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Sample records for fluorescent protein yfp

  1. Fluorescence energy transfer in the bi-fluorescent S-layer tandem fusion protein ECFP-SgsE-YFP.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Birgit; Steiner, Kerstin; Sleytr, Uwe B; Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2010-12-01

    This work reports for the first time on the fabrication of a bi-functional S-layer tandem fusion protein which is able to self-assemble on solid supports without losing its functionality. Two variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) were genetically combined with a self-assembly system having the remarkable opportunity to interact with each other and act as functional nanopatterning biocoating. The S-layer protein SgsE of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a was fused with the cyan ECFP donor protein at the SgsE N-terminus and with the yellow YFP acceptor protein at the C-terminus. The fluorescence energy transfer was studied with spectrofluorimetry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, whilst protein self-assembly (on silicon dioxide particles) and structural investigations were carried out with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of reassembled SgsE tandem protein was 20.0 ± 6.1% which is almost the same transfer efficiency shown in solution (19.6 ± 0.1%). This work shows that bi-fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins self-assemble on silica particles retaining their fluorescent properties. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Super-Resolution Imaging Conditions for enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) Demonstrated on DNA Origami Nanorulers.

    PubMed

    Jusuk, Ija; Vietz, Carolin; Raab, Mario; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-09-16

    Photostability is one of the crucial properties of a fluorophore which strongly influences the quality of single molecule-based super-resolution imaging. Enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) is one of the most widely used versions of fluorescent proteins in modern cell biology exhibiting fast intrinsic blinking and reversible photoactivation by UV light. Here, we developed an assay for studying photostabilization of single eYFP molecules with respect to fast blinking and demonstrated a 6-fold enhanced photostability of single eYFP molecules with a beneficial influence on the blinking kinetics under oxygen removal and addition of aliphatic thiols (dSTORM-buffer). Conjugation to single stranded DNA and immobilization via DNA hybridization on a DNA origami 12 helix bundle in aqueous solution allowed photophyiscal studies of eYFP at the single-molecule level and at close to physiological conditions. The benefit of improved photophysical properties for localization-based super-resolution microscopy is demonstrated and quantitatively characterized by imaging 12 helix bundle DNA origami nanorulers with binding sites at designed distances of 160 and 100 nm and by imaging microtubules in fixed mammalian Vero cells.

  3. Super-Resolution Imaging Conditions for enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) Demonstrated on DNA Origami Nanorulers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusuk, Ija; Vietz, Carolin; Raab, Mario; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-09-01

    Photostability is one of the crucial properties of a fluorophore which strongly influences the quality of single molecule-based super-resolution imaging. Enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) is one of the most widely used versions of fluorescent proteins in modern cell biology exhibiting fast intrinsic blinking and reversible photoactivation by UV light. Here, we developed an assay for studying photostabilization of single eYFP molecules with respect to fast blinking and demonstrated a 6-fold enhanced photostability of single eYFP molecules with a beneficial influence on the blinking kinetics under oxygen removal and addition of aliphatic thiols (dSTORM-buffer). Conjugation to single stranded DNA and immobilization via DNA hybridization on a DNA origami 12 helix bundle in aqueous solution allowed photophyiscal studies of eYFP at the single-molecule level and at close to physiological conditions. The benefit of improved photophysical properties for localization-based super-resolution microscopy is demonstrated and quantitatively characterized by imaging 12 helix bundle DNA origami nanorulers with binding sites at designed distances of 160 and 100 nm and by imaging microtubules in fixed mammalian Vero cells.

  4. Super-Resolution Imaging Conditions for enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) Demonstrated on DNA Origami Nanorulers

    PubMed Central

    Jusuk, Ija; Vietz, Carolin; Raab, Mario; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Photostability is one of the crucial properties of a fluorophore which strongly influences the quality of single molecule-based super-resolution imaging. Enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) is one of the most widely used versions of fluorescent proteins in modern cell biology exhibiting fast intrinsic blinking and reversible photoactivation by UV light. Here, we developed an assay for studying photostabilization of single eYFP molecules with respect to fast blinking and demonstrated a 6-fold enhanced photostability of single eYFP molecules with a beneficial influence on the blinking kinetics under oxygen removal and addition of aliphatic thiols (dSTORM-buffer). Conjugation to single stranded DNA and immobilization via DNA hybridization on a DNA origami 12 helix bundle in aqueous solution allowed photophyiscal studies of eYFP at the single-molecule level and at close to physiological conditions. The benefit of improved photophysical properties for localization-based super-resolution microscopy is demonstrated and quantitatively characterized by imaging 12 helix bundle DNA origami nanorulers with binding sites at designed distances of 160 and 100 nm and by imaging microtubules in fixed mammalian Vero cells. PMID:26373229

  5. Applicability of superfolder YFP bimolecular fluorescence complementation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ottmann, Corinna; Weyand, Michael; Wolf, Alexander; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Ottmann, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is a widely employed method to study protein-protein interactions in cells. As yet, this technique has not been used in vitro. To evaluate a possible application of BiFC in vitro, we constructed a 'superfolder split YFP' system where 15 mutations enhance expression of the fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and enable a native purification due to improved solubility. Here, we present the crystal structure of 'superfolder YFP', providing the structural basis for the enhanced folding and stability characteristics. Complementation between the two non-fluorescent YFP fragments fused to HRas and Raf1RBD or to 14-3-3 and PMA2-CT52 resulted in the constitution of the functional fluorophore. The in vivo BiFC with these protein interaction pairs was demonstrated in eukaryotic cell lines as well. Here, we present for the first time BiFC in vitro studies with natively purified superfolder YFP fusion proteins and show the potential and drawbacks of this method for analyzing protein-protein interactions.

  6. Mapping of fluorescent protein-expressing neurons and axon pathways in adult and developing Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Porrero, Cesar; Rubio-Garrido, Pablo; Avendaño, Carlos; Clascá, Francisco

    2010-07-23

    Transgenic mouse lines in which a fluorescent protein is constitutively expressed under the Thy1 gene promoter have become important models in cell biology and pathology studies of specific neuronal populations. As a result of positional insertion and/or copy number effects on the transgene, the populations expressing the fluorescent protein (eYFP+) vary markedly among the different mice lines. However, identification of the eYFP+ subpopulations has remained sketchy and fragmentary even for the most widely used lines such as Thy1-eYFP-H mice (Feng, G., Mellor, R.H., Bernstein, M., Keller-Peck, C., Nguyen, Q.T., Wallace, M., Nerbonne, J.M., Lichtman and J.W., Sanes. J.R. 2000. Imaging neuronal subsets in transgenic mice expressing multiple spectral variants of GFP. Neuron 28, 41-51). Here, we provide a comprehensive mapping of labeled cell types throughout the central nervous system in adult and postnatal (P0-P30) Thy1-eYFP-H mice. Cell type identification was based on somatodendritic morphology, axon trajectories, and, for cortical cells, retrograde labeling with Fast Blue to distinguish between subpopulations with different axonal targets. In the neocortex, eYFP+ cells are layers 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons, whose abundance and sublaminar distribution varies markedly between areas. Labeling is particularly prevalent in the corticospinal cells; as a result, the pyramidal pathway axons are conspicuously labeled down to the spinal cord. Large populations of hippocampal, subicular and amygdaloid projection neurons are eYFP+ as well. Additional eYFP+ cell groups are located in specific brainstem nuclei. Present results provide a comprehensive reference dataset for adult and developmental studies using the Thy1-eYFP-H mice strain, and show that this animal model may be particularly suitable for studies on the cell biology of corticospinal neurons. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Perchlorate transport and inhibition of the sodium iodide symporter measured with the yellow fluorescent protein variant YFP-H148Q/I152L

    SciTech Connect

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Bernardo, Julie di; Romeo, Giovanni; Rhoden, Kerry J.

    2010-03-15

    Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant that impairs thyroid function by interacting with the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), the transporter responsible for iodide uptake in the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is well known as a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport by NIS, and recent evidence demonstrates that NIS can also transport perchlorate. In this study, we evaluated the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variant YFP-H148Q/I152L, as a genetically encodable biosensor of intracellular perchlorate concentration monitored by real-time fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence of recombinant YFP-H148Q/I152L was suppressed by perchlorate and iodide with similar affinities of 1.2 mM and 1.6 mM, respectively. Perchlorate suppressed YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 thyroid cells and NIS-expressing COS-7 cells, but had no effect on COS-7 cells lacking NIS. Fluorescence changes in FRTL-5 cells were Na{sup +}-dependent, consistent with the Na{sup +}-dependence of NIS activity. Perchlorate uptake in FRTL-5 cells resulted in 10-fold lower intracellular concentrations than iodide uptake, and was characterized by a higher affinity (K{sub m} 4.6 muM for perchlorate and 34.8 muM for iodide) and lower maximal velocity (V{sub max} 6.8 muM/s for perchlorate and 39.5 muM/s for iodide). Perchlorate also prevented iodide-induced changes in YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 cells, with half-maximal inhibition occurring at 1.1-1.6 muM. In conclusion, YFP-H148Q/I152L detects perchlorate accumulation by thyroid and other NIS-expressing cells, and reveals differences in the kinetics of perchlorate versus iodide transport by NIS.

  8. Respective contribution of mitochondrial superoxide and pH to mitochondria-targeted circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (mt-cpYFP) flash activity.

    PubMed

    Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Gong, Guohua; Gerstner, Brent J; Ducreux, Sylvie; Yule, David I; Pouvreau, Sandrine; Wang, Xianhua; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Cheng, Heping; Dirksen, Robert T; Wang, Wang

    2013-04-12

    Superoxide flashes are transient bursts of superoxide production within the mitochondrial matrix that are detected using the superoxide-sensitive biosensor, mitochondria-targeted circularly permuted YFP (mt-cpYFP). However, due to the pH sensitivity of mt-cpYFP, flashes were suggested to reflect transient events of mitochondrial alkalinization. Here, we simultaneously monitored flashes with mt-cpYFP and mitochondrial pH with carboxy-SNARF-1. In intact cardiac myocytes and purified skeletal muscle mitochondria, robust mt-cpYFP flashes were accompanied by only a modest increase in SNARF-1 ratio (corresponding to a pH increase of <0.1), indicating that matrix alkalinization is minimal during an mt-cpYFP flash. Individual flashes were also accompanied by stepwise increases of MitoSOX signal and decreases of NADH autofluorescence, supporting the superoxide origin of mt-cpYFP flashes. Transient matrix alkalinization induced by NH4Cl only minimally influenced flash frequency and failed to alter flash amplitude. However, matrix acidification modulated superoxide flash frequency in a bimodal manner. Low concentrations of nigericin (< 100 nM) that resulted in a mild dissipation of the mitochondrial pH gradient increased flash frequency, whereas a maximal concentration of nigericin (5 μm) collapsed the pH gradient and abolished flash activity. These results indicate that mt-cpYFP flash events reflect a burst in electron transport chain-dependent superoxide production that is coincident with a modest increase in matrix pH. Furthermore, flash activity depends strongly on a combination of mitochondrial oxidation and pH gradient.

  9. Respective Contribution of Mitochondrial Superoxide and pH to Mitochondria-targeted Circularly Permuted Yellow Fluorescent Protein (mt-cpYFP) Flash Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Gong, Guohua; Gerstner, Brent J.; Ducreux, Sylvie; Yule, David I.; Pouvreau, Sandrine; Wang, Xianhua; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Cheng, Heping; Dirksen, Robert T.; Wang, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide flashes are transient bursts of superoxide production within the mitochondrial matrix that are detected using the superoxide-sensitive biosensor, mitochondria-targeted circularly permuted YFP (mt-cpYFP). However, due to the pH sensitivity of mt-cpYFP, flashes were suggested to reflect transient events of mitochondrial alkalinization. Here, we simultaneously monitored flashes with mt-cpYFP and mitochondrial pH with carboxy-SNARF-1. In intact cardiac myocytes and purified skeletal muscle mitochondria, robust mt-cpYFP flashes were accompanied by only a modest increase in SNARF-1 ratio (corresponding to a pH increase of <0.1), indicating that matrix alkalinization is minimal during an mt-cpYFP flash. Individual flashes were also accompanied by stepwise increases of MitoSOX signal and decreases of NADH autofluorescence, supporting the superoxide origin of mt-cpYFP flashes. Transient matrix alkalinization induced by NH4Cl only minimally influenced flash frequency and failed to alter flash amplitude. However, matrix acidification modulated superoxide flash frequency in a bimodal manner. Low concentrations of nigericin (< 100 nm) that resulted in a mild dissipation of the mitochondrial pH gradient increased flash frequency, whereas a maximal concentration of nigericin (5 μm) collapsed the pH gradient and abolished flash activity. These results indicate that mt-cpYFP flash events reflect a burst in electron transport chain-dependent superoxide production that is coincident with a modest increase in matrix pH. Furthermore, flash activity depends strongly on a combination of mitochondrial oxidation and pH gradient. PMID:23457298

  10. The yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-H) mouse reveals neuroprotection as a novel mechanism underlying Chondroitinase ABC-mediated repair following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lucy M.; Starkey, Michelle L.; Akrimi, Sonia F.; Davies, Meirion; McMahon, Stephen B.; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) represents a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury due to its potent effects on restoring function to spinal injured adult mammals. However, there is limited mechanistic insight as to the underlying effects of ChABC treatment, where the effects are mediated, and which signalling pathways are involved in ChABC-mediated repair. Here we utilise a transgenic (YFP-H) mouse to demonstrate that cortical layer V projection neurons undergo severe atrophy four weeks following thoracic dorsal column injury and that ChABC is neuroprotective for these neurons following ICV infusion. ChABC also prevented cell atrophy following localised delivery to the spinal cord, suggesting a possible retrograde neuroprotective effect mediated at the injury site. Furthermore, neuroprotection of corticospinal cell somata coincided with increased axonal sprouting in the spinal cord. In addition, Western blot analysis of a number of kinases important in survival and growth signalling revealed a significant increase in phosphorylated ERK1 at the spinal injury site following in vivo ChABC treatment, indicating that activated ERK may play a role in downstream repair processes following ChABC treatment. Total forms of PKC and AKT were also elevated, indicating that modification of the glial scar by ChABC promotes long-lasting signalling changes at the lesion site. Thus, using the YFP-H mouse as a novel tool to study degenerative changes and repair following spinal cord injury we demonstrate, for the first time, that ChABC treatment regulates multiple signalling cascades at the injury site and exerts protective effects on axotomised corticospinal projection neurons. PMID:19109493

  11. A cautionary note on the use of split-YFP/BiFC in plant protein-protein interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Horstman, Anneke; Tonaco, Isabella Antonia Nougalli; Boutilier, Kim; Immink, Richard G H

    2014-05-30

    Since its introduction in plants 10 years ago, the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method, or split-YFP (yellow fluorescent protein), has gained popularity within the plant biology field as a method to study protein-protein interactions. BiFC is based on the restoration of fluorescence after the two non-fluorescent halves of a fluorescent protein are brought together by a protein-protein interaction event. The major drawback of BiFC is that the fluorescent protein halves are prone to self-assembly independent of a protein-protein interaction event. To circumvent this problem, several modifications of the technique have been suggested, but these modifications have not lead to improvements in plant BiFC protocols. Therefore, it remains crucial to include appropriate internal controls. Our literature survey of recent BiFC studies in plants shows that most studies use inappropriate controls, and a qualitative rather than quantitative read-out of fluorescence. Therefore, we provide a cautionary note and beginner's guideline for the setup of BiFC experiments, discussing each step of the protocol, including vector choice, plant expression systems, negative controls, and signal detection. In addition, we present our experience with BiFC with respect to self-assembly, peptide linkers, and incubation temperature. With this note, we aim to provide a guideline that will improve the quality of plant BiFC experiments.

  12. Nonspecific labeling limits the utility of Cre-Lox bred CST-YFP mice for studies of corticospinal tract regeneration.

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Rafer; Steward, Oswald

    2015-12-15

    Studies of axon regeneration in the spinal cord often assess regeneration of the corticospinal tract (CST). Emx1-Cre x Thy1-STOP-YFP mice have been reported to have yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) selectively expressed in forebrain neurons leading to genetic labeling of CST axons in the spinal cord, and it was suggested that these CST-YFP mice would be useful for studies of CST regeneration. Because regeneration past a lesion may involve only a few axons, the presence of labeled non-CST axons compromises interpretation. We show here that in CST-YFP mice, some YFP-labeled axons are not from the CST. Specifically, YFP-labeled axons are present in regions beyond those with anterogradely labeled CST axons, most YFP-labeled axons beyond established CST locations do not undergo Wallerian degeneration following a large lesion of the sensorimotor cortex, some rubrospinal and reticulospinal neurons are labeled with YFP, and some YFP-labeled cells in the spinal gray matter have YFP-labeled projections into the spinal cord white matter. We further demonstrate that the density of YFP-labeled axon arbors hinders tracing of single axons to their point of origin in the main descending tracts. In light of recent advances in 3D imaging for visualizing axons in unsectioned blocks of spinal cord, we also assessed CST-YFP mice for 3D imaging and found that YFP fluorescence in CST-YFP mice is faint for clearing-based 3D imaging in comparison with fluorescence in Thy1-YFP-H mice and fluorescence of mini-ruby biotinylated dextran amine (BDA). Overall, the nonspecific and faint YFP labeling in CST-YFP mice limits their utility for assessments of CST axon regeneration.

  13. [Reabsorption of yellow fluorescent protein in the Rana temporaria kidney by receptor-mediated endocytosis].

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and the expression of the endocytic receptors, megalin and cubilin, were investigated in the renal proximal tubules (PT) in frogs Rana temporaria after parenteral YFP injections. The methods of confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used. The dynamics of YFP absorption was analyzed 2 h after injection. The logarithmic time dependence of the accumulation of YFP-containing endocytic vesicles in PT cells and the completion of absorption process 90-120 min after injection were shown. Unlike substantial megalin and cubilin expression 15-30 min after YFP introduction, immunolabeled endocytic receptors were not detected in PT cells after 2 h. The re-injection of YFP led to the appearance of apical endocytic vesicles containing megalin or cubilin colocalized with YFP. At the same time, the decrease of YFP uptake associated with reduction in the number of receptor-containing vesicles was demonstrated, suggesting a failure of megalin and cubilin expression. The decrease of absorption capacity of PT cells after YFP re-injection was similar to that found previously under conditions of the competitive absorption of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and YFP injected in different sequences. The data are the further demonstration of the proposed mechanism limiting the tubular protein absorption in the frog kidney and suggest the involvement of megalin and cubilin in uptake and vesicular transport of YFP.

  14. Evaluation of Injured Axons Using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in YFP-H Line Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Hideki; Oshima, Yusuke; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Matsuda, Seiji; Miura, Hiromasa; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of degeneration of injured axons is important for the development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. The aim of this study was to establish a method for time-lapse observation of injured axons in living animals after spinal cord contusion injury. YFP (yellow fluorescent protein)-H transgenic mice, which we used in this study, express fluorescence in their nerve fibers. Contusion damage to the spinal cord at the 11th vertebra was performed by IH (Infinite Horizon) impactor, which applied a pressure of 50 kdyn. The damaged spinal cords were re-exposed during the observation period under anesthesia, and then observed by two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, which can observe deep regions of tissues including spinal cord axons. No significant morphological change of injured axons was observed immediately after injury. Three days after injury, the number of axons decreased, and residual axons were fragmented. Seven days after injury, only fragments were present in the damaged tissue. No hind-limb movement was observed during the observation period after injury. Despite the immediate paresis of hind-limbs following the contusion injury, the morphological degeneration of injured axons was delayed. This method may help clarification of pathophysiology of axon degeneration and development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:26184175

  15. Engineering FRET constructs using CFP and YFP.

    PubMed

    Shimozono, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been used to develop genetically encoded fluorescent indicators for various cellular functions. Here we discuss how to engineer constructs for FRET between the cyan- and yellow-emitting variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria (CFP and YFP, respectively). Throughout this chapter, we stress the fact that FRET is highly sensitive to the relative orientation and distance between the donor and the acceptor. The chapter consists of two parts. First, we discuss FRET-based indicators encoded by single genes, which were developed in our laboratory. In this approach, a number of different constructs can be made for a comparative assessment of their FRET efficiencies. For example, the length and sequence of the linker between the fluorescent protein and the host protein should be optimized for each specific application. In the second part, we describe the use of long and flexible linkers for engineering FRET constructs, including an introduction to a general and efficient tool for making successful fusion proteins with long and flexible linkers. When CFP and YFP are fused through floppy linkers to two protein domains that interact with each other, the two fluorescent proteins will associate due to the weak dimerization propensity of Aequorea GFP, which results in moderate FRET. This approach has become even more powerful due to the construction of a new pair of fluorescent proteins for FRET: CyPet and YPet.

  16. Dependence of fluorescent protein brightness on protein concentration in solution and enhancement of it

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Takamitsu J.; Fujita, Hideaki; Kitamura, Akira; Horio, Takashi; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Kinjo, Masataka; Sasaki, Akira; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Ichimura, Taro; Imada, Katsumi; Nagai, Takeharu; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been widely used in biology because of their compatibility and varied applications in living specimens. Fluorescent proteins are often undesirably sensitive to intracellular conditions such as pH and ion concentration, generating considerable issues at times. However, harnessing these intrinsic sensitivities can help develop functional probes. In this study, we found that the fluorescence of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) depends on the protein concentration in the solution and that this dependence can be enhanced by adding a glycine residue in to the YFP; we applied this finding to construct an intracellular protein-crowding sensor. A Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair, involving a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) insensitive to protein concentration and a glycine-inserted YFP, works as a genetically encoded probe to evaluate intracellular crowding. By measuring the fluorescence of the present FRET probe, we were able to detect dynamic changes in protein crowding in living cells. PMID:26956628

  17. A Laboratory Exercise for Visible Gel Filtration Chromatography Using Fluorescent Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified,…

  18. A Laboratory Exercise for Visible Gel Filtration Chromatography Using Fluorescent Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified,…

  19. CD41-YFP mice allow in vivo labeling of megakaryocytic cells and reveal a subset of platelets hyperreactive to thrombin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghang; Varas, Florencio; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Heck, Susanne; Faust, Nicole; Graf, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Development of a mouse line permitting live imaging of cells expressing CD41/GpIIb as a means to study megakaryopoiesis. The gene encoding yellow fluorescent protein (eyfp) was inserted by homologous recombination into embryonic stem cells at the start site of the gpIIb locus. A knockin mouse line, designated CD41-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), was developed and was characterized by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Activity of YFP(+) platelets was determined by induction of P-selectin expression in response to thrombin stimulation. CD41-YFP mice contained YFP-labeled megakaryocytes and platelets, the proportions of which varied, depending on the genotype and individual animal, while lymphoid, myelomonocytic, and erythroid lineages were negative. In addition, a fraction of hematopoietic stem cells and intermediate progenitors expressed YFP at low levels. Crossing CD41-YFP mice with lysozyme green fluorescent protein and globin cyan fluorescent protein mice, followed by in vivo imaging of fetal liver, revealed megakaryocytic cells as a subset distinct from myeloid and erythroid cells. This experiment is also the first to show the distribution of three hematopoietic lineages in a minimally perturbed organ. Surprisingly, analysis of CD41-YFP platelets showed that the YFP(+) subset is more responsive to thrombin stimulation than the YFP(-) subset. Experiments aimed at determining the stability of the YFP(+) platelets showed that after lethal irradiation of CD41-YFP mice, the proportion of labeled platelets in the blood declines more rapidly than the bulk of the platelets. The newly developed mouse line should become useful not only for in vivo imaging experiments of megakaryocytes and platelets, but also for studies on platelet aging and function. Our irradiation experiments suggest that the YFP(+) platelets are enriched for newly made cells because YFP has a shorter half-life than platelets. Therefore, the finding that YFP(+) platelets are more responsive

  20. Besides neuro-imaging, the Thy1-YFP mouse could serve for visualizing experimental tumours, inflammation and wound-healing.

    PubMed

    Jósvay, Katalin; Winter, Zoltán; Katona, Róbert L; Pecze, László; Marton, Annamária; Buhala, Andrea; Szakonyi, Gerda; Oláh, Zoltán; Vizler, Csaba

    2014-10-27

    The B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-YFP)16Jrs/J transgenic mouse strain, widely used to study neuronal development and regeneration, expresses the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in the peripheral nerves and the central nervous system under the control of regulatory sequences of the Thy1 gene. The Thy1 (CD90) cell surface glycoprotein is present on many cell types besides neurons, and is known to be involved in cell adhesion, migration and signal transduction. We hypothesized that Thy1-activating conditions could probably activate the truncated Thy1 regulatory sequences used in the Thy1-YFP construct, resulting in YFP transgene expression outside the nervous system. We demonstrated that the stroma of subcutaneous tumours induced by the injection of 4T1 or MC26 carcinoma cells into BALB/c(Thy1-YFP) mice, carrying the same construct, indeed expressed the YFP transgene. In the tumour mass, the yellow-green fluorescent stromal cells were clearly distinguishable from 4T1 carcinoma cells stably transfected with red fluorescent protein. Local inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, as well as the experimental wound-healing milieu, also triggered YFP fluorescence in both the BALB/c(Thy1-YFP) and B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-YFP)16Jrs/J mice, pointing to eventual overlapping pathways of wound-healing, inflammation and tumour growth.

  1. Analysis of the spatial distribution of identical and two distinct virus populations differently labeled with cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins in coinfected plants.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsubasa; Sugawara, Tomohiko; Yamatsuta, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2007-10-01

    ABSTRACT Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) expressing yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins (ALSV-YFP and ALSV-CFP) was used to investigate the distribution of identical virus populations in coinfected plants. In Chenopodium quinoa plants inoculated with a mixture of ALSV-YFP and ALSV-CFP, fluorescence from YFP and CFP was always distributed separately in both inoculated and upper uninoculated leaves. Inoculation of each ALSV-YFP and ALSV-CFP to different leaves of a C. quinoa plant resulted in the separate distribution of each virus population among different upper leaves. When C. quinoa leaves were first inoculated with ALSV-CFP and then ALSV-YFP was reinoculated into the same leaves at various times after the first inoculation, ALSV-YFP infected only tissues where ALSV-CFP infection had not been established. The spatial separation was also found in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves coinoculated with Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV)-YFP and BYMV-CFP. In contrast, both YFP and CFP fluorescence signals were observed in the same tissues of N. benthamiana leaves mixed infected with ALSV-YFP and BYMV-CFP. YFP fluorescence from ALSV-YFP in mixed-infected leaves was brighter and longer than in leaves infected with ALSV-YFP singly.

  2. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Komatsubara, Akira T.; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002–0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  3. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-20

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

  4. Advances in fluorescent protein technology.

    PubMed

    Shaner, Nathan C; Patterson, George H; Davidson, Michael W

    2007-12-15

    Current fluorescent protein (FP) development strategies are focused on fine-tuning the photophysical properties of blue to yellow variants derived from the Aequorea victoria jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) and on the development of monomeric FPs from other organisms that emit in the yellow-orange to far-red regions of the visible light spectrum. Progress toward these goals has been substantial, and near-infrared emitting FPs may loom over the horizon. The latest efforts in jellyfish variants have resulted in new and improved monomeric BFP, CFP, GFP and YFP variants, and the relentless search for a bright, monomeric and fast-maturing red FP has yielded a host of excellent candidates, although none is yet optimal for all applications. Meanwhile, photoactivatable FPs are emerging as a powerful class of probes for intracellular dynamics and, unexpectedly, as useful tools for the development of superresolution microscopy applications.

  5. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations confirm that

  6. Thy1.2 YFP-16 Transgenic Mouse Labels a Subset of Large-Diameter Sensory Neurons that Lack TRPV1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E.; Wu, Kevin Y.; Thompson, Julie-Ann; Yang, Kiseok; Bahia, Parmvir K.; Ajmo, Joanne M.

    2015-01-01

    The Thy1.2 YFP-16 mouse expresses yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in specific subsets of peripheral and central neurons. The original characterization of this model suggested that YFP was expressed in all sensory neurons, and this model has been subsequently used to study sensory nerve structure and function. Here, we have characterized the expression of YFP in the sensory ganglia (DRG, trigeminal and vagal) of the Thy1.2 YFP-16 mouse, using biochemical, functional and anatomical analyses. Despite previous reports, we found that YFP was only expressed in approximately half of DRG and trigeminal neurons and less than 10% of vagal neurons. YFP-expression was only found in medium and large-diameter neurons that expressed neurofilament but not TRPV1. YFP-expressing neurons failed to respond to selective agonists for TRPV1, P2X2/3 and TRPM8 channels in Ca2+ imaging assays. Confocal analysis of glabrous skin, hairy skin of the back and ear and skeletal muscle indicated that YFP was expressed in some peripheral terminals with structures consistent with their presumed non-nociceptive nature. In summary, the Thy1.2 YFP-16 mouse expresses robust YFP expression in only a subset of sensory neurons. But this mouse model is not suitable for the study of nociceptive nerves or the function of such nerves in pain and neuropathies. PMID:25746468

  7. A laboratory exercise for visible gel filtration chromatography using fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified, and used in a laboratory exercise to intuitively demonstrate GFC. Different bands, corresponding to RFP, RFP-CFP (RC), YFP-RFP-YFP (YRY), and pyruvate kinase II-GFP (PKG) were well separated on a Superdex 200 column from a 0.5-mL sample. Increasing the sample volume and changing the chromatographic resin to Sephadex G-100 resulted in lower resolution separation. Students enjoyed identifying combinations of colored proteins and found this exercise helpful for understanding the factors that affect GFC resolution.

  8. Intermolecular charge transfer enhances two-photon absorption in yellow fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Friese, Daniel H; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-04-07

    We present a quantum chemical study of the two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), a mutant of the extensively studied green fluorescent protein. The aromatic chromophore of YFP has a π-stacking interaction with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine residue (Tyr203) in a parallel-displaced structure with a distance of about 3.4 Å. We study the TPA spectrum of the π-stacking system of YFP using the well-established Coulomb-attenuated B3LYP density functional (CAM-B3LYP) and the second-order approximate coupled-cluster model CC2. This work presents both the first comprehensive study of the two-photon absorption spectrum of YFP and the largest-scale coupled-cluster calculation of two-photon absorption that has ever been performed. We analyze the intermolecular charge-transfer (ICT) transitions in this stacked system and show that the ICT transitions are an important mechanism for enhancing the TPA cross sections in YFP. We investigate the distance dependence of the ICT transitions and show that their TPA cross sections are strongly dependent on the separation of the aromatic moieties. This provides a means for tuning the TPA properties of YFP and other structurally related fluorescent proteins through molecular engineering.

  9. Birbeck Granule-Like “Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum” Resulting from the Expression of a Cytoplasmic YFP-Tagged Langerin

    PubMed Central

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of “Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum” (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a “double-lock” mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations

  10. A new family of Drosophila balancer chromosomes with a w- dfd-GMR yellow fluorescent protein marker.

    PubMed

    Le, Tien; Liang, Zhiguo; Patel, Heeren; Yu, Marcus H; Sivasubramaniam, Gitanjali; Slovitt, Matthew; Tanentzapf, Guy; Mohanty, Nihar; Paul, Sarah M; Wu, Victoria M; Beitel, Greg J

    2006-12-01

    We report new w- fluorescent balancers scorable from stage 13 through adulthood that bear a nuclear-localized yellow fluorescent protein marker directly driven by dfd and GMR enhancer elements. The utility of this marker is enhanced by identification of an anti-GFP/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) serum that is compatible with heat fixation.

  11. A New Family of Drosophila Balancer Chromosomes With a w− dfd-GMR Yellow Fluorescent Protein Marker

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tien; Liang, Zhiguo; Patel, Heeren; Yu, Marcus H.; Sivasubramaniam, Gitanjali; Slovitt, Matthew; Tanentzapf, Guy; Mohanty, Nihar; Paul, Sarah M.; Wu, Victoria M.; Beitel, Greg J.

    2006-01-01

    We report new w− fluorescent balancers scorable from stage 13 through adulthood that bear a nuclear-localized yellow fluorescent protein marker directly driven by dfd and GMR enhancer elements. The utility of this marker is enhanced by identification of an anti-GFP/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) serum that is compatible with heat fixation. PMID:17057238

  12. Fluorescent protein senses and reports mechanical damage in glass-fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Makyła, Katarzyna; Müller, Christoph; Lörcher, Samuel; Winkler, Thomas; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Eder, Michaela; Bruns, Nico

    2013-05-21

    Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is used as a mechanoresponsive layer at the fiber/resin interface in glass-fiber-reinforced composites. The protein loses its fluorescence when subjected to mechanical stress. Within the material, it reports interfacial shear debonding and barely visible impact damage by a transition from a fluorescent to a non-fluorescent state. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. An eYFP reporter gene for the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Damon, Coralie; Boxus, Mathieu; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Portetelle, Daniel; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2013-02-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system is a powerful tool for detecting binary protein interactions, widely used in large-scale interactome mapping. We modified two yeast strains commonly used in yeast two-hybrid experiments by integrating into their genomes a new reporter gene encoding the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein eYFP. The suitability of this reporter gene for interaction screening was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. The gene shows good potential as a two-hybrid reporter gene for detecting strong interactions. Gal4 transcriptional activation gives rise to sufficient fluorescence for detection with a flow cytometer, but the eYFP reporter is not sensitive enough for detecting weak or moderate interactions. This study highlights the advantages of a fluorescent reporter gene in yeast two-hybrid screening.

  14. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Katie J.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Huang, Xia; Qian, Pu; Dilbeck, Preston; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hitchcock, Andrew; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Yuen, Jonathan M.; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Leggett, Graham J.; Holten, Dewey; Kirmaier, Christine; Neil Hunter, C.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of whole cells and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of purified RC/YFP complexes show that the YFP-RC intermolecular distance and spectral overlap between the emission of YFP and the visible-region (QX) absorption bands of the RC allow energy transfer via a Förster mechanism, with an efficiency of 40+/-10%. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing spectral coverage for harvesting light using non-native genetically-encoded light-absorbers, thereby augmenting energy transfer and trapping in photosynthesis.

  15. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Katie J; Faries, Kaitlyn M; Huang, Xia; Qian, Pu; Dilbeck, Preston; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hitchcock, Andrew; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Yuen, Jonathan M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Leggett, Graham J; Holten, Dewey; Kirmaier, Christine; Neil Hunter, C

    2017-01-05

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of whole cells and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of purified RC/YFP complexes show that the YFP-RC intermolecular distance and spectral overlap between the emission of YFP and the visible-region (QX) absorption bands of the RC allow energy transfer via a Förster mechanism, with an efficiency of 40±10%. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing spectral coverage for harvesting light using non-native genetically-encoded light-absorbers, thereby augmenting energy transfer and trapping in photosynthesis.

  16. Fluorescent tagging of herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP13/14 in virus infection.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Elliott, G

    2001-03-01

    The cellular site of herpesvirus tegument assembly has yet to be defined. We have previously used a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged tegument protein, namely VP22, to show that VP22 is localized exclusively to the cytoplasm during infection. Here we have constructed a similar virus expressing another fluorescent tegument protein, YFP-VP13/14, and have visualized the intracellular localization of this second tegument protein in live infected cells. In contrast to VP22, VP13/14 is targeted predominantly to the nuclei of infected cells at both early and late times in infection. More specifically, YFP-13/14 localizes initially to the nuclear replication compartments and then progresses into intense punctate domains that appear at around 12 h postinfection. At even later times this intranuclear punctate fluorescence is gradually replaced by perinuclear micropunctate and membranous fluorescence. While the vast majority of YFP-13/14 seems to be targeted to the nucleus, a minor subpopulation also appears in a vesicular pattern in the cytoplasm that closely resembles the pattern previously observed for GFP-22. Moreover, at late times weak fluorescence appears at the cell periphery and in extracellular virus particles, confirming that YFP-13/14 is assembled into virions. This predominantly nuclear targeting of YFP-13/14 together with the cytoplasmic targeting of VP22 may imply that there are multiple sites of tegument protein incorporation along the virus maturation pathway. Thus, our YFP-13/14-expressing virus has revealed the complexity of the intracellular targeting of VP13/14 and provides a novel insight into the mechanism of tegument, and hence virus, assembly.

  17. Functional YFP-tagging of the essential GDP-mannose transporter reveals an important role for the secretion related small GTPase SrgC protein in maintenance of Golgi bodies in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Neuza D S P; Arentshorst, Mark; Weenink, Xavier O; Punt, Peter J; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2011-03-01

    The addition of mannose residues to glycoproteins and glycolipids in the Golgi is carried out by mannosyltransferases. Their activity depends on the presence of GDP-mannose in the lumen of the Golgi. The transport of GDP-mannose (mannosyl donor) into the Golgi requires a specific nucleotide sugar transport present in the Golgi membrane. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the putative GDP-mannose transporter in Aspergillus niger, encoded by the gmtA gene (An17g02140). The single GDP-mannose transporter was identified in the A. niger genome and deletion analysis showed that gmtA is an essential gene. The lethal phenotype of the gmtA could be fully complemented by expressing an YFP-GmtA fusion protein from the endogenous gmtA promoter. Fluorescence studies revealed that, as in other fungal species, GmtA localized as punctate dots throughout the hyphal cytoplasm, representing Golgi bodies or Golgi equivalents. SrgC encodes a member of the Rab6/Ypt6 subfamily of secretion-related GTPases and is predicted to be required for the Golgi to vacuole transport. Loss of function of the srgC gene in A. niger resulted in strongly reduced growth and the inability to form conidiospores at 37°C and higher. Furthermore, the srgC disruption in the A. niger strain expressing the functional YFP-GmtA fusion protein led to an apparent 'disappearance' of the Golgi-like structures. The analysis suggests that SrgC has an important role in maintaining the integrity of Golgi-like structures in A. niger.

  18. Detection of protein-protein interactions in plants using bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Bracha-Drori, Keren; Shichrur, Keren; Katz, Aviva; Oliva, Moran; Angelovici, Ruthie; Yalovsky, Shaul; Ohad, Nir

    2004-11-01

    Protein function is often mediated via formation of stable or transient complexes. Here we report the determination of protein-protein interactions in plants using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). The yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) was split into two non-overlapping N-terminal (YN) and C-terminal (YC) fragments. Each fragment was cloned in-frame to a gene of interest, enabling expression of fusion proteins. To demonstrate the feasibility of BiFC in plants, two pairs of interacting proteins were utilized: (i) the alpha and beta subunits of the Arabidopsis protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), and (ii) the polycomb proteins, FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) and MEDEA (MEA). Members of each protein pair were transiently co-expressed in leaf epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis. Reconstitution of a fluorescing YFP chromophore occurred only when the inquest proteins interacted. No fluorescence was detected following co-expression of free non-fused YN and YC or non-interacting protein pairs. Yellow fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm of cells that expressed PFT alpha and beta subunits, or in nuclei and cytoplasm of cells that expressed FIE and MEA. In vivo measurements of fluorescence spectra emitted from reconstituted YFPs were identical to that of a non-split YFP, confirming reconstitution of the chromophore. Expression of the inquest proteins was verified by immunoblot analysis using monoclonal antibodies directed against tags within the hybrid proteins. In addition, protein interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitations. These results demonstrate that plant BiFC is a simple, reliable and relatively fast method for determining protein-protein interactions in plants.

  19. Chimeric Autofluorescent Proteins as Photophysical Model System for Multicolor Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sébastien; Oven-Krockhaus, Sven Zur; Veerabagu, Manikandan; Rodado, Virtudes Mira; Berendzen, Kenneth W; Meixner, Alfred J; Harter, Klaus; Schleifenbaum, Frank E

    2017-03-10

    The yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is frequently used in a protein complementation assay called bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and is employed to visualize protein-protein interactions. In this analysis, two different, nonfluorescent fragments of YFP are genetically attached to proteins of interest. Upon interaction of these proteins, the YFP fragments are brought into proximity close enough to reconstitute their original structure, enabling fluorescence. BiFC allows for a straightforward readout of protein-protein interactions and furthermore facilitates their functional investigation by in vivo imaging. Furthermore, it has been observed that the available color range in BiFC can be extended upon complementing fragments of different proteins that are, like YFP, derived from the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein, thereby allowing for a multiplexed investigation of protein-protein interactions. Some spectral characteristics of "multicolor" BiFC (mcBiFC) complexes have been reported before; however, no in-depth analysis has been performed yet. Therefore, little is known about the photophysical characteristics of these mcBiFC complexes because a proper characterization essentially relies on in vitro data. This is particularly difficult for fragments of autofluorescent proteins (AFPs) because they show a very strong tendency to form supramolecular aggregates which precipitate ex vivo. In this study, this intrinsic difficulty is overcome by directly fusing the coding DNA of different AFP fragments. Translation of the genetic sequence in Escherichia coli leads to fully functional, highly soluble fluorescent proteins with distinct properties. On the basis of their construction, they are designated chimeric AFPs, or BiFC chimeras, here. Comparison of their spectral characteristics with experimental in vivo BiFC data confirmed the utility of the chimeric proteins as a BiFC model system. In this study, nine different chimeras were thoroughly

  20. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION ANALYSIS OF INDUCIBLE PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS OF FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN FOLDING ON FLUORESCENT PROTEIN FRAGMENT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Robida, Aaron M; Kerppola, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables visualization of the subcellular locations of protein interactions in living cells. We investigated the temporal resolution and the quantitative accuracy of BiFC analysis using fragments of different fluorescent proteins. We determined the kinetics of BiFC complex formation in response to the rapamycin-inducible interaction between the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB). Fragments of YFP fused to FKBP and FRB produced detectable BiFC complex fluorescence 10 minutes after rapamycin addition and a ten-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity in 8 hours. The N-terminal fragment of the Venus fluorescent protein fused to FKBP produced constitutive BiFC complexes with several C-terminal fragments fused to FRB. A chimeric N-terminal fragment containing residues from Venus and YFP produced either constitutive or inducible BiFC complexes depending on the temperature at which the cells were cultured. The concentrations of inducers required for half-maximal induction of BiFC complex formation by all fluorescent protein fragments tested were consistent with the affinities of the inducers for unmodified FKBP and FRB. Treatment of the FK506 inhibitor of FKBP-FRB interaction prevented the formation of BiFC complexes by FKBP and FRB fusions, but did not disrupt existing BiFC complexes. Proteins synthesized prior to rapamycin addition formed BiFC complexes with the same efficiency as newly synthesized proteins. Inhibitors of protein synthesis attenuated BiFC complex formation independent of their effects on fusion protein synthesis. The kinetics at which they inhibited BiFC complex formation suggest that they prevented association of the fluorescent protein fragments, but not the slow maturation of BiFC complex fluorescence. Agents that induce the unfolded protein response also reduced formation of BiFC complexes. The effects of these agents were suppressed by cellular

  1. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre

    DOE PAGES

    Grayson, Katie J.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Huang, Xia; ...

    2017-01-05

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of whole cells and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of purified RC/YFP complexes show that the YFP–RC intermolecular distance and spectral overlap between the emission of YFP and the visible-region (QX)more » absorption bands of the RC allow energy transfer via a Fo¨rster mechanism, with an efficiency of 40±10%. Finally, this proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing spectral coverage for harvesting light using non-native genetically-encoded light-absorbers, thereby augmenting energy transfer and trapping in photosynthesis.« less

  2. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Katie J.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Huang, Xia; Qian, Pu; Dilbeck, Preston; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hitchcock, Andrew; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Yuen, Jonathan M.; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Leggett, Graham J.; Holten, Dewey; Kirmaier, Christine; Neil Hunter, C.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of whole cells and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of purified RC/YFP complexes show that the YFP–RC intermolecular distance and spectral overlap between the emission of YFP and the visible-region (QX) absorption bands of the RC allow energy transfer via a Förster mechanism, with an efficiency of 40±10%. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing spectral coverage for harvesting light using non-native genetically-encoded light-absorbers, thereby augmenting energy transfer and trapping in photosynthesis. PMID:28054547

  3. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  4. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. π -Stacking interactions in YFP, quantum mechanics and force field evaluations in the S0 and S1 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabti, Karim Elhadj; Azizi, Sihem; Ridard, Jacqueline; Lévy, Bernard; Demachy, Isabelle

    2017-08-01

    We study the π -stacking interaction between the chromophore and Tyr203 in the Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP) in order to (i) evaluate the contribution of the internal interaction energy of the isolated Chromophore-Tyrosine complex (Eint) to the 26 nm red shift observed from GFP to YFP, (ii) compare the effects of Eint and of the proteic environment. To that end, we perform quantum mechanical and force field (ff) calculations of the isolated complex in S0 and S1 states on a large sample of geometries, together with molecular dynamics simulations and potential of mean force analysis. The calculated absorption wavelengths are found red shifted with respect to the isolated chromophore by 12-19 nm, that represents a large part of the GFP-YFP shift. We find that the effect of the protein is determinant on the dynamics of the complex while the error that results from using a classicalff is of limited effect.

  7. Applying bimolecular fluorescence complementation to screen and purify aquaporin protein:protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sjöhamn, Jennie; Båth, Petra; Neutze, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protein:protein interactions play key functional roles in the molecular machinery of the cell. A major challenge for structural biology is to gain high‐resolution structural insight into how membrane protein function is regulated by protein:protein interactions. To this end we present a method to express, detect, and purify stable membrane protein complexes that are suitable for further structural characterization. Our approach utilizes bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), whereby each protein of an interaction pair is fused to nonfluorescent fragments of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) that combine and mature as the complex is formed. YFP thus facilitates the visualization of protein:protein interactions in vivo, stabilizes the assembled complex, and provides a fluorescent marker during purification. This technique is validated by observing the formation of stable homotetramers of human aquaporin 0 (AQP0). The method's broader applicability is demonstrated by visualizing the interactions of AQP0 and human aquaporin 1 (AQP1) with the cytoplasmic regulatory protein calmodulin (CaM). The dependence of the AQP0‐CaM complex on the AQP0 C‐terminus is also demonstrated since the C‐terminal truncated construct provides a negative control. This screening approach may therefore facilitate the production and purification of membrane protein:protein complexes for later structural studies by X‐ray crystallography or single particle electron microscopy. PMID:27643892

  8. A fluorimetry-based ssYFP secretion assay to monitor vasopressin-induced exocytosis in LLC-PK1 cells expressing aquaporin-2

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Hasler, Udo; McKee, Mary; Lu, Hua A. J.; Bouley, Richard; Brown, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP)-induced exocytosis was dissected in native and aquaporin-2 (AQP2)-expressing renal LLC-PK1 cells by a fluorimetric exocytosis assay based on soluble secreted yellow fluorescent protein (ssYFP). YFP was targeted to the secretory pathway by addition of an 18-amino acid signal peptide from hen egg white lysozyme. Immunofluorescence labeling, together with analysis of Alexa 555-dextran internalization, revealed that ssYFP is exclusively located in the secretory pathway. Immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy showed significant colocalization of ssYFP and AQP2. Fluorimetry and Western blot analysis demonstrated similar constitutive ssYFP secretion in native LLC-PK1 and AQP2-expressing cells. In AQP2-expressing cells, a twofold increase in ssYFP secretion was observed within 15 min of VP stimulation. This transient burst of ssYFP secretion was abolished by the PKA inhibitor H-89 and was not observed in native cells. The endocytotic inhibitor methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which also promotes membrane accumulation of AQP2, had no effect on ssYFP secretion. Although cells expressing phosphorylation-deficient AQP2-S256A showed significantly lower baseline levels of constitutive secretion, VP induced a significant increase in exocytosis. Our data indicate that 1) this assay can monitor exocytosis in cultured epithelial cells, 2) VP has an acute stimulatory effect on ssYFP secretion in AQP2-expressing, but not native, cells, and 3) phosphorylation of AQP2 at S256 may be involved in the regulation of constitutive AQP2 exocytosis and play only a minor role in the VP-induced burst. These results support the idea that, in addition to its role in reducing AQP2 endocytosis, VP increases AQP2 exocytosis. PMID:18799651

  9. An engineered monomeric Zoanthus sp. yellow fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Hiofan; Howe, Elizabeth S; Ding, Yidan; Zhang, Wei; Baird, Michelle A; Sell, Brittney R; Allen, John R; Davidson, Michael W; Campbell, Robert E

    2013-10-24

    Protein engineering has created a palette of monomeric fluorescent proteins (FPs), but there remains an ~30 nm spectral gap between the most red-shifted useful Aequorea victoria green FP (GFP) variants and the most blue-shifted useful Discosoma sp. red FP (RFP) variants. To fill this gap, we have engineered a monomeric version of the yellow FP (YFP) from Zoanthus sp. coral. Our preferred variant, designated as mPapaya1, displays excellent fluorescent brightness, good photostability, and retains its monomeric character both in vitro and in living cells in the context of protein chimeras. We demonstrate that mPapaya1 can serve as a good Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor when paired with an mTFP1 donor. mPapaya1 is a valuable addition to the palette of FP variants that are useful for multicolor imaging and FRET-based biosensing.

  10. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z. Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Lukyanov, Sergey; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λ{sub em}{sup max} ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  11. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression.

  12. Fluorescent Protein Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, C. S.; McEntegart, M. G.; Nairn, R. C.

    1958-01-01

    With the object of simplifying the fluorescent protein tracer technique, the following fluorochromes were examined as possible alternatives to fluorescein: aminoeosin, aminorhodamine B, 3-phenyl-7-isocyanatocumarin (Geigy), 5-β-carboxyethylaminoacridine, R 4388 (Geigy), fluolite C (I.C.I.), lissamine flavine FFS (I.C.I.), lissamine rhodamine GS (I.C.I.), and lissamine rhodamine B 200 (I.C.I.) (RB 200). With the exception of RB 200, none was suitable as a protein label largely because of unsatisfactory fluorescence intensity or colour. RB 200 has proved a successful alternative to fluorescein. The conjugation of dye to protein by a sulphonamido linkage is quick and simple and does not materially affect the physico-chemical or biological properties of the protein. The resulting conjugates are stable, have a brilliant orange fluorescence in ultraviolet light and good contrast with tissue autofluorescence. The contrast is sufficient to permit the use in microscopy of ultraviolet plus blue light with a yellow filter above the object to ensure a black background; fluorescence is greatly enhanced in this way. When injected intravenously into rats or rabbits, conjugates are distributed in the tissues and eliminated from the plasma in much the same way as proteins labelled with fluorescein or radio-active isotopes. Serum antibody conjugated with RB 200 retains immunological specificity as demonstrated by the staining of the corresponding antigen. Practical use has been made of RB 200 conjugates as plasma tracers and as specific immunological stains: they have been applied alone and in combination with fluorescein conjugates in double tracing experiments. ImagesFIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9 PMID:13610415

  13. Engineering color variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for thermostability, pH-sensitivity, and improved folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Aliye, Naser; Fabbretti, Attilio; Lupidi, Giulio; Tsekoa, Tsepo; Spurio, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    A number of studies have been conducted to improve chromophore maturation, folding kinetics, thermostability, and other traits of green fluorescent protein (GFP). However, no specific work aimed at improving the thermostability of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and of the pH-sensitive, yet thermostable color variants of GFP has so far been done. The protein variants reported in this study were improved through rational multiple site-directed mutagenesis of GFP (ASV) by introducing up to ten point mutations including the mutations near and at the chromophore region. Therefore, we report the development and characterization of fast folder and thermo-tolerant green variant (FF-GFP), and a fast folder thermostable yellow fluorescent protein (FFTS-YFP) endowed with remarkably improved thermostability and folding kinetics. We demonstrate that the fluorescence intensity of this yellow variant is not affected by heating at 75 °C. Moreover, we have developed a pH-unresponsive cyan variant AcS-CFP, which has potential use as part of in vivo imaging irrespective of intracellular pH. The combined improved properties make these fluorescent variants ideal tools to study protein expression and function under different pH environments, in mesophiles and thermophiles. Furthermore, coupling of the FFTS-YFP and AcS-CFP could potentially serve as an ideal tool to perform functional analysis of live cells by multicolor labeling.

  14. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered. PMID:21714025

  15. Green fluorescent protein: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Remington, S James

    2011-09-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994-2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered.

  16. A Genetically-Encoded YFP Sensor with Enhanced Chloride Sensitivity, Photostability and Reduced pH Interference Demonstrates Augmented Transmembrane Chloride Movement by Gerbil Prestin (SLC26a5)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Sheng; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Chloride is the major anion in cells, with many diseases arising from disordered Cl− regulation. For the non-invasive investigation of Cl− flux, YFP-H148Q and its derivatives chameleon and Cl-Sensor previously were introduced as genetically encoded chloride indicators. Neither the Cl− sensitivity nor the pH-susceptibility of these modifications to YFP is optimal for precise measurements of Cl− under physiological conditions. Furthermore, the relatively poor photostability of YFP derivatives hinders their application for dynamic and quantitative Cl− measurements. Dynamic and accurate measurement of physiological concentrations of chloride would significantly affect our ability to study effects of chloride on cellular events. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we developed a series of YFP derivatives to remove pH interference, increase photostability and enhance chloride sensitivity. The final product, EYFP-F46L/Q69K/H148Q/I152L/V163S/S175G/S205V/A206K (monomeric Cl-YFP), has a chloride Kd of 14 mM and pKa of 5.9. The bleach time constant of 175 seconds is over 15-fold greater than wild-type EYFP. We have used the sensor fused to the transmembrane protein prestin (gerbil prestin, SLC26a5), and shown for the first time physiological (mM) chloride flux in HEK cells expressing this protein. This modified fluorescent protein will facilitate investigations of dynamics of chloride ions and their mediation of cell function. Conclusions Modifications to YFP (EYFP-F46L/Q69K/H148Q/I152L/V163S/S175G/S205V/A206K (monomeric Cl-YFP) results in a photostable fluorescent protein that allows measurement of physiological changes in chloride concentration while remaining minimally affected by changes in pH. PMID:24901231

  17. Plasmon-enhanced emission from single fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donehue, Jessica E.; Haas, Beth L.; Wertz, Esther; Talicska, Courtney N.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we use evaporated gold nanoparticle films (GNPFs) as substrates for plasmon-enhanced imaging of two fluorescent proteins (FPs): mCherry and YFP. Through single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy, we show enhancement of single FP emission in the presence of GNPFs. The gold-coupled FPs demonstrate emission up to four times brighter and seven times longer lived, yielding order-of-magnitude enhancements in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracies for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, we introduce preliminary results for enhancement of mCherry-labeled TcpP membrane proteins inside live Vibrio cholerae cells coupled to GNPFs. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  18. Dimerization between aequorea fluorescent proteins does not affect interaction between tagged estrogen receptors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Eric M; Guerbadot, Martin; Schaufele, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) detection of protein interaction in living cells is commonly measured following the expression of interacting proteins genetically fused to the cyan (CFP) and yellow (YFP) derivatives of the Aequorea victoria fluorescent protein (FP). These FPs can dimerize at mM concentrations, which may introduce artifacts into the measurement of interaction between proteins that are fused with the FPs. Here, FRET analysis of the interaction between estrogen receptors (alpha isoform, ERalpha) labeled with "wild-type" CFP and YFP is compared with that of ERalpha labeled with "monomeric" A206K mutants of CFP and YFP. The intracellular equilibrium dissociation constant for the hormone-induced ERalpha-ERalpha interaction is similar for ERalpha labeled with wild-type or monomeric FPs. However, the measurement of energy transfer measured for ERalpha-ERalpha interaction in each cell is less consistent with the monomeric FPs. Thus, dimerization of the FPs does not affect the kinetics of ERalpha-ERalpha interaction but, when brought close together via ERalpha-ERalpha interaction, FP dimerization modestly improves FRET measurement.

  19. Functional expression and FRET analysis of green fluorescent proteins fused to G-protein subunits in rat sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2001-01-01

    cDNA constructs coding for a yellow-emitting green fluorescent protein (GFP) mutant fused to the N-terminus of the G-protein subunit β1 (YFP-β1) and a cyan-emitting GFP mutant fused to the N-terminus of the G-protein subunit γ2 (CFP-γ2) were heterologously expressed in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons following intranuclear injection of the tagged subunits. The ability of the tagged subunits to modulate effectors, form a heterotrimer and couple to receptors was characterized using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) was also measured to determine the protein-protein interaction between the two fusion proteins. Similar to co-expression of untagged β1/γ2, co-expression of YFP-β1/γ2, β1/CFP-γ2, or YFP-β1/CFP-γ2 resulted in a significant increase in basal N-type Ca2+ channel facilitation when compared to uninjected neurons. Furthermore, the noradrenaline (NA)-mediated inhibition of Ca2+ channels was significantly attenuated. Co-expression of YFP-β1/CFP-γ2 with G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK1 and GIRK4) resulted in tonic GIRK currents that were blocked by Ba2+. The ability of the tagged subunits to form heterotrimers was tested by co-injecting either tagged or untagged Gβ1 and Gγ2 with excess GαoA cDNA. Under these conditions, the NA-mediated Ca2+ current inhibition was significantly decreased when compared to uninjected neurons. Coupling to the α2-adrenergic receptor was reconstituted in neurons expressing pertussis toxin (PTX)-insensitive GαoA and either tagged or untagged Gβ1γ2 subunits. Application of NA to PTX-treated cells resulted in a voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type Ca2+ currents. FRET measurements in the SCG revealed an in vivo interaction between YFP-β1 and CFP-γ2. Co-expression of untagged β1 significantly decreased the interaction between the two fusion proteins. In summary, the attachment of GFP mutants to the N-terminus of Gβ1 or Gγ2 does not

  20. Imaging individual green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Daniel W.; Hom-Booher, Nora; Vale, Ronald D.

    1997-07-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy techniques have allowed the video-time imaging of single molecules of fluorescent dyes covalently bound to proteins in aqueous environments. However, the techniques have not been exploited fully because proteins can be difficult to label, and dye modification may cause partial or complete loss of activity. These difficulties could be circumvented by fusing proteins to green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. Here we report that single S65T mutant GFP molecules can be imaged using total internal reflection microscopy, and that ATP-driven movement of an individual kinesin molecule (a microtubule motor protein) fused to GFP can be readily observed.

  1. Yellow Fluorescent Protein-Based Assay to Measure GABAA Channel Activation and Allosteric Modulation in CHO-K1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Teres; Norris, Tyrrell; Peilot-Sjögren, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) ion channels are important drug targets for treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Finding GABAA channel subtype selective allosteric modulators could lead to new improved treatments. However, the progress in this area has been obstructed by the challenging task of developing functional assays to support screening efforts and the generation of cells expressing functional GABAA ion channels with the desired subtype composition. To address these challenges, we developed a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based assay to be able to study allosteric modulation of the GABAA ion channel using cryopreserved, transiently transfected, assay-ready cells. We show for the first time how the MaxCyte STX electroporation instrument can be used to generate CHO-K1 cells expressing functional GABAA α2β3γ2 along with a halide sensing YFP-H148Q/I152L (YFP-GABAA2 cells). As a basis for a cell-based assay capable of detecting allosteric modulators, experiments with antagonist, ion channel blocker and modulators were used to verify GABAA subunit composition and functionality. We found that the I− concentration used in the YFP assay affected both basal quench of YFP and potency of GABA. For the first time the assay was used to study modulation of GABA with 7 known modulators where statistical analysis showed that the assay can distinguish modulatory pEC50 differences of 0.15. In conclusion, the YFP assay proved to be a robust, reproducible and inexpensive assay. These data provide evidence that the assay is suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) and could be used to discover novel modulators acting on GABAA ion channels. PMID:23516634

  2. Searching the fluorescent protein color palette for new FRET pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelwood, Kristin L.; Ramko, Ericka B.; Ozarowska, Anna P.; Olenych, Scott G.; Worthy, Patrice N.; Guan, Amy; Murphy, Christopher S.; Davidson, Michael W.

    2008-02-01

    One of the most promising imaging techniques for monitoring dynamic protein interactions in living cells with optical microscopy, universally referred to as FRET, employs the non-radiative transfer of energy between two closely adjacent spectrally active molecules, often fluorescent proteins. The use of FRET in cell biology has expanded to such a degree that hundreds of papers are now published each year using biosensors to monitor a wide spectrum of intracellular processes. Most of these sensors sandwich an environmentally active peptide between cyan and yellow fluorescent protein (CFP and YFP) derivatives to assay variables such as pH, calcium ion concentration, enzyme activity, or membrane potential. The availability of these sensitive indicators is growing rapidly, but many are hampered by a low dynamic range that often is only marginally detectable over the system noise. Furthermore, extended periods of excitation at wavelengths below 500 nm have the potential to induce phototoxic effects that can mask or alter the biological events under observation. Recent success in expanding the fluorescent protein color palette offers the opportunity to explore new FRET partners that may be suitable for use in advanced biosensors.

  3. Analysis of cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of apple latent spherical virus in infected plants using green, cyan, and yellow fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsubasa; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) expressing green, cyan, and yellow fluorescent proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) was constructed and used to analyze the local and systemic movement of the virus in infected plants. In Chenopodium quinoa plants inoculated with GFP-ALSV, the infection foci first appeared as small fluorescent spots 2-3 days post inoculation (dpi). The GFP spots expanded as rings from 5 dpi, then fused to each other, and most fluorescence faded out at 10-12 dpi. In upper uninoculated leaves, GFP fluorescence was first observed 6-7 dpi on the basal area of mature leaves and on the entire area of young developing leaves. The appearance of fluorescent flecks on young leaves was first found on and near the class III and IV veins. ALSV labeled with two different fluorescent proteins (CFP-ALSV and YFP-ALSV) were used to investigate the distribution of identical, but differently labeled viruses in mixed infection. Fluorescence from CFP and YFP was in each case observed in separate areas in both inoculated and upper uninoculated leaves, indicating that populations of identical, but differently labeled viruses were replicated and distributed in discrete areas of infected leaves.

  4. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cranfill, Paula J.; Sell, Brittney R.; Baird, Michelle A.; Allen, John R.; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H. Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W.; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FP) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning the blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has its own unique photophysical properties. Thus, there is no single “best” fluorescent protein for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for any given application, we have characterized quantitatively over 40 different FPs for their brightness, photostability, pH stability, and monomeric properties, which permits easy apples-to-apples comparisons between these FPs. We report the values for all of the FPs measured, but focus the discussion on the more popular and/or best performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  6. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment.

  7. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Measurements of the Membrane Protein TetA in Escherichia coli Suggest Rapid Diffusion at Short Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Chow, David; Guo, Lin; Gai, Feng; Goulian, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Structural inhomogeneities in biomembranes can lead to complex diffusive behavior of membrane proteins that depend on the length or time scales that are probed. This effect is well studied in eukaryotic cells, but has been explored only recently in bacteria. Here we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study diffusion of the membrane protein TetA-YFP in E. coli. We find that the diffusion constant determined from FRAP is comparable to other reports of inner membrane protein diffusion constants in E. coli. However, FCS, which probes diffusion on shorter length scales, gives a value that is almost two orders of magnitude higher and is comparable to lipid diffusion constants. These results suggest there is a population of TetA-YFP molecules in the membrane that move rapidly over short length scales (∼ 400 nm) but move significantly more slowly over the longer length scales probed by FRAP. PMID:23119068

  8. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-10-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses.

  9. Vectors for fluorescent protein tagging in Phytophthora: tools for functional genomics and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ah-Fong, Audrey M V; Judelson, Howard S

    2011-09-01

    Fluorescent tagging has become the strategy of choice for examining the subcellular localisation of proteins. To develop a versatile community resource for this method in oomycetes, plasmids were constructed that allow the expression of either of four spectrally distinct proteins [cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and mCherry], alone or fused at their N- or C-termini, to sequences of interest. Equivalent sets of plasmids were made using neomycin or hygromycin phosphotransferases (nptII, hpt) as selectable markers, to facilitate double-labelling and aid work in diverse species. The fluorescent proteins and drug-resistance markers were fused to transcriptional regulatory sequences from the oomycete Bremia lactucae, which are known to function in diverse oomycetes, although the promoter in the fluorescence cassette (ham34) can be replaced easily by a promoter of interest. The function of each plasmid was confirmed in Phytophthora infestans. Moreover, fusion proteins were generated using targeting sequences for the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, mitochondria, nuclei, and peroxisomes. Studies of the distribution of the fusions in mycelia and sporangia provided insight into cellular organisation at different stages of development. This toolbox of vectors should advance studies of gene function and cell biology in Phytophthora and other oomycetes. Copyright © 2011 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lighting the Way to Protein-Protein Interactions: Recommendations on Best Practices for Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation Analyses[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to detect and verify interactions between proteins in vivo have become invaluable tools in functional genomic research. While many of the initially developed interaction assays (e.g., yeast two-hybrid system and split-ubiquitin assay) usually are conducted in heterologous systems, assays relying on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC; also referred to as split-YFP assays) are applicable to the analysis of protein-protein interactions in most native systems, including plant cells. Like all protein-protein interaction assays, BiFC can produce false positive and false negative results. The purpose of this commentary is to (1) highlight shortcomings of and potential pitfalls in BiFC assays, (2) provide guidelines for avoiding artifactual interactions, and (3) suggest suitable approaches to scrutinize potential interactions and validate them by independent methods. PMID:27099259

  11. Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cranfill, Paula J; Sell, Brittney R; Baird, Michelle A; Allen, John R; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-07-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FPs) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has unique properties. Thus, there is no single 'best' FP for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for a given application, we have quantitatively characterized the brightness, photostability, pH stability and monomeric properties of more than 40 FPs to enable straightforward and direct comparison between them. We focus on popular and/or top-performing FPs in each spectral region.

  12. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  13. Evidence for extended YFP-EGFR dimers in the absence of ligand on the surface of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozer, Noga; Henderson, Christine; Jackson, Jacob T.; Nice, Edouard C.; Burgess, Antony W.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the erbB tyrosine kinase family of receptors. Structural studies have revealed two distinct conformations of the ectodomain of the EGFR: a compact, tethered, conformation and an untethered extended conformation. In the context of a monomer-dimer transition model, ligand binding is thought to untether the monomeric receptor leading to exposure of a dimerization arm which then facilitates receptor dimerization, kinase activation and signaling. For receptors directed orthogonal to the local plane of the membrane surface, this would lead to a large change in the distance of the receptor N-terminus from the membrane surface. To investigate this experimentally, we produced stable BaF/3 cell lines expressing a biochemically functional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-EGFR chimera and determined the vertical separation of the N-terminal YFP tag from the membrane using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques. Homo-FRET/rFLIM was employed to determine the presence of unliganded dimers and to measure the average distance between the N-terminal tags in those dimers. The results suggest that EGF-induced activation occurs within or between pre-formed and extended dimers with very little change in the extension of the N-terminii from the membrane surface. These results provide constraints on possible models for EGFR activation.

  14. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay for Direct Visualization of Protein-Protein Interaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsien-Tsung; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) assay is a method used to directly visualize protein-protein interaction in vivo using live-cell imaging or fixed cells. This protocol described here is based on our recent paper describing the functional association of human chromatin adaptor and transcription cofactor Brd4 with p53 tumor suppressor protein (Wu et al., 2013). BiFC was first described by Hu et al. (2002) using two non-fluorescent protein fragments of enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), which is an Aequorea victoria GFP variant protein, fused respectively to a Rel family protein and a bZIP family transcription factor to investigate interactions between these two family members in living cells. The YFP was later improved by introducing mutations to reduce its sensitivity to pH and chloride ions, thus generating a super-enhanced YFP, named Venus fluorescent protein, without showing diminished fluorescence at 37 °C as typically observed with EYFP (Nagai et al., 2006). The fluorescence signal is regenerated by complementation of two non-fluorescent fragments (e.g., the Venus N-terminal 1-158 amino acid residues, called Venus-N, and its C-terminal 159-239 amino acid residues, named Venus-C; see Figure 1A and Gully et al., 2012; Ding et al., 2006; Kerppola, 2006) that are brought together by interaction between their respective fusion partners (e.g., Venus-N to p53, and Venus-C to the PDID domain of human Brd4; see Figure 1B and 1C). The intensity and cellular location of the regenerated fluorescence signals can be detected by fluorescence microscope. The advantages of the proximity-based BiFC assay are: first, it allows a direct visualization of spatial and temporal interaction between two partner proteins in vivo; second, the fluorescence signal provides a sensitive readout for detecting protein-protein interaction even at a low expression level comparable to that of the endogenous proteins; third, the intensity of the fluorescence signal is

  15. A novel method to visually determine the intracellular pH of xenografted tumor in vivo by utilizing fluorescent protein as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-09-04

    The alkalization of intracellular pH (pHin) advances together with enhancement of aerobic glycolysis within tumor cells (the Warburg effect), and that is responsible for the progression of tumor malignancy together with hypoxia and angiogenesis. But how they correlate each other during tumor growth is poorly understood, partly due to the lack of suitable imaging methods. In present study, we propose a novel method to visually determine the pHin of tumor xenograft model from fluorescent image ratios. We utilized tandemly-linked two fluorescent proteins as a pH indicator; yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, pH sensitive) as an indicator, and red fluorescent protein (RFP, pH insensitive) as a reference. This method can eliminate the influence of optical factors from tissue as well as of the diverse expression level of pH indicator in the grafted cells. In addition, that can be operated by filter-based fluorescent imagers that are generally used in small animal study. The efficacy of the pH indicator, RFP-YFP, was confirmed by studies using recombinant protein in vitro and HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP in vivo. Furthermore, we prepared nude mice subcutaneously xenografted HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP cells as tumor model. The image ratios (YFP/RFP) of the tumor at the day 5 after surgery clearly showed the heterogeneous distribution of diverse pHin cells in the tumor tissue. Concomitantly acquired angiography using near-infrared fluorescence (680 nm for emission) also indicated that the relative alkaline pHin cells located in the region far from tumor vessels in which tumor aerobic glycolysis would be facilitated by progression of hypoxia and nutrient starvation. Applying the present method for a multi-wavelength imaging concerning pO2 and/or nutrient starvation states in addition to pHin and angiogenesis would provide valuable information about complicated alteration of tumoral cell states during tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Real-time detection of cellular death receptor-4 activation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Gandhok, Harmeet; Zeng, Ling Ge; Waqas, Sidra; Jiang, Xuejun; Wang, Sihong

    2013-05-01

    Targeted therapy involving the activation of death receptors DR4 and/or DR5 by its ligand, TRAIL, can selectively induce apoptosis in certain tumor cells. In order to profile the dynamic activation or trimerization of TRAIL-DR4 in live cells in real-time, the development of an apoptosis reporter cell line is essential. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology via a FRET pair, cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescence protein (YFP), was used in this study. DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP were stably expressed in human lung cancer PC9 cells. Flow cytometer sorting and limited dilution coupled with fluorescence microscopy were used to select a monoclonal reporter cell line with high and compatible expression levels of DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP. FRET experiments were conducted and FRET efficiencies were monitored according to the Siegel's YFP photobleaching FRET protocol. Upon TRAIL induction a significant increase in FRET efficiencies from 5% to 9% demonstrated the ability of the DR4-CFP/YFP reporter cell line in monitoring the dynamic activation of TRAIL pathways. 3D reconstructed confocal images of DR4-CFP/YFP reporter cells exhibited a colocalized expression of DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP mainly on cell membranes. FRET results obtained during this study complements the use of epi-fluorescence microscopy for FRET analysis. The real-time FRET analysis allows the dynamic profiling of the activation of TRAIL pathways by using the time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Therefore, DR4-CFP/YFP PC9 reporter cells along with FRET technology can be used as a tool for anti-cancer drug screening to identify compounds that are capable of activating TRAIL pathways.

  17. Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fluorescence after polyelectrolyte caging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Krol, Silke; Campanini, Barbara; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2006-10-01

    Discovery of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) constituted an important improvement for living cell studies on submicron resolution allowing in vivo fluorescence labeling. We studied the photo-physical properties of single GFP molecules incorporated in a charged polyelectrolyte environment by means of single molecule spectroscopy. The fluorescence characteristics change dramatically in terms of photo-stability,lifetime and blinking behavior so that the proteins scale up to quantum dots. The reported results highlight interesting applications in the design of fluorescent markers and in the development of optical data storage architectures.

  18. Isolation of yellow catfish β-actin promoter and generation of transgenic yellow catfish expressing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jiachun; Dong, Zhangji; Li, Jingyun; Xu, Zhiqiang; Song, Wei; Bao, Jie; Liang, Dong; Li, Junbo; Li, Kui; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Muzi; Cai, Yongxiang; Yang, Jiaxin; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2012-10-01

    Yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco Richardson) is one of the most important freshwater farmed species in China. However, its small size and slow growth rate limit its commercial value. Because genetic engineering has been a powerful tool to develop and improve fish traits for aquaculture, we performed transgenic research on yellow catfish in order to increase its size and growth rate. Performing PCR with degenerate primers, we cloned a genomic fragment comprising 5'-flanking sequence upstream of the initiation codon of β-actin gene in yellow catfish. The sequence is 1,017 bp long, containing the core sequence of proximal promoter including CAAT box, CArG motif and TATA box. Microinjecting the transgene construct Tg(beta-actin:eYFP) of the proximal promoter fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) reporter gene into zebrafish and yellow catfish embryos, we found the promoter could drive the reporter to express transiently in both embryos at early development. Screening the offspring of five transgenic zebrafish founders developed from the embryos microinjected with Tg(ycbeta-actin:mCherry) or 19 yellow catfish founders developed from the embryos microinjected with Tg(beta-actin:eYFP), we obtained three lines of transgenic zebrafish and one transgenic yellow catfish, respectively. Analyzing the expression patterns of the reporter genes in transgenic zebrafish (Tg(ycbeta-actin:mCherry)nju8/+) and transgenic yellow catfish (Tg(beta-actin:eYFP)nju11/+), we found the reporters were broadly expressed in both animals. In summary, we have established a platform to make transgenic yellow catfish using the proximal promoter of its own β-actin gene. The results will help us to create transgenic yellow catfish using "all yellow catfish" transgene constructs.

  19. In vivo nonlinear imaging of corneal structures with special focus on BALB/c and streptozotocin-diabetic Thy1-YFP mice.

    PubMed

    Ehmke, Tobias; Leckelt, Janine; Reichard, Maria; Weiss, Heike; Hovakimyan, Marina; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Stachs, Oliver; Baltrusch, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Two-photon microscopy (TPM) allows high contrast imaging at a subcellular resolution scale. In this work, the microscopy technique was applied to visualize corneal structures in two mouse models (BALB/c and B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-YFP)16Jrs/J) in vivo. In particular, the transgenic Thy1-YFP mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in all motor and sensory neurons had been used for investigating the nerve fiber density in healthy and streptozotocin-diabetic mice. This model is clinically relevant since patients suffering from diabetes mellitus have a high risk to develop small fiber neuropathy. Nonlinear laser scanning microscopy displayed a reduction of nerve fiber density in streptozotocin-diabetic versus healthy mice and confirmed data obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In recent years, corneal CLSM was proved to be an appropriate non-invasive tool for an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. Nevertheless, validation of the CLSM method for the clinical routine is currently a matter of investigation and requires confirmation by further studies and complementary techniques. Thus, the present study provides further evidence of corneal confocal microscopy as a promising technique for non-invasive detection of diabetic neuropathy. Information derived from these experiments may become clinically relevant and help to develop new drugs for treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  20. Development of transgenic fish for ornamental and bioreactor by strong expression of fluorescent proteins in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhiyuan; Wan, Haiyan; Tay, Tuan Leng; Wang, Hai; Chen, Mingru; Yan, Tie

    2003-08-15

    In the present study, new applications of the transgenic technology in developing novel varieties of ornamental fish and bioreactor fish were explored in a model fish, the zebrafish (Danio rerio). Three "living color" fluorescent proteins, green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and red fluorescent protein (RFP or dsRed), were expressed under a strong muscle-specific mylz2 promoter in stable lines of transgenic zebrafish. These transgenic zebrafish display vivid fluorescent colors (green, red, yellow, or orange) visible to unaided eyes under both daylight and ultraviolet light in the dark. The level of foreign protein expression is estimated between 3% and 17% of total muscle proteins, equivalent to 4.8-27.2mg/g wet muscle tissue. Thus, the fish muscle may be explored as another useful bioreactor system for production of recombinant proteins. In spite of the high level of foreign protein expression, the expression of endogenous mylz2 mRNAs was not negatively affected. Furthermore, compared to the wild-type fish, these fluorescent transgenic fish have no advantage in survival and reproduction.

  1. Photoconversion in orange and red fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Hazelwood, Kristin L.; Murphy, Christopher S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Piston, David W.

    2009-01-01

    We report that photoconversion is fairly common among orange and red fluorescent proteins, as a screen of 12 variants yielded 8 that exhibit photoconversion. Specifically, three red fluorescent proteins can be switched into a green state, and two orange variants can be photoconverted to the far red. The orange highlighters are ideal for dual-probe highlighter applications, and they exhibit the most red-shifted excitation of all fluorescent protein described to date. PMID:19363494

  2. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP).

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2008-11-28

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure.

  3. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Yi; Zhang Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2008-11-28

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure.

  4. Fluorescent protein biosensors applied to microphysiological systems

    PubMed Central

    Senutovitch, Nina; Boltz, Robert; DeBiasio, Richard; Gough, Albert; Taylor, D Lansing

    2015-01-01

    This mini-review discusses the evolution of fluorescence as a tool to study living cells and tissues in vitro and the present role of fluorescent protein biosensors (FPBs) in microphysiological systems (MPSs). FPBs allow the measurement of temporal and spatial dynamics of targeted cellular events involved in normal and perturbed cellular assay systems and MPSs in real time. FPBs evolved from fluorescent analog cytochemistry (FAC) that permitted the measurement of the dynamics of purified proteins covalently labeled with environmentally insensitive fluorescent dyes and then incorporated into living cells, as well as a large list of diffusible fluorescent probes engineered to measure environmental changes in living cells. In parallel, a wide range of fluorescence microscopy methods were developed to measure the chemical and molecular activities of the labeled cells, including ratio imaging, fluorescence lifetime, total internal reflection, 3D imaging, including super-resolution, as well as high-content screening. FPBs evolved from FAC by combining environmentally sensitive fluorescent dyes with proteins in order to monitor specific physiological events such as post-translational modifications, production of metabolites, changes in various ion concentrations, and the dynamic interaction of proteins with defined macromolecules in time and space within cells. Original FPBs involved the engineering of fluorescent dyes to sense specific activities when covalently attached to particular domains of the targeted protein. The subsequent development of fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the green fluorescent protein, dramatically accelerated the adoption of studying living cells, since the genetic “labeling” of proteins became a relatively simple method that permitted the analysis of temporal–spatial dynamics of a wide range of proteins. Investigators subsequently engineered the fluorescence properties of the FPs for environmental sensitivity that, when combined with

  5. Site-specific immobilization and micrometer and nanometer scale photopatterning of yellow fluorescent protein on glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Nicholas P; Tucker, Jaimey D; Davison, Paul A; Timney, John A; Hunter, C Neil; Leggett, Graham J

    2009-01-28

    A simple method is described for the site-specific attachment of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to glass surfaces on length scales ranging from tens of micrometers to ca. 200 nm. 3-Mercaptopropyl(triethoxy silane) is adsorbed onto a glass substrate and subsequently derivatized using a maleimide-functionalized oligomer of ethylene glycol. The resulting protein-resistant surface is patterned by exposure to UV light, causing photochemical degradation of the oligo(ethylene glycol) units to yield aldehyde groups in exposed regions. These are covalently bound to N-(5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)iminoacetic acid, yielding a nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-functionalized surface, which following complexation with Ni(2+), is coupled to His-tagged YFP. Using scanning near-field photolithography, in which a UV laser coupled to a scanning near-field optical microscope is utilized as the light source for photolithography, it is possible to fabricate lines of protein smaller than 200 nm, in which the biomolecules remain strongly optically active, facilitating the acquisition of diffraction-limited fluorescence images by confocal microscopy.

  6. Photocontrollable Fluorescent Proteins for Superresolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy permits the study of biological processes at scales small enough to visualize fine subcellular structures that are unresolvable by traditional diffraction-limited light microscopy. Many superresolution techniques, including those applicable to live cell imaging, utilize genetically encoded photocontrollable fluorescent proteins. The fluorescence of these proteins can be controlled by light of specific wavelengths. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and photophysical properties of photocontrollable fluorescent proteins that are relevant to their use in superresolution microscopy. We then describe the recently developed photoactivatable, photoswitchable, and reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins, and we detail their particular usefulness in single-molecule localization–based and nonlinear ensemble–based superresolution techniques. Finally, we discuss recent applications of photocontrollable proteins in superresolution imaging, as well as how these applications help to clarify properties of intracellular structures and processes that are relevant to cell and developmental biology, neuroscience, cancer biology and biomedicine. PMID:24895855

  7. Interaction of Photobacterium leiognathi and Vibrio fischeri Y1 luciferases with fluorescent (antenna) proteins: bioluminescence effects of the aliphatic additive.

    PubMed

    Petushkov, V N; Ketelaars, M; Gibson, B G; Lee, J

    1996-09-17

    The kinetics of the bacterial bioluminescence reaction is altered in the presence of the fluorescent (antenna) proteins, lumazine protein (LumP) from Photobacterium or the yellow fluorescence proteins (YFP) having FMN or Rf bound, from Vibrio fischeri strain Y1. Depending on reaction conditions, the bioluminescence intensity and its decay rate may be either enhanced or strongly quenched in the presence of the fluorescent proteins. These effects can be simply explained on the basis of the same protein-protein complex model that accounts for the bioluminescence spectral shifts induced by these fluorescent proteins. In such a complex, where the fluorophore evidently is in proximity to the luciferase active site, it is expected that the on-off rate of certain aliphatic components of the reaction should be altered with a consequent shift in the equilibria among the luciferase intermediates, as recently elaborated in a kinetic scheme. These aliphatic components are the bioluminescence reaction substrate, tetradecanal or other long-chain aldehyde, its carboxylic acid product, or dodecanol used as a stabilizer of the luciferase peroxyflavin. No evidence can be found for the protein-protein interaction in the absence of the aliphatic component.

  8. Using fluorescent sensors to detect botulinum neurotoxin activity in vitro and in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Min; Tepp, William H.; Johnson, Eric A.; Chapman, Edwin R.

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) act as zinc-dependent endopeptidases that cleave proteins required for neurotransmitter release. To detect toxin activity, fragments of the toxin substrate proteins, synaptobrevin (Syb) or synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), were used to link cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Cleavage of these fusion proteins by BoNTs abolished fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the CFP and YFP, providing a sensitive means to detect toxin activity in real-time in vitro. Furthermore, using full-length SNAP-25 and Syb as the linkers, we report two fluorescent biosensors that can detect toxin activity within living cells. Cleavage of the SNAP-25 fusion protein abolished fluorescence resonance energy transfer between CFP and YFP, and cleavage of Syb resulted in spatial redistribution of YFP fluorescence in cells. This approach provides a means to carry out cell-based screening of toxin inhibitors and to study toxin activity in situ. By using these biosensors, we found that the subcellular localizations of SNAP-25 and Syb are critical for efficient cleavage by BoNT/A and B, respectively. PMID:15465919

  9. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N.

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  10. Multi-color femtosecond source for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescent proteins in two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Wu, Juwell; Horton, Nicholas G.; Lin, Charles P.; Xu, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous imaging of cells expressing multiple fluorescent proteins (FPs) is of particular interest in applications such as mapping neural circuits, tracking multiple immune cell populations, etc. To visualize both in vivo and ex vivo tissue morphology and physiology at a cellular level deep within scattering tissues, two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM) is a powerful tool that has found wide applications. However, simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs with 2PM is greatly hampered by the lack of proper ultrafast lasers offering multi-color femtosecond pulses, each targeting the two-photon absorption peak of a different FP. Here we demonstrate simultaneous two-photon fluorescence excitation of RFP, YFP, and CFP in human melanoma cells engineered to express a "rainbow" pallet of colors, using a novel fiber-based source with energetic, three-color femtosecond pulses. The three-color pulses, centered at 775 nm, 864 nm and 950 nm, are obtained through second harmonic generation of the 1550 nm pump laser and SHG of the solitons at 1728 nm and 1900 nm generated through soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) of the pump laser in a large-mode-area (LMA) fiber. The resulting wavelengths are well matched to the two-photon absorption peaks of the three FPs for efficient excitation. Our results demonstrate that multi-color femtosecond pulse generation using SSFS and a turn-key, fiber-based femtosecond laser can fulfill the requirements for simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs in 2PM, opening new opportunities for a wide range of biological applications where non-invasive, high-resolution imaging of multiple fluorescent indicators is required.

  11. Fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Daniel Aaron; Melikov, Rustamzhon; Conkar, Deniz; Nur Firat-Karalar, Elif; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2016-11-01

    The usage time of displays (e.g., TVs, mobile phones, etc) is in general shorter than their functional life time, which worsens the electronic waste (e-waste) problem around the world. The integration of biomaterials into electronics can help to reduce the e-waste problem. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs to use as a backlight source for liquid crystal (LC) displays for the first time. We express and purify enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and monomeric Cherry protein (mCherry), and afterward we integrate these proteins as a wavelength-converter on a blue LED chip. The protein-integrated backlight exhibits a high luminous efficacy of 248 lm/Wopt and the area of the gamut covers 80% of the NTSC color gamut. The resultant colors and objects in the image on the display can be well observed and distinguished. Therefore, fluorescent proteins show promise for display applications.

  12. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  13. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  14. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  15. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  16. Fluorescent protein tagging confirms the presence of ribosomal proteins at Drosophila polytene chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Preethi; Matina, Tina; Wen, Jikai

    2013-01-01

    Most ribosomal proteins (RPs) are stoichiometrically incorporated into ribosomal subunits and play essential roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. However, a number of RPs appear to have non-ribosomal functions, which involve direct association with pre-mRNA and transcription factors at transcription sites. The consensus is that the RPs found at these sites are off ribosomal subunits, but observation that different RPs are usually found together suggests that ribosomal or ribosomal-like subunits might be present. Notably, it has previously been reported that antibodies against 20 different RPs stain the same Pol II transcription sites in Drosophila polytene chromosomes. Some concerns, however, were raised about the specificity of the antibodies. To investigate further whether RPs are present at transcription sites in Drosophila, we have generated several transgenic flies expressing RPs (RpS2, RpS5a, RpS9, RpS11, RpS13, RpS18, RpL8, RpL11, RpL32, and RpL36) tagged with either green or red fluorescent protein. Imaging of salivary gland cells showed that these proteins are, as expected, abundant in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleolus. However, these RPs are also apparent in the nucleus in the region occupied by the chromosomes. Indeed, polytene chromosome immunostaining of a representative subset of tagged RPs confirms the association with transcribed loci. Furthermore, characterization of a strain expressing RpL41 functionally tagged at its native genomic locus with YFP, also showed apparent nuclear accumulation and chromosomal association, suggesting that such a nuclear localization pattern might be a shared feature of RPs and is biologically important. We anticipate that the transgenes described here should provide a useful research tool to visualize ribosomal subunits in Drosophila tissues and to study the non-ribosomal functions of RPs. PMID:23638349

  17. Proteins on the move: insights gained from fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2011-09-23

    Proteins are always on the move, and this may occur through diffusion or active transport. The realization that the regulation of signal transduction is highly dynamic in space and time has stimulated intense interest in the movement of proteins. Over the past decade, numerous new technologies using fluorescent proteins have been developed, allowing us to observe the spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins in living cells. These technologies have greatly advanced our understanding of protein dynamics, including protein movement and protein interactions.

  18. An integral membrane protein from the nuclear pore complex is also present in the annulate lamellae: implications for annulate lamella formation.

    PubMed

    Imreh, G; Hallberg, E

    2000-08-25

    Annulate lamellae (AL) are cytoplasmic arrays of stacked membrane cisternae containing densely packed pore complexes which are similar in structure to the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and thus referred to as annulate lamella pore complexes (ALPCs). We have recently shown that the integral nuclear pore membrane protein POM121 tagged with green fluorescent protein was correctly targeted to the nuclear pores (H. Söderqvist et al., 1997, Eur. J. Biochem. 250, 808-813). Here we have investigated if POM121 fused to three tandem molecules of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) (POM121-YFP(3)) also was able to distribute in the extensive and well-characterized AL of RC37 and BMGE cells. Transfected RC37 or BMGE cells displayed YFP fluorescence around the nuclear envelope, as well as in the cytoplasmic AL structures. The YFP fluorescence colocalized perfectly with immunostaining using antibodies specific for different NPC proteins. The AL of both transfected and untransfected BMGE cells resisted extractions with Tx-100 and 250 mM NaCl, but were completely solubilized at 450 mM NaCl. Loss of YFP fluorescence and immunostaining for other NPC proteins correlated under all extraction conditions tested, suggesting that overexpressed POM121-YFP(3) had become an integrated part both of the NPCs and of the ALPCs. Furthermore, we have generated a stable BHK cell line expressing POM121-YFP(3) located exclusively at the nuclear pores. Treatment with vinblastine sulfate, which induces formation of AL in a variety of cells, resulted in distribution of POM121-YFP(3) into cytoplasmic foci colocalizing with immunostaining for peripheral NPC proteins. Taken together, the results show that YFP-tagged POM121 is able to distribute in drug-induced or naturally occurring AL, suggesting that POM121 is a natural constituent of ALPCs. In COS cells, which normally lack or have very little AL, YFP-tagged POM121 distributed in the nuclear pores when expressed at low levels. However, at high expression

  19. A dark green fluorescent protein as an acceptor for measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Shibata, Akihiro C E; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-10-15

    Measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) is a powerful method for visualization of intracellular signaling activities such as protein-protein interactions and conformational changes of proteins. Here, we developed a dark green fluorescent protein (ShadowG) that can serve as an acceptor for FLIM-FRET. ShadowG is spectrally similar to monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and has a 120-fold smaller quantum yield. When FRET from mEGFP to ShadowG was measured using an mEGFP-ShadowG tandem construct with 2-photon FLIM-FRET, we observed a strong FRET signal with low cell-to-cell variability. Furthermore, ShadowG was applied to a single-molecule FRET sensor to monitor a conformational change of CaMKII and of the light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain in HeLa cells. These sensors showed reduced cell-to-cell variability of both the basal fluorescence lifetime and response signal. In contrast to mCherry- or dark-YFP-based sensors, our sensor allowed for precise measurement of individual cell responses. When ShadowG was applied to a separate-type Ras FRET sensor, it showed a greater response signal than did the mCherry-based sensor. Furthermore, Ras activation and translocation of its effector ERK2 into the nucleus could be observed simultaneously. Thus, ShadowG is a promising FLIM-FRET acceptor.

  20. Miniature fluorescence detection system for protein chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoseong; Choi, Jaeho; Lee, Kook-Nyung; Kim, Yongkwon

    2005-01-01

    We report the development of miniature fluorescence detection systems that employ miniature prism, mirrors and low cost CCD camera to detect the fluorescence emitted from 40 fluorescently-labeled protein patterns without scanner. This kind of miniature fluorescence detection systems can be used in point of care. We introduce two systems, one uses prism + mirror block and the other uses prism and two mirrors. A large NA microscope eyepiece and low cost CCD camera are used. We fabricated protein chip containing multi-pattern BSA labeled with Cy5, using MEMS technology and modified the surface chemically to clean and to immobilize proteins. The measurements show that the combination of prism and mirrors can homogenize elliptical excitation light over the sample with higher optical efficiency, and increase the separation between excitation and fluorescence light at the CCD to give higher signal intensity and higher signal to noise ratio. The measurements also show that protein concentrations ranging from 10 ng/ml to 1000 ng/ml can be assayed with very small error. We believe that the proposed fluorescence detection system can be refined to build a commercially valuable hand-held or miniature detection device.

  1. Conjugation of fluorescent proteins with DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lapiene, Vidmantas; Kukolka, Florian; Kiko, Kathrin; Arndt, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-05-19

    This work describes the synthesis of covalent ssDNA conjugates of six fluorescent proteins, ECFP, EGFP, E(2)GFP, mDsRed, Dronpa, and mCherry, which were cloned with an accessible C-terminal cystein residue to enable site-selective coupling using a heterobispecific cross-linker. The resulting conjugates revealed similar fluorescence emission intensity to the unconjugated proteins, and the functionality of the tethered oligonucleotide was proven by specific Watson-Crick base pairing to cDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the fluorescence of the FP is quenched by the gold particle, and the extent of quenching varied with the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of FP as well as with the configuration of surface attachment. Since this study demonstrates that biological fluorophores can be selectively incorporated into and optically coupled with nanoparticle-based devices, applications in DNA-based nanofabrication can be foreseen.

  2. Quantitative measurement of Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin-target binding by Fura-2 and CFP and YFP FRET imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masayuki X; Imai, Yuko; Itsuki, Kyohei; Inoue, Ryuji

    2011-05-31

    Calcium dynamics and its linked molecular interactions cause a variety of biological responses; thus, exploiting techniques for detecting both concurrently is essential. Here we describe a method for measuring the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and protein-protein interactions within the same cell, using Fura-2 and superenhanced cyan and yellow fluorescence protein (seCFP and seYFP, respectively) FRET imaging techniques. Concentration-independent corrections for bleed-through of Fura-2 into FRET cubes across different time points and [Ca(2+)](i) values allowed for an effective separation of Fura-2 cross-talk signals and seCFP and seYFP cross-talk signals, permitting calculation of [Ca(2+)](i) and FRET with high fidelity. This correction approach was particularly effective at lower [Ca(2+)](i) levels, eliminating bleed-through signals that resulted in an artificial enhancement of FRET. By adopting this correction approach combined with stepwise [Ca(2+)](i) increases produced in living cells, we successfully elucidated steady-state relationships between [Ca(2+)](i) and FRET derived from the interaction of seCFP-tagged calmodulin (CaM) and the seYFP-fused CaM binding domain of myosin light chain kinase. The [Ca(2+)](i) versus FRET relationship for voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and TRPC6 channel CaM binding domains (IQ domain or CBD) revealed distinct sensitivities for [Ca(2+)](i). Moreover, the CaM binding strength at basal or subbasal [Ca(2+)](i) levels provided evidence of CaM tethering or apoCaM binding in living cells. Of the ion channel studies, apoCaM binding was weakest for the TRPC6 channel, suggesting that more global Ca(2+) and CaM changes rather than the local CaM-channel interface domain may be involved in Ca(2+)CaM-mediated regulation of this channel. This simultaneous Fura-2 and CFP- and YFP-based FRET imaging system will thus serve as a simple but powerful means of quantitatively elucidating cellular events associated with Ca(2

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of protein oligomerization in membranes.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for characterization of a multitude of biological processes. Of these, the phenomenon of protein oligomerization attracts especial interest due to its crucial role in the formation of fibrillar protein aggregates (amyloid fibrils) involved in ethiology of so-called protein misfolding diseases. It is becoming increasingly substantiated that protein fibrillization in vivo can be initiated and modulated at membrane-water interface. All steps of membrane-assisted fibrillogenesis, viz., protein adsorption onto lipid bilayer, structural transition of polypeptide chain into a highly aggregation-prone partially folded conformation, assembly of oligomeric nucleus from membrane-bound monomeric species and fiber elongation can be monitored with a mighty family of fluorescence-based techniques. Furthermore, the mechanisms behind cytotoxicity of prefibrillar protein oligomers are highly amenable to fluorescence analysis. The applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to monitoring protein oligomerization in a membrane environment are exemplified and some problems encountered in such kinds of studies are highlighted.

  4. Fluorescent Proteins: A Cell Biologist's User Guide

    PubMed Central

    Snapp, Erik Lee

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent Proteins (FPs) have revolutionized cell biology. The value of labeling and visualizing proteins in living cells is evident from thousands of publications since the cloning of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Biologists have been flooded with a cornucopia of FPs; however, the FP toolbox has not necessarily been optimized for cell biologists. Common FP plasmids are suboptimal for FP-fusion protein construction. More problematic are commercial and investigator-constructed FP-fusion proteins that disrupt important cellular targeting information. Even when cell biologists correctly construct FP-fusion proteins, it is rarely self-evident which FP should be used. Important FP information, such as oligomer formation or photostability, is often unsearchable or anecdotal. This brief guide is offered to assist in correctly exploiting FPs in cells. PMID:19819147

  5. Fluorescent proteins: maturation, photochemistry and photophysics.

    PubMed

    Remington, S James

    2006-12-01

    It has long been appreciated that green fluorescent protein (GFP) autocatalytically forms its chromophore in a host-independent process; several of the initial steps in the reaction have recently been elucidated. Nevertheless, the end points of the process are unexpectedly diverse, as six chemically distinct chromophores, including two with three rings, have been identified. All fluorescent proteins continuously produce a low level of reactive oxygen species under illumination, which, in some cases, can lead to host cell death. In one extreme but useful example, the red fluorescent protein KillerRed can be used to selectively destroy cells upon brief illumination. Finally, when photophysical processes such as excited-state proton transfer, reversible photobleaching and photoactivation are understood, useful research tools, for example, real-time biosensors and optical highlighters, can result; however, side effects of their use may lead to significant artifacts in time-dependent microscopy experiments.

  6. Diversity and Evolution of Coral Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alieva, Naila O.; Konzen, Karen A.; Field, Steven F.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Hunt, Marguerite E.; Beltran-Ramirez, Victor; Miller, David J.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Salih, Anya; Matz, Mikhail V.

    2008-01-01

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red) and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a “chromo-red” color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae) and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae), both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria). The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of structural

  7. Imaging the environment of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Klaus; Siegel, Jan; Phillips, David; French, Paul M W; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Webb, Stephen E D; Davis, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    An emerging theme in cell biology is that cell surface receptors need to be considered as part of supramolecular complexes of proteins and lipids facilitating specific receptor conformations and distinct distributions, e.g., at the immunological synapse. Thus, a new goal is to develop bioimaging that not only locates proteins in live cells but can also probe their environment. Such a technique is demonstrated here using fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP). We first show, by time-correlated single-photon counting, that the fluorescence decay of GFP depends on the local refractive index. This is in agreement with the Strickler Berg formula, relating the Einstein A and B coefficients for absorption and spontaneous emission in molecules. We then quantitatively image, by wide-field time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging, the refractive index of the environment of GFP. This novel approach paves the way for imaging the biophysical environment of specific GFP-tagged proteins in live cells. PMID:12496126

  8. Imaging Erg and Jun transcription factor interaction in living cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Camuzeaux, Barbara; Heliot, Laurent; Coll, Jean . E-mail: martine.duterque@ibl.fr

    2005-07-15

    Physical interactions between transcription factors play important roles in modulating gene expression. Previous in vitro studies have shown a transcriptional synergy between Erg protein, an Ets family member, and Jun/Fos heterodimer, members of the bZip family, which requires direct Erg-Jun protein interactions. Visualization of protein interactions in living cells is a new challenge in biology. For this purpose, we generated fusion proteins of Erg, Fos, and Jun with yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins, YFP and CFP, respectively. After transient expression in HeLa cells, interactions of the resulting fusion proteins were explored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy (FRET) in fixed and living cells. FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun was monitored by using photobleaching FRET and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Both techniques revealed the occurrence of intermolecular FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun. This is stressed by loss of FRET with an YFP-Erg version carrying a point mutation in its ETS domain. These results provide evidence for the interaction of Erg and Jun proteins in living cells as a critical prerequisite of their transcriptional synergy, but also for the essential role of the Y371 residue, conserved in most Ets proteins, in this interaction.

  9. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins.

  10. Engineered fluorescent proteins illuminate the bacterial periplasm.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial periplasm is of special interest whenever cell factories are designed and engineered. Recombinantely produced proteins are targeted to the periplasmic space of Gram negative bacteria to take advantage of the authentic N-termini, disulfide bridge formation and easy accessibility for purification with less contaminating cellular proteins. The oxidizing environment of the periplasm promotes disulfide bridge formation - a prerequisite for proper folding of many proteins into their active conformation. In contrast, the most popular reporter protein in all of cell biology, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), remains inactive if translocated to the periplasmic space prior to folding. Here, the self-catalyzed chromophore maturation is blocked by formation of covalent oligomers via interchain disulfide bonds in the oxidizing environment. However, different protein engineering approaches addressing folding and stability of GFP resulted in improved proteins with enhanced folding properties. Recent studies describe GFP variants that are not only active if translocated in their folded form via the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway, but actively fold in the periplasm following general secretory pathway (Sec) and signal recognition particle (SRP) mediated secretion. This mini-review highlights the progress that enables new insights into bacterial export and periplasmic protein organization, as well as new biotechnological applications combining the advantages of the periplasmic production and the Aequorea-based fluorescent reporter proteins.

  11. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    One of the most powerful and versatile methods for studying molecules in solution is fluorescence. Crystallization typically takes place in a concentrated solution environment, whereas fluorescence typically has an upper concentration limit of approximately 1 x 10(exp -5)M, thus intrinsic fluorescence cannot be employed, but a fluorescent probe must be added to a sub population of the molecules. However the fluorescent species cannot interfere with the self-assembly process. This can be achieved with macromolecules, where fluorescent probes can be covalently attached to a sub population of molecules that are subsequently used to track the system as a whole. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process of tetragonal lysozyme crystal nucleation, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P432121 space group. FRET studies are being carried out between cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex 376 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex 425 nm, Em 520 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R0 for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approximately 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 43 helix. The short CB-lys lifetime (approximately 5 ns), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules ((sup 3) 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a second, shorter lifetime (approximately 0.2 ns). Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with a model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and grow, and the relevance of that model to microgravity protein crystal growth

  12. Expression of Toxoplasma gondii dense granule protein7 (GRA7) in Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangwen; Qin, Mei; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Jingxia; Suo, Xun

    2013-05-01

    Dense granules are specialized secretory organelles of Apicomplexa parasites; the dense granule (GRA) proteins are believed to play a role in intracellular survival and the nutrient/waste exchange mechanism with the host cell. Until now, limited information is available concerning the characterization of GRA proteins in Eimeria. Eimeria tenella and Toxoplasma gondii are apicomplexan protozoa and share many similarities in biology and genomics. We hypothesized that GRA proteins from T. gondii could be expressed and have a similar function in E. tenella. To confirm the expression and localization of the GRA protein in T. gondii and E. tenella, a transient transfection strategy was used to express T. gondii GRA7 tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) (GRA7-YFP); T. gondii tachyzoites were transfected with the plasmid pTgtubGRA7-YFP/sagCAT, and E. tenella sporozoites were transfected with the pEtmic1GRA7-YFP/act construct. The results show that fluorescence can be expressed mainly into the parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) of the T. gondii. GRA7 of T. gondii can also be expressed in E. tenella and can lead the fluorescence protein into the PVs of the parasites and the cavity of the sporocysts. As for the extracellular stage, YFP gathered to form small particles in the released merozoites and sporozoites, suggesting a localization of the secretory organelles of E. tenella. These results suggest that GRA proteins have a conserved function across species of Apicomplexa in targeting proteins to the PVs.

  13. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  14. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers.

    PubMed

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-15

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs.

  15. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers

    PubMed Central

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. PMID:26609072

  16. Fluorescent pH probes, fluorescent proteins, and intrinsic cellular fluorochromes are tools to study cytosolic pH (pHcyt) in mammalian cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Gloria M.; Gollahon, Lauren S.; Shafer, Keri; Oomman, Sowmini K.; Busch, Christian; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2001-07-01

    Our understanding of intracellular pH homeostatis in eukaryotic systems has been enhanced since the introduction of carboxyfluorescein diacetate as a useful pH probe more than 20 years ago. BCECF, a derivative of this earlier fluoroprobe has dominated the field. In the past 10 years, SNARF-1 has emerged as an alternative pH probe. Recently, a novel derivative of BCECF, BCPCF has been developed. Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have also been used recently to monitor pH in a non invasive manner in several cell types. Here, we report that human mammary epithelial cells can be transfected with the gene encoding for cyan (CFP), green (GFP), and yellow (YFP), to study cytosolic pH. The novel red fluorescent protein (DsRed) is not sensitive to pH. Multidrug resistance (MDR) has been associated with altered cytosolic pH homeostasis. We show that experimental maneuvers that decrease pHin enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. We also show that short pulses of UV-B light elicited acidosis in cells, as evaluated by ratio ion cell imaging, and confocal/spectral imaging microscopy. During the course of these experiments we noticed that cells exhibit intrinsic fluorochromes that can be used to monitor pH in living cells.

  17. A bright monomeric green fluorescent protein derived from Branchiostoma lanceolatum

    PubMed Central

    Shaner, Nathan C.; Lambert, Gerard G.; Chammas, Andrew; Ni, Yuhui; Cranfill, Paula J.; Baird, Michelle A.; Sell, Brittney R.; Allen, John R.; Day, Richard N.; Israelsson, Maria; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Jiwu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of fluorescent proteins spanning the entire visual spectrum, the bulk of modern imaging experiments continue to rely on variants of the green fluorescent protein derived from Aequorea victoria. Meanwhile, a great deal of recent effort has been devoted to engineering and improving red fluorescent proteins, and relatively little attention has been given to green and yellow variants. Here we report a novel monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein, mNeonGreen, which is derived from a tetrameric fluorescent protein from the cephalochordate Branchiostoma lanceolatum. This fluorescent protein is the brightest monomeric green or yellow fluorescent protein yet described, performs exceptionally well as a fusion tag for traditional imaging as well as stochastic single-molecule superresolution imaging, and is an excellent FRET acceptor for the newest generation of cyan fluorescent proteins. PMID:23524392

  18. Fluorescent Reporters for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Cheryl L.; Boles, Blaise R.; Lauderdale, Katherine J.; Thoendel, Matthew; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus as a prominent pathogen in community and healthcare settings, there is a growing need for effective reporter tools to facilitate physiology and pathogenesis studies. Fluorescent proteins are ideal as reporters for their convenience in monitoring gene expression, performing host interaction studies, and monitoring biofilm growth. We have developed a suite of fluorescent reporter plasmids for labeling S. aureus cells. These plasmids encode either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or higher wavelength reporter variants for yellow (YFP) and red (mCherry) labeling. The reporters were placed under control of characterized promoters to enable constitutive or inducible expression. Additionally, plasmids were assembled with fluorescent reporters under control of the agr quorum-sensing and Sigma factor B promoters, and the fluorescent response with wildtype and relevant mutant strains was characterized. Interestingly, reporter expression displayed a strong dependence on ribosome binding site (RBS) sequence, with the superoxide dismutase RBS displaying the strongest expression kinetics of the sequences examined. To test the robustness of the reporter plasmids, cell imaging was performed with fluorescence microscopy and cell populations were separated using florescence activated cell sorting (FACS), demonstrating the possibilities of simultaneous monitoring of multiple S. aureus properties. Finally, a constitutive YFP reporter displayed stable, robust labeling of biofilm growth in a flow cell apparatus. This toolbox of fluorescent reporter plasmids will facilitate cell labeling for a variety of different experimental applications. PMID:19264102

  19. Lateral distribution of the transmembrane domain of influenza virus hemagglutinin revealed by time-resolved fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Silvia; Engel, Stephanie; Krebs, Nils; Plazzo, Anna Pia; De Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Prieto, Manuel; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas

    2009-06-05

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) has been suggested to be enriched in liquid-ordered lipid domains named rafts, which represent an important step in virus assembly. We employed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) via fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study the interaction of the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domain (TMD) of HA with agly co sylphos pha tidyl ino si tol (GPI)-anchored peptide, an established marker for rafts in the exoplasmic leaflet of living mammalian plasma membranes. Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was fused to GPI, whereas the HA sequence was tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) on its exoplasmic site (TMD-HA-YFP), avoiding any interference of fluorescent proteins with the proposed role of the cytoplasmic domain in lateral organization of HA. Constructs were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) for which cholesterol-sensitive lipid nanodomains and their dimension in the plasma membrane have been described (Sharma, P., Varma, R., Sarasij, R. C., Ira, Gousset, K., Krishnamoorthy, G., Rao, M., and Mayor, S. (2004) Cell 116, 577-589). Upon transfection in CHO-K1 cells, TMD-HA-YFP is partially expressed as a dimer. Only dimers are targeted to the plasma membrane. Clustering of TMD-HA-YFP with GPI-CFP was observed and shown to be reduced upon cholesterol depletion, a treatment known to disrupt rafts. No indication for association of TMD-HA-YFP with GPI-CFP was found when palmitoylation, an important determinant of raft targeting, was suppressed. Clustering of TMD-HA-YFP and GPI-CFP was also observed in purified plasma membrane suspensions by homoFRET. We concluded that the pal mit oy lated TMD-HA alone is sufficient to recruit HA to cholesterol-sensitive nanodomains. The corresponding construct of the spike protein E2 of Semliki Forest virus did not partition preferentially in such domains.

  20. Directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled cytokines.

    PubMed

    Recker, Tobias; Haamann, Daniel; Schmitt, Anne; Küster, Andrea; Klee, Doris; Barth, Stefan; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    Cytokines are important mediators coordinating inflammation and wound healing in response to tissue damage and infection. Therefore, immobilization of cytokines on the surface of biomaterials is a promising approach to improve biocompatibility. Soluble cytokines signal through receptors on the cell surface leading to cell differentiation, proliferation, or other effector functions. Random immobilization of cytokines on surfaces will result in a large fraction of inactive protein due to impaired cytokine--receptor interaction. We developed a strategy that combined (i) directed covalent coupling of cytokines, (ii) quantification of coupling efficiency through fluorescence detection, and (iii) a reliable protease cleavage assay to control orientation of coupling. For this purpose, fusion proteins of the SNAP-tag followed by an enterokinase recognition site, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and the cytokine of interest being either interleukin-6 (IL-6) or oncostatin M (OSM) were generated. The SNAP-tag is a derivative of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase that couples itself covalently to benzylguanine. Bioactivities of the SNAP-YFP-cytokines were shown to be comparable with the nontagged cytokines. Efficient coupling of SNAP-YFP-cytokines to benzylguanine-modified beads was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The fact that enterokinase treatment released most of the fluorescence from the beads is indicative for directed coupling and only marginal adsorptive binding. Cellular responses to SNAP-YFP-cytokine beads were analyzed in cellular lysates and by confocal microscopy indicating that the directionally immobilized cytokines are fully signaling competent with respect to the activation of ERK and STAT3. The strategy presented here is generally applicable for the directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled proteins including the convenient and reliable control of coupling efficiency and orientation.

  1. Constitutive expression of fluorescent protein by Aspergillus var. niger and Aspergillus carbonarius to monitor fungal colonization in maize plants.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Edwin Rene; Glenn, Anthony Elbie; Hinton, Dorothy Mae; Bacon, Charles Wilson

    2013-09-01

    Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius are two species in the Aspergillus section Nigri (black-spored aspergilli) frequently associated with peanut (Arachis hypogea), maize (Zea mays), and other plants as pathogens. These infections are symptomless and as such are major concerns since some black aspergilli produce important mycotoxins, ochratoxins A, and the fumonisins. To facilitate the study of the black aspergilli-maize interactions with maize during the early stages of infections, we developed a method that used the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) and the monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) to transform A. niger and A. carbonarius, respectively. The results were constitutive expressions of the fluorescent genes that were stable in the cytoplasms of hyphae and conidia under natural environmental conditions. The hyphal in planta distribution in 21-day-old seedlings of maize were similar wild type and transformants of A. niger and A. carbonarius. The in planta studies indicated that both wild type and transformants internally colonized leaf, stem and root tissues of maize seedlings, without any visible disease symptoms. Yellow and red fluorescent strains were capable of invading epidermal cells of maize roots intercellularly within the first 3 days after inoculation, but intracellular hyphal growth was more evident after 7 days of inoculation. We also tested the capacity of fluorescent transformants to produce ochratoxin A and the results with A. carbonarius showed that this transgenic strain produced similar concentrations of this secondary metabolite. This is the first report on the in planta expression of fluorescent proteins that should be useful to study the internal plant colonization patterns of two ochratoxigenic species in the Aspergillus section Nigri.

  2. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  3. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  4. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker for Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalfie, Martin; Tu, Yuan; Euskirchen, Ghia; Ward, William W.; Prasher, Douglas C.

    1994-02-01

    A complementary DNA for the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) produces a fluorescent product when expressed in prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) or eukaryotic (Caenorhabditis elegans) cells. Because exogenous substrates and cofactors are not required for this fluorescence, GFP expression can be used to monitor gene expression and protein localization in living organisms.

  5. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  6. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-03-18

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications.

  7. Generation of red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Teoan; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) share many common genetic diseases with humans and development of disease models using a transgenic approach has long been awaited. However, due to the technical difficulty in obtaining fertilizable eggs and the unavailability of embryonic stem cells, no transgenic dog has been generated. Canine fetal fibroblasts were stably transfected with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene-expressing construct using retrovirus gene delivery method. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was then employed to replace the nucleus of an oocyte with the nucleus of the RFP-fibroblasts. Using this approach, we produced the first generation of transgenic dogs with four female and two male expressing RFP.

  8. Genetically encoded biosensors based on engineered fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Frommer, Wolf B; Davidson, Michael W; Campbell, Robert E

    2009-10-01

    Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized cell biology by allowing researchers to non-invasively peer into the inner workings of cells and organisms. While the most common applications of fluorescent proteins are to image expression, localization, and dynamics of protein chimeras, there is a growing interest in using fluorescent proteins to create biosensors for minimally invasive imaging of concentrations of ions and small molecules, the activity of enzymes, and changes in the conformation of proteins in living cells. This tutorial review provides an overview of the progress made in the development of fluorescent protein-based biosensors to date.

  9. Expression vectors for C-terminal fusions with fluorescent proteins and epitope tags in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Candida glabrata is a haploid yeast considered the second most common of the Candida species found in nosocomial infections, accounting for approximately 18% of candidemias worldwide. Even though molecular biology methods are easily adapted to study this organism, there are not enough vectors that will allow probing the transcriptional and translational activity of any gene of interest in C. glabrata. In this work we have generated a set of expression vectors to systematically tag any gene of interest at the carboxy-terminus with three different fluorophores (CFP, YFP and mCherry) or three epitopes (HA, FLAG or cMyc) independently. This system offers the possibility to generate translational fusions in three versions: under the gene's own promoter integrated in its native locus in genome, on a replicative plasmid under its own promoter, or on a replicative plasmid under a strong promoter to overexpress the fusions. The expression of these translational fusions will allow determining the transcriptional and translational activity of the gene of interest as well as the intracellular localization of the protein. We have tested these expression vectors with two biosynthetic genes, HIS3 and TRP1. We detected fluorescence under the microscope and we were able to immunodetect the fusions using the three different versions of the system. These vectors permit coexpression of several different fusions simultaneously in the same cell, which will allow determining protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. This set of vectors adds a new toolbox to study expression and protein interactions in the fungal pathogen C. glabrata.

  10. Visualization of nuclear localization of transcription factors with cyan and green fluorescent proteins in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Uji, Toshiki; Takahashi, Megumu; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in expression of genomic information in all organisms. The objective of our study is to analyze the function of transcription factors in red algae. One way to analyze transcription factors in eukaryotic cells is to study their nuclear localization, as reported for land plants and green algae using fluorescent proteins. There is, however, no report documenting subcellular localization of transcription factors from red algae. In the present study, using the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we confirmed for the first time successful expression of humanized fluorescent proteins (ZsGFP and ZsYFP) from a reef coral Zoanthus sp. and land plant-adapted sGFP(S65T) in gametophytic cells comparable to expression of AmCFP. Following molecular cloning and characterization of transcription factors DP-E2F-like 1 (PyDEL1), transcription elongation factor 1 (PyElf1) and multiprotein bridging factor 1 (PyMBF1), we then demonstrated that ZsGFP and AmCFP can be used to visualize nuclear localization of PyElf1 and PyMBF1. This is the first report to perform visualization of subcellular localization of transcription factors as genome-encoded proteins in red algae.

  11. A Recombinant Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Line Stably Expressing Halide-Sensitive YFP-I152L for GABAAR and GlyR-Targeted High-Throughput Drug Screening and Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzel, Katharina; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    GABAARs and GlyRs are considered attractive drug targets for therapeutic intervention and are also increasingly recognized in the context of in vitro neurotoxicity (NT) and developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing. However, systematic human-specific GABAAR and GlyR-targeted drug screening and toxicity testing is hampered due to lack of appropriate in vitro models that express native GABAARs and GlyRs. We have established a human pluripotent stem cell line (NT2) stably expressing YFP-I152L, a halide-sensitive variant of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), allowing for fluorescence-based functional analysis of chloride channels. Upon stimulation with retinoic acid, NT2 cells undergo neuronal differentiation and allow pharmacological and toxicological evaluation of native GABAARs and GlyRs at different stages of brain maturation. We applied the cell line in concentration-response experiments with the neurotransmitters GABA and glycine as well as with the drugs strychnine, picrotoxin, fipronil, lindane, bicuculline, and zinc and demonstrate that the established in vitro model is applicable to GABAAR and GlyR-targeted pharmacological and toxicological profiling. We quantified the proportion of GABAAR and GlyR-sensitive cells, respectively, and identified percentages of approximately 20% each within the overall populations, rendering the cells a suitable model for systematic in vitro GABAAR and GlyR-targeted screening in the context of drug development and NT/DNT testing. PMID:27445687

  12. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence can be used to study protein crystal nucleation through methods such as anisotropy, quenching, and resonance energy transfer (FRET), to follow pH and ionic strength changes, and follow events occurring at the growth interface. We have postulated, based upon a range of experimental evidence that the growth unit of tetragonal hen egg white lysozyme is an octamer. Several fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme have been prepared. The fluorescent probes lucifer yellow (LY), cascade blue, and 5-((2-aminoethyl)aminonapthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS), have been covalently attached to ASP 101. All crystallize in the characteristic tetragonal form, indicating that the bound probes are likely laying within the active site cleft. Crystals of the LY and EDANS derivatives have been found to diffract to at least 1.7 A. A second group of derivatives is to the N-terminal amine group, and these do not crystallize as this site is part of the contact region between the adjacent 43 helix chains. However derivatives at these sites would not interfere with formation of the 43 helices in solution. Preliminary FRET studies have been carried out using N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and LY (Ex -425 nm, Em 525 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1 M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10(exp -5) M respectively). The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence intensity of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations reflected in the lower solubility. The calculated average distance between any two protein molecules at 5 x 10(exp -6) M is approximately 70nm, well beyond the

  13. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence can be used to study protein crystal nucleation through methods such as anisotropy, quenching, and resonance energy transfer (FRET), to follow pH and ionic strength changes, and follow events occurring at the growth interface. We have postulated, based upon a range of experimental evidence that the growth unit of tetragonal hen egg white lysozyme is an octamer. Several fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme have been prepared. The fluorescent probes lucifer yellow (LY), cascade blue, and 5-((2-aminoethyl)aminonapthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS), have been covalently attached to ASP 101. All crystallize in the characteristic tetragonal form, indicating that the bound probes are likely laying within the active site cleft. Crystals of the LY and EDANS derivatives have been found to diffract to at least 1.7 A. A second group of derivatives is to the N-terminal amine group, and these do not crystallize as this site is part of the contact region between the adjacent 43 helix chains. However derivatives at these sites would not interfere with formation of the 43 helices in solution. Preliminary FRET studies have been carried out using N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and LY (Ex -425 nm, Em 525 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1 M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10(exp -5) M respectively). The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence intensity of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations reflected in the lower solubility. The calculated average distance between any two protein molecules at 5 x 10(exp -6) M is approximately 70nm, well beyond the

  14. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  15. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  16. Effect of fixation procedures on the fluorescence lifetimes of Aequorea victoria derived fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Joosen, L; Hink, M A; Gadella, T W J; Goedhart, J

    2014-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be used to study protein-protein interactions by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer or to perform lifetime-based multiplexing. Fixation of samples with cells producing fluorescent fusion proteins is commonly used for preservation of samples and for staining with membrane impermeable reagents such as antibodies. However, the effect of fixation methods and mounting media on fluorescence lifetime is poorly documented so far. Here, we demonstrate that fixation by formaldehyde or methanol itself does not affect the lifetime of fluorescent proteins produced in cells but that several widely used mounting media decrease the fluorescence lifetime by up to 20%. It is shown that fixed cells producing Aequorea victoria derived fluorescent proteins mounted in Tris buffer have fluorescence lifetimes indistinguishable from values measured in living cells. Tris buffer also allows accurate Förster Resonance Energy Transfer quantification in fixed cells, as shown with an mTurquoise2-SYFP2 fusion protein. Moreover, identical lifetime contrasts are measured in living and fixed cells mounted in Tris buffer after introducing a single plasmid expressing two lifetime variants of cyan fluorescent proteins, each targeted to different locations in the cell. Our findings will aid the preparation of fixed cells producing fluorescent proteins for reliable measurement of fluorescence lifetimes for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer determination, lifetime based multiplexing and for instrument calibration for standardization purposes.

  17. Non-excitable fluorescent protein orthologs found in ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Francis, Warren R; Christianson, Lynne M; Powers, Meghan L; Schnitzler, Christine E; D Haddock, Steven H

    2016-08-24

    Fluorescent proteins are optically active proteins found across many clades in metazoans. A fluorescent protein was recently identified in a ctenophore, but this has been suggested to derive from a cnidarian, raising again the question of origins of this group of proteins. Through analysis of transcriptome data from 30 ctenophores, we identified a member of an orthologous group of proteins similar to fluorescent proteins in each of them, as well as in the genome of Mnemiopsis leidyi. These orthologs lack canonical residues involved in chromophore formation, suggesting another function. The phylogenetic position of the ctenophore protein family among fluorescent proteins suggests that this gene was present in the common ancestor of all ctenophores and that the fluorescent protein previously found in a ctenophore actually derives from a siphonophore.

  18. Different non-synonymous polymorphisms modulate the interaction of the WRN protein to its protein partners and its enzymatic activities

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Lachapelle, Sophie; Garand, Chantal; Tsofack, Serges P.; Coulombe, Yan; Caron, Marie-Christine; Poirier, Guy G.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Lebel, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies including cancer. The protein defective in WS patients (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA replication and repair. Here, we present the results of a large-scale proteome analysis that has been undertaken to determine protein partners of different polymorphic WRN proteins found with relatively high prevalence in the human population. We expressed different fluorescently tagged-WRN (eYFP-WRN) variants in human 293 embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and used a combination of affinity-purification and mass spectrometry to identify different compositions of WRN-associated protein complexes. We found that a WRN variant containing a phenylalanine residue at position 1074 and an arginine at position 1367 (eYFP-WRN(F-R)) possesses more affinity for DNA-PKc, KU86, KU70, and PARP1 than a variant containing a leucine at position 1074 and a cysteine at position 1367 (eYFP-WRN(L-C)). Such results were confirmed in a WRN-deficient background using WS fibroblasts. Interestingly, the exonuclase activity of WRN recovered from immunoprecipitated eYFP-WRN(L-C) variant was lower than the eYFP-WRN(F-R) in WS cells. Finally, HEK293 cells and WS fibroblasts overexpressing the eYFP-WRN(F-R) variant were more resistant to the benzene metabolite hydroquinone than cells expressing the eYFP-WRN(L-C) variant. These results indicate that the protein-protein interaction landscape of WRN is subject to modulation by polymorphic amino acids, a characteristic associated with distinctive cell survival outcome. PMID:27863399

  19. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of enhanced green fluorescent protein in protein aggregates with expanded polyglutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is one of the characteristic steps in a number of neurodegenerative diseases eventually leading to neuronal death and thorough study of aggregation is required for the development of effective therapy. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the fluorescence dynamics of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in fusion with the polyQ-expanded polyglutamine stretch. At the expansion of polyQ above 39 residues, it has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregates, and is responsible for Huntington's disease. The results of the experiments show that expression of the eGFP in fusion with the 97Q protein leads to the decrease of the eGFP fluorescence lifetime by ~300 ps. This phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells, where the aggregation in polyQ is prevented. We demonstrate that the lifetime decrease observed is related to the aggregation per se and discuss the possible role of refractive index and homo-FRET in these dynamics.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of enhanced green fluorescent protein in protein aggregates with expanded polyglutamine.

    PubMed

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is one of the characteristic steps in a number of neurodegenerative diseases eventually leading to neuronal death and thorough study of aggregation is required for the development of effective therapy. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the fluorescence dynamics of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in fusion with the polyQ-expanded polyglutamine stretch. At the expansion of polyQ above 39 residues, it has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregates, and is responsible for Huntington's disease. The results of the experiments show that expression of the eGFP in fusion with the 97Q protein leads to the decrease of the eGFP fluorescence lifetime by approximately 300 ps. This phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells, where the aggregation in polyQ is prevented. We demonstrate that the lifetime decrease observed is related to the aggregation per se and discuss the possible role of refractive index and homo-FRET in these dynamics.

  1. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Red Fluorescent Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konold, Patrick Eugene

    Red-emitting homologues (RFPs) of the native Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with emission wavelengths beyond 650 nm are desirable probes for in vivo imaging experiments. They offer the potential for deeper tissue penetration and lower background scatter given a cleaner spectral window. However, bioimaging applications are hindered by poor photophysics ( e.g. low fluorescence quantum yield, high photobleaching), which limits experimental resolution and represents a significant obstacle towards utilization for low copy-number, long-duration imaging applications. In this thesis, a variety of femtosecond nonlinear electronic spectroscopies were employed jointly with site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the photophysical properties of RFPs. In one study, the molecular mechanism of red emission was pursued in two notable RFPs, mPlum and TagRFP675. Solvation dynamics observed with time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy were interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations to indicate that their red-emission is correlated with the ability of specific chromophore-sidechain hydrogen-bonding interactions to interconvert between direct and water-mediated states. In a second set of studies, two-dimensional double quantum coherence spectroscopy was used to probe the electronic transitions of mPlum. It was discovered that it displayed a response distinctly different from an organic dye in bulk solvent. Modeling indicate of these spectra indicate the spectral features may be attributed to the existence of multiple high-lying (n>1) excited states. The results provide new insight into the electronic structure of these widely used fluorescent probes.

  2. Cell-based Fluorescence Complementation Reveals a Role for HIV-1 Nef Protein Dimerization in AP-2 Adaptor Recruitment and CD4 Co-receptor Down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sherry T; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2017-02-17

    The HIV-1 Nef accessory factor enhances viral infectivity, immune evasion, and AIDS progression. Nef triggers rapid down-regulation of CD4 via the endocytic adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) complex, a process linked to enhanced viral infectivity and immune escape. Here, we describe a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay to visualize the interaction of Nef with AP-2 and CD4 in living cells. Interacting protein pairs were fused to complementary non-fluorescent fragments of YFP and co-expressed in 293T cells. Nef interactions with both CD4 and AP-2 resulted in complementation of YFP and a bright fluorescent signal by confocal microcopy that localized to the cell periphery. Co-expression of the AP-2 α subunit enhanced the Nef·AP-2 σ2 subunit BiFC signal and vice versa, suggesting that the AP-2 α-σ2 hemicomplex interacts cooperatively with Nef. Mutagenesis of Nef amino acids Arg-134, Glu-174, and Asp-175, which stabilize Nef for AP-2 α-σ2 binding in a recent co-crystal structure, substantially reduced AP-2 interaction without affecting CD4 binding. A dimerization-defective mutant of Nef failed to interact with either CD4 or AP-2 in the BiFC assay, indicating that Nef quaternary structure is required for CD4 and AP-2 recruitment as well as CD4 down-regulation. A small molecule previously shown to bind the Nef dimerization interface also reduced Nef interactions with AP-2 and CD4 and restored CD4 expression to the surface of HIV-infected cells. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for previous observations that dimerization-defective Nef mutants fail to down-regulate CD4 and validate the Nef dimerization interface as a target site for antiretroviral drug development.

  3. A never ending race for new and improved fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander M; Ehrhardt, David W; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-05-03

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins are now used as tools for research in all organisms. There has been massive progress over the past 15 years in creating a palette of fluorescent proteins with a wide spectrum of specific properties. One of the big challenges is to decide which variant may be best for a certain application. A recent article by Mann et al. in BMC Biotechnology describes a new orange fluorescent protein in plants.

  4. Cell tracking using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Kohei; Tsujii, Hitomi; Omura, Tomomi

    2006-01-01

    The tracking of cell fate, shape and migration is an essential component in the study of the development of multicellular organisms. Here we report a protocol that uses the protein Kaede, which is fluorescent green after synthesis but can be photoconverted red by violet or UV light. We have used Kaede along with confocal laser scanning microscopy to track labeled cells in a pattern of interest in zebrafish embryos. This technique allows the visualization of cell movements and the tracing of neuronal shapes. We provide illustrative examples of expression by mRNA injection, mosaic expression by DNA injection, and the creation of permanent transgenic fish with the UAS-Gal4 system to visualize morphogenetic processes such as neurulation, placode formation and navigation of early commissural axons in the hindbrain. The procedure can be adapted to other photoconvertible and reversible fluorescent molecules, including KikGR and Dronpa; these molecules can be used in combination with two-photon confocal microscopy to specifically highlight cells buried in tissues. The total time needed to carry out the protocol involving transient expression of Kaede by injection of mRNA or DNA, photoconversion and imaging is 2-8 d.

  5. Developing new fluorescent proteins with stagger extension process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Lu, Jinling; Luo, Haiming; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2009-02-01

    The Stagger Extension Process (StEP), a recombination of DNA technique, has been used as a rapid molecular mutagenesis strategy. In this study, for obtaining the fluorescence proteins with new properties, six fluorescence proteins (EYFP, EGFP, ECFP, mCitrine, mCerulean and Venus) were used as the templates to recombine the mutation library by the Stagger Extension Process (StEP) technique. Through screening this mutation library, we have obtained some useful new FPs which are different fluorescent properties with ancestor. These protein will extend fluorescent proteins application.

  6. Fluorescent proteins in microbial biotechnology--new proteins and new applications.

    PubMed

    Vizcaino-Caston, Isaac; Wyre, Chris; Overton, Tim W

    2012-02-01

    The recent advances over the past 5 years in the utilisation of fluorescent proteins in microbial biotechnology applications, including recombinant protein production, food processing, and environmental biotechnology, are reviewed. We highlight possible areas where fluorescent proteins currently used in other bioscience disciplines could be adapted for use in biotechnological applications and also outline novel uses for recently developed fluorescent proteins.

  7. Single-molecule analyses of fully functional fluorescent protein-tagged follitropin receptor reveal homodimerization and specific heterodimerization with lutropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Herrick-Davis, Katharine; Barroso, Margarida; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Thomas, Richard M; Dias, James A

    2015-04-01

    We have previously shown that the carboxyl terminus (cT) of human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, follitropin) receptor (FSHR) is clipped before insertion into the plasma membrane. Surprisingly, several different constructs of FSHR fluorescent fusion proteins (FSHR-FPs) failed to traffic to the plasma membrane. Subsequently, we discovered that substituting the extreme cT of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor (LHR) to create an FSHR-LHRcT chimera has no effect on FSHR functionality. Therefore, we used this approach to create an FSHR-LHRcT-FP fusion. We found this chimeric FSHR-LHRcT-FP was expressed in HEK293 cells at levels similar to reported values for FSHR in human granulosa cells, bound FSH with high affinity, and transduced FSH binding to produce cAMP. Quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis of FSHR-LHRcT-YFP/FSHR-LHRcT-mCherry pairs revealed an average FRET efficiency of 12.9 ± 5.7. Advanced methods in single-molecule analyses were applied in order to ascertain the oligomerization state of the FSHR-LHRcT. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy coupled with photon-counting histogram analyses demonstrated that the FSHR-LHRcT-FP fusion protein exists as a freely diffusing homodimer in the plasma membrane. A central question is whether LHR could oligomerize with FSHR, because both receptors are coexpressed in differentiated granulosa cells. Indeed, FRET analysis revealed an average FRET efficiency of 14.4 ± 7.5 when the FSHR-LHR cT-mCherry was coexpressed with LHR-YFP. In contrast, coexpression of a 5-HT2cVSV-YFP with FSHR-LHR cT-mCherry showed only 5.6 ± 3.2 average FRET efficiency, a value indistinguishable from the detection limit using intensity-based FRET methods. These data demonstrate that coexpression of FSHR and LHR can lead to heterodimerization, and we hypothesize that it is possible for this to occur during granulosa cell differentiation. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  8. Quantitation of carcinogen bound protein adducts by fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liang-Shang; Otteson, Michael S.; Doxtader, Mark M.; Skipper, Paul L.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    A highly significant correlation of aflatoxin B 1 serum albumin adduct level with daily aflatoxin B 1 intake was observed in a molecular epidemiological study of aflatoxin carcinogenesis which used conventional fluorescence spectroscopy methods for adduct quantitation. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence techniques have been employed to quantitate antibenzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide derived globin peptide adducts. Fast and efficient methods to isolate the peptide adducts as well as eliminate protein fluorescence background are described. A detection limit of several femtomoles has been achieved. Experimental and technical considerations of low temperature synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence line narrowing to improve the detection sensitivities are also presented.

  9. Development of probes for cellular functions using fluorescent proteins and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Many genetically encoded probes that employ fluorescent proteins and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to better understand the spatiotemporal regulation of various cellular processes. The different types of FRET and measurement techniques necessitate characterization of their specific features. Here I provide theoretical and practical comparisons of bimolecular and unimolecular FRET constructs, intensity-based and lifetime-based FRET measurements, FRET imaging using live- and fixed-cell samples, green fluorescent protein-based and chemical fluorophore-based FRET, and FRET efficiency and indices. The potential benefits and limitations of a variety of features in the technologies using fluorescent proteins and FRET are discussed.

  10. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  11. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  12. Detection of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein by capillary electrophoresis laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Craig, D B; Wong, J C; Dovichi, N J

    1997-01-01

    Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein was assayed by capillary electrophoresis using post-capillary laser-induced fluorescence detection in a sheath flow cuvette. The limit of detection was 3.0 x 10(-12) M protein in an injection volume of 17 nL, corresponding to a mass of 3100 molecules.

  13. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Steven H D; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M

    2010-04-22

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals.

  14. Integrin‐Targeting Fluorescent Proteins: Exploration of RGD Insertion Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, Michael H.; Schill, Jurgen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The potential of the fluorescent protein scaffold to control peptide sequence functionality is illustrated by an exploration of fluorescent proteins as novel probes for targeting integrins. A library of fluorescent mCitrine proteins with RGD motifs incorporated at several positions in loops within the protein main chain was generated and characterized. Amino acid mutations to RGD as well as RGD insertions were evaluated: both led to constructs with typical mCitrine fluorescent properties. Screening experiments against four human integrin receptors revealed two strong‐binding constructs and two selective integrin binders. The effect of the site of RGD incorporation illustrates the importance of the protein scaffold on RGD sequence functionality, leading to fluorescent protein constructs with the potential for selective integrin targeting. PMID:28004511

  15. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Steven H. D.; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals. PMID:20018790

  16. Fluorescent-protein-based probes: general principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-01-01

    An important application of fluorescent proteins is to derive genetically encoded fluorescent probes that can actively respond to cellular dynamics such as pH change, redox signaling, calcium oscillation, enzyme activities, and membrane potential. Despite the large diverse group of fluorescent-protein-based probes, a few basic principles have been established and are shared by most of these probes. In this article, the focus is on these general principles and strategies that guide the development of fluorescent-protein-based probes. A few examples are provided in each category to illustrate the corresponding principles. Since these principles are quite straightforward, others may adapt them to create fluorescent probes for their own interest. Hopefully, the development of the ever-growing family of fluorescent-protein-based probes will no longer be limited to a small number of laboratories specialized in senor development, leading to the situation that biological studies will be bettered assisted by genetically encoded sensors.

  17. Toward fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Patricia R.; Jones, Anita C.; Baxter, Robert L.; Baxter, Helen C.; Whittaker, A. Gavin; Campbell, Gaynor A.

    2004-06-01

    Prion proteins are the infectious agents that cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) in humans. These proteins are particularly resistant to normal sterilization procedures, and the theoretical risk of prion transmission via surgical instruments is of current public and professional concern. We are currently investigating fluorescence methods for the detection of proteins on surfaces, with a view to developing an optical-fiber-based system for routine, online monitoring of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments, in hospital sterilization departments. This paper presents preliminary results on the detection of femtomole amounts of fluorescently labelled protein on surgical steel and discusses some of the problems involved in the detection of fluorescence from metal samples.

  18. Patterns of fluorescent protein expression in Scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Kao, Hung-Teh; Janoschka, Stephen; Tsai, Julia; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2008-10-01

    Biofluorescence exists in only a few classes of organisms, with Anthozoa possessing the majority of species known to express fluorescent proteins. Most species within the Anthozoan subgroup Scleractinia (reef-building corals) not only express green fluorescent proteins, they also localize the proteins in distinct anatomical patterns.We examined the distribution of biofluorescence in 33 coral species, representing 8 families, from study sites on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. For 28 of these species, we report the presence of biofluorescence for the first time. The dominant fluorescent emissions observed were green (480-520 nm) and red (580-600 nm). Fluorescent proteins were expressed in three distinct patterns (highlighted, uniform, and complementary) among specific anatomical structures of corals across a variety of families. We report no significant overlap between the distribution of fluorescent proteins and the distribution of zooxanthellae. Analysis of the patterns of fluorescent protein distribution provides evidence that the scheme in which fluorescent proteins are distributed among the anatomical structures of corals is nonrandom. This targeted expression of fluorescent proteins in corals produces contrast and may function as a signaling mechanism to organisms with sensitivity to specific wavelengths of light.

  19. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  20. Direct Comparison of the Performance of Commonly Employed In Vivo F-actin Markers (Lifeact-YFP, YFP-mTn and YFP-FABD2) in Tobacco Pollen Tubes.

    PubMed

    Montes-Rodriguez, Adriana; Kost, Benedikt

    2017-01-01

    In vivo markers for F-actin organization and dynamics are extensively used to investigate cellular functions of the actin cytoskeleton, which are essential for plant development and pathogen defense. The most widely employed markers are GFP variants fused to F-actin binding domains of mouse talin (GFP-mTn), Arabidopsis fimbrin1 (GFP-FABD2) or yeast Abp140 (Lifeact-GFP). Although numerous reports describing applications of one, or occasionally more, of these markers, are available in the literature, a direct quantitative comparison of the performance of all three markers at different expression levels has been missing. Here, we analyze F-actin organization and growth rate displayed by tobacco pollen tubes expressing YFP-mTn, YFP-FABD2 or Lifeact-YFP at different levels. Results obtained establish that: (1) all markers strongly affect F-actin organization and cell expansion at high expression levels, (2) YFP-mTn and Lifeact-YFP non-invasively label the same F-actin structures (longitudinally oriented filaments in the shank, a subapical fringe) at low expression levels, (3) Lifeact-YFP displays a somewhat lower potential to affect F-actin organization and cell expansion than YFP-mTn, and (4) YFP-FABD2 generally fails to label F-actin structures at the pollen tube tip and affects F-actin organization as well as cell expansion already at lowest expression levels. As pointed out in the discussion, these observations (1) are also meaningful for F-actin labeling in other cell types, which generally respond less sensitively to F-actin perturbation than pollen tubes, (2) help selecting suitable markers for future F-actin labeling experiments, and (3) support the assessment of a substantial amount of published data resulting from such experiments.

  1. Direct Comparison of the Performance of Commonly Employed In Vivo F-actin Markers (Lifeact-YFP, YFP-mTn and YFP-FABD2) in Tobacco Pollen Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Montes-Rodriguez, Adriana; Kost, Benedikt

    2017-01-01

    In vivo markers for F-actin organization and dynamics are extensively used to investigate cellular functions of the actin cytoskeleton, which are essential for plant development and pathogen defense. The most widely employed markers are GFP variants fused to F-actin binding domains of mouse talin (GFP-mTn), Arabidopsis fimbrin1 (GFP-FABD2) or yeast Abp140 (Lifeact-GFP). Although numerous reports describing applications of one, or occasionally more, of these markers, are available in the literature, a direct quantitative comparison of the performance of all three markers at different expression levels has been missing. Here, we analyze F-actin organization and growth rate displayed by tobacco pollen tubes expressing YFP-mTn, YFP-FABD2 or Lifeact-YFP at different levels. Results obtained establish that: (1) all markers strongly affect F-actin organization and cell expansion at high expression levels, (2) YFP-mTn and Lifeact-YFP non-invasively label the same F-actin structures (longitudinally oriented filaments in the shank, a subapical fringe) at low expression levels, (3) Lifeact-YFP displays a somewhat lower potential to affect F-actin organization and cell expansion than YFP-mTn, and (4) YFP-FABD2 generally fails to label F-actin structures at the pollen tube tip and affects F-actin organization as well as cell expansion already at lowest expression levels. As pointed out in the discussion, these observations (1) are also meaningful for F-actin labeling in other cell types, which generally respond less sensitively to F-actin perturbation than pollen tubes, (2) help selecting suitable markers for future F-actin labeling experiments, and (3) support the assessment of a substantial amount of published data resulting from such experiments. PMID:28824684

  2. A New Direct Single-Molecule Observation Method for DNA Synthesis Reaction Using Fluorescent Replication Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Kawasaki, Shohei; Miyata, Hidefumi; Kurita, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Takeshi; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Mizuno, Akira; Oshige, Masahiko; Katsura, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Using a single-stranded region tracing system, single-molecule DNA synthesis reactions were directly observed in microflow channels. The direct single-molecule observations of DNA synthesis were labeled with a fusion protein consisting of the ssDNA-binding domain of a 70-kDa subunit of replication protein A and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (RPA-YFP). Our method was suitable for measurement of DNA synthesis reaction rates with control of the ssλDNA form as stretched ssλDNA (+flow) and random coiled ssλDNA (−flow) via buffer flow. Sequentially captured photographs demonstrated that the synthesized region of an ssλDNA molecule monotonously increased with the reaction time. The DNA synthesis reaction rate of random coiled ssλDNA (−flow) was nearly the same as that measured in a previous ensemble molecule experiment (52 vs. 50 bases/s). This suggested that the random coiled form of DNA (−flow) reflected the DNA form in the bulk experiment in the case of DNA synthesis reactions. In addition, the DNA synthesis reaction rate of stretched ssλDNA (+flow) was approximately 75% higher than that of random coiled ssλDNA (−flow) (91 vs. 52 bases/s). The DNA synthesis reaction rate of the Klenow fragment (3′-5′exo–) was promoted by DNA stretching with buffer flow. PMID:24625741

  3. Microscopie de fluorescence de protéines autofluorescentes uniques pour la biologie cellulaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cognet, Laurent; Coussen, Françoise; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent proteins. Single-molecule experiments performed in live cells using eGFP and preferably eYFP fusion proteins are reviewed. Finally, the first use at the single-molecule level of citrine, a more photostable variant of the eYFP is reported when fused to a receptor for neurotransmitter in live cells. To cite this article: L. Cognet et al., C. R. Physique 3 (2002) 645-656.

  4. Screening for in planta protein-protein interactions combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation with flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Understanding protein and gene function requires identifying interaction partners using biochemical, molecular or genetic tools. In plants, searching for novel protein-protein interactions is limited to protein purification assays, heterologous in vivo systems such as the yeast-two-hybrid or mutant screens. Ideally one would be able to search for novel protein partners in living plant cells. We demonstrate that it is possible to screen for novel protein-protein interactions from a random library in protoplasted Arabidopsis plant cells and recover some of the interacting partners. Our screen is based on capturing the bi-molecular complementation of mYFP between an YN-bait fusion partner and a completely random prey YC-cDNA library with FACS. The candidate interactions were confirmed using in planta BiFC assays and in planta FRET-FLIM assays. From this work, we show that the well characterized protein Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase 3 (CPK3) interacts with APX3, HMGB5, ORP2A and a ricin B-related lectin domain containing protein At2g39050. This is one of the first randomin planta screens to be successfully employed. PMID:22789293

  5. Screening for in planta protein-protein interactions combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation with flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Berendzen, Kenneth Wayne; Böhmer, Maik; Wallmeroth, Niklas; Peter, Sébastien; Vesić, Marko; Zhou, Ying; Tiesler, Franziska Katharina Elisabeth; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Harter, Klaus

    2012-07-12

    Understanding protein and gene function requires identifying interaction partners using biochemical, molecular or genetic tools. In plants, searching for novel protein-protein interactions is limited to protein purification assays, heterologous in vivo systems such as the yeast-two-hybrid or mutant screens. Ideally one would be able to search for novel protein partners in living plant cells. We demonstrate that it is possible to screen for novel protein-protein interactions from a random library in protoplasted Arabidopsis plant cells and recover some of the interacting partners. Our screen is based on capturing the bi-molecular complementation of mYFP between an YN-bait fusion partner and a completely random prey YC-cDNA library with FACS. The candidate interactions were confirmed using in planta BiFC assays and in planta FRET-FLIM assays. From this work, we show that the well characterized protein Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase 3 (CPK3) interacts with APX3, HMGB5, ORP2A and a ricin B-related lectin domain containing protein At2g39050. This is one of the first randomin planta screens to be successfully employed.

  6. Ratiometric fluorescent pH nanoprobes based on in situ assembling of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijun; Chen, Chao; Cao, Xiaodan; Liu, Yueling; Zhou, Shengmin; Wang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    pH-dependent protein adsorption on mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) was examined as a unique means for pH monitoring. Assuming that the degree of protein adsorption determines the distance separating protein molecules, we examined the feasibility of nanoscale pH probes based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins (mTurquoise2 and mNeonGreen, as donor and acceptor, respectively). Since protein adsorption on MSN is pH-sensitive, both fluorescent proteins were modified to make their isoelectric points (pIs) identical, thus achieving comparable adsorption between the proteins and enhancing FRET signals. The adsorption behaviors of such modified fluorescent proteins were examined along with ratiometric FRET signal generation. Results demonstrated that the pH probes could be manipulated to show feasible sensitivity and selectivity for pH changes in hosting solutions, with a good linearity observed in the pH range of 5.5-8.0. In a demonstration test, the pH probes were successfully applied to monitor progress of enzymatic reactions. Such an "in situ-assembling" pH sensor demonstrates a promising strategy in developing nanoscale fluorescent protein probes. Graphical abstract Working principle of the developed pH sensor TNS; and FRET Ratio (I528/I460) as a function of pH under different protein feed ratios (mNeonGreen to mTurquoise2).

  7. Guide to Red Fluorescent Proteins and Biosensors for Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first red fluorescent protein (RFP), named DsRed, 12 years ago, a wide pallet of red-shifted fluorescent proteins has been cloned and biotechnologically developed into monomeric fluorescent probes for optical microscopy. Several new types of monomeric RFPs that change the emission wavelength either with time, called fluorescent timers, or after a brief irradiation with violet light, known as photoactivatable proteins, have been also engineered. Moreover, RFPs with a large Stokes shift of fluorescence emission have been recently designed. Because of their distinctive excitation and fluorescence detection conditions developed specifically for microscopy, these fluorescent probes can be suboptimal for flow cytometry. Here, we have selected and summarized the advanced orange, red, and far-red fluorescent proteins with the properties specifically required for the flow cytometry applications. Their effective brightness was calculated for the laser sources available for the commercial flow cytometers and sorters. Compatibility of the fluorescent proteins of different colors in a multiparameter flow cytometry was determined. Novel FRET pairs, utilizing RFPs, RFP-based intracellular biosensors, and their application to a high-throughput screening, are also discussed. PMID:21704849

  8. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  9. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B.

    PubMed

    Yue, J; Pang, S

    1997-04-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical charactcristics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quenchtr between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (K(sv); K(q),). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was observed in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB- was found to arise from an electron transfer from excited trytophan to HB.

  10. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  11. Green Fluorescent Protein with Anionic Tryptophan-Based Chromophore and Long Fluorescence Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Lidsky, Peter V.; Gorbachev, Dmitry A.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu.; Pereverzeva, Alina R.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Zherdeva, Victoria V.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Bommarius, Andreas S.; Sharonov, George V.; Lindquist, Jake R.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP—the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins. PMID:26200874

  12. Green fluorescent protein with anionic tryptophan-based chromophore and long fluorescence lifetime.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Goryashchenko, Alexander S; Lidsky, Peter V; Gorbachev, Dmitry A; Bozhanova, Nina G; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Pereverzeva, Alina R; Ryumina, Alina P; Zherdeva, Victoria V; Savitsky, Alexander P; Solntsev, Kyril M; Bommarius, Andreas S; Sharonov, George V; Lindquist, Jake R; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Mishin, Alexander S

    2015-07-21

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP-the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins.

  13. Fluorescent protein engineering by in vivo site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Melvys Valledor; Hu, Qinghua; Schiller, Paul; Myers, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In vivo site-directed mutagenesis by ssDNA recombineering is a facile method to change the color of fluorescent proteins without cloning. Two different starting alleles of GFP were targeted for mutagenesis: gfpmut3* residing in the E. coli genome and egfp carried by a bacterial/mammalian dual expression lentiviral plasmid vector. Fluorescent protein spectra were shifted by subtle modification of the chromophore region and residues interacting with the chromophore of the fluorescent protein. Eight different fluorescent proteins (Violeta, Azure, Aqua, Mar, Celeste, Amarillo, Mostaza and Bronze) were isolated and shown to be useful in multicolor imaging and flow cytometry of bacteria and transgenic human stem cells. To make in vivo site-directed mutagenesis more efficient, the recombineering method was optimized using the fluorescence change as a sensitive quantitative assay for recombination. A set of rules to simplify mutant isolation by recombineering is provided. PMID:22639380

  14. Two-photon absorption properties of fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Makarov, Nikolay S.; Tillo, Shane E.; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon excitation of fluorescent proteins is an attractive approach for imaging living systems. Today researchers are eager to know which proteins are the brightest, and what the best excitation wavelengths are. Here we review the two-photon absorption properties of a wide variety of fluorescent proteins, including new far-red variants, to produce a comprehensive guide to choosing the right FP and excitation wavelength for two-photon applications. PMID:21527931

  15. Synthesis of fluorescent dipeptidomimetics and their ribosomal incorporation into green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sandipan Roy; Maini, Rumit; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis and incorporation into position 66 of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by in vitro protein translation of novel oxazole and thiazole based dipeptidomimetics are described. The compounds may be regarded as GFP chromophore analogues, and are strongly fluorescent. An α-amido-β-ketoester intermediate was obtained via bisacylation of a protected glycine. The intermediate underwent dehydrative cyclization to afford the 1,3-oxazole and was treated with Lawesson's reagent to furnish the 1,3-thiazole. When these fluorophores were introduced into position 66 of GFP in place of Tyr66, the resulting GFP analogues exhibited fluorescence emission several-fold greater than wild-type GFP; the emission was also shifted to shorter wavelength. It may be noted that compared to the typical fluorophores formed in the natural and modified fluorescent proteins, the oxazole and thiazole fluorophores are completely stable and do not require activation by posttranslational modification to exhibit fluorescence.

  16. Fluorescence of Alexa Fluor Dye Tracks Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding. PMID:23056480

  17. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  18. Time-resolved FRET fluorescence spectroscopy of visible fluorescent protein pairs.

    PubMed

    Visser, A J W G; Laptenok, S P; Visser, N V; van Hoek, A; Birch, D J S; Brochon, J-C; Borst, J W

    2010-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for obtaining information about small-scale lengths between biomacromolecules. Visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) are widely used as spectrally different FRET pairs, where one VFP acts as a donor and another VFP as an acceptor. The VFPs are usually fused to the proteins of interest, and this fusion product is genetically encoded in cells. FRET between VFPs can be determined by analysis of either the fluorescence decay properties of the donor molecule or the rise time of acceptor fluorescence. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is the technique of choice to perform these measurements. FRET can be measured not only in solution, but also in living cells by the technique of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), where fluorescence lifetimes are determined with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope. Here we focus attention on time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of purified, selected VFPs (both single VFPs and FRET pairs of VFPs) in cuvette-type experiments. For quantitative interpretation of FRET-FLIM experiments in cellular systems, details of the molecular fluorescence are needed that can be obtained from experiments with isolated VFPs. For analysis of the time-resolved fluorescence experiments of VFPs, we have utilised the maximum entropy method procedure to obtain a distribution of fluorescence lifetimes. Distributed lifetime patterns turn out to have diagnostic value, for instance, in observing populations of VFP pairs that are FRET-inactive.

  19. Fluorescence response profiling for small molecule sensors utilizing the green fluorescent protein chromophore and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Baldridge, Anthony; Feng, Suihan; SiQiang, Yang; Kim, Yun Kyung; Tolbert, Laren M; Chang, Young-Tae

    2011-01-10

    Using a fluorescence response profile, a systematic examination was performed for synthetic chromophores of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to discover new small molecule sensors. A group of 41 benzylideneimidazolinone compounds (BDI) was prepared and screened toward 94 biologically relevant analytes to generate fluorescence response profiles. From the response pattern, compounds containing aminobenzyl and heteroaromatic cyclic substructures revealed a pH dependent emission decrease effect, and unlike other fluorescence scaffolds, most BDIs showed fluorescence quenching when mixed with proteins. On the basis of the primary response profile, we obtained three selective fluorescence turn-on sensors for pH, human serum albumin (HSA), and total ribonucleic acid (RNA). Following analysis, a fluorescence response profile testing four nucleic acids revealed the alkyloxy (Ph-OR) functional group in the para position of benzyl analogues contributes to RNA selectivity. Among the primary hit compounds, BDI 2 showed outstanding selectivity toward total RNA with 5-fold emission enhancement. Finally, BDI 24 showed selective fluorescence increase to HSA (K(d) = 3.57 μM) with a blue-shifted emission max wavelength (Δλ(em) = 15 nm). These examples of fluorescence sensor discovery by large-scale fluorescence response profiling demonstrate the general applicability of this approach and the usefulness of the response profiles.

  20. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  1. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  2. Application of fluorescence lifetime imaging of enhanced green fluorescent protein to intracellular pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Wang, Hui-Ping; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-06-01

    We have shown that the intracellular pH of a single HeLa cell expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) can be imaged using the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP, which can be interpreted in terms of the pH-dependent ionic equilibrium of the p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone structure of the chromophore of EGFP.

  3. Strategies for In Vivo Imaging Using Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-08-26

    Fluorescent proteins have enabled the color-coding of cells growing in vivo. Noninvasive imaging of cells expressing fluorescent proteins has allowed the real-time determination of the behavior on cancer cells, the progression of infection, the differentiation of stem cells, and interaction of stromal and cancer cells. Cancer cells in the nucleus and cytoplasm can visualize in vivo nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics in vivo including: mitosis, apoptosis, cell-cycle phase, and differential behavior of nucleus and cytoplasm that occurs during cancer-cell deformation. Linking spectrally-distinct fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins results in color-coding the phases of the cell cycle. With the use of fluorescent proteins, literally any cellular or molecular function can be imaged in vivo. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Description of Hydration Water in Protein (Green Fluorescent Protein) Solution

    DOE PAGES

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Stanley, Christopher B.; ...

    2016-10-26

    The structurally and dynamically perturbed hydration shells that surround proteins and biomolecules have a substantial influence upon their function and stability. This makes the extent and degree of water perturbation of practical interest for general biological study and industrial formulation. Here, we present an experimental description of the dynamical perturbation of hydration water around green fluorescent protein in solution. Less than two shells (~5.5 Å) were perturbed, with dynamics a factor of 2–10 times slower than bulk water, depending on their distance from the protein surface and the probe length of the measurement. Furthermore, this dependence on probe length demonstratesmore » that hydration water undergoes subdiffusive motions (τ ∝ q–2.5 for the first hydration shell, τ ∝ q–2.3 for perturbed water in the second shell), an important difference with neat water, which demonstrates diffusive behavior (τ ∝ q–2). Our results help clarify the seemingly conflicting range of values reported for hydration water retardation as a logical consequence of the different length scales probed by the analytical techniques used.« less

  5. Description of Hydration Water in Protein (Green Fluorescent Protein) Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Stanley, Christopher B.; Mamontov, Eugene; O’Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu; Cheng, Xiaolin; Myles, Dean A. A.; Katsaras, John; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-26

    The structurally and dynamically perturbed hydration shells that surround proteins and biomolecules have a substantial influence upon their function and stability. This makes the extent and degree of water perturbation of practical interest for general biological study and industrial formulation. Here, we present an experimental description of the dynamical perturbation of hydration water around green fluorescent protein in solution. Less than two shells (~5.5 Å) were perturbed, with dynamics a factor of 2–10 times slower than bulk water, depending on their distance from the protein surface and the probe length of the measurement. Furthermore, this dependence on probe length demonstrates that hydration water undergoes subdiffusive motions (τ ∝ q–2.5 for the first hydration shell, τ ∝ q–2.3 for perturbed water in the second shell), an important difference with neat water, which demonstrates diffusive behavior (τ ∝ q–2). Our results help clarify the seemingly conflicting range of values reported for hydration water retardation as a logical consequence of the different length scales probed by the analytical techniques used.

  6. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  7. LucY: A versatile new fluorescent reporter protein

    SciTech Connect

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2015-04-23

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrast to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.

  8. LucY: A Versatile New Fluorescent Reporter Protein

    PubMed Central

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrast to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions. PMID:25906065

  9. LucY: A Versatile New Fluorescent Reporter Protein.

    PubMed

    Auldridge, Michele E; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P; Bingman, Craig A; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M; Phillips, George N; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276 nm, 377 nm, and 460 nm and a single emission peak at 530 nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrast to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.

  10. LucY: A versatile new fluorescent reporter protein

    DOE PAGES

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; ...

    2015-04-23

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrastmore » to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.« less

  11. Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins enable monochromatic multilabel imaging and dual color fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Martin; Stiel, Andre C; Fölling, Jonas; Wenzel, Dirk; Schönle, Andreas; Egner, Alexander; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be reversibly photoswitched between a fluorescent and a nonfluorescent state are important for innovative microscopy schemes, such as protein tracking, fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging, sub-diffraction resolution microscopy and others. However, all available monomeric reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have similar properties and switching characteristics, thereby limiting their use. Here, we introduce two bright green fluorescent RSFPs, bsDronpa and Padron, generated by extensive mutagenesis of the RSFP Dronpa, with unique absorption and switching characteristics. Whereas bsDronpa features a broad absorption spectrum extending into the UV, Padron displays a switching behavior that is reversed to that of all green fluorescent RSFPs known to date. These two RSFPs enable live-cell fluorescence microscopy with multiple labels using a single detection color, because they can be distinguished by photoswitching. Furthermore, we demonstrate dual-color fluorescence microscopy with sub-diffraction resolution using bsDronpa and Dronpa whose emission maxima are separated by <20 nm.

  12. Flavin Mononucleotide-Based Fluorescent Reporter Proteins Outperform Green Fluorescent Protein-Like Proteins as Quantitative In Vivo Real-Time Reporters▿

    PubMed Central

    Drepper, Thomas; Huber, Robert; Heck, Achim; Circolone, Franco; Hillmer, Anne-Kathrin; Büchs, Jochen; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are commonly used as reporter proteins for quantitative analysis of complex biological processes in living microorganisms. Here we demonstrate that the fluorescence signal intensity of GFP-like proteins is affected under oxygen limitation and therefore does not reflect the amount of reporter protein in Escherichia coli batch cultures. Instead, flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) are suitable for quantitative real-time in vivo assays under these conditions. PMID:20601504

  13. X-ray diffraction and time-resolved fluorescence analyses of Aequorea green fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Perozzo, M A; Ward, K B; Thompson, R B; Ward, W W

    1988-06-05

    The energy transfer protein, green fluorescent protein, from the hydromedusan jellyfish Aequorea victoria has been crystallized in two morphologies suitable for x-ray diffraction analysis. Hexagonal plates have been obtained in the P6122 or P6522 space group with a = b = 77.5, c = 370 A, and no more than three molecules per asymmetric unit. Monoclinic parallel-epipeds have been obtained in the C2 space group with a = 93.3, b = 66.5, c = 45.5 A, beta = 108 degrees, and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The monoclinic form is better suited for use in a structure determination, and a data set was collected from the native crystal. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of large single crystals are possible due to the unique, covalently bound chromophore present in this molecule. Fluorescence emission spectra of Aequorea green fluorescent protein in solution and from either the hexagonal or monoclinic single crystal show similar profiles suggesting that the conformations of protein in solution and in the crystal are similar. Multifrequency phase fluorimetric data obtained from a single crystal were best fit by a single fluorescence lifetime very close to that exhibited by the protein in solution. The complementary structural data obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction crystallography will aid in the elucidation of this novel protein's structure-function relationship.

  14. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  15. Soluble, highly fluorescent variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for use in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, S J; Vierstra, R D

    1998-03-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria has rapidly become a standard reporter in many biological systems. However, the use of GFP in higher plants has been limited by aberrant splicing of the corresponding mRNA and by protein insolubility. It has been shown that GFP can be expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana after altering the codon usage in the region that is incorrectly spliced, but the fluorescence signal is weak, possibly due to aggregation of the encoded protein. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we have generated a more soluble version of the codon-modified GFP called soluble-modified GFP (smGFP). The excitation and emission spectra for this protein are nearly identical to wild-type GFP. When introduced into A. thaliana, greater fluorescence was observed compared to the codon-modified GFP, implying that smGFP is 'brighter' because more of it is present in a soluble and functional form. Using the smGFP template, two spectral variants were created, a soluble-modified red-shifted GFP (smRS-GFP) and a soluble-modified blue-fluorescent protein (smBFP). The increased fluorescence output of smGFP will further the use of this reporter in higher plants. In addition, the distinct spectral characters of smRS-GFP and smBFP should allow for dual monitoring of gene expression, protein localization, and detection of in vivo protein-protein interactions.

  16. Interconversion of Anthozoa GFP-like fluorescent and non-fluorescent proteins by mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bulina, Maria E; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Mudrik, Nikolay N; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2002-01-01

    Background Within the family of green fluorescent protein (GFP) homologs, one can mark two main groups, specifically, fluorescent proteins (FPs) and non-fluorescent or chromoproteins (CPs). Structural background of differences between FPs and CPs are poorly understood to date. Results Here, we applied site-directed and random mutagenesis in order to to transform CP into FP and vice versa. A purple chromoprotein asCP (asFP595) from Anemonia sulcata and a red fluorescent protein DsRed from Discosoma sp. were selected as representatives of CPs and FPs, respectively. For asCP, some substitutions at positions 148 and 165 (numbering in accordance to GFP) were found to dramatically increase quantum yield of red fluorescence. For DsRed, substitutions at positions 148, 165, 167, and 203 significantly decreased fluorescence intensity, so that the spectral characteristics of these mutants became more close to those of CPs. Finally, a practically non-fluorescent mutant DsRed-NF was generated. This mutant carried four amino acid substitutions, specifically, S148C, I165N, K167M, and S203A. DsRed-NF possessed a high extinction coefficient and an extremely low quantum yield (< 0.001). These spectral characteristics allow one to regard DsRed-NF as a true chromoprotein. Conclusions We located a novel point in asCP sequence (position 165) mutations at which can result in red fluorescence appearance. Probably, this finding could be applied onto other CPs to generate red and far-red fluorescent mutants. A possibility to transform an FP into CP was demonstrated. Key role of residues adjacent to chromophore's phenolic ring in fluorescent/non-fluorescent states determination was revealed. PMID:11972899

  17. Can the fluorescence of green fluorescent protein chromophore be related directly to the nativity of protein structure?

    PubMed

    Melnik, B S; Povarnitsyna, T V; Melnik, T N

    2009-12-25

    In studies of green fluorescence protein (GFP) or other proteins with the use of GFP as a marker, the fluorescence of GFP is for the most part related directly to the nativity of its structure. Naturally, such a relation does exist since the chromophore of this protein is formed autocatalytically only just after GFP acquires its native structure. However, the fluorescence method may not yield reliable information on protein structure when studying renaturation and denaturation of this protein (with the formed chromophore). Using proteolysis, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism, we demonstrate herein that at major disturbances of the native structure of protein GFP-cycle3 the intensity of fluorescence of its chromophore can change insignificantly. In other words, the chromophore fluorescence does not reliably mirror alterations in protein structure. Since the main conclusions of this study are especially qualitative, it can be suggested that during renaturation/denaturation of wild-type GFP and its "multicolored" mutants their fluorescence is also not always associated with the changes in the structure of these proteins.

  18. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes. Part 2: fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan in proteins.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan in proteins dissolved in pH 7 buffer, in ethanol and in 6 M guanidine pH 7.8 and in lyophilized proteins were measured. In all protein conditions, three lifetimes were obtained along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). The two shortest lifetimes are in the same range of those obtained for L-Trp in water or in ethanol. Thus, these two lifetimes originate from specific two sub-structures existing in the excited state and are inherent to the tryptophan structure independently of the surrounding environment (amino acids residues, solvent, etc.) In proteins, the third lifetime originates from the interactions that are occurring between tryptophan residues and neighboring amino acids. Populations of these lifetimes are independent of the excitation wavelength and thus originate from pre-defined sub structures existing in the excited state and put into evidence after tryptophan excitation. Fluorescence decay studies of different tripeptides having a tryptophan residue in second position show that the best analysis is obtained with two fluorescence lifetimes. Consequently, this result seems to exclude the possibility that peptide bond induces the third fluorescence lifetimes. Indole dissolved in water and/or in ethanol emits with two fluorescence lifetimes that are completely different from those observed for L-Trp. Absence of the third lifetime in ethanol demonstrates that indole behaves differently when compared to tryptophan. Thus, it seems not adequate to attribute fluorescence lifetime or fluorescence properties of tryptophan to indole ring and to compare tryptophan fluorescence properties in proteins to molecules having close structures such as NATA which fluoresces with one lifetime.

  19. Fluorescence properties of o-aminobenzoyl-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Churchich, J E

    1993-09-01

    Isatoic anhydride reacts with nucleophile groups of proteins to yield o-aminobenzoyl protein conjugates. The fluorescence emitted by the chromophore decays in a multiexponential manner with average fluorescence lifetimes ranging from 9.9 to 10.7 ns. The steady emission anisotropy, measured upon excitation at 330 nm, is influenced by the molecular mass of the protein to which o-aminobenzoyl is attached. The fluorescence properties of o-aminobenzoyl are suitable for rotational correlation time measurements of proteins smaller than 65 kDa. The technique of emission anisotropy can be used to detect interactions between proteins in solution, provided one of the proteins is labeled with o-aminobenzoyl.

  20. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Pedelacq,J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP.

  1. Microplate Bioassay for Nisin in Foods, Based on Nisin-Induced Green Fluorescent Protein Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Reunanen, J.; Saris, P. E. J.

    2003-01-01

    A plasmid coding for the nisin two-component regulatory proteins, NisK and NisR, was constructed; in this plasmid a gfp gene (encoding the green fluorescent protein) was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisF promoter. The plasmid was transformed into non-nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strain MG1614. The new strain could sense extracellular nisin and transduce it to green fluorescent protein fluorescence. The amount of fluorescence was dependent on the nisin concentration, and it could be measured easily. By using this strain, an assay for quantification of nisin was developed. With this method it was possible to measure as little as 2.5 ng of pure nisin per ml in culture supernatant, 45 ng of nisin per ml in milk, 0.9 μg of nisin in cheese, and 1 μg of nisin per ml in salad dressings. PMID:12839802

  2. Latest methods of fluorescence-based protein crystal identification

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Arne; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-28

    Fluorescence, whether intrinsic or by using trace fluorescent labeling, can be a powerful aid in macromolecule crystallization. Its use in screening for crystals is discussed here. Successful protein crystallization screening experiments are dependent upon the experimenter being able to identify positive outcomes. The introduction of fluorescence techniques has brought a powerful and versatile tool to the aid of the crystal grower. Trace fluorescent labeling, in which a fluorescent probe is covalently bound to a subpopulation (<0.5%) of the protein, enables the use of visible fluorescence. Alternatively, one can avoid covalent modification and use UV fluorescence, exploiting the intrinsic fluorescent amino acids present in most proteins. By the use of these techniques, crystals that had previously been obscured in the crystallization drop can readily be identified and distinguished from amorphous precipitate or salt crystals. Additionally, lead conditions that may not have been obvious as such under white-light illumination can be identified. In all cases review of the screening plate is considerably accelerated, as the eye can quickly note objects of increased intensity.

  3. An Engineered Palette of Metal Ion Quenchable Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhen; Strub, Marie-Paule; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Buchanan, Susan K.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+). Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum. PMID:24752441

  4. "Color Timer" mice: visualization of neuronal differentiation with fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Kanki, Hiroaki; Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-02-02

    The molecular mechanisms governing the differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into neuronal progenitor cells and finally into neurons are gradually being revealed. The lack of convenient means for real-time determination of the stages of differentiation of individual neural cells, however, has been hindering progress in elucidating the mechanisms. In order to be able to easily identify the stages of differentiation of neural cells, we have been attempting to establish a mouse system that would allow progression of neuronal differentiation to be visualized based on transitions between fluorescence colors by using a combination of mouse genetics and the ever-expanding repertoire of fluorescent proteins. In this study we report the initial version of such a mouse system, which we call "Color Timer." We first generated transgenic (Tg; nestin/KOr Tg) mice in which production of the fluorescent protein Kusabira-Orange (KOr) is controlled by the gene regulatory elements within the 2nd intronic enhancer of the nestin gene, which is a good marker for NSCs, so that NSCs would emit orange fluorescence upon excitation. We then confirmed by immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical analyses that the KOr fluorescence closely reflected the presence of the Nestin protein. We also confirmed by a neurosphere formation assay that the intensity of the KOr fluorescence correlated with "stemness" of the cell and it was possible to readily identify NSCs in the two neurogenic regions, namely the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, in the brain of adult nestin/KOr Tg mice by the orange fluorescence they emitted. We then crossed nestin/KOr mice with doublecortin-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein Tg mice, whose immature neurons emit green fluorescence upon excitation, and it was possible to visualize the progress of NSC-to-neuron differentiation by the transition between fluorescence colors from orange to green. This two-color initial

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein in a single living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Sharman, Kristin K.; Ahuja, Ramesh C.; Eto, Masumi; Brautigan, David L.

    1999-06-01

    Observing dynamic reorganization and molecular interactions of cellular components on a precise spatial and temporal scale is not possible using existing microscopic techniques. However, fluorescence lifetimes occur on a nanosecond time scale, are independent of local signal intensity and concentration of the fluorophore, and provide sensitive discrimination of the molecular environment. We designed and implemented a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) using a picosecond-gated multi-channel plate image intensifier, providing two-dimensional time-resolved images of single cell specimen. BHK21 cells were transfected with vectors for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and placed on an infinity-corrected Olympus epi-fluorescence microscope, coupled to a Coherent tunable femtosecond ti-sapphire pulsed laser and a frequency doubler to select an appropriate excitation wave length. After synchronizing the high-speed gated image intensifier to the excitation laser pulses, time-resolved nanosecond images of fluorescent emission were acquired. These images were processed pixel-by-pixel for single exponential decay to obtain an image based on fluorescence lifetime. Although the nucleus appeared brighter than the cytoplasm by fluorescence intensity measurement, FILM showed a uniform lifetime of the GFP fluorescence in both compartments, indicating that the GFP was in similar molecular environments. This technology also has important applications in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging.

  6. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-10-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC.

  7. Effect of refractive index on the fluorescence lifetime of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Tregidgo, Carolyn; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The average fluorescence lifetime of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in solution is a function of the refractive index of its environment. We report that this is also the case for GFP-tagged proteins in cells. Using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC)-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a confocal scanning microscope, images of GFP-tagged proteins in cells suspended in different refractive index media are obtained. It is found that the average fluorescence lifetime of GFP decreases on addition of glycerol or sucrose to the media in which the fixed cells are suspended. The inverse GFP lifetime is proportional to the refractive index squared. This is the case for GFP-tagged major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins with the GFP located inside the cytoplasm, and also for GPI-anchored GFP that is located outside the cell membrane. The implications of these findings are discussed with regard to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques where the change in refractive index is crucial in producing an evanescent wave to excite fluorophores near a glass interface. Our findings show that the GFP fluorescence lifetime is shortened in TIRF microscopy in comparison to confocal microscopy.

  8. Generation of monomeric reversibly switchable red fluorescent proteins for far-field fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiel, Andre C; Andresen, Martin; Bock, Hannes; Hilbert, Michael; Schilde, Jessica; Schönle, Andreas; Eggeling, Christian; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2008-09-15

    Reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) are GFP-like proteins that may be repeatedly switched by irradiation with light from a fluorescent to a nonfluorescent state, and vice versa. They can be utilized as genetically encodable probes and bear large potential for a wide array of applications, in particular for new protein tracking schemes and subdiffraction resolution microscopy. However, the currently described monomeric RSFPs emit only blue-green or green fluorescence; the spectral window for their use is thus rather limited. Using a semirational engineering approach based on the crystal structure of the monomeric nonswitchable red fluorescent protein mCherry, we generated rsCherry and rsCherryRev. These two novel red fluorescent RSFPs exhibit fluorescence emission maxima at approximately 610 nm. They display antagonistic switching modes, i.e., in rsCherry irradiation with yellow light induces the off-to-on transition and blue light the on-to-off transition, whereas in rsCherryRev the effects of the switching wavelengths are reversed. We demonstrate time-lapse live-cell subdiffraction microscopy by imaging rsCherryRev targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum utilizing the switching and localization of single molecules.

  9. Isolation and Validation of an Endogenous Fluorescent Nucleoid Reporter in Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Passaris, Ioannis; Ghosh, Anirban; Cenens, William; Michiels, Chris W.; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Aertsen, Abram

    2014-01-01

    In this study we adapted a Mud-based delivery system to construct a random yfp reporter gene (encoding the yellow fluorescent protein) insertion library in the genome of Salmonella Typhimurium LT2, and used fluorescence activated cell sorting and fluorescence microscopy to screen for translational fusions that were able to clearly and specifically label the bacterial nucleoid. Two such fusions were obtained, corresponding to a translational yfp insertion in iscR and iolR, respectively. Both fusions were further validated, and the IscR::YFP fluorescent nucleoid reporter together with time-lapse fluorescence microscopy was subsequently used to monitor nucleoid dynamics in response to the filamentation imposed by growth of LT2 at high hydrostatic pressure (40–45 MPa). As such, we were able to reveal that upon decompression the apparently entangled LT2 chromosomes in filamentous cells rapidly and efficiently segregate, after which septation of the filament occurs. In the course of the latter process, however, cells with a “trilobed” nucleoid were regularly observed, indicative for an imbalance between septum formation and chromosome segregation. PMID:24695782

  10. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  11. Photoacoustic analysis of proteins: volumetric signals and fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G; Small, J R

    1997-01-01

    A series of proteins has been examined using time-resolved, pulsed-laser volumetric photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoacoustic waveforms were collected to measure heat release for calculation of fluorescence quantum yields, and to explore the possibility of photoinduced nonthermal volume changes occurring in these protein samples. The proteins studied were the green fluorescent protein (GFP); intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP), and adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP), each labeled noncovalently with 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) and covalently with 6-acryloyl-2-(dimethylamino)naphthalene (acrylodan); and acrylodan-labeled IFABP and ALBP with added oleic acid. Of this group of proteins, only the ALBP labeled with 1,8-ANS showed significant nonthermal volume changes at the beta = 0 temperature (approximately 3.8 degrees C) for the buffer used (10 mM Tris-HCI, pH 7.5) (beta is the thermal cubic volumetric expansion coefficient). For all of the proteins except for acrylodan-labeled IFABP, the fluorescence quantum yields calculated assuming simple energy conservation were anomalously high, i.e., the apparent heat signals were lower than those predicted from independent fluorescence measurements. The consistent anomalies suggest that the low photoacoustic signals may be characteristic of fluorophores buried in proteins, and that photoacoustic signals derive in part from the microenvironment of the absorbing chromophore. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199809

  12. Rational design of enhanced photoresistance in a photoswitchable fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chenxi; Byrdin, Martin; El Khatib, Mariam; Henry, Xavier; Adam, Virgile; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are particularly susceptible to photobleaching, the permanent loss of fluorescence emission resulting from photodestruction of the chromophore. In the case of Reversibly Switchable Fluorescent Proteins (RSFPs), which can be switched back and forth between a non-fluorescent and a fluorescent state, the achievable number of switching cycles is limited by photobleaching, a process known as photofatigue. Photofatigue has become a crucial limitation in a number of advanced applications based on repeated photoswitching of RSFPs, notably in the field of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, based on our previous structural investigation of photobleaching mechanisms in IrisFP, an RSFP also capable of green-to-red photoconversion, we present the rational design of a single-mutant IrisFP-M159A that displays considerably enhanced photostability. The results suggest that, under moderate illumination intensities, photobleaching of IrisFP-like Anthozoan fluorescent proteins such as EosFP, Dendra or Dronpa derivatives is mainly driven by an oxygen-dependent mechanism resulting in the irreversible sulfoxidation of methionine 159. The photofatigue decay profiles of IrisFP and its photoresistant mutant IrisFP-M159A were investigated in different experimental conditions, in vitro and in cellulo. Although the performance of the mutant was found to be always superior, the results showed switching behaviors strongly dependent on the nanoenvironment. Thus, in general, assessment of photostability and switching properties of RSFPs should be carried out in real experimental conditions.

  13. Protein specific fluorescent microspheres for labelling a protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, stable and biocompatible microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing an acrylic monomer containing a covalent bonding group such as hydroxyl, amine or carboxyl, for example, hydroxyethylmethacrylate, with an addition polymerizable fluorescent comonomer such as dansyl allyl amine. A lectin or antibody is bound to the covalent site to provide cell specificity. When the microspheres are added to a cell suspension the marked microspheres will specifically label a cell membrane by binding to a specific receptor site thereon. The labeled membrane can then be detected by fluorescence of the fluorescent monomer.

  14. Fast and Reversible Photoswitching of the Fluorescent Protein Dronpa as Evidenced by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dedecker, Peter; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Ando, Ryoko; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Engelborghs, Yves; Hofkens, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Controlling molecular properties through photoirradiation holds great promise for its potential for noninvasive and selective manipulation of matter. Photochromism has been observed for several different molecules, including green fluorescent proteins, and recently the discovery of a novel photoswitchable green fluorescent protein called Dronpa was reported. Dronpa displays reversible and highly efficient on/off photoswitching of its fluorescence emission, and reversible switching of immobilized single molecules of Dronpa with response times faster than 20 ms was demonstrated. In this Letter, we expand these observations to freely diffusing molecules by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with simultaneous excitation at 488 and 405 nm. By varying the intensity of irradiation at 405 nm, we demonstrate the reversible photoswitching of Dronpa under these conditions, and from the obtained autocorrelation functions we conclude that this photoswitching can occur within tens of microseconds. PMID:16798811

  15. Highly Selective Fluorescent Sensing of Proteins Based on a Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Nanosensor

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiliang; Wu, Jianhua; Zhai, Xiaorui; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Shuo

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescent molecularly imprinted nanosensor was obtained by grafting imprinted polymer onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and post-imprinting treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The fluorescence of lysozyme-imprinted polymer (Lys-MIP) was quenched more strongly by Lys than that of nonimprinted polymer (NIP), which indicated that the Lys-MIP could recognize Lys. The resulted imprinted material has the ability to selectively sense a target protein, and an imprinting factor of 3.34 was achieved. The Lys-MIP also showed selective detection for Lys among other proteins such as cytochrome C (Cyt C), hemoglobin (HB) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to the imprinted sites in the Lys-MIP. This approach combines the high selectivity of surface molecular imprinting technology and fluorescence, and converts binding events into detectable signals by monitoring fluorescence spectra. Therefore, it will have further applications for Lys sensing. PMID:24077318

  16. Biochemical analysis of oligomerization of expanded polyalanine repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Jun; Oma, Yoko; Futai, Eugene; Sasagawa, Noboru; Kuroda, Reiko; Turk, Boris; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2009-08-01

    Many human proteins contain amino acid repeats that can form homopolymeric amino acid (HPAA) tracts. HPAA tract proteins that contain polyalanine sequences promote diseases, including oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. The pathological properties of these proteins develop when the repeats match or exceed approximately 20 residues. We analyzed the oligomerization of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and GST fusion proteins containing >20 alanine repeats by using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. YFP and GST fusion proteins having 23 polyalanine residues sedimented readily in sucrose density gradients, suggesting instability and oligomerization of proteins with an excess of 20 alanine repeats. Moreover, GST fusion proteins were resistant to trypsin digestion after oligomerization. Oligomerized artificial proteins with long polyalanine repeats may be suitable models for studying polyalanine-related diseases.

  17. Wavelength Mutations and Posttranslational Autoxidation of Green Fluorescent Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Roger; Prasher, Douglas C.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1994-12-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is an unusual protein with strong visible absorbance and fluorescence from a p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone chromophore, which is generated by cyclization and oxidation of the protein's own Ser-Tyr-Gly sequence at positions 65-67. Cloning of the cDNA and heterologous expression of fluorescent protein in a wide variety of organisms indicate that this unique posttranslational modification must be either spontaneous or dependent only on ubiquitous enzymes and reactants. We report that formation of the final fluorophore requires molecular oxygen and proceeds with a time constant (≈4 hr at 22^circC and atmospheric pO_2) independent of dilution, implying that the oxidation does not require enzymes or cofactors. GFP was mutagenized and screened for variants with altered spectra. The most striking mutant fluoresced blue and contained histidine in place of Tyr-66. The availability of two visibly distinct colors should significantly extend the usefulness of GFP in molecular and cell biology by enabling in vivo visualization of differential gene expression and protein localization and measurement of protein association by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

  18. Genetic Barcoding with Fluorescent Proteins for Multiplexed Applications

    PubMed Central

    Smurthwaite, Cameron A.; Williams, Wesley; Fetsko, Alexandra; Abbadessa, Darin; Stolp, Zachary D.; Reed, Connor W.; Dharmawan, Andre; Wolkowicz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins, fluorescent dyes and fluorophores in general have revolutionized the field of molecular cell biology. In particular, the discovery of fluorescent proteins and their genes have enabled the engineering of protein fusions for localization, the analysis of transcriptional activation and translation of proteins of interest, or the general tracking of individual cells and cell populations. The use of fluorescent protein genes in combination with retroviral technology has further allowed the expression of these proteins in mammalian cells in a stable and reliable manner. Shown here is how one can utilize these genes to give cells within a population of cells their own biosignature. As the biosignature is achieved with retroviral technology, cells are barcoded ´indefinitely´. As such, they can be individually tracked within a mixture of barcoded cells and utilized in more complex biological applications. The tracking of distinct populations in a mixture of cells is ideal for multiplexed applications such as discovery of drugs against a multitude of targets or the activation profile of different promoters. The protocol describes how to elegantly develop and amplify barcoded mammalian cells with distinct genetic fluorescent markers, and how to use several markers at once or one marker at different intensities. Finally, the protocol describes how the cells can be further utilized in combination with cell-based assays to increase the power of analysis through multiplexing. PMID:25938804

  19. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins as powerful toolkits for in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, A. L.; Savitsky, A. P.

    2011-02-01

    To expand the field of research in biological systems development of extra-sensitive analytical methods is highly desirable. In this review, the latest advances in technologies relying on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins (FP's) to visualize numerous molecular processes in living cells are discussed. Variety of FP's as well as of novel experimental techniques allows one to choose the most appropriate tools to attack concrete problems.

  20. Discovery of coumarin derivatives as fluorescence acceptors for intrinsic fluorescence resonance energy transfer of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Hwan; Sumranjit, Jitapa; Kang, Hyo Jin; Chung, Sang J

    2014-01-01

    Coumarin analogues were synthezised and evaluated as acceptors for the intrinsic fluorescence resonance energy transfer (iFRET) of tryptophan residues in target proteins. The fluorescence properties such as quantum yields, iFRET efficiencies, and Förster distances of the prepared coumarin analogs were determined in a model system, by their conjugation to biotin, utilizing streptavidin (SAV) as the iFRET donor. The coumarin derivatives reported here represent the most efficient iFRET acceptors for tryptophan, known to date.

  1. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Walker, Joshua; Weyant, Kevin B; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11), thermal stability (up to 60°C), and rapid maturation of fluorescence (<3 min.). In addition, the FbFP derived from Arabidopsis thaliana (iLOV) emerged as a stable and nonperturbative reporter of promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that FbFP-based reporters have the potential to address key limitations associated with the use of GFP, such as pH-sensitive fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery). From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to enable

  2. Exploiting fluorescence for multiplex immunoassays on protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Andrea; Matkó, János; Prechl, József

    2014-09-01

    Protein microarray technology is becoming the method of choice for identifying protein interaction partners, detecting specific proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, or for characterizing protein interactions and serum antibodies in a massively parallel manner. Availability of the well-established instrumentation of DNA arrays and development of new fluorescent detection instruments promoted the spread of this technique. Fluorescent detection has the advantage of high sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and wide dynamic range required by most measurements. Fluorescence through specifically designed probes and an increasing variety of detection modes offers an excellent tool for such microarray platforms. Measuring for example the level of antibodies, their isotypes and/or antigen specificity simultaneously can offer more complex and comprehensive information about the investigated biological phenomenon, especially if we take into consideration that hundreds of samples can be measured in a single assay. Not only body fluids, but also cell lysates, extracted cellular components, and intact living cells can be analyzed on protein arrays for monitoring functional responses to printed samples on the surface. As a rapidly evolving area, protein microarray technology offers a great bulk of information and new depth of knowledge. These are the features that endow protein arrays with wide applicability and robust sample analyzing capability. On the whole, protein arrays are emerging new tools not just in proteomics, but glycomics, lipidomics, and are also important for immunological research. In this review we attempt to summarize the technical aspects of planar fluorescent microarray technology along with the description of its main immunological applications.

  3. Directed evolution of an extremely stable fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Csaba; Temirov, Jamshid; Chasteen, Leslie; Waldo, Geoffrey S; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we describe the evolution of eCGP123, an extremely stable green fluorescent protein based on a previously described fluorescent protein created by consensus engineering (CGP: consensus green protein). eCGP123 could not be denatured by a standard thermal melt, preserved almost full fluorescence after overnight incubation at 80 degrees C and possessed a free energy of denaturation of 12.4 kcal/mol. It was created from CGP by a recursive process involving the sequential introduction of three destabilizing heterologous inserts, evolution to overcome the destabilization and finally 'removal' of the destabilizing insert by gene synthesis. We believe that this approach may be generally applicable to the stabilization of other proteins.

  4. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  5. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins: emerging paradigms in biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Schroeder, Charles M

    2015-02-01

    Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) are an emerging class of fluorescent reporters characterized by oxygen-independent fluorescence and a small size - key advantages compared to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development. However, they have already been used as versatile reporters for studying anaerobic biosystems and viral assemblies. Recently, FbFPs with improved brightness and photostability have been engineered. In addition, several FbFPs show high degrees of thermal and pH stability. For these reasons, FbFPs hold strong promise to extend bioimaging to clinically and industrially significant systems that have been challenging to study using GFPs. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the FbFP toolbox and explore further improvements necessary to maximize the potential of FbFPs.

  6. Computer Modeling of the Structure and Spectra of Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grigorenko, B.L.; Savitsky, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins from the family of green fluorescent proteins are intensively used as biomarkers in living systems. The chromophore group based on the hydroxybenzylidene-imidazoline molecule, which is formed in nature from three amino-acid residues inside the protein globule and well shielded from external media, is responsible for light absorption and fluorescence. Along with the intense experimental studies of the properties of fluorescent proteins and their chromophores by biochemical, X-ray, and spectroscopic tools, in recent years, computer modeling has been used to characterize their properties and spectra. We present in this review the most interesting results of the molecular modeling of the structural parameters and optical and vibrational spectra of the chromophorecontaining domains of fluorescent proteins by methods of quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, and combined quantum-mechanical-molecular-mechanical approaches. The main emphasis is on the correlation of theoretical and experimental data and on the predictive power of modeling, which may be useful for creating new, efficient biomarkers. PMID:22649601

  7. Improving membrane voltage measurements using FRET with new fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Karasawa, Satoshi; Okamura, Yasushi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-08-01

    We used two new coral fluorescent proteins as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor to develop a voltage sensor, named Mermaid, that displays approximately 40% changes in emission ratio per 100 mV, allowing for direct visualization of electrical activities in cultured excitable cells. Notably, Mermaid has fast on-off kinetics at warm (approximately 33 degrees C) temperatures and can report voltage spikes comparable to action potentials.

  8. Investigating State Restriction in Fluorescent Protein FRET Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence and Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most fluorescent proteins exhibit multiexponential fluorescence decays, indicating a heterogeneous excited state population. FRET between fluorescent proteins should therefore involve multiple energy transfer pathways. We recently demonstrated the FRET pathways between EGFP and mCherry (mC), upon the dimerization of 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1), to be highly restricted. A mechanism for FRET restriction based on a highly unfavorable κ2 orientation factor arising from differences in donor–acceptor transition dipole moment angles in a far from coplanar and near static interaction geometry was proposed. Here this is tested via FRET to mC arising from the association of glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) with an intrinsically homogeneous and more mobile donor Oregon Green 488 (OG). A new analysis of the acceptor window intensity, based on the turnover point of the sensitized fluorescence, is combined with donor window intensity and anisotropy measurements which show that unrestricted FRET to mC takes place. However, a long-lived anisotropy decay component in the donor window reveals a GST-GSH population in which FRET does not occur, explaining previous discrepancies between quantitative FRET measurements of GST-GSH association and their accepted values. This reinforces the importance of the local donor–acceptor environment in mediating energy transfer and the need to perform spectrally resolved intensity and anisotropy decay measurements in the accurate quantification of fluorescent protein FRET. PMID:28217242

  9. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy.

  10. Deletion mapping of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Dopf, J; Horiagon, T M

    1996-01-01

    Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a promising fluorescent marker which is active in a diverse array of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. A key feature underlying the versatility of GFP is its capacity to undergo heterocyclic chromophore formation by cyclization of a tripeptide present in its primary sequence and thereby acquiring fluorescent activity in a variety of intracellular environments. In order to define further the primary structure requirements for chromophore formation and fluorescence in GFP, a series of N- and C-terminal GFP deletion variant expression vectors were created using the polymerase chain reaction. Scanning spectrofluorometric analyses of crude soluble protein extracts derived from eleven GFP expression constructs revealed that amino acid (aa) residues 2-232, of a total of 238 aa in the native protein, were required for the characteristic emission and absorption spectra of native GFP. Heterocyclic chromophore formation was assayed by comparing the absorption spectrum of GFP deletion variants over the 300-500-nm range to the absorption spectra of full-length GFP and GFP deletion variants missing the chromophore substrate domain from the primary sequence. GFP deletion variants lacking fluorescent activity showed no evidence of heterocyclic ring structure formation when the soluble extracts of their bacterial expression hosts were studied at pH 7.9. These observations suggest that the primary structure requirements for the fluorescent activity of GFP are relatively extensive and are compatible with the view that much of the primary structure serves an autocatalytic function.

  11. A practical teaching course in directed protein evolution using the green fluorescent protein as a model.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain reaction. Screening of bacterial colonies transformed with random mutant libraries identified GFP variants with increased fluorescence yields. Mapping the three-dimensional structure of these mutants demonstrated how alterations in structural features such as the environment around the fluorophore and properties of the protein surface can influence functional properties such as the intensity of fluorescence and protein solubility.

  12. Development of a photoactivatable fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria GFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, George H.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    Photoactivation, the rapid conversion of photoactivatable molecules to a fluorescent state by intense irradiation, can be used to mark and monitor selected molecules within cells1. We report a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) based on a mutation at position 203 that upon intense irradiation with 413 nm light exhibits a stable 60-100 fluorescence increase under 488 nm excitation. The photoactivated form of this mutant named photoactivatable GFP (PA-GFP), is stable under a number of conditions. PA-GFP can be used to analyze protein dynamics in living cells, offering enormous potential for addressing outstanding questions in protein trafficking and turnover, organelle dynamics, and cell lineage patterns.

  13. A palette of fluorescent proteins optimized for diverse cellular environments

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Markwardt, Michele L.; Rizzo, Mark; Guo, Feng; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    To perform quantitative live cell imaging, investigators require fluorescent reporters that accurately report protein localization and levels, while minimally perturbing the cell. Yet, within the biochemically distinct environments of cellular organelles, popular fluorescent proteins (FPs), including EGFP, can be unreliable for quantitative imaging, resulting in underestimation of protein levels and incorrect localization. Specifically, within the secretory pathway, significant populations of FPs misfold and fail to fluoresce due to non-native disulphide bond formation. Furthermore, transmembrane FP fusion constructs can disrupt organelle architecture due to oligomerizing tendencies of numerous common FPs. Here, we describe a powerful set of bright and inert FPs optimized for use in multiple cellular compartments, especially oxidizing environments and biological membranes. Also, we provide new insights into use of red FPs in the secretory pathway. Our monomeric "oxFPs" finally resolve long standing, underappreciated, and important problems of cell biology and should be useful for a number of applications. PMID:26158227

  14. Fluorescence imaging preparation methods for tissue scaffolds implanted into a green fluorescent protein porcine model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; White, Richard A; Grant, David A; Grant, Sheila A

    2015-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) animal models have become increasingly popular due to their potential to enhance in vivo imaging and their application to many fields of study. We have developed a technique to observe host tissue integration into scaffolds using GFP expressing swine and fluorescence imaging. Current fluorescence imaging preparation methods cannot be translated to a full GFP animal model due to several challenges and limitations that are investigated here. We have implanted tissue scaffolds into GFP expressing swine and have prepared explanted scaffolds for fluorescence imaging using four different methods including formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, vapor fixation, freshly prepared paraformaldehyde fixation, and fresh frozen tissue. Explanted scaffolds and tissue were imaged using confocal microscopy with spectral separation to evaluate the GFP animal model for visualization of host tissue integration into explanted scaffolds. All methods except fresh frozen tissue induced autofluorescence of the scaffold, preventing visualization of detail between host tissue and scaffold fibers. Fresh frozen tissue preparation allowed for the most reliable visualization of fluorescent host tissue integration into non-fluorescent scaffolds. It was concluded that fresh frozen tissue preparation is the best method for fluorescence imaging preparation when using scaffolds implanted into GFP whole animal models.

  15. Design of a confocal fluorescence spectrometer for transdermal observation of green fluorescent protein expression in cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Ma, Hong; Horton, William A.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2001-04-01

    We have developed a noninvasive confocal fluorescence spectrometer to measure in vivo fluorescence spectra in mice. Our motivation is the study of the healing process of wounded cartilage in the murine model. The spectrometer measures the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) which is linked to the promoter of type II collagen as a marker for the expression of the chondrocyte phenotype. The confocal system uses an argon ion laser (488 nm) to excite fluorescence in a confocal volume about 200 um below the skin surface in the cartilage of the xyphoid process. In vitro studies showed how the refractive mismatch at the surface boundary and the light scattering of the tissue affect the depth and size of the confocal volume. A thin fluorescent layer was detected through a 130 um tissue phantom (murine skin) by moving the confocal volume axially through the phantom. The presence of skin increased the axial full width at half maximum of the confocal response from 7 um to 72 um. In conclusion, we achieve a low-spatial-resolution confocal spectrometer, which yields a fluorescence spectrum that maximizes the GFP fluorescence of cartilage and minimizes the skin autofluorescence.

  16. A FlAsH-based FRET approach to determine G protein-coupled receptor activation in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Gaietta, Guido; Bünemann, Moritz; Adams, Stephen R; Oberdorff-Maass, Silke; Behr, Björn; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Tsien, Roger Y; Ellisman, Mark H; Lohse, Martin J

    2005-03-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from cyan to yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP/YFP) is a well-established method to monitor protein-protein interactions or conformational changes of individual proteins. But protein functions can be perturbed by fusion of large tags such as CFP and YFP. Here we use G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in living cells as a model system to compare YFP with the small, membrane-permeant fluorescein derivative with two arsen-(III) substituents (fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder; FlAsH) targeted to a short tetracysteine sequence. Insertion of CFP and YFP into human adenosine A(2A) receptors allowed us to use FRET to monitor receptor activation but eliminated coupling to adenylyl cyclase. The CFP/FlAsH-tetracysteine system gave fivefold greater agonist-induced FRET signals, similar kinetics (time constant of 66-88 ms) and perfectly normal downstream signaling. Similar results were obtained for the mouse alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. Thus, FRET from CFP to FlAsH reports GPCR activation in living cells without disturbing receptor function and shows that the small size of the tetracysteine-biarsenical tag can be decisively advantageous.

  17. Probing protein oligomerization in living cells with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Wei, Li-Na; Müller, Joachim D

    2003-12-23

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy provides information about protein interactions in the intercellular environment from naturally occurring equilibrium fluctuations. We determine the molecular brightness of fluorescent proteins from the fluctuations by analyzing the photon counting histogram (PCH) or its moments and demonstrate the use of molecular brightness in probing the oligomerization state of proteins. We report fluorescence fluctuation measurements of enhanced GFP (EGFP) in cells up to concentrations of 10 microM by using an improved PCH theory. The molecular brightness of EGFP is constant in the concentration range studied. The brightness of a tandem EGFP construct, which carries two fluorophores, increases by a factor of two compared with EGFP alone, demonstrating the sensitivity of molecular brightness as a probe for protein complex formation. Oligomerization of nuclear receptors plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. We probe the oligomerization state of the testicular receptor 4 and the ligand-binding domains of retinoid X receptor and retinoic acid receptor by observing molecular brightness changes as a function of protein concentration. The large concentration range accessible by experiment allows us to perform titration experiments on EGFP fusion proteins. An increase in the molecular brightness with protein concentration indicates the formation of homocomplexes. We observe the formation of homodimers of retinoid X receptor ligand binding domain upon addition of ligand. Resolving protein interactions in a cell is an important step in understanding cellular function on a molecular level. Brightness analysis promises to develop into an important tool for determining protein complex formation in cells.

  18. A fluorescent probe for imaging p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Miao, Zhenyuan; Li, Jin; Fang, Kun; Zhuang, Chunlin; Du, Lupei; Sheng, Chunquan; Li, Minyong

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we describe a no-wash small-molecule fluorescent probe for detecting and imaging p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction based on an environment-sensitive fluorescent turn-on mechanism. After extensive biological examination, this probe L1 exhibited practical activity and selectivity in vitro and in cellulo.

  19. Distance-dependent intrinsic fluorescence of proteins on aluminum nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbay, Nuriye; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Ray, Krishanu

    2012-03-01

    In the past several years we have demonstrated the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) and the significant changes in the photophysical properties of fluorophores in the presence of metallic nanostructures and nanoparticles using ensemble spectroscopic studies. In the represented study, we explored the distance effect on intrinsic fluorescence of proteins adsorbed on our layer-by-layer assembled metallic nanostructures. The study is expected to provide more information on the importance of positioning the proteins at a particular distance for enhanced fluorescence from metallic structures. For the present study, we considered using easy and inexpensive LbL technique to provide welldefined distance from metallic surface. The explored proteins were adsorbed on different numbers of alternate layers of poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). SA and BSA were electrostatically attached to the positively charged PAH layer. We obtained a maximum of ~11-fold and 9-fold increase in fluorescence intensity from SA and BSA, respectively. And also we observed ~3-fold decrease in BSA lifetime on metallic nanostructures than those on bare control quartz slides. This study reveals the distance dependence of protein fluorescence.

  20. Monomeric red fluorescent proteins with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Hulit, James; Subach, Oksana M; Wu, Bin; Abdulla, Arian; Segall, Jeffrey E; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-03-23

    Two-photon microscopy has advanced fluorescence imaging of cellular processes in living animals. Fluorescent proteins in the blue-green wavelength range are widely used in two-photon microscopy; however, the use of red fluorescent proteins is limited by the low power output of Ti-Sapphire lasers above 1,000 nm. To overcome this limitation we have developed two red fluorescent proteins, LSS-mKate1 and LSS-mKate2, which possess large Stokes shifts with excitation/emission maxima at 463/624 and 460/605 nm, respectively. These LSS-mKates are characterized by high pH stability, photostability, rapid chromophore maturation, and monomeric behavior. They lack absorbance in the green region, providing an additional red color to the commonly used red fluorescent proteins. Substantial overlap between the two-photon excitation spectra of the LSS-mKates and blue-green fluorophores enables multicolor imaging using a single laser. We applied this approach to a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer to intravitally study the motility and Golgi-nucleus alignment of tumor cells as a function of their distance from blood vessels. Our data indicate that within 40 mum the breast cancer cells show significant polarization towards vessels in living mice.

  1. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  2. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  3. Fluorescent IgG fusion proteins made in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Luria, Yael; Raichlin, Dina; Benhar, Itai

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most powerful tools in biological and biomedical research and are presently the fastest growing category of new bio-pharmaceutics. The most common format of antibody applied for therapeutic, diagnostic and analytical purposes is the IgG format. For medical applications, recombinant IgGs are made in cultured mammalian cells in a process that is too expensive to be considered for producing antibodies for diagnostic and analytical purposes. Therefore, for such purposes, mouse monoclonal antibodies or polyclonal sera from immunized animals are used. While looking for an easier and more rapid way to prepare full-length IgGs for therapeutic purposes, we recently developed and reported an expression and purification protocol for full-length IgGs, and IgG-based fusion proteins in E. coli, called "Inclonals." By applying the Inclonals technology, we could generate full-length IgGs that are genetically fused to toxins. The aim of the study described herein was to evaluate the possibility of applying the "Inclonals" technology for preparing IgG-fluorophore fusion proteins. We found that IgG fused to the green fluorescent proteins enhanced GFP (EGFP) while maintaining functionality in binding, lost most of its fluorescence during the refolding process. In contrast, we found that green fluorescent Superfolder GFP (SFGFP)-fused IgG and red fluorescent mCherry-fused IgG were functional in antigen binding and maintained fluorescence intensity. In addition, we found that we can link several SFGFPs in tandem to each IgG, with fluorescence intensity increasing accordingly. Fluorescent IgGs made in E. coli may become attractive alternatives to monoclonal or polyclonal fluorescent antibodies derived from animals.

  4. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  5. On the Design of Low-Cost Fluorescent Protein Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, Leah

    , magnetic beads, nanoparticles or quantum dots designed to form covalent bonds with amino groups, sulfhydryl groups, carboxylic groups and other reactive functionalities in amino acids. It is not uncommon to conduct combinations of techniques, for example, the introduction of fluorescent labels or probes to proteins require in many cases, site-directed mutagenesis followed by covalent bonding of the fluorescent dye. Accordingly, two or more proteins can be combined to create hybrid or fusion proteins with multiple or altered functions. Indeed, research involving the green fluorescent protein and fluorescent proteins of a variety of colors has expanded by leaps and bounds in the last decade. Because these fluorescent proteins can be genetically encoded in cells, it is possible to observe various cellular processes in vivo. However, this topic has been reviewed extensively in the literature and, thus, will not be expounded on in this chapter.

  6. Deletions of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein define the minimal domain required for fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhang, G; Ngo, N; Zhao, X; Kain, S R; Huang, C C

    1997-11-07

    The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is a widely used marker for gene expression and protein localization studies. Dissection of the structure of the protein would be expected to shed light on its potential applications to other fields such as the detection of protease activity. Using deletion analysis, we have defined the minimal domain in GFP required for fluorescence to amino acids 7-229. This domain starts at the middle of the first small alpha helix at the N terminus of GFP and ends immediately following the last beta sheet. Studies of the amino acids at both termini of the minimal domain revealed that positions 6 and 7 at the N terminus are Glu-specific. Change of the Glu residues to other amino acids results in reduction of GFP fluorescence. Position 229 at the C terminus of GFP, however, is nonspecific: the Ile can be replaced with other amino acids with no measurable loss of fluorescence. A total of only 15 terminal amino acids can be deleted from GFP without disrupting fluorescence, consistent with findings of a previous study of GFP crystal structure (Ormo, M., Cubitt, A. B., Kallio, K., Gross, L. A., Tsien, R. Y., Remington, S. J. (1996) Science 273, 1392-1395 and Yang, F., Moss, L. G., and Phillips, G. N., Jr. (1996) Nat. Biotechnol. 14, 1246-1251) that a tightly packed structure exists in the protein. We also generated internal deletions within the loop regions of GFP according to its crystal structure and found that all such deletions eliminated GFP fluorescence.

  7. Fluorescent protein marker lines in maize: generation and applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingyu; Luo, Anding; Zadrozny, Tara; Sylvester, Anne; Jackson, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) have significantly impacted the way that we study plants in the past two decades. In the post-genomics era, these FP tools are in higher demand by plant scientists for studying the dynamics of protein localization, function, and interactions, and to translate sequence information to biological knowledge that can benefit humans. Although FP tools have been widely used in the model plant Arabidopsis, few FP resources have been developed for maize, one of the most important food crops worldwide, and an ideal species for genetic and developmental biology research. In an effort to provide the maize and cereals research communities with a comprehensive set of FP resources for different purposes of study, we generated more than 100 stable transformed maize FP marker lines, which mark most compartments in maize cells with different FPs. Additionally, we are generating driver and reporter lines, based on the principle of the pOp-LhG4 transactivation system, allowing specific expression or mis-expression of any gene of interest to precisely study protein functions. These marker lines can be used not only for static protein localization studies, but will be useful for studying protein dynamics and interactions using kinetic microscopy methods, such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  8. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  9. Protein amyloids develop an intrinsic fluorescence signature during aggregation†

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Fiona T. S.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Kumita, Janet R.; Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2017-01-01

    We report observations of an intrinsic fluorescence in the visible range, which develops during the aggregation of a range of polypeptides, including the disease-related human peptides amyloid-β(1–40) and (1–42), lysozyme and tau. Characteristic fluorescence properties such as the emission lifetime and spectra were determined experimentally. This intrinsic fluorescence is independent of the presence of aromatic side-chain residues within the polypeptide structure. Rather, it appears to result from electronic levels that become available when the polypeptide chain folds into a cross-β sheet scaffold similar to what has been reported to take place in crystals. We use these findings to quantify protein aggregation in vitro by fluorescence imaging in a label-free manner. PMID:23420088

  10. "Color Timer" mice: visualization of neuronal differentiation with fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing the differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into neuronal progenitor cells and finally into neurons are gradually being revealed. The lack of convenient means for real-time determination of the stages of differentiation of individual neural cells, however, has been hindering progress in elucidating the mechanisms. In order to be able to easily identify the stages of differentiation of neural cells, we have been attempting to establish a mouse system that would allow progression of neuronal differentiation to be visualized based on transitions between fluorescence colors by using a combination of mouse genetics and the ever-expanding repertoire of fluorescent proteins. In this study we report the initial version of such a mouse system, which we call "Color Timer." We first generated transgenic (Tg; nestin/KOr Tg) mice in which production of the fluorescent protein Kusabira-Orange (KOr) is controlled by the gene regulatory elements within the 2nd intronic enhancer of the nestin gene, which is a good marker for NSCs, so that NSCs would emit orange fluorescence upon excitation. We then confirmed by immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical analyses that the KOr fluorescence closely reflected the presence of the Nestin protein. We also confirmed by a neurosphere formation assay that the intensity of the KOr fluorescence correlated with "stemness" of the cell and it was possible to readily identify NSCs in the two neurogenic regions, namely the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, in the brain of adult nestin/KOr Tg mice by the orange fluorescence they emitted. We then crossed nestin/KOr mice with doublecortin-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein Tg mice, whose immature neurons emit green fluorescence upon excitation, and it was possible to visualize the progress of NSC-to-neuron differentiation by the transition between fluorescence colors from orange to green. This two-color initial

  11. Cathodoluminescence and Electron-Induced Fluorescence Enhancement of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Kuniaki; Onuma, Tsubasa; Ueno, Ryosuke; Tamehiro, Katsuyuki; Minoda, Hiroki

    2016-02-18

    Becaues the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy is not high enough to study the molecular level of relationship between the structure and function of biological specimens, correlative light and electron microscopy has been used for this purpose. Another possibility for a high-resolution light microscopy is cathodoluminescence microscopy. Here, we report a new phenomenon, the electron-induced activation of luminescence (cathodoluminescence) and electron-enhanced fluorescence for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). This was found using our recently developed hybrid fluorescence and electron microscopy. Contrary to the past reports, which showed a degradation of organic compounds by electron irradiation, stable cathodoluminescence emitted from an organic molecule, EGFP, has been observed using the hybrid microscopy. Addition of the glycerol promoted the fluorescence enhancement of EGFP probably due to the change in the electronic state density of excitation channels from the ground to the excited state or of relaxation channels from the excited to the emission state. Stable cathodoluminescence and enhanced fluorescence of the EGFP may introduce a cathodoluminescence microscopy, which will increase the variety of the imaging to investigate the biological compounds.

  12. Characterization of a Fluorescent Protein Reporter System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    pathways are initiated with the binding of a small molecule to a catalytic ribonucleic acid molecule (RNA), called a ribozyme (Thodima et al., 2006). The... ribozyme is part of a larger RNA construct, called a riboswitch, which initiates translation of a specific genetic sequence on a plasmid (circular...protein gene. Yen et al. (2004) reported insertion of a self-cleaving ribozyme upstream of the reporter gene. In the absence of a regulator (“off

  13. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Production of green fluorescent protein in transgenic rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Li, Ding; Gao, Jing; Shen, Chunxiu; Fang, Zhen; Xia, Yumei; Yuan, Longping; Cao, Mengliang

    2013-03-01

    Immature embryos from immature seeds of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were transformed by biolistic bombardment with the plasmid carrying the coding region of the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene under the control of the 5' region of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the synthetic green fluorescence protein gene (sgfp) under the control of the maize ubiquitine promoter. Southern blot analysis confirmed the stable integration of hpt and sgfp genes in transformants. Subsequently leaves from regenerated plants were resistant to hygromycin, and microscopic observation of the green fluorescence and immunoblotting analysis revealed that green fluorescence protein was not only detected in the leaf and pollen of primary transformants but also in mature seeds. The results bear out the importance of the suitability of GFP as an in vivo marker to follow the processes of selection of somatic hybrid embryos and plants.

  15. Photophysics and optical switching in green fluorescent protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    Creemers, T. M. H.; Lock, A. J.; Subramaniam, V.; Jovin, T. M.; Völker, S.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate by using low-temperature high-resolution spectroscopy that red-shifted mutants of green fluorescent protein are photo-interconverted among three conformations and are, therefore, not photostable “one-color” systems as previously believed. From our experiments we have further derived the energy-level schemes governing the interconversion among the three forms. These results have significant implications for the molecular and cell biological applications of the green fluorescent protein family; for example, in fluorescence resonant energy transfer experiments, a change in “color” on irradiation may not necessarily be due to energy transfer but can also arise from a photo-induced conversion between conformers of the excited species. PMID:10716703

  16. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  17. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein-protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces.

  18. An icosahedral virus as a fluorescent calibration standard: a method for counting protein molecules in cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M

    2017-03-22

    The ability to replace genes coding for cellular proteins with DNA that codes for fluorescent protein-tagged versions opens the way to counting the number of molecules of each protein component of macromolecular assemblies in vivo by measuring fluorescence microscopically. Converting fluorescence to absolute numbers of molecules requires a fluorescent standard whose molecular composition is known precisely. In this report, the construction, properties and mode of using a set of fluorescence calibration standards are described. The standards are based on an icosahedral virus engineered to contain exactly 240 copies of one of seven different fluorescent proteins. Two applications of the fluorescent standards to counting molecules in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii are described. Methods for improving the preciseness of the measurements and minimizing potential inaccuracies are emphasized.

  19. Fluorescence studies of beer protein uptake by silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apperson, Kathleen; Birch, David J. S.; Leiper, Kenneth; McKeown, Ian P.

    2001-05-01

    Fluorescence has been investigated with respect to new methods for monitoring protein uptake by silica, with particular attention being given to haze forming proteins and foam proteins present in beer. These are of particular interest to the brewing industry as an important aspect of the brewing process is the prevention of chill haze formation. This is necessary in order to maintain the clarity of the beer and to extend the shelf life. Chill haze, which is a result of the interaction of certain proteins with some polyphenols, can be prevented by the removal of one or both of these constituents.

  20. Determining Membrane Protein Topology Using Fluorescence Protease Protection (FPP).

    PubMed

    White, Carl; Nixon, Alex; Bradbury, Neil A

    2015-04-20

    The correct topology and orientation of integral membrane proteins are essential for their proper function, yet such information has not been established for many membrane proteins. A simple technique called fluorescence protease protection (FPP) is presented, which permits the determination of membrane protein topology in living cells. This technique has numerous advantages over other methods for determining protein topology, in that it does not require the availability of multiple antibodies against various domains of the membrane protein, does not require large amounts of protein, and can be performed on living cells. The FPP method employs the spatially confined actions of proteases on the degradation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged membrane proteins to determine their membrane topology and orientation. This simple approach is applicable to a wide variety of cell types, and can be used to determine membrane protein orientation in various subcellular organelles such as the mitochondria, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum and components of the endosomal/recycling system. Membrane proteins, tagged on either the N-termini or C-termini with a GFP fusion, are expressed in a cell of interest, which is subject to selective permeabilization using the detergent digitonin. Digitonin has the ability to permeabilize the plasma membrane, while leaving intracellular organelles intact. GFP moieties exposed to the cytosol can be selectively degraded through the application of protease, whereas GFP moieties present in the lumen of organelles are protected from the protease and remain intact. The FPP assay is straightforward, and results can be obtained rapidly.

  1. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  2. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  3. Fluorescent rare earth solutions as intrinsic wavelength standards for protein fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Anderle, Heinz; Weber, Alfred

    2017-02-01

    Trivalent Gd, Tm, and Dy solutions can be used as intrinsic excitation and emission standards to validate the UV and violet-blue wavelength accuracy of a spectrofluorimeter. Europium extends the range into the red. To attain sufficient sensitivity, these luminescent rare earth ions require deuterated reagents or carbonate complexation, which allow the use of ordinary water and thus preparation in virtually any laboratory. Such solutions are particularly valuable as system suitability standards (SST) for protein fluorescence spectroscopy to detect red shifts of the intrinsic fluorescence maximum in stability and storage studies.

  4. A toolkit for graded expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Ehm, Patrick; Giehler, Susanne; Mayr, Georg W

    2012-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-like proteins of different colors are important tools in cell biology. In many studies, the intracellular targeting of proteins has been determined by transiently expressing GFP fusion proteins and analyzing their intracellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. In most vectors, expression of GFP is driven by the enhancer/promoter cassette of the immediate early gene of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV). This cassette generates high levels of protein expression in most mammalian cell lines. Unfortunately, these nonphysiologically high protein levels have been repeatedly reported to artificially alter the intracellular targeting of proteins fused to GFP. To cope with this problem, we generated a multitude of attenuated GFP expression vectors by modifying the hCMV enhancer/promoter cassette. These modified vectors were transiently expressed, and the expression levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fused to another protein were determined by fluorescence microscopy and/or Western blotting. As shown in this study, we were able to (i) clearly reduce the expression of EGFP alone and (ii) reduce expression of an EYFP fusion protein down to the level of the endogenous protein, both in a graded manner.

  5. Fluorescent sensors of protein kinases: from basics to biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Nhu Ngoc Van, Thi; Morris, May C

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases constitute a major class of enzymes underlying essentially all biological processes. These enzymes present similar structural folds, yet their mechanism of action and of regulation vary largely, as well as their substrate specificity and their subcellular localization. Classical approaches to study the function/activity of protein kinases rely on radioactive endpoint assays, which do not allow for characterization of their dynamic activity in their native environment. The development of fluorescent biosensors has provided a whole new avenue for studying protein kinase behavior and regulation in living cells in real time with high spatial and temporal resolution. Two major classes of biosensors have been developed: genetically encoded single-chain fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensors and peptide/protein biosensors coupled to small synthetic fluorophores which are sensitive to changes in their environment. In this review, we discuss the developments in fluorescent biosensor technology related to protein kinase sensing and the different strategies employed to monitor protein kinase activity, conformation, or relative abundance, as well as kinase regulation and subcellular dynamics in living cells. Moreover, we discuss their application in biomedical settings, for diagnostics and therapeutics, to image disease progression and monitor response to therapeutics, in drug discovery programs, for high-throughput screening assays, for postscreen characterization of drug candidates, and for clinical evaluation of novel drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. FMDV replicons encoding green fluorescent protein are replication competent.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, Fiona; Pathania, Uday; Luke, Garry A; Nicholson, John; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Rowlands, David J; Jackson, Terry; Tuthill, Toby; Haas, Juergen; Lamond, Angus I; Ryan, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    The study of replication of viruses that require high bio-secure facilities can be accomplished with less stringent containment using non-infectious 'replicon' systems. The FMDV replicon system (pT7rep) reported by Mclnerney et al. (2000) was modified by the replacement of sequences encoding chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) with those encoding a functional L proteinase (L(pro)) linked to a bi-functional fluorescent/antibiotic resistance fusion protein (green fluorescent protein/puromycin resistance, [GFP-PAC]). Cells were transfected with replicon-derived transcript RNA and GFP fluorescence quantified. Replication of transcript RNAs was readily detected by fluorescence, whilst the signal from replication-incompetent forms of the genome was >2-fold lower. Surprisingly, a form of the replicon lacking the L(pro) showed a significantly stronger fluorescence signal, but appeared with slightly delayed kinetics. Replication can, therefore, be quantified simply by live-cell imaging and image analyses, providing a rapid and facile alternative to RT-qPCR or CAT assays.

  7. Effect of voltage sensitive fluorescent proteins on neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Lundby, Alicia; Mutoh, Hiroki; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2009-05-20

    Fluorescent protein voltage sensors are recombinant proteins that are designed as genetically encoded cellular probes of membrane potential using mechanisms of voltage-dependent modulation of fluorescence. Several such proteins, including VSFP2.3 and VSFP3.1, were recently reported with reliable function in mammalian cells. They were designed as molecular fusions of the voltage sensor of Ciona intestinalis voltage sensor containing phosphatase with a fluorescence reporter domain. Expression of these proteins in cell membranes is accompanied by additional dynamic membrane capacitance, or "sensing capacitance", with feedback effect on the native electro-responsiveness of targeted cells. We used recordings of sensing currents and fluorescence responses of VSFP2.3 and of VSFP3.1 to derive kinetic models of the voltage-dependent signaling of these proteins. Using computational neuron simulations, we quantitatively investigated the perturbing effects of sensing capacitance on the input/output relationship in two central neuron models, a cerebellar Purkinje and a layer 5 pyramidal neuron. Probe-induced sensing capacitance manifested as time shifts of action potentials and increased synaptic input thresholds for somatic action potential initiation with linear dependence on the membrane density of the probe. Whereas the fluorescence signal/noise grows with the square root of the surface density of the probe, the growth of sensing capacitance is linear. We analyzed the trade-off between minimization of sensing capacitance and signal/noise of the optical read-out depending on kinetic properties and cellular distribution of the probe. The simulation results suggest ways to reduce capacitive effects at a given level of signal/noise. Yet, the simulations indicate that significant improvement of existing probes will still be required to report action potentials in individual neurons in mammalian brain tissue in single trials.

  8. Expression of Aequorea green fluorescent protein in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Cheng, C L

    1995-08-07

    The coding region of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria has been fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and introduced into maize leaf protoplasts. Transient expression of GFP was observed. In addition, the coding region of GFP was fused to an Arabidopsis heat shock promoter and co-transformed with another construct in which GFP has been replaced with chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). The heat-induced expression of GFP in maize protoplasts parallels that of CAT. While GFP was expressed in both dark-grown and green maize leaf protoplasts, no green fluorescence was observed in similarly transformed Arabidopsis protoplasts.

  9. Exciton dynamics in solid-state green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Christof P.; Siegert, Marie; Betzold, Simon; Ohmer, Jürgen; Fischer, Utz; Höfling, Sven

    2017-01-01

    We study the decay characteristics of Frenkel excitons in solid-state enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) dried from solution. We further monitor the changes of the radiative exciton decay over time by crossing the phase transition from the solved to the solid state. Complex interactions between protonated and deprotonated states in solid-state eGFP can be identified from temperature-dependent and time-resolved fluorescence experiments that further allow the determination of activation energies for each identified process.

  10. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  11. Crystal structure of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Ormö, M; Cubitt, A B; Kallio, K; Gross, L A; Tsien, R Y; Remington, S J

    1996-09-06

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the Pacific Northwest jellyfish Aequorea victoria has generated intense interest as a marker for gene expression and localization of gene products. The chromophore, resulting from the spontaneous cyclization and oxidation of the sequence -Ser65 (or Thr65)-Tyr66-Gly67-, requires the native protein fold for both formation and fluorescence emission. The structure of Thr65 GFP has been determined at 1.9 angstrom resolution. The protein fold consists of an 11-stranded beta barrel with a coaxial helix, with the chromophore forming from the central helix. Directed mutagenesis of one residue adjacent to the chromophore, Thr203, to Tyr or His results in significantly red-shifted excitation and emission maxima.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormo, Mats; Cubitt, Andrew B.; Kallio, Karen; Gross, Larry A.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Remington, S. James

    1996-09-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the Pacific Northwest jellyfish Aequorea victoria has generated intense interest as a marker for gene expression and localization of gene products. The chromophore, resulting from the spontaneous cyclization and oxidation of the sequence -Ser65 (or Thr65)-Tyr66-Gly67-, requires the native protein fold for both formation and fluorescence emission. The structure of Thr65 GFP has been determined at 1.9 angstrom resolution. The protein fold consists of an 11-stranded β barrel with a coaxial helix, with the chromophore forming from the central helix. Directed mutagenesis of one residue adjacent to the chromophore, Thr203, to Tyr or His results in significantly red-shifted excitation and emission maxima.

  13. One- and two-photon excited fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy decays of green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Volkmer, A; Subramaniam, V; Birch, D J; Jovin, T M

    2000-01-01

    We have used one- (OPE) and two-photon (TPE) excitation with time-correlated single-photon counting techniques to determine time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decays of the wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and two red-shifted mutants, S65T-GFP and RSGFP. WT-GFP and S65T-GFP exhibited a predominant approximately 3 ns monoexponential fluorescence decay, whereas for RSGFP the main lifetimes were approximately 1.1 ns (main component) and approximately 3.3 ns. The anisotropy decay of WT-GFP and S65T-GFP was also monoexponential (global rotational correlation time of 16 +/- 1 ns). The approximately 1.1 ns lifetime of RSGFP was associated with a faster rotational depolarization, evaluated as an additional approximately 13 ns component. This feature we attribute tentatively to a greater rotational freedom of the anionic chromophore. With OPE, the initial anisotropy was close to the theoretical limit of 0.4; with TPE it was higher, approaching the TPE theoretical limit of 0.57 for the colinear case. The measured power dependence of the fluorescence signals provided direct evidence for TPE. The general independence of fluorescence decay times, rotation correlation times, and steady-state emission spectra on the excitation mode indicates that the fluorescence originated from the same distinct excited singlet states (A*, I*, B*). However, we observed a relative enhancement of blue fluorescence peaked at approximately 440 nm for TPE compared to OPE, indicating different relative excitation efficiencies. We infer that the two lifetimes of RSGFP represent the deactivation of two substates of the deprotonated intermediate (I*), distinguished by their origin (i.e., from A* or B*) and by nonradiative decay rates reflecting different internal environments of the excited-state chromophore. PMID:10692343

  14. Protein immobilization and fluorescence quenching on polydopamine thin films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqun; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Weihua

    2016-09-01

    Mussel inspired polydopamine (PDA) film has attracted great interest as a versatile functional coating for biomolecule immobilization in various bio-related devices. However, the details regarding the interaction between a protein and PDA film remain unclear. Particularly, there is very limited knowledge regarding the protein immobilization on PDA film, even though it is of essential importance in various fields. The situation is even more complicated if considering the fact that quite a number of approaches (e.g., different oxidizing reagent, buffer pH, grown time, grown media, etc.) have been developed to grow PDA films. In this work, protein attachment on PDA film was systematically investigated by using the real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The kinetics of protein-PDA interaction was explored and the influence of buffer pH and deposition media on the protein attachment was studied. Fluorescent protein microarray was further printed on PDA-coated glass slides for quantitative investigations and together with SPR data, the interesting fluorescence quenching phenomenon of PDA film was revealed. This work may deepen our understanding on the PDA-protein interaction and offer a valuable guide for efficient protein attachment on PDA film in various bio-related applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Bolotin, Dmitry A.; Meer, Margarita V.; Usmanova, Dinara R.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Sharonov, George V.; Ivankov, Dmitry N.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Baranov, Mikhail S.; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S.; Vlasov, Peter K.; Egorov, Evgeny S.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Putintseva, Ekaterina V.; Mamedov, Ilgar Z.; Tawfik, Dan S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.

    2016-01-01

    Fitness landscapes1,2, depictions of how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level, form the basis for our understanding of many areas of biology2–7 yet their properties remain elusive. Studies addressing this issue often consider specific genes and their function as proxy for fitness2,4, experimentally assessing the impact on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence2,5,8–15 or in different sequences2,3,5,16–18. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here, we chart an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function, fluorescence, of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We find that its fitness landscape is narrow, with half of genotypes with two mutations showing reduced fluorescence and half of genotypes with five mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations arising mostly through the cumulative impact of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease of protein stability and concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for a number of fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design. PMID:27193686

  16. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Meer, Margarita V; Usmanova, Dinara R; Mishin, Alexander S; Sharonov, George V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bozhanova, Nina G; Baranov, Mikhail S; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Vlasov, Peter K; Egorov, Evgeny S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Tawfik, Dan S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2016-05-19

    Fitness landscapes depict how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level and form the basis of our understanding of many areas of biology, yet their properties remain elusive. Previous studies have analysed specific genes, often using their function as a proxy for fitness, experimentally assessing the effect on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence or in different sequences. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here we visualize an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function (fluorescence) of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We show that the fitness landscape of avGFP is narrow, with 3/4 of the derivatives with a single mutation showing reduced fluorescence and half of the derivatives with four mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations and mostly occurred through the cumulative effect of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease in protein stability and a concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for several fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design.

  17. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  18. Dual-color fluorescence imaging of tumor/host interaction with green and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Baranov, Eugene; Wang, Jin Wei; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2004-06-01

    Dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing transgenic mice has been shown to be a powerful technology to study tumor-host interaction. Host animals include mice which express the GFP transgene in essentially all cells as well as animals in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP. The general GFP-transgenic mouse is available in both the normal and athymic nude (nu/nu) background. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma interaction especially tumor induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. GFP-expressing tumor vasculature could be visualized interacting with the RFP-expressing tumor cells transplanted to the nestin-driven GFP transgenic mice which expressed nestin-GFP in nascent blood vessels was shown as a marker of nascent tumor angiogenesis. Dual-color fluorescence imaging, which visualizes the tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh tissues, dramatically expanding previous studies in fixed and stained preparations (1).

  19. Structural basis of fluorescence fluctuation dynamics of green fluorescent proteins in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuexin; Kim, Hye-Ryong; Heikal, Ahmed A

    2006-11-30

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have become powerful markers for numerous biological studies due to their robust fluorescence properties, site-specific labeling, pH sensitivity, and mutations for multiple-site labeling. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) studies have indicated that fluorescence blinking of anionic GFP mutants takes place on a time scale of 45-300 ms, depending on pH, and have been attributed to external proton transfer. Here we present experimental evidence indicating that conformational change in the protein &beta-barrel is a determining step for the external protonation of GFP-S65T (at low pH) using time-resolved fluorescence and polarization anisotropy measurements. While the average anionic fluorescence lifetime of GFP-S65T is reduced by approximately 18% over a pH range of 3.6-10.0, the fluorescence polarization anisotropy decays mostly as a single exponential with a rotational time of phi = 17 +/- 1 ns, which indicates an intact beta-barrel with a hydrodynamic volume of 78 +/- 5 nm3. In contrast, the total fluorescence (525 +/- 50 nm) of the excited neutral state of S65T reveals a strong correlation between the fluorescence lifetime, structural conformation, and pH. The average fluorescence lifetime of the excited neutral state of S65T as a function of pH yields pKa approximately 5.9 in agreement with literature values using steady-state techniques. In contrast to the intact beta-barrel at high pH, the anisotropy of neutral S65T (at pH protein. The segmental motion of the S65T chromophore becomes faster with an enhanced amplitude ratio as pH is reduced. For comparative purposes, we also provide complementary FCS results on fluorescence blinking of the excited neutral state of an EGFP mutant (F64L/S65T) on a much

  20. Studying Protein-Protein Interactions In Planta Using Advanced Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Somssich, Marc; Simon, Rüdiger

    2017-01-01

    The formation of protein complexes through direct protein-protein interaction is essential for virtually every biological process, and accordingly the ability to determine the interaction properties of specific proteins is important to understand these processes. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements are state-of-the-art confocal fluorescence microscopy- and imaging-based techniques that allow the analysis of protein interactions in vivo and in planta, in specific compartments of single cells or tissues. Here we provide a step-by-step guide to perform FRET measurements by acceptor photobleaching (APB) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in the plant expression system Nicotiana benthamiana.

  1. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  2. The visible touch: in planta visualization of protein-protein interactions by fluorophore-based methods

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Riyaz A; Lahaye, Thomas; Panstruga, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Non-invasive fluorophore-based protein interaction assays like fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC, also referred to as "split YFP") have been proven invaluable tools to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Both methods are now frequently used in the plant sciences and are likely to develop into standard techniques for the identification, verification and in-depth analysis of polypeptide interactions. In this review, we address the individual strengths and weaknesses of both approaches and provide an outlook about new directions and possible future developments for both techniques. PMID:16800872

  3. Colloidal quantum dots for fluorescent labels of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, P.; Kouznetsov, V.; Martinez Bonilla, C.; Dezhurov, S.; Krilsky, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Morenkov, O.; Vrublevskaya, V.; Tsygankov, P.; Ibragimova, S.; Rybakova, A.

    2016-10-01

    The work is devoted to the synthesis of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and their bioconjugates with proteins. Various QDs were obtained as well with synthesis method in an organic solvent followed by hydrophilization and functionalization or synthesis in aqueous phase provides obtaining hydrophilic QDs directly. Particular attention is paid to the synthesis of QDs as fluorescent tags in the near infrared where minimum absorption occurs and the fluorescence of biological tissue and synthetic materials used in analytical systems. A method for the QDs synthesis of type fluorescent core/shell CdTeSe/CdS/CdZnS-PolyT with mixed telluride, selenide cadmium core with a high quantum yield and high resistance to photoaging. It is shown that these quantum dots may be effectively used in the immunoassay.

  4. [Isolation and purification of enhanced green fluorescent protein using chromatography].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qinghua; Song, Shuliang; Liang, Hao; Wang, Weili; Ji, Aiguo

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is a common biological marker. In this research, on the foundation of successful clone and expression of EGFP, a two-step chromatographic method was established to separate and purify EGFP, which includes the use of HisTrap HP immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and Sephadex G-10 HR size exclusion chromatography in sequence. Sephacryl S-300 HR size exclusion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were used to check out the purity of EGFP. At last, it was found that EGFP still had fluorescent activity using fluorescence spectrophotometric detection and Native-PAGE detection. This method can effectively separate the active EGFP. The purity of the obtained EGFP was more than 98%.

  5. Fluorescence quenching in proteins: some applications to protein-DNA and protein-lipid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Jay R.; Chen, Raymond F.; Porter, D. K.; Hensley, Preston; Han, Myun K.; Kim, S. J.; Wilson, Samuel H.; Clague, M.; Williamson, Cynthia K.

    1992-04-01

    The authors outline some examples of the advantages found in subdividing overall quenching into heterogeneous contributions. Subdivision is accomplished by overdetermination (global) and association (DAS, decay associated spectral) methods. In some cases, the subdivision of fluorescence leads to the unique identification of different fluorophores in different sites. Alternatively, the recovered components may reflect conformational heterogeneity at each site. For intrinsic protein fluorescence, it is often noted in the literature that single Trp proteins may be multiexponential. Genetic substitution in multi-Trp proteins, however, often leads to very strong (if not complete) lifetime-to-Trp assignment. Even if a single Trp experiences two or more microenvironments, it can be a useful reporter. The linkage of multiple lifetimes and amplitudes to changes in global conformation often reveals a more `sensitive' subpopulation or lifetime component that becomes a better indicator for important conformational states than aggregate intensity can provide. This has proven useful in studying pH transitions of proteins both in solution and embedded in membranes. Energy transfer is particularly useful in differentiating sites at different distances. Further, the disclosure of heterogeneity in distance is clearly superior to the reporting of a mean distance. This report surveys several systems that have been examined via emission DAS techniques, showing how each protein is better understood when viewed in terms of discrete spectral contributions. We conclude with an overview and some details about our construction of an EDAS (excitation-DAS) instrument; i.e., how excitation scans can be incorporated into a time-resolved instrument.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Highly Charged Green Fluorescent Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Phillips, J L; Colvin, M E

    2009-03-26

    A recent experimental study showed that green fluorescent protein (GFP) that has been mutated to have ultra-high positive or negative net charges, retain their native structure and fluorescent properties while gaining resistance to aggregation under denaturing conditions. These proteins also provide an ideal test case for studying the effects of surface charge on protein structure and dynamics. They have performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the near-neutral wildtype GFP and mutants with net charges of -29 and +35. They analyzed the resulting trajectories to quantify differences in structure and dynamics between the three GFPs. This analyses shows that all three proteins are stable over the MD trajectory, with the near-neutral wild type GFP exhibiting somewhat more flexibility than the positive or negative GFP mutants, as measured by the order parameter and changes in phi-psi angles. There are more dramatic differences in the properties of the water and counter ions surrounding the proteins. The water diffusion constant near the protein surface is closer to the value for bulk water in the positively charged GFP than in the other two proteins. Additionally, the positively charged GFP shows a much greater clustering of the counter ions (CL-) near its surface than corresponding counter ions (Na+) near the negatively charged mutant.

  7. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase…

  8. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase…

  9. [The green fluorescent protein that glows in bioscience].

    PubMed

    Millán, María Inés; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia

    2009-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a protein produced by the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, that emits bioluminescence in the green zone of the visible spectrum. The GFP gene has been cloned and is used in molecular biology as a marker. The three researchers that participated independently in elucidating the structure and function of this and its related proteins, Drs. Shimomura, Chalfie and Tsien were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008. Dr. Shimomura discovered and studied the properties of GFP. Using molecular biological techniques, Chalfie succeeded in introducing the GFP gene into the DNA of the small, almost transparent worm C. elegans, and initiated an era in which GFP would be used as a glowing marker for cellular biology. Finally, Dr.Tsien found precisely how GFP's structure produces the observed green fluorescence, and succeeded in modifying the structure to generate molecules that emit light at slightly different wavelengths, which gave tags of different colors. Fluorescent proteins are very versatile and are being used in many areas, such as microbiology, biotechnology, physiology, environmental engineering, development, etc. They can, for example, illuminate growing cancer tumours; show the development of Alzheimer's disease, or detect arsenic traces in water. Finding the key to how a marine organism produces light unexpectedly ended up providing researchers with a powerful array of tools with which to visualize cell biology in action.

  10. Photoswitchable red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; English, Brian P.; Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Xiao, Hui; Almo, Steven C.; Singer, Robert H.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Subclass of fluorescent proteins, large Stokes shift fluorescent proteins, is characterized by their increased spread between the excitation and emission maxima. Here we report a photoswitchable variant of a red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift, PSLSSmKate, which initially exhibits excitation/emission at 445/622 nm, but irradiation with violet light photoswitches PSLSSmKate into a common red form with excitation/emission at 573/621 nm. We characterize spectral, photophysical and biochemical properties of PSLSSmKate in vitro and in mammalian cells, and determine its crystal structure in the large Stokes shift form. Mass-spectrometry, mutagenesis and spectroscopic analysis of PSLSSmKate allow us to propose molecular mechanisms for the large Stokes shift, pH dependence and light-induced chromophore transformation. We demonstrate applicability of PSLSSmKate to superresolution PALM microscopy and protein dynamics in live cells. Given its promising properties, we expect that PSLSSmKate-like phenotype will be further used for photoactivatable imaging and tracking multiple populations of intracellular objects. PMID:25242289

  11. Portraying G Protein-Coupled Receptors with Fluorescent Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamics of ligand–receptor interactions at the surface of living cells represents a fundamental aspect of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) biology; thus, its detailed elucidation constitutes a challenge for modern pharmacology. Interestingly, fluorescent ligands have been developed for a variety of GPCRs in order to monitor ligand–receptor binding in living cells. Accordingly, new methodological strategies derived from noninvasive fluorescence-based approaches, especially fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), have been successfully developed to characterize ligand–receptor interactions. Importantly, these technologies are supplanting more hazardous and expensive radioactive binding assays. In addition, FRET-based tools have also become extremely powerful approaches for visualizing receptor–receptor interactions (i.e., GPCR oligomerization) in living cells. Thus, by means of the synthesis of compatible fluorescent ligands these novel techniques can be implemented to demonstrate the existence of GPCR oligomerization not only in heterologous systems but also in native tissues. Finally, there is no doubt that these methodologies would also be relevant in drug discovery in order to develop new high-throughput screening approaches or to identify new therapeutic targets. Overall, herein, we provide a thorough assessment of all technical and biological aspects, including strengths and weaknesses, of these fluorescence-based methodologies when applied to the study of GPCR biology at the plasma membrane of living cells. PMID:25010291

  12. Biosensing and protein fluorescence enhancement by functionalized porous silicon devices.

    PubMed

    Palestino, Gabriela; Agarwal, Vivechana; Aulombard, Roger; Pérez, Elías; Gergely, Csilla

    2008-12-02

    Porous silicon (PSi) is a promising biomaterial presenting the advantage of being biocompatible and bioresorbable. Due to the large specific surface area and unique optical features, these microporous structures are excellent candidates for biosensing applications. Investigating device functionality and developing simple Si-based transducers need to be addressed in novel biological detection. Our work demonstrates that, among the various PSi configurations for molecular detection, PSi microcavity structure demonstrates the best biosensing performance, reflected through the enhanced luminescence response and the changes in the refractive index. For successful immobilization, molecular infiltration and confinement are the two key factors that are controlled by the pore size distribution of the PSi microcavities and by the surface modification obtained by silane-glutaraldehyde chemistry. Enhancement of the fluorescence emission of confined fluorescent biomolecules in the active layer of PSi microcavities was observed for a nonlabeled protein with a natural green fluorescence, the glucose oxidase enzyme (GOX). An increase in the fluorescence emission was also observed when functionalized PSi material was used to detect specific binding between biotin and a low concentration of labeled streptavidin. Evidence for the enzymatic activity of GOX in its adsorbed form is also presented. Use of smart silicon devices, enabling enhancement of fluorescence emission of biomolecules, offers easy-to-use biosensing, based on the luminescence response of the molecules to be detected.

  13. Development and validation of a high-content bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay for small-molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 Nef dimerization.

    PubMed

    Poe, Jerrod A; Vollmer, Laura; Vogt, Andreas; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2014-04-01

    Nef is a human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) accessory factor essential for viral pathogenesis and AIDS progression. Many Nef functions require dimerization, and small molecules that block Nef dimerization may represent antiretroviral drug leads. Here we describe a cell-based assay for Nef dimerization inhibitors based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). Nef was fused to nonfluorescent, complementary fragments of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and coexpressed in the same cell population. Dimerization of Nef resulted in juxtaposition of the YFP fragments and reconstitution of the fluorophore. For automation, the Nef-YFP fusion proteins plus a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) reporter were expressed from a single vector, separated by picornavirus "2A" linker peptides to permit equivalent translation of all three proteins. Validation studies revealed a critical role for gating on the mRFP-positive subpopulation of transfected cells, as well as use of the mRFP signal to normalize the Nef-BiFC signal. Nef-BiFC/mRFP ratios resulting from cells expressing wild-type versus dimerization-defective Nef were very clearly separated, with Z factors consistently in the 0.6 to 0.7 range. A fully automated pilot screen of the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set III identified several hit compounds that reproducibly blocked Nef dimerization in the low micromolar range. This BiFC-based assay has the potential to identify cell-active small molecules that directly interfere with Nef dimerization and function.

  14. Fluorescence Anisotropy as a Tool to Study Protein-protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Abril; Nishigaki, Takuya; Sánchez-Puig, Nuria

    2016-10-21

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in the function of a living organism. Once an interaction has been identified and validated it is necessary to characterize it at the structural and mechanistic level. Several biochemical and biophysical methods exist for such purpose. Among them, fluorescence anisotropy is a powerful technique particularly used when the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore-labeled protein remains constant upon protein-protein interaction. In this technique, a fluorophore-labeled protein is excited with vertically polarized light of an appropriate wavelength that selectively excites a subset of the fluorophores according to their relative orientation with the incoming beam. The resulting emission also has a directionality whose relationship in the vertical and horizontal planes defines anisotropy (r) as follows: r=(IVV-IVH)/(IVV+2IVH), where IVV and IVH are the fluorescence intensities of the vertical and horizontal components, respectively. Fluorescence anisotropy is sensitive to the rotational diffusion of a fluorophore, namely the apparent molecular size of a fluorophore attached to a protein, which is altered upon protein-protein interaction. In the present text, the use of fluorescence anisotropy as a tool to study protein-protein interactions was exemplified to address the binding between the protein mutated in the Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SBDS) and the Elongation factor like-1 GTPase (EFL1). Conventionally, labeling of a protein with a fluorophore is carried out on the thiol groups (cysteine) or in the amino groups (the N-terminal amine or lysine) of the protein. However, SBDS possesses several cysteines and lysines that did not allow site directed labeling of it. As an alternative technique, the dye 4',5'-bis(1,3,2 dithioarsolan-2-yl) fluorescein was used to specifically label a tetracysteine motif, Cys-Cys-Pro-Gly-Cys-Cys, genetically engineered in the C-terminus of the recombinant SBDS protein. Fitting of the

  15. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  16. Generation of cloned transgenic cats expressing red fluorescence protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xi Jun; Lee, Hyo Sang; Yu, Xian Feng; Choi, Eugene; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Mo Sun; Lee, Young S; Cho, Su Jin; Jin, Guang Zhen; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Kong, Il Keun

    2008-03-01

    A method for engineering and producing genetically modified cats is important for generating biomedical models of human diseases. Here we describe the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer to produce cloned transgenic cats that systemically express red fluorescent protein. Immature oocytes were collected from superovulating cat ovaries. Donor fibroblasts were obtained from an ear skin biopsy of a white male Turkish Angora cat, cultured for one to two passages, and subjected to transduction with a retrovirus vector designed to transfer and express the red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene. A total of 176 RFP cloned embryos were transferred into 11 surrogate mothers (mean = 16 +/- 7.5 per recipient). Three surrogate mothers were successfully impregnated (27.3%) and delivered two liveborn and one stillborn kitten at 65 to 66 days of gestation. Analysis of nine feline-specific microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned cats were genetically identical to the donor cat. Presence of the RFP gene in the transgenic cat genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Whole-body red fluorescence was detected 60 days after birth in the liveborn transgenic (TG) cat but not in the surrogate mother cat. Red fluorescence was detected in tissue samples, including hair, muscle, brain, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, bronchus, lung, stomach, intestine, tongue, and even excrement of the stillborn TG cat. These results suggest that this nuclear transfer procedure using genetically modified somatic cells could be useful for the efficient production of transgenic cats.

  17. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  18. Use of the A. victoria green fluorescent protein to study protein dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kahana, J A; Silver, P A

    2001-05-01

    Fluorescent molecules serve as valuable tools for the detection of a variety of biochemical phenomena. Such reagents have been employed for protein localization, quantitation of gene expression, detection of nucleic acids, cell sorting, and determination of chemical concentrations. Although fluorescence is a useful tool for detecting molecules within cells, its application in vivo has been limited. The ideal vital fluorescent tag should (1) be detectable without causing cytological damage, (2) be able to label a wide variety of cell types readily, and (3) be able to be targeted to virtually any subcellular region. The recently cloned green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is such a molecule. This overview describes the use of this proteinaceous fluorophore for in vivo observation of cellular phenomena, including applications and problems with the use of GFP, a discussion of mutant GFPs with altered fluorescence characteristics, and also some details on microscopy requirements.

  19. Use of the A. victoria green fluorescent protein to study protein dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kahana, J A; Silver, P A

    2001-05-01

    Fluorescent molecules serve as valuable tools for the detection of a variety of biochemical phenomena. Such reagents have been employed for protein localization, quantitation of gene expression, detection of nucleic acids, cell sorting, and determination of chemical concentrations. Although fluorescence is a useful tool for detecting molecules within cells, its application in vivo has heretofore been limited. The ideal vital fluorescent tag should (1) be detectable without causing cytological damage, (2) be able to label a wide variety of cell types readily, and (3) be able to be targeted to virtually any subcellular region. The recently cloned green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is such a molecule. This overview describes the use of this proteinaceous fluorophore for in vivo observation of cellular phenomena, including applications and problems with the use of GFP, a discussion of mutant GFPs with altered fluorescence characteristics, and also some details on microscopy requirements.

  20. Synthesis of a fluorescent 7-methylguanosine analog and a fluorescence spectroscopic study of its reaction with wheatgerm cap binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ren, J; Goss, D J

    1996-01-01

    In the initiation of protein synthesis, the mRNA 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine cap structure and several recognition proteins play a pivotal role. For the study of this cap binding reaction, one approach is to use fluorescence spectroscopy. A ribose diol-modified fluorescent cap analog, anthraniloyl-m7GTP (Ant-m7GTP), was designed and synthesized for this purpose. This fluorescent cap analog was found to have a high quantum yield, resistance to photobleaching and avoided overlap of excitation and emission wavelengths with those of proteins. The binding of Ant-m7GTP with wheatgerm initiation factors elF-4F and elF-(iso)4F was determined. The fluorescent cap analog and m7GTP had similar interactions with both cap binding proteins. Fluorescence quenching experiments showed that the microenvironment of Ant-m7GTP when bound to protein was hydrophobic. PMID:8836193

  1. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan - prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-10-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies.

  2. Improved method to retain cytosolic reporter protein fluorescence while staining for nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Heinen, André P; Wanke, Florian; Moos, Sonja; Attig, Sebastian; Luche, Hervé; Pal, Prajna Paramita; Budisa, Nediljko; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Waisman, Ari; Kurschus, Florian C

    2014-07-01

    Staining of transcription factors (TFs) together with retention of fluorescent reporter proteins is hindered by loss of fluorescence using current available methods. In this study, it is shown that current TF staining protocols do not destroy fluorescent proteins (FPs) but rather that fixation is not sufficient to retain FPs in the cytosol of the permeabilized cells. In this article, a simple and reliable protocol is elaborated, which allows efficient TF and cytokine staining while retaining FPs inside fixed cells. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  3. Optical studies of dynamical processes in fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebig, Carl; Dennis, William; Kirkpatrick, Sean; Naik, Rajesh; Stone, Morley

    2002-03-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) extracted from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea Victoria[1] and its mutants are novel nanoscale systems, which have been shown to exhibit desirable linear and nonlinear optical properties[2]. In this paper, a combination of both linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopic techniques was used to investigate dynamical processes in fluorescent proteins in both aqueous solution and an organic polymer matrix. Experimental results were analyzed in terms of a Brownian oscillator model[3] and by comparison to computer simulations. [1] M. Chalfie, G. Euskirchen, W. W. Ward and D. C. Prasher, Science 263 (1994) 802. [2] Sean M. Kirkpatrick, Rajesh R. Naik, Morley O. Stone, J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 2867. [3] S. Mukamel, "Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy", (Oxford University Press, New York, 1995) pp. 227.

  4. The fluorescent protein palette: tools for cellular imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding family of fluorescent proteins (FPs) that have become essential tools for studies of cell biology and physiology. Here, we describe the characteristics of the genetically encoded fluorescent markers that now span the visible spectrum from deep blue to deep red. We identify some of the novel FPs that have unusual characteristics that make them useful reporters of the dynamic behaviors of proteins inside cells, and describe how many different optical methods can be combined with the FPs to provide quantitative measurements in living systems. “If wood is rubbed with the Pulmo marinus, it will have all the appearance of being on fire; so much so, indeed, that a walking-stick, thus treated, will light the way like a torch” (translation of Pliny the Elder from John Bostock, 1855). PMID:19771335

  5. Circularly permuted green fluorescent proteins engineered to sense Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Nagai, T; Sawano, A; Park, E S; Miyawaki, A

    2001-03-13

    To visualize Ca(2+)-dependent protein-protein interactions in living cells by fluorescence readouts, we used a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP), in which the amino and carboxyl portions had been interchanged and reconnected by a short spacer between the original termini. The cpGFP was fused to calmodulin and its target peptide, M13. The chimeric protein, which we have named "pericam," was fluorescent and its spectral properties changed reversibly with the amount of Ca(2+), probably because of the interaction between calmodulin and M13 leading to an alteration of the environment surrounding the chromophore. Three types of pericam were obtained by mutating several amino acids adjacent to the chromophore. Of these, "flash-pericam" became brighter with Ca(2+), whereas "inverse-pericam" dimmed. On the other hand, "ratiometric-pericam" had an excitation wavelength changing in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. All of the pericams expressed in HeLa cells were able to monitor free Ca(2+) dynamics, such as Ca(2+) oscillations in the cytosol and the nucleus. Ca(2+) imaging using high-speed confocal line-scanning microscopy and a flash-pericam allowed to detect the free propagation of Ca(2+) ions across the nuclear envelope. Then, free Ca(2+) concentrations in the nucleus and mitochondria were simultaneously measured by using ratiometric-pericams having appropriate localization signals, revealing that extra-mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients caused rapid changes in the concentration of mitochondrial Ca(2+). Finally, a "split-pericam" was made by deleting the linker in the flash-pericam. The Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between calmodulin and M13 in HeLa cells was monitored by the association of the two halves of GFP, neither of which was fluorescent by itself.

  6. The Cyan Fluorescent Protein (CFP) Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Imaging Pancreatic Exocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hop S Tran; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Reynoso, Jose; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Context The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. Objective To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Design Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan). Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA). Intervention All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Main outcome measure Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Results Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. Conclusions The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer. PMID:19287108

  7. The cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) transgenic mouse as a model for imaging pancreatic exocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Tran Cao, Hop S; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Reynoso, Jose; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2009-03-09

    The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan). Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA). All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer.

  8. Primary structure of the Aequorea victoria green-fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Prasher, D C; Eckenrode, V K; Ward, W W; Prendergast, F G; Cormier, M J

    1992-02-15

    Many cnidarians utilize green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) as energy-transfer acceptors in bioluminescence. GFPs fluoresce in vivo upon receiving energy from either a luciferase-oxyluciferin excited-state complex or a Ca(2+)-activated phosphoprotein. These highly fluorescent proteins are unique due to the chemical nature of their chromophore, which is comprised of modified amino acid (aa) residues within the polypeptide. This report describes the cloning and sequencing of both cDNA and genomic clones of GFP from the cnidarian, Aequorea victoria. The gfp10 cDNA encodes a 238-aa-residue polypeptide with a calculated Mr of 26,888. Comparison of A. victoria GFP genomic clones shows three different restriction enzyme patterns which suggests that at least three different genes are present in the A. victoria population at Friday Harbor, Washington. The gfp gene encoded by the lambda GFP2 genomic clone is comprised of at least three exons spread over 2.6 kb. The nucleotide sequences of the cDNA and the gene will aid in the elucidation of structure-function relationships in this unique class of proteins.

  9. Saturation Fluorescence Labeling of Proteins for Proteomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pretzer, Elizabeth; Wiktorowicz, John E.

    2008-01-01

    We present here an optimized and cost-effective approach to saturation fluorescence labeling of protein thiols for proteomic analysis. We investigated a number of conditions and reagent concentrations including a disulfide reducing agent (TCEP), pH, incubation time, linearity of labeling, and saturating dye: protein thiol ratio with protein standards to gauge specific and non-specific labeling. Efficacy of labeling under these conditions was quantified using specific fluorescence estimation, defined as the ratio of fluorescence pixel intensities and Coomassie-stained pixel intensities of bands after digital imaging. Factors leading to specific vs. non-specific labeling in the presence of thiourea are also discussed. We have found that reproducible saturation of available Cys residues of the proteins used as labeling standards (human carbonic anhydrase I, enolase, α-lactalbumin) is achieved at 50-100-fold excess of the uncharged maleimide-functionalized BODIPY™ dyes over Cys. We confirm our previous findings and those of others that the maleimide dyes are not impacted by the presence of 2M thiourea. Moreover, we establish that 2 mM TCEP used as reductant is optimal. We also establish further that labeling is optimal at pH 7.5 and complete after 30 min. Low non-specific labeling was gauged by the inclusion of non-Cys containing proteins (horse myoglobin, bovine carbonic anhydrase) to the labeling mixture. We also show that the dye exhibits little to no effect on the two dimensional mobilities of labeled proteins derived from cells. PMID:18191033

  10. Fluorescence lifetime images of green fluorescent protein in HeLa cells during TNF-alpha induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiyuki; Oshita, Shugo; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Sun, Fan; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2009-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime images of HeLa cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been measured as apoptosis is induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with cycloheximide. The fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is found to decrease after the induction of apoptosis, indicating that the change in environment occurs around the chromophore of EGFP with the apoptosis process. The fluorescence lifetime imaging technique can be used to perform in vivo observation of cell death processes. Fluorescence lifetime measurements are useful to examine the induction of the apoptosis process, even when a morphological change of each cell cannot be observed because of a low spatial resolution.

  11. Complementation and reconstitution of fluorescence from circularly permuted and truncated green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-ming; Bystroff, Christopher

    2009-02-10

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used as a proof of concept for a novel "leave-one-out" biosensor design in which a protein that has a segment omitted from the middle of the sequence by circular permutation and truncation binds the missing peptide and reconstitutes its function. Three variants of GFP have been synthesized that are each missing one of the 11 beta-strands from its beta-barrel structure, and in two of the variants, adding the omitted peptide sequence in trans reconstitutes fluorescence. Detailed biochemical analysis indicates that GFP with beta-strand 7 "left out" (t7SPm) exists in a partially unfolded state. The apo form t7SPm binds the free beta-strand 7 peptide with a dissociation constant of approximately 0.5 microM and folds into the native state of GFP, resulting in fluorescence recovery. Folding of t7SPm, both with and without the peptide ligand, is at least a three-state process and has a rate comparable to that of the full-length and unpermuted GFP. The conserved kinetic properties strongly suggest that the rate-limiting steps in the folding pathway have not been altered by circular permutation and truncation in t7SPm. This study shows that structural and functional reconstitution of GFP can occur with a segment omitted from the middle of the chain, and that the unbound form is in a partially unfolded state.

  12. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions.

  13. An improved bimolecular fluorescence complementation tool based on superfolder green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Lin, Jian; Zhou, Cuihong; Deng, Xiaoyan; Xia, Bin

    2011-03-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) has been widely used in the analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in recent years. There are many notable advantages of BiFC such as convenience and direct visualization of PPI in cells. However, BiFC has one common limitation: the separated non-fluorescent fragments can be spontaneously self-assembled into an intact protein, which leads to false-positive results. In this study, a pair of complementary fragments (sfGFPN and sfGFPC) was constructed by splitting superfolder GFP (sfGFP) between the 214 and 215 amino acid residue, and sfGFPC was mutated by site-directed gene mutagenesis to decrease the signal of negative control. Our results showed that mutations in sfGFPC (sfGFPC(m12)) can effectively decrease the signal of negative control. Thus, we provide an improved BiFC tool for the analysis of PPI. Further, since the self-assembly problem is a common shortcoming for application of BiFC, our research provides a feasible strategy for other BiFC candidate proteins with the same problem.

  14. Thermal effect on Aequorea green fluorescent protein anionic and neutral chromophore forms fluorescence.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Andrea Martins

    2012-01-01

    The emission behaviour of Aequorea green fluorescent protein (A-GFP) chromophore, in both neutral (N) and anionic (A) form, was studied in the temperature range from 20 °C to 75 °C and at pH = 7. Excitation wavelengths of 399 nm and 476 nm were applied to probe the N and A forms environment, respectively. Both forms exhibit distinct fluorescence patterns at high temperature values. The emission quenching rate, following a temperature increase, is higher for the chromophore N form as a result of the hydrogen bond network weakening. The chromophore anionic form emission maximum is red shifted, upon temperature increase, due to a charge transfer process occurring after A form excitation.

  15. Amorphous protein aggregation monitored using fluorescence self-quenching.

    PubMed

    Jozawa, Hiroki; Kabir, Md Golam; Zako, Tamotsu; Maeda, Mizuo; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    Biophysical understanding of amorphous protein aggregation can significantly impact diverse area of biotechnology. Here, we report the time dependent salt-induced formation of amorphous aggregation as monitored by fluorescence self-quenching and compare the results with conventional methods for detecting protein aggregation [static light scattering (LS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS)]. As a model protein, we used a bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) variant extended by two glycines (C2G) at its C terminus, and three variants where three types of Solubility Controlling Peptide tags (SCP tags) made of five serines (C5S), alanines (C5A) or aspartic acids (C5D) were added to the C terminus of C2G. All variants have a native-like BPTI structure and trypsin inhibitory activity, but different solubilities controlled by the SCP tags. The BPTIs were labeled using NHS-Fluorescein (FAM) conjugated to BPTI's lysines, and we measured the changes in fluorescence intensity occurring upon the addition of NaCl. The fluorescence of all FAM-BPTIs decreased almost immediately, albeit to a different extent, upon addition of salt and became constant after 10 min for 24 h or more. On the other hand, LS and DLS signal changes were dependent on the type of tags. Namely, C2G's LS and DLS signals changed immediately, the signals of C5S and C5A tagged FAM-BPTIs increased slowly from 10 min to 24 h, and those of C5D remained constant. These observations indicated the presence of at least one intermediate step, with increased protein-protein interaction yielding a 'molecular condensation' phase. According to this model, C2G would rapidly turn from 'condensates' to aggregates, whereas C5S and C5A tagged FAM-BPTIs would do so slowly, and the soluble C5D tagged variant would remain in the molecular condensation state. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of symbionts and fluorescent proteins in reef corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Guy; Salih, Anya

    2005-03-01

    Reef-building corals are dependent on dinoflagellate algal symbionts (zooxanthellae). Within the range of habitats of any one coral species there can be huge variations in light intensities, so there is a risk of photoinhibition from excess light. In extremes of light and heat, senescent algae are expelled en masse, a phenomenon known as coral bleaching. In freshly isolated tissue the chlorophyll fluorescence has a lifetime of ~1.1ns. 6 hours and 15 hours after isolation the zooxanthellae looked visually healthy, but the lifetimes had increased to 2ns after 6 hours and 2.2ns after 15 hours. Zooxanthellae which were visibly damaged or necrotic had a mean lifetime of 3ns. Lifetime of chlorophyll fluorescence is thus a sensitive indicator, revealing effects in cell metabolism before any structural changes are evident. The occurrence of FRET between fluorescent proteins in corals has already been reported and time-resolved spectra have shown the effect on fluorescent lifetime, but without any spatial resolution. Lifetime confocal microscopy offers lower time resolution but excellent spatial resolution. Lifetimes of the isolated A. millepora pigments amilFP490, amilFP504 and amilFP593 (names indicate emission peaks) were 2.8ns, 2.9ns and 2.9ns respectively. In the coral sample, imaging the entire emission spectrum from 420nm, the mean lifetime was reduced to 1.5ns, implying that FRET was occurring. Looking just at the fluorescence from FRET donors the lifetime was even shorter, at 1.3ns, supporting this interpretation.

  18. Fluorescent Biphenyl Derivatives of Phenylalanine Suitable for Protein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengxi; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Wang, Lin; Jin, Yuguang; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Hecht, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that structurally compact fluorophores incorporated into the side chains of amino acids could be introduced into dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli (ecDHFR) with minimal disruption of protein structure or function, even where the site of incorporation was within a folded region of the protein. The modified proteins could be employed for FRET measurements, providing sensitive monitors of changes in protein conformation. The very favorable results achieved in that study encouraged us to prepare additional fluorescent amino acids of potential utility for studying protein dynamics. Presently, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of four positional isomers of biphenyl-phenylalanine, all of which were found to exhibit potentially useful fluorescent properties. All four phenylalanine derivatives were used to activate suppressor tRNA transcripts, and incorporated into multiple positions of ecDHFR. All phenylalanine derivatives were incorporated with good efficiency into position 16 of ecDHFR, and afforded modified proteins which consumed NADPH at rates up to about twice the rate measured for wild type. This phenomenon has been noted on a number of occasions previously and shown to be due to an increase in the off-rate of tetrahydrofolate from the enzyme, altering a step that is normally rate limiting. When introduced into sterically accessible position 49, the four phenylalanine derivatives afforded DHFRs having catalytic function comparable to wild type. The four phenylalanine derivatives were also introduced into position 115 of ecDHFR, which is known to be a folded region of the protein less tolerant of structural alteration. As anticipated, significant differences were noted in the catalytic efficiencies of the derived proteins. The ability of two of the sizeable biphenyl-phenylalanine derivatives to be accommodated at position 115 with minimal perturbation of DHFR function is attributed to rotational

  19. Fluorescent biphenyl derivatives of phenylalanine suitable for protein modification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengxi; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Wang, Lin; Jin, Yuguang; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-11-26

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that structurally compact fluorophores incorporated into the side chains of amino acids could be introduced into dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) with minimal disruption of protein structure or function, even when the site of incorporation was within a folded region of the protein. The modified proteins could be employed for FRET measurements, providing sensitive monitors of changes in protein conformation. The very favorable results achieved in that study encouraged us to prepare additional fluorescent amino acids of potential utility for studying protein dynamics. Presently, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of four positional isomers of biphenyl-phenylalanine, all of which were found to exhibit potentially useful fluorescent properties. All four phenylalanine derivatives were used to activate suppressor tRNA transcripts and incorporated into multiple positions of ecDHFR. All phenylalanine derivatives were incorporated with good efficiency into position 16 of ecDHFR and afforded modified proteins that consumed NADPH at rates up to about twice the rate measured for wild type. This phenomenon has been noted on a number of occasions previously and shown to be due to an increase in the off-rate of tetrahydrofolate from the enzyme, altering a step that is normally rate limiting. When introduced into sterically accessible position 49, the four phenylalanine derivatives afforded DHFRs having catalytic function comparable to wild type. The four phenylalanine derivatives were also introduced into position 115 of ecDHFR, which is known to be a folded region of the protein less tolerant of structural alteration. As anticipated, significant differences were noted in the catalytic efficiencies of the derived proteins. The ability of two of the sizable biphenyl-phenylalanine derivatives to be accommodated at position 115 with minimal perturbation of DHFR function is attributed to rotational

  20. Axonal Membrane Proteins Are Transported in Distinct Carriers: A Two-Color Video Microscopy Study in Cultured Hippocampal NeuronsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kaether, Christoph; Skehel, Paul; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2000-01-01

    Neurons transport newly synthesized membrane proteins along axons by microtubule-mediated fast axonal transport. Membrane proteins destined for different axonal subdomains are thought to be transported in different transport carriers. To analyze this differential transport in living neurons, we tagged the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and synaptophysin (p38) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) variants. The resulting fusion proteins, APP-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), p38-enhanced GFP, and p38-enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, were expressed in hippocampal neurons, and the cells were imaged by video microscopy. APP-YFP was transported in elongated tubules that moved extremely fast (on average 4.5 μm/s) and over long distances. In contrast, p38-enhanced GFP-transporting structures were more vesicular and moved four times slower (0.9 μm/s) and over shorter distances only. Two-color video microscopy showed that the two proteins were sorted to different carriers that moved with different characteristics along axons of doubly transfected neurons. Antisense treatment using oligonucleotides against the kinesin heavy chain slowed down the long, continuous movement of APP-YFP tubules and increased frequency of directional changes. These results demonstrate for the first time directly the sorting and transport of two axonal membrane proteins into different carriers. Moreover, the extremely fast-moving tubules represent a previously unidentified type of axonal carrier. PMID:10749925

  1. Biased μ-opioid receptor agonists diversely regulate lateral mobility and functional coupling of the receptor to its cognate G proteins.

    PubMed

    Melkes, Barbora; Hejnova, Lucie; Novotny, Jiri

    2016-12-01

    There are some indications that biased μ-opioid ligands may diversely affect μ-opioid receptor (MOR) properties. Here, we used confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study the regulation by different MOR agonists of receptor movement within the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells stably expressing a functional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged μ-opioid receptor (MOR-YFP). We found that the lateral mobility of MOR-YFP was increased by (D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol)-enkephalin (DAMGO) and to a lesser extent also by morphine but decreased by endomorphin-2. Interestingly, cholesterol depletion strongly enhanced the ability of morphine to elevate receptor mobility but significantly reduced or even eliminated the effect of DAMGO and endomorphin-2, respectively. Moreover, the ability of DAMGO and endomorphin-2 to influence MOR-YFP movement was diminished by pertussis toxin treatment. The results obtained by agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays indicated that DAMGO exhibited higher efficacy than morphine and endomorphin-2 did and that the efficacy of DAMGO, contrary to the latter agonists, was enhanced by cholesterol depletion. Overall, our study provides clear evidence that biased MOR agonists diversely affect receptor mobility in plasma membranes as well as MOR/G protein coupling and that the regulatory effect of different ligands depends on the membrane cholesterol content. These findings help to delineate the fundamental properties of MOR regarding their interaction with biased MOR ligands and cognate G proteins.

  2. Simultaneous time-lamination imaging of protein association using a split fluorescent timer protein.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Ayari; Hattori, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-03-17

    Studies of temporal behaviors of protein association in living cells are crucially important for elucidating the fundamental roles and the mechanism of interactive coordination for cell activities. We developed a method for investigating the temporal alternation of a particular protein assembly using monomeric fluorescent proteins, fluorescent timers (FTs), of which the fluorescent color changes from blue to red over time. We identified a dissection site of the FTs, which allows complementation of the split FT fragments. The split fragments of each FT variant recovered their fluorescence and maintained inherent rates of the color changes upon the reassembly of the fragments in vitro. We applied this method to visualize the aggregation process of α-synuclein in living cells. The size of the aggregates with the temporal information was analyzed from ratio values of the blue and red fluorescence of the reconstituted FTs, from which the aggregation rates were evaluated. This method using the split FT fragments enables tracing and visualizing temporal alternations of various protein associations by single fluorescence measurements at a given time point.

  3. Fluorescent labeling of tetracysteine-tagged proteins in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Gaietta, Guido; Zürn, Alexander; Adams, Stephen R; Terrillon, Sonia; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y; Lohse, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a general protocol for labeling proteins with the membrane-permeant fluorogenic biarsenical dye fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder–ethanedithiol (FlAsH-EDT2). Generation of the tetracysteine-tagged protein construct by itself is not described, as this is a protein-specific process. This method allows site-selective labeling of proteins in living cells and has been applied to a wide variety of proteins and biological problems. We provide here a generally applicable labeling procedure and discuss the problems that can occur as well as general considerations that must be taken into account when designing and implementing the procedure. The method can even be applied to proteins with expression below 1 pmol mg−1 of protein, such as G protein–coupled receptors, and it can be used to study the intracellular localization of proteins as well as functional interactions in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. The labeling procedure using FlAsH-EDT2 as described takes 2–3 h, depending on the number of samples to be processed. PMID:20885379

  4. Mechanism of Chromophore Assisted Laser Inactivation Employing Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Mark A.; Rajfur, Zenon; Chen, Zaozao; Humphrey, David; Yang, Bing; Sligar, Stephen G.; Jacobson, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Chromophore Assisted Laser Inactivation (CALI) is a technique that uses irradiation of chromophores proximate to a target protein to inactivate function. Previously, EGFP mediated CALI has been used to inactivate EGFP-fusion proteins in a spatio-temporally defined manner within cells but the mechanism of inactivation is unknown 1, 2. To help elucidate the mechanism of protein inactivation mediated by fluorescent protein CALI ([FP]-CALI), the activities of purified Glutathione-S-transferase-FP (GST-EXFP) fusions were measured after laser irradiation in vitro. Singlet oxygen and free radical quenchers as well as the removal of oxygen inhibited CALI, indicating the involvement of a reactive oxygen species (ROS). At higher concentrations of protein, turbidity after CALI increased significantly indicating cross-linking of proximate fusion proteins suggesting that damage of residues on the surface the protein, distant from the active site, results in inactivation. Control experiments removed sample heating as a possible cause of these effects. Different FP mutants fused to GST vary in their CALI efficiency in the order EGFP>EYFP>ECFP, while a GST construct that binds FlAsH results in significantly higher CALI efficiency than any of the XFPs tested. It is likely that the hierarchy of XFP effectiveness reflects the balance between ROS that are trapped within the XFP structure and cause fluorophore and chromophore bleaching and those that escape to effect CALI of proximate proteins. PMID:19199572

  5. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  6. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  7. Use of the A. victoria green fluorescent protein to study protein dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kahana, J A; Silver, P A

    2001-05-01

    Fluorescent molecules serve as valuable tools for the detection of numerous biochemical phenomena and have been employed for protein localization, quantitation of gene expression, detection of nucleic acids, cell sorting and determination of chemical concentrations. However, the use of such techniques generally requires significant nonphysiological perturbations to the biological system being studied; therefore, they are not always appropriate for the observation of dynamic phenomena. Green fluorescent protein (GFP), cloned from jellyfish, has been used to overcome many of these problems. It is a small, extremely stable fluorescent protein that has been successfully expressed and detected in a wide variety of organisms, both in intact form and fused to other proteins. This overview unit describes the use of this proteinaceous fluorophore for in vivo observation of cellular phenomena.

  8. Protein-retention expansion microscopy of cells and tissues labeled using standard fluorescent proteins and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tillberg, Paul W.; Chen, Fei; Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Zhao, Yongxin; Yu, Chih-Chieh (Jay); English, Brian P.; Gao, Linyi; Martorell, Anthony; Suk, Ho-Jun; Yoshida, Fumiaki; DeGennaro, Ellen M.; Roossien, Douglas H.; Gong, Guanyu; Seneviratne, Uthpala; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Desimone, Robert; Cai, Dawen; Boyden, Edward S.

    2016-01-01

    Expansion microscopy (ExM) enables imaging of preserved specimens with nanoscale precision on diffraction limited instead of specialized super-resolution microscopes. ExM works by physically separating fluorescent probes after anchoring them to a swellable gel. The first expansion microscopy method was unable to retain native proteins in the gel and used custom made reagents not widely available. Here, we describe protein retention ExM (proExM), a variant of ExM that anchors proteins to the swellable gel allowing the use of conventional fluorescently labeled antibodies and streptavidin, and fluorescent proteins. We validate and demonstrate utility of proExM for multi-color super-resolution (~70 nm) imaging of cells and mammalian tissues on conventional microscopes. PMID:27376584

  9. [Preparation and penetrating effect of the polyarginine-enhanced green fluorescence protein fusion protein].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Bai, Yin; Zhao, Jingzhuang; Ye, Xianlong; Wang, Wenfei; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan; Jing, Yan

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study is to establish a platform to deliver therapeutic proteins into target cells through a polyarginine-based cell penetrating peptide. To facilitate the expression of therapeutic proteins, a pSUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier)-R9-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. After induction, the fusion protein SUMO-R9-EGFP was efficiently expressed. To validate the cell penetrating ability of the fusion protein, HepG2 cells were incubated with the purified R9-EGFP or EGFP protein as control, internalization of the fluorescent proteins was examined by either flow cytometry or confocal microscopy. The result obtained by flow cytometry showed that the R9-EGFP fusion protein could efficiently penetrate into the HepG2 cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. In contrast, the fluorescence was barely detected in the HepG2 cells incubated with EGFP control. The fluorescence intensity of the R9-EGFP treated cells reached plateau phase after 1.5 h. The result obtained by confocal microscopy shows that R9-EGFP efficiently entered into the HepG2 cells and was exclusively located in the cytoplasm, whereas, no fluorescence was detected in the cells incubated with the EGFP control. The heparin inhibition experiment showed that heparin could inhibit penetrating effect of the R9-EGFP protein by about 50%, suggesting that the penetrating ability of the fusion protein is heparin-dependent. In summary, the study has established a platform to deliver therapeutic proteins into target cells through a polyarginine-based penetrating peptide.

  10. Intrinsic fluorescence of protein in turbid media using empirical relation based on Monte Carlo lookup table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, Gnanatheepam; Udayakumar, Kanniyappan; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence of Protein has been widely used in diagnostic oncology for characterizing cellular metabolism. However, the intensity of fluorescence emission is affected due to the absorbers and scatterers in tissue, which may lead to error in estimating exact protein content in tissue. Extraction of intrinsic fluorescence from measured fluorescence has been achieved by different methods. Among them, Monte Carlo based method yields the highest accuracy for extracting intrinsic fluorescence. In this work, we have attempted to generate a lookup table for Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence emission by protein. Furthermore, we fitted the generated lookup table using an empirical relation. The empirical relation between measured and intrinsic fluorescence is validated using tissue phantom experiments. The proposed relation can be used for estimating intrinsic fluorescence of protein for real-time diagnostic applications and thereby improving the clinical interpretation of fluorescence spectroscopic data.

  11. A Codon Deletion at the Beginning of Green Fluorescent Protein Genes Enhances Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mejía, José-Luis; Roldán-Salgado, Abigail; Osuna, Joel; Merino, Enrique; Gaytán, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression is one of the key issues in protein engineering and biotechnology. Among the different models for assessing protein production and structure-function studies, green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the preferred models because of its importance as a reporter in cellular and molecular studies. In this research we analyze the effect of codon deletions near the amino terminus of different GFP proteins on fluorescence. Our study includes Gly4 deletions in the enhanced GFP (EGFP), the red-shifted GFP and the red-shifted EGFP. The Gly4 deletion mutants and their corresponding wild-type counterparts were transcribed under the control of the T7 or Trc promoters and their expression patterns were analyzed. Different fluorescent outcomes were observed depending on the type of fluorescent gene versions. In silico analysis of the RNA secondary structures near the ribosome binding site revealed a direct relationship between their minimum free energy and GFP production. Integrative analysis of these results, including SDS-PAGE analysis, led us to conclude that the fluorescence improvement of cells expressing different versions of GFPs with Gly4 deleted is due to an enhancement of the accessibility of the ribosome binding site by reducing the stability of the RNA secondary structures at their mRNA leader regions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Quantification of factors influencing fluorescent protein expression using RMCE to generate an allelic series in the ROSA26 locus in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sara X; Osipovich, Anna B; Ustione, Alessandro; Potter, Leah A; Hipkens, Susan; Gangula, Rama; Yuan, Weiping; Piston, David W; Magnuson, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have great utility in identifying specific cell populations and in studying cellular dynamics in the mouse. To quantify the factors that determine both the expression and relative brightness of FPs in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and in mice, we generated eight different FP-expressing ROSA26 alleles using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). These alleles enabled us to analyze the effects on FP expression of a translational enhancer and different 3'-intronic and/or polyadenylation sequences, as well as the relative brightness of five different FPs, without the confounding position and copy number effects that are typically associated with randomly inserted transgenes. We found that the expression of a given FP can vary threefold or more depending on the genetic features present in the allele. The optimal FP expression cassette contained both a translational enhancer sequence in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and an intron-containing rabbit β-globin sequence within the 3'-UTR. The relative expressed brightness of individual FPs varied up to tenfold. Of the five different monomeric FPs tested, Citrine (YFP) was the brightest, followed by Apple, eGFP, Cerulean (CFP) and Cherry. Generation of a line of Cherry-expressing mice showed that there was a 30-fold variation of Cherry expression among different tissues and that there was a punctate expression pattern within cells of all tissues examined. This study should help investigators make better-informed design choices when expressing FPs in mESCs and mice.

  13. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOEpatents

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  14. A rapid method for detecting protein-nucleic acid interactions by protein induced fluorescence enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Valuchova, Sona; Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Petrov, Alexander P.; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Many fundamental biological processes depend on intricate networks of interactions between proteins and nucleic acids and a quantitative description of these interactions is important for understanding cellular mechanisms governing DNA replication, transcription, or translation. Here we present a versatile method for rapid and quantitative assessment of protein/nucleic acid (NA) interactions. This method is based on protein induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE), a phenomenon whereby protein binding increases the fluorescence of Cy3-like dyes. PIFE has mainly been used in single molecule studies to detect protein association with DNA or RNA. Here we applied PIFE for steady state quantification of protein/NA interactions by using microwell plate fluorescence readers (mwPIFE). We demonstrate the general applicability of mwPIFE for examining various aspects of protein/DNA interactions with examples from the restriction enzyme BamHI, and the DNA repair complexes Ku and XPF/ERCC1. These include determination of sequence and structure binding specificities, dissociation constants, detection of weak interactions, and the ability of a protein to translocate along DNA. mwPIFE represents an easy and high throughput method that does not require protein labeling and can be applied to a wide range of applications involving protein/NA interactions. PMID:28008962

  15. Fluorescent Probe Encapsulated in Avidin Protein to Eliminate Nonspecific Fluorescence and Increase Detection Sensitivity in Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-Wei; Lee, Fang-Hong; Gao, Ruo-Cing; Chew, Chee Ying; Tan, Kui-Thong

    2016-08-16

    Quantitative detection of trace amounts of a biomarker in protein rich human blood plasma using fluorescent probes is a great challenge as the real signal is usually obscured by nonspecific fluorescence. This problem occurs because most of the fluorescent dyes bind very tightly with blood proteins to produce a large fluorescence increase, resulting in overestimation of the biomarker concentrations and false positive diagnosis. In this paper, we report that biotinylated fluorescent probes encapsulated in avidin protein can generate very specific fluorescence in blood serum by blocking out nonspecific dye-protein interactions. We applied our novel probe design to detect two different types of biomolecules, hydrogen sulfide and nitroreductase. Our Avidin conjugated probes achieved quantitative analyte detection in blood serum; whereas concentrations were overestimated up to 320-fold when bare fluorescent probes were employed. As compared to conventional approaches where fluorescent probes are encapsulated into polymers and nanoparticles, our simple approach successfully overcomes many key issues such as dye leakage, long preparation steps, inconsistent dye-host ratios, difficulty in constructing in situ in a complex medium, and limited application to detect only small metabolites.

  16. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Visual Marker in Somatic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    OLIVARES‐FUSTER, O.; PEÑA, L.; DURAN‐VILA, N.; NAVARRO, L.

    2002-01-01

    Using a transgenic citrus plant expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a parent in somatic fusion experiments, we investigated the suitability of GFP as an in vivo marker to follow the processes of protoplast fusion, regeneration and selection of hybrid plants. A high level of GFP expression was detected in transgenic citrus protoplasts, hybrid callus, embryos and plants. It is demonstrated that GFP can be used for the continuous monitoring of the fusion process, localization of hybrid colonies and callus, and selection of somatic hybrid embryos and plants. PMID:12096810

  17. Generation of transgenic dogs that conditionally express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Geon A; Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Kim, Teoan; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Ko, Chemyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2011-06-01

    We report the creation of a transgenic dog that conditionally expresses eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) under the regulation of doxycycline. Briefly, fetal fibroblasts infected with a Tet-on eGFP vector were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Subsequently reconstructed oocytes were transferred to recipients. Three clones having transgenes were born and one dog was alive. The dog showed all features of inducible expression of eGFP upon doxycycline administration, and successful breeding resulted in eGFP-positive puppies, confirming stable insertion of the transgene into the genome. This inducible dog model will be useful for a variety of medical research studies.

  18. Fluorescent proteins in cellular organelles: serious pitfalls and some solutions.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik Lee

    2013-11-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been powerful tools for cell biologists for over 15 years. The large variety of FPs available rarely comes with an instruction manual or a warning label. The potential pitfalls of the use of FPs in cellular organelles represent a significant concern for investigators. FPs generally did not evolve in the often distinctive physicochemical environments of subcellular organelles. In organelles, FPs can misfold, go dark, and even distort organelle morphology. In this minireview, we describe the issues associated with FPs in organelles and provide solutions to enable investigators to better exploit FP technology in cells.

  19. Localized entrapment of green fluorescent protein within nanostructured polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankner, John; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; O'Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2012-02-01

    Protein entrapment within ultrathin polymer films is of interest for applications in biosensing, drug delivery, and bioconversion, but controlling protein distribution within the films is difficult. We report on nanostructured protein/polyelectrolyte (PE) materials obtained through incorporation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) within poly(styrene sulfonate)/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) multilayer films assembled via the spin-assisted layer-by-layer method. By using deuterated GFP as a marker for neutron scattering contrast we have inferred the architecture of the films in both normal and lateral directions. We find that films assembled with a single GFP layer exhibit a strong localization of the GFP without intermixing into the PE matrix. The GFP volume fraction approaches the monolayer density of close-packed randomly oriented GFP molecules. However, intermixing of the GFP with the PE matrix occurs in multiple-GFP layer films. Our results yield new insight into the organization of immobilized proteins within polyelectrolyte matrices and open opportunities for fabrication of protein-containing films with well-organized structure and controllable function, a crucial requirement for advanced sensing applications.

  20. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Quantitation of fluorescence energy transfer between cell surface proteins via fluorescence donor photobleaching kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R M; Arnette, J K; Roess, D A; Barisas, B G

    1994-01-01

    We describe practical aspects of photobleaching fluorescence energy transfer measurements on individual living cells. The method introduced by T. M. Jovin and co-workers (see, most recently, Kubitscheck et al. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:110) is based on the reduced rate of irreversible photobleaching of donor fluorophores when acceptor fluorophores are present. Measuring differences in donor photobleaching rates on cells labeled with donor only (fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated proteins) and with both donor and acceptor (tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated proteins) allows calculation of the fluorescence energy transfer efficiency. We assess possible methods of data analysis in light of the underlying processes of photobleaching and energy transfer and suggest optimum strategies for this purpose. Single murine B lymphocytes binding various ratios of donor and acceptor conjugates of tetravalent concanavalin A (Con A) and divalent succinyl Con A were examined for interlectin energy transfer by these methods. For Con A, a maximum transfer efficiency of 0.49 +/- 0.02 was observed. Under similar conditions flow cytometric measurements of donor quenching yielded a value of 0.54 +/- 0.03. For succinyl Con A, the maximum transfer efficiency was 0.36. To provide concrete examples of quantities arising in such energy transfer determinations, we present examples of individual cell data and kinetic analyses, population rate constant distributions, and error estimates for the various quantities involved. PMID:7948701

  4. Ground-State Proton Transfer Kinetics in Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer plays an important role in the optical properties of green fluorescent protein (GFP). While much is known about excited-state proton transfer reactions (ESPT) in GFP occurring on ultrafast time scales, comparatively little is understood about the factors governing the rates and pathways of ground-state proton transfer. We have utilized a specific isotopic labeling strategy in combination with one-dimensional 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to install and monitor a 13C directly adjacent to the GFP chromophore ionization site. The chemical shift of this probe is highly sensitive to the protonation state of the chromophore, and the resulting spectra reflect the thermodynamics and kinetics of the proton transfer in the NMR line shapes. This information is complemented by time-resolved NMR, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and steady-state absorbance and fluorescence measurements to provide a picture of chromophore ionization reactions spanning a wide time domain. Our findings indicate that proton transfer in GFP is described well by a two-site model in which the chromophore is energetically coupled to a secondary site, likely the terminal proton acceptor of ESPT, Glu222. Additionally, experiments on a selection of GFP circular permutants suggest an important role played by the structural dynamics of the seventh β-strand in gating proton transfer from bulk solution to the buried chromophore. PMID:25184668

  5. Analysis of protein-ligand interactions by fluorescence polarization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ana M.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of the associations between biomolecules is required both to predict and understand the interactions that underpin all biological activity. Fluorescence polarization (FP) provides a non-disruptive means of measuring the association of a fluorescent ligand with a larger molecule. We describe an FP assay in which binding of fluorescein-labelled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to N-terminal fragments of IP3 receptors can be characterised at different temperatures and in competition with other ligands. The assay allows the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) changes of ligand binding to be determined. The method is applicable to any purified ligand-binding site for which an appropriate fluorescent ligand is available. FP can be used to measure low-affinity interactions in real-time without use of radioactive materials, it is non-destructive, and with appropriate care it can resolve ΔH° and ΔS°. The first part of the protocol, protein preparation, may take several weeks, while the FP measurements, once they have been optimised, would normally take 1-6 h. PMID:21372817

  6. Binding phenomena and fluorescence quenching. II: Photophysics of aromatic residues and dependence of fluorescence spectra on protein conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callis, Patrik R.

    2014-12-01

    The three amino acids with aromatic ring side chains-phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and especially tryptophan (Trp) have played a long and productive role in helping unlock the secrets of protein behavior by optical spectroscopy (absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, etc.) In principle, an appropriately placed Trp will undergo fluorescence wavelength and/or intensity changes upon whatever functional process a protein performs. Although perceived to be enigmatic and not well understood, Trp is arguably now better understood than many of the extrinsic probes currently in use. Basic principles of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching and wavelength shifts in proteins are presented, with strong emphasis on the importance of electrostatics. The condensed description of findings from recent experiments and simulations of tryptophan fluorescence and intrinsic quenching in proteins is designed to help authors in planning and interpreting experimental results of ligand binding studies.

  7. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ropp, J.D.; Cuthbertson, R.A.; Donahue, C.J.; Wolfgang-Kimball, D.

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types. The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP`s bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T- GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ropp, J D; Donahue, C J; Wolfgang-Kimball, D; Hooley, J J; Chin, J Y; Hoffman, R A; Cuthbertson, R A; Bauer, K D

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types (Chalfie et al.: Science 263: 802-805, 1994). The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP's bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. (Nature 373:663-664, 1995) have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T-GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm.

  9. Fluorescent Probe Encapsulated in SNAP-Tag Protein Cavity To Eliminate Nonspecific Fluorescence and Increase Detection Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Syun; Gao, Ruo-Cing; Wu, Ting-Wei; Cho, Chien; Tan, Kui-Thong

    2016-08-17

    Despite the promising improvements made recently on fluorescence probes for the detection of enzymes and reactive small molecules, two fundamental problems remain: weaker fluorescence of many dyes in aqueous buffers and strong nonspecific signals in samples containing high protein levels. In this paper, we introduce a novel fluorescent probe encapsulated in protein cavity (FPEPC) concept as demonstrated by SNAP-tag protein and three environment-sensitive fluorescence probes to overcome these two problems. The probes were constructed by following the current probe design for enzymes and reactive small molecules but with an additional benzylguanine moiety for selective SNAP-tag conjugation. The SNAP-tag conjugated probes achieved quantitative nitroreductase and hydrogen sulfide detection in blood plasma, whereas analyte concentrations were overestimated up to 700-fold when bare fluorescent probes were employed for detection. Furthermore, detection sensitivity was increased dramatically, as our probes displayed 390-fold fluorescence enhancement upon SNAP-tag conjugation, in stark contrast to the weak fluorescence of the free probes in aqueous solutions. Compared with the conventional approaches where fluorescent probes are encapsulated into polymers and nanoparticles, our simple and general approach successfully overcame many key issues such as dye leakage, long preparation steps, inconsistent dye-host ratios, difficulty in constructing in situ in a complex medium, and limited application to detect only small metabolites.

  10. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system

    PubMed Central

    Heppert, Jennifer K.; Dickinson, Daniel J.; Pani, Ariel M.; Higgins, Christopher D.; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey R.; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo. Recent advances in genome editing have expedited the precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments and facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent proteins have been made in vitro, removed from biological variables that govern their performance in cells or organisms. To address the gap, we quantitatively assessed fluorescent protein properties in vivo in an animal model system. We generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing green, yellow, or red fluorescent proteins in embryos and imaged embryos expressing different fluorescent proteins under the same conditions for direct comparison. We found that mNeonGreen was not as bright in vivo as predicted based on in vitro data but is a better tag than GFP for specific kinds of experiments, and we report on optimal red fluorescent proteins. These results identify ideal fluorescent proteins for imaging in vivo in C. elegans embryos and suggest good candidate fluorescent proteins to test in other animal model systems for in vivo imaging experiments. PMID:27385332

  11. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  12. Addressing membrane protein topology using the fluorescence protease protection (FPP) assay.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Holger; Hailey, Dale W; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Determining a protein's correct topological distribution within the cell is essential for understanding the proper functioning of many proteins. Here, we describe a fluorescence-based technique, termed FPP for fluorescence protease protection, to determine protein topology in living cells. The FPP assay uses the restricted proteolytic digestibility of green fluorescent protein-tagged membrane proteins to reveal their intramembrane orientation. Membrane protein topology can be assessed using this technique for proteins residing in organelles as diverse as the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes, mitochondria, and autophagosomes. To illustrate the technique, we describe its use for deciphering the topology of a membrane protein in the ER.

  13. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  14. Determination of protein concentration on substrates using fluorescence fluctuation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Mets, Richard; Wang, Irène; Gallagher, Joseph; Destaing, Olivier; Balland, Martial; Delon, Antoine

    2014-03-01

    Micro-fabrication and surface functionalization imply to know the equilibrium surface concentration of various kinds of molecules. Paradoxically, this crucial parameter is often poorly controlled and even less quantified. We have used a technique belonging to the family of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy, namely Image Correlation Spectroscopy (ICS), to measure the absolute surface concentration of fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on glass substrates. As these molecules are immobile, the width of the autocorrelation of the confocal image obtained by scanning the sample only reflects that of the confocal Point Spread Function. Conversely, the amplitude of the autocorrelation is directly related to the average number of proteins simultaneously illuminated by the laser beam and therefore to their surface concentration. We have studied the surface concentration of fibrinogen proteins versus the initial concentration of these molecules, solubilized in the solution which has been deposited on the surface. The estimation of this relation can be biased for several reasons: the concentration of fibrinogen molecules in solution is difficult to control; the measurement of the surface concentration of adsorbed molecules can be strongly underestimated if the surface coverage or the molecular brightness is not uniform. We suggest methods to detect these artifacts and estimate the actual surface concentration, together with control parameters. Globally, fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is a powerful set of techniques when one wants to quantify the surface concentration of molecules at the micrometer scale.

  15. Evidence for a Specific Microwave Radiation Effect on the Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Copty, Anan B.; Neve-Oz, Yair; Barak, Itai; Golosovsky, Michael; Davidov, Dan

    2006-01-01

    We have compared the effect of microwave irradiation and of conventional heating on the fluorescence of solution-based green fluorescent protein. A specialized near-field 8.5 GHz microwave applicator operating at 250 mW input microwave power was used. The solution temperature, the intensity, and the spectrum of the green fluorescent protein fluorescence 1), under microwave irradiation and 2), under conventional heating, were measured. In both cases the fluorescence intensity decreases and the spectrum becomes red-shifted. Although the microwave irradiation heats the solution, the microwave-induced changes in fluorescence cannot be explained by heating alone. Several possible scenarios are discussed. PMID:16731554

  16. Analysis of YFP(J16)-R6/2 reporter mice and postmortem brains reveals early pathology and increased vulnerability of callosal axons in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Rodolfo G; Chu, Yaping; Ye, Allen Q; Price, Steven D; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Buenaventura, Andrea; Brady, Scott T; Magin, Richard L; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Morfini, Gerardo A

    2015-09-15

    Cumulative evidence indicates that the onset and severity of Huntington's disease (HD) symptoms correlate with connectivity deficits involving specific neuronal populations within cortical and basal ganglia circuits. Brain imaging studies and pathological reports further associated these deficits with alterations in cerebral white matter structure and axonal pathology. However, whether axonopathy represents an early pathogenic event or an epiphenomenon in HD remains unknown, nor is clear the identity of specific neuronal populations affected. To directly evaluate early axonal abnormalities in the context of HD in vivo, we bred transgenic YFP(J16) with R6/2 mice, a widely used HD model. Diffusion tensor imaging and fluorescence microscopy studies revealed a marked degeneration of callosal axons long before the onset of motor symptoms. Accordingly, a significant fraction of YFP-positive cortical neurons in YFP(J16) mice cortex were identified as callosal projection neurons. Callosal axon pathology progressively worsened with age and was influenced by polyglutamine tract length in mutant huntingtin (mhtt). Degenerating axons were dissociated from microscopically visible mhtt aggregates and did not result from loss of cortical neurons. Interestingly, other axonal populations were mildly or not affected, suggesting differential vulnerability to mhtt toxicity. Validating these results, increased vulnerability of callosal axons was documented in the brains of HD patients. Observations here provide a structural basis for the alterations in cerebral white matter structure widely reported in HD patients. Collectively, our data demonstrate a dying-back pattern of degeneration for cortical projection neurons affected in HD, suggesting that axons represent an early and potentially critical target for mhtt toxicity.

  17. Protein-protein interaction analysis in single microfluidic droplets using FRET and fluorescence lifetime detection.

    PubMed

    Benz, Christian; Retzbach, Heiko; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-07-21

    Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility of a protein-protein interaction analysis and reaction progress monitoring in microfluidic droplets using FRET and microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurements. The fabrication of microdroplet chips using soft- and photolithographic techniques is demonstrated and the resulting chips reliably generate microdroplets of 630 pL and 6.71 nL at frequencies of 7.9 and 0.75 Hz, respectively. They were used for detection of protein-protein interactions in microdroplets using a model system of Alexa Fluor 488 labelled biotinylated BSA, Alexa Fluor 594 labelled streptavidin and unlabelled chicken egg white avidin. These microchips could be used for quantitative detection of avidin and streptavidin in microdroplets in direct and competitive assay formats with nanomolar detection limits, corresponding to attomole protein amounts. Four droplets were found to be sufficient for analytical determination. Fluorescence intensity ratio and fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed and compared for microdroplet FRET determination. A competitive on-chip binding assay for determination of unlabelled avidin using fluorescence lifetime detection could be performed within 135 s only.

  18. Proton transfer and water exchange in the green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agmon, Noam

    2014-03-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is the only naturally occurring protein in which excited-state proton-transfer has been identified. Upon excitation, a proton is ejected from its chromophore, travelling through the ``privileged water molecule'' (PWM) and Ser205 to Glu222, on a 10 ps timescale or faster. However, time-resolved fluorescence from the chromophore exhibits a t-α power-law decay extending into the ns regime. With increasing temperature, α switches from 1/2 (below 230 K) to 3/2 (above it). This has been interpreted as pseudo one-dimensional proton hopping along an internal ``proton wire,'' with an activated process that opens a ``doorway'' for proton escape to solution at the higher temperatures. To identify such putative pathways, we have developed a computer code mapping all ``proton wires'' within a protein structure. Applying it to a X-ray GFP structure of 0.9 Angstrom resolution, a proton wire indeed continues from Glu222 along the axis of the GFP ``barrel,'' connecting to a negatively charged surface patch (a ``proton collecting antenna''?). This might explain the t- 1 / 2 behavior. However, a direct escape pathway opening from the chromophore to solution is not readily identified in the X-ray structure. Here we report molecular dynamics results showing that the PWM escapes to solution on the 100 ps timescale. This occurs by fluctuations of the beta-sheet, creating an opening through which water molecules can leave and enter the protein. The exact pathway of the PWM on its way in and out has been identified, as well as the water-exchange kinetics that follows a stretched-exponential time behavior. This research was supported by the ISRAEL SCIENCE FOUNDATION grant No. 766/12.

  19. Three-dimensional superresolution colocalization of intracellular protein superstructures and the cell surface in live Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Lew, Matthew D; Lee, Steven F; Ptacin, Jerod L; Lee, Marissa K; Twieg, Robert J; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W E

    2011-11-15

    Recently, single-molecule imaging and photocontrol have enabled superresolution optical microscopy of cellular structures beyond Abbe's diffraction limit, extending the frontier of noninvasive imaging of structures within living cells. However, live-cell superresolution imaging has been challenged by the need to image three-dimensional (3D) structures relative to their biological context, such as the cellular membrane. We have developed a technique, termed superresolution by power-dependent active intermittency and points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography (SPRAIPAINT) that combines imaging of intracellular enhanced YFP (eYFP) fusions (SPRAI) with stochastic localization of the cell surface (PAINT) to image two different fluorophores sequentially with only one laser. Simple light-induced blinking of eYFP and collisional flux onto the cell surface by Nile red are used to achieve single-molecule localizations, without any antibody labeling, cell membrane permeabilization, or thiol-oxygen scavenger systems required. Here we demonstrate live-cell 3D superresolution imaging of Crescentin-eYFP, a cytoskeletal fluorescent protein fusion, colocalized with the surface of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus using a double-helix point spread function microscope. Three-dimensional colocalization of intracellular protein structures and the cell surface with superresolution optical microscopy opens the door for the analysis of protein interactions in living cells with excellent precision (20-40 nm in 3D) over a large field of view (12 12 μm).

  20. Structure-guided wavelength tuning in far-red fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ho-Leung; Lin, Michael Z.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, protein engineers have succeeded in tuning the excitation spectra of natural fluorescent proteins from green wavelengths into orange and red wavelengths, resulting in the creation of a series of fluorescent proteins with emission in the far-red portions of the optical spectrum. These results have arisen from the synergistic combination of structural knowledge of fluorescent proteins, chemical intuition, and high-throughput screening methods. Here we review structural features found in autocatalytic far-red fluorescent proteins, and discuss how they add to our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms of wavelength tuning in biological chromophores. PMID:27468111

  1. Secretory fluorescent protein, a secretion green fluorescent fusion protein with alkaline phosphatase activity as a sensitive and traceable reporter in baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chao-Yi; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The advantages of using traceable fluorescent protein (enhanced green fluorescent protein; EGFP) and a secretory alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) have been used to generate a reporter gene: the secretory fluorescent protein (SEFP). Sf21 cells, infected with the recombinant baculovirus containing the SEFP gene, revealed both traceable fluorescence and easily detectable alkaline phosphatase activity in the culture medium. The distribution of SEFP within the cells revealed that it was excluded from the nucleus, implying that the accumulation of SEFP in a secretory pathway, similar to that of the secretion signal-tagged FPs. Furthermore, the time- and dose-dependent release from the blockage of brefeldin A (BFA) confirmed that the secretion of SEFP was mediated by the secretion pathway and excluded leakage from viral infection. This SEFP reporter gene with traceable fluorescence and alkaline phosphatase activity may become a useful tool for studies on secretory protein production.

  2. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  4. Three-color femtosecond source for simultaneous excitation of three fluorescent proteins in two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Wu, Juwell; Horton, Nicholas G; Lin, Charles P; Xu, Chris

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-based, three-color femtosecond source for simultaneous imaging of three fluorescent proteins (FPs) using two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM). The three excitation wavelengths at 775 nm, 864 nm and 950 nm, are obtained through second harmonic generation (SHG) of the 1550-nm pump laser and the 1728-nm and 1900-nm solitons generated through soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) in a large-mode-area (LMA) fiber. These energetic pulses are well matched to the two-photon excitation peaks of red, cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (TagRFPs, TagCFPs, and TagYFPs) for efficient excitation. We demonstrate simultaneous 2PM of human melanoma cells expressing a "rainbow" combination of these three fluorescent proteins.

  5. Broccoli: rapid selection of an RNA mimic of green fluorescent protein by fluorescence-based selection and directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Filonov, Grigory S; Moon, Jared D; Svensen, Nina; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-11-19

    Genetically encoded fluorescent ribonucleic acids (RNAs) have diverse applications, including imaging RNA trafficking and as a component of RNA-based sensors that exhibit fluorescence upon binding small molecules in live cells. These RNAs include the Spinach and Spinach2 aptamers, which bind and activate the fluorescence of fluorophores similar to that found in green fluorescent protein. Although additional highly fluorescent RNA-fluorophore complexes would extend the utility of this technology, the identification of novel RNA-fluorophore complexes is difficult. Current approaches select aptamers on the basis of their ability to bind fluorophores, even though fluorophore binding alone is not sufficient to activate fluorescence. Additionally, aptamers require extensive mutagenesis to efficiently fold and exhibit fluorescence in living cells. Here we describe a platform for rapid generation of highly fluorescent RNA-fluorophore complexes that are optimized for function in cells. This procedure involves selection of aptamers on the basis of their binding to fluorophores, coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of millions of aptamers expressed in Escherichia coli. Promising aptamers are then further optimized using a FACS-based directed evolution approach. Using this approach, we identified several novel aptamers, including a 49-nt aptamer, Broccoli. Broccoli binds and activates the fluorescence of (Z)-4-(3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one. Broccoli shows robust folding and green fluorescence in cells, and increased fluorescence relative to Spinach2. This reflects, in part, improved folding in the presence of low cytosolic magnesium concentrations. Thus, this novel fluorescence-based selection approach simplifies the generation of aptamers that are optimized for expression and performance in living cells.

  6. Analysis of green fluorescent protein bioluminescence in vivo and in vitro using a glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, L.; Mandujano, L. A.; Cuevas, J.; Reyes, P. G.; Osorio-González, D.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of fluorescent proteins has been a revolution in cell biology and related sciences because of their many applications, mainly emphasizing their use as cellular markers. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used as it requires no cofactors to generate fluorescence and retains this property into any organism when it is expressed by recombinant DNA techniques, which is a great advantage. In this work, we analyze the emission spectra of recombinant green fluorescent protein in vivo and in vitro exposed to a glow discharge plasma of nitrogen in order to relate electron temperature to fluorescence intensity.

  7. Fluorescent proteins for FRET microscopy: monitoring protein interactions in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Richard N.; Davidson, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The discovery and engineering of novel fluorescent proteins (FPs) from diverse organisms is yielding fluorophores with exceptional characteristics for live-cell imaging. In particular, the development of FPs for fluorescence (or Förster) resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is providing important tools for monitoring dynamic protein interactions inside living cells. The increased interest in FRET microscopy has driven the development of many different methods to measure FRET. However, the interpretation of FRET measurements is complicated by several factors including the high fluorescence background, the potential for photoconversion artifacts, and the relatively low dynamic range afforded by this technique. Here, we describe the advantages and disadvantages of four methods commonly used in FRET microscopy. We then discuss the selection of FPs for the different FRET methods, identifying the most useful FP candidates for FRET microscopy. The recent success in expanding the FP color palette offers the opportunity to explore new FRET pairs. PMID:22396229

  8. Highly Fluorescent Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Analogues Made by Decorating the Imidazolone Ring.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sara; Martínez-López, David; Morón, María; Sucunza, David; Sampedro, Diego; Domingo, Alberto; Salgado, Antonio; Vaquero, Juan J

    2015-12-14

    The synthesis and photophysical behavior of an unexplored family of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophore analogues is reported. The compound (Z)-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1-propyl-2-(propylamino)-1H-imidazol-5(4 H)-one (p-HBDNI, 2 a) exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence properties relative to the parent compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2,3-dimethyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one (p-HBDI, 1). p-HBDNI was considered as a model system and the photophysical properties of other novel 2-amino-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one derivatives were evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations were carried out to rationalize the results. The analogue AIDNI (2 c), in which the 4-hydroxybenzyl group of p-HBDNI was replaced by an azaindole group, showed improved photophysical properties and potential for cell staining. The uptake and intracellular distribution of 2 c in living cells was investigated by confocal microscopy imaging.

  9. Photodynamic properties of green fluorescent proteins investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widengren, Jerker; Mets, Ülo; Rigler, Rudolf

    1999-12-01

    GFPs are upon excitation influenced by many different photophysical and photochemical processes effective over a very broad time scale. Much effort has been spent to investigate these processes. However, in the microsecond to millisecond time-range many processes still remain to be further characterized. This time-range can be conveniently covered by FCS, and is used here to study the photodynamical behaviour of wild-type (WT) and a F64L S65T mutant (BioST) of GFP. In addition to intersystem crossing to the triplet state, additional photophysical processes are seen, showing identical fluctuations in fluorescence to those found for a reversible photo-induced isomerization process, as well as fluctuations, not influenced by the electronic state of the chromophore unit. In the nanosecond time-range a contribution to the fluorescence correlation function is observed which can be attributed to rotational diffusion, suggesting a convenient way to measure rotational diffusion of proteins expressed with GFP on a microscopic scale.

  10. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  11. Rotation of plasma membrane proteins measured by polarized fluorescence depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisas, B. George; Rahman, Noorul A.; Yoshida, Thomas M.; Roess, Deborah A.

    1990-05-01

    We have implemented a new laser microscopic method, polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD), for measuring the rotational dynamics of functional membrane proteins on individual, microscopically selected cells under physiological conditions. This method combines the long lifetimes of triplet-state probes with the sensitivity of fluorescence detection to measure macromolecular rotational correlation times from 10 microsec to > 1 ms. As examples, the rotational correlation time of Fc receptors (FcR) on the surface of 2H3 rat basophilic leukemia cells is 79.9 4.4 microsec at 4°C when labeled with eosin conjugates of IgE. This value is consistent with the known 100 kDa receptor size. When labeled with intact F4 anti-FcR monoclonal antibody, the rotational correlation time for FcER is increased about 2-fold to 170.8 +/- 6.5 microsec, consistent with receptor dimer formation on the plasma membrane and with the ability of this antibody to form FcER dimers on 2H3 cell surfaces. We have also examined the rotational diffusion of the luteinizing hormone receptor on plasma membranes of small ovine luteal cells. Luteinizing hormone receptors (LHR), when occupied by ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH), have a rotational correlation time of 20.5 +/- 0.1 microsec at 4°C. When occupied by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), LHR have a rotational correlation time of 46.2 +/- 0.4 microsec suggesting that binding of hCG triggers additional LHR interactions with plasma membrane proteins. Together these studies suggest the utility of PFD measurements in assessing molecular size and molecular association of membrane proteins on individual cells. Relative advantages of time- and frequency-domain implementations of PFD are also discussed.

  12. Temperature-Induced Protein Conformational Changes in Barley Root Plasma Membrane-Enriched Microsomes: II. Intrinsic Protein Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, C R

    1987-07-01

    The membrane-bound proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Conquest) root plasma membrane-enriched microsomes displayed fluorescence typical of protein-associated trytophan residues. The protein fluorescence intensity was sensitive to variations in sample temperature. The temperature-induced decline in protein fluorescence intensity was nonlinear with slope discontinuities at about 12 and 32 degrees C. Detergents at levels above their critical micelle concentration enhanced protein fluorescence. Glutaraldehyde reduced protein fluorescence. Protein fluorescence polarization increased at temperatures above 30 degrees C. Both the rate of tryptophan photoionization and the fluorescence intensity of the photoionization products suggested alterations in membrane protein conformation between 12 and 32 degrees C. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence by acrylamide and potassium iodide indicated changes in accessibility of the extrinsic agents to the protein tryptophan residues beginning at about 14 degrees C. The results indicate thermally induced changes in the dynamics of the membrane proteins over the temperature range of 12 to 32 degrees C which could account for the complex temperature dependence of the barley root plasma membrane ATPase.

  13. Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2007-09-18

    The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

  14. Photo-triggered fluorescent labelling of recombinant proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deokho; Sato, Kohei; Min, Kyoungmi; Shigenaga, Akira; Jung, Juyeon; Otaka, Akira; Kwon, Youngeun

    2015-06-14

    A method to photo-chemically trigger fluorescent labelling of proteins in live cells is developed. The approach is based on photo-caged split-intein mediated conditional protein trans-splicing reaction and enabled background-free fluorescent labelling of target proteins with the necessary spatiotemporal control.

  15. Cyanotryptophans as Novel Fluorescent Probes for Studying Protein Conformational Changes and DNA-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Roy, Basab; Yakovchuk, Petro; Spiering, Michelle M; Alam, Mohammad P; Madathil, Manikandadas M; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-12-29

    Described herein are the syntheses and photophysical characterization of three novel cyanotryptophans, and their efficient incorporation into proteins as fluorescent probes. Photophysical characteristics indicated that each was significantly brighter and red-shifted in fluorescence emission relative to tryptophan. Each analogue was used to activate a suppressor tRNA transcript and was incorporated with good efficiency into two different positions (Trp22 and Trp74) of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR). The Trp analogues could be monitored selectively in the presence of multiple native Trp residues in DHFR. 6-CNTrp (A) formed an efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair with l-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine (HCO, D) at position 17. Further, 6-CNTrp (A) was incorporated into two DNA binding proteins, including the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I and an RNA recognition motif (RRM2) of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like (hnRNP LL). Using these proteins, we demonstrated the use of FRET involving A as a fluorescence donor and benzo[g]quinazoline-2,4-(1H,3H)-dione 2'-deoxyriboside (Tf) or 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one 2'-deoxyriboside (Cf) as fluorescent acceptors to study the binding interaction of the Klenow fragment with duplex DNA oligomers (labeled with Tf), or the domain-specific association between hnRNP LL and the BCL2 i-motif DNA (labeled with Cf). Thus, the non-natural amino acid could be used as a FRET partner for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. Together, these findings demonstrate the potential utility of 6-CNTrp (A) as a fluorescence donor for the study of protein conformational events.

  16. Development of myenteric cholinergic neurons in ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Marlene M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2013-10-01

    Cholinergic neurons are the major excitatory neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS), and include intrinsic sensory neurons, interneurons, and excitatory motor neurons. Cholinergic neurons have been detected in the embryonic ENS; however, the development of these neurons has been difficult to study as they are difficult to detect prior to birth using conventional immunohistochemistry. In this study we used ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice to examine the development of cholinergic neurons in the gut of embryonic and postnatal mice. Cholinergic (YFP+) neurons were first detected at embryonic day (E)11.5, and the proportion of cholinergic neurons gradually increased during pre- and postnatal development. At birth, myenteric cholinergic neurons comprised less than half of their adult proportions in the small intestine (25% of myenteric neurons were YFP+ at P0 compared to 62% in adults). The earliest cholinergic neurons appear to mainly project anally. Projections into the presumptive circular muscle were first observed at E14.5. A subpopulation of cholinergic neurons coexpress calbindin through embryonic and postnatal development, but only a small proportion coexpressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Our study shows that cholinergic neurons in the ENS develop over a protracted period of time.

  17. Fluorescence turn-on sensing of protein based on mannose functionalized perylene bisimides and its fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Rang; An, Hong-Wei; Rong, Rui-Xue; Cao, Zhi-Ran; Li, Xiao-Liu

    2014-08-15

    A new water-soluble glycocluster based on perylene bisimides PBI-12-Man has been designed and synthesized, and its specific and selective binding property with Concanavalin A (Con A) has been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, which showed strong binding affinity for Con A with the binding constant of 8.2×10(5)M(-1) for monomeric mannose unit, two orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding monosaccharide ligand. Most interestingly, a fluorescence enhancement of PBI-12-Man was observed upon binding with Con A because of deaggregation of the self-assembly of PBI-12-Man induced by carbohydrate-protein interaction, and the further study of the fluorescence enhancement with macrophage cells showed that PBI-12-Man as a biocompatible agent had fluorescence imaging of the surface mannose receptor of the cells. Such fluorescence turn-on sensing of protein based on carbohydrate-protein interactions would facilitate the development of new protein-specific fluorescent probe for diagnosis and molecular imaging under live cell conditions.

  18. Development of transgenic chickens expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Choi, Bok Ruyl; Lee, Hoon Taek; Kim, Young Hye; Ryu, Wang-Shik; Shim, Hosup; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Teoan

    2004-07-23

    In this work we demonstrated the successful production of transgenic chickens expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene. Replication-defective recombinant retroviruses produced from vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped retrovirus vector system were injected beneath the blastoderm of non-incubated chicken embryos (stage X). From 129 injected eggs, 13 chicks hatched after 21 days of incubation. All hatched chicks were found to express vector-encoded EGFP gene, which was under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter and boosted post-transcriptionally by woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element sequence. Green fluorescent signals, indicative of the EGFP gene expression, were detected in various body parts, including head, limb, eye, toe, and several internal organs. Genomic incorporation of the transgene was also proven by Southern blot assay. Our results show the exceptional versatile effectiveness of the EGFP gene as a marker in the gene expression-related studies which therefore would be very helpful in establishing a useful transgenic chicken model system for studies on embryo development and for efficient production of transgenic chickens as bioreactors.

  19. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Pardo Garcia, Alan; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them. PMID:26501285

  20. Teal fluorescent proteins: characterization of a reversibly photoswitchable variant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Hui-wang; Campbell, Robert E.

    2008-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) emerged in the mid 1990s as a powerful tool for life science research. Cyan FPs (CFPs), widely used in multicolor imaging or as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor to yellow FPs (YFPs), were considerably less optimal than other FPs because of some relatively poor photophysical properties. We recently initiated an effort to create improved or alternate versions of CFPs. To address the limitations of CFPs, an alternative known as monomeric teal FP1 (mTFP1) was engineered from the naturally tetrameric Clavularia CFP, by screening either rationally designed or random libraries of variants. mTFP1 has proven to be a particularly useful new member of the FP 'toolbox' by facilitating multicolor live cell imaging. During the directed evolution process of mTFP1, it was noticed that some earlier variants underwent fast and reversible photoisomerization. Some of the initial characterization of one particular mutant, designated as mTFP0.7, is described in this manuscript.

  1. Fluorescent proteins as genetically encoded FRET biosensors in life sciences.

    PubMed

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Garcia, Alan Pardo; Schmid, Johannes A

    2015-10-16

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  2. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-01-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters. PMID:27181496

  3. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra.

    PubMed

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I; Er, Ali O; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A

    2016-05-16

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  4. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  5. Cracks in the β-can: Fluorescent proteins from Anemonia sulcata (Anthozoa, Actinaria)

    PubMed Central

    Wiedenmann, Jörg; Elke, Carsten; Spindler, Klaus-Dieter; Funke, Werner

    2000-01-01

    We characterize two green fluorescent proteins (GFPs), an orange fluorescent protein, and a nonfluorescent red protein isolated from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata. The orange fluorescent protein and the red protein seem to represent two different states of the same protein. Furthermore, we describe the cloning of a GFP and a nonfluorescent red protein. Both proteins are homologous to the GFP from Aequorea victoria. The red protein is significantly smaller than other GFP homologues, and the formation of a closed GFP-like β-can is not possible. Nevertheless, the primary structure of the red protein carries all features necessary for orange fluorescence. We discuss a type of β-can that could be formed in a multimerization process. PMID:11121018

  6. Cracks in the beta-can: fluorescent proteins from Anemonia sulcata (Anthozoa, Actinaria).

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, J; Elke, C; Spindler, K D; Funke, W

    2000-12-19

    We characterize two green fluorescent proteins (GFPs), an orange fluorescent protein, and a nonfluorescent red protein isolated from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata. The orange fluorescent protein and the red protein seem to represent two different states of the same protein. Furthermore, we describe the cloning of a GFP and a nonfluorescent red protein. Both proteins are homologous to the GFP from Aequorea victoria. The red protein is significantly smaller than other GFP homologues, and the formation of a closed GFP-like beta-can is not possible. Nevertheless, the primary structure of the red protein carries all features necessary for orange fluorescence. We discuss a type of beta-can that could be formed in a multimerization process.

  7. Application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields into HeLa cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein and fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Kamlesh; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2012-09-13

    An electrode microchamber has been constructed for applying nanosecond pulsed strong electric fields to living cells, and fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) has been used to investigate the effects of external electric fields on dynamics and function of HeLa cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Both morphological change in cells and reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP have been observed after application of electric fields having a pulsed width of 50 ns and a strength of 4 MV m(-1), indicating that apoptosis, which is a programmed cell death, was induced by nanosecond pulsed electric fields and that fluorescence lifetime of EGFP decreased along with the induction of apoptosis. The reduction of the fluorescence lifetime occurred before the morphological change, indicating that FLIM provides a sensitive and noninvasive detection of the progress of apoptosis induced by application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

  8. Quenching of photoexcited states of the proteins chromophores and introduced into the protein macromolecules fluorescent probes by heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. G.; Dyachuk, O. A.; Melnikov, G. V.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the processes of quenching of photoexcited states of fluorescent probes and quenching of the fluorescence of the chromophores of human serum albumin (HSA) by heavy metal ions (HM): cations Tl+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and the anion of iodine (I-). We used the dye from xanthene series - eosin as a fluorescent probe. By quenching of the fluorescence of protein chromophores we found an influence of HM on the structure of proteins, resulting in a shift of the peak of the fluorescence of HSA tryptophanyl. This can be explained by proteins denaturation under the influence of heavy metals and penetration of water into the inner environment of HSA tryptophan. It was established that the constant of the quenching of the probe phosphorescence is much higher than the fluorescence, which is explained by significantly longer lifetime of the photoexcited states of fluorescent probes in the triplet state than in the singlet.

  9. The electronic excited states of green fluorescent protein chromophore models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Seth Carlton

    We explore the properties of quantum chemical approximations to the excited states of model chromophores of the green fluorescent protein of A. victoria. We calculate several low-lying states by several methods of quantum chemical calculation, including state-averaged complete active space SCF (CASSCF) methods, time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), equation-of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) and multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Amongst the low-lying states we identify the optically bright pipi* state of the molecules and examine its properties. We demonstrate that the state is dominated by a single configuration function. We calculate zero-time approximations to the resonance Raman spectrum of GFP chromophore models, and assign published spectra based upon these.

  10. The low frequency vibrational modes of green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzini, V.; Bizzarri, A. R.; Pellegrini, V.; Nifosı̀, R.; Giannozzi, P.; Iuliano, A.; Cannistraro, S.; Beltram, F.

    2003-02-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the low frequency vibrational modes of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs). Our study exploits the surface enhanced Raman scattering technique, which allowed the analysis of the vibrational modes of the proteins down to 300 cm -1. Here we present results on two GFP mutants, namely S65T/F64L GFP (EGFP) and S65T/F64L/T203Y GFP (E 2GFP). These particularly bright mutants display almost inverted population ratio of anionic (B) to neutral (A) forms of the chromophore. By comparing the vibrational spectrum of the proteins with that of a synthetic model chromophore in solution and with the aid of first principle calculations based on density functional theory, we identify the Raman active bands in this region of frequencies. A dominant collective mode at 720 cm -1 is found and assigned to a collective planar deformation of the chromophore. Low frequency vibrational modes belonging specifically to A and/or B structural configurations are also identified. This work demonstrates the possibility of monitoring the structural sub-states of GFPs through vibrational spectroscopy in a range of frequencies where collective modes peculiar of the double ring structure of the chromophore lie.

  11. Dual fluorescence detection of protein and RNA in Drosophila tissues

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Hila; D’Alterio, Cecilia; Loza-Coll, Mariano; Jones, D Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Detection of RNAs by in situ hybridization (ISH) is a well-established technique that permits the study of specific RNA expression patterns in tissues; however, not all tissues are equally amenable to staining using the same procedure. Here we describe a protocol that combines whole-mount immunofluorescence (IF) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the simultaneous detection of specific RNA transcripts and proteins, greatly enhancing the spatial resolution of RNA expression in complex, intact fly tissues. To date, we have successfully used this protocol in adult testis, larval male gonads, adult intestine and Malpighian tubules. IF is conducted in RNase-free solutions, prior to the harsh conditions of FISH, in order to preserve protein antigenicity within dissected tissues. Separate protocols are described for mRNA and miRNA detection, which are based on robust digoxigenin (DIG) RNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes, respectively. The combined IF-FISH procedure can be completed in 2 d for miRNA detection and 4 d for mRNA detection. Although optimized for Drosophila, this IF-FISH protocol should be adaptable to a wide variety of organisms, tissues, antibodies and probes, thus providing a reliable and simple means to compare RNA and protein abundance and localization. PMID:22976352

  12. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-mediated synthesis of biocompatible graphene.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Woong Han, Jae; Kim, Eunsu; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-10-03

    Graphene is the 2D form of carbon that exists as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice and has attracted great interest in the last decade in view of its physical, chemical, electrical, elastic, thermal, and biocompatible properties. The objective of this study was to synthesize an environmentally friendly and simple methodology for the preparation of graphene using a recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The successful reduction of GO to graphene was confirmed using UV-vis spectroscopy, and FT-IR. DLS and SEM were employed to demonstrate the particle size and surface morphology of GO and EGFP-rGO. The results from Raman spectroscopy suggest the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and formation of graphene with defects. The biocompatibility analysis of GO and EGFP-rGO in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells suggests that GO induces significant concentration-dependent cell toxicity in HEK cells, whereas graphene exerts no adverse effects on HEK cells even at a higher concentration (100 μg/mL). Altogether, our findings suggest that recombinant EGFP can be used as a reducing and stabilizing agent for the preparation of biocompatible graphene. The novelty and originality of this work is that it describes a safe, simple, and environmentally friendly method for the production of graphene using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein. Furthermore, the synthesized graphene shows excellent biocompatibility with HEK cells; therefore, biologically synthesized graphene can be used for biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and novel report describing the synthesis of graphene using recombinant EGFP.

  13. From jellyfish to biosensors: the use of fluorescent proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ute; Larrieu, Antoine; Wells, Darren M

    2013-01-01

    The milestone discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, its optimisation for efficient use in plantae, and subsequent improvements in techniques for fluorescent detection and quantification have changed plant molecular biology research dramatically. Using fluorescent protein tags allows the temporal and spatial monitoring of dynamic expression patterns at tissue, cellular and subcellular scales. Genetically-encoded fluorescence has become the basis for applications such as cell-type specific transcriptomics, monitoring cell fate and identity during development of individual organs or embryos, and visualising protein-protein interactions in vivo. In this article, we will give an overview of currently available fluorescent proteins, their applications in plant research, the techniques used to analyse them and, using the recent development of an auxin sensor as an example, discuss the design principles and prospects for the next generation of fluorescent plant biosensors.

  14. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; ...

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction ofmore » high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.« less

  15. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  16. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dual labeling of a binding protein allows for specific fluorescence detection of native protein.

    PubMed

    Karlström, A; Nygren, P A

    2001-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer has been investigated in the context of specific detection of unlabeled proteins. A model system based on the staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-IgG interaction was designed, in which a single domain was engineered to facilitate site-specific incorporation of fluorophores. An Asn23Cys mutant of the B domain from SPA was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently labeled at the introduced unique thiol and at an amino group, using N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (1,5-IAEDANS) and succinimidyl 6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoate (NBD-X, SE), respectively. Biosensor analysis of purified doubly labeled protein showed that high-affinity binding to the Fc region of IgG was retained. The fluorescence emission spectrum of the doubly labeled protein showed a shift in the relative emission of the two fluorophores in the presence of Fc3(1) fragments, which bind specifically to the B domain. In addition, the fluorescence emission ratio 480/525 nm was shown to increase with increasing concentration of Fc3(1), whereas the presence of a control protein did not affect the emission ratio over the same concentration range.

  18. Investigating protein-protein interactions in live cells using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Deriziotis, Pelagia; Graham, Sarah A; Estruch, Sara B; Fisher, Simon E

    2014-05-26

    Assays based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) provide a sensitive and reliable means to monitor protein-protein interactions in live cells. BRET is the non-radiative transfer of energy from a 'donor' luciferase enzyme to an 'acceptor' fluorescent protein. In the most common configuration of this assay, the donor is Renilla reniformis luciferase and the acceptor is Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP). Because the efficiency of energy transfer is strongly distance-dependent, observation of the BRET phenomenon requires that the donor and acceptor be in close proximity. To test for an interaction between two proteins of interest in cultured mammalian cells, one protein is expressed as a fusion with luciferase and the second as a fusion with YFP. An interaction between the two proteins of interest may bring the donor and acceptor sufficiently close for energy transfer to occur. Compared to other techniques for investigating protein-protein interactions, the BRET assay is sensitive, requires little hands-on time and few reagents, and is able to detect interactions which are weak, transient, or dependent on the biochemical environment found within a live cell. It is therefore an ideal approach for confirming putative interactions suggested by yeast two-hybrid or mass spectrometry proteomics studies, and in addition it is well-suited for mapping interacting regions, assessing the effect of post-translational modifications on protein-protein interactions, and evaluating the impact of mutations identified in patient DNA.

  19. Making genes green: creating green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions with blunt-end PCR products.

    PubMed

    Lo, W; Rodgers, W; Hughes, T

    1998-07-01

    The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) has proven to be a useful tool in protein localization and trafficking studies. Fused to GFP, a protein of interest can be visualized and tracked in vivo through fluorescence microscopy. However, the process of making these fusion proteins is often tedious and painstaking. Here, we describe a simple and quick method for creating GFP fusion proteins using blunt-end PCR product ligation.

  20. A simple fluorescence labeling method for studies of protein oxidation, protein modification, and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Andrew M; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2012-01-15

    Proteins are sensitive to oxidation, and oxidized proteins are excellent substrates for degradation by proteolytic enzymes such as the proteasome and the mitochondrial Lon protease. Protein labeling is required for studies of protein turnover. Unfortunately, most labeling techniques involve (3)H or (14)C methylation, which is expensive, exposes researchers to radioactivity, generates large amounts of radioactive waste, and allows only single-point assays because samples require acid precipitation. Alternative labeling methods have largely proven unsuitable, either because the probe itself is modified by the oxidant(s) being studied or because the alternative labeling techniques are too complex or too costly for routine use. What is needed is a simple, quick, and cheap labeling technique that uses a non-radioactive marker, binds strongly to proteins, is resistant to oxidative modification, and emits a strong signal. We have devised a new reductive method for labeling free carboxyl groups of proteins with the small fluorophore 7-amino-4-methycoumarin (AMC). When bound to target proteins, AMC fluoresces very weakly but when AMC is released by proteinases, proteases, or peptidases, it fluoresces strongly. Thus, without acid precipitation, the proteolysis of any target protein can be studied continuously, in multiwell plates. In direct comparisons, (3)H-labeled proteins and AMC-labeled proteins exhibited essentially identical degradation patterns during incubation with trypsin, cell extracts, and purified proteasome. AMC-labeled proteins are well suited to studying increased proteolytic susceptibility after protein modification, because the AMC-protein bond is resistant to oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite and is stable over time and to extremes of pH, temperature (even boiling), freeze-thaw, mercaptoethanol, and methanol. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies. PMID:27748381

  2. Protein fragment bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses for the in vivo study of protein-protein interactions and cellular protein complex localizations

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Schlücking, Kathrin; Schroeder, Julian I.; Kudla, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Summary The analyses of protein-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes including signal transduction, protein trafficking and movement. Protein fragment complementation assays are based on the reconstitution of protein function when non-active protein fragments are brought together by interacting proteins that were genetically fused to these protein fragments. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) relies on the reconstitution of fluorescent proteins and enables both the analysis of protein-protein interactions and the visualization of protein complex formations in vivo. Transient expression of proteins is a convenient approach to study protein functions in planta or in other organisms, and minimizes the need for time-consuming generation of stably expressing transgenic organisms. Here we describe protocols for BiFC analyses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves transiently transformed by Agrobacterium infiltration. Further we discuss different BiFC applications and provide examples for proper BiFC analyses in planta. PMID:24057390

  3. Origin, nature, and fate of the fluorescent state of the green fluorescent protein chromophore at the CASPT2//CASSCF resolution.

    PubMed

    Martin, María Elena; Negri, Fabrizia; Olivucci, Massimo

    2004-05-05

    Ab initio CASPT2//CASSCF relaxation path computations are employed to determine the intrinsic (e.g., in vacuo) mechanism underlying the rise and decay of the luminescence of the anionic form of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorophore. Production and decay of the fluorescent state occur via a two-mode reaction coordinate. Relaxation along the first (totally symmetric) mode leads to production of the fluorescent state that corresponds to a planar species. The second (out-of-plane) mode controls the fluorescent state decay and mainly corresponds to a barrierless twisting of the fluorophore phenyl moiety. While a "space-saving" hula-twist conical intersection decay channel is found to lie only 5 kcal mol(-1) above the fluorescent state, the direct involvement of a hula-twist deformation in the decay is not supported by our data. The above results indicate that the ultrafast fluorescence decay observed for the GFP chromophore in solution is likely to have an intrinsic origin. The possible effects of the GFP protein cavity on the fluorescence lifetime of the investigated chromophore model are discussed.

  4. Improved blue, green, and red fluorescent protein tagging vectors for S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sidae; Lim, Wendell A; Thorn, Kurt S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions are a powerful tool to monitor the localization and trafficking of proteins. Such studies are particularly easy to carry out in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the ease with which tags can be introduced into the genome by homologous recombination. However, the available yeast tagging plasmids have not kept pace with the development of new and improved fluorescent proteins. Here, we have constructed yeast optimized versions of 19 different fluorescent proteins and tested them for use as fusion tags in yeast. These include two blue, seven green, and seven red fluorescent proteins, which we have assessed for brightness, photostability and perturbation of tagged proteins. We find that EGFP remains the best performing green fluorescent protein, that TagRFP-T and mRuby2 outperform mCherry as red fluorescent proteins, and that mTagBFP2 can be used as a blue fluorescent protein tag. Together, the new tagging vectors we have constructed provide improved blue and red fluorescent proteins for yeast tagging and three color imaging.

  5. Protein knockouts in living eukaryotes using deGradFP and green fluorescent protein fusion targets.

    PubMed

    Caussinus, Emmanuel; Kanca, Oguz; Affolter, Markus

    2013-09-24

    This unit describes deGradFP (degrade Green Fluorescent Protein), an easy-to-implement protein knockout method applicable in any eukaryotic genetic system. Depleting a protein in order to study its function in a living organism is usually achieved at the gene level (genetic mutations) or at the RNA level (RNA interference and morpholinos). However, any system that acts upstream of the proteic level depends on the turnover rate of the existing target protein, which can be extremely slow. In contrast, deGradFP is a fast method that directly depletes GFP fusion proteins. In particular, deGradFP is able to counteract maternal effects in embryos and causes early and fast onset loss-of-function phenotypes of maternally contributed proteins.

  6. Selection of Intracellularly Functional RNA Mimics of Green Fluorescent Protein Using Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiawei; Huang, Xin; Wu, Lei; Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was exploited to isolate Escherichia coli cells that were highly fluorescent due to the expression of RNA aptamers that induce fluorescence of 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone. Two different aptamers, named ZT-26 and ZT-324, were identified by this method and compared to the fluorescence-signaling properties of Spinach, a previously reported RNA aptamer. Aptamer ZT-26 exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence over Spinach only in vitro. However, aptamer ZT-324 is 36% brighter than Spinach when expressed in E. coli. The FACS-based selection strategy presented here is attractive for deriving fluorescent RNA aptamers that function in cells as it directly selects for cells with a high level of fluorescence due to the expression of the RNA aptamer.

  7. Detection of constitutive heterodimerization of the integrin Mac-1 subunits by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Guo; Yang Huayan; Wang Chen; Zhang Feng; You Zhendong; Wang Guiying; He Cheng; Chen Yizhang . E-mail: yzchen0928@yahoo.com; Xu Zhihan . E-mail: zzxu@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2006-08-04

    Macrophage differentiation antigen associated with complement three receptor function (Mac-1) belongs to {beta}{sub 2} subfamily of integrins that mediate important cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Biochemical studies have indicated that Mac-1 is a constitutive heterodimer in vitro. Here, we detected the heterodimerization of Mac-1 subunits in living cells by means of two fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques (fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy) and our results demonstrated that there is constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits and this constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits is cell-type independent. Through FRET imaging, we found that heterodimers of Mac-1 mainly localized in plasma membrane, perinuclear, and Golgi area in living cells. Furthermore, through analysis of the estimated physical distances between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fused to Mac-1 subunits, we suggested that the conformation of Mac-1 subunits is not affected by the fusion of CFP or YFP and inferred that Mac-1 subunits take different conformation when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, respectively.

  8. Protein tagging and detection with engineered self-assembling fragments of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Cabantous, Stéphanie; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2005-01-01

    Existing protein tagging and detection methods are powerful but have drawbacks. Split protein tags can perturb protein solubility or may not work in living cells. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions can misfold or exhibit altered processing. Fluorogenic biarsenical FLaSH or ReASH substrates overcome many of these limitations but require a polycysteine tag motif, a reducing environment and cell transfection or permeabilization. An ideal protein tag would be genetically encoded, would work both in vivo and in vitro, would provide a sensitive analytical signal and would not require external chemical reagents or substrates. One way to accomplish this might be with a split GFP, but the GFP fragments reported thus far are large and fold poorly, require chemical ligation or fused interacting partners to force their association, or require coexpression or co-refolding to produce detectable folded and fluorescent GFP. We have engineered soluble, self-associating fragments of GFP that can be used to tag and detect either soluble or insoluble proteins in living cells or cell lysates. The split GFP system is simple and does not change fusion protein solubility.

  9. Characterization of a novel component of the peroxisomal protein import apparatus using fluorescent peroxisomal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, J E; Keller, G A; Morrell, J C; Mihalik, S J; Smith, B; Cregg, J M; Gould, S J

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent peroxisomal probes were developed by fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the matrix peroxisomal targeting signals PTS1 and PTS2, as well as to an integral peroxisomal membrane protein (IPMP). These proteins were used to identify and characterize novel peroxisome assembly (pas) mutants in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mutant cells lacking the PAS10 gene mislocalized both PTS1-GFP and PTS2-GFP to the cytoplasm but did incorporate IPMP-GFP into peroxisome membranes. Similar distributions were observed for endogenous peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. While peroxisomes from translocation-competent pas mutants sediment in sucrose gradients at the density of normal peroxisomes, >98% of peroxisomes from pas10 cells migrated to a much lower density and had an extremely low ratio of matrix:membrane protein. These data indicate that Pas10p plays an important role in protein translocation across the peroxisome membrane. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that Pas10p is an integral protein of the peroxisome membrane. In addition, Pas10p contains a cytoplasmically-oriented C3HC4 zinc binding domain that is essential for its biological activity. Images PMID:8670828

  10. Automated High-Throughput Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Detect Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Camilo; Oetken-Lindholm, Christina; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is widely used to study conformational changes of macromolecules and protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, and protein-small molecule interactions. FRET biosensors can serve as valuable secondary assays in drug discovery and for target validation in mammalian cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) allows precise quantification of the FRET efficiency in intact cells, as FLIM is independent of fluorophore concentration, detection efficiency, and fluorescence intensity. We have developed an automated FLIM system using a commercial frequency domain FLIM attachment (Lambert Instruments) for wide-field imaging. Our automated FLIM system is capable of imaging and analyzing up to 50 different positions of a slide in less than 4 min, or the inner 60 wells of a 96-well plate in less than 20 min. Automation is achieved using a motorized stage and controller (Prior Scientific) coupled with a Zeiss Axio Observer body and full integration into the Lambert Instruments FLIM acquisition software. As an application example, we analyze the interaction of the oncoprotein Ras and its effector Raf after drug treatment. In conclusion, our automated FLIM imaging system requires only commercial components and may therefore allow for a broader use of this technique in chemogenomics projects. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Recent progress in design of protein-based fluorescent biosensors and their cellular applications.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomonori; Hamachi, Itaru

    2014-12-19

    Protein-based fluorescent biosensors have emerged as key bioanalytical tools to visualize and quantify a wide range of biological substances and events in vitro, in cells, and even in vivo. On the basis of the construction method, the protein-based fluorescent biosensors can be principally classified into two classes: (1) genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors harnessing fluorescent proteins (FPs) and (2) semisynthetic biosensors comprised of protein scaffolds and synthetic fluorophores. Recent advances in protein engineering and chemical biology not only allowed the further optimization of conventional biosensors but also facilitated the creation of novel biosensors based on unique strategies. In this review, we survey the recent studies in the development and improvement of protein-based fluorescent biosensors and highlight the successful applications to live cell and in vivo imaging. Furthermore, we provide perspectives on possible future directions of the technique.

  12. Fluorescence of a histidine-modified enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) effectively quenched by copper(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Emese-Éva; Petres, Judit; Szabó, Mária; Orbán, Csongor-Kálmán; Szilágyi, László; Ábrahám, Beáta

    2013-03-01

    Two histidines were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis into the structure of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein, replacing the serine at position 202 and the glutamine at position 204 for increasing the sensitivity of the protein towards different metal ions by creating possible metal binding sites near the chromophore group. There is no appreciable difference between the absorbance and fluorescence spectra of the two proteins (wild type and the double-histidine mutant) indicating that the mutation does not change the environment of the fluorophore. Fluorescence quenching was measured at different pH (6.5-8) and temperatures (20-45 °C) varying the concentration of metal ions. Under optimal conditions (pH = 7.5, 20 °C) the mutant's Kd is 16 nM, it binds copper more than 200fold stronger than the wild type EGFP.

  13. Developing Fast Fluorescent Protein Voltage Sensors by Optimizing FRET Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Uhna; Sepehri-Rad, Masoud; Piao, Hong Hua; Jin, Lei; Hughes, Thomas; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Baker, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based protein voltage sensors can be useful for monitoring neuronal activity in vivo because the ratio of signals between the donor and acceptor pair reduces common sources of noise such as heart beat artifacts. We improved the performance of FRET based genetically encoded Fluorescent Protein (FP) voltage sensors by optimizing the location of donor and acceptor FPs flanking the voltage sensitive domain of the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase. First, we created 39 different “Nabi1” constructs by positioning the donor FP, UKG, at 8 different locations downstream of the voltage-sensing domain and the acceptor FP, mKO, at 6 positions upstream. Several of these combinations resulted in large voltage dependent signals and relatively fast kinetics. Nabi1 probes responded with signal size up to 11% ΔF/F for a 100 mV depolarization and fast response time constants both for signal activation (~2 ms) and signal decay (~3 ms). We improved expression in neuronal cells by replacing the mKO and UKG FRET pair with Clover (donor FP) and mRuby2 (acceptor FP) to create Nabi2 probes. Nabi2 probes also had large signals and relatively fast time constants in HEK293 cells. In primary neuronal culture, a Nabi2 probe was able to differentiate individual action potentials at 45 Hz. PMID:26587834

  14. Vibrations-determined properties of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Krasnenko, Veera; Tkaczyk, Alan H; Tkaczyk, Eric R; Farkas, Odön; Mauring, Koit

    2005-06-15

    The physicochemical characteristics of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), including the thermodynamic properties (entropy, enthalpy, Gibbs' free energy, heat capacity), normal mode vibrations, and atomic fluctuations, were investigated. The Gaussian 03 computational chemistry program was employed for normal mode analysis using the AMBER force field. The thermodynamic parameters and atomic fluctuations were then calculated from the vibrational eigenvalues (frequencies) and eigenvectors. The regions of highest rigidity were shown to be the beta-sheet barrel with the central alpha-helix, which bears the chromophore. The most flexible parts of the GFP molecule were the outlying loops that cover the top and bottom of the beta-barrel. This way, the balance between rigidity and flexibility is maintained, which is the optimal relationship for protein stability in terms of Gibbs' free energy. This dual-schemed structure satisfies the requirements for GFP function. In this sense, the structure of GFP resembles a nanoscale drum: a stiff cylinder with flexible vibrating end(s). Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Photoswitchable red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; English, Brian P; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Xiao, Hui; Almo, Steven C; Singer, Robert H; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2014-10-23

    A subclass of fluorescent proteins (FPs), large Stokes shift (LSS) FP, are characterized by increased spread between excitation and emission maxima. We report a photoswitchable variant of a red FP with an LSS, PSLSSmKate, which initially exhibits excitation and emission at 445 and 622 nm, but violet irradiation photoswitches PSLSSmKate into a common red form with excitation and emission at 573 and 621 nm. We characterize spectral, photophysical, and biochemical properties of PSLSSmKate in vitro and in mammalian cells and determine its crystal structure in the LSS form. Mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and spectroscopy of PSLSSmKate allow us to propose molecular mechanisms for the LSS, pH dependence, and light-induced chromophore transformation. We demonstrate the applicability of PSLSSmKate to superresolution photoactivated localization microscopy and protein dynamics in live cells. Given its promising properties, we expect that PSLSSmKate-like phenotype will be further used for photoactivatable imaging and tracking multiple populations of intracellular objects.

  16. A fluorescence spectroscopic study of a coagulating protein extracted from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    PubMed

    Kwaambwa, H M; Maikokera, R

    2007-11-15

    The fluorescence studies of coagulating protein extracted from Moringa oleifera seeds have been studied using steady-state intrinsic fluorescence. The fluorescence spectra are dominated by tryptophan emission and the emission peak maximum (lambda(max)=343+ or -2nm) indicated that the tryptophan residue is not located in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Changes in solution pH affected the protein conformation as indicated by changes in the tryptophan fluorescence above pH 9 whereas the ionic strength had minimal effect. The exposure and environments of the tryptophan residue were determined using collisional quenchers.

  17. A pH-sensitive red fluorescent protein compatible with hydrophobic resin embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenyan; Gang, Yadong; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Hongfu; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-02-01

    pH sensitive fluorescent proteins enabling chemical reactivation in resin are useful tools for fluorescence microimaging. EYFP or EGFP improved from GFP in jellyfish are good for such applications. For simultaneous two-color imaging, a suitable red fluorescent protein is of urgent need. Here a pH sensitive red fluorescent protein, pHuji, is selected and verified to be compatible with hydrophobic resin embedding and thus may be promising for dual-colour chemical reactivation imaging in conjunction with EGFP or EYFP.

  18. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis of protein interactions in live cells.

    PubMed

    Kerppola, Tom K

    2013-08-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables direct visualization of protein interactions and modifications in living cells. It is based on the facilitated association of two nonfluorescent fragments of a fluorescent protein fused to putative interaction partners. The intrinsic fluorescence of the active complex enables detection of protein interactions with high sensitivity, fine spatial resolution, and minimal perturbation of the cells. This protocol outlines methods to analyze protein interactions in cultured mammalian cells using BiFC, but can be readily adapted to any cell type or aerobically grown organism that can be genetically modified to express the fusion proteins.

  19. Protein oligomerization monitored by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy: Self-assembly of Rubisco activase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A methodology is presented to characterize complex protein assembly pathways by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We have derived the total autocorrelation function describing the behavior of mixtures of labeled and unlabeled protein under equilibrium conditions. Our modeling approach allows us...

  20. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  1. Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-13

    ARL-TR-7572 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold ...JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters by Abby...Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Abby L West, Mark H Griep

  2. Mutual effects of disorder and order in fusion proteins between intrinsically disordered domains and fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marina; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are being paid an increasing amount of interest due to the understanding of the crucial role that flexible regions play in molecular recognition and in signaling. Accordingly, reports focusing on the structural and functional characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins or regions are growing exponentially. Relatively few studies have however been reported on the mutual effects of ordered and disordered moieties in artificial fusion proteins. In this review, we focus on the few available experimental data based on the use of chimeras in which fluorescent proteins were fused to disordered domains of different lengths, compactness and propensity to form secondary structures. The impact of the artificial fusion on the conformational and functional properties of the resulting proteins is discussed.

  3. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hau B; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-12-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10-11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1-9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10-11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1-9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  4. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a reporter gene for the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Marko Riedel; Gautier Calmin; Lassaad Belbahri; Francois Lefort; Monika Gotz; Stefan Wagner; Sabine. Werres

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Phytophthora ramorum strains that produce green fluorescent protein (GFP) constitutively were obtained after stable DNA integration using a polyethylene glycol and CaCl2-based transformation protocol. Green fluorescent protein production was studied in developing colonies and in different propagules of the pathogen...

  5. Simultaneous assembly of two target proteins using split inteins for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stanley; Mills, Evan; Truong, Kevin

    2013-03-01

    Inteins are protein elements that covalently reassemble proteins from two precursor fragments in a process known as protein splicing. They are commonly used to reassemble a single target protein by protein splicing, but a second target protein can potentially reassemble by intein dimerization. Here, we use the naturally occurring split DnaE intein from Nostoc punctiforme (NpuDnaE) to demonstrate the simultaneous assembly of two target proteins in several examples studied with live cell imaging: yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) with monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP), dominant positive mutant of RhoA GTPase with YFP and GCaMP2 Ca(2+) indicator with mRFP. These examples showed the versatility of the strategy along with some interesting attributes: first, the two target proteins are in equal stoichiometry; second, the extent of protein splicing can be reported by a fluorescent protein. In particular, the split GCaMP2 with mRFP could find applications in tissue-specific Ca(2+) imaging in transgenic organisms, where mRFP could control for motion-related intensity changes.

  6. Enhanced green fluorescence by the expression of an Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein mutant in mono- and dicotyledonous plant cells.

    PubMed

    Reichel, C; Mathur, J; Eckes, P; Langenkemper, K; Koncz, C; Schell, J; Reiss, B; Maas, C

    1996-06-11

    The expression of the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) in plants was analyzed by transient expression in protoplasts from Nicotiana tabacum, Arabidopsis thaliana, Hordeum vulgare, and Zea mays. Expression of GFP was only observed with a mutated cDNA, from which a recently described cryptic splice site had been removed. However, detectable levels of green fluorescence were only emitted from a small number of protoplasts. Therefore, other mutations in the GFP cDNA leading to single-amino acid exchanges in the chromophore region, which had been previously studied in Escherichia coli, were tested in order to improve the sensitivity of this marker protein. Of the mutations tested so far, the exchange of GFP amino acid tyrosine 66 to histidine (Y66H) led to detection of blue fluorescence in plant protoplasts, while the exchange of amino acid serine 65 to cysteine (S65C) and threonine (S65T) increased the intensity of green fluorescence drastically, thereby significantly raising the detection level for GFP. For GFP S65C, the detectable number of green fluorescing tobacco (BY-2) protoplasts was raised up to 19-fold, while the fluorimetricly determined fluorescence was raised by at least 2 orders of magnitude.

  7. Structure-guided evolution of cyan fluorescent proteins towards a quantum yield of 93%

    PubMed Central

    Goedhart, Joachim; von Stetten, David; Noirclerc-Savoye, Marjolaine; Lelimousin, Mickaël; Joosen, Linda; Hink, Mark A.; van Weeren, Laura; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Royant, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Cyan variants of green fluorescent protein are widely used as donors in Förster resonance energy transfer experiments. The popular, but modestly bright, Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP) was sequentially improved into the brighter variants Super Cyan Fluorescent Protein 3A (SCFP3A) and mTurquoise, the latter exhibiting a high-fluorescence quantum yield and a long mono-exponential fluorescence lifetime. Here we combine X-ray crystallography and excited-state calculations to rationalize these stepwise improvements. The enhancement originates from stabilization of the seventh β-strand and the strengthening of the sole chromophore-stabilizing hydrogen bond. The structural analysis highlighted one suboptimal internal residue, which was subjected to saturation mutagenesis combined with fluorescence lifetime-based screening. This resulted in mTurquoise2, a brighter variant with faster maturation, high photostability, longer mono-exponential lifetime and the highest quantum yield measured for a monomeric fluorescent protein. Together, these properties make mTurquoise2 the preferable cyan variant of green fluorescent protein for long-term imaging and as donor for Förster resonance energy transfer to a yellow fluorescent protein. PMID:22434194

  8. A novel fluorescent protein from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica (Anthozoa: Actiniaria).

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kenta; Shimada, Eriko; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Tsuruwaka, Yusuke

    2016-03-22

    A fluorescent protein was identified and cloned from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica. Bioluminescence and fluorescence expression were examined by direct observations of live specimens and RNA-Seq analysis. Both approaches revealed a novel green fluorescent protein in the tentacles of the anemone, but bioluminescence was not observed. Behavioural observations revealed that a blue light excited the fluorescence in the tentacles, and initiated a behavioural response whereby the fluorescent tentacles became fully exposed to the blue light. The excitation and emission peaks of C. japonica's fluorescent protein were at 500 and 510 nm, respectively, which were greener than those reported in homologs. Furthermore, this protein was highly tolerant of increased temperatures and repeated freeze-thaw treatments. The current study presents an example of fluorescence in a deep-sea cnidarian, demonstrating that fluorescent proteins could have important roles, regardless of the presence or absence of strong sunlight. It also demonstrates that this deep-sea fluorescent protein has unique characteristics, including high stability, perhaps as an adaptation to the extreme environment.

  9. A novel fluorescent protein from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica (Anthozoa: Actiniaria)

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Kenta; Shimada, Eriko; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Tsuruwaka, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A fluorescent protein was identified and cloned from the deep-sea anemone Cribrinopsis japonica. Bioluminescence and fluorescence expression were examined by direct observations of live specimens and RNA-Seq analysis. Both approaches revealed a novel green fluorescent protein in the tentacles of the anemone, but bioluminescence was not observed. Behavioural observations revealed that a blue light excited the fluorescence in the tentacles, and initiated a behavioural response whereby the fluorescent tentacles became fully exposed to the blue light. The excitation and emission peaks of C. japonica’s fluorescent protein were at 500 and 510 nm, respectively, which were greener than those reported in homologs. Furthermore, this protein was highly tolerant of increased temperatures and repeated freeze–thaw treatments. The current study presents an example of fluorescence in a deep-sea cnidarian, demonstrating that fluorescent proteins could have important roles, regardless of the presence or absence of strong sunlight. It also demonstrates that this deep-sea fluorescent protein has unique characteristics, including high stability, perhaps as an adaptation to the extreme environment. PMID:27002644

  10. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family.

    PubMed

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-11-09

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  11. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  12. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for the monitoring of green fluorescent protein-tagged androgen receptors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Rina; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Li, Xu; Imasaka, Totaro

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to monitor the interaction between androgen receptor (AR) tagging of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the ligands in living cells. The fluorescence lifetime of the AR-GFP without ligands was ca. 3.1 ns, which was reduced to ca. 2.5 ns after treatment with agonist 5α-dihydrotestosterone. On the other hand, the fluorescence lifetime of AR-GFP was not changed after treatment with antagonist hydroxyflutamide. The reaction kinetics was simulated in the present study, and the obtained results indicated the possibility of the presence of an intermediate complex during the reaction. FLIM can be used to record the ratio of the AR as it reacts with an agonist, and, therefore, it is useful for acquiring information concerning the interaction between AR and ligands in living cells.

  14. Rise-Time of FRET-Acceptor Fluorescence Tracks Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Uniform labeling of proteins with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes with an equimolar ratio is paramount for accurate determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies. In practice, however, the labeled protein population contains donor-labeled molecules that have no corresponding acceptor. These FRET-inactive donors contaminate the donor fluorescence signal, which leads to underestimation of FRET efficiencies in conventional fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based FRET experiments. Such contamination is avoided if FRET efficiencies are extracted from the rise time of acceptor fluorescence upon donor excitation. The reciprocal value of the rise time of acceptor fluorescence is equal to the decay rate of the FRET-active donor fluorescence. Here, we have determined rise times of sensitized acceptor fluorescence to study the folding of double-labeled apoflavodoxin molecules and show that this approach tracks the characteristics of apoflavodoxinʼs complex folding pathway. PMID:25535076

  15. Correlative In-Resin Super-Resolution Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy of Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Errin; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Correlative super-resolution light and electron microscopy (super-resolution CLEM) is a powerful and emerging tool in biological research. The practical realization of these two very different microscopy techniques with their individual requirements remains a challenging task. There is a broad range of approaches to choose from, each with their own advantages and limitations. Here, we present a detailed protocol for in-resin super-resolution CLEM of high-pressure frozen and freeze substituted cultured cells. The protocol makes use of a strategy to preserve the fluorescence and photo-switching capabilities of standard fluorescent proteins, such as GFP and YFP, to enable single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) in-resin sections followed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. This results in a fivefold improvement in resolution in the fluorescence image and a more precise correlation of the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules with EM ultrastructure compared with conventional CLEM.

  16. Monitoring and quantification of the protein partition during cytokinesis with fluorescent spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja-Yun; Lin, Yi-Ting; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Hsu, I.-Jen

    2009-02-01

    Cytokinesis is a consecutive process during cell division. For systems biological studies, it is important to precisely monitor and quantify proteins in different cell stages and mitosis processes. However, the absolute quantities in living cells are usually difficult to quantify. Fluorescent protein tagged protein is one of the techniques that are usually applied to monitor biological behaviors and phenomena. In this study, an insect cell line, DPnE, which can stably express both green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and red fluorescent protein (DsRed) was established. This dual fluorescent cell line was chosen as a model system to monitor the protein partition during cytokinesis. A spectrum analysis system was established and integrated in an inverted microscope. The two-dimensional distribution of the full fluorescent spectra of the two fluorescent proteins was obtained in a time-lapse series. Furthermore, we also developed an algorithm to analyze the quantities of both fluorescent proteins in the daughter cells and parent cells during the process of cytokinesis, respectively. With this innovative optical system and algorithm, the proteins partition during cytokinesis can be monitored and quantified precisely.

  17. A comparison of the fluorescence dynamics of single molecules of a green fluorescent protein: one- versus two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Cotlet, Mircea; Goodwin, Peter M; Waldo, Geoffrey S; Werner, James H

    2006-01-16

    We report on the dynamics of fluorescence from individual molecules of a mutant of the wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria, super folder GFP (SFGFP). SFGFP is a novel and robust variant designed for in vivo high-throughput screening of protein expression levels. It shows increased thermal stability and is able to retain its fluorescence when fused to poorly folding proteins. We use a recently developed single-molecule technique which combines fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting in order to characterize the photophysical properties of SFGFP under one- (OPE) and two- (TPE) photon excitation conditions. We use Rhodamine 110 as a model chromophore to validate the methodology and to explain the single-molecule results of SFGFP. Under OPE, single SFGFP molecules undergo fluorescence flickering on the time scale of micros and tens of micros due to triplet formation and ground-state protonation-deprotonation, respectively, as demonstrated by excitation intensity- and pH-dependent experiments. OPE single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes indicate heterogeneity in the population of SFGFP, indicating the presence of the deprotonated I and B forms of the SFGFP chromophore. TPE of single SFGFP molecules results in the photoconversion of the chromophore. TPE of single SFGFP molecules show fluorescence flickering on the time scale of micros due to triplet formation. A flicker connected with protonation-deprotonation of the SFGFP chromophore is detected only at low pH. Our results show that SFGFP is a promising fusion reporter for intracellular applications using OPE and TPE microscopy.

  18. Redox heme-proteins mediated fluorescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lixia; He, Luwei; Ji, Congcong; Li, Xiangqing; Kang, Shi-Zhao; Mu, Jin

    2014-04-05

    The redox properties of cytochrome c (Cyt c), hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) were studied based on electrostatic interactions between Thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and proteins. Results indicated that only Cyt c quenched the fluorescence of the QDs at pH>8.0. Under the optimized conditions, a significant fluorescence recovery of the QDs' system was observed when the reduced form of Cyt c incubated with TGA capped QDs, however, the reduced state of Hb and Mb resulted in a more fluorescence quenching on the same size of QDs. Interestingly, the fluorescence changes of QDs-proteins could be switched by modulating the redox potentials of proteins-attached QDs. Moreover, only the oxidized Cyt c form was reduced by the generated O2(-) that significantly enhanced the fluorescence of the QDs' system, which was also demonstrated by fluorescence imaging in HeLa cells.

  19. Color transitions in coral's fluorescent proteins by site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gurskaya, Nadya G; Savitsky, Alexander P; Yanushevich, Yurii G; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2001-01-01

    Background Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) cloned from jellyfish Aequorea victoria and its homologs from corals Anthozoa have a great practical significance as in vivo markers of gene expression. Also, they are an interesting puzzle of protein science due to an unusual mechanism of chromophore formation and diversity of fluorescent colors. Fluorescent proteins can be subdivided into cyan (~ 485 nm), green (~ 505 nm), yellow (~ 540 nm), and red (>580 nm) emitters. Results Here we applied site-directed mutagenesis in order to investigate the structural background of color variety and possibility of shifting between different types of fluorescence. First, a blue-shifted mutant of cyan amFP486 was generated. Second, it was established that cyan and green emitters can be modified so as to produce an intermediate spectrum of fluorescence. Third, the relationship between green and yellow fluorescence was inspected on closely homologous green zFP506 and yellow zFP538 proteins. The following transitions of colors were performed: yellow to green; yellow to dual color (green and yellow); and green to yellow. Fourth, we generated a mutant of cyan emitter dsFP483 that demonstrated dual color (cyan and red) fluorescence. Conclusions Several amino acid substitutions were found to strongly affect fluorescence maxima. Some positions primarily found by sequence comparison were proved to be crucial for fluorescence of particular color. These results are the first step towards predicting the color of natural GFP-like proteins corresponding to newly identified cDNAs from corals. PMID:11459517

  20. Design of a fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based Mammalian protein-protein interaction trap.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Sam; Van der Heyden, José; Vertenten, Els; Plum, Jean; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Tavernier, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT) is a two-hybrid assay based on insights in type I cytokine signal transduction. Bait and prey polypeptides are tethered to mutant cytokine receptor chimeras which are impaired in signaling. On bait-prey interaction and after ligand stimulation, the JAK-STAT signaling cascade is initiated leading to transcription of a reporter or marker gene under the control of the STAT3-responsive rPAP1 promoter. In addition to a physiologically relevant context for mammalian protein-protein interactions this method provides separation of interactor and effector zones, and can be applied for both analytical and screening purposes. In the protocol described here, a cytokine receptor derived surface tag is used as a selectable marker. After an initial presort step using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), "positive" cells are selected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS).

  1. Automated Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images to Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Doktycz, M. J.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protein interactions is important for elucidating biological networks. One obstacle in comprehensive interaction studies is the analyses of large datasets, particularly those containing images. Development of an automated system to analyze an image-based protein interaction dataset is needed. Such an analysis system is described here, to automatically extract features from fluorescence microscopy images obtained from a bacterial protein interaction assay. These features are used to relay quantitative values that aid in the automated scoring of positive interactions. Experimental observations indicate that identifying at least 50% positive cells in an image is sufficient to detect a protein interaction. Based on this criterion, the automated system presents 100% accuracy in detecting positive interactions for a dataset of 16 images. Algorithms were implemented using MATLAB and the software developed is available on request from the authors. PMID:23165043

  2. Automated Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images to Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Venkatraman, S.; Doktycz, M. J.; Qi, H.; ...

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protein interactions is important for elucidating biological networks. One obstacle in comprehensive interaction studies is the analyses of large datasets, particularly those containing images. Development of an automated system to analyze an image-based protein interaction dataset is needed. Such an analysis system is described here, to automatically extract features from fluorescence microscopy images obtained from a bacterial protein interaction assay. These features are used to relay quantitative values that aid in the automated scoring of positive interactions. Experimental observations indicate that identifying at least 50% positive cells in an image is sufficient to detect a protein interaction.more » Based on this criterion, the automated system presents 100% accuracy in detecting positive interactions for a dataset of 16 images. Algorithms were implemented using MATLAB and the software developed is available on request from the authors.« less

  3. Inference of protein diffusion probed via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations are an inherent part of single molecule or few particle biophysical data sets. Traditionally, ``noise'' fluctuations have been viewed as a nuisance, to be eliminated or minimized. Here we look on how statistical inference methods - that take explicit advantage of fluctuations - have allowed us to draw an unexpected picture of single molecule diffusional dynamics. Our focus is on the diffusion of proteins probed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). First, we discuss how - in collaboration with the Bustamante and Marqusee labs at UC Berkeley - we determined using FCS data that individual enzymes are perturbed by self-generated catalytic heat (Riedel et al, Nature, 2014). Using the tools of inference, we found how distributions of enzyme diffusion coefficients shift in the presence of substrate revealing that enzymes performing highly exothermic reactions dissipate heat by transiently accelerating their center of mass following a catalytic reaction. Next, when molecules diffuse in the cell nucleus they often appear to diffuse anomalously. We analyze FCS data - in collaboration with Rich Day at the IU Med School - to propose a simple model for transcription factor binding-unbinding in the nucleus to show that it may give rise to apparent anomalous diffusion. Here inference methods extract entire binding affinity distributions for the diffusing transcription factors, allowing us to precisely characterize their interactions with different components of the nuclear environment. From this analysis, we draw key mechanistic insight that goes beyond what is possible by simply fitting data to ``anomalous diffusion'' models.

  4. Mapping fast protein folding with multiple-site fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Prigozhin, Maxim B; Chao, Shu-Han; Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-30

    Fast protein folding involves complex dynamics in many degrees of freedom, yet microsecond folding experiments provide only low-resolution structural information. We enhance the structural resolution of the five-helix bundle protein λ6-85 by engineering into it three fluorescent tryptophan-tyrosine contact probes. The probes report on distances between three different helix pairs: 1-2, 1-3, and 3-2. Temperature jump relaxation experiments on these three mutants reveal two different kinetic timescales: a slower timescale for 1-3 and a faster one for the two contacts involving helix 2. We hypothesize that these differences arise from a single folding mechanism that forms contacts on different timescales, and not from changes of mechanism due to adding the probes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the corresponding three distances in one published single-trajectory all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation of a similar mutant. Autocorrelation analysis of the trajectory reveals the same "slow" and "fast" distance change as does experiment, but on a faster timescale; smoothing the trajectory in time shows that this ordering is robust and persists into the microsecond folding timescale. Structural investigation of the all-atom computational data suggests that helix 2 misfolds to produce a short-lived off-pathway trap, in agreement with the experimental finding that the 1-2 and 3-2 distances involving helix 2 contacts form a kinetic grouping distinct from 1 to 3. Our work demonstrates that comparison between experiment and simulation can be extended to several order parameters, providing a stronger mechanistic test.

  5. Cyan-emitting and orange-emitting fluorescent proteins as a donor/acceptor pair for fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Satoshi; Araki, Toshio; Nagai, Takeharu; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2004-07-01

    GFP (green fluorescent protein)-based FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) technology has facilitated the exploration of the spatio-temporal patterns of cellular signalling. While most studies have used cyan- and yellow-emitting FPs (fluorescent proteins) as FRET donors and acceptors respectively, this pair of proteins suffers from problems of pH-sensitivity and bleeding between channels. In the present paper, we demonstrate the use of an alternative additional donor/acceptor pair. We have cloned two genes encoding FPs from stony corals. We isolated a cyan-emitting FP from Acropara sp., whose tentacles exhibit cyan coloration. Similar to GFP from Renilla reniformis, the cyan FP forms a tight dimeric complex. We also discovered an orange-emitting FP from Fungia concinna. As the orange FP exists in a complex oligomeric structure, we converted this protein into a monomeric form through the introduction of three amino acid substitutions, recently reported to be effective for converting DsRed into a monomer (Clontech). We used the cyan FP and monomeric orange FP as a donor/acceptor pair to monitor the activity of caspase 3 during apoptosis. Due to the close spectral overlap of the donor emission and acceptor absorption (a large Förster distance), substantial pH-resistance of the donor fluorescence quantum yield and the acceptor absorbance, as well as good separation of the donor and acceptor signals, the new pair can be used for more effective quantitative FRET imaging.

  6. AY-WB phytoplasma secretes a protein that targets plant cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaodong; Correa, Valdir R; Toruño, Tania Y; Ammar, El-Desouky; Kamoun, Sophien; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2009-01-01

    The fully sequenced genome of aster yellows phytoplasma strain witches' broom (AY-WB; Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris) was mined for the presence of genes encoding secreted proteins based on the presence of N-terminal signal peptides (SP). We identified 56 secreted AY-WB proteins (SAP). These SAP are candidate effector proteins potentially involved in interaction with plant and insect cell components. One of these SAP, SAP11, contains an N-terminal SP sequence and a eukaryotic bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). Transcripts for SAP11 were detected in AY-WB-infected plants. Yellow fluorescence protein (YFP)-tagged SAP11 accumulated in Nicotiana benthamiana cell nuclei, whereas the nuclear targeting of YFP-tagged SAP11 mutants with disrupted NLS was inhibited. The nuclear transport of YFP-SAP11 was also inhibited in N. benthamiana plants in which the expression of importin alpha was knocked down using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Furthermore, SAP11 was detected by immunocytology in nuclei of young sink tissues of China aster plants infected with AY-WB. In summary, this work shows that AY-WB phytoplasma produces a protein that targets the nuclei of plant host cells; this protein is a potential phytoplasma effector that may alter plant cell physiology.

  7. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  8. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  9. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  10. New insights in the interpretation of tryptophan fluorescence : origin of the fluorescence lifetime and characterization of a new fluorescence parameter in proteins: the emission to excitation ratio.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2007-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan fluorescence is still up to these days a quiz which is not completely solved. Fluorescence emission properties of tryptophan within proteins are in general considered as the result of fluorophore interaction within its environment. For example, a low fluorescence quantum yield is supposed to be the consequence of an important fluorophore-environment interaction. However, are we sure that the fluorophore has been excited upon light absorption? What if fluorophore excitation did not occur as the result of internal conformation specific to the fluorophore environment? Are we sure that all absorbed energy is used for the excitation process? Fluorescence lifetimes of Trp residues are considered to originate from rotamers or conformers resulting from the rotation of the indole ring within the peptide bonds. However, how can we explain the fact that in most of the proteins, the two lifetimes 0.5 and 3 ns, attributed to the conformers, are also observed for free tryptophan in solution? The present work, performed on free tryptophan and tyrosine in solution and on different proteins, shows that absorption and excitation spectra overlap but their intensities at the different excitation wavelengths are not necessarily equal. Also, we found that fluorescence emission intensities recorded at different excitation wavelengths depend on the intensities at these excitation wavelengths and not on the optical densities. Thus, excitation is not equal to absorption. In our interpretation of the data, we consider that absorbed photons are not necessary used only for the excitation, part of them are used to reorganize fluorophore molecules in a new state (excited structure) and another part is used for the excitation process. A new parameter that characterizes the ratio of the number of emitted photons over the real number of photons used to excite the fluorophore can be defined. We call this parameter, the emission to excitation ratio. Since our results were

  11. Human alpha-fetal protein immunoassay using fluorescence suppression with fluorescent-bead/antibody conjugate and enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junhyoung; Shin, Yong-Beom; Lee, JaeJong; Kim, Min-Gon

    2015-09-15

    The aim of the study was to develop a simple and rapid immunoassay using fluorescent microbeads and enzyme-substrate reactions to measure alpha-fetal protein (AFP) concentrations. We demonstrated the functionality of the fluorescent immunosensor using antibody-conjugated fluorescent latex beads (AB-FLBs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to catalyze a reaction, where the products would precipitate and suppress the fluorescence of AB-FLBs. First, the AB-FLBs were incubated with antigen, biotinylated antibodies (bABs), and streptavidin-HRP (SAv-HRP) to form a sandwich-type immunoreaction. The mixture was then filtered through a membrane to concentrate the beads on a small area. After washing to remove unbound bABs and SAv-HRP, a chromogenic HRP substrate and H2O2 were added to form precipitates on the FLB surface. The suppression of the fluorescence was measured with a fluorescent image analyzer system. Under optimized conditions, AFP could be measured at concentrations as low as 1 pg mL(-1) with a dynamic range up to 100 ng mL(-1).

  12. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  13. Quantification of factors influencing fluorescent protein expression using RMCE to generate an allelic series in the ROSA26 locus in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sara X.; Osipovich, Anna B.; Ustione, Alessandro; Potter, Leah A.; Hipkens, Susan; Gangula, Rama; Yuan, Weiping; Piston, David W.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have great utility in identifying specific cell populations and in studying cellular dynamics in the mouse. To quantify the factors that determine both the expression and relative brightness of FPs in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and in mice, we generated eight different FP-expressing ROSA26 alleles using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). These alleles enabled us to analyze the effects on FP expression of a translational enhancer and different 3′-intronic and/or polyadenylation sequences, as well as the relative brightness of five different FPs, without the confounding position and copy number effects that are typically associated with randomly inserted transgenes. We found that the expression of a given FP can vary threefold or more depending on the genetic features present in the allele. The optimal FP expression cassette contained both a translational enhancer sequence in the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) and an intron-containing rabbit β-globin sequence within the 3′-UTR. The relative expressed brightness of individual FPs varied up to tenfold. Of the five different monomeric FPs tested, Citrine (YFP) was the brightest, followed by Apple, eGFP, Cerulean (CFP) and Cherry. Generation of a line of Cherry-expressing mice showed that there was a 30-fold variation of Cherry expression among different tissues and that there was a punctate expression pattern within cells of all tissues examined. This study should help investigators make better-informed design choices when expressing FPs in mESCs and mice. PMID:21324933

  14. The Bright Fluorescent Protein mNeonGreen Facilitates Protein Expression Analysis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hostettler, Lola; Grundy, Laura; Käser-Pébernard, Stéphanie; Wicky, Chantal; Schafer, William R.; Glauser, Dominique A.

    2017-01-01

    The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) has been tremendously useful in investigating cell architecture, protein localization, and protein function. Recent developments in transgenesis and genome editing methods now enable working with fewer transgene copies and, consequently, with physiological expression levels. However, lower signal intensity might become a limiting factor. The recently developed mNeonGreen protein is a brighter alternative to GFP in vitro. The goal of the present study was to determine how mNeonGreen performs in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans—a model used extensively for fluorescence imaging in intact animals. We started with a side-by-side comparison between cytoplasmic forms of mNeonGreen and GFP expressed in the intestine, and in different neurons, of adult animals. While both proteins had similar photostability, mNeonGreen was systematically 3–5 times brighter than GFP. mNeonGreen was also used successfully to trace endogenous proteins, and label specific subcellular compartments such as the nucleus or the plasma membrane. To further demonstrate the utility of mNeonGreen, we tested transcriptional reporters for nine genes with unknown expression patterns. While mNeonGreen and GFP reporters gave overall similar expression patterns, low expression tissues were detected only with mNeonGreen. As a whole, our work establishes mNeonGreen as a brighter alternative to GFP for in vivo imaging in a multicellular organism. Furthermore, the present research illustrates the utility of mNeonGreen to tag proteins, mark subcellular regions, and describe new expression patterns, particularly in tissues with low expression. PMID:28108553

  15. Protein cyclization enhanced thermostability and exopeptidase-resistance of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhonglin; Ma, Xin; Li, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Ping, Shuzhen; Xu, Ming-Qun; Lin, Min

    2010-03-01

    A mutant of green fluorescent protein (GFPmut3*) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria was cyclized in vitro and in vivo by the use of a naturally split intein from the dnaE gene of Synechocystis species PCC6803 (Ssp). Cyclization of GFPmut3* was confirmed by amino acid sequencing and resulted in an increased electrophoretic mobility compared with the linear GFPmut3*. The circular GFPmut3* was 5 degrees C more thermostable than the linear form and significantly more resistant to proteolysis of exopeptidase. The circular GFPmut3* also displayed increased relative fluorescence intensity. In addition, chemical stability of GFPmut3* against GdnHCl revealed more stability of the circular form compared with the linear form.

  16. Development of Cysteine-Free Fluorescent Proteins for the Oxidative Environment

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Arai, Seisuke; Takeuchi, Mayumi; Sakurai, Chiye; Ebana, Hideaki; Higashi, Tsunehito; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Wada, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing fluorescent proteins has been widely used to highlight specific reactions or processes in various fields of the life sciences. Despite extensive improvements of the fluorescent tag, this technology is still limited in the study of molecular events in the extracellular milieu. This is partly due to the presence of cysteine in the fluorescent proteins. These proteins almost cotranslationally form disulfide bonded oligomers when expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although single molecule photobleaching analysis showed that these oligomers were not fluorescent, the fluorescent monomer form often showed aberrant behavior in folding and motion, particularly when fused to cysteine-containing cargo. Therefore we investigated whether it was possible to eliminate the cysteine without losing the brightness. By site-saturated mutagenesis, we found that the cysteine residues in fluorescent proteins could be replaced with specific alternatives while still retaining their brightness. cf(cysteine-free)SGFP2 showed significantly reduced restriction of free diffusion in the ER and marked improvement of maturation when fused to the prion protein. We further applied this approach to TagRFP family proteins and found a set of mutations that obtains the same level of brightness as the cysteine-containing proteins. The approach used in this study to generate new cysteine-free fluorescent tags should expand the application of molecular imaging to the extracellular milieu and facilitate its usage in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:22649538

  17. Development of cysteine-free fluorescent proteins for the oxidative environment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Arai, Seisuke; Takeuchi, Mayumi; Sakurai, Chiye; Ebana, Hideaki; Higashi, Tsunehito; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Wada, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing fluorescent proteins has been widely used to highlight specific reactions or processes in various fields of the life sciences. Despite extensive improvements of the fluorescent tag, this technology is still limited in the study of molecular events in the extracellular milieu. This is partly due to the presence of cysteine in the fluorescent proteins. These proteins almost cotranslationally form disulfide bonded oligomers when expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although single molecule photobleaching analysis showed that these oligomers were not fluorescent, the fluorescent monomer form often showed aberrant behavior in folding and motion, particularly when fused to cysteine-containing cargo. Therefore we investigated whether it was possible to eliminate the cysteine without losing the brightness. By site-saturated mutagenesis, we found that the cysteine residues in fluorescent proteins could be replaced with specific alternatives while still retaining their brightness. cf(cysteine-free)SGFP2 showed significantly reduced restriction of free diffusion in the ER and marked improvement of maturation when fused to the prion protein. We further applied this approach to TagRFP family proteins and found a set of mutations that obtains the same level of brightness as the cysteine-containing proteins. The approach used in this study to generate new cysteine-free fluorescent tags should expand the application of molecular imaging to the extracellular milieu and facilitate its usage in medicine and biotechnology.

  18. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling.

  19. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M.; Specht, Christian G.; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  20. Spatio-temporal imaging of EGF-induced activation of protein kinase A by FRET in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin Jun; Chen, Xiao-Chuan; Xing, Da

    2004-07-01

    Intracellular molecular interaction is important for the study of cell physiology, yet current relevant methods require fixation or microinjection and lack temporal or spatial resolution. We introduced a new method -- fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to detect molecular interaction in living cells. On the basis of FRET principle, A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR) protein was designed to consist of the fusions of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), a phosphoamino acid binding domain, a consensus substrate for protein kinase-A (PKA), and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In this study, the designed pAKAR plasmid was used to transfect a human lung cancer cell line (ASTC-a-1). When the AKAR-transfected cells were treated by forskolin (Fsk), we were able to observe the efficient transfer of energy from excited CFP to YFP within the AKAR molecule by fluorescence microcopy, whereas no FRET was detected in the transfected cells without the treatment of Fsk. When the cells were treated by Epidermal growth factor (EGF), the change of FRET was observed at different subcellular locations, reflecting PKA activation inside the cells upon EGF stimulation. The successful design of a fluorescence reporter of PKA activation and its application demonstrated the superiority of this technology in the research of intracellular protein-protein interaction.

  1. Structural basis for reversible photobleaching of a green fluorescent protein homologue

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Nathan; Ai, Hui-wang; Campbell, Robert E.; Remington, S. James

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) variants that can be reversibly converted between fluorescent and nonfluorescent states have proven to be a catalyst for innovation in the field of fluorescence microscopy. However, the structural basis of the process remains poorly understood. High-resolution structures of a FP derived from Clavularia in both the fluorescent and the light-induced nonfluorescent states reveal that the rapid and complete loss of fluorescence observed upon illumination with 450-nm light results from cis–trans isomerization of the chromophore. The photoinduced change in configuration from the well ordered cis isomer to the highly nonplanar and disordered trans isomer is accompanied by a dramatic rearrangement of internal side chains. Taken together, the structures provide an explanation for the loss of fluorescence upon illumination, the slow light-independent recovery, and the rapid light-induced recovery of fluorescence. The fundamental mechanism appears to be common to all of the photoactivatable and reversibly photoswitchable FPs reported to date. PMID:17420458

  2. Structural basis for reversible photobleaching of a green fluorescent protein homologue.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J Nathan; Ai, Hui-Wang; Campbell, Robert E; Remington, S James

    2007-04-17

    Fluorescent protein (FP) variants that can be reversibly converted between fluorescent and nonfluorescent states have proven to be a catalyst for innovation in the field of fluorescence microscopy. However, the structural basis of the process remains poorly understood. High-resolution structures of a FP derived from Clavularia in both the fluorescent and the light-induced nonfluorescent states reveal that the rapid and complete loss of fluorescence observed upon illumination with 450-nm light results from cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore. The photoinduced change in configuration from the well ordered cis isomer to the highly nonplanar and disordered trans isomer is accompanied by a dramatic rearrangement of internal side chains. Taken together, the structures provide an explanation for the loss of fluorescence upon illumination, the slow light-independent recovery, and the rapid light-induced recovery of fluorescence. The fundamental mechanism appears to be common to all of the photoactivatable and reversibly photoswitchable FPs reported to date.