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Sample records for fluorescent thermo-responsive biotin-pnipaam-co-ndapm

  1. Thermo-responsive and fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals grafted with polymer brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Weibing; Huang, Fang; Pan, Shaobo; ...

    2014-11-24

    Fluorescent and thermo-responsive cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with tuned polymer brushes were preparedviasurface initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization.

  2. Thermo-responsive and fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals grafted with polymer brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibing; Huang, Fang; Pan, Shaobo; Mu, Wei; Meng, Xianzhi; Yang, Haitao; Xu, Zhaoyang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Deng, Yulin

    2014-11-24

    Fluorescent and thermo-responsive cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with tuned polymer brushes were preparedviasurface initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization.

  3. Magnetic, fluorescent, and thermo-responsive poly(MMA-NIPAM-Tb(AA)3Phen)/Fe3O4 multifunctional nanospheres prepared by emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ying; Dai, Jingwen; Li, Huan; Wang, Xin; Xiong, Haoran; Zhang, Quanyuan; Li, Penghui; Yi, Changfeng; Xu, Zushun; Xu, Haibo; Chu, Paul K

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic, luminescent, and thermoresponsive multifunctional nanospheres composed of modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles as the core and rare earth complex Tb(AA)3Phen as the shell are synthesized by emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization. The core-shell spherical structure has a size between 140 and 220 nm and exhibits strong green fluorescence of the rare earth complex Tb(AA)3Phen. In the R2 relaxivity and in vivo MRI studies, the R2 relaxivity of the nanospheres is 562.56 mM(-1) s(-1) and enhanced T2-weighted images are observed from the nanospheres in the liver and spleen after injection as a contrast agent. The excellent superparamagnetic, thermosensitive, and fluorescent properties render the nanospheres useful in biomedical engineering and optical imaging.

  4. Magnetic, fluorescent, and thermo-responsive Fe(3)O(4)/rare earth incorporated poly(St-NIPAM) core-shell colloidal nanoparticles in multimodal optical/magnetic resonance imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haie; Tao, Juan; Wang, Wenhao; Zhou, Yingjie; Li, Penghui; Li, Zheng; Yan, Kai; Wu, Shuilin; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Xu, Zushun; Xu, Haibo; Chu, Paul K

    2013-03-01

    Multifunctional colloidal nanoparticles which exhibit fluorescence, superparamagnetism, and thermosensitivity are produced by two step seed emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization in the presence of oleic acid (OA) and sodium undecylenate (NaUA) modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. In the first step, St and NIPAM polymerize the NaUA on the surface of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles to form Fe(3)O(4)/poly(St-NIPAM) nanoparticles which act as seeds for the polymerization of Eu(AA)(3)Phen with the remaining St and NIPAM in the second step to form an outer fluorescent layer. The core-shell composite nanoparticles show reversible dimensional changes in response to external temperature stimuli. Fluorescence spectra acquired from the composites exhibit characteristic emission peaks of Eu(3+) at 594 and 619 nm and vivid red luminescence can be observed by 2-photon confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). In vitro cytotoxicity tests based on the MTT assay demonstrate good cytocompatibility and the composites also possess paramagnetic properties with a maximum saturation magnetization of 6.45 emu/g and high transverse relaxivity rates (r(2)) of 411.78 mM(-1) s(-1). In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies show significant liver and spleen contrast with relative signal intensity reduction of about 86% 10 min after intravenous injection of the composites. These intriguing properties suggest that these nanocarriers have large clinical potential as multimodal optical/MRI probes.

  5. Thermally tunable grating using thermo-responsive magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaibudeen, A. W.; Philip, John

    2017-04-01

    We report a thermally tunable grating prepared using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The array spacing is reversibly tuned by varying the temperature between 5 and 38 °C. Here, the ability of thermo-responsive polymer brushes to alter their conformation at an interface is exploited to control the grating spacing in nanoscale. The underlying mechanism for the temperature dependent conformational changes are studied by measuring the subtle intermolecular forces between the polymer covered interfaces. It is observed that the interparticle forces are repulsive and exponentially decaying with distance. The thermo-responsive grating is simple to use and offers a wide range of applications.

  6. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P

    2016-12-19

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control.

  7. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P.

    2016-01-01

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control. PMID:27991563

  8. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P.

    2016-12-01

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control.

  9. Facile fabrication, properties and application of novel thermo-responsive hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiaxing; Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Sheng, Ping; Wen, Weijia

    2011-07-01

    The authors report a novel thermo-responsive hydrogel design based on the thermally induced aggregation of two kinds of nonionic surfactants: triblock copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (EPE) and 4-octylphenol polyethoxylate (TX-100). In the preparation of the hydrogel, agarose is used to host the aqueous surfactant molecules, allowing them to move freely through its intrinsic network structure. To study it, EPE molecules are labeled with fluorescent Rhodamine B, and the aggregation phenomenon under various temperatures is imaged by fluorescence microscopy. In order to realize flexible control of the opaque/transparent transition temperature (OTTT), the surfactants' aggregation is modified by adding ionic surfactant or salts. The rate of the opaque/transparent transition and applications in the smart window and smart roof based on this kinds of hydrogel are also investigated.

  10. Harvesting pre-polarized macrophages using thermo-responsive substrates

    PubMed Central

    Malheiro, Vera; Elbs-Glatz, Yvonne; Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Bruinink, Arie

    2017-01-01

    In the cell culture environment macrophages are highly adherent cells. Currently used methods to harvest macrophages have the disadvantage of reducing cell viability and their ability to re-attach after seeding. Although thermo-responsive surfaces have been employed to harvest cell sheets no reports are available to use these to harvest (pre-polarized) macrophages. We show that this method significantly improves the yield of living macrophages and percentage of subsequent cell reattachment, whilst having a minimal effect on the cell phenotype. PMID:28195152

  11. Thermo-Responsive Polymers for Cell-based Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Hodari-Sadiki

    Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is a well-known thermo-responsive polymer that has be shown to be biocompatible, with surfaces coated with PNIPAAm supporting the culture of cells. These surfaces support the adhesion and proliferation of multiple cell phenotypes at 37 °C, when surface is hydrophobic, as the polymer chains are collapse and lose their affinity for water. Reducing the temperature below the polymers lower critical solution temperature (LCST) elicits hydration and swelling of the polymer chains and leads to cell detachment. In vitro culture on thermo-responsive surfaces can be used to produce cell sheets for the use of different therapeutic treatments. PNIPAAm coated membranes were used to culture human keratinocyte cells to confluence, with cell release possible after exposing the membranes to room temperature (˜25 °C) for 10 minutes. Cell sheet transfer was possible from the coated membrane to cell culture dishes using a protocol that we developed. There was also a trend towards similar cell apoptosis on both PNIPAAm coated and uncoated surfaces.

  12. A thermo-responsive protein treatment for dry eyes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Jashnani, Aarti; Aluri, Suhaas R.; Gustafson, Joshua A.; Hsueh, Pang-Yu; Yarber, Frances; McKown, Robert L.; Laurie, Gordon W.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; MacKay, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Millions of Americans suffer from dry eye disease, and there are few effective therapies capable of treating these patients. A decade ago, an abundant protein component of human tears was discovered and named lacritin(Lacrt). Lacrt has prosecretory activity in the lacrimal gland and mitogenic activity at the corneal epithelium. Similar to other proteins placed on the ocular surface, the durability of its effect is limited by rapid tear turnover. Motivated by the rationale that a thermo-responsive coacervate containing Lacrt would have better retention upon administration, we have constructed and tested the activity of a thermo-responsive Lacrt fused to an Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). Inspired from the human tropoelastin protein, ELP protein polymers reversibly phase separate into viscous coacervates above a tunable transition temperature. This fusion construct exhibited the prosecretory function of native Lacrt as illustrated by its ability to stimulate β-hexosaminidase secretion from primary rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells. It also increased tear secretion from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of autoimmune dacryoadenitis, when administered via intra-lacrimal injection. Lacrt ELP fusion proteins undergo temperature-mediated assembly to form a depot inside the lacrimal gland. We propose that these Lacrt ELP fusion proteins represent a potential therapy for dry eye disease and the strategy of ELP-mediated phase separation may have applicability to other diseases of the ocular surface. PMID:25481446

  13. Thermo-responsive hydrogels for intravitreal injection and biomolecule release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapala, Pawel

    In this dissertation, we develop an injectable polymer system to enable localized and prolonged release of therapeutic biomolecules for improved treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Thermo-responsive hydrogels derived from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) poly(L-Lactic acid) (PLLA) copolymer were synthesized via free-radical polymerization. These materials were investigated for (a) phase change behavior, (b) in-vitro degradation, (c) capacity for controlled drug delivery, and (d) biocompatibility. The volume-phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the PNIPAAm- co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels was adjusted using hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties so that it is ca. 33°C. These hydrogels did not initially show evidence of degradation at 37°C due to physical cross-links of collapsed PNIPAAm. Only after addition of glutathione chain transfer agents (CTA)s to the precursor did the collapsed hydrogels become fully soluble at 37°C. CTAs significantly affected the release kinetics of biomolecules; addition of 1.0 mg/mL glutathione to 3 mM cross-linker accelerated hydrogel degradation, resulting in 100% release in less than 2 days. This work also explored the effect of PEGylation in order to tether biomolecules to the polymer matrix. It was demonstrated that non-site-specific PEGylation can postpone the burst release of solutes (up to 10 days in hydrogels with 0.5 mg/mL glutathione). Cell viability assays showed that at least two 20-minute buffer extraction steps were needed to remove cytotoxic elements from the hydrogels. Clinically-used therapeutic biomolecules LucentisRTM and AvastinRTM were demonstrated to be both stable and bioactive after release form PNIPAAm-co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels. The thermo-responsive hydrogels presented here offer a promising platform for the localized delivery of proteins such as recombinant antibodies.

  14. Novel calcium-alginate capsules with aqueous core and thermo-responsive membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Yun; Jin, Yao; Xie, Rui; Liu, Jie-Yi; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Meng, Tao; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2011-01-01

    Novel calcium-alginate (Ca-alginate) capsules with aqueous core and thermo-responsive membrane are successfully prepared by introducing a co-extrusion minifluidic approach, and the thermo-responsive gating characteristics of Ca-alginate capsule membranes embedded with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microspheres are investigated systematically. The experimental results show that the prepared Ca-alginate capsules are highly monodisperse, and the average diameter and membrane thickness of Ca-alginate capsules are about 2.96 mm and 0.11 mm respectively. The Ca-alginate capsule membranes exhibit desired thermo-responsive gating property. With increasing the content of PNIPAM microspheres embedded in the Ca-alginate capsule membranes, the thermo-responsive gating coefficient of the capsule membranes increases simply. When solute molecules diffuse through the capsule membrane, the thermo-responsive gating coefficient is significantly affected by the molecular weight of solute molecules.

  15. Artificial phototropism based on a photo-thermo-responsive hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishna, Hamsini

    Solar energy is leading in renewable energy sources and the aspects surrounding the efforts to harvest light are gaining importance. One such aspect is increasing the light absorption, where heliotropism comes into play. Heliotropism, the ability to track the sun across the sky, can be integrated with solar cells for more efficient photon collection and other optoelectronic systems. Inspired by plants, which optimize incident sunlight in nature, several researchers have made artificial heliotropic and phototropic systems. This project aims to design, synthesize and characterize a material system and evaluate its application in a phototropic system. A gold nanoparticle (Au NP) incorporated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogel was synthesized as a photo-thermo-responsive material in our phototropic system. The Au NPs generate heat from the incident via plasmonic resonance to induce a volume phase change of the thermo-responsive hydrogel PNIPAAm. PNIPAAm shrinks or swells at temperature above or below 32°C. Upon irradiation, the Au NP-PNIPAAm micropillar actuates, specifically bending toward the incident light and precisely following the varying incident angle. Swelling ratio tests, bending angle tests with a static incident light and bending tests with varying angles were carried out on hydrogel samples with varying Au NP concentrations. Swelling ratios ranging from 1.45 to 2.9 were recorded for pure hydrogel samples and samples with very low Au NP concentrations. Swelling ratios of 2.41 and 3.37 were calculated for samples with low and high concentrations of Au NPs, respectively. A bending of up to 88° was observed in Au NP-hydrogel pillars with a low Au NP concentration with a 90° incident angle. The light tracking performance was assessed by the slope of the pillar Bending angle (response angle) vs. Incident light angle plot. A slope of 1 indicates ideal tracking with top of the pillar being normal to the incident light, maximizing the photon

  16. Autonomously-triggered microfluidic cooling using thermo-responsive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Abhishek K; Dong, Liang; Beebe, David J; Jiang, Hongrui

    2007-03-01

    We present autonomously-triggered on-chip microfluidic cooling devices that utilize thermo-responsive hydrogels to adapt to local environmental temperatures. An external rotating magnetic stirrer couples with an in situ fabricated nickel impeller in these centrifugal-based microfluidic cooling devices to recirculate cooler water. Temperature-responsive hydrogels, which exhibit volumetric expansion and contraction, are integrated at the axle of the impeller. In this design, the hydrogels behave similar to an automotive clutch, to autonomously control the impeller's rotation as a function of the local environmental temperature. Therefore, the hydrogels act as both sensors and actuators and help take away the necessity for additional temperature sensing, feedback, and/or control units here. Cooling devices capable of on-chip thermal management at multiple predetermined onset operation points are realized by changes to the composition of hydrogel to alter its lowest critical solution temperature (LCST). Furthermore, the effect of magnetic stirrer frequency on the fluid cooling and flowrates for different two-blade nickel impeller designs are presented.

  17. Water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes: synthesis and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Saban; Stetsyshyn, Yurij; Lobaz, Volodymyr; Harhay, Khrystyna; Ohar, Halyna; Çulha, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were prepared in a simple two-step process, where on the first step oligoperoxide was grafted via the interaction of amino groups (defects) of BNNTs with pyromellitic chloroanhydride fragments in oligoperoxide molecules. The second step involves N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) graft polymerization ‘from the surface’ of oligoperoxide-functionalized BNNTs resulting in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) coating. The pristine and functionalized BNNTs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs exhibit excellent dispersibility in water and possess thermo-responsive properties. The water-dispersion of thermo-responsive PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs can help their potential use in biomedical applications as ‘smart’ surfaces, nanotransducers and nanocarriers.

  18. Water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes: synthesis and properties.

    PubMed

    Kalay, Saban; Stetsyshyn, Yurij; Lobaz, Volodymyr; Harhay, Khrystyna; Ohar, Halyna; Çulha, Mustafa

    2016-01-22

    In this study, water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were prepared in a simple two-step process, where on the first step oligoperoxide was grafted via the interaction of amino groups (defects) of BNNTs with pyromellitic chloroanhydride fragments in oligoperoxide molecules. The second step involves N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) graft polymerization 'from the surface' of oligoperoxide-functionalized BNNTs resulting in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) coating. The pristine and functionalized BNNTs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs exhibit excellent dispersibility in water and possess thermo-responsive properties. The water-dispersion of thermo-responsive PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs can help their potential use in biomedical applications as 'smart' surfaces, nanotransducers and nanocarriers.

  19. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  20. A thermo-responsive supramolecular organogel: dual luminescence properties and luminescence conversion induced by Cd(2+).

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinxian; Zhang, Jinjin; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2014-12-14

    A simple dual luminescent acylhydrazone-functionalized benzimidazole derivative (L) was blended with ethylene glycol affording a thermo-responsive green-light-emitting supramolecular gel (G-gel). This G-gel can convert to a blue-light-emitting gel (B-gel) by strongly increasing the luminescence of the benzimidazole moiety upon addition of one equivalent of Cd(2+).

  1. Hydrophilic magnetic nanoclusters with thermo-responsive properties and their drug controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerod, Siraprapa; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2015-10-01

    Synthesis and drug controlled release properties of thermo-responsive magnetic nanoclusters grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm)) and poly(NIPAAm-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PEGMA) copolymers were described. These magnetic nanoclusters were synthesized via an in situ radical polymerization in the presence of acrylamide-grafted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Poly(NIPAAm) provided thermo-responsive properties, while PEGMA played a role in good water dispersibility to the nanoclusters. The ratios of PEGMA to NIPAAm in the (co)polymerization in the presence of the MNPs were fine-tuned such that the nanoclusters with good water dispersibility, good magnetic sensitivity and thermo responsiveness were obtained. The size of the nanoclusters was in the range of 50-100 nm in diameter with about 100-200 particles/cluster. The nanoclusters were well dispersible in water at room temperature and can be suddenly agglomerated when temperature was increased beyond the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (32 °C). The release behavior of an indomethacin model drug from the nanoclusters was also investigated. These novel magnetic nanoclusters with good dispersibility in water and reversible thermo-responsive properties might be good candidates for the targeting drug controlled release applications.

  2. Rheological properties of a biological thermo-responsive hydrogel produced from soybean oil polymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rheological properties of a newly developed biological thermo-hydrogel made from vegetable oil were investigated. The material named HPSO-HG is a hydrolytic product of polymerized soybean oil (PSO). HPSO-HG is a thermo-responsive gel, and it exhibited viscoelastic behavior above 2% (wt.%) at roo...

  3. Study on properties and testing methods of thermo-responsive cementing system for well cementing in heavy oil thermal recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, thermo-responsive cement slurry system were being developed, the properties of conventional cement slurry, compressive strength high temperature of cement sheath, mechanical properties of cement sheath and thermal properties of cement sheath were being tested. Results were being used and simulated by Well-Life Software, Thermo-responsive cement slurry system can meet the requirements of heavy oil thermal recovery production. Mechanical and thermal properties of thermo-responsive cement sheath were being tested. Tensile fracture energy of the thermo-responsive cement sheath is larger than conventional cement. The heat absorption capacity of conventional cement sheath is larger than that of thermo-responsive cement sheath, this means more heat is needed for the unit mass once increasing 1.0 °C, which also indicates that thermo-responsive cement own good heat insulating and preservation effects. The heat conductivity coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of thermo-responsive cement is less than and conventional cement, this means that thermo-responsive cement have good heat preservation and insulation effects with good thermal expansion stabilities.

  4. High-capacity thermo-responsive magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for selective extraction of curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    You, Qingping; Zhang, Yuping; Zhang, Qingwen; Guo, Junfang; Huang, Weihua; Shi, Shuyun; Chen, Xiaoqin

    2014-08-08

    Thermo-responsive magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (TMMIPs) for selective recognition of curcuminoids with high capacity and selectivity have firstly been developed. The resulting TMMIPs were characterized by TEM, FT-IR, TGA, VSM and UV, which indicated that TMMIPs showed thermo-responsiveness [lower critical solution temperature (LCST) at 33.71°C] and rapid magnetic separation (5s). The polymerization, adsorption and release conditions were optimized in detail to obtain the highest binding capacity, selectivity and release ratio. We found that the adopted thermo-responsive monomer [N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm)] could be considered not only as inert polymer backbone for thermo-responsiveness but also as functional co-monomers combination with basic monomer (4-VP) for more specific binding sites when ethanol was added in binding solution. The maximum adsorption capacity with highest selectivity of curcumin was 440.3μg/g (1.93 times that on MMIPs with no thermosensitivity) at 45°C (above LCST) in 20% (v/v) ethanol solution on shrunk TMMIPs, and the maximum release proportion was about 98% at 20°C (below LCST) in methanol-acetic acid (9/1, v/v) solution on swelled TMMIPs. The adsorption process between curcumin and TMMIPs followed Langumuir adsorption isotherm and pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The prepared TMMIPs also showed high reproducibility (RSD<6% for batch-to-batch evaluation) and stability (only 7% decrease after five cycles). Subsequently, the TMMIPs were successfully applied for selective extraction of curcuminoids from complex natural product, Curcuma longa.

  5. Excimer laser micropatterning of freestanding thermo-responsive hydrogel layers for cells-on-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaniello, Tommaso; Martello, Federico; Tocchio, Alessandro; Gassa, Federico; Webb, Patrick; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    We report a novel reliable and repeatable technologic manufacturing protocol for the realization of micro-patterned freestanding hydrogel layers based on thermo-responsive poly-(N-isopropyl)acrylamide (PNIPAAm), which have potential to be employed as temperature-triggered smart surfaces for cells-on-chip applications. PNIPAAm-based films with controlled mechanical properties and different thicknesses (100-300 µm thickness) were prepared by injection compression moulding at room temperature. A 9 × 9 array of 20 µm diameter through-holes is machined by means of the KrF excimer laser on dry PNIPAAm films which are physically attached to flat polyvinyl chloride (PVC) substrates. Machining parameters, such as fluence and number of shots, are optimized in order to achieve highly resolved features. Micro-structured freestanding films are then easily obtained after hydrogels are detached from PVC by gradually promoting the film swelling in ethanol. In the PNIPAAm water-swollen state, the machined holes’ diameter approaches a slight larger value (30 µm) according to the measured hydrogel swelling ratio. Thermo-responsive behaviour and through-hole tapering characterization are carried out by metrology measurements using an optical inverted and confocal microscope setup, respectively. After the temperature of freestanding films is raised above 32 °C, we observe that the shrinkage of the whole through-hole array occurs, thus reducing the holes’ diameter to less than a half its original size (about 15 µm) as a consequence of the film dehydration. Different holes’ diameters (10 and 30 µm) are also obtained on dry hydrogel employing suitable projection masks, showing similar shrinking behaviour when hydrated and undergone thermo-response tests. Thermo-responsive PNIPAAm-based freestanding layers could then be integrated with other suitable micro-fabricated thermoplastic components in order to preliminary test their feasibility in operating as temperature

  6. Thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogels as temporary substrate for cell sheet biofabrication.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Lina; Cochis, Andrea; Carletta, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; Farè, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Methylcellulose (MC), a water-soluble polymer derived from cellulose, was investigated as a possible temporary substrate having thermo-responsive properties favorable for cell culturing. MC-based hydrogels were prepared by a dispersion technique, mixing MC powder (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 % w/v) with selected salts (sodium sulphate, Na2SO4), sodium phosphate, calcium chloride, or phosphate buffered saline, to evaluate the influence of different compositions on the thermo-responsive behavior. The inversion test was used to determine the gelation temperatures of the different hydrogel compositions; thermo-mechanical properties and thermo-reversibility of the MC hydrogels were investigated by rheological analysis. Gelation temperatures and rheological behavior depended on the MC concentration and type and concentration of salt used in hydrogel preparation. In vitro cytotoxicity tests, performed using L929 mouse fibroblasts, showed no toxic release from all the tested hydrogels. Among the investigated compositions, the hydrogel composed of 8 % w/v MC with 0.05 M Na2SO4 had a thermo-reversibility temperature at 37 °C. For that reason, this formulation was thus considered to verify the possibility of inducing in vitro spontaneous detachment of cells previously seeded on the hydrogel surface. A continuous cell layer (cell sheet) was allowed to grow and then detached from the hydrogel surface without the use of enzymes, thanks to the thermo-responsive behavior of the MC hydrogel. Immunofluorescence observation confirmed that the detached cell sheet was composed of closely interacting cells.

  7. Thermo-responsive hollow silica microgels with controlled drug release properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Zhu, Changling; Xu, Jun; Xin, Yan; Yang, Tingting; Li, Jing; Shi, Lei; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2013-11-01

    Thermo-responsive hollow silica microgels (THSMGs) consisting of a hollow core, an intermediate silica supporting layer and a smart polymer gel corona were fabricated via organic-inorganic hybridization. Hollow silica particles and PNIPAAm microgels were successfully combined by utilizing the cross-linking reaction between 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA) and silanol groups on the silica surface, and then the copolymerization of TMSPMA and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The morphology and chemical composition were systematically examined by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurement. The thermo-responsive phase transition behavior was investigated by the determination of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), and particle size measurement using dynamic light scattering. THSMGs remain porous even after the coverage of PNIPAAm gels, and also have obvious hydrophilic/hydrophobic transition property and good swelling/collapse capability in spite of the rigid silica layer. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation and Rhodamine B (RHB) release study demonstrated that THSMGs have good biocompatibility, and achieve a thermo-responsive controlled-release behavior. The prepared THSMGs show considerable potential for applications as targeted and ambient temperature responsive drug delivery system.

  8. Dynamic and biocompatible thermo-responsive magnetic hydrogels that respond to an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Federica; Moore, Thomas L.; Mortato, Mariangela; Geers, Christoph; Haeni, Laetitia; Hirt, Ann M.; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic thermo-responsive hydrogels are a new class of materials that have recently attracted interest in biomedicine due to their ability to change phase upon magnetic stimulation. They have been used for drug release, magnetic hyperthermia treatment, and can potentially be engineered as stimuli-responsive substrates for cell mechanobiology. In this regard, we propose a series of magnetic thermo-responsive nanocomposite substrates that undergo cyclical swelling and de-swelling phases when actuated by an alternating magnetic field in aqueous environment. The synthetized substrates are obtained with a facile and reproducible method from poly-N-isopropylacrylamide and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Their conformation and the temperature-related, magnetic, and biological behaviors were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, swelling ratio analysis, vibrating sample magnetometry, alternating magnetic field stimulation and indirect viability assays. The nanocomposites showed no cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells, and exhibited swelling/de-swelling behavior near physiological temperatures (around 34 °C). Therefore these magnetic thermo-responsive hydrogels are promising materials as stimuli-responsive substrates allowing the study of cell-behavior by changing the hydrogel properties in situ.

  9. Thermo-responsive polymeric nanoparticles for enhancing neuronal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye In; Cho, Ann-Na; Jang, Jiho; Kim, Dong-Wook; Cho, Seung-Woo; Chung, Bong Geun

    2015-10-01

    We report thermo-responsive retinoic acid (RA)-loaded poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylamide (PNIPAM-co-Am) nanoparticles for directing human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) fate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance analysis confirmed that RA was efficiently incorporated into PNIAPM-co-Am nanoparticles (PCANs). The size of PCANs dropped with increasing temperatures (300-400 nm at room temperature, 80-90 nm at 37°C) due to its phase transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. Due to particle shrinkage caused by this thermo-responsive property of PCANs, RA could be released from nanoparticles in the cells upon cellular uptake. Immunocytochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that neuronal differentiation of hiPSC-derived neuronal precursors was enhanced after treatment with 1-2 μg/ml RA-loaded PCANs. Therefore, we propose that this PCAN could be a potentially powerful carrier for effective RA delivery to direct hiPSC fate to neuronal lineage. The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been at the forefront of research in the field of regenerative medicine, as these cells have the potential to differentiate into various terminal cell types. In this article, the authors utilized a thermo-responsive polymer, Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), as a delivery platform for retinoic acid. It was shown that neuronal differentiation could be enhanced in hiPSC-derived neuronal precursor cells. This method may pave a way for future treatment of neuronal diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of thermo responsive magnetic nano-particles for high- Tc SQUID bio application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Toriyabe, C.; Torii, Y.; Hatsukade, Y.; Eki, T.; Katsura, S.; Ohnishi, N.; Wan, J.; Yang, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    Immunoassay or detection of biological molecules using a high sensitive SQUID and magnetic nano-particles as labeling has been recently proposed. In this method, mostly a few particles are labeled on an antibody or biological molecules. If it is possible to give much more magnetic particles to the antibody, sensitivity must notably increase. We propose the use of thermo responsive magnetic nano-particles, which can agglutinate and disperse by themselves associated with temperature. As a preliminary experiment, we investigated the properties of thermo responsive nano-particles made of Fe3O4. By detailed study on the particles using an analyzer for a distribution of particle's outer dimension in aqueous liquid, it was found that the dimension increased with temperature above 25°, and became 400 nm at 30.5°. Magnetic measurements of the particles at different conditions using high-Tc SQUID have been done. The results suggested that the particles must be dried by heat before magnetic measurement to enhance the signal from the particles.

  11. Tunable thermo-responsive hydrogels: synthesis, structural analysis and drug release studies.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giuseppe; Spataro, Tania; Curcio, Manuela; Spizzirri, U Gianfranco; Nicoletta, Fiore Pasquale; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2015-03-01

    Thermo-responsive hydrogel films, synthesized by UV-initiated radical polymerization, are proposed as delivery devices for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Diclofenac sodium and Naproxen). N-isopropylacrylamide and N,N'-ethylenebisacrylamide were chosen as thermo-sensitive monomer and crosslinker, respectively. Infrared spectroscopy was used to assess the incorporation of monomers into the network, and the network density of hydrogel films was found to strictly depend on both feed composition and film thickness. Calorimetric analyses showed negative thermo-responsive behaviour with shrinking/swelling transition values in the range 32.8-36.1°C. Equilibrium swelling studies around the LCST allowed the correlation between the structural changes and the temperature variations. The mesh size, indeed, rapidly changed from a collapsed to a swollen state, with beneficial effects in applications such as size-selective permeation or controlled drug delivery, while the crosslinking degree, the film thickness, and the loading method deeply influenced the drug release profiles at 25 and 40°C. The analysis of both 3D-network structure, release kinetics and diffusional constraints at different temperatures was evaluated by mathematical modelling.

  12. The microbial transglutaminase immobilization on carboxylated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for thermo-responsivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian Qin; He, Ting; Wang, Jian Wen

    2016-06-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (mTG) is widely utilized in the PEGylation of pharmaceutical proteins. mTG immobilization can be achieved via covalent bonding on solid supports. However, the catalytic efficiency of mTG immobilized on solid supports was significantly reduced by mass transfer limitation. To overcome this limitation, mTG was covalently immobilized on the thermo-responsive carboxylated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM). The pNIPAM-mTG conjugate exhibited reversibly solubility in aqueous solution with a low critical solution temperature (LCST) at 39°C, i.e., it was insoluble above 39°C and soluble below 39°C. The pH dependence of the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate was similar with that of the native mTG. Upon conjugation to pNIPAM, the optimal temperature of mTG shifted down from 50-55°C to 40-45°C, and the thermal stability of the conjugate was elevated. The easy separation of the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate with its substrate and the catalytic efficiency of the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate were demonstrated by employing the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate to cross-link bovine serum albumin (BSA) and catalyze PEGylation of therapeutic protein, cytochrome c (Cyt C), respectively. The thermo-responsive mTG is suitable to modify proteins in food processing and biomedical engineering.

  13. Thermo-responsive non-woven scaffolds for "smart" 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, Claire L; Chetty, Avashnee; Moolman, Francis Sean; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Hoppe, Heinrich; Mancama, Dalu T

    2012-08-01

    The thermo-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has received widespread attention for its in vitro application in the non-invasive, non-destructive release of adherent cells on two dimensional surfaces. In this study, 3D non-woven scaffolds fabricated from poly(propylene) (PP), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and nylon that had been grafted with PNIPAAm were tested for their ability to support the proliferation and subsequent thermal release of HC04 and HepG2 hepatocytes. Hepatocyte viability and proliferation were estimated using the Alamar Blue assay and Hoechst 33258 total DNA quantification. The assays revealed that the pure and grafted non-woven scaffolds maintained the hepatocytes within the matrix and promoted 3D proliferation comparable to that of the commercially available Algimatrix™ alginate scaffold. Albumin production and selected cytochrome P450 genes expression was found to be superior in cells growing on pure and grafted non-woven PP scaffolds as compared to cells grown as a 2D monolayer. Two scaffolds, namely, PP-g-PNIPAAm-A and PP-g-PNIPAAm-B were identified as having far superior thermal release capabilities; releasing the majority of the cells from the matrices within 2 h. This is the first report for the development of 3D non-woven, thermo-responsive scaffolds able to release cells from the matrix without the use of any enzymatic assistance or scaffold degradation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Composite of magnetic drug carriers with thermo-responsive polymer for controlled drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes organic/inorganic composite nanoparticles (CNPs) with a thermal response for biomedical applications. The composite nanoparticles are composed of a thermo-responsive polymer shell of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and a magnetic FeOx/silica core that exhibits a heat-generation capability against alternating magnetic fields. The heat-generation capability of the FeOx core was improved by modifying the synthesis process of the NPs to oxidize nonmagnetic FeO to magnetic Fe3O4. The HPC shell is observed by transmission electron microscopy after coating FeOx/silica NPs with HPC; the coating is confirmed by the increase of the hydrodynamic size of NPs and the weight loss with thermogravimetry. The FeOx/silica/HPC composite NPs exhibit a thermal response, which is confirmed by the temperature-dependent hydrodynamic size of the NPs. These results indicate that the thermo-responsive FeOx/silica/HPC composite particles have a potential as a drug carrier with a capability of controlled release.

  15. Thermo-responsive polymer brush-grafted porous polystyrene beads for all-aqueous chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Aya; Nagase, Kenichi; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kanazawa, Hideko; Akiyama, Yoshikatsu; Kobayashi, Jun; Annaka, Masahiko; Okano, Teruo

    2010-01-22

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) brush-grafted porous polystyrene beads with variable grafted polymer densities were prepared using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for applications in thermo-responsive chromatography. Utilization of these grafted beads as a stationary phase in aqueous chromatographic analysis of insulin provides a graft density-dependent analyte retention behavior. The separations calibration curve on PIPAAm-grafted polystyrene was obtained using pullulan standards and exhibited inflection points attributed to analyte diffusion into bead pores and partitioning into grafted PIPAAm brush surfaces. Presence of these inflection points supports a separation mechanism where insulin penetrates pores in polystyrene beads and hydrophobically interacts with PIPAAm brushes grafted within the pores. Control of PIPAAm brush graft density on polystyrene facilitates effective aqueous phase separation of peptides based on thermally modulated hydrophobic interactions with grafted PIPAAm within stationary phase pores. These results indicated that PIPAAm brush-grafted porous polystyrene beads prepared by surface-initiated ATRP was effective stationary phase of thermo-responsive chromatography for aqueous phase peptide separations. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isocyanate crosslinked reactive starch nanoparticles for thermo-responsive conducting applications.

    PubMed

    Valodkar, Mayur; Thakore, Sonal

    2010-11-02

    Hydrophobic nanoparticles and nanocomposite films of 1,4-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI)-modified starch nanoparticles (SNPs) have been synthesized at ambient temperatures. The platelet-like starch nanocrystals become pseudospherical after modification with HMDI and the size increases or decreases depending on diisocyanate concentration compared to the ungrafted particles as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. The obtained nanocrystals were characterized by means of the FT-IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. When compared with the hydrophobic performance of the unmodified starch nanocrystals, that of crosslinked starch nanocrystals significantly increased. X-ray diffraction reveals that the crystalline structure of modified starch nanocrystals was preserved. The resulting hydrophobic starch nanoparticles are versatile precursors to the development of nanocomposites. The polyether-polyurethane crosslinked with SNPs nanocomposite film exhibited thermo-responsive electrical conductivity.

  17. Preparation of thermo-responsive superhydrophobic TiO2/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Pan, Shuaijun; Xiong, Yuzi; Peng, Chang; Pang, Xiangzhong; Li, Ling; Xiong, Yuanqin; Xu, Weijian

    2012-10-01

    Here we reported a facile method that combined sol-gel and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to prepare thermo-responsive superhydrophobic TiO2/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microspheres with core-shell structure. The surface coated with microspheres show hydrophilic properties (CA = 90.5 ± 2.3°) at 27 °C, it changes to superhydrophobicity (CA = 150.2 ± 2.3°) while the temperature rises up to 42 °C. This performance is attributed to lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phenomenon of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide). Five cycle measurements of water droplet reversible switch between hydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity were demonstrated temperature-responsive surface property. The changes were rapid and significant. The as-prepared particles have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, FT-IR analysis, and dynamic light scattering.

  18. Preparation of Thermo-Responsive and Cross-Linked Fluorinated Nanoparticles via RAFT-Mediated Aqueous Polymerization in Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiachen; Zhang, Luqing; Geng, Bing; Azhar, Umair; Xu, Anhou; Zhang, Shuxiang

    2017-01-25

    In this work, a thermo-responsive and cross-linked fluoropolymer poly(2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl) methacrylate (PTFEMA) was successfully prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) mediated aqueous polymerization with a thermo-responsive diblock poly(dimethylacrylamide-b-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PDMA-b-PNIPAM) that performed a dual function as both a nanoreactor and macro-RAFT agent. The cross-linked polymer particles proved to be in a spherical-like structure of about 50 nm in diameter and with a relatively narrow particle size distribution. ¹H-NMR and (19)F-NMR spectra showed that thermo-responsive diblock P(DMA-b-NIPAM) and cross-linked PTFEMA particles were successfully synthesized. Influence of the amount of ammonium persulfate (APS), the molar ratio of monomers to RAFT agent, influence of the amount of cross-linker on aqueous polymerization and thermo-responsive characterization of the particles are investigated. Monomer conversion increased from 44% to 94% with increasing the molar ratio of APS and P(DMA-b-NIPAM) from 1:9 to1:3. As the reaction proceeded, the particle size increased from 29 to 49 nm due to the consumption of TFEMA monomer. The size of cross-linked nanoparticles sharply decreased from 50.3 to 40.5 nm over the temperature range 14-44 °C, suggesting good temperature sensitivity for these nanoparticles.

  19. Fabrication of thermo-responsive cotton fabrics using poly(vinyl caprolactam-co-hydroxyethyl acrylamide) copolymer.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Min; González, Edurne; Monterroza, Alexis Martell; Frey, Margaret

    2017-10-15

    A thermo-responsive polymer with hydrophilic to hydrophobic transition behavior, poly(vinyl caprolactam-co-hydroxyethyl acrylamide) P(VCL-co-HEAA), was prepared by copolymerization of vinyl caprolactam and N-hydroxyethyl acrylamide via free radical solution polymerization. The resulting copolymer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of P(VCL-co-HEAA) was determined at 34.5°C. This thermo-responsive polymer was then grafted onto cotton fabrics using 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) as crosslinker and sodium hypophosphite (SHP) as catalyst. FTIR and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) studies confirmed the successful grafting reaction. The modified cotton fabric exhibited thermo-responsive behavior as evidenced by water vapor permeability measurement confirming decreased permeability at elevated temperature. This is the first demonstration that a PVCL based copolymer is grafted to cotton fabrics. This study provides a new thermo-responsive polymer for fabrication of smart cotton fabrics with thermally switchable hydrophilicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues. PMID:27381562

  1. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-07-06

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues.

  2. Thermo-responsive and compression properties of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber-modified PNIPAm hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinguang; Chen, Yufei; Liu, Hongzhi; Du, Chungui; Yu, Huilong; Zhou, Zhongxi

    2016-08-20

    In this study, TEMPO-oxidized bamboo cellulose nanofibers (TO-CNF) with anionic carboxylate groups on the surfaces were in-situ incorporated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) matrix to improve its thermo-responsive and mechanical properties during the polymerization. The microstructure, swelling behaviors, and compressive strength of resultant PNIPAm composite hydrogels with varying contents of TO-CNFs (0-10wt%) were then examined, respectively. Modified hydrogels exhibited the similar light transparency to pure PNIPAm one due to the formation of semi-IPN structure between PNIPAm and TO-CNF. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the presence of TO-CNF did not alter the position of characteristic peaks associated with PNIPAm. SEM observation suggested that the pore size of PNIPAm hydrogels was markedly increased after the incorporation of TO-CNF. Also, the composite hydrogels showed superior swelling behavior and much improved compression properties with respect to pure PNIPAm one. Thus, TO-CNF appeared to be a "green" nanofiller that can simultaneously improve swelling and mechanical properties of PNIPAm hydrogel.

  3. Thermo-responsive cross-linked liquid crystal bowl-shaped colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Xia, Yu; Yang, Shu; Yodh, A. G.

    In this work we create and investigate cross-linked bowl-shaped nematic liquid crystal (NLC) colloidal particles. Janus colloids are first formed via solvent-induced phase separation in emulsions consisting of NLC monomers and isotropic polymers. This scheme enables us to realize different particle morphologies such as bowl-shape by fine-tuning the confinement of NLCs within the droplets, e.g. by varying the size of droplets, the volume ratio between NLC and polymer, and the type/concentration of surfactants in aqueous background phase. The NLC compartment is composed of RM82 (1,4-Bis-[4-(6-acryloyloxyhexyloxy)benzoyloxy]-2-methylbenzene) monomers, which are then photocrosslinked by dithiol groups to form nematic liquid crystal elastomer. Finally, we remove the polymer parts of Janus colloids to obtain the target structures, which are temperature sensitive due to change of elasticity and molecular alignment of NLC near the isotropic to nematic phase transition temperature. We will explore novel mechanical and optical properties from the thermo-responsive structures as well as their applications, such as biomimic swimming behaviors and adjustable lensing effects. This work is supported by the foundation through NSF Grant DMR12-05463, NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR11-20901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  4. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues.

  5. Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals grafted with thermo-responsive polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Zoppe, Justin O; Venditti, Richard A; Rojas, Orlando J

    2012-03-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) from ramie fibers are studied as stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions. The phase behavior of heptane and water systems is studied, and emulsions stabilized by CNCs are analyzed by using drop sizing (light scattering) and optical, scanning, and freeze-fracture electron microscopies. Water-continuous Pickering emulsions are produced with cellulose nanocrystals (0.05-0.5 wt%) grafted with thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM) brushes (poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs). They are observed to be stable during the time of observation of 4 months. In contrast, unmodified CNCs are unable to stabilize heptane-in-water emulsions. After emulsification, poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs are observed to form aligned, layered structures at the oil-water interface. The emulsions stabilized by poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs break after heating at a temperature above the LCST of poly(NIPAM), which is taken as indication of the temperature responsiveness of the brushes installed on the particles and thus the responsiveness of the Pickering emulsions. This phenomenon is further elucidated via rheological measurements, in which viscosities of the Pickering emulsions increase on approach of the low critical solution temperature of poly(NIPAM). The effect of temperature can be counterbalanced with the addition of salt which is explained by the reduction of electrostatic and steric interactions of poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs at the oil-water interface. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermo-responsive copolymer coatings for flow regulation on demand in glass microcapillaries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Yarin, A L

    2010-11-01

    This study presents thermo-responsive on-demand regulation of water flow rate in glass microcapillaries with a recently developed water-stable, stimuli-responsive poly(methyl methacrylate/N-isopropyl acrylamide) [P(MMA/NIPAM)] copolymer grafted at the inner walls. It is shown that the grafted coatings are stable and can withstand significant tractions under temperature variation. Such microcapillaries allow flow regulation on demand by changing temperature across the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the copolymer layer, which makes it swell or shrink, thus changing the bore available for pressure-driven flow. The grafted copolymer layers were subjected to different pressure drops applied to the capillary open ends, as well as to periodic temperature variation across the copolymer LCST to determine the best grafting conditions for microfluidic operation. Then, by varying the temperature, the flow rate in the capillaries was changed periodically on demand due to the swelling/shrinkage of the grafted copolymer layer. It was also shown that the entrapped air bubbles are present in the coating which can result in an apparent slip.

  7. On-chip single cell funneling operated by microfabricated thermo-responsive hydrogel layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaniello, Tommaso; Yan, Yunsong; Tocchio, Alessandro; Martello, Federico; Gassa, Federico; Webb, Patrick; Zhao, Weiwei; Tamplenizza, Margherita; Schulte, Carsten; Liu, Yang; Hutt, David; Milani, Paolo; Conway, Paul; Lenardi, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    We present a multilayer microfluidic system having a KrF excimer laser micro-patterned thermo-responsive poly-(N-isopropyl)-acrylamide (PNIPAAm) based hydrogel layer integrated as a freestanding component that operates as a temperature-triggered cell isolation actuator for single cell assays applications. When the system is assembled, the size of the laser machined micro-through-hole (entrance diameter is 150 μm, while exit hole diameter varies from 10 to 80 μm) can be reversibly modulated as a consequence of the polymer volumetric phase transition induced by heating the device above the critical temperature of 32 °C as a result of the polymer water loss, the shrinkage of the layer caused the hole to homogeneously shrink, thus reducing its original size to about 40% in the polymer collapsed state. This actuation mechanism was exploited to trap a cellular sample in the shrunken exit hole on the top of the hydrogel layer by applying a negative pressure across the film when the system is brought to 37 °C. Subsequently, the funneling of the trapped cell took place through the orifice when the polymer’s natural relaxation at room temperature toward its initial state occurred; the functionality of the device was proved using optical microscopy to monitor MG63 cells as a model cell line during the funneling through the size-modulating structure.

  8. Tunable microlens arrays actuated by various thermo-responsive hydrogel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuefeng; Li, Chenhui; Zhu, Difeng; Cho, Hyung Joon; Jiang, Hongrui

    2010-11-01

    We report on liquid-based tunable-focus microlens arrays made of a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. Each microlens in the array is formed through an immiscible liquid-liquid interfacial meniscus. Here deionized water and silicone oil were used. The liquids were constrained in the PDMS structures fabricated through liquid-phase photopolymerization for molding and soft lithography. The microlenses were actuated by thermo-responsive N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) hydrogel microstructures and could be tuned individually by changing the local temperature. The NIPAAm hydrogels expanded and contracted, absorbing and releasing water, at different temperatures. Thus the pressure across the water-oil interface in the microlenses varied responding to the temperature, tuning their corresponding focal lengths. The microlens diameter was 2.4 mm. The typical microlens focal length was measured to be from 8 to 60 mm depending on the temperature. The microlens response time actuated by different structures and components of the NIPAAm hydrogels were compared. The normalized light intensities of the microlens focused spots were measured, matching well with a Zemax simulation, to study the microlens spherical aberrations. The NIPAAm hydrogel durability was also measured.

  9. Synthesis and properties of novel biomimetic and thermo-responsive dextran-based biohybrids.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Pei, Danfeng; Huang, Qingrong; Shi, Tongfei; Zhang, Guo

    2014-01-01

    A new class of biodegradable, biomimetic and thermo-responsive dextran/synthetic glycopolymer biohybrids (dextran-graft-poly(lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate), dextran-g-(PLAMA-b-PDEGMA)), was synthesized by the direct atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of unprotected lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate (LAMA) glycomonomer and di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA) monomer. The dextran macroinitiator for ATRP was prepared by partial esterification of the hydroxyl groups of the polysaccharide with 2-bromo-2-methylpropionic acid (BrMPA). The biohybrids containing PDEGMA segments exhibited a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior, which changed from unimers to aggregates in solutions. Moreover, it was demonstrated that these biohybrids had specific biomolecular recognition with ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA₁₂₀) in comparison with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Furthermore, these biohybrids showed good biocompatibility in the cytotoxicity assays. This hopefully provides a platform for targeted drug delivery and studying the biomolecular recognition between sugar and lectin.

  10. Effective separation of peptides using highly dense thermo-responsive polymer brush-grafted porous polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Aya; Nagase, Kenichi; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kanazawa, Hideko; Akiyama, Yoshikatsu; Kobayashi, Jun; Annaka, Masahiko; Okano, Teruo

    2010-08-15

    For the development of well-defined highly dense thermo-responsive polymer grafted surface as an improved stationary phase for thermo-responsive chromatography, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) brush-grafted porous polystyrene beads were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PIPAAm grafted region of polystyrene beads was adjusted by the addition of isooctane as a poor solvent for polystyrene upon the reaction of ATRP initiator immobilization. Using a thermo-responsive HPLC column containing the prepared beads with PIPAAm brush grafted on the inside pores nearby the outer surfaces, angiotensin subtypes were effectively separated with aqueous mobile phase, because the densely grafted PIPAAm on nearby the outer surface effectively interacted with the peptides hydrophobically. Retention of basic peptide was achieved by the beads with basic mobile phase. These results indicated that the prepared beads with grafted PIPAAm nearby the outer surface became an effective chromatographic stationary phase for retaining basic peptides using wide pH range of mobile phase. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Controllable targeted system based on pH-dependent thermo-responsive nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengling; Guo, Hua; Hu, Zhenpeng; Tian, Zhiqing; Wu, Yukun; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a pH-dependent thermo-responsive polymer (poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-methacrylic acid-co-ethyl methacrylate, P(NIPAAm-co-MAA-co-EMA)), which was used as a masking functional module was designed and prepared. Its LCST was pH-dependent, leading to a sensitive isothermal phase transition between the blood and the extracellular environment of solid tumours. This masking polymer had a LCST of 36.4 °C at pH 6.5, and remained hydrophilic at pH 7.4 even when the temperature was increased to 50 °C. The liver-targeted nanoparticles (NPs) were then obtained by co-grafting the masking functional module and the targeting ligands glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) onto the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Their surface properties and targeting ability could be switched based on the expanding or shrinking behaviour of the polymers. The shielding/deshielding effect of GA was confirmed by the bovine serum albumin adsorption and cellular uptake. The results indicated that GA could be shielded by the hydrophilic P(NIPAAm-co-MAA-co-EMA) in the normal physiological environment (pH 7.4, 37 °C) and deshielded in the tumour microenvironment of pH 6.5, 40 °C, leading to an increase in cellular uptake as high as 2.3-fold compared with that observed at pH 7.4, 37 °C. More importantly, the ultrasensitive phase transition of the polymer was reversible, which means that the targeting ability of the deshielded Au NPs could be reshielded if they come back to the blood circulation.

  12. FCC-HCP coexistence in dense thermo-responsive microgel crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthickeyan, D.; Joshi, R. G.; Tata, B. V. R.

    2017-06-01

    Analogous to hard-sphere suspensions, monodisperse thermo-responsive poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles beyond a volume fraction (ϕ) of 0.5 freeze into face centered cubic (FCC)-hexagonal close packed (HCP) coexistence under as prepared conditions and into an FCC structure upon annealing. We report here FCC-HCP coexistence to be stable in dense PNIPAM microgel crystals (ϕ > 0.74) with particles in their deswollen state (referred to as osmotically compressed microgel crystals) and the FCC structure with particles in their swollen state by performing annealing studies with different cooling rates. The structure of PNIPAM microgel crystals is characterized using static light scattering technique and UV-Visible spectroscopy and dynamics by dynamic light scattering (DLS). DLS studies reveal that the particle motion is diffusive at short times in crystals with ϕ < 0.74 and sub-diffusive at short times in PNIPAM crystals with ϕ > 0.74. The observed sub-diffusive behavior at short times is due to the overlap (interpenetration) of the dangling polymer chains between the shells of neighbouring PNIPAM microgel particles. Overlap is found to disappear upon heating the crystals well above their melting temperature, Tm due to reduction in the particle size. Annealing studies confirm that the overlap of dangling polymer chains between the shells of neighbouring PNIPAM spheres is responsible for the stability of FCC-HCP coexistence observed in osmotically compressed PNIPAM microgel crystals. Results are discussed in the light of recent reports of stabilizing the HCP structure in hard sphere crystals by adding interacting polymer chains.

  13. NMR Studies of Thermo-responsive Behavior of an Amphiphilic Poly(asparagine) Derivative in Water.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiji; Boutis, Gregory S; Sato, Hiroko; Sekine, Sokei; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2014-01-14

    The thermo-responsive behavior of a unique biocompatible polymer, poly(N-substituted α/β-asparagine) derivative (PAD), has been studied with several NMR methods. The (1)H and (13)C solution NMR measurements of the PAD in DMSO-d6 were used to investigate the isolated polymer and perform spectral assignments. By systematic addition of D2O we have tracked structural changes due to aggregation and observed contraction of hydrophilic side chains. Solution and cross polarization / magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) (13)C NMR approaches were implemented to investigate the aggregates of the PAD aqueous solution during the liquid to gel transition as the temperature was increased. At temperatures near 20 °C, all of the peaks from the PAD were observed in the (13)C CP/MAS and (13)C solution NMR spectra, indicating the presence of polymer chain nodes. Increasing the temperature to 40 °C resulted in a partial disentanglement of the nodes due to thermal agitation and further heating resulted in little to no additional structural changes. Deuterium T1-T2 and T2-T2 two-dimensional relaxation spectroscopies using an inverse Laplace transform, were also implemented to monitor the water-PAD interaction during the phase transition. At temperatures near 20 °C the dynamical characteristics of water were manifested into one peak in the deuterium T1-T2 map. Increasing the temperature to 40 °C resulted in several distinguishable reservoirs of water with different dynamical characteristics. The observation of several reservoirs of water at the temperature of gel formation at 40 °C is consistent with a physical picture of a gel involving a network of interconnected polymer chains trapping a fluid. Further increase in temperature to 70 °C resulted in two non-exchanging water reservoirs probed by deuterium T2-T2 measurements.

  14. A remotely operated drug delivery system with an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ying; Zaher, Amir; Yassine, Omar; Kosel, Jurgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery devices are becoming attractive due to their abilities of targeted and controlled dose release. Currently, two important issues are functional lifetime and non-controlled drug diffusion. In this work, we present a drug delivery device combining an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve, which are both remotely controlled by an electromagnetic field (40.5 mT and 450 kHz). Our proposed device exhibits a novel operation mechanism for long-term therapeutic treatments using a solid drug in reservoir approach. Our device also prevents undesired drug liquid diffusions. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolysis-induced bubble drives the drug liquid towards the Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) valve that consists of PNIPAM and iron micro-particles. The heat generated by the iron micro-particles causes the PNIPAM to shrink, resulting in an open valve. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the PNIPAM starts to swell. In the meantime, the bubbles are catalytically recombined into water, reducing the pressure inside the pumping chamber, which leads to the refilling of the fresh liquid from outside the device. A catalytic reformer is included, allowing more liquid refilling during the limited valve's closing time. The amount of body liquid that refills the drug reservoir can further dissolve the solid drug, forming a reproducible drug solution for the next dose. By repeatedly turning on and off the electromagnetic field, the drug dose can be cyclically released, and the exit port of the device is effectively controlled. PMID:26339328

  15. Heat-induced solution mixing in thermo-responsive polymer-coated microchannels for the fluorometric determination of polyamines in saliva.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tohru; Suzuki, Norio; Furuse, Takehiro; Hiraide, Masataka

    2009-12-15

    We developed a simple and easy method for solution mixing based on the heat-induced regulation of capillary action in thermo-responsive polymer-coated microchannels. The channels having two T-junctions were fabricated on a glass plate by a sand-blast technique and then coated with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) film. The polymer-coating was performed by the modification with allyltrimethoxysilane and the subsequent radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide. When the channel was warmed by a Peltier device, a capillarity-based solution flow completely stopped because of the water-repellency of channel surfaces. On the other hand, the cooling of the channels allowed the restart of the solution flow through hydrophilic channels. Solution mixing downstream a T-junction was readily conducted by a Peltier device that had placed at the junction. The technique was applied to the fluorometric analysis of polyamines in saliva. The saliva sample was mixed with nickel(II) chloride solution at the first junction to mask amino acids and then mixed with o-phthalaldehyde solution at the second junction to form the fluorometric derivatives of polyamines. Blue fluorescence was observed downstream the second junction. Linear correlation was obtained between the emission intensity and the spermine concentration in the range of 20-100 microM. No mechanical pump or valve was required for the fluid manipulation.

  16. Non-covalent synthesis of thermo-responsive graphene oxide-perylene bisimides-containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hybrid for organic pigment removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Jiang, Lai; Su, Dan; Sun, Chen; Chen, Minfang; Goh, Kunli; Chen, Yuan

    2014-09-15

    In this work, thermo-responsive graphene oxide-perylene bisimides-containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hybrid (TGO) was successfully prepared via non-covalent π-π stacking interactions of GO and perylene bisimides-containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PBI-PNIPAM). PBI-PNIPAM was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide, using bifunctional N,N'-bis[6-(2-chloropropionamide)hexyl] perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid bisimide (PBI-Cl) as the initiator. The obtained polymer was then characterized by (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. The surface chemical states, morphology, and composition of TGO were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. This new hybrid showed reversible temperature-dependent self-assembly and disassembly at 35.9°C in water. Therefore, it may have great potentials as a convenient adsorbent for removing organic pigment, as exemplified as for removing methylene blue from water with excellent adsorption capacity of 568 mg/g, high removal efficiency of 99.5%, and facile temperature-controlled post-separation of the adsorbent.

  17. Development of thermo-responsive hydrogels with immobilized metal affinity groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young-Seo

    A Hydrogel is defined as a polymeric material which possesses the ability to swell in water and retain a significant fraction of water within its structure, but which will not dissolve in water. Hydrogels have been studied by many researchers because they have many useful applications in bio related fields such as drug delivery, bioseparation, and etc. In this thesis, a new hydrogel system that possesses the characteristics of thermo-responsive swelling property and immobilized metal affinity was developed. This affinity material consists of a hydrogel with stimuli responsive swelling characteristics to provide modulated diffusivity and size selectivity. Covalently bound ligands within hydrogels provide highly selective and tunable affinity-based separation. Swelling and affinity properties can be independently controlled by regulating the temperature or pH of the solution to provide a sequential separations scheme. The developed affinity hydrogels incorporate multiple modes of separations or recovery and concentrate specific solutes in chromatographic systems. Thermal sensitive affinity hydrogels were synthesized from a N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer, a crosslinker (1,4-bismethylene acrylamide) and a ligand attachable co-monomer acrylamide (AAm), using free radical chemistry. The ligand of choice is the metal affinity iminodiacetic acid (IDA) which is bound to hydrogel backbone via a spacer arm. The challenge lay in incorporating affinity ligands without affecting the temperature induced swelling of the hydrogel. Thus, PNIPAAm-Am hydrogels are functionalized with a spacer arm (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether), the chelating ligand IDA and a divalent metal ion (Cu2+). This ligand binds histidine groups at high pH and releases them upon protonation of histidine at low pH. This can be used to separate proteins based on the occurrence of surface histidine residues in them. The resulting affinity hydrogel was shown to adsorb the protein chicken egg white

  18. Thermo-responsive Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels in Non-polar Solvents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) is polymerized using a poly(lauryl methacrylate) macromolecular chain transfer agent (PLMA macro-CTA) using reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization at 70 °C in n-dodecane. This choice of solvent leads to an efficient dispersion polymerization, with polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) occurring via the growing PBzMA block to produce a range of PLMA–PBzMA diblock copolymer nano-objects, including spheres, worms, and vesicles. In the present study, particular attention is paid to the worm phase, which forms soft free-standing gels at 20 °C due to multiple inter-worm contacts. Such worm gels exhibit thermo-responsive behavior: heating above 50 °C causes degelation due to the onset of a worm-to-sphere transition. Degelation occurs because isotropic spheres interact with each other much less efficiently than the highly anisotropic worms. This worm-to-sphere thermal transition is essentially irreversible on heating a dilute solution (0.10% w/w) but is more or less reversible on heating a more concentrated dispersion (20% w/w). The relatively low volatility of n-dodecane facilitates variable-temperature rheological studies, which are consistent with eventual reconstitution of the worm phase on cooling to 20 °C. Variable-temperature 1H NMR studies conducted in d26-dodecane confirm partial solvation of the PBzMA block at elevated temperature: surface plasticization of the worm cores is invoked to account for the observed change in morphology, because this is sufficient to increase the copolymer curvature and hence induce a worm-to-sphere transition. Small-angle X-ray scattering and TEM are used to investigate the structural changes that occur during the worm-to-sphere-to-worm thermal cycle; experiments conducted at 1.0 and 5.0% w/w demonstrate the concentration-dependent (ir)reversibility of these morphological transitions. PMID:24678949

  19. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hollow fiber membranes for osteoblasts culture and non-invasive harvest.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Meiling; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Ge, Dan; Li, Xiangqin

    2015-10-01

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) culture system is one of the most important bioreactors for the large-scale culture and expansion of therapeutic cells. However, enzymatic and mechanical treatments are traditionally applied to harvest the expanded cells from HFMs, which inevitably causes harm to the cells. In this study, thermo-responsive cellulose acetate HFMs for cell culture and non-invasive harvest were prepared for the first time via free radical polymerization in the presence of cerium (IV). ATR-FTIR and elemental analysis results indicated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was covalently grafted on HFMs successfully. Dynamic contact angle measurements at different temperatures revealed that the magnitude of volume phase transition was decreased with increasing grafted amount of PNIPAAm. And the amount of serum protein adsorbed on HFMs surface also displayed the same pattern. Meanwhile osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs at 37 °C. And Calcein-AM/PI staining, AB assay, ALP activity and OCN protein expression level all showed that PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs had good cell compatibility. After incubation at 20 °C for 120 min, the adhering cells on PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs turned to be round and detached after being gently pipetted. These results suggest that thermo-responsive HFMs are attractive cell culture substrates which enable cell culture, expansion and the recovery without proteolytic enzyme treatment for the application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  20. Surface immobilization of thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) by simple entrapment in a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane network.

    PubMed

    Alghunaim, Abdullah; Brink, Eric T; Newby, Bi-Min Zhang

    2016-09-28

    In a previous study, we demonstrated the feasibility of retaining poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) on hydroxylated surfaces by spin-coating a blend of pNIPAAm with a small amount of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), an organosilane, followed by thermal annealing. In this study, we detail the conditions for retaining pNIPAAm films by APTES. Our results show that the difference in surface energy between pNIPAAm and APTES in the blended film resulted in the segregation of APTES molecules to the film/substrate interface, as verified by XPS, during annealing, and the segregated APTES molecules cross-linked to form the APTES network, thus entrapping pNIPAAm. The retained pNIPAAm films (25-35 nm) exhibited thermo-responsive behavior, determined by water contact angles and film thickness in water at temperatures above and below the lower critical solution temperature of pNIPAAm, as well as good cell attachment and rapid detachment (<10 minutes). The gained insights would allow a better design of these thermo-responsive surfaces for cell sheet engineering and other relevant applications.

  1. Controlled release of doxorubicin loaded within magnetic thermo-responsive nanocarriers under magnetic and thermal actuation in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Pernia Leal, Manuel; Torti, Andrea; Riedinger, Andreas; La Fleur, Rocco; Petti, Daniela; Cingolani, Roberto; Bertacco, Riccardo; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2012-12-21

    We report a procedure to grow thermo-responsive polymer shells at the surface of magnetic nanocarriers made of multiple iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-ocatadecene) polymer nanobeads. Depending on the comonomers and on their relative composition, tunable phase transition temperatures in the range between 26 and 47 °C under physiological conditions could be achieved. Using a suitable microfluidic platform combining magnetic nanostructures and channels mimicking capillaries of the circulatory system, we demonstrate that thermo-responsive nanobeads are suitable for localized drug delivery with combined thermal and magnetic activation. Below the critical temperature nanobeads are stable in suspension, retain their cargo, and cannot be easily trapped by magnetic fields. Increasing the temperature above the critical temperature causes the aggregation of nanobeads, forming clusters with a magnetic moment high enough to permit their capture by suitable magnetic gradients in close proximity to the targeted zone. At the same time the polymer swelling activates drug release, with characteristic times on the order of one hour for flow rates of the same order as those of blood in capillaries.

  2. Thermo-responsive and aqueous dispersible ZnO/PNIPAM core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Halima; Schejn, Aleksandra; Roques-Carmes, Thibault; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Schneider, Raphaël

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we developed a new process to covalently graft a thermoresponsive polymer on the surface of fluorescent nanocrystals in order to synthesize materials that combine both responsive and fluorescent properties. For the first time, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) was grown by activator regenerated by electron transfer-atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET-ATRP) from ZnO quantum dots (QDs) by surface-initiated polymerization. This process allowed the formation of fluorescent and responsive ZnO/PNIPAM core/shell QDs while only requiring the use of a ppm amount of copper for the synthesis. The influence of the nature of the silanized layer and the polymerization time on the properties of the final nanomaterials were investigated. Results clearly evidence that both the PNIPAM layer thickness and the temperature affected the luminescence properties of the core/shell nanoparticles, but also that the PNIPAM layer, when it is thick enough, could stabilize the QDs’ optical properties.

  3. Thermo-Responsive Polyplex Micelles with PEG Shells and PNIPAM Layer to Protect DNA Cores for Systemic Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Zha, Zengshi; Ge, Zhishen

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous achievement of prolonged retention in blood circulation and efficient gene transfection activity in target tissues has always been a major challenge hindering in vivo applications of nonviral gene vectors via systemic administration. The engineered strategies for efficient systemic gene delivery are under wide investigation. These approaches include the thermo-responsive formation of a hydrophobic intermediate layer on PEG-shielded polyplex micelles. Herein, we constructed novel rod-shaped ternary polyplex micelles (TPMs) via complexation between the mixed block copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly{N'-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]aspartamide} (PEG-b-PAsp(DET)) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-PAsp(DET) (PNIPAM-b-PAsp(DET)) and plasmid DNA (pDNA) at room temperature (RT), exhibiting distinct temperature-responsive formation of a hydrophobic intermediate layer between PEG shells and pDNA cores through facile temperature increase from RT to body temperature (~37 °C).

  4. Thermo-responsive chitosan-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) injectable hydrogel for cultivation of chondrocytes and meniscus cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Cheng, Tai-Hong

    2006-12-08

    A thermo-responsive comb-like polymer with chitosan as the backbone and pendant poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) groups has been synthesized by grafting PNIPAM-COOH with a single carboxy end group onto chitosan through amide bond linkages. The copolymer exhibits reversible temperature-responsive soluble-insoluble characteristics with the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) being at around 30 degrees C. Results from SEM observations confirm a porous 3D hydrogel structure with interconnected pores ranging from 10 to 40 microm at physiological temperature. A preliminary in vitro cell culture study has demonstrated the usefulness of this hydrogel as an injectable cell-carrier material for entrapping chondrocytes and meniscus cells. The hydrogel not only preserves the viability and phenotypic morphology of the entrapped cells but also stimulates the initial cell-cell interactions.

  5. Adjuvant properties of a biocompatible thermo-responsive polymer of N-isopropylacrylamide in autoimmunity and arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) polymer as an adjuvant, we synthesized PNiPAAm through free radical polymerization and characterized it both in vitro and in vivo. The polymer when mixed with collagen type II (CII) induced antigen-specific autoimmunity and arthritis. Mice immunized with PNiPAAm–CII developed significant levels of CII-specific IgG response comprising major IgG subclasses. Antigen-specific cellular recall response was also enhanced in these mice, while negligible level of IFN-γ was detected in splenocyte cultures, in vitro. PNiPAAm–CII-immunized arthritic mouse paws showed massive infiltration of immune cells and extensive damage to cartilage and bone. As determined by immunostaining, most of the CII protein retained its native configuration after injecting it with PNiPAAm in naive mice. Physical adsorption of CII and the high-molecular-weight form of moderately hydrophobic PNiPAAm induced a significant anti-CII antibody response. Similar to CII, mice immunized with PNiPAAm and ovalbumin (PNiPAAm–Ova) induced significant anti-ovalbumin antibody response. Comparable levels of serum IFN-γ, IL-1β and IL-17 were observed in ovalbumin-immunized mice with complete Freund, incomplete Freund (CFA and IFA) or PNiPAAm adjuvants. However, serum IL-4 levels were significantly higher in PNiPAAm–Ova and CFA–Ova groups compared with the IFA–Ova group. Thus, we show for the first time, biocompatible and biodegradable thermo-responsive PNiPAAm can be used as an adjuvant in several immunological applications as well as in better understanding of the autoimmune responses against self-proteins. PMID:21543351

  6. Binary blend of glyceryl monooleate and glyceryl monostearate for magnetically induced thermo-responsive local drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mengesha, Abebe E; Wydra, Robert J; Hilt, J Zach; Bummer, Paul M

    2013-12-01

    To develop a novel monoglycerides-based thermal-sensitive drug delivery system, specifically for local intracavitary chemotherapy. Lipid matrices containing mixtures of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) and glyceryl monostearate (GMS) were evaluated for their potential application as magnetically induced thermo-responsive local drug delivery systems using a poorly water-soluble model drug, nifedipine (NF). Oleic acid-modified iron oxide (OA-Fe3O4) nanoparticles were embedded into the GMO-GMS matrix for remote activation of the drug release using an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The crystallization behavior of binary blends of GMO and GMS as characterized by DSC did show temperature dependent phase transition. GMO-GMS (75:25 wt%) blend showed a melting (T m ) and crystallization (T c ) points at 42°C and 37°C, respectively indicating the potential of the matrix to act as an 'on-demand' drug release. The matrix released only 35% of the loaded drug slowly in 10 days at 37°C whereas 96% release was obtained at 42°C. A concentration of 0.5% OA-Fe3O4 heated the matrix to 42.3 and 45.5°C within 5 min and 10 min of AMF exposure, respectively. The in vitro NF release profiles form the monoglycerides matrix containing 0.5% OA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles after AMF activation confirmed the thermo-responsive nature of the matrix that could provide pulsatile drug release 'on-demand'.

  7. Thermo-Responsive Complexes of c-Myc Antisense Oligonucleotide with Block Copolymer of Poly(OEGMA) and Quaternized Poly(4-Vinylpyridine).

    PubMed

    Topuzogullari, Murat; Elalmis, Yeliz Basaran; Isoglu, Sevil Dincer

    2017-04-01

    Solution behavior of thermo-responsive polymers and their complexes with biological macromolecules may be affected by environmental conditions, such as the concentration of macromolecular components, pH, ion concentration, etc. Therefore, a thermo-responsive polymer and its complexes should be characterized in detail to observe their responses against possible environments under physiological conditions before biological applications. To briefly indicate this important issue, thermo-responsive block copolymer of quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) and poly(oligoethyleneglycol methyl ether methacrylate) as a potential nonviral vector has been synthesized. Polyelectrolyte complexes of this copolymer with the antisense oligonucleotide of c-Myc oncogene are also thermo-responsive but, have lower LCST (lower critical solution temperature) values compared to individual copolymer. LCST values of complexes decrease with molar ratio of macromolecular components and presence of salt. Dilution of solutions also affects solution behavior of complexes and causes a significant decrease in size and an increase in LCST, which indicates possible effects of severe dilutions in the blood stream.

  8. Efficient synthetic access to thermo-responsive core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dine, Enaam Jamal Al; Ferjaoui, Zied; Roques-Carmes, Thibault; Schjen, Aleksandra; Meftah, Abdelaziz; Hamieh, Tayssir; Toufaily, Joumana; Schneider, Raphaël; Gaffet, Eric; Alem, Halima

    2017-03-01

    Core/shell nanostructures based on silica, fluorescent ZnO quantum dots (QDs) and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared and fully characterized by the combination of different techniques and the physical properties of the nanostructures were studied. We demonstrate the efficiency of the atom transfer radical polymerization with activators regenerated by electron transfer process to graft (co-)polymers of different structures and polarity at the surface of metal oxide NPs. The influence of the polymer chain configuration on the optical properties of the ZnO/polymer core/shell QDs was enlightened. Concerning the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4/polymer nanostructures, only the amount of the grafted polymer plays a role on the saturation magnetization of the NPs and no influence of the aggregation was evidenced. The simple and fast process described in this work is efficient for the grafting of copolymers from surfaces and the derived NPs display the combination of the physical properties of the core and the macromolecular behavior of the shell.

  9. A novel thermo-responsive hydrogel based on salecan and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide): synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Hu, Xinyu; Qi, Xiaoliang; Yu, Hao; Liu, Yucheng; Li, Junjian; Zhang, Jianfa; Dong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Salecan is a novel microbial polysaccharide produced by Agrobacterium sp. ZX09. The salt-tolerant strain was isolated from a soil sample in our laboratory and the 16S rDNA sequence was deposited in the GenBank database under the accession number GU810841. Salecan is suitable to fabricate hydrogel for biomedical applications due to the excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility. Here, salecan has been introduced into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) network to form novel thermo-sensitive semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs). The structure of salecan/PNIPAm semi-IPNs was confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) proved the stability of the semi-IPNs. Rheological and compressive tests revealed an elastic solid-like behavior and good mechanical properties of the hydrogels. Swelling behavior test showed the hydrogels possessed high water content at room temperature. An excellent thermo-sensitive property of fast response rates to temperature had been demonstrated as well. In vitro degradation measurements ensured the semi-IPNs were degradable. Cytotoxicity and cell adhesion study suggested the synthesized salecan/PNIPAm hydrogels were non-toxic and biocompatibility. The results indicated the novel thermo-responsive hydrogels could be a suitable candidate for biomedical applications.

  10. Breast Tumor Targetable Fe3O4 Embedded Thermo-Responsive Nanoparticles for Radiofrequency Assisted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Thomas, Reju George; Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Lee, Hwa Jeongong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, In-kyu; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) frequency may be utilized as an energy source to activate thermo-responsive nanoparticles for the controlled local delivery of drugs to cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrate that 180 ± 20 nm sized curcumin encapsulated chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) nanoparticles containing iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs) were selectively internalized in cancer cells in vivo. Using an RF treatment at 80 watts for 2 min, Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs, dissipated heat energy of 42 degrees C, which is the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam), causing controlled curcumin release and apoptosis to cultured 4T1 breast cancer cells. Further, the tumor localization studies on orthotopic breast cancer model revealed that Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs selectively accumulated at the primary tumor as confirmed by in vivo live imaging followed by ex vivo tissue imaging and HPLC studies. These initial results strongly support the development of RF assisted drug delivery from nanoparticles for improved tumor targeting for breast cancer treatment.

  11. Self-Healing and Thermo-Responsive Dual-Crosslinked Alginate Hydrogels based on Supramolecular Inclusion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Tianxin; Fenn, Spencer L.; Charron, Patrick N.; Oldinski, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), with a lipophilic inner cavity and hydrophilic outer surface, interacts with a large variety of non-polar guest molecules to form non-covalent inclusion complexes. Conjugation of β-CD onto biomacromolecules can form physically-crosslinked hydrogel networks upon mixing with a guest molecule. Herein describes the development and characterization of self-healing, thermo-responsive hydrogels, based on host-guest inclusion complexes between alginate-graft-β-CD and Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(propylene glycol)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)). The mechanics, flow characteristics, and thermal response were contingent on the polymer concentrations, and the host-guest molar ratio. Transient and reversible physical crosslinking between host and guest polymers governed self-assembly, allowing flow under shear stress, and facilitating complete recovery of the material properties within a few seconds of unloading. The mechanical properties of the dual-crosslinked, multi-stimuli responsive hydrogels were tuned as high as 30 kPa at body temperature, and are advantageous for biomedical applications such as drug delivery and cell transplantation. PMID:26509214

  12. Swelling and Shrinking Properties of Thermo-Responsive Polymeric Ionic Liquid Hydrogels with Embedded Linear pNIPAAM

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Simon; Florea, Larisa; Fraser, Kevin J.; Diamond, Dermot

    2014-01-01

    In this study, varying concentrations of linear pNIPAAM have been incorporated for the first time into a thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) hydrogel, namely tributyl-hexyl phosphonium 3-sulfopropylacrylate (P-SPA), to produce semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. The thermal properties of the resulting hydrogels have been investigated along with their thermo-induced shrinking and reswelling capabilities. The semi-interpenetrating networks (IPN) hydrogels were found to have improved shrinking and reswelling properties compared with their PIL counterpart. At elevated temperatures (50–80 °C), it was found that the semi-IPN with the highest concentration of hydrophobic pNIPAAM exhibited the highest shrinking percentage of ~40% compared to the conventional P-SPA, (27%). This trend was also found to occur for the reswelling measurements, with semi-IPN hydrogels producing the highest reswelling percentage of ~67%, with respect to its contracted state. This was attributed to an increase in water affinity due to the presence of hydrophilic pNIPAAM. Moreover, the presence of linear pNIPAAM in the polymer matrix leads to improved shrinking and reswelling response compared to the equivalent PIL. PMID:24681582

  13. Thermo-Responsive Collagen/Cell Penetrating Hybrid Peptide as Nanocarrier in Targeting-Free Cell Selection and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Myungeun; Hu, Chloe; Urfano, Selina F.; Arostegui, Merlyn; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The effective delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents to a selected group of cells has been at the forefront of biomedical research. Unfortunately, the identification of the unique cell surface targets for cell selection remains a major challenge, particularly if cells within the selected group are not identical. Here we demonstrate a novel approach to cell section relying on a thermo-responsive peptide-based nanocarrier. The hybrid peptide containing cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and collagen (COLL) domains is designed to undergo coil-to-helix transition (folding) below physiological temperature. Since only helical form undergoes effective internalization by the cells, this approach allows effective temperature-discriminate cellular uptake. The cells selected for uptake are locally cooled down thus enabling the carrier to fold and subsequently internalize. Our approach demonstrates a generic method as selected cells could differ from the adjacent cells or could belong to the same cell population. The method is fast (< 15 min) and selective; over 99.6% of cells in vitro internalized the peptide carrier at low temperatures (15°C), while less than 0.2% internalized at 37°C. In vivo results confirm the high selectivity of the method. The potential clinical applications in mixed cell differentiation carcinoma, most frequently encountered in breast and ovarian cancer, are envisioned. PMID:27603918

  14. Curcumin-loaded dual pH- and thermo-responsive magnetic microcarriers based on pectin maleate for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Elizângela A M S; Bellettini, Ismael C; Garcia, Francielle P; Farinácio, Maroanne T; Nakamura, Celso V; Rubira, Adley F; Martins, Alessandro F; Muniz, Edvani C

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic microgels with pH- and thermo-responsive properties were developed from the pectin maleate, N-isopropyl acrylamide, and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The hybrid materials were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, wide angle X-ray scattering, Zeta potential, and magnetization hysteresis measurements. Curcumin (CUR) was loaded into the microgels, and release assays were carried out in simulated environments (SGF and SIF) at different conditions of temperature (25 or 37°C). A slow and sustainability CUR release was achieved under external magnetic field influence. Loaded CUR displayed stability, bioavailability and greater solubility regarding free CUR. Besides, the cytotoxicity assays showed that magnetic microgels without CUR could suppress the Caco-2 cells growth. So, the pectin maleate, N-isopropyl acrylamide, and Fe3O4 could be tailored to elicit hybrid-based materials with satisfactory application in the medical arena. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Swelling and shrinking properties of thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid hydrogels with embedded linear pNIPAAM.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Simon; Florea, Larisa; Fraser, Kevin J; Diamond, Dermot

    2014-03-27

    In this study, varying concentrations of linear pNIPAAM have been incorporated for the first time into a thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) hydrogel, namely tributyl-hexyl phosphonium 3-sulfopropylacrylate (P-SPA), to produce semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. The thermal properties of the resulting hydrogels have been investigated along with their thermo-induced shrinking and reswelling capabilities. The semi-interpenetrating networks (IPN) hydrogels were found to have improved shrinking and reswelling properties compared with their PIL counterpart. At elevated temperatures (50-80 °C), it was found that the semi-IPN with the highest concentration of hydrophobic pNIPAAM exhibited the highest shrinking percentage of ~40% compared to the conventional P-SPA, (27%). This trend was also found to occur for the reswelling measurements, with semi-IPN hydrogels producing the highest reswelling percentage of ~67%, with respect to its contracted state. This was attributed to an increase in water affinity due to the presence of hydrophilic pNIPAAM. Moreover, the presence of linear pNIPAAM in the polymer matrix leads to improved shrinking and reswelling response compared to the equivalent PIL.

  16. Thermo-responsive shell cross-linked PMMA-b-P(NIPAAm-co-NAS) micelles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cong; Wei, Hua; Wu, De-Qun; Yang, Bin; Chen, Ni; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2011-11-28

    Thermo-responsive amphiphilic poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide) (PMMA-b-P(NIPAAm-co-NAS)) block copolymer was synthesized by successive RAFT polymerizations. The uncross-linked micelles were facilely prepared by directly dissolving the block copolymer in an aqueous medium, and the shell cross-linked (SCL) micelles were further fabricated by the addition of ethylenediamine as a di-functional cross-linker into the micellar solution. Optical absorption measurements showed that the LCST of uncross-linked and cross-linked micelles was 31.0°C and 40.8°C, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that both uncross-linked and cross-linked micelles exhibited well-defined spherical shape in aqueous phase at room temperature, while the SCL micelles were able to retain the spherical shape with relatively smaller dimension even at 40°C due to the cross-linked structure. In vitro drug release study demonstrated a slower and more sustained drug release behavior from the SCL micelles at high temperature as compared with the release profile of uncross-linked micelles, indicating the great potential of SCL micelles developed herein as novel smart carriers for controlled drug release.

  17. Injectable thermo-responsive hydrogel composed of xanthan gum and methylcellulose double networks with shear-thinning property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijia; Yao, Ping

    2015-11-05

    Injectable hydrogel precursor solution was prepared by physical blend of xanthan gum (XG) and methylcellulose (MC) in aqueous solution. Due to the formation of XG network composed of XG double helical strand structure, XG/MC blend was a high viscous solution with good shear-thinning property at room temperature. When the temperature was changed from 23 to 37 °C, thermo-responsive MC network formed, which caused XG/MC blend solution to gelate. The gelation time and storage modulus of the blend can be tuned by XG and/or MC concentrations. Both in vitro and in vivo investigations revealed that the blend solution immediately recovered its high viscosity and rapidly formed hydrogel at body temperature after injection using a syringe. In vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrogel were validated by implantation of the hydrogel in rats. In vitro investigation demonstrated that XG/MC blend is a promising injectable hydrogel material for long-term drug delivery.

  18. Preparation of thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent and its application for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Cunfeng; Yu, Shirong; Liu, Cheng; Deng, Yuanming; Xu, Yiting; Chen, Xiaoling; Dai, Lizong

    2016-05-01

    A methodology to prepare thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent was proposed. The macro-RAFT agent with pendant dithioester (ZC(S)SR) was facilely prepared via the combination of RAFT polymerization and esterification reaction. By means of ZC(S)SR-initiated RAFT polymerization, the thermo-responsive graft copolymer consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-co-HEMA)) backbone and hydrophilic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) side chains was constructed through the "grafting from" approach. The chemical compositions and molecular weight distributions of the synthesized polymers were respectively characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Self-assembly behavior of the amphiphilic graft copolymers (P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and spectrofluorimeter. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value was 0.052 mg mL(-1). These micelles have thermo-responsibility and a low critical solution temperature (LCST) of 33.5°C. Further investigation indicated that the guest molecule release property of these micelles, which can be well described by a first-order kinetic model, was significantly affected by temperature. Besides, the micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property. Hence, these micelles are considered to have potential application in controlled drug delivery.

  19. Polyester textile functionalization through incorporation of pH/thermo-responsive microgels. Part II: polyester functionalization and characterization.

    PubMed

    Glampedaki, Pelagia; Calvimontes, Alfredo; Dutschk, Victoria; Warmoeskerken, Marijn M C G

    A new approach to functionalize the surface of polyester textiles is described in this study. Functionalization was achieved by incorporating pH/temperature-responsive polyelectrolyte microgels into the textile surface layer using UV irradiation. The aim of functionalization was to regulate polyester wettability according to ambient conditions by imparting stimuli-responsiveness from the microgel to the textile itself. Microgels consisted of pH/thermo-responsive microparticles of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) either alone or complexed with the pH-responsive natural polysaccharide chitosan. Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, ζ-potential measurements, and topographical analysis were used for surface characterization. Wettability of polyester textiles was assessed by dynamic wetting, water vapor transfer, and moisture regain measurements. One of the main findings showed that the polyester surface was rendered pH-responsive, both in acidic and alkaline pH region, owing to the microgel incorporation. With a marked relaxation in their structure and an increase in their microporosity, the functionalized textiles exhibited higher water vapor transfer rates both at 20 and 40 °C, and 65% relative humidity compared with the reference polyester. Also, at 40 °C, i.e., above the microgel Lower Critical Solution Temperature, the functionalized polyester textiles had lower moisture regains than the reference. Finally, the type of the incorporated microgel affected significantly the polyester total absorption times, with an up to 300% increase in one case and an up to 80% decrease in another case. These findings are promising for the development of functional textile materials with possible applications in biotechnology, technical, and protective clothing.

  20. Non-ionic, thermo-responsive DEA/DMA nanogels: synthesis, characterization, and use for DNA separations by microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xihua; Sun, Mingyun; Barron, Annelise E

    2011-05-15

    Thermo-responsive polymer "nanogels" (crosslinked hydrogel particles with sub-100 nm diameters) are intriguing for many potential applications in biotechnology and medicine. There have been relatively few reports of electrostatically neutral, thermosensitive nanogels comprising a high fraction of hydrophilic co-monomer. Here we demonstrate the syntheses and characterization of novel, non-ionic nanogels based on random N,N-diethylacrylamide (DEA)/N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) copolymers, made by free-radical, surfactant-free dispersion polymerization. The volume-phase transition temperatures of these DEA/DMA nanogels are strongly affected by co-monomer composition, providing a way to "tune" the phase transition temperature of these non-ionic nanogels. While DEA nanogels (comprising no DMA) can be obtained at 70 °C by standard emulsion precipitation, DEA/DMA random co-polymer nanogels can be obtained only in a particular range of temperatures, above the initial phase transition temperature and below the critical precipitation temperature of the DEA/DMA copolymer, controlled by co-monomer composition. Increasing percentages of DMA in the nanogels raises the phase transition temperature, and attenuates and broadens it as well. We find that concentrated DEA/DMA nanogel dispersions are optically clear at room temperature. This good optical clarity was exploited for their use in a novel DNA sieving matrix for microfluidic chip electrophoresis. An ultrafast, high-efficiency dsDNA separation was achieved in less than 120 s for dsDNA ranging from 75 bp to 15,000 bp.

  1. Doxorubicin loaded dual pH- and thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarrier for combined magnetic hyperthermia and targeted controlled drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervault, Aziliz; Dunn, Alexander E.; Lim, May; Boyer, Cyrille; Mott, Derrick; Maenosono, Shinya; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanocarriers have attracted increasing attention for multimodal cancer therapy due to the possibility to deliver heat and drugs locally. The present study reports the development of magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) made of an iron oxide core and a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, that can be used as both hyperthermic agent and drug carrier. The conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to the pH- and thermo-responsive MNCs via acid-cleavable imine linker provides advanced features for the targeted delivery of DOX molecules via the combination of magnetic targeting, and dual pH- and thermo-responsive behaviour which offers spatial and temporal control over the release of DOX. The iron oxide cores exhibit a superparamagnetic behaviour with a saturation magnetization around 70 emu g-1. The MNCs contained 8.1 wt% of polymer and exhibit good heating properties in an alternating magnetic field. The drug release experiments confirmed that only a small amount of DOX was released at room temperature and physiological pH, while the highest drug release of 85.2% was obtained after 48 h at acidic tumour pH under hyperthermia conditions (50 °C). The drug release kinetic followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model and displayed Fickian diffusion mechanism. From the results obtained it can be concluded that this smart magnetic nanocarrier is promising for applications in multi-modal cancer therapy, to target and efficiently deliver heat and drug specifically to the tumour.Magnetic nanocarriers have attracted increasing attention for multimodal cancer therapy due to the possibility to deliver heat and drugs locally. The present study reports the development of magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) made of an iron oxide core and a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, that can be used as both hyperthermic agent and drug carrier. The conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to the pH- and thermo-responsive MNCs via acid-cleavable imine linker provides advanced

  2. Preparation of Thermo-Responsive Poly(ionic liquid)s-Based Nanogels via One-Step Cross-Linking Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jingjiang; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Rongmin; Xiong, Yubing

    2015-09-18

    In this study, thermo-responsive polymeric nanogels were facilely prepared via one-step cross-linking copolymerization of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate/divinylbenzene and ionic liquid (IL)-based monomers, 1,n-dialkyl-3,3'-bis-1-vinyl imidazolium bromides ([CnVIm]Br; n = 6, 8, 12) in selective solvents. The results revealed that stable and blue opalescent biimidazolium (BIm)-based nanogel solutions could be obtained without any precipitation when the copolymerizations were conducted in methanol. Most importantly, these novel nanogels were thermo-response, and could reversibly transform to precipitation in methanol with temperature changes. Turbidity analysis and dynamic light scatting (DLS) measurement illustrated that PIL-based nanogel solutions presented the phase transform with upper critical solution temperature (UCST) in the range of 5-25 °C. The nanogels were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, BIm-based nanogels could also be used as highly active catalysts in the cycloaddition reaction of CO₂ and epoxides. As a result, our attributes build a robust platform suitable for the preparation of polymeric nanomaterials, as well as CO₂ conversion.

  3. Effects of surface wettability and roughness of microchannel on flow behaviors of thermo-responsive microspheres therein during the phase transition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yu; Xie, Rui; Yu, Ya-Lan; Chen, Gang; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Yang, Lihua; Liang, Bin; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2009-08-01

    The flow characteristics of monodisperse thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microspheres during the phase transition in microchannels with different surface wettabilities and roughnesses are investigated systematically. Glass microchannels are modified by hydroxylation treatment to achieve hydrophilic surface, by self-assembly of chlorotrimethylsilane to realize hydrophobic surface, and by coating with silica nanoparticles to generate rough surface. The phase transition of PNIPAM microspheres in microchannels is induced by local heating. The results show that the surface wettability and roughness of microchannel significantly affect the flow behaviors of PNIPAM microspheres during the phase transition. It is much easier for the PNIPAM microspheres in microchannel with hydrophobic surface to stop right after the phase transition than those in microchannel with hydrophilic surface, and it is also much easier for the PNIPAM microspheres in microchannel with rough surface to stop right after the phase transition than those in microchannel with smooth surface. These results indicate that hydrophobic and rough surface properties of the microchannel can enhance the site-specific targeting of PNIPAM microspheres caused by the phase transition. The results in this study provide valuable information for the application of thermo-responsive drug carriers in site-specific targeting therapy.

  4. Thermo-responsive polymer tethered metal-organic framework core-shell magnetic microspheres for magnetic solid-phase extraction of alkylphenols from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuqian; Su, Hao; Wong, Y-L Elaine; Chen, Xiangfeng; Dominic Chan, T-W

    2016-07-22

    In this work, the thermo-responsive polymer PNIPAM tethered to Fe3O4@SiO2@MOF core-shell magnetic microspheres was first synthesized by a surface-selective post-synthetic strategy and underwent highly efficient magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of alkylphenols from aqueous samples. Alkylphenols, including 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), were selected as target compounds. The sample quantification was carried out using LC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitor (MRM) mode. Under optimal working conditions, the developed method showed good linearity in the range of 5-1000ngL(-1), a low limit of detection (1.5ngL(-1)), and good repeatability (relative standard deviation, <8%, n=5) for NP and OP. Owning to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic switchable properties of the nanocomposite, high recoveries (78.7-104.3%) of alkylphenols were obtained under different extraction conditions. The levels of OP and NP in environmental samples collected from local river, lake and pond waters were analyzed using the developed method. It was believed that the synthesized material with the thermo-responsive coating, large surface areas and magnetic properties should have great potential in the extraction and removal of alkylphenols from environmental samples.

  5. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-coated thermo-responsive nanoparticles for controlled delivery of sulfonated Zn-phthalocyanine in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro and zebra fish in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jia; Chen, Ji-Yao; Wang, Pu; Wang, Pei-Nan; Guo, Jia; Yang, Wu-Li; Wang, Chang-Chun; Peng, Qian

    2007-10-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)-coated Fe3O4@SiO2@CdTe multifunctional nanoparticles with photoluminescent (PL), thermosensitive and magnetic properties, were investigated as carriers to deliver water-soluble, fluorescent sulfonated Zn-phthalocyanine (ZnPcS), a photosensitizing drug for photodynamic therapy of cancer, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in vitro and zebra fish in vivo. PNIPAM is a well-known thermo-responsive polymer with a volume phase transition temperature. This property allows it to be swollen in water at temperatures lower than 32-34 °C to take up ZnPcS and shrunken to expel the drug at higher temperatures. Since the PL band of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as indicators for the nanoparticles is at 585 nm and the emission band of ZnPcS is at 680 nm, it is possible to study the temperature-dependent release of ZnPcS from the nanoparticles by fluorescence measurements. ZnPcS was embedded in the PNIPAM of the nanoparticles at 25 °C in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution and released at 37 °C, measured with a spectrophotometer. When CHO cells had been incubated with the ZnPcS-loaded nanoparticles at 27 °C, a similar intracellular localization pattern of CdTe QDs and ZnPcS was seen by multichannel measurements in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but a diffuse pattern of only ZnPcS fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm of the cells at 37 °C, indicating a release of ZnPcS from the nanoparticles. Similar results were also found in the intestinal tract of zebra fish in vivo after intake of the nanoparticles. Since the nanoparticles contain magnetic (Fe3O4) material, the nanoparticles could also be manipulated to change their location in the intestinal tract of the zebra fish with an external magnetic field gradient of 300 G mm-1. The results presented suggest that such multifunctional nanoparticles may have combined potential for temperature-dependent drug delivery, QD photodetection and magnetic manipulation in diagnosis and

  6. Agar/gelatin bilayer gel matrix fabricated by simple thermo-responsive sol-gel transition method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Dong, Meng; Guo, Mengmeng; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Jing; Lei, Jian; Guo, Chuanhang; Qin, Chaoran

    2017-08-01

    We present a simple and environmentally-friendly method to generate an agar/gelatin bilayer gel matrix for further biomedical applications. In this method, the thermally responsive sol-gel transitions of agar and gelatin combined with the different transition temperatures are exquisitely employed to fabricate the agar/gelatin bilayer gel matrix and achieve separate loading for various materials (e.g., drugs, fluorescent materials, and nanoparticles). Importantly, the resulting bilayer gel matrix provides two different biopolymer environments (a polysaccharide environment vs a protein environment) with a well-defined border, which allows the loaded materials in different layers to retain their original properties (e.g., magnetism and fluorescence) and reduce mutual interference. In addition, the loaded materials in the bilayer gel matrix exhibit an interesting release behavior under the control of thermal stimuli. Consequently, the resulting agar/gelatin bilayer gel matrix is a promising candidate for biomedical applications in drug delivery, controlled release, fluorescence labeling, and bio-imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers based on poly(vinyl methyl ether)-the effect of biomolecular ligands to balance cell adhesion and stimulated detachment.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Juliane; Nitschke, Mirko; Pette, Dagmar; Valtink, Monika; Gramm, Stefan; Härtel, Frauke V; Noll, Thomas; Funk, Richard H W; Engelmann, Katrin; Werner, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    Two established material systems for thermally stimulated detachment of adherent cells were combined in a cross-linked polymer blend to merge favorable properties. Through this approach poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) with its superior switching characteristic was paired with a poly(vinyl methyl ether)-based composition that allows adjusting physico-chemical and biomolecular properties in a wide range. Beyond pure PNiPAAm, the proposed thermo-responsive coating provides thickness, stiffness and swelling behavior, as well as an apposite density of reactive sites for biomolecular functionalization, as effective tuning parameters to meet specific requirements of a particular cell type regarding initial adhesion and ease of detachment. To illustrate the strength of this approach, the novel cell culture carrier was applied to generate transplantable sheets of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC). Sheets were grown, detached, and transferred onto planar targets. Cell morphology, viability and functionality were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and determination of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) before and after sheet detachment and transfer. HCEC layers showed regular morphology with appropriate TEER. Cells were positive for function-associated marker proteins ZO-1, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, and paxillin, and extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV before and after transfer. Sheet detachment and transfer did not impair cell viability. Subsequently, a potential application in ophthalmology was demonstrated by transplantation onto de-endothelialized porcine corneas in vitro. The novel thermo-responsive cell culture carrier facilitates the generation and transfer of functional HCEC sheets. This paves the way to generate tissue engineered human corneal endothelium as an alternative transplant source for endothelial keratoplasty.

  8. Synthesis of thermo-responsive polymers recycling aqueous two-phase systems and phase formation mechanism with partition of ε-polylysine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengning; Dong, Wenying; Wan, Junfen; Cao, Xuejun

    2016-11-11

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) have the potential application in bioseparation and biocatalysis engineering. In this paper, a recyclable ATPS was developed by two thermo-responsive copolymers, PVBAm and PN. Copolymer PVBAm was copolymerized using N-vinylcaprolactam, Butyl methacrylate and Acrylamide as monomers, and PN was synthesized by N-isopropylacrylamide. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PVBAm and PN were 45.0°C and 33.5°C, respectively. The recoveries of both polymers could achieve over 95.0%. The phase behavior and formation mechanism of PVBAm/PN ATPS was studied. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was applied in the phase-forming mechanism study in ATPS. In addition, combining the analysis results of surface tension, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, the phase-forming of the PVBAm/PN ATPS was proved. The application was performed by partition of ε-polylysine in the 2% PVBAm/2% PN (w/w) ATPS. The results demonstrated that ε-polylysine was extracted into the PN-rich phase, the maximal partition coefficient (1/K) and extraction recovery of pure ε-polylysine were 6.87 and 96.36%, respectively, and 7.41 partition coefficient and 97.85% extraction recovery for ε-polylysine fermentation broth were obtained in the presence of 50mM (NH4)2SO4 at room temperature. And this method can effectively remove the most impurities from fermentation broth when (NH4)2SO4 exists in the ATPS. It is believed that the thermo-responsive recycling ATPS has a good application prospect in the field of bio-separation.

  9. Abatement of aqueous anionic contaminants by thermo-responsive nanocomposites: (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide))-co-silylanized magnesium/aluminun layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Qian, Guangren; Ruan, Xiuxiu; Frost, Ray L

    2015-06-15

    A series of novel thermo-responsive composite sorbents, were prepared by free-radical co-polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) and the silylanized Mg/Al layered double hydroxides (SiLDHs), named as PNIPAm-co-SiLDHs. For keeping the high affinity of Mg/Al layered double hydroxides towards anions, the layered structure of LDHs was assumed to be reserved in PNIPAm-co-SiLDHs by the silanization of the wet LDH plates as evidenced by the X-ray powder diffraction. The sorption capacity of PNIPAm-co-SiLDH (13.5 mg/g) for Orange-II from water was found to be seven times higher than that of PNIPAm (2.0mg/g), and the sorption capacities of arsenate onto PNIPAm-co-SiLDH are also greater than that onto PNIPAm, for both As(III) and As(V). These sorption results suggest that reserved LDH structure played a significant role in enhancing the sorption capacities. NO3(-) intercalated LDHs composite showed the stronger sorption capacity for Orange-II than that of CO3(2-). After sorption, the PNIPAm-co-SiLDH may be removed from water because of its gel-like nature, and may be easily regenerated contributing to the accelerated desorption of anionic contaminants from PNIPAm-co-SiLDHs by the unique phase-transfer feature through slightly heating (to 40 °C). These recyclable and regeneratable properties of thermo-responsive nanocomposites facilitate its potential application in the in-situ remediation of organic and inorganic anions from contaminated water.

  10. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers based on poly(vinyl methyl ether)—the effect of biomolecular ligands to balance cell adhesion and stimulated detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Juliane; Nitschke, Mirko; Pette, Dagmar; Valtink, Monika; Gramm, Stefan; Härtel, Frauke V.; Noll, Thomas; Funk, Richard H. W.; Engelmann, Katrin; Werner, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    Two established material systems for thermally stimulated detachment of adherent cells were combined in a cross-linked polymer blend to merge favorable properties. Through this approach poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) with its superior switching characteristic was paired with a poly(vinyl methyl ether)-based composition that allows adjusting physico-chemical and biomolecular properties in a wide range. Beyond pure PNiPAAm, the proposed thermo-responsive coating provides thickness, stiffness and swelling behavior, as well as an apposite density of reactive sites for biomolecular functionalization, as effective tuning parameters to meet specific requirements of a particular cell type regarding initial adhesion and ease of detachment. To illustrate the strength of this approach, the novel cell culture carrier was applied to generate transplantable sheets of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC). Sheets were grown, detached, and transferred onto planar targets. Cell morphology, viability and functionality were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and determination of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) before and after sheet detachment and transfer. HCEC layers showed regular morphology with appropriate TEER. Cells were positive for function-associated marker proteins ZO-1, Na+/K+-ATPase, and paxillin, and extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV before and after transfer. Sheet detachment and transfer did not impair cell viability. Subsequently, a potential application in ophthalmology was demonstrated by transplantation onto de-endothelialized porcine corneas in vitro. The novel thermo-responsive cell culture carrier facilitates the generation and transfer of functional HCEC sheets. This paves the way to generate tissue engineered human corneal endothelium as an alternative transplant source for endothelial keratoplasty.

  11. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers based on poly(vinyl methyl ether)—the effect of biomolecular ligands to balance cell adhesion and stimulated detachment

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Juliane; Nitschke, Mirko; Pette, Dagmar; Valtink, Monika; Gramm, Stefan; Härtel, Frauke V; Noll, Thomas; Funk, Richard H W; Engelmann, Katrin; Werner, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Two established material systems for thermally stimulated detachment of adherent cells were combined in a cross-linked polymer blend to merge favorable properties. Through this approach poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) with its superior switching characteristic was paired with a poly(vinyl methyl ether)-based composition that allows adjusting physico-chemical and biomolecular properties in a wide range. Beyond pure PNiPAAm, the proposed thermo-responsive coating provides thickness, stiffness and swelling behavior, as well as an apposite density of reactive sites for biomolecular functionalization, as effective tuning parameters to meet specific requirements of a particular cell type regarding initial adhesion and ease of detachment. To illustrate the strength of this approach, the novel cell culture carrier was applied to generate transplantable sheets of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC). Sheets were grown, detached, and transferred onto planar targets. Cell morphology, viability and functionality were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and determination of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) before and after sheet detachment and transfer. HCEC layers showed regular morphology with appropriate TEER. Cells were positive for function-associated marker proteins ZO-1, Na+/K+-ATPase, and paxillin, and extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV before and after transfer. Sheet detachment and transfer did not impair cell viability. Subsequently, a potential application in ophthalmology was demonstrated by transplantation onto de-endothelialized porcine corneas in vitro. The novel thermo-responsive cell culture carrier facilitates the generation and transfer of functional HCEC sheets. This paves the way to generate tissue engineered human corneal endothelium as an alternative transplant source for endothelial keratoplasty. PMID:27877823

  12. Preparation of porous bioceramics using reverse thermo-responsive hydrogels in combination with rhBMP-2 carriers: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Wang, Chau-Zen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling; Wang, Chih-Kuang

    2013-11-01

    Porous biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP) were fabricated using reverse thermo-responsive hydrogels with hydroxyapatite (HAp) and β-tricalcium (β-TCP) powder and planetary centrifugal mixer. This hydrogel mixture slurry will shrink and compress the HAp powder during the sintering process. The porous bioceramics are expected to have good mechanical properties after sintering at 1200°C. Reverse thermo-responsive hydrogels of poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-(methacrylic acid)] p(NiPAAm-MAA) were synthesized by free-radical cross-linking copolymerization, and their chemical properties were evaluated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the hydrogel was determined using turbidity measurements. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to examine the thermal properties. The porous bioceramic properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, bulk density, compressive strength testing and cytotoxicity. The compressive strength and average porosity of the porous bioceramics were examined at approximately 6.8MPa and 66% under 10wt% p(NiPAAm-MAA)=99:1 condition. The ratio of HAp/β-TCP can adjust two different compositional behaviors during the 1200°C sintering process without resulting in cell toxicity. The (rhBMP-2)-HAp-PLGA carriers were fabricated as in our previous study of the double emulsion and drop-coating technique. Results of animal study included histological micrographs of the 1-mm defect in the femurs, with the rhBMP-2 carrier group, the bioceramic spacer group and the bioceramic spacer with rhBMP-2 carriers group showing better callus formation around the femur defect site than the control group. The optimal dual effects of the bone growth factors from osteoconductive bioceramics and osteoinductive rhBMP-2 carriers produced better bone formation.

  13. SANS study on the solvated structure and molecular interactions of a thermo-responsive polymer in a room temperature ionic liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Hirosawa, Kazu; Fujii, Kenta; Ueki, Takeshi; ...

    2016-06-17

    Here, we utilized small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to quantitatively characterize the LCST-type phase behavior of the poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBnMA) derivative poly(2-phenylethyl methacrylate) (PPhEtMA) in the deuterated ionic liquid (IL) d8-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (d8-[C2mIm+][TFSA-]). The SANS curves showed a discontinuous change from those characteristics of dispersed polymer chains to those of large aggregates of PPhEtMA chains suspended in the IL solution, indicating that phase separation occurs discontinuously at Tc. We also evaluated the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the effective interaction parameter χeff of PPhEtMA in [C2mIm+][TFSA-] and compared them with those of PBnMA. The absolute value of the enthalpic contribution observedmore » for PPhEtMA was smaller than that for PBnMA. This difference in the enthalpic term can be attributed to the unfavorable interaction between the IL and the alkyl group in the side chain of PPhEtMA. In addition, the temperature dependence of χeff was smaller than the previously reported value for a thermo-responsive polymer in an aqueous system. Finally, it was found out that the strong dependence of Tc on the chemical structure in IL systems originated from the relatively smaller temperature dependence of χeff.« less

  14. One-step synthesis and self-assembly behavior of thermo-responsive star-shaped β-cyclodextrin-(P(MEO2MA- co-PEGMA))21 copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lulu; Lu, Beibei; Li, Lei; Wu, Jianning; Liu, Zhiyong; Guo, Xuhong

    2017-09-01

    A novel β-cyclodextrin-poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate)- co-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (abbreviated as: β-CD-(P(MEO2MA- co-PEGMA))21) was prepared by using the one-step strategy, and then the star-shaped copolymers were used in the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The structure of star-shaped β-CD-(P(MEO2MA- co-PEGMA))21 copolymers were studied by FTIR, 1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The star-shaped copolymers could self-assembled into micelles in aqueous solution owing to the outer amphiphilic β-CD as a core and the hydrophilic P(MEO2MA- co-PEGMA) segments as a shell. These thermo-responsive starshaped copolymers micelles exhibited lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water, which could be finely tuned by changing the feed ratio of MEO2MA to PEGMA. The LCST of star-shaped β-CD-(P(MEO2MA- co-PEGMA))21 copolymer micelles were increased from 35°C to 58°C with the increasing content of PEGMA. The results were investigated by DLS and TEM. When the temperature was higher than corresponding LCSTs, the micelles started to associate and form spherical nanoparticles. Therefore, β-CD-(P(MEO2MA- co-PEGMA))21 star-shaped copolymer micelles could be potentially applied in nano-carrier, nano-reactor, smart materials and biomedical fields.

  15. Photo-cross-linkable and thermo-responsive hydrogels containing chitosan and Pluronic for sustained release of human growth hormone (hGH).

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2007-01-01

    A Pluronic/chitosan hydrogel was prepared by employing di-acrylated Pluronic and acrylated chitosan for thermo-responsive and photo-cross-linkable in situ gelation. Mixtures of diacrylated Pluronic and acrylated chitosan were transformed to physical gels at elevated temperatures and the gelation temperature of the hydrogels gradually increased by increasing chitosan content in the hydrogels from 0% to 15%. Photo-cross-linked Pluronic/chitosan hydrogels were prepared by UV irradiation of the physical gels above their gelation temperatures. Hydrogels with a long photo-cross-linking time showed low degradation rates and chitosan contents in the hydrogels also impeded the degradation rates of the hydrogels, which was caused by a high degree of inter-connected polymer networks between acrylated Pluronic and acrylated chitosan. Human growth hormone (hGH), mixed with the mixture of Pluronic and chitosan, was photo-cross-linked to prepare biodegradable hGH hydrogels. The hydrogels containing hGH showed sustained release profiles for those with long photo-cross-linking times and high chitosan contents in the hydrogel. The hydrogels with a long cross-linking time showed impeded release of the protein and high content of chitosan in the hydrogels also decreased burst release of hGH from the hydrogels while hGH was rapidly released out for the hydrogels with low content of chitosan.

  16. SANS study on the solvated structure and molecular interactions of a thermo-responsive polymer in a room temperature ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Hirosawa, Kazu; Fujii, Kenta; Ueki, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Yuzo; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2016-06-17

    Here, we utilized small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to quantitatively characterize the LCST-type phase behavior of the poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBnMA) derivative poly(2-phenylethyl methacrylate) (PPhEtMA) in the deuterated ionic liquid (IL) d8-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (d8-[C2mIm+][TFSA-]). The SANS curves showed a discontinuous change from those characteristics of dispersed polymer chains to those of large aggregates of PPhEtMA chains suspended in the IL solution, indicating that phase separation occurs discontinuously at Tc. We also evaluated the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the effective interaction parameter χeff of PPhEtMA in [C2mIm+][TFSA-] and compared them with those of PBnMA. The absolute value of the enthalpic contribution observed for PPhEtMA was smaller than that for PBnMA. This difference in the enthalpic term can be attributed to the unfavorable interaction between the IL and the alkyl group in the side chain of PPhEtMA. In addition, the temperature dependence of χeff was smaller than the previously reported value for a thermo-responsive polymer in an aqueous system. Finally, it was found out that the strong dependence of Tc on the chemical structure in IL systems originated from the relatively smaller temperature dependence of χeff.

  17. SANS study on the solvated structure and molecular interactions of a thermo-responsive polymer in a room temperature ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Hirosawa, Kazu; Fujii, Kenta; Ueki, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Yuzo; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2016-06-17

    Here, we utilized small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to quantitatively characterize the LCST-type phase behavior of the poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBnMA) derivative poly(2-phenylethyl methacrylate) (PPhEtMA) in the deuterated ionic liquid (IL) d8-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (d8-[C2mIm+][TFSA-]). The SANS curves showed a discontinuous change from those characteristics of dispersed polymer chains to those of large aggregates of PPhEtMA chains suspended in the IL solution, indicating that phase separation occurs discontinuously at Tc. We also evaluated the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the effective interaction parameter χeff of PPhEtMA in [C2mIm+][TFSA-] and compared them with those of PBnMA. The absolute value of the enthalpic contribution observed for PPhEtMA was smaller than that for PBnMA. This difference in the enthalpic term can be attributed to the unfavorable interaction between the IL and the alkyl group in the side chain of PPhEtMA. In addition, the temperature dependence of χeff was smaller than the previously reported value for a thermo-responsive polymer in an aqueous system. Finally, it was found out that the strong dependence of Tc on the chemical structure in IL systems originated from the relatively smaller temperature dependence of χeff.

  18. A new style for synthesis of thermo-responsive Fe3O4/poly (methylmethacrylate-b-N-isopropylacrylamide-b-acrylic acid) magnetic composite nanosphere and theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Ghamkhari, Aliyeh; Massoumi, Bakhshali; Salehi, Roya

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a novel thermo-responsive Fe3O4/poly(methylmethacrylate-b-N-isopropylacrylamide-b-acrylic acid) magnetic composite nanosphere was synthesized for anticancer drug delivery applications. For this propose, the poly(methylmethacrylate-b-N-isopropylacrylamide-b-acrylic acid) [poly (MMA-b-NIPAAm-b-AAc)] was synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation transfer method. The physic-chemical characterization of the Fe3O4/poly(MMA-b-NIPAAm-b-AAc) magnetic composite nanosphere was investigated by FTIR, HNMR spectroscopies and GPC, FESEM, XRD, VSM and DLS. The thermo-sensitivity of the Fe3O4/P(MMA-b-NIPAAm-b-AAc) magnetic composite nanosphere was confirmed via DLS at 40 °C. DOX encapsulation efficiency was calculated to be 98.2%. The effect of temperature and pH on release behaviors of stimuli responsive DOX-loaded Fe3O4/P(MMA-b-NIPAAm-b-AAc)] magnetic composite nanosphere were investigated. The release rate at pH 7.4, 5.4 and 4 (T = 37 °C) was reached about 24.4, 42.4 and 57.5 wt%, after 4-5 day. The release rate improved at tumor simulated environment (t:40 °C and pH ≤ 5.4). The cytotoxic effects of the magnetic composite nanosphere were appraised by MTT assay and the results indicated that novel developed smart nanocomposite here was nontoxic to MCF-7 cells and can be applied as anti-cancer drug delivery system. Also, the results of the Cellular uptake of MCF7 cells treated with rhodamine labeled DOX-loaded nanocarrier for 2 h have indicated that DOX can be applied as cytotoxic agent and targeting ligand.

  19. Collagen Type II and a Thermo-Responsive Polymer of N-Isopropylacrylamide Induce Arthritis Independent of Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Klaczkowska, Dorota; Hultqvist, Malin; Hagenow, Kristin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva

    2011-01-01

    We established and characterized an arthritis mouse model using collagen type II (CII) and a thermo-responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm). The new PNiPAAm adjuvant is TLR-independent, as all immunized TLR including MyD88-deficient mice developed an anti-CII response. Unlike other adjuvants, PNiPPAm did not skew the cytokine response (IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17), as there was no immune deviation towards any one type of immune spectrum after immunization with CII/PNiPPAm. Hence, using PNiPAAm, we studied the actual immune response to the self-protein, CII. We observed arthritis and autoimmunity development in several murine strains having different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes after CII/PNiPAAm immunization but with a clear MHC association pattern. Interestingly, C57Bl/6 mice did not develop CII-induced arthritis, with PNiPAAm demonstrating absolute requirement for a classical adjuvant. Presence of a gene (Ncf1) mutation in the NADPH oxidation complex has a profound influence in arthritis and using PNiPAAm we could show that the high CIA severity in Ncf1 mutated mice is independent of any classical adjuvant. Macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, and osteoclasts but not mast cells dominated the inflamed joints. Furthermore, arthritis induction in the adjuvant-free, eosinophil-dependent Vβ12 DBA/1 mice could be shown to develop arthritis independent of eosinophils using CII/PNiPAAm. Thus, biocompatible and biodegradable PNiPAAm offers unique opportunities to study actual autoimmunity independent of TLR and a particular cytokine phenotype profile. PMID:21933654

  20. Synthesis and water-swelling of thermo-responsive poly(ester urethane)s containing poly(epsilon-caprolactone), poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(propylene glycol).

    PubMed

    Loh, Xian Jun; Colin Sng, Kian Boon; Li, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Thermo-responsive multiblock poly(ester urethane)s comprising poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) segments were synthesized. The copolymers were characterized by GPC, NMR, FTIR, XRD, DSC and TGA. Water-swelling analysis carried out at different temperatures revealed that the bulk hydrophilicity of the copolymers could be controlled either by adjusting the composition of the copolymer or by changing the temperature of the environment. These thermo-responsive copolymer films formed highly swollen hydrogel-like materials when soaked in cold water and shrank when soaked in warm water. The changes are reversible. The mechanical properties of the copolymer films were assessed by tensile strength measurement. These copolymers were ductile when compared to PCL homopolymers. Young's modulus and the stress at break increased with increasing PCL content, whereas the strain at break increased with increasing PEG content. The results of the cytotoxicity tests based on the ISO 10993-5 protocol demonstrated that the copolymers were non-cytotoxic and could be potentially used in biomedical applications.

  1. Thermo-responsive release of curcumin from micelles prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm)-b-PLLA-b-P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm) triblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfei; Darcos, Vincent; Monge, Sophie; Li, Suming; Zhou, Yang; Su, Feng

    2014-12-10

    Thermo-responsive micelles are prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic triblock copolymers composed of a poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) central block and two poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm)) lateral blocks, using solvent evaporation/film hydration method. The resulting micelles exhibit very low critical micelle concentration (CMC) which slightly increases from 0.0113 to 0.0144 mg mL(-1) while the DMAAm content increases from 31.8 to 39.4% in the hydrophilic P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm) blocks. The lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) of copolymers varies from 44.7 °C to 49.4 °C in water as determined by UV spectroscopy, and decreases by ca. 3.5 °C in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Curcumin was encapsulated in the core of micelles. High drug loading up to 20% is obtained with high loading efficiency (>94%). The LCST of drug loaded micelles ranges from 37.5 to 38.0 °C with drug loading increasing from 6.0 to 20%. The micelles with diameters ranging from 47.5 to 88.2 nm remain stable over one month due to the negative surface charge as determined by zeta potential (-12.4 to -18.7 mV). Drug release studies were performed under in vitro conditions at 37 °C and 40 °C, i.e. below and above the LCST, respectively. Initial burst release is observed in all cases, followed by a slower release. The release rate is higher at 40 °C than that at 37 °C due to thermo-responsive release across the LCST. On the other hand, micelles with lower drug loading exhibit higher release rate than those with higher drug loading, which is assigned to the solubility effect. Peppas' theory was applied to describe the release behaviors. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxicity of copolymers was evaluated using MTT assay. The results show that the copolymers present good cytocompatibility. Therefore, the nano-scale size, low CMC, high drug loading and stability, as well as good biocompatibility indicate that these thermo-responsive triblock copolymer micelles

  2. Novel biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles: generation and size-tuning of nanoparticles by the formation of micelle templates obtained from thermo-responsive monomers mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Shainer, Inbal; Gottlieb, Hugo E.; Gothilf, Yoav; Ebenstein, Yuval; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles are prepared by polymerization and cross-linking of N-isopropyl acrylamide in a micelle template formed by block copolymers macro-monomers at high temperature. Different monomer ratios form, at high temperature, well-defined micelles of different sizes which are further polymerized leading to nanoparticles with varied sizes from 20 to 390 nm. Physico-chemical characterization of the nanoparticles demonstrates their composition and homogeneity. The NPs were tested in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility assays, and their lack of toxicity was proven. The NPs can be labeled with fluorescent probes, and their intracellular fate can be visualized and quantified using confocal microscopy. Their uptake by live stem cells and distribution in whole developing animals is reported. On the basis of our results, a mechanism of nanoparticle formation is suggested. The lack of toxicity makes these nanoparticles especially attractive for biological applications such as screening and bio-sensing.

  3. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  4. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  5. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  6. Fluorescent monomers as building blocks for dye labeled polymers: synthesis and application in energy conversion, biolabeling and sensors.

    PubMed

    Breul, Alexander M; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2013-06-21

    This review focuses on side-chain functionalized polymers derived from direct (co)polymerization of fluorescent dyes. This overview about polymerizable dyes includes 1,8-naphthalimides, fluoresceins, rhodamines, coumarins, azo-dyes, oxadiazoles, diverse aromatic dyes as well as selected other dyes that cannot be classified within these groups. The discussed dyes have been functionalized with a polymerizable unit in order to apply straight-forward polymerization procedures. Therefore, the center of attention is set to the optical properties of the polymerizable dyes and the applicable polymerization techniques. Furthermore, the various applications (i.e., in biomedicine and pharmacy, as thermo-responsive materials and energy transfer materials, for dispersion of carbon nanotubes and others) of each polymer are discussed.

  7. Fluorescent microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  8. Fluorescence of dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Clerjaud, B

    1993-01-01

    This study of the fluorescence of natural enamel and of dental ceramics shows the fluorescence of ceramics not containing rare earths decreases when the color saturation increases; the fluorescence of samples of the same shade guide are not homogenous; some guides show a strong green fluorescence; and two shade guides of the same origin can present completely different fluorescence. The cementing medium can affect the fluorescence of a ceramic prosthesis.

  9. Engineering structure and function using thermo-responsive biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszka, Martha K.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly enables exquisite control at the smallest scale and generates order amongst macromolecular building blocks that remain too small to be manipulated individually. Environmental cues, such as heating, can trigger the organization of these materials from individual molecules to multiparticle assemblies with a variety of compositions and functions. Synthetic as well as biological polymers have been engineered for these purposes; however, biological strategies can offer unparalleled control over the composition of these macromolecular building blocks. Biologic polymers are macromolecules, themselves composed of monomeric units that can be precisely tailored at the genetic level; furthermore, they can often utilize endogenous biodegradation pathways, which may enhance their potential clinical applications. DNA (nucleotides), polysaccharides (carbohydrates), and proteins (amino acids) have all been engineered to self-assemble into nanostructures in response to a change in temperature. This focus article reviews the growing body of literature exploring temperature-dependent nano-assembly of these biological macromolecules, summarizes some of their physical properties, and discusses future directions. PMID:26112277

  10. Photo and Thermo Responsive Poly-N-isopropylacrylamide Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwaschka, J'nae; Cai, Tong; Garcia, Antonio; Marquez, Manuel; Gust, Devens; Vail, Sean; Hu, Zhibing

    2006-10-01

    Hydrogels composed with poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-Spiropyran acrylamide (PNIPAM-co-SP) were studied for their photo and thermal responsive properties. A mixture of a certain amount of N-isopropylacrylamide monomers, spiropyran acrylamide, crosslinker N, N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide, and photo initiator in acetone/ water solvent was irradiated by UV light to synthesize this PNIPAM-co-SP hydrogel. PNIPAM-co-SP hydrogel was then balanced in water for two days and its property measured by using UV-visible spectroscopy. It is found that the gel's size and charge may be altered using stimuli including light of different wavelengths and temperature.

  11. Designing thermo-responsive nanocomposites with anti-fouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; McFarlin, Gerald; Yong, Xin; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by marine organisms that utilize active ``defense'' (such as active cilia) to prevent the biofouling of their surfaces, we use computational modeling to design synthetic gel-based composite films that provide dual ``defense'' for antifouling applications. We design a nanocomposite gel film that can be harnessed to repel a variety of particles via either a temperature change or an imposed shear. Incorporation of stiff hydrophobic posts into a gel composed of cross-linked poly(N-isoproylacrylamide) chains allows us to drastically alter the film's surface properties when gel undergoes temperature-induced volume phase transition. Depending on whether the system's temperature is below or above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the gel, the posts are hidden in the swollen gel or exposed to the external solution. We model our system using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD); we validate our model through comparisons with Flory-Rehner theory. We focus on the influence of shear and temperature on the position of the particle in the system and isolate the conditions under which adsorption of particles of different sizes to the substrate is effectively prevented.

  12. Fabrication of thermo-responsive microfluidic membrane using photopolymerization patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    The programmed manipulation of responsive functional hydrogels is receiving large attention because of its unique functions and wide range of engineering applications. In this study, we developed an innovative stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) by fabricating a temperature-responsive hydrogel with a simple, cost effective, and high-throughput photopolymerization patterning process. Polymerization-induced diffusion on the macro-scale surface gives rise to form a multi-parted polymer membrane with fine pores by simple UV irradiation. After heating the SIM, the less deformable thick frame supports the whole structure, and the highly deformable thin base regulates the size of pores. The morphological configuration of the SIM can be easily changed by varying the solution composition or selecting a suitable photomask with different pattern. The developed SIM has the special sensing-to-actuation functions of stimuli-responsive hydrogels. This membrane with temperature-responsive pores would be potentially utilized in numerous practical applications, such as filter membranes with self-adjustable pores, membrane-based sensors, membrane-based actuators, and multi-functional membranes etc. This study was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) and funded by the Korean government (MSIP) (Grant No. 2008-0061991).

  13. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  14. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  15. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  16. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  17. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  18. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  19. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  20. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  1. Holograms with fluorescent benzyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Pérez, A.; Toxqui-López, S.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.; Dorantes-Garcia, V.

    2011-02-01

    Behavior study of the diffraction efficiency parameter from holographic gratings, with fluorescents inks such as benzyls. We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence to blue laser to make transmissions holograms using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensibilizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence propertied of inks, mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we show the results of painting hologram method with fluorescents inks and describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with gratings with a He-Cd laser at 442nm and we later were painting with fluorescent ink, interesting fluorescence characteristic to the hologram.

  2. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  3. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  4. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dysli, Chantal; Wolf, Sebastian; Berezin, Mikhail Y; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-09-01

    Imaging techniques based on retinal autofluorescence have found broad applications in ophthalmology because they are extremely sensitive and noninvasive. Conventional fundus autofluorescence imaging measures fluorescence intensity of endogenous retinal fluorophores. It mainly derives its signal from lipofuscin at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. Fundus autofluorescence, however, can not only be characterized by the spatial distribution of the fluorescence intensity or emission spectrum, but also by a characteristic fluorescence lifetime function. The fluorescence lifetime is the average amount of time a fluorophore remains in the excited state following excitation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is an emerging imaging modality for in vivo measurement of lifetimes of endogenous retinal fluorophores. Recent reports in this field have contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of various macular and retinal diseases. Within this review, the basic concept of fluorescence lifetime imaging is provided. It includes technical background information and correlation with in vitro measurements of individual retinal metabolites. In a second part, clinical applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging and fluorescence lifetime features of selected retinal diseases such as Stargardt disease, age-related macular degeneration, choroideremia, central serous chorioretinopathy, macular holes, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal artery occlusion are discussed. Potential areas of use for fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy will be outlined at the end of this review. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluorescence in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  7. Fluorescent Detection of Flaws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a method for detecting flaws in the surface of a workpiece, initially microcapsules containing a fluorescent dye are deposited on the surface...After removal of excess microcapsules from the surface in order to reduce background fluorescence, the surface is visually inspected under ultraviolet

  8. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  9. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  10. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  11. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  12. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  13. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  14. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  15. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  16. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ; Sun, Yiru [Princeton, NJ; Giebink, Noel [Princeton, NJ; Thompson, Mark E [Anaheim Hills, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  17. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  18. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  19. Laser fluorescence diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. K.; Krasilnikov, D. M.; Turkin, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper descsribes the development of an apparatus, method, and practical recommendation on using fluorescence diagnostics in alimentary-intestinal tract surgery and analyses of blood serum and plasma for investigating influence of various drug preparations on a human organism. The report of the firm Israel Aircraft Industries on the high efficiency of using fluorescent analysis in early diagnostics of rectum, lung, and breast cancer has stimulated our publication.

  20. Phase-Conjugated Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number)FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP PHASE-CONJUGATED FLUORESCENCE EMITTED POWER FOUR -WAVE MIXING THREE CONTRIBUTIONS...atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave mixing is studied from first principles. The MaxwellLeisenberg equations are solved for the...Fronczak Hall State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York 14260 Fluorescent emission by an atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave

  1. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  2. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluorescent Applications to Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and tests with model proteins have shown that labeling u to 5 percent of the protein molecules does not affect the X-ray data quality obtained . The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages. Since the label is covalently attached to the protein molecules, it "tracks" the protein s response to the crystallization conditions. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a darker background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, do not show up under fluorescent illumination. Crystals have the highest protein concentration and are readily observed against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. Preliminary tests, using model proteins, indicates that we can use high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that more rapid amorphous precipitation kinetics may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Experiments are now being carried out to test this approach using a wider range, of proteins. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also

  4. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Ray, Krishanu; Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Badugu, Ramachandram; Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Szmacinski, Henryk; Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence is widely used in biological research. Future advances in biology and medicine often depend on the advances in the capabilities of fluorescence measurements. In this overview paper we describe how a combination of fluorescence, and plasmonics, and nanofabrication can fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. This change will be based on the use of surface plasmons which are collective oscillations of free electrons in metallic surfaces and particles. Surface plasmon resonance is now used to measure bioaffinity reactions. However, the uses of surface plasmons in biology are not limited to their optical absorption or extinction. We have shown that fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons which radiate into the far field; additionally fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to this technology as plasmon-controlled fluorescence. We predict that plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF) will result in a new generation of probes and devices. PCF is likely to allow design of structures which enhance emission at specific wavelengths and the creation of new devices which control and transport the energy from excited fluorophores in the form of plasmons, and then convert the plasmons back to light. PMID:20953312

  5. Fluorescence of Melanin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, James Martin

    1981-06-01

    Optical fluorescence in aqueous suspensions of synthetic dopa melanin has been detected and investigated. A fluorescence lifetime of 8.3 ns was measured in pulsed laser experiments. Fluorescence was observed for excitation between 290 and 420 nm. The emission as a function of wavelength displayed a single broad maximum falling between 440 and 480 nm, depending on excitation wavelength. The dependence of the quantum efficiency for fluorescence on parameters such as solution temperature, viscosity, pH, and concentration of metal ion, such as copper, has been investigated. The emission intensity decreased at both high and low values of pH, with increasing temperatures, and with increasing metal ion concentration, and decreasing viscosity. The pH dependence of the fluorescence can be related to changes in the ionization state of the various ionizable groups attached to the fluorophores. A self consistent model was developed in which proton transfer from these groups was fast compared with fluorescence rates for one type of fluorophore and slow compared with those for another type. The fluorescence dependence on copper ion concentration is explained in terms of a model invoking a reaction between melanin fluorophores and copper ions leading to the formation of a melanin-copper complex which is itself fluorescent. A model incorporating diffusion controlled chemical reactions between fluorescents groups and quencher groups on the melanin polymer is developed and used to explain the observed dependence of melanin fluorescence on solvent viscosity. Over the temperature range 20(DEGREES)C-70(DEGREES)C, an Arrhenius type behavior was found with an activation enthalpy of 1.3 Kcal/mole. Using the temperature dependence of the viscous quenching model as well as the temperature dependence of the fluorophore-radical equilibrium concentration leads to a temperature dependence which is in reasonable agreement with the observed behavior. Many aspects of the experimental results

  6. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  7. Fluorescent Aptamer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui William; Kim, Youngmi; Meng, Ling; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika; Martin, Jennifer; Tang, Zhiwen; Shangguan, Dihua; O'Donoghue, Meghan; Tan, Weihong

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acid probes that can be evolved to have high specificity and affinity for different targets. These targets include biomar-ker proteins, small molecules, and even whole live cells that express a variety of surface proteins of interest. Aptamers offer several advantages over protein-based molecular probes such as low immunogenic activity, flexible modification, and in vitro synthesis. In addition, aptamers used as molecular probes can be made with easy signaling for binding with their corresponding targets. There are a few different fluorescence-based signal transduction mechanisms, such as direct fluorophore labeling, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence quenching, fluorescence anisotropy, and light-switching excimers. These signaling processes in combination with various labeling strategies of nucleic acid aptamers contribute to simple, rapid, sensitive, and selective biological assays. In this chapter, we discuss the optical signaling of aptamers for single proteins such as α-thrombin and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We also present detailed discussion about fluorescent aptamers developed from cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) for the recognition of different target tumor cells.

  8. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  9. Plasmonic fluorescent quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu

    2009-09-01

    Combining multiple discrete components into a single multifunctional nanoparticle could be useful in a variety of applications. Retaining the unique optical and electrical properties of each component after nanoscale integration is, however, a long-standing problem. It is particularly difficult when trying to combine fluorophores such as semiconductor quantum dots with plasmonic materials such as gold, because gold and other metals can quench the fluorescence. So far, the combination of quantum dot fluorescence with plasmonically active gold has only been demonstrated on flat surfaces. Here, we combine fluorescent and plasmonic activities in a single nanoparticle by controlling the spacing between a quantum dot core and an ultrathin gold shell with nanometre precision through layer-by-layer assembly. Our wet-chemistry approach provides a general route for the deposition of ultrathin gold layers onto virtually any discrete nanostructure or continuous surface, and should prove useful for multimodal bioimaging, interfacing with biological systems, reducing nanotoxicity, modulating electromagnetic fields and contacting nanostructures.

  10. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to < 10 ns. A temporal resolution of half the excitation period is possible which in this instance is 15 ns. This stroboscopic technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  11. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  12. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime attachment LIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Oord, Cornelius J. R.; Stoop, Karel W. J.; van Geest, Lambertus K.

    2001-05-01

    We present the Lambert Instruments Fluorescence Lifetime Attachment LIFA. LIFA enables easy to use and affordable microscopy and macroscopic FLIM. The system implements the homodyne detection scheme for measuring the fluorescence lifetime in each pixel of the image. The microscopy system features an ultra bright LED illuminator, the LI-(mu) Cam intensified CCD camera a high frequency signal generator. The illuminator replaces the excitation light source of a standard fluorescence microscopy, while the LI-(mu) CAM intensified CCD camera is attached to the photo-port. Both the illuminator and the intensifier are modulated at a frequency up to 100 MHz at a series of phase differences. The lifetime image is calculated from the series of images on a personal computer.

  14. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  15. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  16. A fluorescent molecularly-imprinted polymer gate with temperature and pH as inputs for detection of alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Karfa, Paramita; Roy, Ekta; Patra, Santanu; Kumar, Deepak; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we have reported a new approach on the use of stimuli-responsive molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for trace level sensing of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), which is a well know cancer biomarker. The stimuli-responsive MIP is composed of three components, a thermo-responsive monomer, a pH responsive component (tyrosine derivative) and a highly fluorescent vinyl silane modified carbon dot. The synthesized AFP-imprinted polymer possesses excellent selectivity towards their template molecule and dual-stimuli responsive behavior. Along with this, the imprinted polymer was also explored as 'OR' logic gate with two stimuli (pH and temperature) as inputs. However, the non-imprinted polymers did not have such 'OR' gate property, which confirms the role of template binding. The imprinted polymer was also used for estimation of AFP in the concentration range of 3.96-80.0 ng mL(-1), with limit of detection (LOD) 0.42 ng mL(-1). The role of proposed sensor was successfully exploited for analysis of AFP in real human blood plasma, serum and urine sample.

  17. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  18. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  19. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  20. Fluorescence Imaging in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Ryan K.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Although the modern surgical era is highlighted by multiple technological advances and innovations, one area that has remained constant is the dependence of the surgeon's vision on white-light reflectance. This renders different body tissues in a limited palette of various shades of pink and red, thereby limiting the visual contrast available to the operating surgeon. Healthy tissue, anatomic variations, and diseased states are seen as slight discolorations relative to each other and differences are inherently limited in dynamic range. In the upcoming years, surgery will undergo a paradigm shift with the use of targeted fluorescence imaging probes aimed at augmenting the surgical armamentarium by expanding the “visible” spectrum available to surgeons. Such fluorescent “smart probes” will provide real-time, intraoperative, pseudo-color, high-contrast delineation of both normal and pathologic tissues. Fluorescent surgical molecular guidance promises another major leap forward to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes, and to reduce overall healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of current and future surgical applications of fluorescence imaging in diseased and nondiseased tissues and focus on the innovative fields of image processing and instrumentation. PMID:23335674

  1. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  2. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  3. Microencapsulated Fluorescent Dye Penetrant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Microencapsulated fluorescent dye pentrant materials were evaluated for feasibility as a technique to detect cracks on metal surfaces when applied as...a free flowing dry powder. Various flourescent dye solutions in addition to a commercial penetrant (Zyglo ZL-30) were microencapsulated and tested on

  4. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  5. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  6. Recent Advances in Fluorescent Labeling Techniques for Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Haruo; Aoki, Takeo; Takata, Kuniaki

    2007-01-01

    Tremendous progress in recent computer-controlled systems for fluorescence and laser-confocal microscopy has provided us with powerful tools to visualize and analyze molecular events in the cells. Various fluorescent staining and labeling techniques have also been developed to be used with these powerful instruments. Fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) allow us to directly label particular proteins of interest in living cells. This technique has been extended over a large area of cell biology, and a variety of fluorescent protein-derived techniques have been developed to visualize the functions and conditions of the molecules within living cells. In this review, we summarize the techniques for fluorescent staining and labeling for recent fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18224244

  7. Holograms of fluorescent albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2011-09-01

    We report the characterization and analysis of photochromic films gallus gallus albumin as a matrix modified for holographic recording. Photo-oxidation of homogeneous mixtures prepared with albumin-propylene glycol, to combine chemically with aqueous solution of ammonium dichromate at certain concentrations. We analyzed the diffraction gratings, through the diffraction efficiency of the proposed material. Also, eosin was used as a fluorescent agent, so it is found that produces an inhibitory effect, thus decreasing the diffraction efficiency of the matrices prepared in near-identical circumstances. The work was to achieve stability of albumin films, were prepared with propylene glycol. Finally, experimental studies were performed with films when subjected to aqueous solution of eosin (fluorescent agent) to verify the ability to increase or decrease in diffraction efficiency.

  8. Integrated fluorescence analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Yoshida, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

  9. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  10. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  11. Chelators Exhibiting Triple Fluorescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-31

    dual fluorescence of 4-(N.N-dimethylamino) benzonitrile . DMABN (Fig. I a). in polar 19 solvent was discovered by Lippert more than 30 years ago...place between the 4 dimethyl amino donor group and the benzonitrile acceptor that is accompanied by a tvisting motion 5 and orbital decoupling of the...monitoring heavy metal ion concentration. The covalent 14 attachment of benzonitrile to the aza group of a metal binding ionophore that uniquely combines the

  12. Fluorescent Protein Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, C. S.; McEntegart, M. G.; Nairn, R. C.

    1958-01-01

    With the object of simplifying the fluorescent protein tracer technique, the following fluorochromes were examined as possible alternatives to fluorescein: aminoeosin, aminorhodamine B, 3-phenyl-7-isocyanatocumarin (Geigy), 5-β-carboxyethylaminoacridine, R 4388 (Geigy), fluolite C (I.C.I.), lissamine flavine FFS (I.C.I.), lissamine rhodamine GS (I.C.I.), and lissamine rhodamine B 200 (I.C.I.) (RB 200). With the exception of RB 200, none was suitable as a protein label largely because of unsatisfactory fluorescence intensity or colour. RB 200 has proved a successful alternative to fluorescein. The conjugation of dye to protein by a sulphonamido linkage is quick and simple and does not materially affect the physico-chemical or biological properties of the protein. The resulting conjugates are stable, have a brilliant orange fluorescence in ultraviolet light and good contrast with tissue autofluorescence. The contrast is sufficient to permit the use in microscopy of ultraviolet plus blue light with a yellow filter above the object to ensure a black background; fluorescence is greatly enhanced in this way. When injected intravenously into rats or rabbits, conjugates are distributed in the tissues and eliminated from the plasma in much the same way as proteins labelled with fluorescein or radio-active isotopes. Serum antibody conjugated with RB 200 retains immunological specificity as demonstrated by the staining of the corresponding antigen. Practical use has been made of RB 200 conjugates as plasma tracers and as specific immunological stains: they have been applied alone and in combination with fluorescein conjugates in double tracing experiments. ImagesFIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9 PMID:13610415

  13. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, S. M.; Richardson, R. W.

    1983-12-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  14. Plasmonic fluorescent quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yongdong

    2009-01-01

    Combining multiple discrete components into a single multifunctional nanoparticle could be useful in a variety of applications. Retaining the unique optical and electrical properties of each component after nanoscale integration is, however, a long-standing problem1,2. It is particularly difficult when trying to combine fluorophores such as semiconductor quantum dots with plasmonic materials such as gold, because gold and other metals can quench the fluorescence3,4. So far, the combination of quantum dot fluorescence with plasmonically active gold has only been demonstrated on flat surfaces5. Here, we combine fluorescent and plasmonic activities in a single nanoparticle by controlling the spacing between a quantum dot core and an ultrathin gold shell with nanometre precision through layer-by-layer assembly. Our wet-chemistry approach provides a general route for the deposition of ultrathin gold layers onto virtually any discrete nanostructure or continuous surface, and should prove useful for multimodal bioimaging6, interfacing with biological systems7, reducing nanotoxicity8, modulating electromagnetic fields5 and contacting nanostructures9,10. PMID:19734929

  15. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered. PMID:21714025

  16. Green fluorescent protein: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Remington, S James

    2011-09-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994-2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered.

  17. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E.; Pedron, Federico N.; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A.; Bari, Sara E.; Chemes, Lucía B.; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18−29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments. PMID:28289227

  18. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  19. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications.Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging

  20. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  1. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression.

  2. LABCEDE Fluorescence Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    S ) 5. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) PSI TR-756 AFGL-TR-88-0186 6a NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b OFFICE SYMBOL 7a NAME OF MONITORING...Include Security Classification) LABCEDE Fluorescence Investigations (U) 2 PZRSONAL AUTHOR( S ) B.D. ureen, B.L. Upschulte, W.J. Marinelli, L.G. Piper...production rates. 32 2. N2 (a 1l -X3 E 1) Einstein coefficients, Av,v,, ( s - 1) and transifion frequency (cm-i). 53 3. N2 (a,v)/N 2(C,2) population ratios. 56

  3. Fluorescence Detection In Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarner, Susan

    1988-04-01

    Fluorescence detection is in common usage in forensic science laboratories for the visualization of three enzyme markers. The fluorogenic substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate, 4-methylutbel-liveryl acetate, and fluorecein diacetate, are acted upon by the enzymes Erythrocyte Acid Phospha, tase, Esterase-D, and Carbonic Anhydrase-III, respectively, to produce compounds visible to the analyst when viewed with transmitted UV light at 365 nm. Additionally, the choice of fluorogenic corn, pounds may help detect a specific enzyme from a related enzyme. One of the responsibilities of a forensic science laboratory may be the analysis of blood for genetically controlled polymorphic enzymes and protein markers. The genetic markers are said to be polymorphic because each exhibits types which can be differentiated and allows for the inclusion or exclusion of possible-donors of the blood. Each genetic marker can be separated into these recognizable types by electrophoresis, a technique which separates compounds based on electrical charges. Electrophoresis is conducted by placing a portion or extract of each bloodstain into a support medium which will conduct electricity. This is known as a plate or membrane. By controlling the pH of the buffer and the potential that is applied to the plate, the analyst can achieve separation of the types within an enzyme marker. The types appear as differing patterns of bands. Once the bloodstain has been subjected to electrophoresis, the enzymes must be visualized. This is generally best accomplished by using the specific activity of the enzyme. For the enzymes described in the present work, the visualization is performed by over-layering the plate with a piece of filter paper that 'has been saturated with the appropriate non-fluorescent substrate and buffer. The bands of enzyme, which is now in discrete patterns, will act upon the non-fluorescent substrate to create a fluorescent compound. The plate is then viewed with transmitted UV

  4. Fluorescence in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Henrik

    Following the initial detection by Bowen in 1934 of the strong O III lines being due to accidental resonance with strong He II radiation, many strong spectral emission lines are explained as produced by fluorescence. Many of these are Fe II lines pumped by H Lyα, as a consequence of strong radiation from hydrogen and a favorable energy level structure for Fe II. The lines are observed in many types of objects with low density plasma components. The Weigelt condensations in the vicinity of the massive star Eta Carinae is one location where these lines are observed and can be studied in detail, as well as been used for diagnostics.

  5. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  6. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  7. Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fluorescence after polyelectrolyte caging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Krol, Silke; Campanini, Barbara; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2006-10-01

    Discovery of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) constituted an important improvement for living cell studies on submicron resolution allowing in vivo fluorescence labeling. We studied the photo-physical properties of single GFP molecules incorporated in a charged polyelectrolyte environment by means of single molecule spectroscopy. The fluorescence characteristics change dramatically in terms of photo-stability,lifetime and blinking behavior so that the proteins scale up to quantum dots. The reported results highlight interesting applications in the design of fluorescent markers and in the development of optical data storage architectures.

  8. Fluorescence-Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Guillermo

    The natural luminescent phenomena (from the Latin words "lumen" and "essentia", i.e., "made of light") such as northern lights (aurora borealis), marine brightness, glow-worms, shining putrid fish scales, "bluish"- appearing water when contained in certain wooden cups (quinine fluorescence), some stones heated at high temperatures with reducing agents (BaS phosphorescence), or light emitted while crushing sugar (triboluminescence) already fascinated our ancestors. Nowadays we understand that ultraviolet and visible emission of light originates from a competitive deactivation pathway of the lowest electronic excited state of atoms and molecules that produces the so called luminescence (the sub-terms fluorescence and phosphorescence just designate whether the return of the excited to the ground state is an "allowed" or "forbidden" process, namely it is fast or slow, the loosely-defined border between them being a 1-μs-1 rate constant). Actually, luminescence is the only method to generate light in the known Universe regardless it is powered by the nuclear reactions in the stars, the ohmical heating in bulbs, an electric discharge, the absorption of light or a (bio)chemical reaction (chemiluminescence).

  9. Two-photon resonance fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad; Bose, Subir K.

    2006-12-15

    We present a theory of two-photon resonance fluorescence of an atom or molecule in which the excitation by an external electromagnetic field as well as fluorescence emission is mediated by two-photon processes. The treatment is based on first dressing the atom or molecule by the external field and then evaluating perturbatively the effect of the interaction with the vacuum or fluorescent field and so resonance fluorescence can be considered as spontaneous emission from the dressed atom. The introduction of the combined system of atom and external field via dressed states leads to simpler calculations and more transparent physics. The fluorescence spectrum derived by us has similarities as well as differences with that of one-photon resonance fluorescence and earlier theoretical predictions for the two-photon case.

  10. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ``fluorescent cryocooler`` could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance.

  11. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-04-20

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  12. Fluorescence In Blood Stain Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heye, Curtis L.; Thornton, John I.

    1988-04-01

    Two fluorescent probes, ANS and TNS, have been further examined for their effectiveness in acting as fluorescent probes for the detection of blood stain patterns. These materials, which are not fluorescent in aqueous solution, react non-specifically with protein and enable an observer to discern a blood pattern when viewed under UV light at 365 nm. Other possible fluorescent probes have been evaluated and rejected for various reasons; these include luminol, tetramethylbenzidine, p-hvdroxy-phenylacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 2,7-aminofluorene.

  13. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards.

    PubMed

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F; Nield, Kathryn M; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-04-20

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600?nm and emitted above 700?nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  14. Absolute brightness of fluorescent microspheres.

    PubMed

    Finger, Isaac; Phillips, Scott; Mobley, Elizabeth; Tucker, Robert; Hess, Henry

    2009-02-07

    The absolute brightness of fluorescent particles, such as dye-containing nano- and microspheres or quantum dots, is a critical design parameter for many applications relying on fluorescence detection. The absolute brightness, defined as the ratio of radiant intensity of emission to illumination intensity of excitation, of nile-red fluorescent microspheres with a 1 micrometre diameter is measured to be 4.2 +/- 1 x 10(-16) m(2)/sr, and the implications for the design of kinesin motor protein-powered "smart dust" devices and the remote detection of fluorescence are discussed.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime in cardiovascular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We review fluorescence lifetime techniques including time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) instrumentation and associated methodologies that allow for characterization and diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaques. Emphasis is placed on the translational research potential of TR-LIFS and FLIM and on determining whether intrinsic fluorescence signals can be used to provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of high-risk atherosclerotic plaque. Our results demonstrate that these techniques allow for the discrimination of important biochemical features involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability and rupture and show their potential for future intravascular applications.

  16. Fluorescently labelled glycans and their applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongbin; Yalagala, Ravi Shekar; Yan, Fengyang

    2015-11-01

    This review summarises the literature on the synthesis and applications of fluorescently labelled carbohydrates. Due to the sensitivity of fluorescent detection, this approach provides a useful tool to study processes involving glycans. A few general categories of labelling are presented, in situ labelling of carbohydrates with fluorophores, fluorescently labelled glycolipids, fluorogenic glycans, pre-formed fluorescent glycans for intracellular applications, glycan-decorated fluorescent polymers, fluorescent glyconanoparticles, and other functional fluorescent glycans.

  17. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for the fluorescent detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Shushen; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xihan; Zhang, Mingchao

    2015-01-15

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) as a new kind of fluorescent nanoparticles, have recently attracted considerable research interest in a wide range of applications due to their low-cost and good biocompatibility. The fluorescent detection of metal ions is one of the most important applications. In this review, we first present the general detection mechanism of F-CNPs for the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including fluorescence turn-off, fluorescence turn-on, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ratiometric response. We then focus on the recent advances of F-CNPs in the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and other metal ions. Further, we discuss the research trends and future prospects of F-CNPs. We envision that more novel F-CNPs-based nanosensors with more accuracy and robustness will be widely used to assay and remove various metal ions, and there will be more practical applications in coming years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  19. Deconvolution method for fluorescence decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apanasovich, V. V.; Novikov, E. G.

    1990-09-01

    A new method for fluorescence decay deconvolution is offered. It has acceptable accuracy, high speed of deconvolution, and allows to estimate the number of exponentials. Some results of statistical experiments, using a simulation model of a pulsed fluorescence spectrometer, are introduced.

  20. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  1. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  2. Intense fluorescence of Au20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chongqi; Harbich, Wolfgang; Sementa, Luca; Ghiringhelli, Luca; Aprá, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Brune, Harald

    2017-08-01

    Ligand-protected Au clusters are non-bleaching fluorescence markers in bio- and medical applications. Here we show that their fluorescence can be an intrinsic property of the Au cluster itself. We find a very intense and sharp fluorescence peak located at λ =739.2 nm (1.68 eV) for Au20 clusters in a Ne matrix held at 6 K. The fluorescence reflects the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital-Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO-LUMO) diabatic bandgap of the cluster. Au20 shows a very rich absorption fine structure reminiscent of well defined molecule-like quantum levels. These levels are resolved since Au20 has only one stable isomer (tetrahedral); therefore our sample is mono-disperse in cluster size and conformation. Density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations clarify the nature of optical absorption and predict both main absorption peaks and intrinsic fluorescence in fair agreement with experiment.

  3. Exogenous specific fluorescence marker location reconstruction using surface fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Garashi; Gannot, Israel; Chernomordik, Victor V.; Gannot, Gallya; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.

    2003-07-01

    Diseased tissue may be specifically marked by an exogenous fluorescent marker and then, following laser activation of the marker, optically and non-invasively detected through fluorescence imaging. Interaction of a fluorophore, conjugated to an appropriate antibody, with the antigen expressed by the diseased tissue, can indicate the presence of a specific disease. Using an optical detection system and a reconstruction algorithm, we were able to determine the fluorophore"s position in the tissue. We present 3D reconstructions of the location of a fluorescent marker, FITC, in the tongues of mice. One group of BALB/c mice was injected with squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) cell line to the tongue, while another group served as the control. After tumor development, the mice"s tongues were injected with FITC conjugated to anti-CD3 and anti-CD 19 antibodies. An Argon laser excited the marker at 488 nm while a high precision fluorescent camera collected the emitted fluorescence. Measurements were performed with the fluorescent marker embedded at various simulated depths. The simulation was performed using agarose-based gel slabs applied to the tongue as tissue-like phantoms. A biopsy was taken from every mouse after the procedure and the excised tissue was histologically evaluated. We reconstruct the fluorescent marker"s location in 3D using an algorithm based on the random walk theory.

  4. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  5. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  6. Fluorescent blood cell angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-nun, Joshua; Constable, Ian J.

    1994-06-01

    Fluorescein angiography is currently the main method for evaluation of the retinal vascular patency. Ashton noted that capillary patency to the small fluorescein molecule may differ from that of the larger red blood cells. He concluded that fluorescein angiography is not able to demonstrate a developing stenosis, that might be the precipitating cause of a later capillary closure in various microvasculopathies. Sarelius et al have shown, in hamster cheek pouch and cremaster muscle, that fluorescently labeled erythrocytes in known concentrations can be used for the direct measurement of capillary flow parameters. The only assumption that this method relies on, is that the labeled cells are rheologically normal and therefore reflect the behavior of the total cell population. We have developed a new method for an in-vivo, real-time demonstration of the blood cell flow in the retinal capillary net. Based on the assumption presented by Sarelius et al, measurement and analysis of the retinal capillary blood cell flow is also possible from the results achieved by the new method.

  7. Autocatalytic fluorescence photoactivation.

    PubMed

    Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Swaminathan, Subramani; Captain, Burjor; Raymo, Françisco M

    2014-10-01

    We designed an autocatalytic photochemical reaction based on the photoinduced cleavage of an α-diketone bridge from the central phenylene ring of a fluorescent anthracene derivative. The product of this photochemical transformation sensitizes its own formation from the reactant, under illumination at a wavelength capable of exciting both species. Specifically, the initial and direct excitation of the reactant generates the product in the ground state. The subsequent excitation of the latter species results in the transfer of energy to another molecule of the former to establish an autocatalytic loop. Comparison of the behavior of this photoactivatable fluorophore with that of a model system and the influence of dilution on the reaction progress demonstrates that the spectral overlap between the emission of the product and the absorption of the reactant together with their physical separation govern autocatalysis. Indeed, both parameters control the efficiency of the resonant transfer of energy that is responsible for establishing the autocatalytic loop. Furthermore, the proximity of silver nanoparticles to reactant and product increases the energy-transfer efficiency with a concomitant acceleration of the autocatalytic process. Thus, this particular mechanism to establish sensitization offers the opportunity to exploit the plasmonic effects associated with metallic nanostructures to boost photochemical autocatalysis.

  8. Fluorescent Reporters for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Cheryl L.; Boles, Blaise R.; Lauderdale, Katherine J.; Thoendel, Matthew; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus as a prominent pathogen in community and healthcare settings, there is a growing need for effective reporter tools to facilitate physiology and pathogenesis studies. Fluorescent proteins are ideal as reporters for their convenience in monitoring gene expression, performing host interaction studies, and monitoring biofilm growth. We have developed a suite of fluorescent reporter plasmids for labeling S. aureus cells. These plasmids encode either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or higher wavelength reporter variants for yellow (YFP) and red (mCherry) labeling. The reporters were placed under control of characterized promoters to enable constitutive or inducible expression. Additionally, plasmids were assembled with fluorescent reporters under control of the agr quorum-sensing and Sigma factor B promoters, and the fluorescent response with wildtype and relevant mutant strains was characterized. Interestingly, reporter expression displayed a strong dependence on ribosome binding site (RBS) sequence, with the superoxide dismutase RBS displaying the strongest expression kinetics of the sequences examined. To test the robustness of the reporter plasmids, cell imaging was performed with fluorescence microscopy and cell populations were separated using florescence activated cell sorting (FACS), demonstrating the possibilities of simultaneous monitoring of multiple S. aureus properties. Finally, a constitutive YFP reporter displayed stable, robust labeling of biofilm growth in a flow cell apparatus. This toolbox of fluorescent reporter plasmids will facilitate cell labeling for a variety of different experimental applications. PMID:19264102

  9. Imaging individual green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Daniel W.; Hom-Booher, Nora; Vale, Ronald D.

    1997-07-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy techniques have allowed the video-time imaging of single molecules of fluorescent dyes covalently bound to proteins in aqueous environments. However, the techniques have not been exploited fully because proteins can be difficult to label, and dye modification may cause partial or complete loss of activity. These difficulties could be circumvented by fusing proteins to green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. Here we report that single S65T mutant GFP molecules can be imaged using total internal reflection microscopy, and that ATP-driven movement of an individual kinesin molecule (a microtubule motor protein) fused to GFP can be readily observed.

  10. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  11. Fluorescent beads disintegrate actin networks.

    PubMed

    Golde, Tom; Schuldt, Carsten; Schnauß, Jörg; Strehle, Dan; Glaser, Martin; Käs, Josef

    2013-10-01

    We studied the influence of fluorescent polystyrene beads on both entangled and cross-linked actin networks. Thermal bead fluctuations were observed via video particle tracking and analyzed with one-point microrheology. Illumination of fluorescent beads with their appropriate excitation wavelength leads to a drastic softening of actin gels. Other wavelengths and bright field microscopy do not increase thermal bead fluctuations. This effect cannot be significantly reduced by adding common oxygen scavengers. We conclude that the usage of fluorescent beads impairs results when studying the microrheology of actin networks.

  12. NIR fluorescent ytterbium compound for in vivo fluorescence molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Aita, Kazuki; Temma, Takashi; Kuge, Yuji; Seki, Koh-ichi; Saji, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new NIR fluorescent probe based on an ytterbium(III) (E)-1-(pyridin-2-yl-diazenyl)naphthalen-2-ol (PAN) complex. This probe emits near-infrared luminescence derived from the Yb ion through excitation of the PAN moiety with visible light (lambda(ex)= 530 nm, lambda(em)= 975 nm). The results support the possible utility of the probe for in vivo fluorescence molecular imaging.

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cranfill, Paula J.; Sell, Brittney R.; Baird, Michelle A.; Allen, John R.; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H. Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W.; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FP) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning the blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has its own unique photophysical properties. Thus, there is no single “best” fluorescent protein for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for any given application, we have characterized quantitatively over 40 different FPs for their brightness, photostability, pH stability, and monomeric properties, which permits easy apples-to-apples comparisons between these FPs. We report the values for all of the FPs measured, but focus the discussion on the more popular and/or best performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  14. Fluorescence diagnosis in tissue injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Vitória H.; Ferreira, Juliana; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2009-06-01

    Background and Objectives: The paper aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the fluorescence spectroscopy in the detection of UV-induced skin change of Wistar rats. Study Design/ Materials and Methods: In a group male Wistar rats, the skin damage was produced by an UV-C lamp, periodically monitored using the laser-induced fluorescence, until complete healing process. After determining a characteristic emission band present in the fluorescence spectra of the induced injuries, the amplitude band monitoring allowed the follow up on the injury and the recovery. Results: We observed the appearance of two new emission bands more evident at the injury spectra when compared to the spectrums from normal non-exposed tissue. Following such spectral bands was possible to observe the establishment and recovery. Conclusions: The fluorescence spectroscopy is a promising technique in distinguishing between normal and UV induced skin change helping the evaluation of changes which are irreversible cancer tissue characteristics.

  15. Fluorescent immunosensors using planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, James N.; Caldwell, Karin D.; Christensen, Douglas A.; Dyer, Shellee; Hlady, Vladimir; Huang, P.; Janatova, V.; Wang, Hiabo K.; Wei, A. P.

    1993-05-01

    The goal of our research program is to develop competitive and sandwich fluoroimmunoassays with high sensitivity and fast response time, that do not require external reagents. Our approach to this problem is to employ an optical immunoassay based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Specifically, monoclonal antibodies are immobilized on a planar waveguide. Total internal reflection of light in the planar waveguide sets up an evanescent field which extends about 2000 angstroms from the interface. In the competitive immunoassay, a fluorescent label is coupled to a small synthetic antigen which is packaged with the antibody. In the absence of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen binds to the antibody and is excited by the evanescent field. Upon the addition of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen molecules are displaced by unlabeled antigen molecules and diffuse out of the evanescent field. In the sandwich assay, a primary or `capture' antibody is immobilized on the planar waveguide, and a secondary or `tracer' antibody (which is labeled with a fluorescent dye) is added to the bulk solution. In the absence of analyte, the tracer antibody remains in solution and very little fluorescence is observed. However, upon addition of analyte, a `molecular sandwich' is formed on the waveguide, composed of: (1) the capture antibody; (2) the analyte; and (3) the tracer antibody. Once this sandwich forms, the tracer antibody is within the evanescent field and fluoresces. Fluorescence emission is detected by a charged- coupled device (CCD). Using this approach, we have developed a prototype immunosensor for the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This device meets our design goals and exhibits a sensitivity of 0.1 - 1 pmolar.

  16. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  17. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  18. Fluorescence guidance during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Brucker, David; Ehrhardt, Andre; Fischer, Stefan; Goebel, Werner; Goetz, Marcus; Guenther, Bettina; Hennig, Georg; Herms, Jochen; Irion, Klaus-Martin; Johansson, Ann; Kienast, Yvonne; Kniebuehler, Gesa; Li, Pan; Ruehm, Adrian; Sandner, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    Objective: When a stereotactic biopsy is taken to enable histopathological diagnosis of a suspected brain tumor, it is essential to i) do this safely, that is not injure a major blood vessel and ii) to obtain relevant vital material from the tumor. We are investigating the suitability of Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence for blood vessel recognition and 5- Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence for identification of proliferative brain tumor tissue. Methods: A fiber-optic endoscopic approach was studied to generate and detect both fluorescence signals. PpIX concentrations in brain tumors have been measured by chemical extraction. Preliminary equipment was studied in a mouse model. Results: PpIX-concentrations in glioblastoma tissue showed high inner- and inter-patient variability, but each patient out of 15 with interpretable data showed at least one sample with a PpIX-concentration exceeding 2.4 μmol/l, which is easily detectable by state-of-the-art fiberoptic fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. The imaging fluoroscope with 30,000 pixels resolution could be introduced through a position controlled stereotactic needle. ICG-fluorescence from vessels with diameters >= 0.1 mm can be detected with a contrast of 2-2.5 against surrounding tissue. Conclusion: Fluorescence detection during stereotactic biopsy might increase safety and precision of the procedure significantly.

  19. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  20. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  1. A Convenient Lecture Demonstration of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Hugh D.; Axtell, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes fluorescence experiments demonstrating that emitted light is at longer wavelengths than absorbed light and that fluorescence decays rapidly when the source of excitation is removed. Systems whose acidic and basic forms have different fluorescent characteristics are used to demonstrate fluorescence visible and invisible to the naked eye.…

  2. A Convenient Lecture Demonstration of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Hugh D.; Axtell, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes fluorescence experiments demonstrating that emitted light is at longer wavelengths than absorbed light and that fluorescence decays rapidly when the source of excitation is removed. Systems whose acidic and basic forms have different fluorescent characteristics are used to demonstrate fluorescence visible and invisible to the naked eye.…

  3. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology. PMID:23710326

  4. Investigation of Quenching Mechanism in Thermoreversible Fluorescent Recording Materials of Fluorescence Using Thermochromic Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Shuzo; Vacha, Martin; Watanabe, Toshiyuki

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrated reversible thermosensitive recording of a fluorescent image (TRF) using a low-molecular-weight mixture consisting of a fluorescent dye, a fluoran dye, a developer, and a reversible matrix. In this material, reversible thermoresponsive disorder-crystal transition triggers a cyclical colorless-color change of a fluoran dye, which induces on-off switching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a fluorescent dye to a fluoran dye. On-off switching of fluorescence is induced by heat-promoted off-on switching of FRET. Modulation of fluorescence is held at room temperature by utilizing thermal hysteresis, and nondestructive readout of the fluorescent image is accomplished in the presence of excitation light. Here, we investigate the on-off switching mechanism of fluorescence in this recording material. We analyzed the theoretical factor of emission quenching in the erasing state by comparing the theoretical overlap integral Ω between fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes on the basis of the FRET theory with experimental emission contrast for various combinations of fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes. It was proved that fluorescence on-off switching occurs mainly by concentration quenching due to the aggregation of fluorescent dyes and FRET from isolated fluorescent dyes to colored fluoran dyes. The key issue to obtain both high-contrast fluorescence and high fluorescence quantum yield is to control these two factors.

  5. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  6. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP).

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2008-11-28

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure.

  7. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Yi; Zhang Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2008-11-28

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure.

  8. Ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of DNA sequencing gels

    SciTech Connect

    Mathies, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the three years of this grant we have: (1) Developed and applied a new theory for optimizing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection. (2) Developed and patented a new high-sensitivity confocal-fluorescence laser-excited gel-scanner. (3) Applied this scanner to the development of a new class of versatile and sensitive fluorescent dyes for DNA detection. (4) Developed methods for the detection of single fluorescent molecules by fluorescence burst detection. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mathies, R.A.; Glazer, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    We have shown that a number of polycationic highly fluorescent dyes form complexes with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) which are stable to electrophoresis and have characterized in detail such dsDNA complexes with TOTO (1,1[prime]-(4,4,7,7-tetramethyl-4,7-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-[3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene]-quinolinium tetraiodide) and oxazole yellow dimer (YOYO; an analogue of TOTO with a benzo-1,3-oxazole in place of the benzo-1,3-thiazole). TOTO and YOYO are virtually non-fluorescent in solution, but form highly fluorescent complexes with dsDNA, up to a maximum dye to DNA bp ratio of 1:4, with >1000-fold fluorescence enhancement. We have developed an assay using YOYO for the quantitation of single-stranded and dsDNA in solution applicable over a range of DNA concentrations from 0.5 to 100 ng per ml. The fluorescent dsDNA-dye complexes allow detection of dsDNA on agarose and acrylamide gels with picogram sensitivity. We have applied these complexes in multiplex mapping experiments for accurate sizing and quantitation of restriction fragments. We have shown that in gel shift experiments the stable dsDNA-dye complexes can be used to detect heteroduplex-Muts complexes with a sensitivity comparable to radioisotopic detection.

  10. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-05-18

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  11. Thermo-responsive PNIPAM-metal hybrids: An efficient nanocatalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathy, Smith Sagar; Bhol, Prachi; Chakkarambath, Aswathy; Mohanta, Jagdeep; Samantaray, Kunal; Bhat, Suresh K.; Panda, Subhendu K.; Mohanty, Priti S.; Si, Satyabrata

    2017-10-01

    Micron size thermoresponsive cross-linked polymeric microgels of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) are used as ;microreactor; for embedding metal nanoparticles of different shapes. Using a simple and robust method, we have synthesized various polymer-metal hybrid nanostructures incorporated with Au nanorods (AuNR), Au nanospheres (AuNS) and Ag nanospheres (AgNS). These hybrid nanostructures have been characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and static light scattering (SLS) followed by their catalytic activity. TEM studies directly confirmed the mondispersity of synthesized hybrid microgels and stability of the embedded metal nanoparticles within the microgels. Optical studies confirmed the presence of respective absorption bands that correspond to AuNS, AgNS and AuNR respectively. Extensive DLS studies demonstrated that although these hybrid microgels preserve their thermoresponsive properties, i.e their hydrodynamic radius decreased with increasing temperature, their thermosensitivity were comparatively lesser than pure PNIPAM microgels. Combining with studies using static light scattering, we further found that AuNS and AgNS were inhomogeneously distributed within microgels where the majority of the nanoparticles present within the loosely cross-linked shell. On the other hand AuNR were distributed more homogeneously within the microgels. Catalytic performance of various nanostructures loaded onto PNIPAM microgel beads were evaluated by studying the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. Complete catalytic conversion using AgNS occurred in ∼30 min with a first-order rate constant of 0.159 min-1 having a 7 min induction period. On the other hand no induction period was observed for AuNS and AuNR and the reaction completed in 3-4 min with a first-order rate constant of 1.607 min-1 and 1.627 min-1 respectively. Further, PNIPAM-AuNS and PNIPAM-AuNR possess better catalytic activity as well as recyclability compared to that of PNIPAM-AgNS.

  12. Rheological properties of a biological thermo-responsive hydrogel prepared from vegetable oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hydrogel is a colloidal gel in which water is the dispersion medium. The unique properties of hydrogels make this kind of materials have many utilization potentials, such as drug delivery, gene therapy, wound care products, breast implant materials, cosmetic products, and tissue engineering. Hydroge...

  13. Effective electrostatic interactions among charged thermo-responsive microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    González-Mozuelos, P.

    2016-02-07

    This work explores the nature and thermodynamic behavior of the effective electrostatic interactions among charged microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte, taking special interest in the effects due to the thermally induced variation of the microgel size while the remaining parameters (microgel charge and concentration, plus the amount of added salt) are kept constant. To this end, the rigorous approach obtained from applying the precise methodology of the dressed ion theory to the proper definition of the effective direct correlation functions, which emerge from tracing-out the degrees of freedom of the microscopic ions, is employed to provide an exact description of the parameters characterizing such interactions: screening length, effective permittivity, and renormalized charges. A model solution with three components is assumed: large permeable anionic spheres for the microgels, plus small charged hard spheres of equal size for the monovalent cations and anions. The two-body correlations among the components of this model suspension, used as the input for the determination of the effective interaction parameters, are here calculated by using the hyper-netted chain approximation. It is then found that at finite microgel concentrations the values of these parameters change as the microgel size increases, even though the ionic strength of the supporting electrolyte and the bare charge of the microgels remain fixed during this process. The variation of the screening length, as well as that of the effective permittivity, is rather small, but still interesting in view of the fact that the corresponding Debye length stays constant. The renormalized charges, in contrast, increase markedly as the microgels swell. The ratio of the renormalized charge to the corresponding analytic result obtained in the context of an extended linear response theory allows us to introduce an effective charge that accounts for the non-linear effects induced by the short-ranged association of microions to the microgels. The behavior of these effective charges as a function of the amount of added salt and the macroion charge, size, and concentration reveals the interplay among all these system parameters.

  14. Thermo-Responsive Films Based Upon Diels-Alder Chemistry and Block Copolymer Phase Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    angles were measured using HPLC- grade water by defining a circle about the drop and recording the tangent angle formed at the substrate surface...Health. http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/download.html (accessed 2006). 27. Doolittle, L. R. A Semiautomatic Algorithm for Rutherford Backscattering

  15. Functionalized thermo-responsive microgels for high performance forward osmosis desalination.

    PubMed

    Hartanto, Yusak; Yun, Seonho; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels were recently proposed for energy-saving forward osmosis (FO) process. However, their low water flux and dewatering ability for reuse make them less attractive for industrial desalination process. In this work, the co-polymer microgels of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid with different mixing ratios were synthesized using surfactant-free emulsion polymerization to produce submicron-size hydrogels with high surface area and fast swelling-deswelling response. The microgels were employed as draw agents in a laboratory scale FO desalination system. The microgel-based FO process performed a high water flux up to 23.8 LMH and high water recovery ability of 72.4%. In addition, we explored a new conductivity measurement method to online analyze water flux of the FO system. This on-line conductivity analysis approach appeared to be an accurate and efficient method for evaluating microgel-based FO desalination performance. Our experimental data revealed that the stimuli-responsive microgel was an efficient draw agent for FO desalination.

  16. Novel thermo-responsive coloring phenomena in water/surfactant/oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Clara; Aoyama, Tetsuya; Imura, Yoshiro; Kawai, Takeshi

    2011-11-14

    Emulsions comprising a dual-surfactant system of a long-chain amidoamine derivative and a quaternary ammonium salt developed an iridescent color at a specific temperature region. The emulsions underwent phase inversion on heating from an O/W emulsion to a W/O emulsion, passing through a periodical lamellar structure which developed a characteristic interference color. Interestingly, the color and the coloring temperature can be independently controlled by adjusting the concentration of surfactants, respectively. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  17. Dynamics of a thermo-responsive microgel colloid near to the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Xiaojun; Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, we used diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) to investigate the aging signatures of a thermo-sensitive colloidal glass and compared them with those of molecular glasses from the perspective of the Kovacs temperature-jump, volume recovery experiments [X. Di, K. Z. Win, G. B. McKenna, T. Narita, F. Lequeux, S. R. Pullela, and Z. Cheng, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 095701 (2011)]. In order to further look into the glassy behavior of colloidal systems, we have synthesized a new core/shell particle with lower temperature sensitivity and studied the aging signatures of concentrated systems, again following Kovacs' protocol. Similar signatures of aging to those observed previously were seen in this new system. Moreover, a systematic study of the temperature dependence of the dynamics of the new system for different weight concentrations was performed and the dynamic fragility index m was determined. We have also explored the use of the properties determined from the DWS measurements to obtain macroscopic rheological parameters - storage modulus G'(ω) and loss modulus G″(ω) - using a generalized Stokes-Einstein approach. The micro-rheological and macro-rheological values are in reasonable agreement.

  18. Structural studies on aqueous gelatin solutions: Implications in designing a thermo-responsive nanoparticulate formulation.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Saad M; Rao, Ch Mohan

    2017-02-01

    Gelatin as a polymer has found extensive application in the pharmaceutical industry. It is also being used, as a matrix molecule, for nanoparticle based drug delivery applications. Gelatin nanoparticles synthesised, keeping the native structure intact, show interesting properties. Synthesizing such nanoparticles requires an understanding of the structural features of gelatin under conditions of nanoparticle synthesis and preserving them during the process. To address this we have carried out an extensive characterization of gelatin using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) under various reaction conditions that are utilized in the desolvation method for gelatin nanoparticle synthesis. We investigated the gel-sol transition, hysteresis and gelatin fibre morphology under different pH and temperature conditions. We also investigated the temperature and pH dependence of triple-helix to random-coil transition in gelatin. We finally demonstrate the synthesis of gelatin nanoparticles with native gelatin. These nanoparticles show shrinkage in size (∼90nm) with increase in temperature from 30°C (369.4 ±19.8) to 40°C (282.3±9.8). Our results suggest that by carefully selecting the reaction conditions, it is possible to synthesise nanoparticles having partially folded structures and with a varying degree of sensitivity towards temperature and pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kinetic investigation and lifetime prediction of Cs-NIPAM-MBA-based thermo-responsive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Othman, Muhammad Bisyrul Hafi; Khan, Abbas; Ahmad, Zulkifli; Zakaria, Muhammad Razlan; Ullah, Faheem; Akil, Hazizan Md

    2016-01-20

    This study attempted to clarify the influence of a cross-linker, N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) on the non-isothermal kinetic degradation, solid state and lifetime of hydrogels using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (F-W-O), Kissinger, and Coats-Redfern (C-Red) methods. The series of dual-responsive Cs-PNIPAM-MBA microgels were synthesized by soapless-emulsion free radical copolymerization in an aqueous medium at 70 °C. The thermal properties were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under nitrogen atmosphere. The apparent activation energy using the chosen Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger methods showed that they fitted each other. Meanwhile, the type of solid state mechanism was determined using the Coats-Redfern method proposed for F1 (pure Cs) and F2 (Cs-PNIPAM-MBA hydrogel series) types, which comprise random nucleation with one nucleus reacting on individual particles, and random nucleation with two nuclei reacting on individual particles, respectively. On average, a higher Ea was attributed to the greater cross-linking density of the Cs hydrogel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermo-responsive hydrogels with N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylamide interpenetrating networks for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Wu, Yanye; Huo, Yinlei

    2015-01-01

    Series of thermo-sensitive hydrogels (PNAs) based on N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylamide interpenetrating polymer networks were synthesized via in situ free-radical polymerization. Poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate) and poly (ε-caprolactone diacrylate) were synthesized as macro-cross-linkers due to their excellent biocompatibilities. The macro-cross-linkers and hydrogels were characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR, respectively. The interior morphology of the hydrogels was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The swelling ratios at different temperatures and the swelling/deswelling kinetics of the hydrogels were studied. Their volume phase transition temperatures were also measured by differential scanning calorimetry characterization. The results indicated that the PNA hydrogels had uniform macroporous structures, and they not only had considerable swelling ratios, but also exhibited rapid swelling/deswelling kinetics and response sensitivities. In addition, the weight ratio of AAm/NIPAAm also affected the swelling performance and phase transition temperature of hydrogels, and its value less than 5% was the optimal proportion to achieve excellent comprehensive properties. Levofloxacin lactate and Naproxen were selected as drugs and simulated in vitro condition release, and the drug release results showed that the PNA hydrogels behaved fast release performance.

  1. Effective electrostatic interactions among charged thermo-responsive microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Mozuelos, P.

    2016-02-01

    This work explores the nature and thermodynamic behavior of the effective electrostatic interactions among charged microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte, taking special interest in the effects due to the thermally induced variation of the microgel size while the remaining parameters (microgel charge and concentration, plus the amount of added salt) are kept constant. To this end, the rigorous approach obtained from applying the precise methodology of the dressed ion theory to the proper definition of the effective direct correlation functions, which emerge from tracing-out the degrees of freedom of the microscopic ions, is employed to provide an exact description of the parameters characterizing such interactions: screening length, effective permittivity, and renormalized charges. A model solution with three components is assumed: large permeable anionic spheres for the microgels, plus small charged hard spheres of equal size for the monovalent cations and anions. The two-body correlations among the components of this model suspension, used as the input for the determination of the effective interaction parameters, are here calculated by using the hyper-netted chain approximation. It is then found that at finite microgel concentrations the values of these parameters change as the microgel size increases, even though the ionic strength of the supporting electrolyte and the bare charge of the microgels remain fixed during this process. The variation of the screening length, as well as that of the effective permittivity, is rather small, but still interesting in view of the fact that the corresponding Debye length stays constant. The renormalized charges, in contrast, increase markedly as the microgels swell. The ratio of the renormalized charge to the corresponding analytic result obtained in the context of an extended linear response theory allows us to introduce an effective charge that accounts for the non-linear effects induced by the short-ranged association of microions to the microgels. The behavior of these effective charges as a function of the amount of added salt and the macroion charge, size, and concentration reveals the interplay among all these system parameters.

  2. Effects of chitosan fiber addition on the properties of polyurethane with thermo-responsive shape memory.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Iijima, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Ohta, Mitsuru; Muguruma, Takeshi; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nakazawa, Futoshi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2016-03-30

    We investigated the effects of the addition of chitosan fiber (biomass nanofiber made by Sugino (BiNFi-s)) to polyether-based thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) on material properties. BiNFi-s (2 and 5 wt %)/TPU composite materials were prepared via compression molding, and glass fiber (2 and 5 wt %)/TPU composite materials and plain TPU were also prepared for comparison. The glass transition temperature was analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, and the crystal structure was investigated using X-ray diffraction. 20-mm-long test specimens with cross-sectional dimensions of 1 mm × 1 mm were cut from sheets of the composite materials, and three-point bending tests were carried out using a universal testing machine to investigate their mechanical properties and shape memory. The addition of BiNFi-s or glass fiber to TPU did not influence the glass transition temperature, although the crystal structure changed from semi-crystalline to amorphous. The elastic modulus increased 40% by the addition of 5 wt % BiNFi-s (2.31 MPa) compared with plain TPU (1.65 MPa), and these composites exhibited shape recovery with clinically relevant changes in temperature. The addition of 5 wt % BiNFi-s into TPU resulted in an improvement in the elastic modulus without any decrease in the shape memory effect. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  3. Plasmonic photoheating of gold nanorods in thermo-responsive chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sio, Luciano; Placido, Tiziana; Comparelli, Roberto; Curri, Maria Lucia; Tabiryan, Nelson; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the thermo-optical properties of gold nanorods (GNRs) dispersed in a thermotropic cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC). We have characterized the CLC reflection band behavior for two different cell thicknesses under the influence of a suitable (resonant) pump beam. It turns out that for the 1.6 μm thick cell there is a suppression of the CLC reflection band for both pure CLC and CLC/GNRs. For the 10 μm thick cell, the presence of GNRs desensitizes the shift of the CLC reflection band to temperature. Suitable cell design enables one to ‘turn off’ the wavelength shift of the peak reflection, thereby turning the system into a pure amplitude measurement tool. This has implications where the probe wavelength is fixed at a common, single wavelength.

  4. Rheological properties of a biological thermo-responsive hydrogel produced from soybean oil polymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rheological properties of a newly developed biological thermo-hydrogel made from vegetable oil were investigated. The material named HPSO-VI is a hydrolytic product of polymerized soybean oil (PSO). HPSO-VI exhibited viscoelastic behavior above 2% (wt. %) at room temperature and viscous fluid ...

  5. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment.

  6. Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cranfill, Paula J; Sell, Brittney R; Baird, Michelle A; Allen, John R; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-07-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FPs) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has unique properties. Thus, there is no single 'best' FP for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for a given application, we have quantitatively characterized the brightness, photostability, pH stability and monomeric properties of more than 40 FPs to enable straightforward and direct comparison between them. We focus on popular and/or top-performing FPs in each spectral region.

  7. Fluorescence applications in molecular neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Taraska, Justin W; Zagotta, William N

    2010-04-29

    Macromolecules drive the complex behavior of neurons. For example, channels and transporters control the movements of ions across membranes, SNAREs direct the fusion of vesicles at the synapse, and motors move cargo throughout the cell. Understanding the structure, assembly, and conformational movements of these and other neuronal proteins is essential to understanding the brain. Developments in fluorescence have allowed the architecture and dynamics of proteins to be studied in real time and in a cellular context with great accuracy. In this review, we cover classic and recent methods for studying protein structure, assembly, and dynamics with fluorescence. These methods include fluorescence and luminescence resonance energy transfer, single-molecule bleaching analysis, intensity measurements, colocalization microscopy, electron transfer, and bimolecular complementation analysis. We present the principles of these methods, highlight recent work that uses the methods, and discuss a framework for interpreting results as they apply to molecular neurobiology.

  8. Fluorescence applications in molecular neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.; Zagotta, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Macromolecules drive the complex behavior of neurons. For example, channels and transporters control the movements of ions across membranes, SNAREs direct the fusion of vesicles at the synapse, and motors move cargo throughout the cell. Understanding the structure, assembly, and conformational movements of these and other neuronal proteins is essential to understanding the brain. Developments in fluorescence have allowed the architecture and dynamics of proteins to be studied in real time and in a cellular context with great accuracy. In this review, we cover classic and recent methods for studying protein structure, assembly, and dynamics with fluorescence. These methods include fluorescence and luminescence resonance energy transfer, single molecule bleaching analysis, intensity measurements, co-localization microscopy, electron transfer, and bi-molecular complementation analysis. We present the principles of these methods, highlight recent work that uses the methods, and discuss a framework for interpreting results as they apply to molecular neurobiology. PMID:20434995

  9. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  10. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  11. Lens-based fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Christian; Willig, Katrin I; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-05-01

    The majority of studies of the living cell rely on capturing images using fluorescence microscopy. Unfortunately, for centuries, diffraction of light was limiting the spatial resolution in the optical microscope: structural and molecular details much finer than about half the wavelength of visible light (~200 nm) could not be visualized, imposing significant limitations on this otherwise so promising method. The surpassing of this resolution limit in far-field microscopy is currently one of the most momentous developments for studying the living cell, as the move from microscopy to super-resolution microscopy or 'nanoscopy' offers opportunities to study problems in biophysical and biomedical research at a new level of detail. This review describes the principles and modalities of present fluorescence nanoscopes, as well as their potential for biophysical and cellular experiments. All the existing nanoscopy variants separate neighboring features by transiently preparing their fluorescent molecules in states of different emission characteristics in order to make the features discernible. Usually these are fluorescent 'on' and 'off' states causing the adjacent molecules to emit sequentially in time. Each of the variants can in principle reach molecular spatial resolution and has its own advantages and disadvantages. Some require specific transitions and states that can be found only in certain fluorophore subfamilies, such as photoswitchable fluorophores, while other variants can be realized with standard fluorescent labels. Similar to conventional far-field microscopy, nanoscopy can be utilized for dynamical, multi-color and three-dimensional imaging of fixed and live cells, tissues or organisms. Lens-based fluorescence nanoscopy is poised for a high impact on future developments in the life sciences, with the potential to help solve long-standing quests in different areas of scientific research.

  12. X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1972-01-01

    The preliminary results from the Sco X-1 and Cyg X-1 obtained from the Apollo 15 X-ray detector data are presented along with preliminary results of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric data of the lunar surface composition. The production of the characteristic X-rays following the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface is described along with the X-ray spectrometer. Preliminary analyses of the astronomical X-ray observation and the X-ray fluorescence data are presented.

  13. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-10-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses.

  14. Detection of Recurrent Fluorescence Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebara, Yuta; Furukawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Jun; Tanuma, Hajime; Azuma, Toshiyuki; Shiromaru, Haruo; Hansen, Klavs

    2016-09-01

    We have detected visible photons emitted from the thermally populated electronic excited state, namely recurrent fluorescence (RF), of C6- stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring. Clear evidence is provided to distinguish RF from normal fluorescence, based on the temporal profile of detected photons synchronized with the revolution of C6- in the ring, for which the time scale is far longer than the lifetime of the intact photoexcited state. The relaxation (cooling) process via RF is likely to be commonplace for isolated molecular systems and crucial to the stabilization of molecules in interstellar environments.

  15. Carotenoid fluorescence in Dunaliella salina

    PubMed Central

    van Es, Marjon A.; Janssen, Marcel; Brandenburg, Willem A.; Wijffels, René H.

    2010-01-01

    Dunaliella salina is a halotolerant green alga that is well known for its carotenoid producing capacity. The produced carotenoids are mainly stored in lipid globules. For various research purposes, such as production and extraction kinetics, we would like to determine and/or localise the carotenoid globules in vivo. In this study, we show that the carotenoid-rich globules emit clear green fluorescence, which can be used in, for example, fluorescence microscopy (e.g. CLSM) to obtain pictures of the cells and their carotenoid content. PMID:20835349

  16. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-07-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements.

  17. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  18. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  19. Exploring the World of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czarnik, Stanley A.

    1991-01-01

    Provides a basic introduction to fluorescence enabling the amateur scientist to easily, and safely, demonstrate and photograph this phenomenon with the aid of an ultraviolet lamp. Includes a list of necessary equipment and materials, as well as catalog availability from several hardware suppliers. (JJK)

  20. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  1. Exploring the World of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czarnik, Stanley A.

    1991-01-01

    Provides a basic introduction to fluorescence enabling the amateur scientist to easily, and safely, demonstrate and photograph this phenomenon with the aid of an ultraviolet lamp. Includes a list of necessary equipment and materials, as well as catalog availability from several hardware suppliers. (JJK)

  2. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  3. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  4. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikal, Ahmed A.; Webb, Watt W.

    2002-11-01

    The inherent advantages of nonlinear excitation make multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) awell-suited imaging technique for extracting valuable information from turbid and thick biological samples. These advantages include high three-dimensional spatial resolution, large penetration depth, minimum out-of-focus cellular photodamage, and high signal-to-noise contrast. We have investigated the nonlinear spectroscopy of biologically important molecules such as NADH, flavins, and intrinsically fluorescent proteins. Fundamental understanding of the molecular spectroscopy and dynamics of these biomolecules is essential for advancing their applications in biological research. MPFM has been utilized for monitoring a large spectrum of biological processes including metabolic activity and exocytosis. We will discuss two-photon (2P) redox fluorescence microscopy of NADH, which gives a quantitative measure of the respiratory chain activity, thus allowing functional imaging of energy metabolism in neurons and native brain tissue. Finally, a rational design strategy, based on donor-acceptor-donor configuration, will be elucidated for fluorescent probes with large 2P-excitation cross-section. These dyes are water-soluble, yet possess a high affinity to organic phases with site-specific labeling and Ca+2 sensitivity (Kd ~ 350 nM). A brief account on the biological application of nanocrystals and second harmonic imaging will be reviewed.

  5. Fluorescent zinc indicators for neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Peterson, Dwight; Mahoney, William; Cramer, Michele; Maliwal, Badri P; Suh, Sang Won; Frederickson, Chris; Fierke, Carol; Herman, Petr

    2002-07-30

    Mounting evidence indicates that zinc has multiple roles in cell biology, viz. as a part of metalloenzyme catalytic sites, as a structural component of gene regulatory proteins, and (like calcium) as a free signal ion, particularly in the cortex of the brain. While most Zn(II) in the brain is tightly bound, such that free Zn(II) levels extracellularly and intracellularly are likely to be picomolar, a subset of glutamatergic neurons possess weakly bound zinc in presynaptic boutons which is released at micromolar levels in response to a variety of stimuli. Key to further progress in understanding the multiple roles of zinc will be the availability of fluorescent indicator systems that will permit quantitative determination and imaging of zinc fluxes and levels over a broad concentration range both intracellularly and extracellularly using fluorescence microscopy. Towards that end, we have compared a variety of fluorescent indicators for their sensitivity to Zn(II) and Cu(II), selectivity for Zn(II) in the presence of potential interferents such as Ca(II) or Mg(II), and potential for quantitative imaging. The commercially available probes Fura-2, Mag-Fura-5, Newport Green DCF, and FuraZin-1 were compared with the carbonic anhydrase-based indicator systems for selectivity and sensitivity. In addition, intracellular levels of Zn following excitotoxic insult were determined by single pixel fluorescence lifetime microscopy of Newport Green DCF, and extracellular levels of free zinc following stimulus of rat hippocampal slices were determined ratiometrically with a carbonic anhydrase-based indicator system. These results suggest that zinc ion at high nM to microM levels can be accurately quantitated by FuraZin-1 ratiometrically or by Newport Green DCF by fluorescence lifetime; and at levels down to pM by intensity ratio, lifetime, or polarization using carbonic anhydrase-based systems. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Anorganic fluorescence reference materials for decay time of fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Ottermann, C.; Klahn, J.; Korb, T.; Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Kynast, U.; Rupertus, V.

    2008-02-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools, detection methods and imaging applications for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics, and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for steady state fluorescence diagnostics, a method having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers such as absorption/excitation cross sections and quantum yield. This has been done for different types of dopands in different materials such as glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Samples doped with several fluophores of different emission wavelengths and decay times are required for fluorescent multiplexing applications. Decay times shorter than 100 ns are of special interest. In addition, a proper knowledge is necessary of quantum efficiency in highly scattering media. Recently, quantum efficiency in YAG:Ce glass ceramics has been successfully investigated. Glass and glass ceramics doped with threefold charged rare earth elements are available. However, these samples have the disadvantage of emission decay times much longer than 1 microsecond, due to the excitation and emission of their optical forbidden electronic transitions. Therefore first attempts have been made to produce decay-time standards based on organic and inorganic fluophores. Stable LUMOGEN RED pigments and YAG:Ce phosphors are diluted simultaneously in silicone matrices using a wide range of concentrations between 0.0001 and 2 wt%. Organic LUMOGEN RED has decay times in the lower nanosecond range with a slight dependency on concentration

  7. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  8. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  9. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  10. Holographic techniques for cellular fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung K.

    2017-04-01

    We have constructed a prototype instrument for holographic fluorescence microscopy (HFM) based on self-interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH) and demonstrate novel imaging capabilities such as differential 3D fluorescence microscopy and optical sectioning by compressive sensing.

  11. A fluorescence high-temperature sensor based on fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinling; Wang, Yutian; Wang, Xinian

    2006-11-01

    A kind of fluorescence optic-fiber temperature sensor is devised based on the alexandrite crystal. In this system, a new optic- fiber probe fabrication techniques is proposed. This system is particularly adapted to the temperature measurement in the range of room temperature to 650°C. During the cause of experimentation, using the PLD-PMTR (termed the Pulse Modulated Phase-locked detection with Two References) signal processing scheme. This temperature measurement method is proved to be effective and useful for its highly resolution and precision. It ensured the detected fluorescence signal to noise ratio was high enough to be measurable when the temperature is raised to 650°C.

  12. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, < 400 nm), where significant opportunity exists for both fundamental and application research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50

  13. Sunlight induced 685 nm fluorescence imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.; Van Der Piepen, Heinz

    1986-01-01

    The capability of a new fluorescence method is evaluated using data from an aircraft fluorescence experiment conducted on the Elbe River on August 10-14, 1981. The technique measures chlorophyll concentrations by monitoring sunlight-induced fluorescence at 685 nm. Upwelling radiance spectra and vertical profiles of upwelling radiances are presented and analyzed. The image-processing algorithm used to retrieve fluorescence signals from raw data is described.

  14. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence: a new paradigm in fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Ray, Krishanu; Chowdhury, Mustafa; Szmacinski, Henryk; Fu, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used in biological research. Until recently, essentially all fluorescence experiments were performed using optical energy which has radiated to the far-field. By far-field we mean at least several wavelengths from the fluorophore, but propagating far-field radiation is usually detected at larger macroscopic distances from the sample. In recent years there has been a growing interest in the interactions of fluorophores with metallic surfaces or particles. Near-field interactions are those occurring within a wavelength distance of an excited fluorophore. The spectral properties of fluorophores can be dramatically altered by near-field interactions with the electron clouds present in metals. These interactions modify the emission in ways not seen in classical fluorescence experiments. In this review we provide an intuitive description of the complex physics of plasmons and near-field interactions. Additionally, we summarize the recent work on metal–fluorophore interactions and suggest how these effects will result in new classes of experimental procedures, novel probes, bioassays and devices. PMID:18810279

  15. Interferometric sensor for plant fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, E.; Heaps, W. S.; Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Corp, L. A.

    2009-08-01

    We present preliminary design studies and modeling results for a new system for the assessment of vegetation photosynthetic function, especially carbon uptake. Plant health and carbon uptake efficiency are of key consideration in assessing global productivity, biomass, changes in land cover and carbon dioxide flux. Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) measurements are critical for understanding photosynthetic functioning, plant environmental stress responses and direct assessments of plant health. Plant ChlF occurs predominately in two broad emission bands in the red and infrared regions of the spectrum. Unfortunately, the fluorescence signal from vegetation is much weaker than, and obscured by, the reflected signal. This limitation can be overcome by acquiring ChlF measurements in atmospheric absorption lines. The Interferometric Sensor for Plant Fluorescence (ISPF) will measure plant ChlF using the Fraunhofer Line Discrimination approach. Fabry-Perot (FP) etalons will be used to restrict the measurement to radiation in the Solar Fraunhofer lines (SFL). An advantage of the proposed sensor design is that it will collect measurements using two sets of SFL at the same time. This technique increases the optical throughput producing a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR). The instrument is designed to have two channels for two different spectral regions. Each channel will have two sub-channels, one defined by a prefilter (Reference, Ref) and the other having a tunable FP etalon. The first subchannel (the Ref) will cover a relatively broad spectral range to include at least two Fraunhofer lines but for which the fluorescence signal will represent only a small fraction of total reflected light. The second subchannel will use a FP interferometer to restrict the detected light to include only the selected SFL where the ChlF in-filling is significant. A small change in the fluorescence will then produce an insignificant change in the Ref subchannel but a relatively large change in

  16. Characterization of Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    the contribution of fluorescence to the spectrum of fluorescent patches on a stomatopod ( mantis shrimp ), referenced in last year’s report (Mazel, 2002...PUBLICATIONS Mazel, C. H., T. W. Cronin, R. L. Caldwell, and N. J. Marshall. Fluorescent Enhancement of Signaling in a Mantis Shrimp . Science [in press, refereed]. 6

  17. Quantification of fluorescent reporters in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Pound, Michael; French, Andrew P; Wells, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent reporters are powerful tools for plant research. Many studies require accurate determination of fluorescence intensity and localization. Here, we describe protocols for the quantification of fluorescence intensity in plant cells from confocal laser scanning microscope images using semiautomated software and image analysis techniques.

  18. Fluorescence anisotropy of UV-irradiated viruses.

    PubMed

    Hörer, O L

    1989-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements on influenza and parainfluenza viruses, showed no changes in the microviscosity of the viral membranes after exposure to UV-irradiation, when a fluorescent probe was used, but the intrinsic fluorescence of viral proteins presented, under the same experimental conditions, a significant difference of anisotropy behaviour in the two viruses used.

  19. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  20. Characterization of natural fluorescence in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeziri, Salim; Ma, Guobin; Mincu, Niculae; Benyamin Seeyar, Anader; Khayat, Mario

    2008-02-01

    One important challenge for in-vivo imaging fluorescence in cancer research and related pharmaceutical studies is to discriminate the exogenous fluorescence signal of the specific tagged agents from the natural fluorescence. For mice, natural fluorescence is composed of endogenous fluorescence from organs like the skin, the bladder, etc. and from ingested food. The discrimination between the two kinds of fluorescence makes easy monitoring the targeted tissues. Generally, the amplitude of the fluorescence signal depends on the location and on the amount of injected fluorophore, which is limited in in-vivo experiments. This paper exposes some results of natural fluorescence analysis from in-vivo mice experiments using a time domain small animal fluorescence imaging system: eXplore Optix TM. Fluorescence signals are expressed by a Time Point Spread Function (TPSF) at each scan point. The study uses measures of similarity applied purposely to the TPSF to evaluate the discrepancy and/or the homogeneity of scanned regions of a mouse. These measures allow a classification scheme to be performed on the TPSF's based on their temporal shapes. The work ends by showing how the exogenous fluorescence can be distinguished from natural fluorescence by using the TPSF temporal shape.

  1. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  2. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  3. Fluorescence imaging agents in cancerology

    PubMed Central

    Paganin-Gioanni, Aurélie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Paquereau, Laurent; Ecochard, Vincent; Golzio, Muriel; Teissié, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in cancer therapy is to improve early detection and prevention using novel targeted cancer diagnostics. Detection requests specific recognition. Tumor markers have to be ideally present on the surface of cancer cells. Their targeting with ligands coupled to imaging agents make them visible/detectable. Conclusions Fluorescence imaging is a newly emerging technology which is becoming a complementary medical method for cancer diagnosis. It allows detection with a high spatio-temporal resolution of tumor markers in small animals and in clinical studies. In this review, we focus on the recent outcome of basic studies in the design of new approaches (probes and devices) used to detect tumor cells by fluorescence imaging. PMID:22933906

  4. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  5. Advances in fluorescent protein technology.

    PubMed

    Shaner, Nathan C; Patterson, George H; Davidson, Michael W

    2007-12-15

    Current fluorescent protein (FP) development strategies are focused on fine-tuning the photophysical properties of blue to yellow variants derived from the Aequorea victoria jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) and on the development of monomeric FPs from other organisms that emit in the yellow-orange to far-red regions of the visible light spectrum. Progress toward these goals has been substantial, and near-infrared emitting FPs may loom over the horizon. The latest efforts in jellyfish variants have resulted in new and improved monomeric BFP, CFP, GFP and YFP variants, and the relentless search for a bright, monomeric and fast-maturing red FP has yielded a host of excellent candidates, although none is yet optimal for all applications. Meanwhile, photoactivatable FPs are emerging as a powerful class of probes for intracellular dynamics and, unexpectedly, as useful tools for the development of superresolution microscopy applications.

  6. Supercritical Angle Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Jonas; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Verdes, Dorinel; Schwille, Petra

    2008-01-01

    We explore the potential of a supercritical angle (SA) objective for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This novel microscope objective combines tight focusing by an aspheric lens with strong axial confinement of supercritical angle fluorescence collection by a parabolic mirror lens, resulting in a small detection volume. The tiny axial extent of the detection volume features an excellent surface sensitivity, as is demonstrated by diffusion measurements in model membranes with an excess of free dye in solution. All SA-FCS measurements are directly compared to standard confocal FCS, demonstrating a clear advantage of SA-FCS, especially for diffusion measurements in membranes. We present an extensive theoretical framework that allows for accurate and quantitative evaluation of the SA-FCS correlation curves. PMID:17827221

  7. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  8. Molecular-sized fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Igor I.; Shiryaev, Andrey A.; Rendler, Torsten; Steinert, Steffen; Lee, Sang-Yun; Antonov, Denis; Vörös, Márton; Jelezko, Fedor; Fisenko, Anatolii V.; Semjonova, Lubov F.; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Lebedev, Oleg I.; Sildos, Ilmo; Hemmer, Philip. R.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Gali, Adam; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Doping of carbon nanoparticles with impurity atoms is central to their application. However, doping has proven elusive for very small carbon nanoparticles because of their limited availability and a lack of fundamental understanding of impurity stability in such nanostructures. Here, we show that isolated diamond nanoparticles as small as 1.6 nm, comprising only ~400 carbon atoms, are capable of housing stable photoluminescent colour centres, namely the silicon vacancy (SiV). Surprisingly, fluorescence from SiVs is stable over time, and few or only single colour centres are found per nanocrystal. We also observe size-dependent SiV emission supported by quantum-chemical simulation of SiV energy levels in small nanodiamonds. Our work opens the way to investigating the physics and chemistry of molecular-sized cubic carbon clusters and promises the application of ultrasmall non-perturbative fluorescent nanoparticles as markers in microscopy and sensing.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  10. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  11. Ruby fluorescence pressure scale: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Bi, Yan; Xu, Ji-An

    2013-05-01

    Effect of non-hydrostatic stress on X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) is studied. The pressure gradient in the sample chamber leads to the broadening of the diffraction peaks, which increase with the hkl index of the crystal. It is found that the difference between the determined d-spacing compressive ratio d/d0 and the real d-spacing compressive ratio dr/d0 is determined by the yield stress of the pressure transmitting media (if used) and the shear modulus of the sample. On the basis of the corrected experiment data of Mao et al. (MXB86), which was used to calibrate the most widely used ruby fluorescence scale, a new relationship of ruby fluorescence pressure scale is corrected, i.e., P = (1904/9.827)[(1 + Δλ/λ0)9.827-1].

  12. Fluorescence-based reversible immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issachar, David; Rao, Srivasta V.; Ho, Winston; Kempen, Lothar U.; Wang, Allan Z.; Gasca, Rebecca; Lieberman, Robert A.

    1999-02-01

    All immunosensors currently described in literature are irreversible. Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. has developed a revolutionary method for producing reversible immunosensors. In this method, the antibody and a labeled analog (structurally and functionally similar to the antigen) are coimmobilized on the sensor surface. Under equilibrium conditions, the labeled analog interacts with immobilized antibody to produce a sensor response. However, in the presence of antigen (analyte), the equilibrium is disturbed as the analyte competes for the binding sites of the immobilized antibody. This produces a measurable sensor response. The equilibrium is shifted back by washing the analyte away with a wash buffer, and the bound analog interacts with the immobilized antibody. Polarization and intensity based measurements are used to design the analog. Photoinduced electron transfer is used to create fluorescent analogs that provide enhancements in fluorescence intensity that can be measured. This principle can be extended to the detection of bacteria.

  13. Multispectral fluorescence diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua Kenny; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) has been widely used for in vivo small animal studies and the illposed problem in reconstruction can be eased by utilizing structural a priori obtained from an anatomic imaging modality. In this study, a multispectral fluorescence tomography (FT) is used, which has shown the ability to detect subtle shifts in the ICG absorption spectrum in our previous study. The imaging system is in trans-illumination mode with a swept-wavelength laser and a CCD on a rotation gantry and the structural image from the X-ray computed tomography is used to guide and constrain the FT reconstruction algorithm. In this work, a phantom with two inclusions filled with different fluorophores is utilized to evaluate whether the spectral information obtained using sweptwavelength laser can distinguish these two inclusions. The images are captured from 8 different views with three different wavelengths.

  14. Quantitative imaging with fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-01-01

    Molecular activities are highly dynamic and can occur locally in subcellular domains or compartments. Neighboring cells in the same tissue can exist in different states. Therefore, quantitative information on the cellular and subcellular dynamics of ions, signaling molecules, and metabolites is critical for functional understanding of organisms. Mass spectrometry is generally used for monitoring ions and metabolites; however, its temporal and spatial resolution are limited. Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology-e.g., fluorescent proteins can report on gene expression or protein localization in real time-yet promoter-based reporters are often slow to report physiologically relevant changes such as calcium oscillations. Therefore, novel tools are required that can be deployed in specific cells and targeted to subcellular compartments in order to quantify target molecule dynamics directly. We require tools that can measure enzyme activities, protein dynamics, and biophysical processes (e.g., membrane potential or molecular tension) with subcellular resolution. Today, we have an extensive suite of tools at our disposal to address these challenges, including translocation sensors, fluorescence-intensity sensors, and Förster resonance energy transfer sensors. This review summarizes sensor design principles, provides a database of sensors for more than 70 different analytes/processes, and gives examples of applications in quantitative live cell imaging.

  15. Aptamer-Based Fluorescent Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Jianfeng; Cai, Weibo; Gao, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Selected from random pools of DNA or RNA molecules through systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), aptamers can bind to target molecules with high affinity and specificity, which makes them ideal recognition elements in the development of biosensors. To date, aptamer-based biosensors have used a wide variety of detection techniques, which are briefly summarized in this article. The focus of this review is on the development of aptamer-based fluorescent biosensors, with emphasis on their design as well as properties such as sensitivity and specificity. These biosensors can be broadly divided into two categories: those using fluorescently-labeled aptamers and others that employ label-free aptamers. Within each category, they can be further divided into “signal-on” and “signal-off” sensors. A number of these aptamer-based fluorescent biosensors have shown promising results in biological samples such as urine and serum, suggesting their potential applications in biomedical research and disease diagnostics. PMID:21838688

  16. Temperature-dependent fluorescence in nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Zang, Jin-Hao; Shan, Chong-Xin; Gao, Yuan-Fei

    2017-02-01

    Here, we report that nanodiamonds (NDs) exhibit blue fluorescence with an emission peak at around 400 nm. With increasing temperature, the peak energy of fluorescence was found to demonstrate a blue shift, possibly due to excited excitons populating higher-energy states, such as oxidation defect states. The intensity evolution of the fluorescence was attributed to a thermally activated process. Moreover, the bandwidth of fluorescence also increased because of exciton–phonon interactions and ionized impurity scattering. The above results indicate that the fluorescence of NDs could originate from radiative recombination through intrinsic transitions between highly localized π states.

  17. Cresyl violet: a red fluorescent Nissl stain.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Buylla, A; Ling, C Y; Kirn, J R

    1990-08-01

    Cresyl violet is widely used by neurobiologists to visualize Nissl substance in bright-field microscopy. Here we describe a method for using this dye as a red fluorescent Nissl stain. Unlike the bright-field staining technique, fluorescent cresyl is compatible with other fluorescent dyes and tracers, such as fluorescein, Fluoro-Gold and Fast Blue. The procedure requires only minor modifications of routine bright-field cresyl staining, the most significant being dilution of the stain. Thus, fluorescent red cresyl violet is simple to implement and may be of general use in fluorescence microscopy.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime image of a single halobacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui-Ping; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Tsujimoto, Kazuo; Miyauchi, Seiji; Kamo, Naoki; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2007-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has been reported for a single halobacterium loaded with 2',7'-bis-(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). FLIM of halobacteria exhibits two distinct fluorescence lifetimes, representing different environments from each other in different halobacteria. The observed difference in the fluorescence lifetime appears to be due to the difference in electric field inside a cell. Fluorescence intensity of BCECF in polyvinyl alcohol film is quenched by an external electric field, indicating that the fluorescence lifetime of BCECF is affected by an electric field.

  19. Dental fluorescence: potential forensic use.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ricarda Duarte; da Silva, Marcos André Duarte; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista; Melo, Ana Cláudia Moreira; de Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira

    2013-09-10

    In cases of identification of bones, skeletal segments or isolated bones, searching for biotypologic diagnostic data to estimate an individual's age enables comparing these data with those of missing individuals. Enamel, dentin and pulp undergo remarkable changes during an individual's life. The enamel becomes more mineralized, smoother and thinner, and deteriorates because of physiological and pathological factors. Dental pulp decreases in volume due to the deposition of secondary dentin; thus, the dentin becomes thicker with time. In natural teeth, the fluorescence phenomenon occurs in dentin and enamel and changes in those tissues may alter the expression of the natural tooth color. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between age and teeth fluorescence for individuals from different age groups. The sample consisted of 66 randomly selected Brazilians of both genders aged 7-63 years old. They were divided into 6 groups: Group 1 - aged 7-12 years, Group 2 - aged 13-20 years, Group 3 - aged 21-30 years, Group 4 - aged 31-40 years, Group 5 - aged 41-50 years and Group 6 - aged between 51 and 63 years. Upper right or left central incisors were used for the study. Restored and aesthetic rehabilitated teeth were excluded from the sample. The measurement of tooth fluorescence was carried out via computer analysis of digital images using the software ScanWhite DMC/Darwin Systems - Brazil. It was observed that dental fluorescence decreases when comparing the age groups 21-30, 31-40, 41-50 and 51-63 years. The results also showed that there is a statistically significant difference between the groups 41-50 years and 21-30 years (p=0.005) and also among the group 51-63 years and all other groups (p<0.005). It can be concluded that dental fluorescence is correlated with age and has a similar and stable behavior from 7 to 20 years of age. It reaches its maximum expected value at the age of 26.5 years and thereafter decreases.

  20. Correlation fluorescence method of amine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myslitsky, Valentin F.; Tkachuk, Svetlana S.; Rudeichuk, Volodimir M.; Strinadko, Miroslav T.; Slyotov, Mikhail M.; Strinadko, Marina M.

    1997-12-01

    The amines fluorescence spectra stimulated by UV laser radiation are investigated in this paper. The fluorescence is stimulated by the coherent laser beam with the wavelength 0.337 micrometers . At the sufficient energy of laser stimulation the narrow peaks of the fluorescence spectra are detected besides the wide maximum. The relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of amines solutions are investigated. The fluorescence intensity temporal dependence on wavelength 0.363 micrometers of the norepinephrine solution preliminarily radiated by UV laser with wavelength 0.337 micrometers was found. The computer stimulated and experimental investigations of adrenaline and norepinephrine mixtures fluorescence spectra were done. The correlation fluorescent method of amines detection is proposed.

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy applied to orange trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Belasque, J., Jr.; Lins, E. C.; Dias Nunes, F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, we have applied laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate biological processes in orange trees (Citrus aurantium L.). We have chosen to investigate water stress and Citrus Canker, which is a disease caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. The fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated by using as an excitation source a 442-nm 15-mW HeCd gas multimode discharge laser and a 532-nm 10-mW Nd3+:YAG laser. The stress manifestation was detected by the variation of fluorescence ratios of the leaves at different wavelengths. The fluorescence ratios present a significant variation, showing the possibility to observe water stress by fluorescence spectrum. The Citrus Canker’s contaminated leaves were discriminated from the healthy leaves using a more complex analysis of the fluorescence spectra. However, we were unable to discriminate it from another disease, and new fluorescence experiments are planned for the future.

  2. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  3. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  4. Bioaerosol Analysis by Online Fluorescence Detection and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Treutlein, Bärbel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (< 1 μm), but not for coarse particles (1 - 20 μm). Microscopy studies were later performed at the same location to more directly investigate and identify biological particles. Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August - December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was 3x10-2 cm-3, corresponding to 4% of total coarse particle number [1]. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was 1 ?g m-3, corresponding to 20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters, though a pronounced peak at 3 μm was essentially always observed. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around 1.5 μm, 5 μm, and 13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol filter samples. To our knowledge, however, this

  5. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  6. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Janus, Marleen M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries. PMID:27997567

  7. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  8. Fluorescence interferometry: principles and applications in biology.

    PubMed

    Bilenca, Alberto; Cao, Jing; Colice, Max; Ozcan, Aydogan; Bouma, Brett; Raftery, Laurel; Tearney, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    The use of fluorescence radiation is of fundamental importance for tackling measurement problems in the life sciences, with recent demonstrations of probing biological systems at the nanoscale. Usually, fluorescent light-based tools and techniques use the intensity of light waves, which is easily measured by detectors. However, the phase of a fluorescence wave contains subtle, but no less important, information about the wave; yet, it has been largely unexplored. Here, we introduce the concept of fluorescence interferometry to allow the measurement of phase information of fluorescent light waves. In principle, fluorescence interferometry can be considered a unique form of optical low-coherence interferometry that uses fluorophores as a light source of low temporal coherence. Fluorescence interferometry opens up new avenues for developing new fluorescent light-based imaging, sensing, ranging, and profiling methods that to some extent resemble interferometric techniques based on white light sources. We propose two experimental realizations of fluorescence interferometry that detect the interference pattern cast by the fluorescence fields. This article discusses their measurement capabilities and limitations and compares them with those offered by optical low-coherence interferometric schemes. We also describe applications of fluorescence interferometry to imaging, ranging, and profiling tasks and present experimental evidences of wide-field cross-sectional imaging with high resolution and large range of depth, as well as quantitative profiling with nanometer-level precision. Finally, we point out future research directions in fluorescence interferometry, such as fluorescence tomography of whole organisms and the extension to molecular interferometry by means of quantum dots and bioluminescence.

  9. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    PubMed

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics.

  10. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine.

  11. Fluorescent nucleosides with 'on-off' switching function, pH-responsive fluorescent uridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshio; Miyamoto, Shigenori; Suzuki, Azusa; Matsumoto, Katsuhiko; Ishihara, Tsutomu; Saito, Isao

    2012-04-15

    We synthesized various pH-responsive fluorescent deoxyuridine derivatives (1a-g). These fluorescent nucleosides exhibited distinctive fluorescence at 470-600 nm in aqueous solvents containing methanol only at acidic to neutral pH values. In particular, 1f exhibited strong fluorescence only at pH range of 3.1-7.2 with a pK(a) of 6.1. Such pH-sensitive fluorescent nucleosides can be used as 'on-off' fluorescence switch for monitoring pH change in biological systems, particularly for cancer cell detection.

  12. Visualizing Fluorescence: Using a Homemade Fluorescence "Microscope" to View Latent Fingerprints on Paper.

    PubMed

    Lafratta, Christopher N; Huh, Sun Phill; Mallillin, Allistair C; Riviello, Peter J; Walt, David R

    2010-10-01

    We describe an inexpensive handheld fluorescence imager (low-magnification microscope), constructed from poly(vinyl chloride) pipe and other inexpensive components for use as a teaching tool to understand the principles of fluorescence detection. Optical filters are used to select the excitation and emission wavelengths and can be easily interchanged to accommodate different fluorescent samples. As a demonstration, we used the fluorescence imager to view lawsone-dyed fingerprints on paper, which fluoresce red when illuminated with green light. This emission can be seen by viewing the sample through the instrument by eye, or the fluorescence can be captured by a camera. The entire imager can be built for less than $300.

  13. FAA Fluorescent Penetrant Laboratory Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    WINDES,CONNOR L.; MOORE,DAVID G.

    2000-08-02

    The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center currently assesses the capability of various non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods used for analyzing aircraft components. The focus of one such exercise is to evaluate the sensitivity of fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection. A baseline procedure using the water-washable fluorescent penetrant method defines a foundation for comparing the brightness of low cycle fatigue cracks in titanium test panels. The analysis of deviations in the baseline procedure will determine an acceptable range of operation for the steps in the inspection process. The data also gives insight into the depth of each crack and which step(s) of the inspection process most affect penetrant sensitivities. A set of six low cycle fatigue cracks produced in 6.35-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V specimens was used to conduct the experiments to produce sensitivity data. The results will document the consistency of the crack readings and compare previous experiments to find the best parameters for water-washable penetrant.

  14. Analysis of ultrasensitive fluorescence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuxing; Whitehead, Bruce A.; Davis, Lloyd M.

    1999-05-01

    DNA sequencing and several other applications of single- molecule detection (SMD) currently under development utilize spectroscopic measurements for categorization of different types of fluorophores. In the collection and analysis of data from such experiments, the photon signals are sorted into different channels, depending upon their arrival time, emission wavelength, or other distinguishable properties. If the photon statistics are adequate, maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) techniques can be successfully applied to determine which fluorophore is present. However, data analysis using neural network (NN) methods can offer several advantages. We consider data from a Monte Carlo simulation of SMD in a flow-cell, in which a time-resolved fluorescence decay profile is accumulated for each photon burst. A 2-layer NN, with sigmoid as the activation function, is trained on a set of simulated data using back-propagation and the (delta) - learning rule, and then used for identification of photon bursts in subsequent simulations. The NN is able to consider additional input parameters, such as the amplitudes of the weighted-sliding-sum digital-filter output of the photon bursts and the durations of the bursts. It can yield superior identification of photon bursts, particularly in cases where the fluorophores have disparate fluorescence quantum efficiencies, absorption cross-sections, or photodegradation efficiencies, or where the categorization includes other possibilities, such as background fluctuations, or the simultaneous presence of both fluorophores.

  15. Biodetection using fluorescent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckman, Donna M.; Jennings, Travis L.; LaLumondiere, Steven D.; Klimcak, Charles M.; Moss, Steven C.; Loper, Gary L.; Beck, Steven M.

    2002-07-01

    Multi-pathogen biosensors that take advantage of sandwich immunoassay detection schemes and utilize conventional fluorescent dye reporter molecules are difficult to make into extremely compact and autonomous packages. The development of a multi-pathogen, immunoassay-based, fiber optic detector that utilizes varying sized fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as the reporter labels has the potential to overcome these problems. In order to develop such a quantum dot-based biosensor, it is essential to demonstrate that QDs can be attached to antibody proteins, such that the specificity of the antibody is maintained. We have been involved in efforts to develop a reproducible method for attaching QDs to antibodies for use in biodetection applications. We have synthesized CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs of differing size, functionalized their surfaces with several types of organic groups for water solubility, and covalently attached these functionalized QDs to rabbit anti-ovalbumin antibody protein. We also demonstrated that these labeled antibodies exhibit selective binding to ovalbumin antigen. We characterized the QDs at each step in the overall synthesis by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and by picosecond (psec) transient photoluminescence (TPL) spectroscopy. TPL spectroscopy measurements indicate that QD lifetime depends on the size of the QD, the intensity of the optical excitation source, and whether or not they are functionalized and conjugated to antibodies. We describe details of these experiments and discuss the impact of our results on our biosensor development program.

  16. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM).

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael W; Loftus, Andrew F; Dunn, Sarah E; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J

    2015-01-05

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light sheet fluorescent microscopy (LSFM), a century-old idea made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light-sheet-based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM) while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Nucleic acid based fluorescent nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Sara; Akhlaghi, Yousef; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Rinnan, Asmund

    2014-10-28

    Accurate thermometry at micro- and nanoscales is essential in many nanobiotechnological applications. The nanothermometers introduced in this paper are composed of labeled molecular beacons (MBs) comprising gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on which, depending on application, many MBs of one or more types are immobilized. In this design, three differently labeled MBs with different thermostabilities function as the sensing elements, and AuNPs act as carriers of the MBs and also quenchers of their fluorophores. This flexible design results in a number of nanothermometers with various temperature-sensing ranges. At the lowest temperature, the MBs are in the closed form, where they are quenched. By increasing the temperature, the MBs start to open with respect to their melting points (Tm), and as a result, the fluorescence emission will increase. The temperature resolution of the nanoprobes over a range of 15-60 °C is less than 0.50 °C, which indicates their high sensitivity. Such a good temperature resolution is a result of the specific design of the unusual less stable MBs and also presence of many MBs on AuNPs. The reproducibility and precision of the probes are also satisfactory. The multiplex MB nanoprobe is suitable for thermal imaging by fluorescence microscopy.

  18. Mitochondrially targeted fluorescent redox sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kylie; Kolanowski, Jacek L; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-04-06

    The balance of oxidants and antioxidants within the cell is crucial for maintaining health, and regulating physiological processes such as signalling. Consequently, imbalances between oxidants and antioxidants are now understood to lead to oxidative stress, a physiological feature that underlies many diseases. These processes have spurred the field of chemical biology to develop a plethora of sensors, both small-molecule and fluorescent protein-based, for the detection of specific oxidizing species and general redox balances within cells. The mitochondrion, in particular, is the site of many vital redox reactions. There is therefore a need to target redox sensors to this particular organelle. It has been well established that targeting mitochondria can be achieved by the use of a lipophilic cation-targeting group, or by utilizing natural peptidic mitochondrial localization sequences. Here, we review how these two approaches have been used by a number of researchers to develop mitochondrially localized fluorescent redox sensors that are already proving useful in providing insights into the roles of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria.

  19. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy (LSFM), a century old idea (Siedentopf and Zsigmondy, 1902) made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light sheet based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. PMID:25559221

  20. Chromosome characterization using single fluorescent dye

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, Harry A.; Hirons, Gregory T.

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomes are characterized by fluorescent emissions from a single fluorescent dye that is excited over two different wavelengths. A mixture containing chromosomes is stained with a single dye selected from the group consisting of TOTO and YOYO and the stained chromosomes are placed in a flow cytometer. The fluorescent dye is excited sequentially by a first light having a wavelength in the ultraviolet range to excite the TOTO or YOYO to fluoresce at a first intensity and by a second light having a wavelength effective to excite the TOTO or YOYO dye to fluoresce at a second intensity. Specific chromosomes may be identified and sorted by intensity relationships between the first and second fluorescence emissions.

  1. Chemomertical analysis of endometrial tissue fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, Aurelija; Auksorius, E.; Fuchs, D.; Gavriushin, V.

    2002-10-01

    An effort has been made to detect neopterin spectrum in fluorescence of premalignant endometrial tissue and to estimate the number of fluorophores naturally existing in the tissue with fluorescence present above the noise level. Endometrial Tissue fluorescence was measured in vitro by excitation with the third harmonic of Nd YAG laser. Multivariate curve resolution was used for testing neopterin presence in endometrial tissue. Fluorescence spectra ofneopterin was measured and used as a target spectrum for testing. Seven factors -fluorescence ofnatural fluorophores ofendometrial tissue were found to be present above the noise level in the overall autofluorescence. Neopterin concentration may be too low in endometrial tissue to make its fluorescence above the noise level because neopterin spectrum was not found to be among the spectra resolved by multivariate curve resolution. An intensity increase in the neopterin spectrum spectral region in hyperplastic endometrial samples might be associated with neopterin concentration increase.

  2. Saccharide sensing molecules having enhanced fluorescent properties

    DOEpatents

    Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Cary, Douglas R.; Tran, Joe Anh

    2004-01-06

    The present invention provides formulae for fluorescent compounds that have a number of properties which make them uniquely suited for use in sensors of analytes such as saccharides. The advantageous fluorescent properties include favorable excitation wavelengths, emission wavelengths, fluorescence lifetimes, and photostability. Additional advantageous properties include enhanced aqueous solubility, as well as temperature and pH sensitivity. The compound comprises an aryl or a substituted phenyl botonic acid that acts as a substrate recognition component, a fluorescence switch component, and a fluorophore. Fluorescent compounds are described that are excited at wavelengths greater than 400 nm and emit at wavelengths greater than 450 nm, which is advantageous for optical transmission through skin. The fluorophore is typically selected from transition metal-ligand complexes and thiazine, oxazine, oxazone, or oxazine-one as well as anthracene compounds. The fluorescent compound can be immobilized in a glucose permeable biocompatible polymer matrix that is implantable below the skin.

  3. Advances in Surface-Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Aslan, Kadir; Lukomska, Joanna; Matveeva, Evgenia; Zhang, Jian; Badugu, Ramachandram; Huang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We report recent achievements in metal-enhanced fluorescence from our laboratory. Several fluorophore systems have been studied on metal particle-coated surfaces and in colloid suspensions. In particular, we describe a distance dependent enhancement on silver island films (SIFs), release of self-quenching of fluorescence near silver particles, and the applications of fluorescence enhancement near metalized surfaces to bioassays. We discuss a number of methods for various shaped silver particle deposition on surfaces. PMID:15617385

  4. Fluorescent protein biosensors applied to microphysiological systems

    PubMed Central

    Senutovitch, Nina; Boltz, Robert; DeBiasio, Richard; Gough, Albert; Taylor, D Lansing

    2015-01-01

    This mini-review discusses the evolution of fluorescence as a tool to study living cells and tissues in vitro and the present role of fluorescent protein biosensors (FPBs) in microphysiological systems (MPSs). FPBs allow the measurement of temporal and spatial dynamics of targeted cellular events involved in normal and perturbed cellular assay systems and MPSs in real time. FPBs evolved from fluorescent analog cytochemistry (FAC) that permitted the measurement of the dynamics of purified proteins covalently labeled with environmentally insensitive fluorescent dyes and then incorporated into living cells, as well as a large list of diffusible fluorescent probes engineered to measure environmental changes in living cells. In parallel, a wide range of fluorescence microscopy methods were developed to measure the chemical and molecular activities of the labeled cells, including ratio imaging, fluorescence lifetime, total internal reflection, 3D imaging, including super-resolution, as well as high-content screening. FPBs evolved from FAC by combining environmentally sensitive fluorescent dyes with proteins in order to monitor specific physiological events such as post-translational modifications, production of metabolites, changes in various ion concentrations, and the dynamic interaction of proteins with defined macromolecules in time and space within cells. Original FPBs involved the engineering of fluorescent dyes to sense specific activities when covalently attached to particular domains of the targeted protein. The subsequent development of fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the green fluorescent protein, dramatically accelerated the adoption of studying living cells, since the genetic “labeling” of proteins became a relatively simple method that permitted the analysis of temporal–spatial dynamics of a wide range of proteins. Investigators subsequently engineered the fluorescence properties of the FPs for environmental sensitivity that, when combined with

  5. Photoconversion in orange and red fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Hazelwood, Kristin L.; Murphy, Christopher S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Piston, David W.

    2009-01-01

    We report that photoconversion is fairly common among orange and red fluorescent proteins, as a screen of 12 variants yielded 8 that exhibit photoconversion. Specifically, three red fluorescent proteins can be switched into a green state, and two orange variants can be photoconverted to the far red. The orange highlighters are ideal for dual-probe highlighter applications, and they exhibit the most red-shifted excitation of all fluorescent protein described to date. PMID:19363494

  6. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.

    2016-02-29

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  7. Thermochromism and fluorescence in dyed PEO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, Archana; S, Raghu; V, Mini; C, Sharanappa; H, Devendrappa

    2015-06-01

    The optical absorbance spectra of solution casted pure & methyl blue (MB) dyed polyethylene oxide (PEO) films were recorded in a wavelength range from 190-1100nm at different temperatures. The absorbance was found to increases with increasing temperature. Fluorescence micrographs confirmed the interaction between polymer and dye and also revealed decreased crystallinity of the sample. Fluorescence quantum yield has been calculated with the help of fluorescence spectra.

  8. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Daniel L.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon

    1998-01-01

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC.

  9. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barton, D.L.; Tangyunyong, P.

    1998-01-06

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC. 1 fig.

  10. Thermochromism and fluorescence in dyed PEO films

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, Archana; S, Raghu; V, Mini; C, Sharanappa; H, Devendrappa

    2015-06-24

    The optical absorbance spectra of solution casted pure & methyl blue (MB) dyed polyethylene oxide (PEO) films were recorded in a wavelength range from 190-1100nm at different temperatures. The absorbance was found to increases with increasing temperature. Fluorescence micrographs confirmed the interaction between polymer and dye and also revealed decreased crystallinity of the sample. Fluorescence quantum yield has been calculated with the help of fluorescence spectra.

  11. Fluorescence goggle for intraoperative breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Charanya, Tauseef; Mondal, Suman; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a fluorescence goggle device for intraoperative oncologic imaging. With our system design, the surgeon can directly visualize the fluorescence information from the eyepieces in real time without any additional monitor, which can improve one's coordination and surgical accuracy. In conjunction with targeting fluorescent dyes, the goggle device can successfully detect tumor margins and small nodules that are not obvious to naked eye. This can potentially decrease the incidence of incomplete resection.

  12. Safranine fluorescent staining of wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Bond, J; Donaldson, L; Hill, S; Hitchcock, K

    2008-06-01

    Safranine is an azo dye commonly used for plant microscopy, especially as a stain for lignified tissues such as xylem. Safranine fluorescently labels the wood cell wall, producing green/yellow fluorescence in the secondary cell wall and red/orange fluorescence in the middle lamella (ML) region. We examined the fluorescence behavior of safranine under blue light excitation using a variety of wood- and fiber-based samples of known composition to interpret the observed color differentiation of different cell wall types. We also examined the basis for the differences in fluorescence emission using spectral confocal microscopy to examine lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls including reaction wood and decayed wood compared to normal wood. Our results indicate that lignin-rich cell walls, such as the ML of tracheids, the secondary wall of compression wood tracheids, and wood decayed by brown rot, tend to fluoresce red or orange, while cellulose-rich cell walls such as resin canals, wood decayed by white rot, cotton fibers and the G-layer of tension wood fibers, tend to fluoresce green/yellow. This variation in fluorescence emission seems to be due to factors including an emission shift toward red wavelengths combined with dye quenching at shorter wavelengths in regions with high lignin content. Safranine fluorescence provides a useful way to differentiate lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls without counterstaining as required for bright field microscopy.

  13. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  14. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-09-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and office supply stores. We also employ violet-blue and green laser pointers as excitation sources. We conclude with a brief discussion of neon pigments in terms of the "day glow" or "daylight fluorescence" phenomenon.

  15. Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of time-resolved (lifetime) fluorescence techniques used in biomedical diagnostics. In particular, we review the development of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) instrumentation and associated methodologies which allows for in vivo characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues. Emphasis is placed on the translational research potential of these techniques and on evaluating whether intrinsic fluorescence signals provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of human diseases including cancer (gastrointestinal tract, lung, head and neck, and brain), skin and eye diseases, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:22273730

  16. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  17. Rational design of fluorescent phosgene sensors.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pradip; Hwang, Kuo Chu

    2012-05-15

    Phosgene is a very toxic gas, which was used as a chemical weapon in World War I, and is currently widely used in industrial processes. So far, no any phosgene fluorescent sensor has been reported. In this study, we report rational design of unimolecular fluorescent phosgene sensors for the first time. Phosgene was used to initiate intramolecular cyclization and convert nonfluorescent molecules to highly fluorescent products. Bright blue fluorescence of phosgene reaction products can be easily visualized by naked eye. The detection limit for phosgene is as low as 1 nM in solutions at room temperature.

  18. Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Schuresko, Daniel D.

    1980-01-01

    A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

  19. Characterization of marine macroalgae by fluorescence signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topinka, J. A.; Bellows, W. Korjeff; Yentsch, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of distinguishing macroalgal classes by their fluorescence signatures was investigated using narrow-waveband light to excite groups of accessory pigments in brown, red, and green macroalgae and measuring fluorescence emission at 685 nm. Results obtained on 20 marine macroalgae field-collected samples showed that fluorescence excitation signatures were relatively uniform within phylogenetic classes but were substantially different for different classes. It is suggested that it may be possible to characterize the type and the abundance of subtidal macroalgae from low-flying aircraft using existing laser-induced fluorescence methodology.

  20. [Fluorescent probes for intracellular Mg2+ measurement].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yoshio; Suzuki, Koji

    2004-08-01

    Recently, fluorescent probes are widely used as tools for dynamical measurement of ion distributions and concentrations in cells. They are highly sensitive, and offer imaging by the use of fluorescent microscopy in easily and less cell damaging way. This paper discusses the selectivity and optical character of the three novel Mg(2+) fluorescent probes. KMG-20AM offers ratiometric quantative measurement of Mg(2+), KMG-104 provides high-sensitive qualitative analysis and 3-D measurement. With those improved Mg(2+) fluorescent probes, the physiological and pathological role of Mg(2+) are going to be more and more clear.

  1. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  2. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  3. Modeling Fluorescence Escape from Tissue Phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Craig Morris

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation represents a contribution to the field of quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy of biological tissue. The absorption and scattering properties of a turbid medium affect the propagation of fluorescence to the medium surface. Optical properties also affect the amount of light reaching a detector placed to monitor fluorescence non-invasively. These facts have in part limited fluorescence spectroscopy of turbid media to a qualitative science. To study the general characteristics of turbid medium fluorescence, a Monte Carlo algorithm of fluorescence light propagation was developed. Modifications to the general algorithm were made to study several specific light distribution quantities associated with optical fiber fluorescent measurement devices. The Monte Carlo-based studies were also used to develop simple, accurate expressions describing the one -dimensional distribution of excitation light within a turbid medium and the escape of fluorescence from the medium. The expressions have accuracy comparable to solutions of the radiative transport equation. The two expressions were combined to derive a simple expression relating the fluorescence power escaping a turbid medium due to surface excitation, to the medium intrinsic fluorescence coefficient, as a function of the medium optical properties. Based on this expression and a description of the fluorescence escape power intercepted by a distant detector, a method was developed to recover the intrinsic fluorescence coefficient from surface measurements of fluorescence and optical properties. Experiments with water-based, turbid media verified the recovery method. The method used to recover the intrinsic fluorescence coefficient was modified for use with a clinical measurement geometry, specifically a small diameter optical fiber probe. Modification required a calibration method to estimate two optical property variables from two unique surface measurements of diffuse reflectance made with the optical

  4. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  5. Fluorescence nanoscopy in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2017-09-06

    Fluorescence nanoscopy uniquely combines minimally invasive optical access to the internal nanoscale structure and dynamics of cells and tissues with molecular detection specificity. While the basic physical principles of 'super-resolution' imaging were discovered in the 1990s, with initial experimental demonstrations following in 2000, the broad application of super-resolution imaging to address cell-biological questions has only more recently emerged. Nanoscopy approaches have begun to facilitate discoveries in cell biology and to add new knowledge. One current direction for method improvement is the ambition to quantitatively account for each molecule under investigation and assess true molecular colocalization patterns via multi-colour analyses. In pursuing this goal, the labelling of individual molecules to enable their visualization has emerged as a central challenge. Extending nanoscale imaging into (sliced) tissue and whole-animal contexts is a further goal. In this Review we describe the successes to date and discuss current obstacles and possibilities for further development.

  6. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defect cherry tomatoes using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defect cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface, and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-...

  7. Multispectral excitation based multiple fluorescent targets resolving in fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and resolve multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. An algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) for multispectral excited FMT is proposed to resolve multiple fluorescent targets in this study. Fluorescent targets are excited by multispectral excitation, and the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent yields under the excitation spectrum is reconstructed by an iterative Tikhonov regularization algorithm. Subsequently, multiple fluorescent targets are resolved from mixed fluorescence signals by employing ICA. Simulations were performed and the results demonstrate that multiple adjacent fluorescent targets can be resolved if the number of excitation wavelengths is not smaller than that of fluorescent targets with different concentrations. The algorithm obtains both independent components that provide spatial information of different fluorescent targets and spectral courses that reflect variation trends of fluorescent yields along with the excitation spectrum. By using this method, it is possible to visualize the metabolism status of drugs in different structure organs, and quantitatively depict the variation trends of fluorescent yields of each functional organ under the excitation spectrum. This method may provide a pattern for tumor detection, drug delivery and treatment monitoring in vivo.

  8. Multi-Photon Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Bio-Probes and Bio-Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    the set-up of a multi-photon fluorescence microscope. The information can also be useful in the detection of multi-photon fluorescence in bio -chip...technology. In addition, we have investigated a few highly fluorescent bio -molecules commonly found in plant cells.

  9. An insight into fluorescent transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chia, Y Y; Tay, M G

    2014-09-21

    The emission from transition metal complexes is usually produced from triplet excited states. Owing to strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the fast conversion of singlet to triplet excited states via intersystem crossing (ISC) is facilitated. Hence, in transition metal complexes, emission from singlet excited states is not favoured. Nevertheless, a number of examples of transition metal complexes that fluoresce with high intensity have been found and some of them were even comprehensively studied. In general, three common photophysical characteristics are used for the identification of fluorescent emission from a transition metal complex: emission lifetimes on the nanosecond scale; a small Stokes shift; and intense emission under aerated conditions. For most of the complexes reviewed here, singlet emission is the result of ligand-based fluorescence, which is the dominant emission process due to poor metal-ligand interactions leading to a small metal contribution in the excited states, and a competitive fluorescence rate constant when compared to the ISC rate constant. In addition to the pure fluorescence from metal complexes, another two types of fluorescent emissions were also reviewed, namely, delayed fluorescence and fluorescence-phosphorescence dual emissions. Both emissions also have their respective unique characteristics, and thus they are discussed in this perspective.

  10. Fluorescence diagnostic imaging in patients with acne.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, Hristo

    2010-12-01

    Orange-red fluorescence in the follicle openings, induced by ultraviolet A light, originates from porphyrins, the metabolic products of Propionibacteria acnes. To investigate the relationship of orange-red follicular fluorescence with the severity of acne and the amount of sebum secretion. Twenty-five volunteers were included. The severity of acne was rated on a 4-point scale. The casual sebum level was measured using a Sebumeter and the follicular fluorescence was determined using the camera Visiopor. Casual sebum level and the intensity of fluorescence (percentage of the area and number of orange-red spots) were higher at the T zone than at the U zone in all patients regardless of their skin type. Sebum amount and area of fluorescence spots were significantly negative in correlation with the clinical grade of acne. There was a significant positive correlation between the orange-red fluorescence and the casual sebum level. The orange-red fluorescence showed stronger correlation with the presence of non-inflammatory acne lesions (comedones) and high sebum amount than the presence of inflammatory acne lesions (pustules) and low sebum amount. The fluorescence diagnostic imaging could be useful in the objective evaluation and monitoring of treatment efficacy in subjects with acne-prone skin and patients with acne. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  12. Classroom Activity Connections: Lessons from Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCormac, Aoife; O'Brien, Emma; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This Classroom Activity Connections paper describes an extension to the "JCE" Classroom Activity #68 "Turning on the Light". A number of additional common items that display fluorescence under UV light are described, including fruits, vegetables, and seashells. Two classroom extensions on fluorescence are also described. From these activities,…

  13. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    PubMed

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-04

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  14. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  15. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  16. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  19. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  1. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy in reduced detection volumes.

    PubMed

    Blom, H; Kastrup, L; Eggeling, C

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy is a versatile technique applied to in vitro and in vivo investigations of biochemical processes such as interactions, mobilities or densities with high specifity and sensitivity. The prerequisite of this dynamical fluorescence technique is to have, at a time, only few fluorescent molecules in the detection volume in order to generate significant fluorescence fluctuations. For usual confocal fluorescence microscopy this amounts to a useful concentration in the nanomolar range. The concentration of many biomolecules in living cell or on cell membranes is, however, often quite high, usually in the micro- to the millimolar range. To allow fluctuation spectroscopy and track intracellular interaction or localization of single fluorescently labeled biomolecules in such crowded environments, development of detection volumes with nanoscale resolution is necessary. As diffraction prevents this in the case of light microscopy, new (non-invasive) optical concepts have been developed. In this mini-review article we present recent advancements, implemented to decrease the detection volume below that of normal fluorescence microscopy. Especially, their combination with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy is emphasized.

  2. Xanthines Studied via Femtosecond Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Kovács, Lajos; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Gustavsson, Thomas

    2016-12-03

    Xanthines represent a wide class of compounds closely related to the DNA bases adenine and guanine. Ubiquitous in the human body, they are capable of replacing natural bases in double helices and give rise to four-stranded structures. Although the use of their fluorescence for analytical purposes was proposed, their fluorescence properties have not been properly characterized so far. The present paper reports the first fluorescence study of xanthine solutions relying on femtosecond spectroscopy. Initially, we focus on 3-methylxanthine, showing that this compound exhibits non-exponential fluorescence decays with no significant dependence on the emission wavelength. The fluorescence quantum yield (3 × 10(-4)) and average decay time (0.9 ps) are slightly larger than those found for the DNA bases. Subsequently, we compare the dynamical fluorescence properties of seven mono-, di- and tri-methylated derivatives. Both the fluorescence decays and fluorescence anisotropies vary only weakly with the site and the degree of methylation. These findings are in line with theoretical predictions suggesting the involvement of several conical intersections in the relaxation of the lowest singlet excited state.

  3. Comprehensive phantom for interventional fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, Maria; Koch, Maximilian; Gorpas, Dimitris; Karlas, Angelos; Klemm, Uwe; Garcia-Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging has been considered for over a half-century as a modality that could assist surgical guidance and visualization. The administration of fluorescent molecules with sensitivity to disease biomarkers and their imaging using a fluorescence camera can outline pathophysiological parameters of tissue invisible to the human eye during operation. The advent of fluorescent agents that target specific cellular responses and molecular pathways of disease has facilitated the intraoperative identification of cancer with improved sensitivity and specificity over nonspecific fluorescent dyes that only outline the vascular system and enhanced permeability effects. With these new abilities come unique requirements for developing phantoms to calibrate imaging systems and algorithms. We briefly review herein progress with fluorescence phantoms employed to validate fluorescence imaging systems and results. We identify current limitations and discuss the level of phantom complexity that may be required for developing a universal strategy for fluorescence imaging calibration. Finally, we present a phantom design that could be used as a tool for interlaboratory system performance evaluation.

  4. Bowel perforation detection using metabolic fluorescent chlorophylls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung Hyun; Jo, Young Goun; Kim, Jung Chul; Choi, Sujeong; Kang, Hoonsoo; Kim, Yong-Chul; Hwang, In-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Thus far, there have been tries of detection of disease using fluorescent materials. We introduce the chlorophyll derivatives from food plants, which have longer-wavelength emissions (at >650 nm) than those of fluorescence of tissues and organs, for detection of bowel perforation. To figure out the possibility of fluorescence spectroscopy as a monitoring sensor of bowel perforation, fluorescence from organs of rodent models, intestinal and peritoneal fluids of rodent models and human were analyzed. In IVIS fluorescence image of rodent abdominal organ, visualization of perforated area only was possible when threshold of image is extremely finely controlled. Generally, both perforated area of bowel and normal bowel which filled with large amount of chlorophyll derivatives were visualized with fluorescence. The fluorescence from chlorophyll derivatives penetrated through the normal bowel wall makes difficult to distinguish perforation area from normal bowel with direct visualization of fluorescence. However, intestinal fluids containing chlorophyll derivatives from food contents can leak from perforation sites in situation of bowel perforation. It may show brighter and longer-wavelength regime emissions of chlorophyll derivatives than those of pure peritoneal fluid or bioorgans. Peritoneal fluid mixed with intestinal fluids show much brighter emissions in longer wavelength (at>650 nm) than those of pure peritoneal fluid. In addition, irrigation fluid, which is used for the cleansing of organ and peritoneal cavity, made of mixed intestinal and peritoneal fluid diluted with physiologic saline also can be monitored bowel perforation during surgery.

  5. Effects of collisions on uranium hexafluoride fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menghini, M.; Montone, A.; Morales, P.; Nencini, L.; Dore, P.

    1988-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence intensities and quenching are used to probe collisional relaxation of UF 6. Buffer gases used are rare gases, N 2, O 2, CO 2, N 2O, SO 2, SiF 4 and SF 6. Energy transfer associated with anisotropic interactions is important in determining the UF 6 fluorescence quenching.

  6. Classroom Activity Connections: Lessons from Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCormac, Aoife; O'Brien, Emma; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This Classroom Activity Connections paper describes an extension to the "JCE" Classroom Activity #68 "Turning on the Light". A number of additional common items that display fluorescence under UV light are described, including fruits, vegetables, and seashells. Two classroom extensions on fluorescence are also described. From these activities,…

  7. Multiphoton excited fluorescence spectroscopy of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2001-09-01

    Recent work on the emerging application of multiphoton excitation to fluorescence studies of biomolecular dynamics and structure is reviewed. The fundamental principles and experimental techniques of multiphoton excitation are outlined, fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy and spectra in membranes, proteins, hydrocarbons, skin, tissue and metabolites are featured, and future opportunities are highlighted.

  8. Surface Enhanced Fluorescence of Tryptophan by Silver-Nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    The present study deals with the study of surface enhanced fluorescence of Tryptophan by Silver Nanoparticles. Absorption and fluorescence studies of Tryptophan with and without Ag-nanoparticles are presented here. Homebuilt Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectroscopy setup was used for the fluorescence studies. Calibration plots for absorption and fluorescence shows noticeable enhancement in the florescence signal.

  9. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  10. Holograms preparation using commercial fluorescent benzyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorantes-García, V.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Ordoñez-Padilla, M. J.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.

    2011-01-01

    We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence thought of light blue laser to make transmissions holograms, using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensitizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence properties of inks, both mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we avoid this chemical reaction and we show the results to use the method of painting hologram with fluorescents ink and we describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of the ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with the gratings, we got good results, making holographic gratings with a blue light from laser diode 470 nm. And we later were painting with fluorescent ink, integrating fluorescence characteristics to the hologram.

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodopsins: Insights and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Farrens, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has become an established tool at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics because of its exquisite sensitivity and recent technical advancements. However, rhodopsin proteins present the fluorescence spectroscopist with a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to the presence of the light-sensitive retinal chromophore. This review briefly summarizes some approaches that have successfully met these challenges and the novel insights they have yielded about rhodopsin structure and function. We start with a brief overview of fluorescence fundamentals and experimental methodologies, followed by more specific discussions of technical challenges rhodopsin proteins present to fluorescence studies. Finally, we end by discussing some of the unique insights that have been gained specifically about visual rhodopsin and its interactions with affiliate proteins through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24183695

  12. Photocontrollable Fluorescent Proteins for Superresolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy permits the study of biological processes at scales small enough to visualize fine subcellular structures that are unresolvable by traditional diffraction-limited light microscopy. Many superresolution techniques, including those applicable to live cell imaging, utilize genetically encoded photocontrollable fluorescent proteins. The fluorescence of these proteins can be controlled by light of specific wavelengths. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and photophysical properties of photocontrollable fluorescent proteins that are relevant to their use in superresolution microscopy. We then describe the recently developed photoactivatable, photoswitchable, and reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins, and we detail their particular usefulness in single-molecule localization–based and nonlinear ensemble–based superresolution techniques. Finally, we discuss recent applications of photocontrollable proteins in superresolution imaging, as well as how these applications help to clarify properties of intracellular structures and processes that are relevant to cell and developmental biology, neuroscience, cancer biology and biomedicine. PMID:24895855

  13. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  14. The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Kłos-Witkowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors is described in this paper. Both structure and characteristics of biosensors and immunosensors are presented. Types of immunosensors and the response of bioreceptor layers to the reaction with analytes as well as measurements of electrochemical, piezoelectric and optical parameters in immunosensors are also presented. In addition, detection techniques used in studies of optical immunosensors based on light-matter interactions (absorbance, reflectance, dispersion, emission) such as: UV/VIS spectroscopy, reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfs), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), optical waveguide light-mode spectroscopy (OWLS), fluorescence spectroscopy. The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors and standard configurations of immunoreactions between an antigen and an antibody (direct, competitive, sandwich, displacement) is described. Fluorescence parameters taken into account in analyses and fluorescence detection techniques used in research of immunosensors are presented. Examples of immunosensor applications are given.

  15. Speckle spectroscopy of fluorescent randomly inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Asharchuk, I. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Sviridov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a coherence optical method for probing fluorescent randomly inhomogeneous media based on the statistical analysis of spatial fluctuations of spectrally selected fluorescence radiation. We develop a phenomenological model that interrelates the flicker index of the spatial distribution of the fluorescence intensity at a fixed wavelength and the mean path difference of partial components of the fluorescence radiation field in the probed medium. The results of experimental approbation of the developed method using the layers of densely packed silicon dioxide particles saturated with the aqueous rhodamine 6G solution with a high concentration of the dye are presented. The experimentally observed significant decrease in the flicker index under the wavelength tuning from the edges of the fluorescence spectrum towards it central part is presumably a manifestation of spectrally dependent negative absorption in the medium.

  16. Photon correlation system for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, C. G.; Murray, J. G.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1995-07-01

    The construction and testing of a dual-channel photon correlator is reported for the frequency domain imaging of fluorescence lifetimes using photon-counting detection. A light source modulated at radio frequency excites fluorescence, which is detected using an imaging single-photon detector. After discrimination, single-photon events are processed in parallel by the correlation circuit, the purpose of which is to allow both the mean phase delay and the demodulation of fluorescence to be calculated relative to a reference signal derived from the modulated excitation source. Outputs from the correlator are integrated in a computer, resulting in accumulation of images which have been statistically filtered by sine and cosine transforms, and which can be manipulated within the computer to generate a resultant image where contrast depends on fluorescence lifetime rather than fluorescence intensity.

  17. Fluorescence induction characteristics of iron deficient cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.; Guikema, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    The fluorescence induction characteristics of Anacystis nidulans were examined after cultures were stressed with iron deficiency. When these cells were illuminated with 620 nm light to excite phycocyanin, a fluorescence induction transient was observed which was not present in normal cells. The transient had a rise time of approximately 3-4 sec, and was abolished when cells were preilluminated with 620 nm light. One goal of this work was to ascertain the role of electron transfer between PSII and either PSI or the respiratory system in causing the fluorescence transient. The effects of electron transport inhibitors and uncouplers on fluorescence induction were examined. Respiratory inhibitors, such as KCN, had little or no effect on the fluorescence transient. p-Chloromercuribenzoic acid, at concentrations below 0.5 mM, delayed the transient rise time without causing a decrease in the extent. Uncouplers, such as gramicidin and CCCP, caused a decrease in the extent of the transient.

  18. Quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence by quinones.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, V D; Borisov AYu; Barsky, E L; Borisova, O F; Kitashov, A V

    1998-10-01

    Quinones caused quenching of Chl a fluorescence in native and model systems. Menadione quenched twofold the fluorescence of Chl a and BChl a in pea chloroplasts, chromatophores of purple bacteria, and liposomes at concentrations of 50-80 microM. To obtain twofold quenching in Triton X-100 micelles and in ethanol, the addition of 1.3 mM and 11 mM menadione was required, respectively. A proportional decrease in the lifetime and yield of Chl a fluorescence in chloroplasts, observed as the menadione concentration increased, is indicative of the efficient excitation energy transfer from bulk Chl to menadione. The decrease in the lifetime and yield of fluorescence was close to proportional in liposomes, but not in detergent micelles. The insensitivity of the menadione quenching effect to DCMU in chloroplasts, and similarity of its action in chloroplasts and liposomes indicate that menadione in chloroplasts interacts with antenna Chl, i.e., nonphotochemical quenching of fluorescence occurs.

  19. D-light for laparoscopic fluorescence diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlen, Johannes; Laubach, Hans-Heinrich; Stern, Josef; Pressmar, Jochen; Pietschmann, Mathias; Herfarth, Christian

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the role of ALA induced fluorescence diagnosis in laparoscopic surgery, we induced peritoneal carcinosis in rats by multilocular intraabdominal tumorcell implantation (CC531). The animals were photosensitized by intraabdominal ALA lavage. Laparoscopy was performed with both, conventional white and then blue light (D-Light, KARL STORZ Germany) excitation. Laparoscopy with conventional white light showed peritoneal carcinoma foci from 0.1 to 2 cm in diameter. All macroscopically visible tumors (n equals 142) were fluorescence positive after laparoscopic blue light excitation. In addition, 30 laparoscopic not visible (white light) tumors showed fluorescence and were histologically confirmed as colon carcinoma metastases. We conclude that only ALA induced laparoscopic fluorescence detection after blue light excitation is the adequate method to detect the entire extent of the intraabdominal tumor spread. Fluorescence laparoscopy is essential for laparoscopic staging of colorectal cancer because of a higher rate of cancer foci detection.

  20. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Richard B.

    2007-05-01

    A fluorescent clock reaction is described that is based on the principles of the Landolt iodine reaction but uses the potent fluorescence quenching properties of triiodide to abruptly extinguish the ultraviolet fluorescence of optical brighteners present in liquid laundry detergents. The reaction uses easily obtained household products. One variation illustrates the sequential steps and mechanisms of the reaction; other variations maximize the dramatic impact of the demonstration; and a variation that uses liquid detergent in the Briggs Rauscher reaction yields a striking oscillating luminescence. The iodine fluorescence quenching clock reaction can be used in the classroom to explore not only the principles of redox chemistry and reaction kinetics, but also the photophysics of fluorescent pH probes and optical quenching.

  1. Radioactivity-synchronized fluorescence enhancement using a radionuclide fluorescence-quenched dye.

    PubMed

    Berezin, Mikhail Y; Guo, Kevin; Teng, Bao; Edwards, W Barry; Anderson, Carolyn J; Vasalatiy, Olga; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Griffiths, Gary L; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-07-08

    We demonstrate the first evidence of radioactivity-synchronized fluorescence quenching of a near-infrared light-emitting dye by a radionuclide, (64)Cu, and subsequent fluorescence enhancement upon (64)Cu decay to the daughter isotopes (64)Ni and (64)Zn. The dynamic switch from high radioactivity and low fluorescence to low radioactivity and high fluorescence is potentially useful for developing complementary multimodal imaging and detection platforms for chemical, environmental, and biomedical applications as well as for unraveling the mechanisms of metal-induced dynamic fluorescence changes.

  2. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  3. Further Insights into Metal-DOM Interaction: Consideration of Both Fluorescent and Non-Fluorescent Substances

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huacheng; Zhong, Jicheng; Yu, Guanghui; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Helong; Yang, Liuyan

    2014-01-01

    Information on metal binding with fluorescent substances has been widely studied. By contrast, information on metal binding with non-fluorescent substances remains lacking despite the dominance of these substances in aquatic systems. In this study, the metal binding properties of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances were investigated by using metal titration combined with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D–COS) analysis. The organic matters in the eutrophic algae-rich lake, including natural organic matters (NOM) and algae-induced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), both contained fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances. The peaks in the one-dimensional spectra strongly overlapped, while 2D–COS can decompose the overlapped peaks and thus enhanced the spectral resolution. Moreover, 2D FTIR COS demonstrated that the binding susceptibility of organic ligands in both NOM and algal EPS matrices followed the order: 3400>1380>1650 cm−1, indicative the significant contribution of non-fluorescent ligands in metal binding. The modified Stern-Volmer equation also revealed a substantial metal binding potential for the non-fluorescent substances (logKM: 3.57∼4.92). As for the effects of organic ligands on metal binding, EPS was characterized with higher binding ability than NOM for both fluorescent and non-fluorescent ligands. Algae-induced EPS and the non-fluorescent substances in eutrophic algae-rich lakes should not be overlooked because of their high metal binding potential. PMID:25380246

  4. Further insights into metal-DOM interaction: consideration of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huacheng; Zhong, Jicheng; Yu, Guanghui; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Helong; Yang, Liuyan

    2014-01-01

    Information on metal binding with fluorescent substances has been widely studied. By contrast, information on metal binding with non-fluorescent substances remains lacking despite the dominance of these substances in aquatic systems. In this study, the metal binding properties of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances were investigated by using metal titration combined with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) analysis. The organic matters in the eutrophic algae-rich lake, including natural organic matters (NOM) and algae-induced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), both contained fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances. The peaks in the one-dimensional spectra strongly overlapped, while 2D-COS can decompose the overlapped peaks and thus enhanced the spectral resolution. Moreover, 2D FTIR COS demonstrated that the binding susceptibility of organic ligands in both NOM and algal EPS matrices followed the order: 3400>1380>1650 cm-1, indicative the significant contribution of non-fluorescent ligands in metal binding. The modified Stern-Volmer equation also revealed a substantial metal binding potential for the non-fluorescent substances (logKM: 3.57∼4.92). As for the effects of organic ligands on metal binding, EPS was characterized with higher binding ability than NOM for both fluorescent and non-fluorescent ligands. Algae-induced EPS and the non-fluorescent substances in eutrophic algae-rich lakes should not be overlooked because of their high metal binding potential.

  5. Fluorescent probes and fluorescence (microscopy) techniques--illuminating biological and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Drummen, Gregor P C

    2012-11-28

    Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  6. Selection of Intracellularly Functional RNA Mimics of Green Fluorescent Protein Using Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiawei; Huang, Xin; Wu, Lei; Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was exploited to isolate Escherichia coli cells that were highly fluorescent due to the expression of RNA aptamers that induce fluorescence of 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone. Two different aptamers, named ZT-26 and ZT-324, were identified by this method and compared to the fluorescence-signaling properties of Spinach, a previously reported RNA aptamer. Aptamer ZT-26 exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence over Spinach only in vitro. However, aptamer ZT-324 is 36% brighter than Spinach when expressed in E. coli. The FACS-based selection strategy presented here is attractive for deriving fluorescent RNA aptamers that function in cells as it directly selects for cells with a high level of fluorescence due to the expression of the RNA aptamer.

  7. Two-hierarchical nonnegative matrix factorization distinguishing the fluorescent targets from autofluorescence for fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaosen; Zhao, Yong; Qin, Binjie

    2015-12-15

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has been used in blind fluorescence unmixing for multispectral in-vivo fluorescence imaging, which decomposes a mixed source data into a set of constituent fluorescence spectra and corresponding concentrations. However, most classical NMF algorithms have ill convergence problems and they always fail to unmix multiple fluorescent targets from background autofluorescence for the sparse acquisition of multispectral fluorescence imaging, which introduces incomplete measurements and severe discontinuities in multispectral fluorescence emissions across the multiple spectral bands. Observing the spatial distinction between the diffusive autofluorescence and the sparse fluorescent targets, we propose to separate the mixed sparse multispectral data into equality constrained two-hierarchical updating within NMF framework by dividing the concentration matrix of entire endmembers into two hierarchies: the fluorescence targets and the background autofluorescence. Specifically, when updating concentrations of multiple fluorescent targets in the two-hierarchical NMF, we assume that the concentration of autofluorescence is fixed and known, and vice versa. Furthermore, a sparsity constraint is imposed on the concentration matrix components of fluorescence targets only. Synthetic data sets, in vivo fluorescence imaging data are employed to demonstrate and validate the performance of our approach. The proposed algorithm can achieve more satisfying results of spectral unmixing and autofluorescence removal compared to other state-of-the-art methods, especially for the sparse multispectral fluorescence imaging. The proposed algorithm can successfully tackle the sparse acquisition and ill-posed problems in the NMF-based fluorescence unmixing through equality constraint along with partial sparsity constraint during two-hierarchical NMF optimization, at which fixing sparsity constrained target fluorescence can make the update of autofluorescence as

  8. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  9. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Rostad, Christina A.; Currier, Michael C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  10. Mercury-free fluorescent lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.A.

    1996-05-01

    A brief comparative review of possible mercury free fluorescent lighting technologies is presented, including rare-gas positive column discharges, molecular discharges, and dielectric barrier discharges. Detailed experimental results on xenon positive column discharges will then be considered. In order to judge whether xenon-based discharges are a viable UV source it is necessary to measure the radiant emittance (power per unit area) for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) resonance xenon emission at 147 nm. Two techniques to determine the VUV radiant emittance have been developed and applied to xenon discharges. One method combines the measured resonance level density using absorption spectroscopy and a calculation of the trapped decay rate for the resonance radiation to arrive at the radiant emittance at 147 nm. A second method utilizes a direct measurement of the radiance (power per unit area per unit solid angle) at 147 nm using a calibrated VUV photodiode, and a calculation of the relative angular distribution of the resonance radiation to determine the radiant emittance. In both techniques a simulation of the transport of resonance radiation is key to determining the radiant emittance.

  11. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  12. Caries diagnosis using laser fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Souza-Campos, Dilma H.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2000-03-01

    Caries prevention is a goal to be achieved by dentist in order to promote health. There are several methods used to detect dental caries each one presenting advantages and disadvantages, especially regarding hidden occlusal caries. The improvement of laser technology has permitted the use of laser fluorescence for early diagnosis of hidden occlusal caries. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the use of 655 nm laser light on the detection of hidden occlusal caries. Forty molar teeth from patients of both sexes which ages ranging from 10 - 18 years old were used on this study. Following manufacture's instructions regarding the use of the equipment, the teeth had their occlusal surface examined with the DIAGNOdent. Twenty six of 40 teeth had hidden occlusal caries detected by the DIAGNOdent. However only 17 of these 26 teeth showed radiographic signs of caries the other 9 teeth showed no radiological signs of the lesion. Radiographic examination was able to identify 34,61% of false negative cases. This means that many caries would be left untreated due to the lack of diagnosis using both visual and radiographic examination. The use of the DIAGNOdent was effective in successfully detecting hidden occlusal caries.

  13. Electronic ballast for fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimierczuk, M.K.; Szaraniec, W.

    1993-10-01

    A frequency-domain analysis is given for a Class D voltage-switching power inverter with a load resistance connected in parallel with a resonant capacitor. Using the fundamental component approximation, design equations are derived to provide easy-to-use design tools. The inverter is inherently short-circuit proof, but cannot operate safely with an open circuit at the resonant frequency. Safe operation with an open circuit can be achieved if the operating frequency is sufficiently lower or higher than the resonant frequency. The experimental results are given for two fluorescent lamps F40 connected in series, using MTP5N40 MOSFET`s. The operating frequency was 50 kHz at full power and 70 kHz at 20% of full power. The power factor was 0.99 at full power and 0.96 at 20% of full power. At full power, the efficiency of the Class D inverter was 95.6% and the efficiency of the power factor corrector was 93%. The overall efficiency of the ballast was 89.4% at full power.

  14. [Rapid identification of mycobacteria using laser fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, M A; Makarova, M V; Vasil'ev, E; Aleksandrov, M T; Pashkov, E P

    2009-01-01

    To develop rapid method of identification of mycobacteria based on laser fluorescence. Characteristics of laser-induced fluorescence of 19 bacteria species, including 17 species of mycobacteria, were studied. Identification of microorganisms was performed using measurement of spectral-fluorescent characteristics. Library of spectral-fluorescent characteristics of mycobacteria in different concentrations ratios and associations was created, which formed the basis of database for identification of mycobacteria by laser-fluorescent method. Principles of diagnostic algorithm of indication and differentiation of mycobacteria using this method were developed. Effect of myramistin for increasing the intensity of mycobacteria fluorescence, account of the diffracting characteristics of medium for adjustment of spectral characteristics of mycobacteria and processing of data by factor analysis are needed. Efficacy of the method was 80 - 90%. Principles of rapid identification of mycobacteria and their associations developed on the basis of laser-fluorescent method are experimentally founded and tested on unknown cultures of mycobacteria and objectively prove the possibility to apply this method for express identification of mycobacteria belonging to M. tuberculosis complex as well as non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

  15. Magneto-Fluorescent Core-Shell Supernanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ou; Riedemann, Lars; Etoc, Fred; Herrmann, Hendrik; Coppey, Mathieu; Barch, Mariya; Farrar, Christian T.; Zhao, Jing; Bruns, Oliver T.; Wei, He; Guo, Peng; Cui, Jian; Jensen, Russ; Chen, Yue; Harris, Daniel K.; Cordero, Jose M.; Wang, Zhongwu; Jasanoff, Alan; Fukumura, Dai; Reimer, Rudolph; Dahan, Maxime; Jain, Rakesh K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2014-01-01

    Magneto-fluorescent particles have been recognized as an emerging class of materials that exhibit great potential in advanced applications. However, synthesizing such magneto-fluorescent nanomaterials that simultaneously exhibit uniform and tunable sizes, high magnetic content loading, maximized fluorophore coverage at the surface, and a versatile surface functionality has proven challenging. Here we report a simple approach for co-assembling magnetic nanoparticles with fluorescent quantum dots to form colloidal magneto-fluorescent supernanoparticles. Importantly, these supernanoparticles exhibit a superstructure consisting of a close packed magnetic nanoparticle “core” which is fully surrounded by a “shell” of fluorescent quantum dots. A thin layer of silica-coating provides high colloidal stability and biocompatiblity and a versatile surface functionality. We demonstrate that after surface pegylation, these silica-coated magneto-fluorescent supernanoparticles can be magnetically manipulated inside living cells while being optically tracked. Moreover, our silica-coated magneto-fluorescent supernanoparticles can also serve as an in vivo multi-photon and magnetic resonance dual-modal imaging probe. PMID:25298155

  16. Glucose sensing molecules having selected fluorescent properties

    DOEpatents

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Cary, Douglas R.; Tran, Joe Anh

    2004-01-27

    An analyte sensing fluorescent molecule that employs intramolecular electron transfer is designed to exhibit selected fluorescent properties in the presence of analytes such as saccharides. The selected fluorescent properties include excitation wavelength, emission wavelength, fluorescence lifetime, quantum yield, photostability, solubility, and temperature or pH sensitivity. The compound comprises an aryl or a substituted phenyl boronic acid that acts as a substrate recognition component, a fluorescence switch component, and a fluorophore. The fluorophore and switch component are selected such that the value of the free energy for electron transfer is less than about 3.0 kcal mol.sup.-1. Fluorescent compounds are described that are excited at wavelengths greater than 400 nm and emit at wavelengths greater than 450 nm, which is advantageous for optical transmission through skin. The fluorophore is typically selected from transition metal-ligand complexes and thiazine, oxazine, oxazone, or oxazine-one as well as anthracene compounds. The fluorescent compound can be immobilized in a glucose permeable biocompatible polymer matrix that is implantable below the skin.

  17. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  18. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-07-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread.

  19. Fluorescent sensing of fluoride in cellular system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F(-) detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F(-) including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F(-) are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F(-), mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be

  20. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread. PMID:24668857

  1. Interpretation of the fluorescence signatures from vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, C.

    Vegetation emits fluorescence as part of the energy taken up by absorption %of solar radiation from UV to the visible. This fluorescence consists of light with low intensity (only few percents of the reflected light) emitted from the leaves. The fluorescence emission of a green leaf is characterized by four bands with maxima in the blue (440 nm), green (520 nm), red (690 nm) and far red (740 nm) spectral region. The intensity of fluorescence in the maxima of the emission spectrum varies depending on the following six basic parameters which must be taken into account for the interpretation of fluorescence signatures from vegetation: (a) content of the fluorophores (ferulic acid, chlorophyll a), (b) temperature of the leaf, (c) penetration of excitation light into the leaf, (d) emission of fluorescence from the leaf (re-absorption inside the leaf tissue), (e) photosynthetic activity of the leaf, (f) non-radiative decay (heat production) parallel to the fluorescence The ratios between the intensities of the maxima (F440/F690, F440/F520, F690/F740) are used as characteristic fluorescence parameter. The wide range of changes of these ratios caused by differences in the leaf tissue (aerial interspaces, variegated/homogeneous green leaves), various types of stress (UV, photoinhibition, sun exposure, heat, water deficiency, N-deficiency) and chemicals (inhibitors, fertilizers) can be explained by changes of the six basic parameters. It will be shown that the interpretation of the fluorescence signatures, in most cases, must be based on a complex consideration of more than one of the basic parameters.

  2. Fluorescence Characterization of Clinically-Important Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Roberts, Tom A.; Moore, Ginny; Ward, John M.; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAI/HAI) represent a substantial threat to patient health during hospitalization and incur billions of dollars additional cost for subsequent treatment. One promising method for the detection of bacterial contamination in a clinical setting before an HAI outbreak occurs is to exploit native fluorescence of cellular molecules for a hand-held, rapid-sweep surveillance instrument. Previous studies have shown fluorescence-based detection to be sensitive and effective for food-borne and environmental microorganisms, and even to be able to distinguish between cell types, but this powerful technique has not yet been deployed on the macroscale for the primary surveillance of contamination in healthcare facilities to prevent HAI. Here we report experimental data for the specification and design of such a fluorescence-based detection instrument. We have characterized the complete fluorescence response of eleven clinically-relevant bacteria by generating excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) over broad wavelength ranges. Furthermore, a number of surfaces and items of equipment commonly present on a ward, and potentially responsible for pathogen transfer, have been analyzed for potential issues of background fluorescence masking the signal from contaminant bacteria. These include bedside handrails, nurse call button, blood pressure cuff and ward computer keyboard, as well as disinfectant cleaning products and microfiber cloth. All examined bacterial strains exhibited a distinctive double-peak fluorescence feature associated with tryptophan with no other cellular fluorophore detected. Thus, this fluorescence survey found that an emission peak of 340nm, from an excitation source at 280nm, was the cellular fluorescence signal to target for detection of bacterial contamination. The majority of materials analysed offer a spectral window through which bacterial contamination could indeed be detected. A few instances were found of potential problems

  3. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  4. Structured illumination fluorescence Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Chen, Youhua; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Wang, Yifan; Fan, Jiannan; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2016-12-01

    We apply a Fourier ptychographic algorithm for fluorescent samples using structured illumination. The samples are illuminated with structured light patterns and the raw imaging data using traditional structured illumination fluorescence microscopy (SIM) are acquired. We then extract equivalent oblique illuminated images of fluorescent samples from the SIM images. An optimized Fourier ptychography algorithm is proposed, which ensures the fidelity of the reconstructed the super-resolution results. This method can break the diffraction limit to a resolution of λ/4, and has a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than SIM, especially when the background noise is high.

  5. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M.; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  6. Welcome to Methods and Applications in Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David; Mély, Yves; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    2013-03-01

    On behalf of the Editorial Board of Methods and Applications in Fluorescence and IOP Publishing we are delighted to invite you to read the first articles in our new journal. Methods and Applications in Fluorescence is forged out of the renowned MAF conference series of the same name and we fully expect the natural synergy between the two to provide the ideal platform for moving the field of fluorescence forward. Our aim is for this new journal to reflect the truly global and diverse impact fluorescence is having across many disciplines and help fluorescence achieve its full potential. Just as MAF is the leading conference in fluorescence we are confident of the high impact of this new journal. Methods and Applications in Fluorescence has a distinguished Editorial Board that is drawn from the MAF conference Permanent Steering Committee. Together with the Editorial Board and the rest of the community, the journal will closely track the very latest developments in fluorescence while delivering a fair and constructive review process. We are very pleased that this journal is backed by the Institute of Physics, one of the world's premier learned societies. IOP Publishing has a wealth of experience in science publishing that dates back to 1874. It is a not-for-profit organization that publishes over 60 journals, many on multidisciplinary topics and many including seminal contributions from Nobel Laureates. Any funding surplus generated by IOP Publishing goes directly back into science through the Institute of Physics, thus helping to nurture science for future generations. We invite submissions as regular articles, review articles and technical notes within the scope of the journal, which includes all the major aspects of fluorescence. This covers both theory and experiment across spectroscopy, imaging, materials, labels, probes and sensors. The applications of fluorescence to emerging areas in bionanotechnology, nanotechnology and medicine are very much part of the

  7. Spectrum of squeezing in resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collett, M. J.; Walls, D. F.; Zoller, P.

    1984-01-01

    A spectral analysis of the squeezing in resonance fluorescence is accomplished via a study of a phase sensitive correlation function. In the case of resonance fluorescence from a two-level system, the initial state is a coherent state for the laser mode, a vacuum for the other states of the radiation field, and the atoms in the lower level. Maximum squeezing for resonance excitation is obtained for near resonant frequencies of the fluorescent light. Possible experimental configurations are discussed in order to detect spectral squeezing.

  8. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-06-10

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties.

  9. Synthetic pathways to make nanoparticles fluorescent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Viktoriya; Epple, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    In biosciences, it is often necessary to follow the pathway of nanoparticles within cells or tissues. The nanoparticles can be used as labeled sensors which may, e.g., address functionalities within a cell, carry other specific agents like drugs or be magnetic for tumor thermotherapy. In the context of nanotoxicology, the fate of a given nanoparticle is of interest. As many methods in cell biology are based on fluorescence detection, there is a strong demand to make nanoparticles fluorescent. Different ways to introduce fluorescence are reviewed and exemplified with typical kinds of nanoparticles, i.e. polymers, silica and calcium phosphate.

  10. Solvent dependence of cyanoindole fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, Mary Rose; Mukherjee, Debopreeti; Troxler, Thomas; Gai, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Several cyanotryptophans have been shown to be useful biological fluorophores. However, how their fluorescence lifetimes vary with solvent has not been examined. In this regard, herein we measure the fluorescence decay kinetics as well as the absorption and emission spectra of six cyanoindoles in different solvents. In particular, we find, among other results, that only 4-cyanoindole affords a long fluorescence lifetime and hence high quantum yield in H2O. Therefore, our measurements provide not only a guide for choosing which cyanotryptophan to use in practice but also data for computational modeling of the substitution effect on the electronic transitions of indole.

  11. Metal Enhanced Fluorescence on Silicon Wafer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, I.; Matveeva, E.G.; Sarkar, P.; Bharill, S.; Borejdo, J.; Mandecki, W.; Akopova, I.; Gryczynski, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the fluorescence enhancement induced by silver island film (SIF) deposited on a silicon wafer. The model immunoassay was studied on silvered and unsilvered wafers. The fluorescence brightness of Rhodamine Red X increased about 300% on the SIF, while the lifetime was reduced by several fold and the photostability increased substantially. We discuss potential uses of silicon wafer substrates in multiplex assays in which the fluorescence is enhanced due to the SIF, and the multiplexing is achieved by using micro transponders. PMID:19137060

  12. New fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, A. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Spangler, C. W.

    1993-02-01

    The fluorescent compound 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) has been modified in order to study the resulting structure-fluorescence relationship. A series of twelve derivatives, bearing different substituents at various positions on the phenyl ring, has been synthesized. Each derivative has been tested as a dopant for plastic scintillator applications by incorporating it in a polystyrene matrix. The absorption, fluorescence, and scintillation light yield characteristics of these compounds in polystyrene have been determined. In addition, emission time distributions have been measured and decay time constants have been calculated from these data.

  13. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    PubMed Central

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties. PMID:19451687

  14. In vivo fluorescence lifetime optical projection tomography

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, James; Taylor, Harriet B.; Chen, Lingling; Bugeon, Laurence; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Dallman, Margaret J.; French, Paul M. W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of fluorescence lifetime optical projection tomography (FLIM-OPT) to in vivo imaging of lysC:GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). This method has been applied to unambiguously distinguish between the fluorescent protein (GFP) signal in myeloid cells from background autofluorescence based on the fluorescence lifetime. The combination of FLIM, an inherently ratiometric method, in conjunction with OPT results in a quantitative 3-D tomographic technique that could be used as a robust method for in vivo biological and pharmaceutical research, for example as a readout of Förster resonance energy transfer based interactions. PMID:21559145

  15. Absorption and fluorescence of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Butter, J Y P; Hecht, B; Crenshaw, B R; Weder, C

    2006-10-21

    Simultaneous detection of single molecules by absorption and fluorescence is demonstrated using confocal microscopy at cryogenic temperature. Dynamical processes such as blinking and spectral jumping of single emitters are observed in both detection channels. The relative magnitude of fluorescence and absorption varies between molecules. In particular, we observe molecules that do not emit detectable Stokes-shifted fluorescence but show a strong absorption signal. The fact that coherent resonant scattering underlies the absorption process is demonstrated by a correlation between small linewidth and large absorption amplitude.

  16. Containerless Atomic-Fluorescence Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P.; Schiffman, R.; Walker, C.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes studies conducted to establish and verify use of laser-induced fluorescence in monitoring and controlling high-temperature containerless processes. Specimens levitated by gas jets or electromagnetic fields and heated by laser beams or electromagnetic induction while being irradiated and detected by fluorescence technique. Makes quantitative and qualitative comparisons among three new methods of temperature measurement; all rely on laser-induced fluorescence. One method gas-density thermometry with seed gas. Other two methods involve measurements of velocities of evaporating atoms or of population ratios of different electronic states.

  17. Fluorescent integrating sphere for the vacuum ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Brandenberg, W M

    1970-02-01

    An integrating sphere for absolute, hemispherical reflectance measurements on imperfectly diffuse surfaces in the wavelength range between 1250 A and 3500 A has been built. The sphere uses a double layer coating consisting of a sodium salicylate film on top of a diffuse white paint. The phosphor coating, under uv irradiation, emits fluorescent radiation in the blue, and the underlying paint layer serves as a diffuser of the fluorescent radiation. The usual problem, encountered in ordinary integrating spheres where direct irradiation of the detector by the sample can lead to erroneous signals, is easily eliminated in the fluorescent integrating sphere by proper filtering of the detector.

  18. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-03

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  19. Effect of fixation procedures on the fluorescence lifetimes of Aequorea victoria derived fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Joosen, L; Hink, M A; Gadella, T W J; Goedhart, J

    2014-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be used to study protein-protein interactions by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer or to perform lifetime-based multiplexing. Fixation of samples with cells producing fluorescent fusion proteins is commonly used for preservation of samples and for staining with membrane impermeable reagents such as antibodies. However, the effect of fixation methods and mounting media on fluorescence lifetime is poorly documented so far. Here, we demonstrate that fixation by formaldehyde or methanol itself does not affect the lifetime of fluorescent proteins produced in cells but that several widely used mounting media decrease the fluorescence lifetime by up to 20%. It is shown that fixed cells producing Aequorea victoria derived fluorescent proteins mounted in Tris buffer have fluorescence lifetimes indistinguishable from values measured in living cells. Tris buffer also allows accurate Förster Resonance Energy Transfer quantification in fixed cells, as shown with an mTurquoise2-SYFP2 fusion protein. Moreover, identical lifetime contrasts are measured in living and fixed cells mounted in Tris buffer after introducing a single plasmid expressing two lifetime variants of cyan fluorescent proteins, each targeted to different locations in the cell. Our findings will aid the preparation of fixed cells producing fluorescent proteins for reliable measurement of fluorescence lifetimes for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer determination, lifetime based multiplexing and for instrument calibration for standardization purposes.

  20. Technical principles and neurosurgical applications of fluorescein fluorescence using a microscope-integrated fluorescence module.

    PubMed

    Rey-Dios, Roberto; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent technology has recently become a valuable tool in the surgical management of neoplastic and vascular lesions. The availability of microscope-integrated fluorescent modules has facilitated incorporation of this technology within the microsurgical workflow. The currently available microscope integrated modules use 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and indocyanine green (ICG) as fluorophores. Fluorescein sodium is a fluorescent molecule that has been used specifically in ophthalmology for the treatment of retinal angiography. A new microscope-integrated fluorescent module has been recently developed for fluorescein. We employed this technology to maximize resection of tumors and perform intraoperative angiography to guide microsurgical management of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations. Fluorescein fluorescence allows the surgeon to appreciate fluorescent structures through the oculars while visualizing non-fluorescent tissues in near natural colors. Therefore, the operator can proceed with microsurgery under the fluorescent mode. We present three representative cases in which the use of fluorescein fluorescence was found useful in the surgeon's decision making during surgery. The applications of this new microscope-integrated fluorescent module are multiple, and include vascular and oncologic neurosurgery. Further clinical investigations with large patient cohorts are needed to fully establish the role of this new technology.

  1. Time-resolved FRET fluorescence spectroscopy of visible fluorescent protein pairs.

    PubMed

    Visser, A J W G; Laptenok, S P; Visser, N V; van Hoek, A; Birch, D J S; Brochon, J-C; Borst, J W

    2010-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for obtaining information about small-scale lengths between biomacromolecules. Visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) are widely used as spectrally different FRET pairs, where one VFP acts as a donor and another VFP as an acceptor. The VFPs are usually fused to the proteins of interest, and this fusion product is genetically encoded in cells. FRET between VFPs can be determined by analysis of either the fluorescence decay properties of the donor molecule or the rise time of acceptor fluorescence. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is the technique of choice to perform these measurements. FRET can be measured not only in solution, but also in living cells by the technique of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), where fluorescence lifetimes are determined with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope. Here we focus attention on time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of purified, selected VFPs (both single VFPs and FRET pairs of VFPs) in cuvette-type experiments. For quantitative interpretation of FRET-FLIM experiments in cellular systems, details of the molecular fluorescence are needed that can be obtained from experiments with isolated VFPs. For analysis of the time-resolved fluorescence experiments of VFPs, we have utilised the maximum entropy method procedure to obtain a distribution of fluorescence lifetimes. Distributed lifetime patterns turn out to have diagnostic value, for instance, in observing populations of VFP pairs that are FRET-inactive.

  2. Fluorescence response profiling for small molecule sensors utilizing the green fluorescent protein chromophore and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Baldridge, Anthony; Feng, Suihan; SiQiang, Yang; Kim, Yun Kyung; Tolbert, Laren M; Chang, Young-Tae

    2011-01-10

    Using a fluorescence response profile, a systematic examination was performed for synthetic chromophores of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to discover new small molecule sensors. A group of 41 benzylideneimidazolinone compounds (BDI) was prepared and screened toward 94 biologically relevant analytes to generate fluorescence response profiles. From the response pattern, compounds containing aminobenzyl and heteroaromatic cyclic substructures revealed a pH dependent emission decrease effect, and unlike other fluorescence scaffolds, most BDIs showed fluorescence quenching when mixed with proteins. On the basis of the primary response profile, we obtained three selective fluorescence turn-on sensors for pH, human serum albumin (HSA), and total ribonucleic acid (RNA). Following analysis, a fluorescence response profile testing four nucleic acids revealed the alkyloxy (Ph-OR) functional group in the para position of benzyl analogues contributes to RNA selectivity. Among the primary hit compounds, BDI 2 showed outstanding selectivity toward total RNA with 5-fold emission enhancement. Finally, BDI 24 showed selective fluorescence increase to HSA (K(d) = 3.57 μM) with a blue-shifted emission max wavelength (Δλ(em) = 15 nm). These examples of fluorescence sensor discovery by large-scale fluorescence response profiling demonstrate the general applicability of this approach and the usefulness of the response profiles.

  3. High-throughput imaging of adult fluorescent zebrafish with an LED fluorescence macroscope

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jessica S; Liu, Sali; Raimondi, Aubrey R; Ignatius, Myron S; Salthouse, Christopher D; Langenau, David M

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish are a useful vertebrate model for the study of development, behavior, disease and cancer. A major advantage of zebrafish is that large numbers of animals can be economically used for experimentation; however, high-throughput methods for imaging live adult zebrafish had not been developed. Here, we describe protocols for building a light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence macroscope and for using it to simultaneously image up to 30 adult animals that transgenically express a fluorescent protein, are transplanted with fluorescently labeled tumor cells or are tagged with fluorescent elastomers. These protocols show that the LED fluorescence macroscope is capable of distinguishing five fluorescent proteins and can image unanesthetized swimming adult zebrafish in multiple fluorescent channels simultaneously. The macroscope can be built and used for imaging within 1 day, whereas creating fluorescently labeled adult zebrafish requires 1 hour to several months, depending on the method chosen. The LED fluorescence macroscope provides a low-cost, high-throughput method to rapidly screen adult fluorescent zebrafish and it will be useful for imaging transgenic animals, screening for tumor engraftment, and tagging individual fish for long-term analysis. PMID:21293462

  4. Benzobisoxazole cruciforms as fluorescent sensors.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Musabbir A; Le, Ha T M; Miljanić, Ognjen Š

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cross-conjugated molecular cruciforms are intriguing platforms for optoelectronic applications. Their two intersecting π-conjugated arms allow independent modulation of the molecules' HOMO and LUMO levels and guarantee a well-defined optical response to analyte binding. In addition, the rigid cross-conjugated geometries of these molecules allow their organization in two- and three-dimensional space with long-range order, making them convenient precursors for the transition from solution-based to the more practical solid-state- and surface-based devices. Not surprisingly, a number of molecular cruciform classes have been explored because of these appealing properties. These include tetrakis(arylethynyl)benzenes, tetrastyrylbenzenes, distyrylbis(arylethynyl)benzenes, tetraalkynylethenes, biphenyl-based "swivel" cruciforms, and benzobisoxazole-based cruciforms. In this Account, we summarize our group's work on benzobisoxazole molecular cruciforms. The heterocyclic central core of these molecules forces their HOMOs to localize along the vertical bisethynylbenzene axis; the HOMO localization switches to the horizontal benzobisoxazole axis only in cases when that axis bears electron-rich 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)phenyl substituents and the vertical axis does not. In contrast, the LUMOs are generally delocalized across the entire molecule, and their localization occurs only in cruciforms with donor-acceptor substitution. Such spatially isolated frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) of the benzobisoxazole cruciforms make their response to protonation very predictable. Benzobisoxazole cruciforms are highly solvatochromic, and their fluorescence quantum yields reach 80% in nonpolar solvents. Solutions of cruciforms in different solvents change emission colors upon addition of carboxylic and boronic acid analytes. These changes are highly sensitive to the analyte structure, and the emission color responses permit qualitative discrimination among structurally closely

  5. Fluorescence enhancement of photoswitchable metal ion sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Georgina; Heng, Sabrina; Abell, Andrew D.

    2016-12-01

    Spiropyran-based fluorescence sensors are an ideal target for intracellular metal ion sensing, due to their biocompatibility, red emission frequency and photo-controlled reversible analyte binding for continuous signal monitoring. However, increasing the brightness of spiropyran-based sensors would extend their sensing capability for live-cell imaging. In this work we look to enhance the fluorescence of spiropyran-based sensors, by incorporating an additional fluorophore into the sensor design. We report a 5-membered monoazacrown bearing spiropyran with metal ion specificity, modified to incorporate the pyrene fluorophore. The effect of N-indole pyrene modification on the behavior of the spiropyran molecule is explored, with absorbance and fluorescence emission characterization. This first generation sensor provides an insight into fluorescence-enhancement of spiropyran molecules.

  6. Fluorescent nanothermometers for intracellular thermal sensing.

    PubMed

    Jaque, Daniel; Rosal, Blanca Del; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Maestro, Laura Martínez; Haro-González, Patricia; Solé, José García

    2014-05-01

    The importance of high-resolution intracellular thermal sensing and imaging in the field of modern biomedicine has boosted the development of novel nanosized fluorescent systems (fluorescent nanothermometers) as the next generation of probes for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. This thermal mapping requires fluorescent nanothermometers with good biocompatibility and high thermal sensitivity in order to obtain submicrometric and subdegree spatial and thermal resolutions, respectively. This review describes the different nanosized systems used up to now for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. We also include the later advances in molecular systems based on fluorescent proteins for thermal mapping. A critical overview of the state of the art and the future perspective is also included.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  8. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  9. Carbon Nanoparticle-based Fluorescent Bioimaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C.; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability compared with conventional molecular probes. Although significant progress has been made in fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal-based biological labelling and imaging, the presence of heavy metals and the toxicity issues associated with heavy metals have severely limited the application potential of these nanocrystals. Here, we report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based, alternative, nontoxic imaging probe that is suitable for biological staining and diagnostics. We have developed a chemical method to synthesise highly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles 1–10 nm in size; these particles exhibit size-dependent, tunable visible emission. These carbon nanoparticles have been transformed into various functionalised nanoprobes with hydrodynamic diameters of 5–15 nm and have been used as cell imaging probes. PMID:23502324

  10. Three-photon excitation in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Bahlmann, Karsten; Schrader, Martin; Soini, Aleksi; Malak, Henryk; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1996-01-01

    We show experiments proving the feasibility of scanning fluorescence microscopy by three-photon excitation. Three-photon excitation fluorescence axial images are shown of polystyrene beads stained with the fluorophore 2,5- bis(4-biphenyl)oxazole (BBO). Three-photon excitation is performed at an excitation wavelength of 900 nm and with pulses of 130 fs duration provided by a mode-locked titanium-sapphire laser. Fluorescence is collected between 350 and 450 nm. The fluorescence image signal features a third-order dependence on the excitation power, also providing intrinsic 3-D imaging. The resolution of a three-photon excitation microscope is increased over that of a comparable two-photon excitation microscope.

  11. Multiphoton, optical fiber-based fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereś-Pawlik, ElŻbieta; Stawska, Hanna; Popenda, Maciej; Pajewski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Natalia; Hossa, Robert

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents investigation of normal and cancerous tissue by the means of one and two photon fluorescence spectroscopy. A comparison those methods has been conducted, allowing for eventual determination of granting the best possible diagnostic results.

  12. Multivariate analysis of endometrial tissue fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, Aurelija; Auksorius, E.; Fuchs, D.; Gavriushin, V.

    2002-10-01

    Background and Objective: The detailed multivariate analysis of endometrial tissue fluorescence spectra was done. Spectra underlying features and classification algorithm were analyzed. An effort has been made to determine the importance of neopterin component in endometrial premalignization. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Biomedical tissue fluorescence was measured by excitation with the Nd YAG laser third harmonic. Multivariate analysis techniques were used to analyze fluorescence spectra. Biomedical optics group at Vilnius University analyzed the neopterin substance supplied by the Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry of Innsbruck University. Results: Seven statistically significant spectral compounds were found. The classification algorithm classifying samples to histopathological categories was developed and resulted in sensitivity of 80% and specificity 93% for malignant vs. hyperplastic and normal. Conclusions: Fluorescence spectra could be classified with high accuracy. Spectral variation underlying features can be extracted. Neopterin component might play an important role in endometrial hyperplasia development.

  13. Structural Principles of Fluorescent RNA Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Trachman, Robert J; Truong, Lynda; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2017-10-01

    Several aptamer RNAs have been selected in vitro that bind to otherwise weakly fluorescent small molecules and enhance their fluorescence several thousand-fold. By genetically tagging cellular RNAs of interest with these aptamers and soaking cells in their cell-permeable cognate small-molecule fluorophores, it is possible to use them to study RNA localization and trafficking. These aptamers have also been fused to metabolite-binding RNAs to generate fluorescent biosensors. The 3D structures of three unrelated fluorogenic RNAs have been determined, and reveal a shared reliance on base quadruples (tetrads) to constrain the photo-excited chromophore. The structural diversity of fluorogenic RNAs and the chemical diversity of potential fluorophores to be activated are likely to yield a variety of future fluorogenic RNA tags that are optimized for different applications in RNA imaging and in the design of fluorescent RNA biosensors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Analysis of cholesterol trafficking with fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wüstner, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in determining the biophysical properties of biological membranes, and its concentration is tightly controlled by homeostatic processes. The intracellular transport of cholesterol among organelles is a key part of the homeostatic mechanism, but sterol transport processes are not well understood. Fluorescence microscopy is a valuable tool for studying intracellular transport processes, but this method can be challenging for lipid molecules because addition of a fluorophore may alter the properties of the molecule greatly. We discuss the use of fluorescent molecules that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy and by multiphoton microscopy are described. Some label-free methods for imaging cholesterol itself are also discussed briefly. PMID:22325611

  15. Fluorescent carbon nanomaterials: "quantum dots" or nanoclusters?

    PubMed

    Dekaliuk, Mariia O; Viagin, Oleg; Malyukin, Yuriy V; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2014-08-14

    Despite many efforts, the mechanisms of light absorption and emission of small fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (C-dots) are still unresolved and are a subject of active discussion. In this work we address the question as to whether the fluorescence is a collective property of these nanoparticles or they are composed of assembled individual emitters. Selecting three types of C-dots with "violet", "blue" and "green" emissions and performing a detailed study of fluorescence intensity, lifetime and time-resolved anisotropy as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths together with the effect of viscogen and dynamic fluorescence quencher, we demonstrate that the C-dots represent assemblies of surface-exposed fluorophores. They behave as individual emitters, display electronic anisotropy, do not exchange their excited-state energies via homo-FRET and possibly display sub-nanosecond intra-particle mobility.

  16. Conjugation of fluorescent proteins with DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lapiene, Vidmantas; Kukolka, Florian; Kiko, Kathrin; Arndt, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-05-19

    This work describes the synthesis of covalent ssDNA conjugates of six fluorescent proteins, ECFP, EGFP, E(2)GFP, mDsRed, Dronpa, and mCherry, which were cloned with an accessible C-terminal cystein residue to enable site-selective coupling using a heterobispecific cross-linker. The resulting conjugates revealed similar fluorescence emission intensity to the unconjugated proteins, and the functionality of the tethered oligonucleotide was proven by specific Watson-Crick base pairing to cDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the fluorescence of the FP is quenched by the gold particle, and the extent of quenching varied with the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of FP as well as with the configuration of surface attachment. Since this study demonstrates that biological fluorophores can be selectively incorporated into and optically coupled with nanoparticle-based devices, applications in DNA-based nanofabrication can be foreseen.

  17. Two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; Shao, Hanrong; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a novel method for imaging the fluorescence intensity and anisotropy by two-photon fluorescence microscopy and tested its capability in biological application. This method is applied to model sample including FITC and FITC-CD44 antibody solution and also FITC-CD44 stained cells. The fluorescence anisotropy (FA) of FITC-CD44ab solution is higher than the FITC solution with the same concentration. The fluorescence in cell sample has even higher FA than in solution because the rotation diffusion is restrained in membrane. The method is employed to study the effect of berberine a kind of Chinese medicine, on tumor metastasis. The results indicated that tumor cell membrane fluidity is decreasing with increasing the concentration of berberine in culture medium.

  18. Collective fluorescence enhancement in nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siying; Querner, Claudia; Dadosh, Tali; Crouch, Catherine H; Novikov, Dmitry S; Drndic, Marija

    2011-06-21

    Many nanoscale systems are known to emit light intermittently under continuous illumination. In the fluorescence of single semiconductor nanoparticles, the distributions of bright and dark periods ('on' and 'off' times) follow Lévy statistics. Although fluorescence from single-quantum dots and from macroscopic quantum dot ensembles has been studied, there has been little study of fluorescence from small ensembles. Here we show that blinking nanorods (NRs) interact with each other in a cluster, and the interactions affect the blinking statistics. The on-times in the fluorescence of a NR cluster increase dramatically; in a cluster with N NRs, the maximum on-time increases by a factor of N or more compared with the combined signal from N well-separated NRs. Our study emphasizes the use of statistical properties in identifying the collective dynamics. The scaling of this interaction-induced increase of on-times with number of NRs reveals a novel collective effect at the nanoscale.

  19. Lensless fluorescence imaging with height calculation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Akshaya; Salthouse, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Lensless fluorescence imaging (LFI) is the imaging of fluorescence from cells or microspheres using an image sensor with no external lenses or filters. The simplicity of the hardware makes it well suited to replace fluorescence microscopes and flow cytometers in lab-on-a-chip applications, but the images captured by LFI are highly dependent on the distance between the sample and the sensor. This work demonstrates that not only can samples be accurately detected across a range of sample-sensor separations using LFI, but also that the separation can be accurately estimated based on the shape of fluorescence in the LFI image. First, a theoretical model that accurately predicts LFI images of microspheres is presented. Then, the experimental results are compared to the model and an image processing method for accurately predicting sample-sensor separation from LFI images is presented. Finally, LFI images of microspheres and cells passing through a microfluidic channel are presented.

  20. Naphthoxazole-based singlet oxygen fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Rubén; Zanocco, Renzo; Gidi, Yasser; Zanocco, Antonio L; Nonell, Santi; Lemp, Else

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis and photochemical behavior of a new family of photoactive compounds to assess its potential as singlet oxygen ((1)O2) probes. The candidate dyads are composed by a (1)O2 trap plus a naphthoxazole moiety linked directly or through an unsaturated bond to the oxazole ring. In the native state, the inherent great fluorescence of the naphthoxazole moiety is quenched; but in the presence of (1)O2, generated by the addition and appropriate irradiation of an external photosensitizer, a photooxidation reaction occurs leading to the formation of a new chemical entity whose fluorescence is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the initial compound, at the optimal selected wavelength. The presented dyads outperform the commonly used indirect fluorescent (1)O2 probes in terms of fluorescence enhancement maintaining the required specificity for (1)O2 detection in solution.

  1. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  2. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    van der Tol, C; Berry, J A; Campbell, P K E; Rascher, U

    2014-01-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions. Key Points Light saturation of photosynthesis determines quenching of leaf fluorescence We incorporated steady state leaf fluorescence in a photosynthesis model PMID:27398266

  3. Visualizing Fluorescence: Using a Homemade Fluorescence “Microscope” to View Latent Fingerprints on Paper

    PubMed Central

    LaFratta, Christopher N.; Huh, Sun Phill; Mallillin, Allistair C.; Riviello, Peter J.; Walt, David R.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive handheld fluorescence imager (low-magnification microscope), constructed from poly(vinyl chloride) pipe and other inexpensive components for use as a teaching tool to understand the principles of fluorescence detection. Optical filters are used to select the excitation and emission wavelengths and can be easily interchanged to accommodate different fluorescent samples. As a demonstration, we used the fluorescence imager to view lawsone-dyed fingerprints on paper, which fluoresce red when illuminated with green light. This emission can be seen by viewing the sample through the instrument by eye, or the fluorescence can be captured by a camera. The entire imager can be built for less than $300. PMID:20852733

  4. Do large fluorescent particles enhance the modulation efficiency of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Baohong; Vignola, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    The question of whether particle size affects modulation efficiency, defined as the ratio of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence (UMF) signal to DC (direct current) signal, of the fluorescence emission from four different sized fluorescent particles was investigated experimentally. The four particles are streptavidin-conjugated Alexa Fluo 647 ({5 nm in diameter) and three carboxylate-modified fluorescent microspheres (FM) with different diameters of 0.02, 0.2, and 1.0 μm. Modulation efficiency was evaluated as a function of the fluorophore size and fluorophore concentration. The modulation efficiency was improved about two times when the size of the fluorescent particles is increased from 5 nm to 1 μm. This result implies that using large fluorescence particles can slightly improve the modulation efficiency but the improvement is limited.

  5. Determination of nitrite in waters by microplate fluorescence spectroscopy and HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Büldt, A; Karst, U

    1999-08-01

    A selective and versatile fluorescence spectroscopic method for the determination of nitrite in waters has been developed. Nitrite reacts in the presence of mineral acids with the nonfluorescent N-methyl-4-hydrazino-7-nitrobenzofurazan forming N-methyl-4-amino-7-nitrobenzofurazan, which can be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation maximum at lambda = 468 nm and an emission maximum at lambda = 537 nm in acetonitrile. Three new methods based on this reaction have been developed: Direct fluorescence spectroscopy, HPLC/fluorescence, or HPLC with UV/vis detector may be selected as detection techniques. On microplates, high-throughput fluorescence spectroscopy is achieved, while HPLC/fluorescence provides lower limits of detection, and HPLC with UV/vis detection enables evaluation of the reaction with standard instrumentation. Different water samples were investigated using all detection modes, and a photometric standard procedure was successfully employed to validate the new methods with an independent technique.

  6. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  7. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths < 400 nm) and emit photons in the long-wavelength ultraviolet, visible, and, when dissolved in some solvents, near-infrared regions. In addition, these dyes can be excited by two-photon absorption at near-infrared wavelengths (600 to 800 nm) to produce fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields

  8. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  9. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  10. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  11. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  12. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  13. A mathematical model for nonlinear fluorescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    e Coura, Carla Patrícia de Morais; Schneider, Ayda Henriques; Cortez, Celia Martins; Cruz, Frederico Alan de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Here, we presents a mathematical model to describe the nonlinear processes of fluorescence quenching, showing that the Stern-Volmer model can be a particular case when the quenching occurs as a linear phenomenon. The preliminary simulation, using data from the interaction of risperidone, an antipsychotic drug, with human serum albumin showed that the mathematical model may reproduce with very good approximation the nonlinear fluorescence quenching process.

  14. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    One of the most powerful and versatile methods for studying molecules in solution is fluorescence. Crystallization typically takes place in a concentrated solution environment, whereas fluorescence typically has an upper concentration limit of approximately 1 x 10(exp -5)M, thus intrinsic fluorescence cannot be employed, but a fluorescent probe must be added to a sub population of the molecules. However the fluorescent species cannot interfere with the self-assembly process. This can be achieved with macromolecules, where fluorescent probes can be covalently attached to a sub population of molecules that are subsequently used to track the system as a whole. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process of tetragonal lysozyme crystal nucleation, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P432121 space group. FRET studies are being carried out between cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex 376 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex 425 nm, Em 520 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R0 for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approximately 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 43 helix. The short CB-lys lifetime (approximately 5 ns), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules ((sup 3) 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a second, shorter lifetime (approximately 0.2 ns). Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with a model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and grow, and the relevance of that model to microgravity protein crystal growth

  15. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors for anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Maria; Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-05-01

    Sensing of anions has been investigated using the fluorescence decaytime as the information carrier. The sensing mechanism is based on the coextraction of an anion and a proton, and the presence of a fluorophore with a rather long fluorescence decaytime inside the membrane to act as a pH indicator. The relevant theory is discussed shortly. As an example a sensor for nitrate is shown, and the influence of ionic additives on the working function has been investigated.

  16. Use of upconverting fluorescent nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Dev K.; Zhang, Yong

    2012-02-01

    Lanthanide doped nanocrystals with upconversion fluorescence emission have been synthesized. The surface of these nanocrystals are modified to render them water dispersible and biocompatible. Use of these nanocrystals for bioimaging introduces many advantages, for example, minimum photo-damage to biological samples, weak auto-fluorescence, high detection sensitivity, high light penetration depth, etc. Here, we use upconversion nanocrystals to label cancer cells and demonstrate confocal imaging of the labeled cells implanted in mouse muscle.

  17. Recovering intrinsic fluorescence by Monte Carlo modeling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Manfred; Hendriks, Benno H W

    2013-02-01

    We present a novel way to recover intrinsic fluorescence in turbid media based on Monte Carlo generated look-up tables and making use of a diffuse reflectance measurement taken at the same location. The method has been validated on various phantoms with known intrinsic fluorescence and is benchmarked against photon-migration methods. This new method combines more flexibility in the probe design with fast reconstruction and showed similar reconstruction accuracy as found in other reconstruction methods.

  18. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Amiruddha

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1 %, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "hits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low

  19. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, 51%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear hits. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low cost optics

  20. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minamitani, Elizabeth Forsythe; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of a macromolecules purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals will show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "bits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment

  1. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically can not reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "hits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low

  2. High sensitivity radiographic NDT using fluorescent screens

    SciTech Connect

    Trapp, L.F.; Aman, J.K.

    1993-12-31

    Fluorescent Screen exposure previously reserved for thick sections, to shorten long exposures, may now be used for routine radiography. Changes in four areas make this possible: screen technology; specifications; imaging materials not previously available; and technique adjustment. This presentation covers these four areas, the use of fluorescent screens and image quality experimentation that show equivalent sensitivity with conventional techniques. The exposures were shorter and more productive.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy at endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianan Y.; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1994-07-01

    A spectrofluorometry system has been developed for the collection of laser induced fluorescense spectra of tissue during endoscopy. In this system, a catheter with seven optical fibers was used to deliver the excitation light and collect the emitted fluorescence. The system enables one to switch from regular endoscopy into fluorescence measurement in 50 ms using a computerized shutter system. The fluorescence spectra can be recorded in 100 ms. This spectrofluorometry system has been used to obtain spectra from bronchial, larynx and nasopharyngeal tissues when employed with the appropriate endoscopes. The results demonstrate that laser induced fluorescence can be used to differentiate abnormal tissue from normal tissue. The illumination and fluorescence collection patterns of this system have been modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo simulation data shows that the spectra recorded by our collection pattern is very close to the intrinsic spectra of tissue. The experimental results and the Monte Carlo simulation suggest that changes in fluorescence intensity are more robust for the detection of early cancers than the differences in spectral characteristics.

  4. Miniature fluorescence detection system for protein chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoseong; Choi, Jaeho; Lee, Kook-Nyung; Kim, Yongkwon

    2005-01-01

    We report the development of miniature fluorescence detection systems that employ miniature prism, mirrors and low cost CCD camera to detect the fluorescence emitted from 40 fluorescently-labeled protein patterns without scanner. This kind of miniature fluorescence detection systems can be used in point of care. We introduce two systems, one uses prism + mirror block and the other uses prism and two mirrors. A large NA microscope eyepiece and low cost CCD camera are used. We fabricated protein chip containing multi-pattern BSA labeled with Cy5, using MEMS technology and modified the surface chemically to clean and to immobilize proteins. The measurements show that the combination of prism and mirrors can homogenize elliptical excitation light over the sample with higher optical efficiency, and increase the separation between excitation and fluorescence light at the CCD to give higher signal intensity and higher signal to noise ratio. The measurements also show that protein concentrations ranging from 10 ng/ml to 1000 ng/ml can be assayed with very small error. We believe that the proposed fluorescence detection system can be refined to build a commercially valuable hand-held or miniature detection device.

  5. Constraining Simulated Photosynthesis with Fluorescence Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, I. T.; Berry, J. A.; Lee, J.; Frankenberg, C.; Denning, S.

    2012-12-01

    The measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence from satellites is an emerging technology. To date, most applications have compared fluorescence to light use efficiency models of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP). A close correspondence between fluorescence and GPP has been found in these comparisons. Here, we 'go the other way' and calculate fluorescence using an enzyme kinetic photosynthesis model (the Simple Biosphere Model; SiB), and compare to spectral retrievals. We utilize multiple representations for model phenology as a sensitivity test, obtaining leaf area index (LAI) and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed (fPAR) from both MODIS-derived products as well as a prognostic model of LAI/fPAR based on growing season index (PGSI). We find that bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), canopy radiative transfer, and leaf-to-canopy scaling all contribute to variability in simulated fluorescence. We use our results to evaluate discrepancies between light use efficiency and enzyme kinetic models across latitudinal, vegetation and climatological gradients. Satellite retrievals of fluorescence will provide insight into photosynthetic process and constrain simulations of the carbon cycle across multiple spatiotemporal scales.

  6. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) received immense interest in cancer imaging. FSNPs are a new class of engineered optical probes consisting of silica NPs loaded with fluorescent dye molecules. These probes exhibit some attractive features, such as photostability and brightness, which allow sensitive imaging of cancer cells. In general, FSNPs are chemically synthesized in solution using appropriate silane-based precursors. Fluorescent dye molecules are entrapped during the synthesis process. The synthetic process involves hydrolysis and condensation reactions of silane precursors. Stöber's sol-gel and water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion methods are two popular chemical methods that have been used for synthesizing FSNPs. Silica matrix is capable of carrying hundreds of fluorescent dye molecules in each FSNP, resulting in bright fluorescence. In FSNPs, fluorescent molecules are somewhat protected by the surrounding silica layer, resulting in good photostability. For cancer cell imaging, surface modification of FSNPs is often necessary to obtain appropriate surface functional groups to improve NP aqueous dispersibility as well as bioconjugation capability. Using conventional bioconjugate chemistry, cancer cell-specific biomolecules are then attached to the surface-modified FSNPs. For targeting cancer cells, the FSNPs are often conjugated to specific biomolecules such as antibodies, aptamers, and folic acid. In this chapter, different approaches for the FSNP design will be discussed and some representative protocols for FSNP synthesis will be provided. We will also discuss FSNP surface modification and bioconjugation techniques that are useful for cancer cell imaging.

  7. Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence Biosensors: a Review.

    PubMed

    Bauch, Martin; Toma, Koji; Toma, Mana; Zhang, Qingwen; Dostalek, Jakub

    Surfaces of metallic films and metallic nanoparticles can strongly confine electromagnetic field through its coupling to propagating or localized surface plasmons. This interaction is associated with large enhancement of the field intensity and local optical density of states which provides means to increase excitation rate, raise quantum yield, and control far field angular distribution of fluorescence light emitted by organic dyes and quantum dots. Such emitters are commonly used as labels in assays for detection of chemical and biological species. Their interaction with surface plasmons allows amplifying fluorescence signal (brightness) that accompanies molecular binding events by several orders of magnitude. In conjunction with interfacial architectures for the specific capture of target analyte on a metallic surface, plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF) that is also referred to as metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) represents an attractive method for shortening detection times and increasing sensitivity of various fluorescence-based analytical technologies. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates current developments in design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilizes propagating and localized surface plasmons, and summarizes current implementations to biosensors for detection of trace amounts of biomarkers, toxins, and pathogens that are relevant to medical diagnostics and food control.

  8. Optimal design of optical fiber fluorescent thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Danping; Jia, Ting; Gao, Lu; Lin, Yingwen

    2008-12-01

    It is proved that most of the actual fluorescent decays contain non-exponential component. An instability factor is defined to express the goodness of the actual fluorescent decay using in thermometer. The principle of mathematical model established in a fluorescent decay thermometer is discussed. It is critical to establish an accurate mathematical model in temperature measurement based on fluorescent decay, a good mathematical model is the one which is consistent with physical reality. If short of such consistence The traditional single-exponential model would induce much error in higher level precision temperature measurement for it's only a theoretical assumption. A cutting and normalized method and an instability factor are defined to judge the influence of non-exponential deflection of the fluorescent decay curve. The principle of establishing a mathematical model is discussed. Its pointed out that the matching of the mathematical model and the data processing method are essentially important for the measurement, the deducing conclusions such as data processing precisions, experimental and simulation results are uncertainty as applying to actual fluorescent material. Prony method having the potential capability in dealing with multi-exponential decay model also is pointed out. The above conclusions are evaluated by computer simulations and experiments.

  9. Fluorescence imaging of early lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Ikeda, Norihiko; Palcic, Branko

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a fluorescence imaging device was compared with conventional white-light bronchoscopy in 100 patients with lung cancer, 46 patients with resected State I nonsmall cell lung cancer, 10 patients with head and neck cancer, and 67 volunteers who had smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for twenty-five years or more. Using differences in tissue autofluorescence between premalignant, malignant and normal tissues, fluorescence bronchoscopy was found to detect more than twice as many moderate-severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ sites than conventional white-light bronchoscopy. The use of fluorescence imaging to detect small peripheral lung nodules was investigated in a micro metastatic lung model of mice implanted with Lewis lung tumor cells. Fluorescence imaging was found to be able to detect small malignant lung lesions. The use of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance fluorescence detection of CIS was investigated in a patient after oral administration of 60 mg/kg of ALA four hours prior to bronchoscopy, although ALA enhanced the tumor's visibility, multiple sites of false positive fluorescence were observed in areas of inflammation or metaplasia.

  10. Fluorescence markers in some New Zealand honeys.

    PubMed

    Bong, Jessie; Loomes, Kerry M; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Stephens, Jonathan M

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescence characteristics of various New Zealand honeys were investigated to establish if this technique might detect signatures unique to manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides) honeys. We found unique fluorescence profiles for these honeys which distinguished them from other New Zealand honey floral types. Two excitation-emission (ex-em) marker wavelengths each for manuka and kanuka honeys were identified; manuka honey at 270-365 (MM1) and 330-470 (MM2) nm and kanuka honey at 275-305 (KM1) and 445-525 (KM2) nm. Dilution of manuka and kanuka honeys with other honey types that did not possess these fluorescence profiles resulted in a proportional reduction in fluorescence signal of the honeys at the marker wavelengths. By comparison, rewarewa (Knightia excelsa), kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa), and clover (Trifolium spp.) honeys did not exhibit unique fluorescence patterns. These findings suggests that a fluorescence-based screening approach has potential utility for determining the monoflorality status of manuka and kanuka honeys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  12. Catchment-scale fluorescence water quality determination.

    PubMed

    Baker, A; Inverarity, R; Ward, D

    2005-01-01

    Chemical water quality determinants and river water fluorescence were determined on the River Tyne, northeast England. Statistically significant relationships between nitrate (r = 0.87), phosphate (r = 0.80), ammonia (r = 0.70), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (r = 0.85) and dissolved oxygen (r = -0.65) and tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity were observed. The strongest correlations are between tryptophan-like intensity and nitrate and phosphate, which in the Tyne catchment derive predominantly from point and diffuse source sewage inputs. The correlation between BOD and the tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity suggests that this fluorescence centre is related to the bioavailable or fluorescence intensity and ammonia concentration and dissolved oxygen. The weaker correlation with ammonia is due to good ammonia treatment within the wastewater treatment plants within the catchment, and that with dissolved oxygen due to the natural aeration of the river such that this is not a good indicator of water quality. Mean annual tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, measured by both bench and portable spectrometers, agrees well with the General Water Quality Assessment as determined by the England and Wales environmental regulators, the Environment Agency.

  13. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  14. Fluorescent penetration enhancers for transdermal applications.

    PubMed

    Seto, Jennifer E; Polat, Baris E; VanVeller, Brett; Lopez, Renata F V; Langer, Robert; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2012-02-28

    Chemical penetration enhancers are often used to enhance transdermal drug delivery. However, the fundamental mechanisms that govern the interactions between penetration enhancers and skin are not fully understood. Therefore, the goal of this work was to identify naturally fluorescent penetration enhancers (FPEs) in order to utilize well-established fluorescence techniques to directly study the behavior of FPEs within skin. In this study, 12 fluorescent molecules with amphiphilic characteristics were evaluated as skin penetration enhancers. Eight of the molecules exhibited significant activity as skin penetration enhancers, determined using skin current enhancement ratios. In addition, to illustrate the novel, direct, and non-invasive visualization of the behavior of FPEs within skin, three case studies involving the use of two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) are presented, including visualizing glycerol-mitigated and ultrasound-enhanced FPE skin penetration. Previous TPM studies have indirectly visualized the effect of penetration enhancers on the skin by using a fluorescent dye to probe the transdermal pathways of the enhancer. These effects can now be directly visualized and investigated using FPEs. Finally, future studies are proposed for generating FPE design principles. The combination of FPEs with fluorescence techniques represents a useful novel approach for obtaining physical insights on the behavior of penetration enhancers within the skin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorescent Penetration Enhancers for Transdermal Applications

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Jennifer E.; Polat, Baris E.; VanVeller, Brett; Lopez, Renata F.V.; Langer, Robert; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chemical penetration enhancers are often used to enhance transdermal drug delivery. However, the fundamental mechanisms that govern the interactions between penetration enhancers and skin are not fully understood. Therefore, the goal of this work was to identify naturally fluorescent penetration enhancers (FPEs) in order to utilize well-established fluorescence techniques to directly study the behavior of FPEs within skin. In this study, 12 fluorescent molecules with amphiphilic characteristics were evaluated as skin penetration enhancers. Eight of the molecules exhibited significant activity as skin penetration enhancers, determined using skin current enhancement ratios. In addition, to illustrate the novel, direct, and non-invasive visualization of the behavior of FPEs within skin, three case studies involving the use of two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) are presented, including visualizing glycerol-mitigated and ultrasound-enhanced FPE skin penetration. Previous TPM studies have indirectly visualized the effect of penetration enhancers on skin by using a fluorescent dye to probe the transdermal pathways of the enhancer. These effects can now be directly visualized and investigated using FPEs. Finally, future studies are proposed for generating FPE design principles. The combination of FPEs with fluorescence techniques represents a useful novel approach for obtaining physical insights on the behavior of penetration enhancers within skin. PMID:22062691

  16. Non-classical Phase-dependent Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Samir

    2000-06-01

    A simple two-level atom, radiating in free space, is a canonical system in quantum optics. Historically, resonance fluorescence provided the first experimental evidence for photon antibunching, sub-Poisson statistics, and quantum jumps. However, it is well known that observation of phase-dependent nonclassical effects in resonance fluorescence presents severe experimental challenges. In particular, the phenomenon of squeezing in resonance fluorescence, first predicted in 1981footnote D. F. Walls and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 709 (1981), long eluded observation despite receiving considerable attention. In this talk I will describe how we recently overcame these challenges to make the first measurements of single-atom squeezing spectra in the phase-dependent fluorescence of a beam of driven two-level atoms in free space(Z. H. Lu, S. Bali, and J. E. Thomas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81), 3635 (1998). The experimental scheme permits a valid comparison of these measurements with our predictions, thus yielding a new and simple physical picture of phase-dependent resonance fluorescence. Results of a direct measurement of the two-time field correlation function will also be presented. Our measurements enable important insights into the basic atomic processes underlying squeezing, and help elucidate the role of quantum jumps in phase-dependent resonance fluorescence.

  17. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein in a single living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Sharman, Kristin K.; Ahuja, Ramesh C.; Eto, Masumi; Brautigan, David L.

    1999-06-01

    Observing dynamic reorganization and molecular interactions of cellular components on a precise spatial and temporal scale is not possible using existing microscopic techniques. However, fluorescence lifetimes occur on a nanosecond time scale, are independent of local signal intensity and concentration of the fluorophore, and provide sensitive discrimination of the molecular environment. We designed and implemented a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) using a picosecond-gated multi-channel plate image intensifier, providing two-dimensional time-resolved images of single cell specimen. BHK21 cells were transfected with vectors for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and placed on an infinity-corrected Olympus epi-fluorescence microscope, coupled to a Coherent tunable femtosecond ti-sapphire pulsed laser and a frequency doubler to select an appropriate excitation wave length. After synchronizing the high-speed gated image intensifier to the excitation laser pulses, time-resolved nanosecond images of fluorescent emission were acquired. These images were processed pixel-by-pixel for single exponential decay to obtain an image based on fluorescence lifetime. Although the nucleus appeared brighter than the cytoplasm by fluorescence intensity measurement, FILM showed a uniform lifetime of the GFP fluorescence in both compartments, indicating that the GFP was in similar molecular environments. This technology also has important applications in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging.

  19. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  20. New method of acne disease fluorescent diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light and treatment control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimova, L. N.; Berezin, A. N.; Shevchik, S. A.; Kharnas, S. S.; Kusmin, S. G.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2005-08-01

    In the given research the new method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) control of acne disease is submitted. Method is based on simultaneous diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light. PDT was based on using 5-ALA (5- aminolevulinic acid) preparation and 600-730 nanometers radiation. If the examined site of a skin possessed a high endogenous porphyrin fluorescence level, PDT was carried out without 5-ALA. For FD and treatment control a dot spectroscopy and the fluorescent imaging of the affected skin were used.

  1. Development of probes for cellular functions using fluorescent proteins and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Many genetically encoded probes that employ fluorescent proteins and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to better understand the spatiotemporal regulation of various cellular processes. The different types of FRET and measurement techniques necessitate characterization of their specific features. Here I provide theoretical and practical comparisons of bimolecular and unimolecular FRET constructs, intensity-based and lifetime-based FRET measurements, FRET imaging using live- and fixed-cell samples, green fluorescent protein-based and chemical fluorophore-based FRET, and FRET efficiency and indices. The potential benefits and limitations of a variety of features in the technologies using fluorescent proteins and FRET are discussed.

  2. Influence of vessel stenosis on indocyanine green fluorescence intensity assessed by near-infrared fluorescence angiography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Nishimori, Hideaki; Fukutomi, Takashi; Handa, Takemi; Kihara, Kazuki; Tashiro, Miwa; Sato, Takayuki; Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2017-07-01

    Although useful for visualizing blood flow during revascularization surgery, the permeability of near-infrared fluorescence (NIR) angiography using indocyanine green (ICG) does not allow for vessel stenosis visualization. We hypothesized that changes in ICG fluorescence intensity reflect vessel stenosis, and evaluated the influence of stenosis on blood flow by ex vivo experimentation. The vessel stenosis model comprised a silicon tube, a graft occluder, and artificial blood. During near-infrared angiography, the fluorescense intensity was calculated during pre- and post-stenosis of an artificial circuit, using a NIR angiography. We measured the maximum fluorescence intensity and the time to maximum fluorescence intensity. Severe stenosis (≥75%) attenuated the increase in ICG fluorescence intensity in the tube significantly, pre- and post-stenosis. The time to maximum fluorescence intensity did not differ between sites pre- and post-stenosis, irrespective of stenosis severity. Stenosis affected the ICG fluorescence intensity through the vessel. Thus, quantitative analysis using NIR angiography may detect severe vessel stenosis (≥75%), and the extinction curve of indocyanine fluorescence intensity may support the evaluation of blood flow. The absence of differences in the time to maximum fluorescence intensity for degrees of stenosis might suggest a limitation of previous conventional qualitative assessments.

  3. Multicolor fluorescence detection for single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping using a filter-less fluorescence detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Keita; Nakazawa, Hirokazu; Misawa, Nobuo; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2013-06-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis that is commonly performed using fluorescence is important in drug development and pathology research. In this study, to facilitate the analysis, multicolor fluorescence detection for SNP genotyping using a filter-less fluorescence detector (FFD) was investigated. FFDs do not require any optical filters for multicolor fluorescence detection. From the experimental results, FFD could identify 0 μM, 1 μM, and 10 μM solutions of Texas Red and fluorescein isothiocyanate. Moreover, a mixture of Texas Red and 6-FAM could be detected in the SNP genotyping simulation. Therefore, a small and low-cost SNP genotyping system is feasible.

  4. Fluorescent halite from Bochnia salt mine, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluś, Edyta; Głąbińska, Dobrochna; Puławska, Aleksandra; Flasza, Michał; Manecki, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    The photoluminescence of selected halite crystals from Bochnia Salt Mine (Bochnia, Poland) were discovered in 2014. This is a result of contemporary precipitation from percolating waters. In most cases the fluorescence is observed in whole crystals or in zones of crystals. Only clear parts of transparent crystals are orange-red fluorescent in short UV light (320 nm). Chemical microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy SEM/EDS indicates that this is activated by Mn and Pb. The concentration of Mn is similar in fluorescent and inactive salt and equals to 0.13 - 0.27 wt.%. The concentration of Pb, however, averages to 3.8 wt.% in fluorescent parts reaching only 1.9 wt.% elsewhere. There is no difference in the unit cell parameters determined by powder X-ray diffraction. The percolating waters contain some Mn (ca. 3.9 ppm) but the concentration of Pb is below the detection limits. The experiments of precipitation of halite from the solutions containing various concentrations of Mn and Pb were performed to simulate this fenomenon using solutions containing: 1 mg Pb/L and 80 mg Mn/L; 1 mg Pb/L and 0.8 mg Mn/L; 1 mg Pb/L and 0.6 mg Mn/L; and 0 mg Pb/L and 80 mg Mn/L. The results indicate that fluorescence is apparent when halite forms from solutions containing more than 0.8 mg Mn/L and more than 1 mg Pb/L. The presence of lead as co-activator is necessary requirement: Mn alone does not activate the fluorescence of halite. This is in accordance with the results of previous work (Murata et al., 1946; Sidike et al., 2002). Rock salt in the mine does not show fluorescence at all. Fluorescence of contemporary salt in Bochnia salt mine is a result of mining activity and slight, sporadic contamination with traces of Mn and Pb. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319. Murata K. J., Smith R. L., 1946. Manganese and lead as coactivators of red fluorescence in halite, American Mineralogist, Volume 31, pages 527

  5. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  6. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Peck, K.

    1992-02-25

    A fluorescent scanner is designed for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier. The scanner includes a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from the volume to provide a display of the separated sample. 8 figs.

  7. Review of applications of fluorescence excitation spectroscopy to dermatology.

    PubMed

    Franco, W; Gutierrez-Herrera, E; Kollias, N; Doukas, A

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous molecules that exhibit fluorescence hold the potential to serve as reporters of tissue structure, activity and physiology. Fluorescence excitation spectroscopy is one means to measure and express tissue's innate fluorescence. This review focuses on the application of endogenous fluorescence ultraviolet excitation spectroscopy to dermatology.

  8. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan

    1992-01-01

    A fluorescent scanner for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier including a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from said volume to provide a display of the separated sample.

  9. Ratiometric fluorescent pH nanoprobes based on in situ assembling of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijun; Chen, Chao; Cao, Xiaodan; Liu, Yueling; Zhou, Shengmin; Wang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    pH-dependent protein adsorption on mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) was examined as a unique means for pH monitoring. Assuming that the degree of protein adsorption determines the distance separating protein molecules, we examined the feasibility of nanoscale pH probes based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins (mTurquoise2 and mNeonGreen, as donor and acceptor, respectively). Since protein adsorption on MSN is pH-sensitive, both fluorescent proteins were modified to make their isoelectric points (pIs) identical, thus achieving comparable adsorption between the proteins and enhancing FRET signals. The adsorption behaviors of such modified fluorescent proteins were examined along with ratiometric FRET signal generation. Results demonstrated that the pH probes could be manipulated to show feasible sensitivity and selectivity for pH changes in hosting solutions, with a good linearity observed in the pH range of 5.5-8.0. In a demonstration test, the pH probes were successfully applied to monitor progress of enzymatic reactions. Such an "in situ-assembling" pH sensor demonstrates a promising strategy in developing nanoscale fluorescent protein probes. Graphical abstract Working principle of the developed pH sensor TNS; and FRET Ratio (I528/I460) as a function of pH under different protein feed ratios (mNeonGreen to mTurquoise2).

  10. Interconversion of Anthozoa GFP-like fluorescent and non-fluorescent proteins by mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bulina, Maria E; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Mudrik, Nikolay N; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2002-01-01

    Background Within the family of green fluorescent protein (GFP) homologs, one can mark two main groups, specifically, fluorescent proteins (FPs) and non-fluorescent or chromoproteins (CPs). Structural background of differences between FPs and CPs are poorly understood to date. Results Here, we applied site-directed and random mutagenesis in order to to transform CP into FP and vice versa. A purple chromoprotein asCP (asFP595) from Anemonia sulcata and a red fluorescent protein DsRed from Discosoma sp. were selected as representatives of CPs and FPs, respectively. For asCP, some substitutions at positions 148 and 165 (numbering in accordance to GFP) were found to dramatically increase quantum yield of red fluorescence. For DsRed, substitutions at positions 148, 165, 167, and 203 significantly decreased fluorescence intensity, so that the spectral characteristics of these mutants became more close to those of CPs. Finally, a practically non-fluorescent mutant DsRed-NF was generated. This mutant carried four amino acid substitutions, specifically, S148C, I165N, K167M, and S203A. DsRed-NF possessed a high extinction coefficient and an extremely low quantum yield (< 0.001). These spectral characteristics allow one to regard DsRed-NF as a true chromoprotein. Conclusions We located a novel point in asCP sequence (position 165) mutations at which can result in red fluorescence appearance. Probably, this finding could be applied onto other CPs to generate red and far-red fluorescent mutants. A possibility to transform an FP into CP was demonstrated. Key role of residues adjacent to chromophore's phenolic ring in fluorescent/non-fluorescent states determination was revealed. PMID:11972899

  11. Double-excitation fluorescence spectral imaging: eliminating tissue auto-fluorescence from in vivo PPIX measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosean, Sason; Flynn, Brendan; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Gunn, Jason; Axelsson, Johan; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-02-01

    An ultrasound coupled handheld-probe-based optical fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system has been in development for the purpose of quantifying the production of Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in aminolevulinic acid treated (ALA), Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) in vivo. The design couples fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with a high frequency ultrasound imaging system, allowing regionally localized fluorescence intensities to be quantified [1]. The optical data are obtained by sequential excitation of the tissue with a 633nm laser, at four source locations and five parallel detections at each of the five interspersed detection locations. This method of acquisition permits fluorescence detection for both superficial and deep locations in ultrasound field. The optical boundary data, tissue layers segmented from ultrasound image and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorescence in tissue layers. To improve the recovery of the fluorescence signal of PPIX, eliminating tissue autofluorescence is of great importance. Here the approach was to utilize measurements which straddled the steep Qband excitation peak of PPIX, via the integration of an additional laser source, exciting at 637 nm; a wavelength with a 2 fold lower PPIX excitation value than 633nm.The auto-fluorescence spectrum acquired from the 637 nm laser is then used to spectrally decouple the fluorescence data and produce an accurate fluorescence emission signal, because the two wavelengths have very similar auto-fluorescence but substantially different PPIX excitation levels. The accuracy of this method, using a single source detector pair setup, is verified through animal tumor model experiments, and the result is compared to different methods of fluorescence signal recovery.

  12. Spectral variation of fluorescence lifetime near single metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Webster, Linden; Segovia, Paulina; Zayats, Anatoly V.; Richards, David

    2016-02-01

    We explore the spectral dependence of fluorescence enhancement and the associated lifetime modification of fluorescent molecules coupled to single metal nanoparticles. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and single-particle dark-field spectroscopy are combined to correlate the dependence of fluorescence lifetime reduction on the spectral overlap between the fluorescence emission and the localised surface plasmon (LSP) spectra of individual gold nanoparticles. A maximum lifetime reduction is observed when the fluorescence and LSP resonances coincide, with good agreement provided by numerical simulations. The explicit comparison between experiment and simulation, that we obtain, offers an insight into the spectral engineering of LSP mediated fluorescence and may lead to optimized application in sensing and biomedicine.

  13. Quantification of dental fluorosis using fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Pretty, I A; Tavener, J A; Browne, D; Brettle, D S; Whelton, H; Ellwood, R P

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging hardware and software have been recently employed to assess demineralization due to early dental caries. Dental fluorosis also presents as diffuse surface hypomineralization of enamel and in principle similar measurement methods might be applicable to both. The caries analysis system requires the user to select an area of sound enamel around the lesion so that the affected surface can be reconstructed and the lesion subtracted. Whereas early caries presents as discrete isolated lesions fluorosis is characterized by diffuse opacities covering most of the tooth. Consequently it is difficult to use commercial QLF software for the assessment of fluorosis, as there is typically no sound area of enamel to use for reconstruction. This study describes a fluorescent imaging device capable of recording digital images of the anterior teeth and also software that is able to objectively measure fluorosis area and severity. A convenience sample of 26 subjects with a range of fluorosis from TF scores 0-3 took part in the study. The upper left central incisor of these subjects was scored for fluorosis using the TF index, photographed using a conventional digital camera and imaged using the fluorescence imaging device. The TF index was then used to visually score the digital photographs and the fluorescence images. The data from the fluorescence method demonstrated a strong correlation with TF scores from fluorescence images (Kendall's tau = 0.862). The fluorescence imaging method shows promise as an objective, potentially blinded system for the longitudinal assessment of enamel fluorosis in vivo. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Online fluorescence suppression in modulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Anna Chiara; Mazilu, Michael; Riches, Andrew; Herrington, C Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-01-15

    Label-free chemical characterization of single cells is an important aim for biomedical research. Standard Raman spectroscopy provides intrinsic biochemical markers for noninvasive analysis of biological samples but is often hindered by the presence of fluorescence background. In this paper, we present an innovative modulated Raman spectroscopy technique to filter out the Raman spectra from the fluorescence background. The method is based on the principle that the fluorescence background does not change whereas the Raman scattering is shifted by the periodical modulation of the laser wavelength. Exploiting this physical property and importantly the multichannel lock-in detection of the Raman signal, the modulation technique fulfills the requirements of an effective fluorescence subtraction method. Indeed, once the synchronization and calibration procedure is performed, minimal user intervention is required, making the method online and less time-consuming than the other fluorescent suppression methods. We analyze the modulated Raman signal and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) signal of 2 mum-sized polystyrene beads suspended in a solution of fluorescent dye as a function of modulation rate. We show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the modulated Raman spectra at the highest modulation rate is 3 times higher than the SERDS one. To finally evaluate the real benefits of the modulated Raman spectroscopy, we apply our technique to Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Specifically, by analyzing separate spectra from the membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus of CHO cells, we demonstrate the ability of this method to obtain localized sensitive chemical information from cells, away from the interfering fluorescence background. In particular, statistical analysis of the Raman data and classification using PCA (principal component analysis) indicate that our method allows us to distinguish between different cell locations with higher sensitivity and

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy for wastewater monitoring: A review.

    PubMed

    Carstea, Elfrida M; Bridgeman, John; Baker, Andy; Reynolds, Darren M

    2016-05-15

    Wastewater quality is usually assessed using physical, chemical and microbiological tests, which are not suitable for online monitoring, provide unreliable results, or use hazardous chemicals. Hence, there is an urgent need to find a rapid and effective method for the evaluation of water quality in natural and engineered systems and for providing an early warning of pollution events. Fluorescence spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable technique to characterize and monitor wastewater in surface waters for tracking sources of pollution, and in treatment works for process control and optimization. This paper reviews the current progress in applying fluorescence to assess wastewater quality. Studies have shown that, in general, wastewater presents higher fluorescence intensity compared to natural waters for the components associated with peak T (living and dead cellular material and their exudates) and peak C (microbially reprocessed organic matter). Furthermore, peak T fluorescence is significantly reduced after the biological treatment process and peak C is almost completely removed after the chlorination and reverse osmosis stages. Thus, simple fluorometers with appropriate wavelength selectivity, particularly for peaks T and C could be used for online monitoring in wastewater treatment works. This review also shows that care should be taken in any attempt to identify wastewater pollution sources due to potential overlapping fluorophores. Correlations between fluorescence intensity and water quality parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total organic carbon (TOC) have been developed and dilution of samples, typically up to ×10, has been shown to be useful to limit inner filter effect. It has been concluded that the following research gaps need to be filled: lack of studies on the on-line application of fluorescence spectroscopy in wastewater treatment works and lack of data processing tools suitable for rapid correction and extraction of

  16. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Zhenglong; Zheng, Hairong; Sun, Mentao

    2015-12-01

    The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal-dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle's surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP) can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES), plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF). As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE) in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC) and down-conversion (DC) nanoparticles (NPs) are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  17. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  18. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  19. Detection of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein by capillary electrophoresis laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Craig, D B; Wong, J C; Dovichi, N J

    1997-01-01

    Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein was assayed by capillary electrophoresis using post-capillary laser-induced fluorescence detection in a sheath flow cuvette. The limit of detection was 3.0 x 10(-12) M protein in an injection volume of 17 nL, corresponding to a mass of 3100 molecules.

  20. Visualizing Fluorescence: Using a Homemade Fluorescence "Microscope" to View Latent Fingerprints on Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFratta, Christopher N.; Huh, Sun Phill; Mallillin, Allistair C.; Riviello, Peter J.; Walt, David R.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive hand-held fluorescence imager (low-magnification microscope), constructed from poly(vinyl chloride) pipe and other inexpensive components for use as a teaching tool to understand the principles of fluorescence detection. Optical filters are used to select the excitation and emission wavelengths and can be easily…