. In these studies, we placed a bimane (probe) and Trp or Tyr (quencher) on opposite ends of a “hinge” in T4L and conducted TrIQ and TyrIQ measurements. Our results are consistent with an ∼5 Å change in Cα–Cα distances between these sites upon substrate binding, in agreement with the crystal structures. Subsequent Arrhenius analysis suggests the activation energy barrier (Ea) to this movement is relatively low (∼1.5–2.5 kcal/mol). Together, these results demonstrate that TyrIQ, used together with TrIQ, significantly expands the power of quenching-based distance mapping SDFL studies. PMID:25144569

  16. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Analysis of Protein-Based Binding Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Cather, S.; Anglos, D.; Fotakis, Costas

    Laser-induced fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores of organic media found in paintings (casein, animal glue and egg proteins) provides a means of characterising general classes of media depending on the amino acid composition and presence of degradation cross-linkages. Wavelength dependence of spectra is investigated for non-destructive and non-invasive analyses of thin films of protein-based binding media.

  17. Erratum: Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The author's email has been corrected in the publication of Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing. There was an error with the author, Jerry Zhou's, email. The author's email has been updated to: j.zhou@uws.edu.au from: jzho7551@mail.usyd.edu.au. PMID:26167960

  18. Analysis and quality control of carbohydrates in therapeutic proteins with fluorescence HPLC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Huang, Jian; Luo, Delun; Xu, Kai; Wu, Zhigang; Xu, Xun

    2016-09-16

    Conbercept is an Fc fusion protein with very complicated carbohydrate profiles which must be carefully monitored through manufacturing process. Here, we introduce an optimized fluorescence derivatization high-performance liquid chromatographic method for glycan mapping in conbercept. Compared with conventional glycan analysis method, this method has much better resolution and higher reproducibility making it excellent for product quality control. PMID:27514451

  19. Adaptive evolution of multicolored fluorescent proteins in reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Field, Steven F; Bulina, Maria Y; Kelmanson, Ilya V; Bielawski, Joseph P; Matz, Mikhail V

    2006-03-01

    Here we investigate the evolutionary scenarios that led to the appearance of fluorescent color diversity in reef-building corals. We show that the mutations that have been responsible for the generation of new cyan and red phenotypes from the ancestral green were fixed with the help of positive natural selection. This fact strongly suggests that the color diversity is a product of adaptive evolution. An unexpected finding was a set of residues arranged as an intermolecular binding interface, which was also identified as a target of positive selection but is nevertheless not related to color diversification. We hypothesize that multicolored fluorescent proteins evolved as part of a mechanism regulating the relationships between the coral and its algal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae). We envision that the effect of the proteins' fluorescence on algal physiology may be achieved not only through photosynthesis modulation, but also through regulatory photosensors analogous to phytochromes and cryptochromes of higher plants. Such a regulation would require relatively subtle, but spectrally precise, modifications of the light field. Evolution of such a mechanism would explain both the adaptive diversification of colors and the coevolutionary chase at the putative algae-protein binding interface in coral fluorescent proteins.

  20. Fluorescent Protein Aided Insights on Plastids and their Extensions: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Kathleen; Wozny, Michael R.; Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Barton, Kiah A.; Anderson, Cole; Mathur, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Multi-colored fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behavior of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli, and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signaling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes. PMID:26834765

  1. Fluorescent Protein Aided Insights on Plastids and their Extensions: A Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Delfosse, Kathleen; Wozny, Michael R; Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Barton, Kiah A; Anderson, Cole; Mathur, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Multi-colored fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behavior of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli, and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signaling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes.

  2. Fluorescent Magnesium Nanocomplex in Protein Scaffold for Cell Nuclei Imaging Application

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Alok; Tripathi, Apritam; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Sanjay; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Singh, Surinder P.; Shanker, Rishi

    2015-10-27

    Here in, we report a facile strategy for the synthesis of water-soluble ultra-fine blue emitting fluorescent Magnesium nanoparticles-protein complex (MgNC). This MgNC is demonstrated to exhibit excellent photo stability and biocompatibility. It was also observed that MgNC stain cell nuclei with high specifcity.

  3. PCR-mediated gene modification strategy for construction of fluorescent protein fusions in Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Gonia, Sara; Larson, Britta; Gale, Cheryl A

    2016-02-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a common cause of invasive candidiasis, especially in premature infants, even surpassing Candida albicans as the most frequently identified Candida species in some newborn intensive care units. Whereas many molecular tools are available to facilitate the study of C. albicans, relatively few have been developed for C. parapsilosis. In this study, we show that plasmids harbouring green, yellow and mCherry fluorescent protein sequences, previously developed for expression in C. albicans, can be used to construct fluorescent fusion proteins in C. parapsilosis by PCR-mediated gene modification. Further, the strategy can be used in clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, which are typically prototrophic, because the plasmids include NAT1, a dominant selectable trait that confers resistance to the antibiotic nourseothricin. Overall, these tools will be useful to yeast researchers who require the ability to visualize C. parapsilosis directly, e.g. in in vitro and in vivo infection models. In addition, this strategy can be used to generate fluorescence in other C. parapsilosis clinical isolates and to tag sequences of interest for protein localization studies. Lastly, the ability to express up to three different fluorescent proteins will allow researchers to visualize and differentiate C. parapsilosis and/or C. albicans clinical isolates from each other in mixed infection models.

  4. Reversible and oriented immobilization of ferrocene-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lanti; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Young, Jacqui F; Nguyen, Hoang D; Cabanas-Danés, Jordi; Huskens, Jurriaan; Brunsveld, Luc; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2012-11-21

    Adopting supramolecular chemistry for immobilization of proteins is an attractive strategy that entails reversibility and responsiveness to stimuli. The reversible and oriented immobilization and micropatterning of ferrocene-tagged yellow fluorescent proteins (Fc-YFPs) onto β-cyclodextrin (βCD) molecular printboards was characterized using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy in combination with electrochemistry. The proteins were assembled on the surface through the specific supramolecular host-guest interaction between βCD and ferrocene. Application of a dynamic covalent disulfide lock between two YFP proteins resulted in a switch from monovalent to divalent ferrocene interactions with the βCD surface, yielding a more stable protein immobilization. The SPR titration data for the protein immobilization were fitted to a 1:1 Langmuir-type model, yielding K(LM) = 2.5 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(i,s) = 1.2 × 10(3) M(-1), which compares favorably to the intrinsic binding constant presented in the literature for the monovalent interaction of ferrocene with βCD self-assembled monolayers. In addition, the SPR binding experiments were qualitatively simulated, confirming the binding of Fc-YFP in both divalent and monovalent fashion to the βCD monolayers. The Fc-YFPs could be patterned on βCD surfaces in uniform monolayers, as revealed using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Both fluorescence microscopy imaging and SPR measurements were carried out with the in situ capability to perform cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. These studies emphasize the repetitive desorption and adsorption of the ferrocene-tagged proteins from the βCD surface upon electrochemical oxidation and reduction, respectively.

  5. New fluorescent reagents specific for Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Lemelson, Daniela; Israelson, Adrian; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New reagents specifically inhibit the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru allow for mechanism-independent probing of Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in reagents fluorescence allow characterization of protein Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} carries information pivotal to cell life and death via its interactions with specific binding sites in a protein. We previously developed a novel photoreactive reagent, azido ruthenium (AzRu), which strongly inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities. Here, we synthesized new fluorescent ruthenium-based reagents containing FITC or EITC, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru. These reagents were purified, characterized and found to specifically interact with and markedly inhibit Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities but not the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-independent reactions. In contrast to many reagents that serve as probes for Ca{sup 2+}, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru are the first fluorescent divalent cation analogs to be synthesized and characterized that specifically bind to Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and inhibit their activity. Such reagents will assist in characterizing Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins, thereby facilitating better understanding of the function of Ca{sup 2+} as a key bio-regulator.

  6. Modeling structure and spectra of the kindling fluorescent protein asFP595

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jack R.; Topol, Igor A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2011-03-01

    Modern computational approaches based on quantum mechanical methods to characterize structures and optical spectra of biological chromophores in proteins are intensively used to gain knowledge of events occurring upon of their photoexcitation. Primary attention is paid to the species from the family of the green fluorescent protein applied as biomarkers in living cells. We apply quantum chemical approaches for accurate calculations of the structures of the chromophore binding pockets and to estimate spectral bands corresponding to the S0-S1 optical transitions of the intriguing kindling protein asFP595. Its precursor, the chromoprotein asCP from the sea anemony Anemonia sulcata is characterized by distinctive spectral properties: at low light intensities the wild-type protein is weakly fluorescent with the very low quantum yield, however, high intensity irradiation with green light leads to a drastic increase of quantum yield. This phenomenon is now termed "kindling". In simulations, the model system is designed as a molecular cluster constructed on the basis of available crystal structures of the related protein. The equilibrium geometry of the cluster is optimized using density functional theory approximations. The vertical excitation energies corresponding to the S0-S1 transitions are computed by using the semiempirical ZINDO technique. A special attention is paid to evaluate effects of point mutations in the vicinity of the chromophore group. Theoretical data provide important information on the chromophore properties aiming to interpret the results of experimental studies and applications of this fluorescent protein.

  7. Structural Determinants of Improved Fluorescence in a Family of Bacteriophytochrome-Based Infrared Fluorescent Proteins: Insights from Continuum Electrostatic Calculations and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Feliks, Mikolaj; Lafaye, Céline; Shu, Xiaokun; Royant, Antoine; Field, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Using X-ray crystallography, continuum electrostatic calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structure, protonation behavior, and dynamics of the biliverdin chromophore and its molecular environment in a series of genetically engineered infrared fluorescent proteins (IFPs) based on the chromophore-binding domain of the Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome. Our study suggests that the experimentally observed enhancement of fluorescent properties results from the improved rigidity and planarity of the biliverdin chromophore, in particular of the first two pyrrole rings neighboring the covalent linkage to the protein. We propose that the increases in the levels of both motion and bending of the chromophore out of planarity favor the decrease in fluorescence. The chromophore-binding pocket in some of the studied proteins, in particular the weakly fluorescent parent protein, is shown to be readily accessible to water molecules from the solvent. These waters entering the chromophore region form hydrogen bond networks that affect the otherwise planar conformation of the first three rings of the chromophore. On the basis of our simulations, the enhancement of fluorescence in IFPs can be achieved either by reducing the mobility of water molecules in the vicinity of the chromophore or by limiting the interactions of the nearby protein residues with the chromophore. Finally, simulations performed at both low and neutral pH values highlight differences in the dynamics of the chromophore and shed light on the mechanism of fluorescence loss at low pH. PMID:27471775

  8. Variation of Spectral Characteristics of Coelenteramide-Containing Fluorescent Protein from Obelia Longissima Exposed to Dimethyl Sulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, A. S.; Alieva, R. R.; Belogurova, N. V.; Tirranen, L. S.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a widespread biomedical agent, on spectral-luminescent characteristics of coelenteramide-containing fluorescent protein - discharged obelin - is investigated. Contributions of violet and blue-green spectral components to fluorescence of discharged obelin are elucidated and characterized at different photoexcitation energies. Dependences of these contributions on the DMSO concentration are presented. Spectral changes are related to the destructive effect of DMSO on fluorescent protein and decreasing efficiency of proton transfer to electronically excited states of fluorophore.

  9. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged cysteine-rich domains from protein kinase C as fluorescent indicators for diacylglycerol signaling in living cells.

    PubMed

    Oancea, E; Teruel, M N; Quest, A F; Meyer, T

    1998-02-01

    Cysteine-rich domains (Cys-domains) are approximately 50-amino acid-long protein domains that complex two zinc ions and include a consensus sequence with six cysteine and two histidine residues. In vitro studies have shown that Cys-domains from several protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms and a number of other signaling proteins bind lipid membranes in the presence of diacylglycerol or phorbol ester. Here we examine the second messenger functions of diacylglycerol in living cells by monitoring the membrane translocation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged first Cys-domain of PKC-gamma (Cys1-GFP). Strikingly, stimulation of G-protein or tyrosine kinase-coupled receptors induced a transient translocation of cytosolic Cys1-GFP to the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane translocation was mimicked by addition of the diacylglycerol analogue DiC8 or the phorbol ester, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Photobleaching recovery studies showed that PMA nearly immobilized Cys1-GFP in the membrane, whereas DiC8 left Cys1-GFP diffusible within the membrane. Addition of a smaller and more hydrophilic phorbol ester, phorbol dibuterate (PDBu), localized Cys1-GFP preferentially to the plasma and nuclear membranes. This selective membrane localization was lost in the presence of arachidonic acid. GFP-tagged Cys1Cys2-domains and full-length PKC-gamma also translocated from the cytosol to the plasma membrane in response to receptor or PMA stimuli, whereas significant plasma membrane translocation of Cys2-GFP was only observed in response to PMA addition. These studies introduce GFP-tagged Cys-domains as fluorescent diacylglycerol indicators and show that in living cells the individual Cys-domains can trigger a diacylglycerol or phorbol ester-mediated translocation of proteins to selective lipid membranes.

  10. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses.

  11. Application of Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Quantify Shear-Induced Protein Conformation Change

    PubMed Central

    Themistou, Efrosyni; Singh, Indrajeet; Shang, Chengwei; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Rapid and robust methods are required to quantify the effect of hydrodynamic shear on protein conformation change. We evaluated such strategies in this work and found that the binding of the fluorescent probe 4,4′-dianilino-1,1′-binaphthyl-5,5′-disulfonic acid (bis-ANS) to hydrophobic pockets in the blood protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) is enhanced upon the application of fluid shear to the isolated protein. Significant structural changes were observed when the protein was sheared at shear rates ≥ 6000/s for ∼3.5 min. The binding of bis-ANS to multimeric VWF, but not dimeric VWF or control protein bovine serum albumin, was enhanced upon fluid shear application. Thus, high-molecular-weight VWF is more susceptible to conformation change upon tensile loading. Although bis-ANS itself did not alter the conformation of VWF, it stabilized protein conformation once it bound the sheared molecule. Bis-ANS binding to VWF was reduced when the sheared protein was allowed to relax before dye addition. Taken together with functional data in the literature, our results suggest that shear-induced conformation changes in VWF reported by bis-ANS correlate well with the normal function of the protein under physiological/pathological fluid flow conditions. Further, this study introduces the fluorescent dye bis-ANS as a tool that may be useful in studies of shear-induced protein conformation change. PMID:19883600

  12. Imaging HIV-1 Tat Trafficking and Interactions by Engineered Green-Fluorescent-Protein Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltram, Fabio

    2002-03-01

    The direct monitoring of protein function in live cells under physiologically relevant conditions is one of the most powerful and innovative methodologies for proteomics. Efficient florescent probes fully compatible with human-cell expression are the fundamental tools for these studies and their optimization opens the way to resolution at the single-protein level. Biological events involving protein pairs are also directly accessible thanks to tuning of protein-tag spectral properties and production of complementary pairs. Such pairs are characterized by overlapping absorption (for the acceptor tag) and emission (for the donor tag) spectra. By tagging the proteins of interest with acceptor and donor molecules, protein interaction can be directly visualized by FRET, fluorescent resonant energy transfer. In this talk we shall present the design by molecular dynamics calculations and the application of optimized green fluorescent proteins to the study of the human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 proteomics. In particular trafficking and cellular interactions of HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat in live human cells will be presented. Tat localization and complex internalization pathways of exogenous molecules will be presented thanks to the peculiar optical properties of mutated GFPs. Cellular protein partners and subcellular interaction sites will be identified and directly visualized. The relevance of such results and of advanced spectroscopic and imaging techniques for a new level of understanding of biological processes and its significance for advancement in molecular biology will be underlined. A. Marcello et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276, 39220 (2001). R. Cinelli et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 3353 (2001).

  13. Experimental Evolution of a Green Fluorescent Protein Composed of 19 Unique Amino Acids without Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words)

  14. Molecular dynamics study of chemically engineered green fluorescent protein mutants: comparison of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Felicity L; Frank, Filipp; Marks, Gabriel E; Suzuki, Miho; Douglas, Kenneth T; Bryce, Richard A

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unusual spectroscopic properties, green fluorescent protein (GFP) has become a useful tool in molecular genetics, biochemistry and cell biology. Here, we computationally characterize the behavior of two GFP constructs, designed as bioprobes for enzymatic triggering using intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These constructs differ in the location of an intramolecular FRET partner, an attached chemical chromophore (either near an N-terminal or C-terminal site). We apply the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics method to the two flexible constructs in conjunction with a generalized Born implicit solvent model. The calculated rate of FRET was derived from the interchromophore distance, R, and orientational factor, kappa(2). In agreement with experiment, the construct with the C-terminally attached dye was predicted to have higher energy transfer rate than observed for the N-terminal construct. The molecular basis for this observation is discussed. In addition, we find that the orientational factor, kappa(2), deviates from the commonly assumed value, the implications of which are also considered.

  15. Natural Photoreceptors as a Source of Fluorescent Proteins, Biosensors, and Optogenetic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Shemetov, Anton A.; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical tools have revolutionized modern biology by allowing detection and control of biological processes with exceptional spatiotemporal precision and sensitivity. Natural photoreceptors provide researchers with a vast source of molecular templates for engineering of fluorescent proteins, biosensors, and optogenetic tools. Here, we give a brief overview of natural photoreceptors and their mechanisms of action. We then discuss fluorescent proteins and biosensors developed from light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) domains and phytochromes, as well as their properties and applications. These fluorescent tools possess unique characteristics not achievable with green fluorescent protein–like probes, including near-infrared fluorescence, independence of oxygen, small size, and photo-sensitizer activity. We next provide an overview of available optogenetic tools of various origins, such as LOV and BLUF (blue-light-utilizing flavin adenine dinucleotide) domains, cryptochromes, and phytochromes, enabling control of versatile cellular processes. We analyze the principles of their function and practical requirements for use. We focus mainly on optical tools with demonstrated use beyond bacteria, with a specific emphasis on their applications in mammalian cells. PMID:25706899

  16. Protein-gold nanoclusters for identification of amino acids by metal ions modulated ratiometric fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Mei, Qingsong; Zhang, Kui; Zhang, Zhongping

    2012-04-01

    Here we report that the dual fluorescence emissions from protein-gold (Au) nanoclusters can greatly be modulated by metal ions and the resultant fluorescence ratiometric responses provide a novel sensory method for the identification of amino acids. The protein-gold (Au) nanoclusters were simply synthesized by the reduction of chloroauric acid with bovine serum albumin (BSA), which exhibit dual emissions: the blue at 425 nm from the oxides of BSA, and the red at 635 nm from Au nanoclusters. It has been demonstrated that different metal ions react with BSA-Au nanoclusters and thus greatly affect the two emissions in different ways by fluorescence enhancement or quenching. Interestingly, the addition of amino acids leads to fluorescence ratiometric changes through the interactions with the bound metal ions. When BSA-Au nanocluster probes modulated by four different metal ions were used together to construct a sensor array, different amino acids were clearly discriminated by the distinctive patterns of four ratiometric fluorescence responses. Results and methods reported here provide a unique strategy for the determination of amino acids.

  17. A Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay For Monitoring α- Synclein Aggregation in a Caenorhabditis Elegans Model For Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Archana; Bodhicharla, Rakesh; Winter, Jody; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Morgan, Kevin; Searle, Mark; Nazir, Aamir; Adenle, Ademola; Fineberg, April; Brady, Declan; Vere, Kelly; Richens, Jo; O'Shea, Paul; Bell, David; de-Pomerai, David

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein (Syn or S) to form insoluble fibrils is important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, but key risk factors remain ill-defined. We have developed Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based assays for α-synuclein aggregation, using Green Fluorescent Protein variants Cerulean (C) or Venus (V), fused to each other (CV, VC) or to human synuclein (SC, SV etc). Bacterially expressed proteins were purified to homogeneity, and C-terminal fusions SC and SV largely retained their ability to aggregate in vitro. FRET signals from mixtures of SC and SV were used to monitor aggregation. These fusion genes were linked to the C. elegans unc-54 myosin promoter to generate integrated transgenic strains. Increased FRET signals, indicative of S aggregation, were observed following treatment of unc-54::SC + unc-54::SV double transgenic worms with low concentrations of mercury or chlorpyrifos, or with RNAi against hsp-70 and hip-1. Opposite changes in Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP) fluorescence in an unc-54::SV strain (NL5901) are likely to reflect FRET from Yellow Fluorescent Protein to aggregates of Syn fusion protein. This could provide the basis for a high throughput screening assay, which could be used for studying the effects of toxic chemicals and environmental pollutants on the aggregation of proteins such as Syn in vivo. PMID:26295817

  18. Is Fluorescence Valid to Monitor Removal of Protein Bound Uremic Solutes in Dialysis?

    PubMed Central

    Luman, Merike; Uhlin, Fredrik; Tanner, Risto; Fridolin, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution and removal dynamics of the main fluorophores during dialysis by analyzing the spent dialysate samples to prove the hypothesis whether the fluorescence of spent dialysate can be utilized for monitoring removal of any of the protein bound uremic solute. A high performance liquid chromatography system was used to separate and quantify fluorophoric solutes in the spent dialysate sampled at the start and the end of 99 dialysis sessions, including 57 hemodialysis and 42 hemodiafiltration treatments. Fluorescence was acquired at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm. The main fluorophores found in samples were identified as indole derivatives: tryptophan, indoxyl glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, indoleacetyl glutamine, and indoleacetic acid. The highest contribution (35 ± 11%) was found to arise from indoxyl sulfate. Strong correlation between contribution values at the start and end of dialysis (R2 = 0.90) indicated to the stable contribution during the course of the dialysis. The reduction ratio of indoxyl sulfate was very close to the decrease of the total fluorescence signal of the spent dialysate (49 ± 14% vs 51 ± 13% respectively, P = 0.30, N = 99) and there was strong correlation between these reduction ratio values (R2 = 0.86). On-line fluorescence measurements were carried out to illustrate the technological possibility for real-time dialysis fluorescence monitoring reflecting the removal of the main fluorophores from blood into spent dialysate. In summary, since a predominant part of the fluorescence signal at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm in the spent dialysate originates from protein bound derivatives of indoles, metabolites of tryptophan and indole, the fluorescence signal at this wavelength region has high potential to be utilized for monitoring the removal of slowly dialyzed uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate. PMID:27228162

  19. In vivo cell biology of cancer cells visualized with fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes a new cell biology where the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. Previously it has been demonstrated that fluorescent proteins can be used for whole-body imaging of metastatic tumor growth, bacterial infection, and gene expression. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of tumor-stroma interactions and especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts, and macrophages. Another example is the color coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo. Mice in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP expression enable nascent vasculature to be visualized interacting with transplanted RFP-expressing cancer cells. Nestin-driven GFP expression can also be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Highly elongated cancer cells in capillaries in living mice were observed within skin flaps. The migration velocities of the cancer cells in the capillaries were measured by capturing images of the dual-color fluorescent cells over time. The cells in the capillaries elongated to fit the width of these vessels. The use of the dual-color cancer cells differentially labeled in the cytoplasm and nucleus and associated fluorescent imaging provide a powerful tool to understand the mechanism of cancer cell migration and deformation in small vessels.

  20. Computational Design of the β-Sheet Surface of a Red Fluorescent Protein Allows Control of Protein Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Wannier, Timothy M.; Moore, Matthew M.; Mou, Yun; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Computational design has been used with mixed success for the design of protein surfaces, with directed evolution heretofore providing better practical solutions than explicit design. Directed evolution, however, requires a tractable high-throughput screen because the random nature of mutation does not enrich for desired traits. Here we demonstrate the successful design of the β-sheet surface of a red fluorescent protein (RFP), enabling control over its oligomerization. To isolate the problem of surface design, we created a hybrid RFP from DsRed and mCherry with a stabilized protein core that allows for monomerization without loss of fluorescence. We designed an explicit library for which 93 of 96 (97%) of the protein variants are soluble, stably fluorescent, and monomeric. RFPs are heavily used in biology, but are natively tetrameric, and creating RFP monomers has proven extremely difficult. We show that surface design and core engineering are separate problems in RFP development and that the next generation of RFP markers will depend on improved methods for core design. PMID:26075618

  1. Fluorescent protein barrel fluctuations and oxygen diffusion pathways in mCherry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapagain, Prem P.; Regmi, Chola K.; Castillo, William

    2011-12-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are valuable tools as biochemical markers for studying cellular processes. Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are highly desirable for in vivo applications because they absorb and emit light in the red region of the spectrum where cellular autofluorescence is low. The naturally occurring fluorescent proteins with emission peaks in this region of the spectrum occur in dimeric or tetrameric forms. The development of mutant monomeric variants of RFPs has resulted in several novel FPs known as mFruits. Though oxygen is required for maturation of the chromophore, it is known that photobleaching of FPs is oxygen sensitive, and oxygen-free conditions result in improved photostabilities. Therefore, understanding oxygen diffusion pathways in FPs is important for both photostabilites and maturation of the chromophores. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics calculations to investigate the protein barrel fluctuations in mCherry, which is one of the most useful monomeric mFruit variant. We employ implicit ligand sampling to determine oxygen pathways from the bulk solvent into the mCherry chromophore in the interior of the protein. We also show that these pathways can be blocked or altered and barrel fluctuations can be reduced by strategic amino acid substitutions.

  2. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    PubMed Central

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  3. Site-specific fluorescent labeling to visualize membrane translocation of a myristoyl switch protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Lim, Sung In; Kiessling, Volker; Kwon, Inchan; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence approaches have been widely used for elucidating the dynamics of protein-membrane interactions in cells and model systems. However, non-specific multi-site fluorescent labeling often results in a loss of native structure and function, and single cysteine labeling is not feasible when native cysteines are required to support a protein's folding or catalytic activity. Here, we develop a method using genetic incorporation of non-natural amino acids and bio-orthogonal chemistry to site-specifically label with a single fluorescent small molecule or protein the myristoyl-switch protein recoverin, which is involved in rhodopsin-mediated signaling in mammalian visual sensory neurons. We demonstrate reversible Ca(2+)-responsive translocation of labeled recoverin to membranes and show that recoverin favors membranes with negative curvature and high lipid fluidity in complex heterogeneous membranes, which confers spatio-temporal control over down-stream signaling events. The site-specific orthogonal labeling technique is promising for structural, dynamical, and functional studies of many lipid-anchored membrane protein switches. PMID:27605302

  4. Tryptophan fluorescence reveals induced folding of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein upon interaction with partner enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Peter W; Langille, Gavin M; Minielly, Sarah J; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

    2008-11-01

    We have introduced tryptophan as a local fluorescent probe to monitor the conformation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small flexible protein that is unfolded at neutral pH but must undergo reversible conformational change during the synthesis and delivery of bacterial fatty acids. Consistent with known 3D structures of ACP, steady-state fluorescence and quenching experiments indicated that Trp at positions 46, 50, and 72 are buried in the hydrophobic core upon Mg(2+)-induced ACP folding, whereas residues 25 and 45 remain in a hydrophilic environment on the protein surface. Attachment of fatty acids to the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group progressively stabilized the folded conformation of all Trp-substituted ACPs, but longer chains (14:0) were less effective than medium chains (8:0) in shielding Trp from acrylamide quenching in the L46W protein. Interaction with ACP-dependent enzymes LpxA and holo-ACP synthase also caused folding of L46W; fluorescence quenching indicated proximity of Trp-45 in helix II of ACP in LpxA binding. Our results suggest that divalent cations and fatty acylation produce differing environments in the ACP core and also reveal enzyme partner-induced folding of ACP, a key feature of "natively unfolded" proteins.

  5. Honey-Induced Protein Stabilization as Studied by Fluorescein Isothiocyanate Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Tayyab, Saad

    2013-01-01

    Protein stabilizing potential of honey was studied on a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), using extrinsic fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as the probe. BSA was labelled with FITC using chemical coupling, and urea and thermal denaturation studies were performed on FITC-labelled BSA (FITC-BSA) both in the absence and presence of 10% and 20% (w/v) honey using FITC fluorescence at 522 nm upon excitation at 495 nm. There was an increase in the FITC fluorescence intensity upon increasing urea concentration or temperature, suggesting protein denaturation. The results from urea and thermal denaturation studies showed increased stability of protein in the presence of honey as reflected from the shift in the transition curve along with the start point and the midpoint of the transition towards higher urea concentration/temperature. Furthermore, the increase in ΔGDH2O and ΔGD25°C in presence of honey also suggested protein stabilization. PMID:24222758

  6. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  7. PNA-induced assembly of fluorescent proteins using DNA as a framework.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Zahra; Brunsveld, Luc; Hanley, Quentin

    2013-08-21

    Controlled alignment of proteins on molecular frameworks requires the development of facile and orthogonal chemical approaches and molecular scaffolds. In this work, protein-PNA conjugates are brought forward as new chemical components allowing efficient assembly and alignment on DNA scaffolds. Site-selective monomeric teal fluorescent protein (mTFP)-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (mTFP-PNA) conjugation was achieved by covalent linkage of the PNA to the protein through expressed protein ligation (EPL). A DNA beacon, with 6-Fam and Dabcyl at its ends, acts as a framework to create an assembled hetero-FRET system with the mTFP-PNA conjugate. Using fluorescence intensity, frequency domain lifetime measurements, and anisotropy measurements, the system was shown to produce FRET as indicated by decreased donor intensity, decreased donor lifetime, and increased donor anisotropy. Extension of the DNA scaffold allowed for the assembly of multiple mTFP-PNA constructs. Efficient formation of protein dimers and oligomers on the DNA-PNA frameworks could be shown, as visualized via size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Assembly of multiple proteins in a row induced homo-FRET for the mTFP-PNA's assembled on the DNA scaffolds. The oligonucleotide framework allows an induced and controllable assembly of proteins by fusing them to PNAs directed to align on DNA scaffolds.

  8. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified. PMID:24925085

  9. Microfluidic cell sorter for use in developing red fluorescent proteins with improved photostability.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lloyd M; Lubbeck, Jennifer L; Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E; Jimenez, Ralph

    2013-06-21

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic cytometer for mammalian cells that rapidly measures the irreversible photobleaching of red fluorescent proteins expressed within each cell and achieves high purity (>99%) selection of individual cells based on these measurements. The selection is achieved by using sub-millisecond timed control of a piezo-tilt mirror to steer a focused 1064-nm laser spot for optical gradient force switching following analysis of the fluorescence signals from passage of the cell through a series of 532-nm laser beams. In transit through each beam, the fluorescent proteins within the cell undergo conversion to dark states, but the microfluidic chip enables the cell to pass sufficiently slowly that recovery from reversible dark states occurs between beams, thereby enabling irreversible photobleaching to be quantified separately from the reversible dark-state conversion. The microfluidic platform achieves sorting of samples down to sub-millilitre volumes with minimal loss, wherein collected cells remain alive and can subsequently proliferate. The instrument provides a unique first tool for rapid selection of individual mammalian cells on the merits of photostability and is likely to form the basis of subsequent lab-on-a-chip platforms that combine photobleaching with other spectroscopic measurements for on-going research to develop advanced red fluorescent proteins by screening of genetic libraries. PMID:23636097

  10. New Environment-Sensitive Multichannel DNA Fluorescent Label for Investigation of the Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Barthes, Nicolas P. F.; Michel, Benoît Y.; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5′-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified. PMID:24925085

  11. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M−1cm−1, mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths. PMID:26648024

  12. MiniTn7-transposon delivery vectors for inducible or constitutive fluorescent protein expression in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N. P.; Gisler, Pascal; Drissner, David

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the generation and function of two sets of bacterial plasmids that harbor fluorescent genes encoding either blue, cyan, yellow or red fluorescent proteins. In the first set, protein expression is controlled by the strong and constitutive nptII promoter whereas in the second set, the strong tac promoter was chosen that underlies LacIq regulation. Furthermore, the plasmids are mobilizable, contain Tn7 transposons and a temperature-sensitive origin of replication. Using Escherichia coli S17-1 as donor strain, the plasmids allow fast and convenient Tn7-transposon delivery into many enterobacterial hosts, such as the here-used E. coli O157:H7. This procedure omits the need of preparing competent recipient cells and antibiotic resistances are only transiently conferred to the recipients. As the fluorescence proteins show little to no overlap in fluorescence emission, the constructs are well suited for the study of multicolored synthetic bacterial communities during biofilm production or in host colonization studies, e.g. of plant surfaces. Furthermore, tac promoter-reporter constructs allow the generation of so-called reproductive success reporters, which allow to estimate past doublings of bacterial individuals after introduction into environments, emphasizing the role of individual cells during colonization. PMID:27445318

  13. Fluorescent proteins as singlet oxygen photosensitizers: mechanistic studies in photodynamic inactivation of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-González, Rubén.; White, John H.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Agut, Montserrat; Nonell, Santi; Flors, Cristina

    2013-02-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) combines a photosensitizer, light and oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), mainly singlet oxygen (1O2), to photo-oxidize important biomolecules and induce cell death. aPDT is a promising alternative to standard antimicrobial strategies, but its mechanisms of action are not well understood. One of the reasons for that is the lack of control of the photosensitizing drugs location. Here we report the use of geneticallyencoded fluorescent proteins that are also 1O2 photosensitizers to address the latter issue. First, we have chosen the red fluorescent protein TagRFP as a photosensitizer, which unlike other fluorescent proteins such as KillerRed, is able to produce 1O2 but not other ROS. TagRFP photosensitizes 1O2 with a small, but not negligible, quantum yield. In addition, we have used miniSOG, a more efficient 1O2 photosensitizing fluorescent flavoprotein that has been recently engineered from phototropin 2. We have genetically incorporated these two photosensitizers into the cytosol of E. coli and demonstrated that intracellular 1O2 is sufficient to kill bacteria. Additional assays have provided further insight into the mechanism of cell death. Photodamage seems to occur primarily in the inner membrane, and extends to the outer membrane if the photosensitizer's efficiency is high enough. These observations are markedly different to those reported for external photosensitizers, suggesting that the site where 1O2 is primarily generated proves crucial for inflicting different types of cell damage.

  14. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  15. Molecular Dynamic Indicators of the Photoswitching Properties of Green Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Smyrnova, Daryna; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Michielssens, Servaas; Hofkens, Johan; Dedecker, Peter; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2015-09-10

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) are highly useful probes for a range of applications including diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy. It was previously shown that reversible photoswitching not only involves cis-trans isomerization and protonation-deprotonation of the chromophore but also results in a marked difference in β-barrel flexibility. In this work, we performed flexibility profiling and functional mode analysis (FMA) using molecular dynamics calculations to study how the flexibility of the RSFP β-barrel influences the photoswitching properties of several fluorescent proteins. We also used Partial Least-Squared (PLS) FMA to detect promising mutation sites for the modulation of photoswitching properties of RSFPs. Our results show that the flexibility of RSFP does depend on its state with a systematically higher flexibility in the dark state compared to the bright state. In particular our method highlights the importance of Val157 in Dronpa, which upon mutation yields a striking difference in the collective motions of the two mutants. Overall, we show that PLS-FMA yields information, complementary to static structures, that can guide the rational design of fluorescent proteins.

  16. Microfluidic cell sorter for use in developing red fluorescent proteins with improved photostability

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Lubbeck, Jennifer L.; Dean, Kevin M.; Palmer, Amy E.; Jimenez, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic cytometer for mammalian cells that rapidly measures the irreversible photobleaching of red fluorescent proteins expressed within each cell and achieves high purity (>99%) selection of individual cells based on these measurements. The selection is achieved by using sub-millisecond timed control of a piezo-tilt mirror to steer a focused 1064-nm laser spot for optical gradient force switching following analysis of the fluorescence signals from passage of the cell through a series of 532-nm laser beams. In transit through each beam, the fluorescent proteins within the cell undergo conversion to dark states, but the microfluidic chip enables the cell to pass sufficiently slowly that recovery from reversible dark states occurs between beams, thereby enabling irreversible photobleaching to be quantified separately from the reversible dark-state conversion. The microfluidic platform achieves sorting of samples down to sub-millilitre volumes with minimal loss, wherein collected cells remain alive and can subsequently proliferate. The instrument provides a unique first tool for rapid selection of individual mammalian cells on the merits of photostability and is likely to form the basis of subsequent lab-on-a-chip platforms that combine photobleaching with other spectroscopic measurements for on-going research to develop advanced red fluorescent proteins by screening of genetic libraries. PMID:23636097

  17. Multispectral opto-acoustic tomography of deep-seated fluorescent proteins in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razansky, Daniel; Distel, Martin; Vinegoni, Claudio; Ma, Rui; Perrimon, Norbert; Köster, Reinhard W.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescent proteins have become essential reporter molecules for studying life at the cellular and sub-cellular level, re-defining the ways in which we investigate biology. However, because of intense light scattering, most organisms and tissues remain inaccessible to current fluorescence microscopy techniques at depths beyond several hundred micrometres. We describe a multispectral opto-acoustic tomography technique capable of high-resolution visualization of fluorescent proteins deep within highly light-scattering living organisms. The method uses multiwavelength illumination over multiple projections combined with selective-plane opto-acoustic detection for artifact-free data collection. Accurate image reconstruction is enabled by making use of wavelength-dependent light propagation models in tissue. By performing whole-body imaging of two biologically important and optically diffuse model organisms, Drosophila melanogaster pupae and adult zebrafish, we demonstrate the facility to resolve tissue-specific expression of eGFP and mCherrry fluorescent proteins for precise morphological and functional observations in vivo.

  18. Red-edge excitation fluorescence measurements of several two-tryptophan-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Wasylewski, Z; Kołoczek, H; Waśniowska, A; Slizowska, K

    1992-05-15

    The dependence of the fluorescence emission maximum of the tryptophan residues in several two-tryptophan-containing proteins (horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, yeast 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, Staphylococcus aureus metalloprotease and bee venom phospholipase A2) on the excitation wavelengths has been studied. Using fluorescence-resolved spectroscopy, we have dissected the contributions of particular tryptophan residues located in different parts of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that dipolar structural relaxation can occur in the environment of tryptophan residues buried within protein molecules. The observed spectral shifts upon red-edge excitation of these residues can depend on temperature or ligand binding, as demonstrated in case of metalloprotease and alcohol dehydrogenase. No spectral shifts upon red-edge excitation have been observed for tryptophan residues totally exposed to the rapidly relaxing aqueous solvent.

  19. Monitoring Protein Interactions in Living Cells with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuansheng; Hays, Nicole M.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Davidson, Michael W.; Day, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is now routinely used for dynamic measurements of signaling events inside single living cells, such as monitoring changes in intracellular ions and detecting protein–protein interactions. Here, we describe the digital frequency domain FLIM data acquisition and analysis. We describe the methods necessary to calibrate the FLIM system and demonstrate how they are used to measure the quenched donor fluorescence lifetime that results from Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). We show how the “FRET-standard” fusion proteins are used to validate the FLIM system for FRET measurements. We then show how FLIM–FRET can be used to detect the dimerization of the basic leucine zipper (B Zip) domain of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α in the nuclei of living mouse pituitary cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail. PMID:22264545

  20. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore. PMID:23008753

  1. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-09-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore.

  2. Broadband photon pair generation in green fluorescent proteins through spontaneous four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Siyuan; Thomas, Abu; Corzo, Neil V.; Kumar, Prem; Huang, Yuping; Lee, Kim Fook

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies in quantum biology suggest that quantum mechanics help us to explore quantum processes in biological system. Here, we demonstrate generation of photon pairs through spontaneous four-wave mixing process in naturally occurring fluorescent proteins. We develop a general empirical method for analyzing the relative strength of nonlinear optical interaction processes in five different organic fluorophores. Our results indicate that the generation of photon pairs in green fluorescent proteins is subject to less background noises than in other fluorophores, leading to a coincidence-to-accidental ratio ~145. As such proteins can be genetically engineered and fused to many biological cells, our experiment enables a new platform for quantum information processing in a biological environment such as biomimetic quantum networks and quantum sensors.

  3. Broadband photon pair generation in green fluorescent proteins through spontaneous four-wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Siyuan; Thomas, Abu; Corzo, Neil V; Kumar, Prem; Huang, Yuping; Lee, Kim Fook

    2016-04-14

    Recent studies in quantum biology suggest that quantum mechanics help us to explore quantum processes in biological system. Here, we demonstrate generation of photon pairs through spontaneous four-wave mixing process in naturally occurring fluorescent proteins. We develop a general empirical method for analyzing the relative strength of nonlinear optical interaction processes in five different organic fluorophores. Our results indicate that the generation of photon pairs in green fluorescent proteins is subject to less background noises than in other fluorophores, leading to a coincidence-to-accidental ratio ~145. As such proteins can be genetically engineered and fused to many biological cells, our experiment enables a new platform for quantum information processing in a biological environment such as biomimetic quantum networks and quantum sensors.

  4. Broadband photon pair generation in green fluorescent proteins through spontaneous four-wave mixing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Siyuan; Thomas, Abu; Corzo, Neil V.; Kumar, Prem; Huang, Yuping; Lee, Kim Fook

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies in quantum biology suggest that quantum mechanics help us to explore quantum processes in biological system. Here, we demonstrate generation of photon pairs through spontaneous four-wave mixing process in naturally occurring fluorescent proteins. We develop a general empirical method for analyzing the relative strength of nonlinear optical interaction processes in five different organic fluorophores. Our results indicate that the generation of photon pairs in green fluorescent proteins is subject to less background noises than in other fluorophores, leading to a coincidence-to-accidental ratio ~145. As such proteins can be genetically engineered and fused to many biological cells, our experiment enables a new platform for quantum information processing in a biological environment such as biomimetic quantum networks and quantum sensors. PMID:27076032

  5. Toxicity detection using lysosomal enzymes, glycoamylase and thioredoxin fused with fluorescent protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Tu; Shin, Hwa-Yoon; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2015-11-20

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the simplest and a favorite eukaryotic system that contains lysosome and thus, is a suitable organism for monitoring some toxic effects in environmental pollution. In this study, S. cerevisiae was transformed with two recombinant plasmids. Sporulation-specific glycoamyla