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Sample records for fluorescently labeled substance

  1. Evaluation of Fluorescently Labeled Lectins for Noninvasive Localization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances in Sphingomonas Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Anders R.; Hausner, Martina; Schnell, Annette; Wuertz, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    Three strains of Sphingomonas were grown as biofilms and tested for binding of five fluorescently labeled lectins (Con A-type IV-TRITC or -Cy5, Pha-E-TRITC, PNA-TRITC, UEA 1-TRITC, and WGA-Texas red). Only ConA and WGA were significantly bound by the biofilms. Binding of the five lectins to artificial biofilms made of the commercially available Sphingomonas extracellular polysaccharides was similar to binding to living biofilms. Staining of the living and artificial biofilms by ConA might be explained as binding of the lectin to the terminal mannosyl and terminal glucosyl residues in the polysaccharides secreted by Sphingomonas as well as to the terminal mannosyl residue in glycosphingolipids. Staining of the biofilms by WGA could only be explained as binding to the Sphingomonas glycosphingolipid membrane, binding to the cell wall, or nonspecific binding. Glycoconjugation of ConA and WGA with the target sugars glucose and N-acetylglucosamine, respectively, was used as a method for evaluation of the specificity of the lectins towards Sphingomonas biofilms and Sphingomonas polysaccharides. Our results show that the binding of lectins to biofilms does not necessarily prove the presence of specific target sugars in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilms. The lectins may bind to non-EPS targets or adhere nonspecifically to components of the biofilm matrix. PMID:10919811

  2. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  3. Fluorescently labelled glycans and their applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongbin; Yalagala, Ravi Shekar; Yan, Fengyang

    2015-11-01

    This review summarises the literature on the synthesis and applications of fluorescently labelled carbohydrates. Due to the sensitivity of fluorescent detection, this approach provides a useful tool to study processes involving glycans. A few general categories of labelling are presented, in situ labelling of carbohydrates with fluorophores, fluorescently labelled glycolipids, fluorogenic glycans, pre-formed fluorescent glycans for intracellular applications, glycan-decorated fluorescent polymers, fluorescent glyconanoparticles, and other functional fluorescent glycans.

  4. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  5. Enzymic synthesis of labelled chiral substances.

    PubMed

    Battersby, A R

    1985-01-01

    The enzymic synthesis of chiral substances in which one hydrogen atom of a methylene group has been replaced by deuterium or tritium is illustrated. Such labelled products can be used to determine the stereochemistry of other enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  6. Recent Advances in Fluorescent Labeling Techniques for Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Haruo; Aoki, Takeo; Takata, Kuniaki

    2007-01-01

    Tremendous progress in recent computer-controlled systems for fluorescence and laser-confocal microscopy has provided us with powerful tools to visualize and analyze molecular events in the cells. Various fluorescent staining and labeling techniques have also been developed to be used with these powerful instruments. Fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) allow us to directly label particular proteins of interest in living cells. This technique has been extended over a large area of cell biology, and a variety of fluorescent protein-derived techniques have been developed to visualize the functions and conditions of the molecules within living cells. In this review, we summarize the techniques for fluorescent staining and labeling for recent fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18224244

  7. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  8. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  9. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  10. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  11. Fluorescent labeling and tracking of nanoclay.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Carlos A; Xia, Yining; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael; Jayaraman, Krishnamurthy; Hotchkiss, Joseph

    2013-01-07

    We report a methodology developed to detect and track stable fluorescent-labeled nanoclay, in polymer-clay nanocomposite films, and in a contact solvent after migration testing. Fluorescein-5-maleimide (fluorescein) or tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (rhodamine) was covalently bonded to organically modified montmorillonite (o-MMT). Fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled nanoclay showed good thermal stability up to 220 °C and the rhodamine-labeled nanoclay remained stable at 250 °C. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to confirm the tagging and to detect the fluorescent-labeled nanoclays in various systems.

  12. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  13. Fluorescent labels and their use in separations

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Glazer, Alexander; Ju, Jingyue

    1997-01-01

    Compositions are provided comprising sets of fluorescent labels carrying pairs of donor and acceptor dye molecules, designed for efficient excitation of the donors at a single wavelength and emission from the acceptor in each of the pairs at different wavelengths. The different molecules having different donor-acceptor pairs can be modified to have substantially the same mobility under separation conditions, by varying the distance between the donor and acceptor in a given pair. Particularly, the fluorescent compositions find use as labels in sequencing nucleic acids.

  14. Ballistic labeling with fluorescent dyes and indicators.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joshua L; Wong, Rachel O L

    2008-04-01

    Neuronal cell labeling is fundamental to investigations of the nervous system. Labeling of cells in live or fixed tissue with dyes or ion indicators using ballistic approaches has recently been developed for the study of neuronal architecture and function. In this approach, dye-coated particles are propelled into cells by a pulse of pressurized helium. This unit provides step-by-step protocols for coating tungsten particles with fluorescent or indicator dyes and for delivering these particles into cells and tissue. The major advantage of the ballistic method of dye delivery is that large populations of neurons can be rapidly labeled within a piece of live or fixed tissue. Advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed and technical advice is provided. (c) 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled cytokines.

    PubMed

    Recker, Tobias; Haamann, Daniel; Schmitt, Anne; Küster, Andrea; Klee, Doris; Barth, Stefan; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    Cytokines are important mediators coordinating inflammation and wound healing in response to tissue damage and infection. Therefore, immobilization of cytokines on the surface of biomaterials is a promising approach to improve biocompatibility. Soluble cytokines signal through receptors on the cell surface leading to cell differentiation, proliferation, or other effector functions. Random immobilization of cytokines on surfaces will result in a large fraction of inactive protein due to impaired cytokine--receptor interaction. We developed a strategy that combined (i) directed covalent coupling of cytokines, (ii) quantification of coupling efficiency through fluorescence detection, and (iii) a reliable protease cleavage assay to control orientation of coupling. For this purpose, fusion proteins of the SNAP-tag followed by an enterokinase recognition site, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and the cytokine of interest being either interleukin-6 (IL-6) or oncostatin M (OSM) were generated. The SNAP-tag is a derivative of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase that couples itself covalently to benzylguanine. Bioactivities of the SNAP-YFP-cytokines were shown to be comparable with the nontagged cytokines. Efficient coupling of SNAP-YFP-cytokines to benzylguanine-modified beads was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The fact that enterokinase treatment released most of the fluorescence from the beads is indicative for directed coupling and only marginal adsorptive binding. Cellular responses to SNAP-YFP-cytokine beads were analyzed in cellular lysates and by confocal microscopy indicating that the directionally immobilized cytokines are fully signaling competent with respect to the activation of ERK and STAT3. The strategy presented here is generally applicable for the directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled proteins including the convenient and reliable control of coupling efficiency and orientation.

  16. Further Insights into Metal-DOM Interaction: Consideration of Both Fluorescent and Non-Fluorescent Substances

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huacheng; Zhong, Jicheng; Yu, Guanghui; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Helong; Yang, Liuyan

    2014-01-01

    Information on metal binding with fluorescent substances has been widely studied. By contrast, information on metal binding with non-fluorescent substances remains lacking despite the dominance of these substances in aquatic systems. In this study, the metal binding properties of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances were investigated by using metal titration combined with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D–COS) analysis. The organic matters in the eutrophic algae-rich lake, including natural organic matters (NOM) and algae-induced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), both contained fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances. The peaks in the one-dimensional spectra strongly overlapped, while 2D–COS can decompose the overlapped peaks and thus enhanced the spectral resolution. Moreover, 2D FTIR COS demonstrated that the binding susceptibility of organic ligands in both NOM and algal EPS matrices followed the order: 3400>1380>1650 cm−1, indicative the significant contribution of non-fluorescent ligands in metal binding. The modified Stern-Volmer equation also revealed a substantial metal binding potential for the non-fluorescent substances (logKM: 3.57∼4.92). As for the effects of organic ligands on metal binding, EPS was characterized with higher binding ability than NOM for both fluorescent and non-fluorescent ligands. Algae-induced EPS and the non-fluorescent substances in eutrophic algae-rich lakes should not be overlooked because of their high metal binding potential. PMID:25380246

  17. Further insights into metal-DOM interaction: consideration of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huacheng; Zhong, Jicheng; Yu, Guanghui; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Helong; Yang, Liuyan

    2014-01-01

    Information on metal binding with fluorescent substances has been widely studied. By contrast, information on metal binding with non-fluorescent substances remains lacking despite the dominance of these substances in aquatic systems. In this study, the metal binding properties of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances were investigated by using metal titration combined with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) analysis. The organic matters in the eutrophic algae-rich lake, including natural organic matters (NOM) and algae-induced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), both contained fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances. The peaks in the one-dimensional spectra strongly overlapped, while 2D-COS can decompose the overlapped peaks and thus enhanced the spectral resolution. Moreover, 2D FTIR COS demonstrated that the binding susceptibility of organic ligands in both NOM and algal EPS matrices followed the order: 3400>1380>1650 cm-1, indicative the significant contribution of non-fluorescent ligands in metal binding. The modified Stern-Volmer equation also revealed a substantial metal binding potential for the non-fluorescent substances (logKM: 3.57∼4.92). As for the effects of organic ligands on metal binding, EPS was characterized with higher binding ability than NOM for both fluorescent and non-fluorescent ligands. Algae-induced EPS and the non-fluorescent substances in eutrophic algae-rich lakes should not be overlooked because of their high metal binding potential.

  18. Multiplexed Spectral Imaging of 120 Different Fluorescent Labels

    PubMed Central

    Valm, Alex M.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Borisy, Gary G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of fluorescent labels that can unambiguously be distinguished in a single image when acquired through band pass filters is severely limited by the spectral overlap of available fluorophores. The recent development of spectral microscopy and the application of linear unmixing algorithms to spectrally recorded image data have allowed simultaneous imaging of fluorophores with highly overlapping spectra. However, the number of distinguishable fluorophores is still limited by the unavoidable decrease in signal to noise ratio when fluorescence signals are fractionated over multiple wavelength bins. Here we present a spectral image analysis algorithm to greatly expand the number of distinguishable objects labeled with binary combinations of fluorophores. Our algorithm utilizes a priori knowledge about labeled specimens and imposes a binary label constraint on the unmixing solution. We have applied our labeling and analysis strategy to identify microbes labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization and here demonstrate the ability to distinguish 120 differently labeled microbes in a single image. PMID:27391327

  19. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  20. Protein specific fluorescent microspheres for labelling a protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, stable and biocompatible microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing an acrylic monomer containing a covalent bonding group such as hydroxyl, amine or carboxyl, for example, hydroxyethylmethacrylate, with an addition polymerizable fluorescent comonomer such as dansyl allyl amine. A lectin or antibody is bound to the covalent site to provide cell specificity. When the microspheres are added to a cell suspension the marked microspheres will specifically label a cell membrane by binding to a specific receptor site thereon. The labeled membrane can then be detected by fluorescence of the fluorescent monomer.

  1. Inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation by fluorescent dye labels

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, Mariana; Wellbrock, Thorben; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2014-02-10

    The fluorescence decay of beta-amyloid's (Aβ) intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine has been used for sensing the oligomer formation of dye-labelled Aβ monomers and the results compared with previously studied oligomerization of the non-labelled Aβ peptides. It has been demonstrated that two different sized, covalently bound probes 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl and Hilyte Fluor 488 (HLF), alter the rate and character of oligomerization to different extents. The ability of HLF to inhibit formation of highly ordered structures containing beta-sheets was also shown. The implications of our findings for using fluorescence methods in amyloidosis research are discussed and the advantages of this auto-fluorescence approach highlighted.

  2. Inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation by fluorescent dye labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Mariana; Wellbrock, Thorben; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2014-02-01

    The fluorescence decay of beta-amyloid's (Aβ) intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine has been used for sensing the oligomer formation of dye-labelled Aβ monomers and the results compared with previously studied oligomerization of the non-labelled Aβ peptides. It has been demonstrated that two different sized, covalently bound probes 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl and Hilyte Fluor 488 (HLF), alter the rate and character of oligomerization to different extents. The ability of HLF to inhibit formation of highly ordered structures containing beta-sheets was also shown. The implications of our findings for using fluorescence methods in amyloidosis research are discussed and the advantages of this auto-fluorescence approach highlighted.

  3. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  4. The effects of radioiodination and fluorescent labelling on albumin.

    PubMed

    Crandall, R E; Janatova, J; Andrade, J D

    1981-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of fluorescamine -, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) -, and radioiodine-labelled bovine serum albumin is critically evaluated. Electrophoretic mobility and ion-exchange chromatography, together with measures of degree of conjugation and sulfhydryl content, are used to assess the changes due to conjugation. Fluorescamine labelling results in drastic changes in chromatographic behavior and electrophoretic mobility. FITC labelling also results in significant changes in chromatographic and electrophoretic properties. Radioiodination leads to minor changes in chromatographic properties and oxydation of sulfhydryl groups, with little or no change in electrophoretic properties. All three labels have some degree of lability and show increased levels of free label with time, even after extensive initial purification. It is concluded that the two fluorescent labels and possibly the radioiodine labelling method used here are unsuitable for certain studies of BSA, such as its adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces.

  5. Reduction of lipofuscin-like autofluorescence in fluorescently labeled tissue.

    PubMed

    Schnell, S A; Staines, W A; Wessendorf, M W

    1999-06-01

    The fluorescent pigment lipofuscin accumulates with age in the cytoplasm of cells of the CNS. Because of its broad excitation and emission spectra, the presence of lipofuscin-like autofluorescence complicates the use of fluorescence microscopy (e.g., fluorescent retrograde tract tracing and fluorescence immunocytochemistry). In this study we examined several chemical treatments of tissue sections for their ability to reduce or eliminate lipofuscin-like autofluorescence without adversely affecting other fluorescent labels. We found that 1-10 mM CuSO4 in 50 mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5) or 1% Sudan Black B (SB) in 70% ethanol reduced or eliminated lipofuscin autofluorescence in sections of monkey, human, or rat neural tissue. These treatments also slightly reduced the intensity of immunofluorescent labeling and fluorescent retrograde tract tracers. However, the reduction of these fluorophores was far less dramatic than that for the lipofuscin-like compound. We conclude that treatment of tissue with CuSO4 or SB provides a reasonable compromise between reduction of lipofuscin-like fluorescence and maintenance of specific fluorescent labels.

  6. Saturation Fluorescence Labeling of Proteins for Proteomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pretzer, Elizabeth; Wiktorowicz, John E.

    2008-01-01

    We present here an optimized and cost-effective approach to saturation fluorescence labeling of protein thiols for proteomic analysis. We investigated a number of conditions and reagent concentrations including a disulfide reducing agent (TCEP), pH, incubation time, linearity of labeling, and saturating dye: protein thiol ratio with protein standards to gauge specific and non-specific labeling. Efficacy of labeling under these conditions was quantified using specific fluorescence estimation, defined as the ratio of fluorescence pixel intensities and Coomassie-stained pixel intensities of bands after digital imaging. Factors leading to specific vs. non-specific labeling in the presence of thiourea are also discussed. We have found that reproducible saturation of available Cys residues of the proteins used as labeling standards (human carbonic anhydrase I, enolase, α-lactalbumin) is achieved at 50-100-fold excess of the uncharged maleimide-functionalized BODIPY™ dyes over Cys. We confirm our previous findings and those of others that the maleimide dyes are not impacted by the presence of 2M thiourea. Moreover, we establish that 2 mM TCEP used as reductant is optimal. We also establish further that labeling is optimal at pH 7.5 and complete after 30 min. Low non-specific labeling was gauged by the inclusion of non-Cys containing proteins (horse myoglobin, bovine carbonic anhydrase) to the labeling mixture. We also show that the dye exhibits little to no effect on the two dimensional mobilities of labeled proteins derived from cells. PMID:18191033

  7. Fluorescent Labeling of Plasmid DNA and mRNA: Gains and Losses of Current Labeling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, K; Braeckmans, K; Remaut, K

    2016-02-17

    Live-cell imaging has provided the life sciences with insights into the cell biology and dynamics. Fluorescent labeling of target molecules proves to be indispensable in this regard. In this Review, we focus on the current fluorescent labeling strategies for nucleic acids, and in particular mRNA (mRNA) and plasmid DNA (pDNA), which are of interest to a broad range of scientific fields. By giving a background of the available techniques and an evaluation of the pros and cons, we try to supply scientists with all the information needed to come to an informed choice of nucleic acid labeling strategy aimed at their particular needs.

  8. Recombinant alpha-actin for specific fluorescent labeling.

    PubMed

    Iwane, Atsuko H; Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, actin was thought to act merely as a passive track for its motility partner, myosin, during actomyosin interactions. Yet a recent report having observed dynamical conformational changes in labeled skeletal muscle alpha-actin suggests that actin has a more active role. Because the labeling technique was still immature, however, conclusions regarding the significance of the different conformations are difficult to make. Here, we describe the preparation of fully active alpha-actin obtained from a baculovirus expression system. We developed alpha-actin recombinants, of which subdomains 1 and 2 have specific sites for fluorescent probes. This specific labeling technique offers to significantly expand the information acquired from actin studies.

  9. 21 CFR 1302.07 - Labeling and packaging requirements for imported and exported substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling and packaging requirements for imported and exported substances. 1302.07 Section 1302.07 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LABELING AND PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 1302.07 Labeling and packaging requirements for imported and...

  10. Universal fluorescent labeling of amplification products using locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Asari, Masaru; Oka, Kumiko; Omura, Tomohiro; Maseda, Chikatoshi; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Shiono, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Matsuda, Mitsuyoshi; Shimizu, Keiko

    2013-02-01

    Amplification/hybridization-based genetic analyses using primers containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) present many benefits. Here, we developed a novel design for universal fluorescent PCR using LNAs. Universal fluorescent PCR generates intermediate nonlabeled fragments and final fluorescent fragments in a two-step amplification process that uses locus-specific primers with universal tails and universal fluorescent primers. In this study, a few standard nucleotides were replaced with LNAs only in the fluorescent universal primers. The sequence of the fluorescent universal primer significantly affected the amplification efficiency. For primers with three LNAs, the fluorescent primers with stable M13(-47) sequences provided the most efficient signal (approximately tenfold higher than the primers with M13(-21) sequences at lower Tm values). Moreover, AT-rich LNA substitutions in the fluorescent primers produced much lower amplification efficiencies than GC-rich substitutions. GC-rich LNAs produced greater differences in Tm values among primers, and resulted in the preferential production of fluorescently labeled amplicons. The specificity and sensitivity of LNA-containing fluorescent primers were assessed by genotyping eight STRs in Japanese individuals, and full STR profiles could be generated using as little as 0.25 ng of genomic DNA. The method permitted clear discrimination of alleles and represents sensitive STR genotyping at a reduced cost. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. High-level fluorescence labeling of gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aymanns, Simone; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Wolz, Christiane; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb) promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10-50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration.

  12. In Situ Live-Cell Nucleus Fluorescence Labeling with Bioinspired Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pan; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques for visualization of nuclear structure and function in live cells are fundamentally important for exploring major cellular events. The ideal cellular labeling method is capable of realizing label-free, in situ, real-time, and long-term nucleus labeling in live cells, which can fully obtain the nucleus-relative information and effectively alleviate negative effects of alien probes on cellular metabolism. However, current established fluorescent probes-based strategies (e.g., fluorescent proteins-, organic dyes-, fluorescent organic/inorganic nanoparticles-based imaging techniques) are unable to simultaneously realize label-free, in situ, long-term, and real-time nucleus labeling, resulting in inevitable difficulties in fully visualizing nuclear structure and function in live cells. To this end, we present a type of bioinspired fluorescent probes, which are highly efficacious for in situ and label-free tracking of nucleus in long-term and real-time manners. Typically, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, served as fluorescent probes, can be readily synthesized in situ within live cell nucleus without any further modifications under physiological conditions (37 °C, pH ∼7.4). Compared with other conventional nuclear dyes (e.g., propidium iodide (PI), Hoechst), superior spectroscopic properties (e.g., quantum yield of ∼35.8% and high photostability) and low cytotoxicity of PDA-based probes enable long-term (e.g., 3 h) fluorescence tracking of nucleus. We also demonstrate the generality of this type of bioinspired fluorescent probes in different cell lines and complex biological samples.

  13. Interaction between carbamazepine and humic substances: a fluorescence spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Liu, Congqiang; Guo, Jianyang; Fu, Pingqing; Li, Wen; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-01-01

    Carbamazepine is a popular drug that has been detected in natural environments, but little is known about its biogeochemical cycling, influencing factors, and eco-environmental effects in aquatic ecosystems. Interaction between carbamazepine and humic substances, including fulvic and humic acids, was studied using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous-scan fluorescence spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of humic substances was quenched on the addition of carbamazepine, and static quenching was the primary mechanism. The binding parameters on their interaction, including the conditional binding constants (log K) and binding capacities (C(L)), were estimated by the Ryan-Weber nonlinear theory equation. Log K ranged from 3.41 to 5.04 L/mol at 25 degrees C and pH 7.0. The influence of pH on the complexation and the competition between carbamazepine and Cu(II) for fluorescence-binding sites also were discussed. The present results would be helpful in understanding the fate and biogeochemical cycling of other pharmaceuticals and personal care products in aquatic ecosystems.

  14. PRN 92-2: Permissible label claims regarding ozone depleting substances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This notice describes EPA's policy for certain chlorofluorocarbon-related labeling claims on pesticide aerosol products. Under this policy, true claims that a product does not contain CFCs or other ozone-depleting substances are permitted on labels.

  15. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Mariette; Damron, F Heath

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  16. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Mariette; Damron, F. Heath

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26937640

  17. A highly sensitive method for analyses of sugar moieties of glycoproteins by fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Hase, S; Ikenaka, T; Matsushima, Y

    1981-08-01

    The sensitivity of a fluorescence labeling method ((1979). J. Biochem. 85, 989--994; 995--1002) for structure analyses of asparagine-linked sugar moieties of glycoproteins was increased by using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Sugar moieties were separated from polypeptide portions by hydrazinolysis. Free amino groups thus exposed were acetylated and the reducing ends of sugar chains were reductively aminated with a fluorescent reagent, 2-aminopyridine, by the use of sodium cyanoborohydride. The pyridylamino derivatives were purified on a Dowex 1 column to eliminate undesired substances. The separation and identification of the pyridylamino derivatives were carried out by HPLC with a column of C18 reversed phase or gel permeation phase. As little as 0.1 pmol of pyridylamino derivatives can be detected. Ten microgram of Taka-amylase A was easily detected by this system. The method was also applied to some other glycoproteins.

  18. Homogeneous substrate-labeled fluorescent immunoassay for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Patinkin, J; Inbar, D; Ben-Gigi, C; Derfler, S; Klausner, Y; Fridlender, B

    1983-01-01

    A homogeneous substrate-labeled fluorescent immunoassay for human serum albumin (HSA) has been developed, similar to previously described immunoassays for Immunoglobulin G and Immunoglobulin M. HSA was covalently linked to 6-(7-beta-galactosylcoumarin-3-carboxamide) hexylamine. The resulting conjugate had minimal fluorescence at 450 nm (with excitation at 400 nm). However, when the acetal linkage of the galactosyl moiety was hydrolyzed by beta-galactosidase, a substantial increase in the fluorescence was obtained. This increase was specifically inhibited by antibody to HSA. A competitive binding immunoassay was established by letting the conjugate compete with HSA in the serum for the limited number of antibody-binding sites. The level of fluorescence resulting from the addition of enzyme was proportional to the amount of HSA in the serum. Precision, analytical recovery and serum dilution studies were carried out on the assay. The immunoassay was compared to an albumin assay using the dye-binding method.

  19. In vivo fluorescent labeling of corneal wound healing fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gatlin, Joel; Melkus, Michael W; Padgett, Angela; Petroll, W Matthew; Cavanagh, H Dwight; Garcia, J Victor; Jester, James V

    2003-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown that fibroblasts play an important role in corneal wound healing, however, the dynamic cellular events underlying wound tissue organization and contraction remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to develop a system to enable live cell imaging of corneal wound healing fibroblasts in situ. To this end, concentrated preparations of an RD114 pseudotyped MLV-based vector expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were evaluated in vitro for gene transfer efficiency using cultured rabbit corneal keratocytes. Primary rabbit keratocytes were efficiently labeled in vitro (up to 50% EGFP(+)) at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI=10). To evaluate this gene transfer vector in vivo, rabbit corneal fibroblasts were transduced by direct application of vector supernatant to injured corneas following lamellar keratectomy. Fluorescent fibroblasts were then visualized in situ using epifluorescence microscopy and multiphoton confocal microscopy of excised fresh tissue at multiple time points from 14 days to four months following gene transfer. Fourteen days post-transduction, labeled fibroblasts expressing EGFP were readily detectable by fluorescence microscopy. Detectable fluorescence was noted up to eight weeks post-transduction. Labeled fibroblasts were detected in clusters located predominantly along the margin circumscribing the wound and to a lesser extent within the wound area. Cell growth in clusters was suggestive of the expansion of individual transduced clones. High-resolution imaging showed fluorescent fibroblasts to have a broad, flattened, dendritic morphology, distinct from the spindle shape of cultured fibroblasts. Utilizing multiphoton confocal microscopy, three-dimensional imaging of viable, labeled cells showed wound healing fibroblasts to be extensively interconnected and multi-layered within the corneal wound. These results demonstrate that rabbit corneal fibroblasts can be efficiently transduced in vitro and in

  20. Trypsinization-dependent cell labeling with fluorescent nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Trypsin is often used to detach adhered cell subculture from a substrate. However, the proteolytic activity of trypsin may harm cells by cleaving the cell membrane proteins. The present study shows that cellular uptake of fluorescent nanoparticles is remarkably increased within 24 h after trypsinization. These results highlight the trypsin-induced protein digestion, provoking leaky cell plasma membrane which leads to the strongly enhanced cellular uptake of the nanoparticles. To prevent this effect, one should expose cells to the nanoparticle (NP)-based fluorescent labels at least 48 h after trypsinization. PMID:25328505

  1. Global analysis of fluorescence decays to probe the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Jean

    2014-03-11

    The aim of this review is to introduce the reader first to the mathematical complexity associated with the analysis of fluorescence decays acquired with solutions of macromolecules labeled with a fluorophore and its quencher that are capable of interacting with each other via photophysical processes within the macromolecular volume, second to the experimental and mathematical approaches that have been proposed over the years to handle this mathematical complexity, and third to the information that one can expect to retrieve with respect to the internal dynamics of such fluorescently labeled macromolecules. In my view, the ideal fluorophore-quencher pair to use in studying the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules would involve a long-lived fluorophore, a fluorophore and a quencher that do not undergo energy migration, and a photophysical process that results in a change in fluorophore emission upon contact between the excited fluorophore and quencher. Pyrene, with its ability to form an excimer on contact between excited-state and ground-state species, happens to possess all of these properties. Although the concepts described in this review apply to any fluorophore and quencher pair sharing pyrene's exceptional photophysical properties, this review focuses on the study of pyrene-labeled macromolecules that have been characterized in great detail over the past 40 years and presents the main models that are being used today to analyze the fluorescence decays of pyrene-labeled macromolecules reliably. These models are based on Birks' scheme, the DMD model, the fluorescence blob model, and the model free analysis. The review also provides a step-by-step protocol that should enable the noneducated user to achieve a successful decay analysis exempt of artifacts. Finally, some examples of studies of pyrene-labeled macromolecules are also presented to illustrate the different types of information that can be retrieved from these fluorescence decay

  2. New method for covalent fluorescent biomolecule labeling with hemicyanine dye.

    PubMed

    Kostenko, Olexander M; Kovalska, Vladyslava B; Volkova, Kateryna D; Shaytanov, Pavel; Kocheshev, Igor O; Slominskiy, Yuriy L; Pisareva, Irina V; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2006-07-01

    Fluorescent chromophore, alkylamino-(tetra-hydronaphthalenylidene)- benzothiazolium derivatives (HBTN dyes), are proposed as covalent labels for proteins via aliphatic amino groups. Spectral-luminescent properties of 3-methyl-2-{(E)-[7-(methylamino)-4,4a,5,6-tetra-hydronaphthalen-2(3H)-ylidene]methyl}-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium chloride (HBTN, R=Me) and its predecessor, 2-[(E)-(7-methoxy-4,4a,5,6-tetrahydronaphthalen-2(3H)-ylidene)methyl]-3-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium chloride (ABTN), are studied for free dyes and in the presence of DNA and BSA. Considerable spectral-luminescent changes accompany the transformation of ABTN into HBTN that allows monitoring conjugation reaction. In presence of DNA and BSA the HBTN increases its emission in 15 and 4 times respectively and becomes strongly fluorescent. The conditions for labeling are developed and a model conjugate of HBTN dye with BSA is synthesized. It was shown that using of HBTN dye as a fluorescent label allows detection by eye of about 3 mug/band of BSA on polyacrylamide gel upon UV-irradiation.

  3. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  4. Spatial arrangement of selected fluorescence labels in lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Zygmunt H

    2013-08-05

    The method for the determination the orientation factor κ(2), spatial arrangement and depth position of fluorescence labels located in hydrophilic layers of vesicles bilayer from resonance energy transfer (RET) data is presented. The method is based on the broadened Wolber and Hudson RET model in two dimensions (Biophys J. 1979). The vesicles were labeled with N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (NBD-PE) as the donor and N-(Lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl) 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (NRh-PE) as the acceptor. It was found that in basic environment sodium dithionite quenches fluorescence of both labels located in outer leaflet of bilayer. Therefore, RET data prior to and following dithionite treatment were compared and the donor-acceptor cis and trans distances of the closest approach as well as cis and trans Förster radii R0, and orientation factors κ(2) for cis RET equal to 0.61±0.06 and for trans RET equal to 0.17±0.01 were assigned. Knowing the κ(2) data, the spatial arrangement of NBD and NRh labels as dipoles in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer were described.

  5. Fluorescently labeled circular DNA molecules for DNA topology and topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Maxwell; Berrido, Andrea; Gonzalez, Walter G.; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Chambers, Jeremy W.; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-01-01

    DNA topology plays essential roles in several fundamental biological processes, such as DNA replication, recombination, and transcription. Typically agarose gel electrophoresis is employed to study DNA topology. Since gel electrophoresis is time-consuming and labor intensive, it is desirable to develop other methods, such as fluorescence-based methods, for such studies. In this paper we report the synthesis of a type of unique fluorescence-labeled DNA molecules that can be used to study DNA topology and topoisomerases by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Specifically, we inserted an 82 nt. synthetic DNA oligomer FL905 carrying a 42 nt. AT sequence with fluorescein and dabcyl labels into a gapped DNA molecule to generate relaxed and supercoiled pAB1_FL905. Since the fluorescence intensity of pAB1_FL905 is dependent on its supercoiling status, pAB1_FL905 is a powerful tool to study DNA topology and topoisomerases by FRET. pAB1_FL905 can also be developed into rapid and efficient high-throughput screening assays to identify inhibitors that target various DNA topoisomerases. PMID:27796331

  6. Fluorescence properties of o-aminobenzoyl-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Churchich, J E

    1993-09-01

    Isatoic anhydride reacts with nucleophile groups of proteins to yield o-aminobenzoyl protein conjugates. The fluorescence emitted by the chromophore decays in a multiexponential manner with average fluorescence lifetimes ranging from 9.9 to 10.7 ns. The steady emission anisotropy, measured upon excitation at 330 nm, is influenced by the molecular mass of the protein to which o-aminobenzoyl is attached. The fluorescence properties of o-aminobenzoyl are suitable for rotational correlation time measurements of proteins smaller than 65 kDa. The technique of emission anisotropy can be used to detect interactions between proteins in solution, provided one of the proteins is labeled with o-aminobenzoyl.

  7. Fluorescent labeling of cells and biomolecules with nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Suga, Masakazu; Sasaki, Yu F.; Ohta, Toshihiro; Yasuhara, Masato; Dohi, Taeko; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), novel nanometer-size probes and have the potential to be used as easy imaging tool for molecular biology and bioimaging including medical applications, since some nanocrystals emit higher and far longer fluorescence than conventional organic probes. QDs are now becoming widely used in biotechnology and medical applications. QDs have several advantages over organic fluorophores with regard to high luminescence, stability against photobleaching, and a range of fluorescence wavelengths from blue to infrared depending on the particle size. In this review, we reported labeling of some kinds of immune cells and biomolecules with several QDs coated with hydrophilic carboxyl/amine groups, and reported that we could image the circulation of mouse lymphocytes in vivo by QDs. In addition, we also reported here about the cytotoxicity of these nanocrystals.

  8. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  9. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  10. Fluorescence lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystals and organic labels.

    PubMed

    Grabolle, Markus; Kapusta, Peter; Nann, Thomas; Shu, Xu; Ziegler, Jan; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2009-09-15

    The potential of semiconducting nanocrystals or so-called quantum dots (QDs) for lifetime multiplexing has not been investigated yet, despite the increasing use of QDs in (bio)analytical detection, biosensing, and fluorescence imaging and the obvious need for simple and cost-effective tools and strategies for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes or events. This is most likely related to their multiexponential decay behavior as for multiplex chromophores, typically monoexponential decay kinetics are requested. The fluorescence decay kinetics of various mixtures of a long-lived, multiexponentially decaying CdSe QD and a short-lived organic dye were analyzed, and a model was developed for the quantification of these labels from the measured complex decay kinetics as a first proof-of-concept for the huge potential of these labels for lifetime multiplexing. In a second step, we evaluated the potential of mixtures of two types of QDs, varying in constituent material to realize distinguishable, yet multiexponential decay kinetics and similar absorption and emission spectra. Strategies for lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystalline labels were derived on the basis of these measurements.

  11. Diphenylhexatrienylpropanoylhydrazyl stachyose: a new fluorescence label for membrane research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, Josef; Ivessa, E. N.; Kalb, Edwin; Paltauf, Fritz; Hermetter, Albin

    1990-05-01

    Diphenylhexatrienylpropanoylhydrazyl stachyose (glyco-DPH), a new fluorescence probe, was synthesized. It inserts almost instantaneously into artificial phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes. Due to its large hydrophilic carbohydrate portion, it serves as an uncharged probe with a defined orientation within the membrane bilayer. Its usefulness to monitor lipid mobility by means of its fluorescence anisotropy could be demonstrated for dipalmitoylglycerophosphocholine at temperatures around the gel to liquid phase transition and the rigidifying effect of cholesterol on egg yolk phosphatidyicholine membranes. In addition, lipid mobility was determined for biological membrane systems such as yeast spheroplasts, yeast organelles, cultured human skin fibroblasts and compared with the 'fluidities" of vesicles made of the corresponding lipid extracts. Bimodal Lorentzian lifetime distributions determined for glyco-DPH in vesicles of 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine showed that the label is distributed homogeneously within a phospholipid bilayer. Fluorescence microscopy of living (fibroblast) cells revealed selective labeling of the surface membrane with glyco-DPH under appropriate conditions.

  12. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-01-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures. PMID:28150730

  13. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-02-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures.

  14. In Vivo Fluorescence Immunohistochemistry: Localization of Fluorescently Labeled Cetuximab in Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Esther; Warram, Jason M; Tucker, Matthew D; Hartman, Yolanda E; Moore, Lindsay S; de Jong, Johannes S; Chung, Thomas K; Korb, Melissa L; Zinn, Kurt R; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rosenthal, Eben L; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret S

    2015-06-29

    Anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) antibody based treatment strategies have been successfully implemented in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Unfortunately, predicting an accurate and reliable therapeutic response remains a challenge on a per-patient basis. Although significant efforts have been invested in understanding EGFR-mediated changes in cell signaling related to treatment efficacy, the delivery and histological localization in (peri-)tumoral compartments of antibody-based therapeutics in human tumors is poorly understood nor ever made visible. In this first in-human study of a systemically administered near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled therapeutic antibody, cetuximab-IRDye800CW (2.5 mg/m(2), 25 mg/m(2), and 62.5 mg/m(2)), we show that by optical molecular imaging (i.e. denominated as In vivo Fluorescence Immunohistochemistry) we were able to evaluate localization of fluorescently labeled cetuximab. Clearly, optical molecular imaging with fluorescently labeled antibodies correlating morphological (peri-)tumoral characteristics to levels of antibody delivery, may improve treatment paradigms based on understanding true tumoral antibody delivery.

  15. A label-free, fluorescence based assay for microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Sanjun

    DNA chip technology has drawn tremendous attention since it emerged in the mid 90's as a method that expedites gene sequencing by over 100-fold. DNA chip, also called DNA microarray, is a combinatorial technology in which different single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules of known sequences are immobilized at specific spots. The immobilized ssDNA strands are called probes. In application, the chip is exposed to a solution containing ssDNA of unknown sequence, called targets, which are labeled with fluorescent dyes. Due to specific molecular recognition among the base pairs in the DNA, the binding or hybridization occurs only when the probe and target sequences are complementary. The nucleotide sequence of the target is determined by imaging the fluorescence from the spots. The uncertainty of background in signal detection and statistical error in data analysis, primarily due to the error in the DNA amplification process and statistical distribution of the tags in the target DNA, have become the fundamental barriers in bringing the technology into application for clinical diagnostics. Furthermore, the dye and tagging process are expensive, making the cost of DNA chips inhibitive for clinical testing. These limitations and challenges make it difficult to implement DNA chip methods as a diagnostic tool in a pathology laboratory. The objective of this dissertation research is to provide an alternative approach that will address the above challenges. In this research, a label-free assay is designed and studied. Polystyrene (PS), a commonly used polymeric material, serves as the fluorescence agent. Probe ssDNA is covalently immobilized on polystyrene thin film that is supported by a reflecting substrate. When this chip is exposed to excitation light, fluorescence light intensity from PS is detected as the signal. Since the optical constants and conformations of ssDNA and dsDNA (double stranded DNA) are different, the measured fluorescence from PS changes for the same

  16. Fluorescent labeling of tetracysteine-tagged proteins in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Gaietta, Guido; Zürn, Alexander; Adams, Stephen R; Terrillon, Sonia; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y; Lohse, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a general protocol for labeling proteins with the membrane-permeant fluorogenic biarsenical dye fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder–ethanedithiol (FlAsH-EDT2). Generation of the tetracysteine-tagged protein construct by itself is not described, as this is a protein-specific process. This method allows site-selective labeling of proteins in living cells and has been applied to a wide variety of proteins and biological problems. We provide here a generally applicable labeling procedure and discuss the problems that can occur as well as general considerations that must be taken into account when designing and implementing the procedure. The method can even be applied to proteins with expression below 1 pmol mg−1 of protein, such as G protein–coupled receptors, and it can be used to study the intracellular localization of proteins as well as functional interactions in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. The labeling procedure using FlAsH-EDT2 as described takes 2–3 h, depending on the number of samples to be processed. PMID:20885379

  17. Simple and cost-effective fluorescent labeling of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahal, Tamar; Green, Ori; Hananel, Uri; Michaeli, Yael; Shabat, Doron; Ebenstein, Yuval

    2016-12-01

    The nucleobase 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), a modified form of cytosine, is an important epigenetic mark related to regulation of gene expression. 5-hmC levels are highly dynamic during early development and are modulated during the progression of neurodegenerative disease and cancer. We describe a spectroscopic method for the global quantification of 5-hmC in genomic DNA. This method relies on the enzymatic glucosylation of 5-hmC, followed by a glucose oxidation step that results in the formation of aldehyde moieties that are covalently linked to a fluorescent reporter by oxime ligation. The fluorescence intensity of the labeled sample is directly proportional to its 5-hmC content. We show that this simple and cost-effective technique is suitable for quantification of 5-hmC content in different mouse tissues.

  18. Antiangiogenic antibody improves melanoma detection by fluorescently labeled therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sweeny, Larissa; Prince, Andrew; Patel, Neel; Moore, Lindsay S; Rosenthal, Eben L; Hughley, Brian B; Warram, Jason M

    2016-12-01

    Evaluate if vascular normalization with an antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody improves detection of melanoma using fluorescently labeled antibody-based imaging. Preclinical. Panitumumab and control IgG were covalently linked to a near-infrared fluorescent probe (IRDye800CW). Immunodeficient mice with ear xenografts of melanoma cell lines (A375 and SKMEL5) were systemically injected (200 μg, tail vein) with either IgG-IRDye800CW, panitumumab-IRDye800CW, or a combination (bevacizumab [5mg/kg], administered 72 hours prepanitumumab-IRDye800CW) (n = 5). Primary tumors were imaged with open-field (LUNA, Novadaq, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) and closed-field (Pearl, LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NB) imaging devices. Postresection, the concentration of labeled antibody within the tumor (μg/g) was calculated using normalized standards. The mean fluorescence within the melanoma tumors was greater for the combination group compared to panitumumab alone for both cell lines (P < 0.001). The tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) for the A375 tumors was greater for the combination (3.4-7.1) compared to the panitumumab alone (3.2-5.0) (P = 0.04). The TBR for SKMEL5 tumors was greater for the combination (2.4-6.0) compared to the panitumumab alone (2.2-3.9) (P = 0.02). Within A375 tumors, the concentration was lower for panitumumab (0.51 μg/g) compared to combination group (0.68 μg/g) (P = 0.036). Within SKMEL5 tumors, the concentration was lower for panitumumab (0.0.17 μg/g) compared to combination group (0.35 μg/g) (P = 0.048). Residual tumor (1.0-0.2 mg) could be differentiated from background in both panitumumab and combination groups. For both cell lines, panitumumab and combination groups had greater mean fluorescence of the tumor compared to control IgG. The addition of antiangiogenic therapy improves uptake of fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies within melanoma tumors. Clinical translation could improve detection of melanoma intraoperatively, reducing positive margins

  19. Understanding the local public health workforce: labels versus substance.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jacqueline A; Keeling, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    The workforce is a key component of the nation's public health (PH) infrastructure, but little is known about the skills of local health department (LHD) workers to guide policy and planning. To profile a sample of LHD workers using classification schemes for PH work (the substance of what is done) and PH job titles (the labeling of what is done) to determine if work content is consistent with job classifications. A secondary analysis was conducted on data collected from 2,734 employees from 19 LHDs using a taxonomy of 151 essential tasks performed, knowledge possessed, and resources available. Each employee was classified by job title using a schema developed by PH experts. The inter-rater agreement was calculated within job classes and congruence on tasks, knowledge, and resources for five exemplar classes was examined. The average response rate was 89%. Overall, workers exhibited moderate agreement on tasks and poor agreement on knowledge and resources. Job classes with higher agreement included agency directors and community workers; those with lower agreement were mid-level managers such as program directors. Findings suggest that local PH workers within a job class perform similar tasks but vary in training and access to resources. Job classes that are specific and focused have higher agreement whereas job classes that perform in many roles show less agreement. The PH worker classification may not match employees' skill sets or how LHDs allocate resources, which may be a contributor to unexplained fluctuation in public health system performance. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Direct Evidence of Lack of Colocalisation of Fluorescently Labelled Gold Labels Used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Benjamin T.; Greenwood, Alexander B.; Benito-Alifonso, David; Tanner, Hugh; Galan, M. Carmen; Verkade, Paul; Gersen, Henkjan

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescently labelled nanoparticles are routinely used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) to combine the capabilities of two separate microscope platforms: fluorescent light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). The inherent assumption is that the fluorescent label observed under LM colocalises well with the electron dense nanoparticle observed in EM. Herein we show, by combining single molecule fluorescent imaging with optical detection of the scattering from single gold nanoparticles, that for a commercially produced sample of 10 nm gold nanoparticles tagged to Alexa-633 there is in fact no colocalisation between the fluorescent signatures of Alexa-633 and the scattering associated with the gold nanoparticle. This shows that the attached gold nanoparticle quenches the fluorescent signal by ~95%, or less likely that the complex has dissociated. In either scenario, the observed fluorescent signal in fact arises from a large population of untagged fluorophores; rendering these labels potentially ineffective and misleading to the field. PMID:28317888

  1. Direct Evidence of Lack of Colocalisation of Fluorescently Labelled Gold Labels Used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Benjamin T.; Greenwood, Alexander B.; Benito-Alifonso, David; Tanner, Hugh; Galan, M. Carmen; Verkade, Paul; Gersen, Henkjan

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescently labelled nanoparticles are routinely used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) to combine the capabilities of two separate microscope platforms: fluorescent light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). The inherent assumption is that the fluorescent label observed under LM colocalises well with the electron dense nanoparticle observed in EM. Herein we show, by combining single molecule fluorescent imaging with optical detection of the scattering from single gold nanoparticles, that for a commercially produced sample of 10 nm gold nanoparticles tagged to Alexa-633 there is in fact no colocalisation between the fluorescent signatures of Alexa-633 and the scattering associated with the gold nanoparticle. This shows that the attached gold nanoparticle quenches the fluorescent signal by ~95%, or less likely that the complex has dissociated. In either scenario, the observed fluorescent signal in fact arises from a large population of untagged fluorophores; rendering these labels potentially ineffective and misleading to the field.

  2. Fluorescence-labeled peptides as isoelectric point (pI) markers in capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Shimura, K; Kasai, K

    1995-08-01

    Commercially available peptides, mostly angiotensin derivatives, were labeled at their N-terminal amino group with 5-carboxytetramethylrhodamine succinimidyl ester, to obtain fluorescent pI markers for capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorescence detection. The labeled peptides were purified by reversed-phase chromatography. They were well separated on isoelectric focusing in a polyacrylamide gel slab and their pIs were determined by comigration with protein-pI markers. The fluorescent markers could be detected as sharp peaks in capillary isoelectric focusing with laser-induced fluorescence detection (He-Ne laser, 1 mW, 543.5 nm). The detection limit was found to be around 3 x 10(-12) M (0.8 amol). Tetramethylrhodamine-labeled pea lectin (3 pg) was subjected to capillary isoelectric focusing and the pIs of the fluorescent derivatives of the lectin were determined by using the fluorescence-labeled peptides as pI markers.

  3. Cancer cell labeling and tracking using fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Lien, Zhi-Yi; Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Liao, Wei-Siang; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Chao, Jui-I

    2012-09-01

    Nanodiamond, a promising carbon nanomaterial, develops for biomedical applications such as cancer cell labeling and detection. Here, we establish the nanodiamond-bearing cancer cell lines using the fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond (FMND). Treatment with FMND particles did not significantly induce cytotoxicity and growth inhibition in HFL-1 normal lung fibroblasts and A549 lung cancer cells. The fluorescence intensities and particle complexities were increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by treatment with FMND particles in lung cancer cells; however, the existence of FMND particles inside the cells did not alter cellular size distribution. The FMND-bearing lung cancer cells could be separated by the fluorescent and magnetic properties of FMNDs using the flow cytometer and magnetic device, respectively. The FMND-bearing cancer cells were identified by the existence of FMNDs using flow cytometer and confocal microscope analysis. More importantly, the cell morphology, viability, growth ability and total protein expression profiles in the FMND-bearing cells were similar to those of the parental cells. The separated FMND-bearing cells with various generations were cryopreservation for further applications. After re-thawing the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, the cells still retained the cell survival and growth ability. Additionally, a variety of human cancer types including colon (RKO), breast (MCF-7), cervical (HeLa), and bladder (BFTC905) cancer cells could be used the same strategy to prepare the FMND-bearing cancer cells. These results show that the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, which reserve the parental cell functions, can be applied for specific cancer cell labeling and tracking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimized Time-Gated Fluorescence Spectroscopy for the Classification and Recycling of Fluorescently Labeled Plastics.

    PubMed

    Fomin, Petr; Zhelondz, Dmitry; Kargel, Christian

    2016-08-29

    For the production of high-quality parts from recycled plastics, a very high purity of the plastic waste to be recycled is mandatory. The incorporation of fluorescent tracers ("markers") into plastics during the manufacturing process helps overcome typical problems of non-tracer based optical classification methods. Despite the unique emission spectra of fluorescent markers, the classification becomes difficult when the host plastics exhibit (strong) autofluorescence that spectrally overlaps the marker fluorescence. Increasing the marker concentration is not an option from an economic perspective and might also adversely affect the properties of the plastics. A measurement approach that suppresses the autofluorescence in the acquired signal is time-gated fluorescence spectroscopy (TGFS). Unfortunately, TGFS is associated with a lower signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, which results in larger classification errors. In order to optimize the S/N ratio we investigate and validate the best TGFS parameters-derived from a model for the fluorescence signal-for plastics labeled with four specifically designed fluorescent markers. In this study we also demonstrate the implementation of TGFS on a measurement and classification prototype system and determine its performance. Mean values for a sensitivity of [Formula: see text] = 99.93% and precision [Formula: see text] = 99.80% were achieved, proving that a highly reliable classification of plastics can be achieved in practice.

  5. Enhanced detection of fluorescence quenching in labeled cells

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, H.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1987-11-30

    A method is provided for quantifying BrdU labeled DNA in cells. The BrdU is substituted onto the DNA and the DNA is stained with a first fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is quenchable by BrdU. The first fluorochrome is preferably a thymidine base halogen analogue, such as a Hoechst fluorochrome. The DNA is then stained with a second fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is substantially uneffected by BrdU. The second fluorochrome may be selected from the group consisting of mithramycin, chromomycin A3, olivomycin, propidium iodide and ethidium bromine. The fluorescence from the first and second fluorochromes is then measured to obtain first and second output signals, respectively. The first output signal is subtracted from the second output signal to obtain a difference signal which is functionally related to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into DNA. The technique is particularly useful for quantifying the synthesis of DNA during the S-phase of the cell cycle. 2 figs.

  6. Enhanced detection of fluorescence quenching in labeled cells

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, Harry A.; Steinkamp, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for quantifying BrdU labeled DNA in cells. The BrdU is incorporated into the DNA and the DNA is stained with a first fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is quenchable by BrdU. The first fluorochrome is preferably a thymidine base halogen analogue, such as a Hoechst fluorochrome. The DNA is then stained with a second fluorochrome having a fluorescence that is substantially uneffected by BrdU. The second fluorochrome may be selected from the group consisting of mithramycin, chromomycin A3, olivomycin, propidium iodide and ethidium bromine. The fluorescence from the first and second fluorochromes is then measured to obtain first and second output signals, respectively. The first output signal is substracted from the second output signal to obtain a difference signal which is functionally related to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into DNA. The technique is particularly useful for quantifying the synthesis of DNA during the S-phase of the cell cycle.

  7. Investigation of fluorescence spectra disturbances influencing the classification performance of fluorescently labeled plastic flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Petr; Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The recycling of plastic products becomes increasingly attractive not only from an environmental point of view, but also economically. For recycled (engineering) plastic products with the highest possible quality, plastic sorting technologies must provide clean and virtually mono-fractional compositions from a mixture of many different types of (shredded) plastics. In order to put this high quality sorting into practice, the labeling of virgin plastics with specific fluorescent markers at very low concentrations (ppm level or less) during their manufacturing process is proposed. The emitted fluorescence spectra represent "optical fingerprints" - each being unique for a particular plastic - which we use for plastic identification and classification purposes. In this study we quantify the classification performance using our prototype measurement system and 15 different plastic types when various influence factors most relevant in practice cause disturbances of the fluorescence spectra emitted from the labeled plastics. The results of these investigations help optimize the development and incorporation of appropriate fluorescent markers as well as the classification algorithms and overall measurement system in order to achieve the lowest possible classification error rates.

  8. Double-labeled donor probe can enhance the signal of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in detection of nucleic acid hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Yukio; Kondo, Satoshi; Sase, Ichiro; Suga, Takayuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Furusawa, Iwao; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2000-01-01

    A set of fluorescently-labeled DNA probes that hybridize with the target RNA and produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals can be utilized for the detection of specific RNA. We have developed probe sets to detect and discriminate single-strand RNA molecules of plant viral genome, and sought a method to improve the FRET signals to handle in vivo applications. Consequently, we found that a double-labeled donor probe labeled with Bodipy dye yielded a remarkable increase in fluorescence intensity compared to a single-labeled donor probe used in an ordinary FRET. This double-labeled donor system can be easily applied to improve various FRET probes since the dependence upon sequence and label position in enhancement is not as strict. Furthermore this method could be applied to other nucleic acid substances, such as oligo RNA and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (S-oligos) to enhance FRET signal. Although the double-labeled donor probes labeled with a variety of fluorophores had unexpected properties (strange UV-visible absorption spectra, decrease of intensity and decay of donor fluorescence) compared with single-labeled ones, they had no relation to FRET enhancement. This signal amplification mechanism cannot be explained simply based on our current results and knowledge of FRET. Yet it is possible to utilize this double-labeled donor system in various applications of FRET as a simple signal-enhancement method. PMID:11121494

  9. Elementary-Age Children of Substance Abusers: Issues Associated with Identification and Labeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Sharon M.

    1994-01-01

    Explores ways that school counselors and other school personnel can identify children of substance abusers (COSAs) and address the issues and concerns associated with identification and labeling. Reviews pervasiveness of parental chemical dependency and potential impact of parental substance abuse on COSAs. Discusses behavior patterns of COSAs…

  10. Sentinel lymph node imaging by a fluorescently labeled DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Lee, Yong-Deok; Lee, Taemin; Kim, Byeong-Su; Kim, Sehoon; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2013-07-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) are the first lymph nodes which cancer cells reach after traveling through lymphatic vessels from the primary tumor. Evaluating the nodal status is crucial in accurate staging of human cancers and accordingly determines prognosis and the most appropriate treatment. The commonly used methods for SLN identification in clinics are based on employment of a colloid of radionuclide or injection of a small dye. Although these methods have certainly contributed to improve surgical practice, new imaging materials are still required to overcome drawbacks of the techniques such as inconvenience of handling radioactive materials and short retention time of small dyes in SLNs. Here, we prepare a fluorescence-labeled DNA tetrahedron and perform SLN imaging by using the DNA nanoconstruct. With a successful identification of SLNs by the DNA nanoconstruct, we suggest that DNA tetrahedron hold great promises for clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Associations Between Ethnic Labels and Substance Use Among Hispanic/Latino Adolescents in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Jennifer B; Thing, James; Soto, Daniel Wood; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Self-identification with ethnic-specific labels may indicate successful ethnic identity formation, which could protect against substance use. Alternatively, it might indicate affiliation with oppositional subcultures, a potential risk factor. This study examined longitudinal associations between ethnic labels and substance use among 1,575 Hispanic adolescents in Los Angeles. Adolescents who identified as Cholo or La Raza in 9th grade were at increased risk of past-month substance use in 11th grade. Associations were similar across gender and were not confounded by socioeconomic status, ethnic identity development, acculturation, or language use. Targeted prevention interventions for adolescents who identify with these subcultures may be warranted. PMID:24779500

  12. Fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotide probes: detection of hybrid formation in solution by fluorescence polarization spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, A; Nakaura, M; Nakatsuji, Y; Nagahara, S; Tran-Cong, Q; Makino, K

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotides as DNA-probes were synthesized and used to monitor hybrid formation, namely to detect DNA or oligonucleotide sequence in solution. The introduction of fluorescein to oligonucleotides was carried out by oxidation of a hydrogen phosphonate linkage with ethylenediamine or hexamethylenediamine as a tether and by a subsequent labeling of the primary amine moiety by FITC. Fluorescence anisotropy, r, was adopted as an index to monitor the behavior of F-probe in solution. An increase in the anisotropy was observed upon an increase in the chain-length of F-probe. When F-Probe formed a hybrid with its complementary oligonucleotide in solution, the r value increased compared to that of F-Probe itself. These observations clearly indicate that measurements of r in solution will readily lead to the monitoring of the presence of a hybrid in solution. Consequently, it is promising to detect a certain nucleic acid sequence in solution using fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides. PMID:1870966

  13. The internalization of fluorescence-labeled PLA nanoparticles by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengjuan; Zhu, Aiping; Song, Xiaoli; Ji, Lijun; Wang, Juan

    2013-09-10

    Rhodamine B (RhB)-labeled PLA nanoparticles were prepared through surface grafting copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto PLA nanoparticles during the emulsion/evaporation process. RhB firstly interacts with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) through electrostatic interaction to form hydrophobic complex (SDS-RhB). Due to the high-affinity of SDS-RhB with GMA, hydrophilic RhB can be successfully combined into PLA nanoparticles. The internalization of RhB-labeled PLA nanoparticles by macrophages was investigated with fluorescence microscope technology. The effects of the PLA nanoparticle surface nature and size on the internalization were investigated. The results indicate that the PLA particles smaller than 200 nm can avoid the uptake of phagocytosis. The bigger PLA particles (300 nm) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface showed less internalization by macrophage compared with those with poly(ethylene oxide-propylene oxide) copolymer (F127) or poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) surface. The "stealth" function of PEG on the PLA nanoparticles from internalization of macrophages due to the low protein adsorption is revealed by electrochemical impedance technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  15. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E K; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S; Winton, Douglas J; Neves, André A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-04-13

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apc(min) mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy.

  16. Label-free, turn-on fluorescent sensor for trypsin activity assay and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lufeng; Qin, Haiyan; Cui, Wanwan; Zhou, Yang; Du, Jianxiu

    2016-12-01

    The development of new detection methods for proteases activity assay is important in clinical diagnostics and drug development. In this work, a simple, label-free, and turn-on fluorescent sensor was fabricated for trypsin, a protease produced in the pancreas. Cytochrome c, a natural substance of trypsin, could be selectively cleaved by trypsin into heme-peptide fragment. The produced heme-peptide fragment exhibited an intensive catalytic role on the H2O2-mediated the oxidation of thiamine to form strong fluorescent thiochrome. The fluorescence intensity was closely dependent on the amount of trypsin presented. The procedure allowed the measurement of trypsin over the range of 0.5-20.0μg/mL with a detection limit of 0.125μg/mL. The sensor showed better precision with a relative standard deviation of 1.6% for the measurement of 1.0μg/mL trypsin solution (n=11). This sensing system was applied to screen the inhibitor of trypsin, the IC50 values were calculated to be 12.71ng/mL for the trypsin inhibitor from soybean and 2.0μg/mL for benzamidine hydrochloride, respectively, demonstrating its potential application in drug development and related diseases treatment.

  17. RNA sequencing using fluorescent-labeled dideoxynucleotides and automated fluorescence detection.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, G J

    1990-01-01

    Although dideoxy terminated sequencing of RNA, using reverse transcriptase and oligodeoxynucleotide primers, is now a well established method, the accuracy is limited by sequence ambiguities due to unspecific chain termination events. A protocol is described which circumvents these ambiguities by using fluorescence labels tagged to dideoxynucleotides. Only chain terminations caused by dideoxynucleotides were detected while premature terminated cDNA's remain undetectable. In addition, the remaining multiple signals at nucleotide positions can be assigned to sequence heterogeneities within the RNA sequence to be determined. Images PMID:1690393

  18. Photo-triggered fluorescent labelling of recombinant proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deokho; Sato, Kohei; Min, Kyoungmi; Shigenaga, Akira; Jung, Juyeon; Otaka, Akira; Kwon, Youngeun

    2015-06-14

    A method to photo-chemically trigger fluorescent labelling of proteins in live cells is developed. The approach is based on photo-caged split-intein mediated conditional protein trans-splicing reaction and enabled background-free fluorescent labelling of target proteins with the necessary spatiotemporal control.

  19. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy of quantum dot labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Dukes, Madeline J; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, the microchip with the labeled cells and one with a spacer are assembled in a special microfluidic device and imaged with STEM.

  20. Robust fluorescent labelling of micropipettes for use in fluorescence microscopy: application to the observation of a mosquito borne parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Amanda E; Neuman, Keir; Sinnis, Photini; Balaban, Robert S

    2017-08-10

    The ability to monitor micropipette injections with a high-resolution fluorescent microscope has utility for a variety of applications. Herein, different approaches were tested for creating broad-band fluorescently labelled glass micropipettes including: UV cured glass glues, baked glass enamel containing fluorescent dyes as well as nanodiamonds attached during pipette formation in the microforge. The most robust and simplest approach was to use labelled baked enamel on the exterior of the pipette. This approach was tested using pipettes designed to mimic a mosquito proboscis for the injection of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium spp., into the dermis of a living mouse ear. The pipette (∼30 micron diameter) was easily detected in the microscopy field of view and tolerated multiple insertions through the skin. This simple inexpensive approach to fluorescently labelling micropipettes will aid in the development of procedures under the fluorescent microscope. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Debranchase-resistant labeling of RNA using the 10DM24 deoxyribozyme and fluorescent modified nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Carrocci, Tucker J; Lohe, Lea; Ashton, Matthew J; Höbartner, Claudia; Hoskins, Aaron A

    2017-10-06

    The 10DM24 deoxyribozyme can site-specifically label RNAs with fluorophore-GTP conjugates; however, the 2',5'-branched RNA linkage is readily cleaved by debranchase. To prevent loss of labels upon cleavage, we synthesized phosphorothioate-modified, fluorescent GTP derivatives and elaborated conditions for their incorporation by 10DM24. RNAs labeled with fluorescent derivatives of Sp-GTP(S) were found to be resistant to debranchase.

  2. Near-infrared fluorescence labeling of iron nanoparticles and applications for cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinke; Liu, Yingxun; Hou, Yong; Chen, Zhongpin; Gu, Ning

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) labeled iron nanoparticles were synthesized and applied to labeling human cells for monitoring the engraftment process, imaging tumors, testing intracellular molecular environment surrounding the nanoparticles, and tracing biodistribution of nanoparticles in vivo. These studies demonstrated that the NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles provided an excellent method not only for cell labeling but also for in vivo monitoring and tracing of iron nanoparticles due to the excellent in vivo imaging performance of the NIR fluorophores. However, the availability of commercial iron nanoparticles labeled with suitable NIRF dyes is limited. Optimal wavelength for in vivo imaging is centered at 800 nm, where tissue autofluorescence is minimal. Here we describe the manufacture of 12-nm 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles, their labeling with a new near-infrared fluorophore, IRDye800CW (excitation/emission: 778/806 nm), and their applications for cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

  3. Antibiotic residues (bacterial inhibitory substances) in the milk of cows treated under label and extra-label conditions

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Scott A.; Black, William D.; Meek, Alan H.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the depletion pattern of antibiotic residues (microbial inhibitory substances) from the milk of cows treated under field conditions of clinical disease and antibiotic administration, including both label and extra-label use, and to determine if the type of extra-label use, the route of administration, and the drug used were factors associated with prolonged shedding of residues in milk. Milk samples from 138 cows, treated with a variety of antibiotic products on farms in southwestern Ontario in 1989 and 1990, were collected before treatment and for six days after cessation of treatment. Samples were tested for antibiotic residues with the Brilliant Black reduction test (BR-test) and the Bacillus stearothermophilus var calidolactis disc assay. In 13/138 (9.4%) of cow treatments, at least one milk sample was positive on both antibiotic residue tests after the label milk withholding time for the drug(s) used. In ten of these instances, the antibiotics were administered in extra-label fashion and in three the drugs were reportedly used according to label instructions. Extra-label use of antibiotics was significantly associated with increased risk of antibiotic residues in milk beyond the label withholding time. No significant differences in risk were observed among the various antibiotic products used in the study. The farms involved in this study were selected on the basis of their proximity to our laboratory; therefore, the frequency of antibiotic residue detection after withholding times may not be indicative of the provincial or national situation. If farmers and veterinarians find themselves in a situation where extra-label use of an antibiotic is necessary, use of an alternative antibiotic that can be used at label dose and with a known withdrawal time may avoid a problem with residues. PMID:17424060

  4. Fluorescence characterization of IHSS humic substances: Total luminescence spectra with absorbance correction

    SciTech Connect

    Mobed, J.J.; Hemmingsen, S.L.; Autry, J.L.; Mcgown, L.B.

    1996-10-01

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to discriminate between soil-derived and aquatic-derived IHSS humic substances and between humic and fulvic acids derived from the same source (soil or aquatic). Ionic strength in the range of 0-1 M KCl and humic substance concentration in the range 5-100 mg/L had little effect on the fluorescence spectral characteristics of the humic substances, while pH had significant effects as expected. Absorbance correction was shown to be essential for accurate representation and comparison of the EEMs of the humic substances at high concentrations. 16 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. In Situ Bioorthogonal Metabolic Labeling for Fluorescence Imaging of Virus Infection In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong; Li, Wen-Jun; Yao, Xiang-Jie; Wu, Ya-Yun; Liu, Lan-Lan; He, Hua-Mei; Zhang, Ren-Li; Ma, Yi-Fan; Cai, Lin-Tao

    2017-02-20

    Optical fluorescence imaging is an important strategy to explore the mechanism of virus-host interaction. However, current fluorescent tag labeling strategies often dampen viral infectivity. The present study explores an in situ fluorescent labeling strategy in order to preserve viral infectivity and precisely monitor viral infection in vivo. In contrast to pre-labeling strategy, mice are first intranasally infected with azide-modified H5N1 pseudotype virus (N3 -H5N1p), followed by injection of dibenzocyclooctyl (DBCO)-functionalized fluorescence 6 h later. The results show that DBCO dye directly conjugated to N3 -H5N1p in lung tissues through in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry with high specificity and efficacy. More remarkably, in situ labeling rather than conventional prelabeling strategy effectively preserves viral infectivity and immunogenicity both in vitro and in vivo. Hence, in situ bioorthogonal viral labeling is a promising and reliable strategy for imaging and tracking viral infection in vivo.

  6. EFFECTS OF ALUMINUM-INDUCED AGGREGATION ON THE FLUORESCENCE OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-induced aggregates of terrestrial and aquatic humic acid standards from the International Humic Substances Society are shown to be fluorescent by means of a multiwavelength fluorescence anisotropy experiment in which the data was treated with a model for nonspherical ...

  7. EFFECTS OF ALUMINUM-INDUCED AGGREGATION ON THE FLUORESCENCE OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-induced aggregates of terrestrial and aquatic humic acid standards from the International Humic Substances Society are shown to be fluorescent by means of a multiwavelength fluorescence anisotropy experiment in which the data was treated with a model for nonspherical ...

  8. Cu(2+)-labeled dansyl compounds as fluorescent and PET probes for imaging apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Wang, Xukui; Yu, MeiXiang

    2016-11-15

    Compound DNSTT-Cu(2+), a novel chelate of Cu(2+) with DOTA conjugated to a fluorescent dansyl fragment, is developed for imaging cell apoptosis. Apoptotic U-87MG cells could be selectively visualized by the fluorescence of DNSTT-Cu(2+) from cytoplasm of cells, confirmed by the fluorescence of apoptosis cells co-labeled with Alexa Fluor 568-labeled annexin V, a conventional probe for selectively labeling membranes of apoptosis cells. A radioactive (64)Cu(2)(+) analog, DNSTT-(64)Cu(2+), was easily synthesized, providing a potential PET probe for imaging apoptosis in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequence-Dependent Fluorescence of Cy3- and Cy5-Labeled Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 dyes is strongly dependent on the nucleobase sequence of the labeled oligonucleotides. Sequence-dependent fluorescence may significantly influence the data obtained from many common experimental methods based on fluorescence detection of nucleic acids, such as sequencing, PCR, FRET, and FISH. To quantify sequence dependent fluorescence, we have measured the fluorescence intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 bound to the 5′ end of all 1024 possible double-stranded DNA 5mers. The fluorescence intensity was also determined for these dyes bound to the 5′ end of fixed-sequence double-stranded DNA with a variable sequence 3′ overhang adjacent to the dye. The labeled DNA oligonucleotides were made using light-directed, in situ microarray synthesis. The results indicate that the fluorescence intensity of both dyes is sensitive to all five bases or base pairs, that the sequence dependence is stronger for double- (vs single-) stranded DNA, and that the dyes are sensitive to both the adjacent dsDNA sequence and the 3′-ssDNA overhang. Purine-rich sequences result in higher fluorescence. The results can be used to estimate measurement error in experiments with fluorescent-labeled DNA, as well as to optimize the fluorescent signal by considering the nucleobase environment of the labeling cyanine dye. PMID:26895222

  10. Automated sorting of polymer flakes: fluorescence labeling and development of a measurement system prototype.

    PubMed

    Brunner, S; Fomin, P; Kargel, Ch

    2015-04-01

    The extensive demand and use of plastics in modern life is associated with a significant economical impact and a serious ecological footprint. The production of plastics involves a high energy consumption and CO2 emission as well as the large need for (limited) fossil resources. Due to the high durability of plastics, large amounts of plastic garbage is mounting in overflowing landfills (plus 9.6 million tons in Europe in the year 2012) and plastic debris is floating in the world oceans or waste-to-energy combustion releases even more CO2 plus toxic substances (dioxins, heavy metals) to the atmosphere. The recycling of plastic products after their life cycle can obviously contribute a great deal to the reduction of the environmental and economical impacts. In order to produce high-quality recycling products, mono-fractional compositions of waste polymers are required. However, existing measurement technologies such as near infrared spectroscopy show limitations in the sorting of complex mixtures and different grades of polymers, especially when black plastics are involved. More recently invented technologies based on mid-infrared, Raman spectroscopy or laser-aided spectroscopy are still under development and expected to be rather expensive. A promising approach to put high sorting purities into practice is to label plastic resins with unique combinations of fluorescence markers (tracers). These are incorporated into virgin resins during the manufacturing process at the ppm (or sub ppm) concentration level, just large enough that the fluorescence emissions can be detected with sensitive instrumentation but neither affect the visual appearance nor the mechanical properties of the polymers. In this paper we present the prototype of a measurement and classification system that identifies polymer flakes (mill material of a few millimeters size) located on a conveyor belt in real time based on the emitted fluorescence of incorporated markers. Classification performance

  11. Directly labeled DNA probes using fluorescent nucleotides with different length linkers.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Chao, J; Yu, H; Waggoner, A S

    1994-01-01

    Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes have been made by nick translation and PCR using dUTP attached to the fluorescent label, Cy3, with different length linkers. With preparation of probes by PCR we find that linker length affects the efficiency of incorporation of Cy3-dUTP, the yield of labeled probe, and the signal intensity of labeled probes hybridized to chromosome target sequences. For nick translation and PCR, both the level of incorporation and the hybridization fluorescence signal increased in parallel when the length of the linker arm is increased. Under optimal conditions, PCR yielded more densely labeled probes, however, the yield of PCR labeled probe decreased with greater linear density of labeling. By using a Cy3-modified dUTP with the longest linker under optimal conditions it was possible to label up to 28% of the possible substitution sites on the target DNA with reasonable yield by PCR and 18% by nick translation. A mechanism involving steric interactions between the polymerase, cyanine-labeled sites on template and extending chains and the modified dUTP substrate is proposed to explain the inverse correlation between the labeling efficiency and the yield of DNA probe synthesis by PCR. Images PMID:8078779

  12. Frequency-domain flow cytometry: fluorescence-lifetime-based sensing technology for analyzing cells and chromosomes labeled with fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Crissman, Harry A.; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Lehnert, Nancy M.; Deka, Chiranjit

    1997-05-01

    A flow cytometer has been developed that combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making frequency-domain, excited-state lifetime measurements on cells/chromosomes labeled with fluorescent probes, while preserving conventional FCM capabilities. Cells are analyzed as they intersect a high-frequency, intensity-modulated (sine-wave) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence signals are processed by (1) low-pass filtering to obtain conventional FCM dc-excited signals and (2) phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve heterogeneous fluorescence based on differences in lifetimes expressed as phase-shifts and to quantify fluorescence lifetimes in real time. Processed signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate contour diagrams. Recent examples of biological applications include: (1) lifetime histograms recorded on autofluorescent human lung fibroblasts, murine thymus cells labeled with antibodies conjugated to fluorophores for studying fluorescence quenching as a function of antibody dilution and F/P ratio, and on cultured cells, nuclei, and chromosomes stained with DNA-binding fluorochromes and (2) phase-resolved, fluorescence signal- intensity histograms recorded on autofluorescent HLFs labeled with immunofluorescence markers and on murine thymus cells labeled with Red 613-antiThy 1.2 and propidium iodide (PI positive `dead' cells) to demonstrate the resolution of signals from highly overlapping emission spectra. This technology will increase the number of fluorescent markers usable in multilabeling studies and lifetimes can be used as spectroscopic probes to study the interaction of markers with their targets, each other, and the surrounding microenvironment.

  13. Fluorescence quenching and aluminum adsorption to organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.S.; Kramer, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Fluorescent measurements of Al-modified natural organic matter (NOM) were used to better determine site-specific aluminum binding sites. Excitation-emission surfaces were used to characterize fluorescent groups within NOM; further, the kinetics of the reaction were followed by observing emission signal change over time. Calibration experiments were carried out on salicylic acid and the more complex Armadale and Suwannee River reference fulvic acids. Salicylic acid showed one fluorophore but the fulvic acids contain at least two distinct fluorophores that are modified with aluminum addition. Existing equilibrium speciation models for salicylic acid are correlated to the changes in fluorescence with added Al at fixed pH and ionic strength. Al speciation can be modelled by a modified Stern-Volmer or Ryan-Weber equation. The kinetics of the salicylate reaction suggest two reaction modes, an initial quick reaction (seconds) followed by a slower second reaction (minutes).

  14. Biochemical characterization of fluorescent-labeled recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tippin, Brigette L.; Troitskaya, Larisa; Kan, Shih-hsin; Todd, Amanda K.; Le, Steven Q.; Dickson, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo tracking of the delivery of therapeutic proteins is a useful tool for preclinical studies. However, many labels are too large to use without disrupting the normal uptake, function, or other properties of the protein. Low-molecular weight fluorescent labels allow in vivo and ex vivo tracking of the distribution of therapeutic proteins, and should not alter the protein’s characteristics. We tested the in vitro properties of fluorescent-labeled recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase (rhIDU, the enzyme deficient in Hurler syndrome) and compared labeled to unlabeled protein. Labeled rhIDU retained full enzymatic activity and showed similar kinetics to non-labeled rhIDU. Uptake of labeled rhIDU into human Hurler fibroblasts, measured by activity assay, was equivalent to unlabeled rhIDU enzyme and showed an uptake constant of 0.72 nM. Labeled rhIDU was also able to enter cells via the mannose 6-phospate receptor pathway and reduce glycosaminoglycan (GAG) storage in Hurler fibroblasts. Subcellular localization was verified within lysosomes by confocal microscopy. These findings suggest that fluorescent labeling does not significantly interfere with enzymatic activity, stability, or uptake, and validates this method as a way to track exogenously administered enzyme. PMID:22172101

  15. A new tool to ensure the fluorescent dye labeling stability of nanocarriers: a real challenge for fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Bastiat, Guillaume; Pritz, Christian Oliver; Roider, Clemens; Fouchet, Florian; Lignières, Erwann; Jesacher, Alexander; Glueckert, Rudolf; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese; Saulnier, Patrick; Benoit, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-28

    Numerous studies on nanocarriers use fluorescent dye labeling to investigate their biodistribution or cellular trafficking. However, when the fluorescence dye is not grafted to the nanocarrier, the question of the stability of the labeling arises. How can it be validated that the fluorescence observed during an experiment corresponds to the nanocarriers, and not to the free dye released from the nanocarriers? Studying the integrity of the labeling is challenging. Therefore, an innovative approach to confirm the labeling stability was developed, based on the transfer of a fluorescent dye from its hosting nanocarrier to a lipophilic compartment. Lipid nanocapsules (LNC) and triglyceride oil were used as models. The protocol involved mixing of LNC suspension and oil, and then separation by centrifugation. The quality of the separation was controlled by light scattering, using the derived count rate tool. Dye transfer from loaded LNCs to the lipophilic compartment or from a lipophilic compartment containing dye to non-loaded LNC was investigated by varying the nature of the dye and the oil, the oil volume and the LNC dilution. Tensiometry was used to define the dye location in the nanocarrier. Results showed that when dyes such as Nile Red and Coumarin-6 are located in oily core, the transfer occurred in a partition-dependent manner. In contrast, when the dye was entrapped in the surfactant shell of LNCs such as lipophilic indocarbocyanines (i.e. DiO, DiI and DiD), no transfer was observed. Dye diffusion was also observed in cell culture, with Nile Red inside lipid bodies of HEI-OC1 cells, without uptake of LNCs. In contrast, DiO-loaded LNCs had to be internalized to observe fluorescence inside the cells, providing a further confirmation of the absence of transfer in this case, and the stability of fluorescence labeling of the LNCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between the fluorescence spectroscopy and the 125I albumin-labeling technique for the study of skin edema dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Melo, Milene; Zangaro, Renato A.; Villaverde, Antonio G. J. B.; Antunes, Edson; Camargo, Enilton A.; Martins, Rodrigo A. B. L.; Ferreira, Denise M.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Munin, Egberto

    2004-07-01

    Skin injury caused by chemicals substances as the carrageenan produces a local inflammatory reaction involving the liberation of mediators that leads to an increase in vascular permeability and, consequently, edema formation. The vascular permeability can be evaluated by measuring the amount of some extravasating specific dyes. The Evans blue dye is recommended due to its systemic effect and non-toxicity to the organism. That dye binds to the plasma albumin and emits radiation when excited, allowing for spectroscopic monitoring of the edema. In this study, the amount of extravasating plasma albumin in the site of the carrageenan-induced edema in Wistar rats is evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The intensity of the Evans blue dye fluorescence signal for different edema evolution times is compared to the 125I labeled albumin data obtained with a g-counter. A dye laser (458 nm) was used as the fluorescence excitation source. The fluorescence intensity was taken at the 680 nm peak of the dye spectral emission. The spectroscopic data shows the dye emission intensity growing with the settling up of the edema and decreasing as the tissue recovers from the inflammatory stimulus. A good correlation between the spectroscopic and the g-counter data was obtained, which suggests that the Evans blue dye fluorescence is a promising technique for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of edema dynamics.

  17. Isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins as potential fluorescence-suppressed spin probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Zou, T J; Tan, Z L; Chen, S; Wu, Z H; Yan, G P; Zhang, Q; Liang, S C; Yang, J

    2017-02-07

    A series of isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins were synthesized by the reaction of 5-phenyldipyrromethane and 5-(4'-carboethoxy-methyleneoxyphenyl)dipyrromethane with 5-formyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl (FTMIO) using the Lindsey method. The corresponding water-soluble spin-labeled porphyrins were also prepared. Subsequently, these compounds were characterized and their in vitro properties were evaluated. The electrochemical assay demonstrated that these isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins had similar electrochemical and redox properties to 5-carboxy-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl (CTMIO). The electron paramagnetic resonance test showed that these porphyrins exhibited hyperfine splittings and characteristic spectra of CTMIO with typical nitroxide g-values and nitrogen isotropic hyperfine coupling constants. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay indicated that these porphyrins possessed low cytotoxicity to human renal tubular epithelial 293T cells (normal cells) and human hepatoma HepG2 cells (tumor cells). Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that free base isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins exhibited fluorescence suppression characteristic of nitroxide-fluorophore systems. In vitro fluorescene imaging demonstrated that the reduced isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins eliminated fluorescence suppression and displayed strong red fluorescence imaging in HepG2 cells. Thus these isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins may be considered potentially as biological spin probes for fluorescence imaging and EPR spectroscopy.

  18. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluations of fluorescent or 149Promethium labeled Trastuzumab-polyethylenimine

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan; Nayak, Tapan; Cutler, Cathy; ...

    2015-12-30

    Radioimmunotherapy utilize a targeting antibody coupled to a therapeutic isotope to target and treat a tumor or disease. In this study we examine the synthesis and cell binding of a polymer scaffold containing a radiotherapeutic isotope and a targeting antibody. Methods: The multistep synthesis of a fluorescent or 149Promethium-labeled Trastuzumab-polyethyleneimine (PEI), Trastuzumab, or PEI is described. In vitro uptake, internalization and/or the binding affinity to the Her2/neu expressing human breast adenocarcinoma SKBr3 cells was investigated with the labeled compounds. Fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab-PEI was internalized more into cells at 2 and 18 h than fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab or PEI. The fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab wasmore » concentrated on the cell surface at 2 and 18 h and the labeled PEI had minimal uptake. DOTA-PEI was prepared and contained an average of 16 chelates per PEI; the compound was radio-labeled with 149Promethium and conjugated to Trastuzumab. The purified 149Pm-DOTA-PEI-Trastuzumab had a radiochemical purity of 96.7% and a specific activity of 0.118 TBq/g. The compound demonstrated a dissociation constant for the Her2/neu receptor of 20.30 ± 6.91 nM. In conclusion, the results indicate the DOTA-PEI-Trastuzumab compound has potential as a targeted therapeutic carrier, and future in vivo studies should be performed.« less

  19. Blind Source Separation Techniques for the Decomposition of Multiply Labeled Fluorescence Images

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Richard A.; Mitkovski, Mišo; Kirchhoff, Frank; Neher, Erwin; Theis, Fabian J.; Zeug, André

    2009-01-01

    Methods of blind source separation are used in many contexts to separate composite data sets according to their sources. Multiply labeled fluorescence microscopy images represent such sets, in which the sources are the individual labels. Their distributions are the quantities of interest and have to be extracted from the images. This is often challenging, since the recorded emission spectra of fluorescent dyes are environment- and instrument-specific. We have developed a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm to detect and separate spectrally distinct components of multiply labeled fluorescence images. It operates on spectrally resolved images and delivers both the emission spectra of the identified components and images of their abundance. We tested the proposed method using biological samples labeled with up to four spectrally overlapping fluorescent labels. In most cases, NMF accurately decomposed the images into contributions of individual dyes. However, the solutions are not unique when spectra overlap strongly or when images are diffuse in their structure. To arrive at satisfactory results in such cases, we extended NMF to incorporate preexisting qualitative knowledge about spectra and label distributions. We show how data acquired through excitations at two or three different wavelengths can be integrated and that multiple excitations greatly facilitate the decomposition. By allowing reliable decomposition in cases where the spectra of the individual labels are not known or are known only inaccurately, the proposed algorithms greatly extend the range of questions that can be addressed with quantitative microscopy. PMID:19413985

  20. Azido Push–Pull Fluorogens Photoactivate to Produce Bright Fluorescent Labels

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Samuel J.; Lee, Hsiao-lu D.; Samuel, Reichel; Weber, Ryan; Liu, Na; Conley, Nicholas R.; Thompson, Michael A.; Twieg, Robert J.; Moerner, W. E.

    2009-01-01

    Dark azido push–pull chromophores have the ability to be photoactivated to produce bright fluorescent labels suitable for single-molecule imaging. Upon illumination, the aryl azide functionality in the fluorogens participates in a photochemical conversion to an aryl amine, thus restoring charge-transfer absorption and fluorescence. Previously, we reported that one compound, DCDHF-V-P-azide, was photoactivatable. Here, we demonstrate that the azide-to-amine photoactivation process is generally applicable to a variety of push–pull chromophores, and we characterize the photophysical parameters including photoconversion quantum yield, photostability, and turn-on ratio. Azido push–pull fluorogens provide a new class of photoactivatable single-molecule probes for fluorescent labeling and super-resolution microscopy. Lastly, we demonstrate that photoactivated push–pull dyes can insert into bonds of nearby biomolecules, simultaneously forming a covalent bond and becoming fluorescent (fluorogenic photoaffinity labeling). PMID:19860443

  1. Horseradish peroxidase-driven fluorescent labeling of nanotubes with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Vladimir V; Baskin, David S

    2006-03-01

    We describe the first enzyme-driven technique for fluorescent labeling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The labeling was performed via enzymatic biotinylation of nanotubes in the tyramide-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reaction. Both direct and indirect fuorescent labeling of SWNTs was achieved using either biotinyl tyramide or fluorescently tagged tyramides. Biotinylated SWNTs later reacted with streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores. Linking semiconductor nanocrystals, quantum dots (Q-dots), to the surface of nanotubes resulted in their fluorescent visualization, whereas conventional fluorophores bound to SWNTs directly or through biotin-streptavidin linkage, were completely quenched. Enzymatic biotinylation permits fluorescent visualization of carbon nanotubes, which could be useful for a number of biomedical applications. In addition, other organic molecules such as proteins, antibodies, or DNA can be conjugated to biotinylated SWNTs using this approach.

  2. A detection instrument for enhanced-fluorescence and label-free imaging on photonic crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Block, Ian D; Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Jones, Sarah I; Dorvel, Brian R; Chaudhery, Vikram; Vodkin, Lila O; Bashir, Rashid; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-07-20

    We report on the design and demonstration of an optical imaging system capable of exciting surface-bound fluorophores within the resonant evanescent electric field of a photonic crystal surface and gathering fluorescence emission that is directed toward the imaging objective by the photonic crystal. The system also has the ability to quantify shifts in the local resonance angle induced by the adsorption of biomolecules on the photonic crystal surface for label-free biomolecular imaging. With these two capabilities combined within a single detection system, we demonstrate label-free images self-registered to enhanced fluorescence images with 328x more sensitive fluorescence detection relative to a glass surface. This technique is applied to a DNA microarray where label-free quantification of immobilized capture DNA enables improved quality control and subsequent enhanced fluorescence detection of dye-tagged hybridized DNA yields 3x more genes to be detected versus commercially available microarray substrates.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled cetuximab as a potential tool for fluorescence-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Saccomano, Mara; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Napp, Joanna

    2016-11-15

    The high rate of recurrence in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) could be reduced by supporting the surgeons in discriminating healthy from diseased tissues with intraoperative fluorescence-guidance. Here, we studied the suitability of Cetuximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled as a new tool for fluorescence-guided surgery. Distribution and binding of systemically injected Cetuximab Alexa Fluor 647 conjugate (Cetux-Alexa-647) and the co-injected control human IgG Alexa Fluor 750 conjugate (hIgG-Alexa-750) was studied over 48 h by NIR fluorescence imaging in mice bearing human orthotopic AsPC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 PDAC tumors. Cetux-Alexa-647, but not the control hIgG-Alexa-750 fluorescence, was specifically detected in vivo in both primary pancreatic tumors with maximum fluorescence intensities at 24 h, and in metastases of AsPC-1 tumors as small as 1 mm. Lifetime analysis and NIR fluorescence microscopy of tumor sections confirmed the binding specificity of Cetux-Alexa-647 to PDAC cells. Comparable results were obtained with Cetuximab conjugated to Alexa Fluor 750 dye (Cetux-Alexa-750). Fluorescence-guided dissection, performed 24 h after injection of Cetuximab conjugated to IRDye 800CW (Cetux-800CW), enabled a real-time delineation of AsPC-1 tumor margins, and small metastases. Odyssey scans revealed that only the vital part of the tumor, but not the necrotic part was stained with Cetux-800CW. NIR fluorescently labeled Cetuximab may be a promising tool that can be applied for fluorescence-guided surgery to visualize tumor margins and metastatic sites in order to allow a precise surgical resection.

  4. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses.

  5. Tumor cell differentiation by label-free fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Kioschis, Petra; Kessler, Waltraud; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2012-10-01

    Autofluorescence spectra, images, and decay kinetics of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and subsequent to activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence intensity patterns of tumor (control) cells and less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from autofluorescence spectra and decay kinetics. In particular, upon near UV excitation, the fluorescence ratio of the free and protein-bound coenzyme nicotinamid adenine dinucleotide depends on the state of malignancy and reflects different cytoplasmic (including lysosomal) and mitochondrial contributions. While larger numbers of fluorescence spectra are evaluated by principal component analysis, a multivariate data analysis method, additional information on cell metabolism is obtained from spectral imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

  6. The use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to characterize the molecular mobility of fluorescently labelled G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Laura E; Hill, Stephen J

    2016-04-15

    The membranes of living cells have been shown to be highly organized into distinct microdomains, which has spatial and temporal consequences for the interaction of membrane bound receptors and their signalling partners as complexes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique with single cell sensitivity that sheds light on the molecular dynamics of fluorescently labelled receptors, ligands or signalling complexes within small plasma membrane regions of living cells. This review provides an overview of the use of FCS to probe the real time quantification of the diffusion and concentration of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), primarily to gain insights into ligand-receptor interactions and the molecular composition of signalling complexes. In addition we document the use of photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis to investigate how changes in molecular brightness (ε) can be a sensitive indicator of changes in molecular mass of fluorescently labelled moieties.

  7. The use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to characterize the molecular mobility of fluorescently labelled G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, Laura E.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The membranes of living cells have been shown to be highly organized into distinct microdomains, which has spatial and temporal consequences for the interaction of membrane bound receptors and their signalling partners as complexes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique with single cell sensitivity that sheds light on the molecular dynamics of fluorescently labelled receptors, ligands or signalling complexes within small plasma membrane regions of living cells. This review provides an overview of the use of FCS to probe the real time quantification of the diffusion and concentration of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), primarily to gain insights into ligand–receptor interactions and the molecular composition of signalling complexes. In addition we document the use of photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis to investigate how changes in molecular brightness (ε) can be a sensitive indicator of changes in molecular mass of fluorescently labelled moieties. PMID:27068980

  8. Method and apparatus for detection of fluorescently labeled materials

    DOEpatents

    Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter

    2004-05-25

    Fluorescently marked targets bind to a substrate 230 synthesized with polymer sequences at known locations. The targets are detected by exposing selected regions of the substrate 230 to light from a light source 100 and detecting the photons from the light fluoresced therefrom, and repeating the steps of exposure and detection until the substrate 230 is completely examined. The resulting data can be used to determine binding affinity of the targets to specific polymer sequences.

  9. Method and apparatus for detection of fluorescently labeled materials

    DOEpatents

    Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Fluorescently marked targets bind to a substrate 230 synthesized with polymer sequences at known locations. The targets are detected by exposing selected regions of the substrate 230 to light from a light source 100 and detecting the photons from the light fluoresced therefrom, and repeating the steps of exposure and detection until the substrate 230 is completely examined. The resulting data can be used to determine binding affinity of the targets to specific polymer sequences.

  10. Novel Fitc-Labeled Igy Antibody: Fluorescence Imaging Toxoplasma Gondii In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sert, Mehtap; Cakir Koc, Rabia; Budama Kilinc, Yasemin

    2017-04-12

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by T. gondii and can create serious health problems in humans and also worldwide economic harm. Because of the clinical and veterinary importance of toxoplasmosis, its timely and accurate diagnosis has a major impact on disease-fighting strategies. T. gondii surface antigen 1 (SAG1), an immunodominant-specific antigen, is often used as a diagnostic tool. Therefore, the aim of this study was the optimization of novel fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeling of the SAG1-specific IgY antibody to show the potential for immunofluorescence imaging of T. gondii in vitro. The specificity of IgY antibodies was controlled by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the concentration of the IgY antibody was detected using a spectrophotometer. The optimum incubation time and FITC concentration were determined with a fluorescence spectrometer. The obtained FITC-labeled IgY was used for marking T. gondii tachyzoites, which were cultured in vitro and viewed using light microscopy. The interaction of the fluorescence-labeled antibody and the T. gondii tachyzoites was examined with a fluorescence microscope. In this study, for the first time, a FITC-labeled anti-SAG1 IgY antibody was developed according to ELISA, fluorescence spectrometer, and fluorescence imaging of cell culture. In the future, the obtained FITC-labeled T. gondii tachyzoites' specific IgY antibodies may be used as diagnostic tools for the detection of T. gondii infections in different samples.

  11. Preparation of lucifer yellow fluorescent liposomes: A method for cells' membrane labeling.

    PubMed

    Menna, C; Calonghi, N; Masotti, L; Neyroz, P

    1993-03-01

    This report describes a method to conjugate lucifer yellow to the external surface of liposomes. The heterobifunctional cross-linking reagentN-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate has been used to activate DMPE molecules. The DMPE-dithiopyridine product has been mixed with DMPC to prepare liposome vesicles. These have been reduced by DTT and finally reacted with lucifer yellow-iodoacetamide to produce the fluorescence-labeled vesicles. The quenching of their fluorescence intensity by Kl is consistent with fully exposed fluorophores. The decay of the fluorescence intensity of the lipid-bound lucifer yellow is biexponential (τ1=7.9 ns; τ2=1.1 ns), with a relative yield of 0.16. When the fluorescent liposomes are mixed with cells, the lucifer yellow-DMPE derivative is transferred. Boar spermatozoa and peripheral human blood lymphocytes have been used as cellular models. The extent of incorporation is dependent on the incubation time and temperature. At 36°C, lucifer yellow fluorescence appears in the spermatozoa cells after 10 min of incubation and reaches its maximum at about 60 min. The fluorescent phospholipid derivative seems to incorporate specifically into membrane structures. The highest labeling ratio is observed with integer, scarcely motile, spermatozoa. A poorer labeling yield (≈15%) is found with lymphocytes. Interestingly, photobleaching due to epiillumination of the labeled cells is apparently negligible and cells are clearly visible after irradiation times ranging from several minutes to few hours.

  12. Capillary Electrophoresis and Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy for Characterization of Humic Substances

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in natural organic matter (NOM) studies. In this study, we characterized five fulvic acids, six humic acids and two unprocessed NOM samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) using these two ana...

  13. Colloidal quantum dots for fluorescent labels of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, P.; Kouznetsov, V.; Martinez Bonilla, C.; Dezhurov, S.; Krilsky, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Morenkov, O.; Vrublevskaya, V.; Tsygankov, P.; Ibragimova, S.; Rybakova, A.

    2016-10-01

    The work is devoted to the synthesis of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and their bioconjugates with proteins. Various QDs were obtained as well with synthesis method in an organic solvent followed by hydrophilization and functionalization or synthesis in aqueous phase provides obtaining hydrophilic QDs directly. Particular attention is paid to the synthesis of QDs as fluorescent tags in the near infrared where minimum absorption occurs and the fluorescence of biological tissue and synthetic materials used in analytical systems. A method for the QDs synthesis of type fluorescent core/shell CdTeSe/CdS/CdZnS-PolyT with mixed telluride, selenide cadmium core with a high quantum yield and high resistance to photoaging. It is shown that these quantum dots may be effectively used in the immunoassay.

  14. Fluorescence labeling and microscopic imaging of colonic mucosal transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlamazoglou, Vassilis; Yova, Dido M.; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Loukas, Spyros

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an efficient fluorescence microscopic technique and selective fluoroprobes for cancer diagnosis in colon tissue sections, as well as to determine the morphological components where selective dye accumulation has occurred. For this purpose a novel fluorescence probe, Rh-B - phenyl boronic acid was synthesized and examined. This derivative distinguished clearly and consistently, healthy form neoplastic human colon tissue sections. Intense accumulation was observed at the amorphous material in the lumen of neoplastic crypts, of the colonic epithelium. To gain insight into the localization pattern of this fluoroprobe and to correlate it with mucin alterations, mucicarmine and the blue-fluorescent conjugate of wheat germ agglutinin with Alexa 350 were used. Alexa 350-WGA reacted primarily with mucin secreted in the malignant crypt lumen suggesting that this materia is rich in cialic acid and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues.

  15. Ultrasound modulated fluorescence emission from Pyrene-labelled liposome contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qimei; Moles, Matthew D.; Mather, Melissa L.; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound modulated fluorescence tomography (USMFT) has the potential to be a useful technique to obtain fluorescence images with optical contrast and ultrasound (US) resolution in deep tissue. However, due to the intrinsic incoherent properties of fluorescence and the low modulation depth, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image contrast are poor. In this paper, the feasibility of using pyrene-labelled nanosize liposomes as contrast agents to improve the modulation depth in USMFT is investigated by using a light-scattering technique. Compared with microbubbles (MBs), which have been applied to USMFT to improve the modulation depth, liposomes are more stable and they can be manufactured with good repeatability. Also liposomes have a lower US scattering coefficient due to their liquid core as compared to the gas core of MBs, which can be advantageous when switching on fluorescence in a region of interest is required. Pyrene can form excimer fluorescence when in close proximity to other pyrene molecules. The exposure of these liposomes to US can change the collision rate of the pyrene molecules and hence modulate the optical emission. In the current work, 100 nm sized liposomes composed of varying concentrations of pyrene-labelled phospholipids were investigated to identify a suitable liposome-based US contrast agent candidate. The fluorescence emission of the pyrene-labelled liposomes insonified by continuous US were studied. It has been observed that the excimer emission from 0.5 mol% pyrene-labelled liposome is US sensitive at pressures between 1.4 MPa and 2.7 MPa. Possible fluorescence modulation mechanisms and application of pyrene-labelled liposomes for high-resolution, high-contrast fluorescence imaging are also discussed.

  16. Rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy in chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y by quantitative fluorescence-PCR combined with short tandem repeat and fluorescence-labeled homologous gene quantitative‑PCR using 4-color fluorescently labeled universal primers.

    PubMed

    Long, Ju; Ye, Xuehe; Weng, Xunjin; Fu, Kepeng; Sun, Lei; Pang, Wanrong

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to develop a rapid diagnostic test of aneuploidy in chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y through a program combining short tandem repeat (STR) typing with fluorescence-labeled homologous gene quantitative‑polymerase chain reaction (fHGQ-PCR), which avoids misjudgment risks by using one method alone. Furthermore, fluorescently labeled universal primers not only ensure the accuracy of the results but also reduces the cost of fluorescent labels. The verification of DNA extracted from samples confirmed by karyotype analysis with quantitative fluorescence (QF)-PCR shows that the results obtained using the QF-PCR program are consistent with the results of karyotype analysis in rapidly diagnosing the aneuploidy of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y.

  17. Use of Multiple Fluorescent Labels in Biological Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    stanford.edu Abstract: We describe novel fluorescent N-deoxyribosides (1 and 2) having 2-pyrido-2-benzimidazole and 2- quino -2-benzimidazole as aglycones...with conjugated systems (Chart 1). We chose these pyrido- (and related quino -) benzimidazole heterocycles (3 and 4), both of which were previously

  18. Metal-enhanced intrinsic fluorescence of proteins and label-free bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Krishanu; Szmacinski, Henryk; Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2010-02-01

    Most of the applications of fluorescence require the use of labeled drugs and labeled biomolecules. Due to the need of labeling biomolecules with extrinsic fluorophores, there is a rapidly growing interest in methods which provide label-free detection (LFD). Proteins are highly fluorescent, which is due primarily to tryptophan residues. However, since most proteins contain tryptophan, this emission is not specific for proteins of interest in a biological sample. This is one of the reasons of not utilizing intrinsic tryptophan emission from proteins to detect specific proteins. Here, we present the intrinsic fluorescence for several proteins bound to the silver or aluminum metal nanostructured surfaces. We demonstrate the metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of proteins with different numbers of tryptophan residues. Large increases in fluorescence intensity and decreases in lifetime provide the means of direct detection of bound protein without separation from the unbound. We present specific detection of individual types of proteins and measure the binding kinetics of proteins such as IgG and streptavidin. Additionally, specific detection of IgG and streptavidin has been accomplished in the presence of large concentrations of other proteins in sample solutions. These results will allow design of surface-based assays with biorecognitive layer that specifically bind the protein of interest and thus enhance its intrinsic fluorescence. The present study demonstrates the occurrence of MEF in the UV region and thus opens new possibilities to study tryptophan-containing proteins without labeling with longer wavelength fluorophores and provides an approach to label-free detection of biomolecules.

  19. Application of the DNA-specific stain methyl green in the fluorescent labeling of embryos.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Daniel; Aparicio, Gonzalo; Machado, Matías; Zolessi, Flavio R

    2015-05-02

    Methyl green has long been known as a histological stain with a specific affinity for DNA, although its fluorescent properties have remained unexplored until recently. In this article, we illustrate the method for preparing a methyl green aqueous stock solution, that when diluted can be used as a very convenient fluorescent nuclear label for fixed cells and tissues. Easy procedures to label whole zebrafish and chick embryos are detailed, and examples of images obtained shown. Methyl green is maximally excited by red light, at 633 nm, and emits with a relatively sharp spectrum that peaks at 677 nm. It is very inexpensive, non-toxic, highly stable in solution and very resistant to photobleaching when bound to DNA. Its red emission allows for unaltered high resolution scanning confocal imaging of nuclei in thick specimens. Finally, this methyl green staining protocol is compatible with other cell staining procedures, such as antibody labeling, or actin filaments labeling with fluorophore-conjugated phalloidin.

  20. Detection of fluorophore-labeled antibodies by surface-enhanced fluorescence on metal nanoislands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalkhammer, Thomas G. M.; Aussenegg, Franz R.; Leitner, Alfred; Brunner, Harald; Hawa, Gerhard; Lobmaier, Christina; Pittner, Fritz

    1997-06-01

    In fluorescence labelled immunosensing the discrimination of labels remaining in the bulk solution from labels bound to the analyte at the sensor surface is a basic optical problem. It is shown that application of surface enhanced fluorescence at a layer of noble metal nano-particles can increase the surface-to-background signal ratio. We explain the enhancement mechanism by an electrodynamic model and discuss the interaction between metal particle and fluorophore for the excitation and emission process. We show the principal guidelines for optimization of that processes. We find that the obtained discrimination power increases with decreasing intrinsic quantum efficiency of the fluorophore, suggesting the application of new classes of labels, namely low-quantum efficiency fluorophores. This theoretical finding is shown by a practical model experiment.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of radioactive and fluorescent residualizing labels for identifying sites of plasma protein catabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, J.L.; Baynes, J.W.; Thorpe, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Inulin and lactose were each coupled to tyramine by reductive amination with NaBH/sub 3/CN and the tyramine then labeled with /sup 125/I. Dilactitol-/sup 125/I-tyramine (DLT) and inulin-/sup 125/I-tyramine (InTn) were coupled by reductive amination and cyanuric chloride, respectively, to asialofetuin (ASF), fetuin and rat serum albumin (RSA). Attachment of either label had no effect on the circulating half-lives of the proteins. Radioactivity from labeled ASF was recovered in rat liver (> 90%) by 1 h post-injection and remained in liver with half-lives of 2 and 6 days, respectively, for the DLT and InTn labels. Whole body recoveries of radioactivity from DLT- and InTn labels. Whole body recoveries of radioactivity from DLT- and InTn-labeled RSA were 5 and 6.5 days, respectively, again indicating that the larger glycoconjugate label residualized more efficiently in cells following protein degradation. (Lactitol)/sub 2/-N-CH/sub 2/-CH/sub 2/-NH-fluroescein (DLF) was also coupled to ASF by reductive amination and recovered quantitatively in liver at 1 h post-injection. Native ASF was an effective competitor for clearance of DLF-ASF from the circulation. Fluorescent degradation products were retained in liver with a half-life of 1.2 days. Residualizing fluorescent labels should be useful for identification and sorting of cells active in the degradation of plasma proteins.

  2. Preparation and chromatographic use of 5'-fluorescent-labelled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Tous, G; Fausnaugh, J; Vieira, P; Stein, S

    1988-07-01

    A convenient procedure for synthesizing and purifying fluorescently-labelled short DNA probes is reported. DNA probes were chemically synthesized on an automated instrument using the "Aminolink" reagent in the final cycle to attach a primary amino group at the 5'-terminus in the final step. The synthetic oligonucleotides were purified by polyacrylamide urea gel electrophoresis, followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The oligomers were then allowed to react with a fluorescent compound, and the products were separated by HPLC with consecutive detection by UV absorption and fluorescence. Gel permeation chromatography demonstrated that the fluorescent probes were able to form stable hybrids with complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. Furthermore, essentially 100% of the purified fluorescent probe was capable of hybridizing to its complementary strand. Special precautions in handling the fluorescent probes, such as stability, were investigated.

  3. Cryo-imaging of fluorescently labeled single cells in a mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyer, Grant J.; Roy, Debashish; Salvado, Olivier; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a cryo-imaging system to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse, with particular applicability to stem cells and metastatic cancer. The Case cryoimaging system consists of a fluorescence microscope, robotic imaging positioner, customized cryostat, PC-based control system, and visualization/analysis software. The system alternates between sectioning (10-40 μm) and imaging, collecting color brightfield and fluorescent blockface image volumes >60GB. In mouse experiments, we imaged quantum-dot labeled stem cells, GFP-labeled cancer and stem cells, and cell-size fluorescent microspheres. To remove subsurface fluorescence, we used a simplified model of light-tissue interaction whereby the next image was scaled, blurred, and subtracted from the current image. We estimated scaling and blurring parameters by minimizing entropy of subtracted images. Tissue specific attenuation parameters were found [uT : heart (267 +/- 47.6 μm), liver (218 +/- 27.1 μm), brain (161 +/- 27.4 μm)] to be within the range of estimates in the literature. "Next image" processing removed subsurface fluorescence equally well across multiple tissues (brain, kidney, liver, adipose tissue, etc.), and analysis of 200 microsphere images in the brain gave 97+/-2% reduction of subsurface fluorescence. Fluorescent signals were determined to arise from single cells based upon geometric and integrated intensity measurements. Next image processing greatly improved axial resolution, enabled high quality 3D volume renderings, and improved enumeration of single cells with connected component analysis by up to 24%. Analysis of image volumes identified metastatic cancer sites, found homing of stem cells to injury sites, and showed microsphere distribution correlated with blood flow patterns. We developed and evaluated cryo-imaging to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse. Our cryo-imaging system provides extreme (>60GB), micron

  4. AZIDE-SPECIFIC LABELLING OF BIOMOLECULES BY STAUDINGER-BERTOZZI LIGATION: PHOSPHINE DERIVATIVES OF FLUORESCENT PROBES SUITABLE FOR SINGLE-MOLECULE FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Wang, Dongye; Ebright, Yon W.; Ebright, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of phosphine derivatives of three fluorescent probes that have brightness and photostability suitable for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy: Alexa488, Cy3B, and Alexa647. In addition, we describe procedures for use of these reagents in azide-specific, bioorthogonal labelling through use of the Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation and procedures for quantitation of labelling specificity and labelling efficiency. The reagents and procedures of this report enable chemoselective, site-selective labelling of azide-containing biomolecules for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. PMID:20580957

  5. Conjugation-induced fluorescent labeling of proteins and polymers using dithiomaleimides.

    PubMed

    Robin, Mathew P; Wilson, Paul; Mabire, Anne B; Kiviaho, Jenny K; Raymond, Jeffery E; Haddleton, David M; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-02-27

    Dithiomaleimides (DTMs) with alkyl substituents are shown to be a novel class of highly emissive fluorophores. Variable solubility and further functionalization can easily be tailored through the choice of N and S substituents. Inclusion of a DTM unit into a ROP/RAFT initiator or insertion into the disulfide bond of salmon calcitonin (sCT) demonstrates the utility for fluorescent labeling of polymers and proteins. Simultaneous PEGylation and fluorescent labeling of sCT is also demonstrated, using the DTM unit as both a linker and a fluorophore. It is anticipated that DTMs will offer an attractive alternative to commonly used bulky, planar fluorophores.

  6. Chemical biology-based approaches on fluorescent labeling of proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deokho; Min, Kyoungmi; Jung, Juyeon; Jang, Wonhee; Kwon, Youngeun

    2013-05-01

    Recently, significant advances have been made in live cell imaging owing to the rapid development of selective labeling of proteins in vivo. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was the first example of fluorescent reporters genetically introduced to protein of interest (POI). While GFP and various types of engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been actively used for live cell imaging for many years, the size and the limited windows of fluorescent spectra of GFP and its variants set limits on possible applications. In order to complement FP-based labeling methods, alternative approaches that allow incorporation of synthetic fluorescent probes to target POIs were developed. Synthetic fluorescent probes are smaller than fluorescent proteins, often have improved photochemical properties, and offer a larger variety of colors. These synthetic probes can be introduced to POIs selectively by numerous approaches that can be largely categorized into chemical recognition-based labeling, which utilizes metal-chelating peptide tags and fluorophore-carrying metal complexes, and biological recognition-based labeling, such as (1) specific non-covalent binding between an enzyme tag and its fluorophore-carrying substrate, (2) self-modification of protein tags using substrate variants conjugated to fluorophores, (3) enzymatic reaction to generate a covalent binding between a small molecule substrate and a peptide tag, and (4) split-intein-based C-terminal labeling of target proteins. The chemical recognition-based labeling reaction often suffers from compromised selectivity of metal-ligand interaction in the cytosolic environment, consequently producing high background signals. Use of protein-substrate interactions or enzyme-mediated reactions generally shows improved specificity but each method has its limitations. Some examples are the presence of large linker protein, restriction on the choice of introducible probes due to the substrate specificity of enzymes, and competitive

  7. Specific fluorescent labeling of chicken myofibril Z-line proteins catalyzed by guinea pig liver transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Guinea pig liver transglutaminase has been found to catalyze the covalent incorporation of dansylcadaverine into chicken skeletal muscle myofibril proteins. Epifluorescence microscopy reveals that the incorporated dansylcadaverine is specifically localized at or near the myofibril Z line. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicates that actin constitutes a major fraction of the labeled material; the Z-line proteins alpha-actinin and desmin also show significant labeling, as well as tropomyosin, several additional unidentified proteins, and material with an extremely high molecular weight. The Z-line-specific fluorescence can be removed by brief trypsinization, which releases fluorescent alpha-actinin into the supernate. The majority of the fluorescent protein species are resistant to extraction by either 0.6 M KCl or KI. These results, in conjunction with the microscopic localization, suggest that the dansyl- labeled proteins are constituents of the myofibril Z line. A significant amount of fluorescently labeled transglutaminase is also present in labeled myofibrils, which is resistant to extraction with either 0.6 M KCl or KI. This result indicates a strong, noncovalent interaction between the transglutaminase molecule and the myofibril Z line. PMID:38257

  8. Complexation between Hg(II) and biofilm extracellular polymeric substances: an application of fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Mostofa, Khan M G; Chen, Xi; Mu, Guijin; Wu, Fengchang; Liu, Jing; Song, Wenjuan; Yang, Jianying; Liu, Yanli; Fu, Qinglong

    2010-03-15

    The three-dimensional excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to investigate the interaction of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from natural biofilm with Hg(II). The EEM spectra demonstrated that EPS with molecular weight over 14 kDa had two protein-like fluorescence peaks. The fluorescence intensity at both peaks was strongly dependent on the solution pH in the absence and presence of Hg(II), with the maximal fluorescence intensity at neutral pH. Fluorescence of both protein-like peaks was significantly quenched by Hg(II). The values of conditional stability constants (log K(a)=3.28-4.48) derived from modified Stern-Volmer equation are approximate to those for humic substances and dissolved organic matter (DOM), indicating that fluorescent components in EPS have strong binding capacity for Hg(II). Our findings suggest that EPS from biofilm is a class of important organic ligands for complexation with Hg(II) and may significantly affect the chemical forms, mobility, bioavailability and ecotoxicity of heavy metals in the aquatic environment. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  10. Fluorescence Phenomena in Nerve-Labeling Styryl-Type Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Siclovan, Tiberiu M.; Zhang, Rong; Cotero, Victoria; Bajaj, Anshika; Dylov, Dmitry V.; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Carter, Randall; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Natarajan, Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of diversely substituted styryl type dyes have been synthesized with the goal of extending their expected fluorescent properties as much towards red as possible given the constraint that they maintain drug-like properties and retain high affinity binding to their biological target. We report on the synthesis, optical properties of a series of styryl dyes (d1-d14), and the anomalous photophysical behavior of several of these Donor-Acceptor pairs separated by long conjugated π-systems (d7-d10). We further describe an unusual dual emission behavior with two distinct ground state conformers which could be individually excited to locally excited (LE) and twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) excited state in push-pull dye systems (d7, d9 and d10). Additionally, unexpected emission behavior in dye systems d7 and d8 wherein the amino- derivative d7 displayed a dual emission in polar medium while the N,N-dimethyl derivative d8 and other methylated derivatives d12-d14 showed only LE emission but did not show any TICT emission. Based on photophysical and nerve binding studies, we down selected compounds that exhibited the most robust fluorescent staining of nerve tissue sections. These dyes (d7, d9, and d10) were subsequently selected for in-vivo fluorescence imaging studies in rodents using the small animal multispectral imaging instrument and the dual-mode laparoscopic instrument developed in-house. PMID:26693208

  11. Fabry-Perot-based Fourier-transform hyperspectral imaging allows multi-labeled fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Marco; Zucco, Massimo

    2014-05-10

    We demonstrate the ability of our hyperspectral imaging device, based on a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer, to obtain a single hyper-image of a sample marked with different fluorescent molecules, and to unambiguously discriminate them by observing their spectral fingerprints. An experiment carried out with cyanines, fluorescein, and quantum dots emitting in the yellow-orange region, demonstrates the feasibility of multi-labeled fluorescence microscopy without the use of multiple filter sets or dispersive means.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide deactivates common nitrobenzofurazan-based fluorescent thiol labeling reagents.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pluth, Michael D

    2014-06-17

    Sulfhydryl-containing compounds, including thiols and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), play important but differential roles in biological structure and function. One major challenge in separating the biological roles of thiols and H2S is developing tools to effectively separate the reactivity of these sulfhydryl-containing compounds. To address this challenge, we report the differential responses of common electrophilic fluorescent thiol labeling reagents, including nitrobenzofurazan-based scaffolds, maleimides, alkylating agents, and electrophilic aldehydes, toward cysteine and H2S. Although H2S reacted with all of the investigated scaffolds, the photophysical response to each scaffold was significantly different. Maleimide-based, alkylating, and aldehydic thiol labeling reagents provided a diminished fluorescence response when treated with H2S. By contrast, nitrobenzofurazan-based labeling reagents were deactivated by H2S addition. Furthermore, the addition of H2S to thiol-activated nitrobenzofurazan-based reagents reduced the fluorescence signal, thus establishing the incompatibility of nitrobenzofurazan-based thiol labeling reagents in the presence of H2S. Taken together, these studies highlight the differential reactivity of thiols and H2S toward common thiol-labeling reagents and suggest that sufficient care must be taken when labeling or measuring thiols in cellular environments that produce H2S due to the potential for both false-positive and eroded responses.

  13. Monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides by two-color fluorescent label.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, V Y; Shvadchak, V V; Duportail, G; Pivovarenko, V G; Klymchenko, A S; Mély, Y

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we developed an approach for monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides using a fluorescent environment-sensitive label of the 3-hydroxyflavone family. For this purpose, we labeled the N-terminus of three synthetic peptides, melittin, magainin 2 and poly-l-lysine capable to interact with lipid membranes. Binding of these peptides to lipid vesicles induced a strong fluorescence increase, which enabled to quantify the peptide-membrane interaction. Moreover, the dual emission of the label in these peptides correlated well with the depth of its insertion measured by the parallax quenching method. Thus, in melittin and magainin 2, which show deep insertion of their N-terminus, the label presented a dual emission corresponding to a low polar environment, while the environment of the poly-l-lysine N-terminus was rather polar, consistent with its location close to the bilayer surface. Using spectral deconvolution to distinguish the non-hydrated label species from the hydrated ones and two photon fluorescence microscopy to determine the probe orientation in giant vesicles, we found that the non-hydrated species were vertically oriented in the bilayer and constituted the best indicators for evaluating the depth of the peptide N-terminus in membranes. Thus, this label constitutes an interesting new tool for monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides.

  14. Specific labelling of cell populations in blood with targeted immuno-fluorescent/magnetic glyconanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Juan; García, Isabel; Genicio, Nuria; Padro, Daniel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-12-01

    Current performance of iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast agents in clinical use is based on the unspecific accumulation of the probes in certain organs or tissues. Specific targeted biofunctional nanoparticles would significantly increase their potential as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in vivo. In this study, multimodal fluorescent/magnetic glyco-nanoparticles were synthesized from gold-coated magnetite (glyco-ferrites) and converted into specific probes by the covalent coupling of protein G and subsequent incubation with an IgG antibody. The immuno-magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles were applied to the specific labelling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a complex biological medium, as human blood. We have been able to label specifically PBMCs present in blood in a percentage as low as 0.10-0.17%. Red blood cells (RBCs) were also clearly labelled, even though the inherent T(2) contrast arising from the high iron content of these cells (coming mainly from haemoglobin). The labelling was further assessed at cellular level by fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we have developed new contrast agents able to label specifically a cell population under adverse biological conditions (low abundance, low intrinsic T(2), high protein content). These findings open the door to the application of these probes for the labelling and tracking of endogenous cell populations like metastatic cancer cells, or progenitor stem cells that exist in very low amount in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide Deactivates Common Nitrobenzofurazan-Based Fluorescent Thiol Labeling Reagents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sulfhydryl-containing compounds, including thiols and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), play important but differential roles in biological structure and function. One major challenge in separating the biological roles of thiols and H2S is developing tools to effectively separate the reactivity of these sulfhydryl-containing compounds. To address this challenge, we report the differential responses of common electrophilic fluorescent thiol labeling reagents, including nitrobenzofurazan-based scaffolds, maleimides, alkylating agents, and electrophilic aldehydes, toward cysteine and H2S. Although H2S reacted with all of the investigated scaffolds, the photophysical response to each scaffold was significantly different. Maleimide-based, alkylating, and aldehydic thiol labeling reagents provided a diminished fluorescence response when treated with H2S. By contrast, nitrobenzofurazan-based labeling reagents were deactivated by H2S addition. Furthermore, the addition of H2S to thiol-activated nitrobenzofurazan-based reagents reduced the fluorescence signal, thus establishing the incompatibility of nitrobenzofurazan-based thiol labeling reagents in the presence of H2S. Taken together, these studies highlight the differential reactivity of thiols and H2S toward common thiol-labeling reagents and suggest that sufficient care must be taken when labeling or measuring thiols in cellular environments that produce H2S due to the potential for both false-positive and eroded responses. PMID:24852143

  16. Zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol: preparation, characterization, interaction with bovine serum albumin and near infrared fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lv, Feng; Cao, Bo; Cui, Yanli; Liu, Tianjun

    2012-05-25

    Zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol was prepared to track and monitor the in vivo fate of polyethylene glycol. The chemical structures were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Their light stability and fluorescence quantum yield were evaluated by UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopy methods. The interaction of zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol with bovine serum albumin was evaluated by fluorescence titration and isothermal titration calorimetry methods. Optical imaging in vivo, organ aggregation as well as distribution of fluorescence experiments for tracking polyethylene glycol were performed with zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol as fluorescent agent. Results show that zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol has good optical stability and high emission ability in the near infrared region. Imaging results demonstrate that zinc phthalocyanine labelled polyethylene glycol can track and monitor the in vivo process by near infrared fluorescence imaging, which implies its potential in biomaterials evaluation in vivo by a real-time noninvasive method.

  17. Synthetic strategies for the fluorescent labeling of epichlorohydrin-branched cyclodextrin polymers.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Milo; Bálint, Mihály; Puskás, István; Tuza, Kata; Sohajda, Tamás; Jicsinszky, László; Szente, Lajos; Fenyvesi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescent tagging of cyclodextrin derivatives enlarges their spectroscopic properties thus generating chemosensors, biological tools for visualization and sophisticated photoresponsive devices. Cyclodextrin polymers, due to the cooperative interactions, exhibit additional properties compared to their monomeric counterpart. These macromolecules can be prepared either in well water-soluble form or as gels of high swelling. Two versatile synthetic strategies for introducing a fluorescent tag (rhodamine, fluorescein, nitrobenzofuran or coumarin) into the water-soluble epichlorohydrin branched cyclodextrin polymers were worked out and compared. The fluorescent labeling was realized in three steps: 1) building in azido moieties, 2) transforming the azido groups into amino groups and 3) coupling the proper fluorescent compound to the amino groups. The other strategy started by functionalization of the monomer prior to the branching. Either the fluorescent-labeled monomer or the intermediate azido derivative of the monomer was branched. Further tuning of the properties of the polymer was achieved via branching of the methylated cyclodextrin derivative. The key intermediates and the fluorescent final products were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and capillary electrophoresis. The applied synthetic routes were evaluated based on the molecular weight, cyclodextrin content of the products and the efficiency of labeling.

  18. Synthetic strategies for the fluorescent labeling of epichlorohydrin-branched cyclodextrin polymers

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, Mihály; Puskás, István; Tuza, Kata; Sohajda, Tamás; Jicsinszky, László; Szente, Lajos; Fenyvesi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    Summary The fluorescent tagging of cyclodextrin derivatives enlarges their spectroscopic properties thus generating chemosensors, biological tools for visualization and sophisticated photoresponsive devices. Cyclodextrin polymers, due to the cooperative interactions, exhibit additional properties compared to their monomeric counterpart. These macromolecules can be prepared either in well water-soluble form or as gels of high swelling. Two versatile synthetic strategies for introducing a fluorescent tag (rhodamine, fluorescein, nitrobenzofuran or coumarin) into the water-soluble epichlorohydrin branched cyclodextrin polymers were worked out and compared. The fluorescent labeling was realized in three steps: 1) building in azido moieties, 2) transforming the azido groups into amino groups and 3) coupling the proper fluorescent compound to the amino groups. The other strategy started by functionalization of the monomer prior to the branching. Either the fluorescent-labeled monomer or the intermediate azido derivative of the monomer was branched. Further tuning of the properties of the polymer was achieved via branching of the methylated cyclodextrin derivative. The key intermediates and the fluorescent final products were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and capillary electrophoresis. The applied synthetic routes were evaluated based on the molecular weight, cyclodextrin content of the products and the efficiency of labeling. PMID:25670971

  19. Universal primers for fluorescent labelling of PCR fragments--an efficient and cost-effective approach to genotyping by fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Blacket, M J; Robin, C; Good, R T; Lee, S F; Miller, A D

    2012-05-01

    Directly labelling locus-specific primers for microsatellite analysis is expensive and a common limitation to small-budget molecular ecology projects. More cost-effective end-labelling of PCR products can be achieved through a three primer PCR approach, involving a fluorescently labelled universal primer in combination with modified locus-specific primers with 5' universal primer sequence tails. This technique has been widely used but has been limited largely due to a lack of available universal primers suitable for co-amplifying large numbers of size overlapping loci and without requiring locus-specific PCR conditions to be modified. In this study, we report a suite of four high-performance universal primers that can be employed in a three primer PCR approach for efficient and cost-effective fluorescent end-labelling of PCR fragments. Amplification efficiency is maximized owing to high universal primer Tm values (approximately 60+ °C) that enhance primer versatility and enable higher annealing temperatures to be employed compared with commonly used universal primers such as M13. We demonstrate that these universal primers can be combined with multiple fluorophores to co-amplify multiple loci efficiently via multiplex PCR. This method provides a level of multiplexing and PCR efficiency similar to microsatellite fluorescent detection assays using directly labelled primers while dramatically reducing project costs. Primer performance is tested using several alternative PCR strategies that involve both single and multiple fluorophores in single and multiplex PCR across a wide range of taxa. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant protein C in spread phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Perez-Gil, J; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex, secreted into the fluid lining of lungs prevents alveolar collapse at low lung volumes. Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C), an acylated, hydrophobic, alpha-helical peptide, enhances the surface activity of pulmonary surfactant lipids. Fluorescein-labeled SP-C (F-SP-C) (3, 6, 12 wt%) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and DPPC:dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) [DPPC:DPPG 7:3 mol/mol] in spread monolayers was studied by epifluorescence microscopy. Mass spectometry of F-SP-C indicated that the protein is partially deacylated and labeled with 1 mol fluorescein/1 mol protein. The protein partitioned into the fluid, or liquid expanded, phase. Increasing amounts of F-SP-C in DPPC or DPPC:DPPG monolayers decreased the size and total amounts of the condensed phase at all surface pressures. Calcium (1.6 mM) increased the amount of the condensed phase in monolayers of DPPC:DPPG but not of DPPC alone, and such monolayers were also perturbed by F-SP-C. The study indicates that SP-C perturbs the packing of neutral and anionic phospholipid monolayers even when the latter systems are condensed by calcium, indicating that interactions between SP-C and the lipids are predominantly hydrophobic in nature. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:8804608

  1. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of directly labelled DNA: from microscopy standards to living cells.

    PubMed

    Flors, C

    2013-07-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is ideally suited to study the complex organization of cell DNA in the 10-100 nm range. Novel methods to image directly labelled DNA, instead of DNA-associated proteins, are being developed and refined. This minireview provides an update of recent progress in super-resolution fluorescence imaging methods for DNA. These developments should allow a deeper understanding of chromatin structure and widen the scope of biological processes that may be investigated with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. © 2013 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Short communication: Labeling Listeria with anaerobic fluorescent protein for food safety studies.

    PubMed

    Landete, José M; Peirotén, Ángela; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2017-01-01

    Many food safety-related studies require the tracking of inoculated food-borne pathogens to monitor their fate in food complex environments. In the current study, we demonstrate the potential of plasmids containing the fluorescence protein gene evoglow-Pp1 (Evocatal, Dusseldorf, Germany) as a real-time reporter system for Listeria strains. This anaerobic fluorescent protein provides an easily detectable phenotype of microorganisms for food safety studies. This work is the first to report a reliable method to identify fluorescently labeled Listeria strains in food ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation and properties of fluorescence labeled neuro- and cardiotoxin II from the sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata).

    PubMed

    Rack, M; Meves, H; Béress, L; Grünhagen, H H

    1983-01-01

    Labeling of the sea anemone toxin II with fluoresceinisothiocyanate is described. The native toxin and low molecular weight fluorescent compounds were completely separated from the derivative. Compared to fluorescein, the fluorescence of the toxin-derivative has a red shift and a decreased quantum yield. Like the native toxin, the fluorescent derivative affects the voltage-dependent sodium channel in nerve membranes. Under voltage-clamp conditions, the effect of the modified toxin on the inactivation of sodium channels was 45% of that of the unlabeled toxin.

  4. Validation of fluorescent-labeled microspheres for measurement of relative blood flow in severely injured lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, M.; Souders, J. E.; Shade, E. D.; Hlastala, M. P.; Polissar, N. L.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to validate a nonradioactive method for relative blood flow measurements in severely injured lungs that avoids labor-intensive tissue processing. The use of fluorescent-labeled microspheres was compared with the standard radiolabeled-microsphere method. In seven sheep, lung injury was established by using oleic acid. Five pairs of radio- and fluorescent-labeled microspheres were injected before and after established lung injury. Across all animals, 175 pieces were selected randomly. The radioactivity of each piece was determined by using a scintillation counter. The fluorescent dye was extracted from each piece with a solvent without digestion or filtering. The fluorescence was determined with an automated fluorescent spectrophotometer. Perfusion was calculated for each piece from both the radioactivity and fluorescence and volume normalized. Correlations between flow determined by the two methods were in the range from 0.987 +/- 0.007 (SD) to 0.991 +/- 0.002 (SD) after 9 days of soaking. Thus the fluorescent microsphere technique is a valuable tool for investigating regional perfusion in severely injured lungs and can replace radioactivity.

  5. Validation of fluorescent-labeled microspheres for measurement of relative blood flow in severely injured lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, M.; Souders, J. E.; Shade, E. D.; Hlastala, M. P.; Polissar, N. L.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to validate a nonradioactive method for relative blood flow measurements in severely injured lungs that avoids labor-intensive tissue processing. The use of fluorescent-labeled microspheres was compared with the standard radiolabeled-microsphere method. In seven sheep, lung injury was established by using oleic acid. Five pairs of radio- and fluorescent-labeled microspheres were injected before and after established lung injury. Across all animals, 175 pieces were selected randomly. The radioactivity of each piece was determined by using a scintillation counter. The fluorescent dye was extracted from each piece with a solvent without digestion or filtering. The fluorescence was determined with an automated fluorescent spectrophotometer. Perfusion was calculated for each piece from both the radioactivity and fluorescence and volume normalized. Correlations between flow determined by the two methods were in the range from 0.987 +/- 0.007 (SD) to 0.991 +/- 0.002 (SD) after 9 days of soaking. Thus the fluorescent microsphere technique is a valuable tool for investigating regional perfusion in severely injured lungs and can replace radioactivity.

  6. A system for automatically scanning tissue culture dishes to detect fluorescently labeled cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Seth R.; Guan-Xiong, Zhou; Siegel, Ruth E.; Brownstein, Michael J.

    1989-07-01

    A microprocessor-controlled system has been developed to automatically scan tissue culture dishes in order to detect and locate fluorescently labeled cell colonies for subsequent cloning. An X-Y recorder mechanism moves an 80-mm-diam dish in a raster scan through a stationary laser beam adjacent to a photomultiplier tube equipped with an emission filter. Front-end electronics processes the PMT signal to screen out small-scale fluorescent artifacts of selectable size (e.g., <0.2 mm). Appropriate signals are input to the computer which then interrupts the raster scan to perform a limited fine scan of the dish to accurately localize the fluorescent spot position. An additional artifact test using a different filter is then performed. The underside of the dish is scribed at the location of spots that pass this test. Using fluorescein as a label, fluorescence as low as 25% above intrinsic cell background fluorescence can be detected. The fluorescence signal level threshhold can be set (e.g., 70% above intrinsic cell background) to within an accuracy of approximately 15% of intrinsic cell background fluorescence, and the system will reliably find colonies with a signal exceeding that level. With the above typical values, the number of false positives is typically less than five per dish and the time to completely scan an 80-mm-diam tissue culture dish is 2-4 min.

  7. SNAP-Tag-Based Subcellular Protein Labeling and Fluorescent Imaging with Naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Song, Xinbo; Xiao, Yi

    2017-09-05

    Genetically encoded technologies provide methods for the specific labeling and imaging of proteins, which is essential to understand the subcellular localization of these proteins and their function. Herein, we employed naphthalimide, an efficient two-photon fluorophore, to develop O(6) -benzylguanine (BG) derivatives for specific labeling of subcellular proteins and fluorescent imaging through the SNAP-tag. Three naphthalimide-BG derivatives, TNI-BG, QNI-BG, and ONI-BG, were conveniently synthesized through modular "click chemistry" in high yields. All of them showed high labeling efficiency with SNAP-tag in solution (≈1-2×10(3)  s(-1)  m(-1) ) and in bacteria. Among them, ONI-BG showed high specificity to diffused, histone H2B and mitochondria COX8A targeted SNAP-tag in mammalian cells. The protein-labeled naphthalimides exhibited high two-photon absorption cross-sections, which indicated their potential application in protein-specific two-photon fluorescent imaging, such as two-photon fluorescent lifetime imaging and two-photon multicolor imaging. Therefore, ONI-BG is a versatile tool that can be used to track subcellular proteins through multiple fluorescent techniques. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Activity-dependent fluorescent labeling of bacterial cells expressing the TOL pathway

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Keener; Mary E. Watwood

    2005-01-01

    3-Ethynylbenzoate functions as an activity-dependent, fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for Pseudomonas putida mt-2, which is known to degrade toluene via conversion to benzoate, followed by meta ring fission of the intermediate, catechol. This direct physiological analysis allows the fluorescent labeling of cells whose toluene-degrading enzymes have been induced by an aromatic substrate.

  9. A Trp-BODIPY cyclic peptide for fluorescence labelling of apoptotic bodies.

    PubMed

    Subiros-Funosas, Ramon; Mendive-Tapia, Lorena; Sot, Jesus; Pound, John D; Barth, Nicole; Varela, Yaiza; Goñi, Felix M; Paterson, Margaret; Gregory, Christopher D; Albericio, Fernando; Dransfield, Ian; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Vendrell, Marc

    2017-01-10

    The rational design and synthesis of a Trp-BODIPY cyclic peptide for the fluorescent labelling of apoptotic bodies is described. Affinity assays, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis confirmed the binding of the peptide to negatively-charged phospholipids associated with apoptosis, and its applicability for the detection and characterisation of subcellular structures released by apoptotic cells.

  10. Allelic divergence in sugarcane cultivars revealed through capillary electrophoregrams of fluorescence-labeled microsatellite markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electerophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 eac...

  11. Combined enhanced fluorescence and label-free biomolecular detection with a photonic crystal surface.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Chan, Leo L; Cunningham, Brian T

    2007-04-20

    A 2D photonic crystal surface with a different period in each lateral direction is demonstrated to detect biomolecules using two distinct sensing modalities. The sensing mechanisms both rely on the generation of a resonant reflection peak at one of two specific wavelengths, depending on the polarization of light that is incident on the photonic crystal. One polarization results in a resonant reflection peak in the visible spectrum to coincide with the excitation wavelength of a fluorophore, while the orthogonal polarization results in a resonant reflection peak at an infrared wavelength which is used for label-free detection of adsorbed biomolecules. The photonic crystal resonance for fluorescence excitation causes enhanced near fields at the structure surface, resulting in increased signal from fluorophores within 100 nm of the device surface. Label-free detection is performed by illuminating the photonic crystal with white light and monitoring shifts in the peak reflected wavelength of the infrared resonance with a high-resolution imaging detection instrument. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis was used to determine optimal dimensions for the photonic crystal structure, and devices were fabricated using a polymer-based nanoreplica molding approach. Fluorescence-based and label-free detection were demonstrated using arrays of spots of dye-conjugated streptavidin. Quantification of the fluorescent signal showed that the fluorescence output from protein spots on the photonic crystal was increased by up to a factor of 35, and deposited spots were also imaged in the label-free detection mode.

  12. Synthesis of a Fluorescently Labeled (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC Analog for Somatostatin Receptor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukhen C; Hernandez Vargas, Servando; Rodriguez, Melissa; Kossatz, Susanne; Voss, Julie; Carmon, Kendra S; Reiner, Thomas; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Azhdarinia, Ali

    2017-07-13

    Fluorescently labeled imaging agents can identify surgical margins in real-time to help achieve complete resections and minimize the likelihood of local recurrence. However, photon attenuation limits fluorescence-based imaging to superficial lesions or lesions that are a few millimeters beneath the tissue surface. Contrast agents that are dual-labeled with a radionuclide and fluorescent dye can overcome this limitation and combine quantitative, whole-body nuclear imaging with intraoperative fluorescence imaging. Using a multimodality chelation (MMC) scaffold, IRDye 800CW was conjugated to the clinically used somatostatin analog, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC, to produce the dual-labeled analog, (68)Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, with high yield and specific activity. In vitro pharmacological assays demonstrated retention of receptor-targeting properties for the dual-labeled compound with robust internalization that was somatostatin receptor (SSTR) 2-mediated. Biodistribution studies in mice identified the kidneys as the primary excretion route for (68)Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, along with clearance via the reticuloendothelial system. Higher uptake was observed in most tissues compared to (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC but decreased as a function of time. The combination of excellent specificity for SSTR2-expressing cells and suitable biodistribution indicate potential application of (68)Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC for intraoperative detection of SSTR2-expressing tumors.

  13. Site-specific fluorescent labeling to visualize membrane translocation of a myristoyl switch protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Lim, Sung In; Kiessling, Volker; Kwon, Inchan; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence approaches have been widely used for elucidating the dynamics of protein-membrane interactions in cells and model systems. However, non-specific multi-site fluorescent labeling often results in a loss of native structure and function, and single cysteine labeling is not feasible when native cysteines are required to support a protein’s folding or catalytic activity. Here, we develop a method using genetic incorporation of non-natural amino acids and bio-orthogonal chemistry to site-specifically label with a single fluorescent small molecule or protein the myristoyl-switch protein recoverin, which is involved in rhodopsin-mediated signaling in mammalian visual sensory neurons. We demonstrate reversible Ca2+-responsive translocation of labeled recoverin to membranes and show that recoverin favors membranes with negative curvature and high lipid fluidity in complex heterogeneous membranes, which confers spatio-temporal control over down-stream signaling events. The site-specific orthogonal labeling technique is promising for structural, dynamical, and functional studies of many lipid-anchored membrane protein switches. PMID:27605302

  14. In vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Muscle Cell Regeneration by Transplanted EGFP-labeled Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyin; Yang, Zhong; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Yaming

    2010-01-01

    In vivo fluorescence imaging (FLI) enables monitoring fluorescent protein (FP)-labeled cells and proteins in living organisms noninvasively. Here, we examined whether this modality could reach a sufficient sensitivity to allow evaluation of the regeneration process of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labeled muscle precursors (myoblasts). Using a basic FLI station, we were able to detect clear fluorescence signals generated by 40,000 labeled cells injected into a tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of mouse. We observed that the signal declined to ~25% on the 48 hours of cell injection followed by a recovery starting at the second day and reached a peak of ~45% of the original signal by the 7th day, suggesting that the survived population underwent a limited run of proliferation before differentiation. To assess whether transplanted myoblasts could form satellite cells, we injured the transplanted muscles repeatedly with cardiotoxin. We observed a recovery of fluorescence signal following a disappearance of the signal after each cardiotoxin injection. Histology results showed donor-derived cells located underneath basal membrane and expressing Pax7, confirming that the regeneration observed by imaging was indeed mediated by donor-derived satellite cells. Our results show that FLI is a powerful tool that can extend our ability to unveil complicated biological processes such as stem cell-mediated regeneration. PMID:20125125

  15. Fluorescent probes for selective protein labeling in lysosomes: a case of α-galactosidase A.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Cornelius; Pomorski, Adam; Seemann, Susanne; Knospe, Anne-Marie; Zheng, Chaonan; Krężel, Artur; Rolfs, Arndt; Lukas, Jan

    2017-08-15

    Fluorescence-based live-cell imaging (LCI) of lysosomal glycosidases is often hampered by unfavorable pH and redox conditions that reduce fluorescence output. Moreover, most lysosomal glycosidases are low-mass soluble proteins that do not allow for bulky fluorescent protein fusions. We selected α-galactosidase A (GALA) as a model lysosomal glycosidase involved in Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) for the current LCI approach. Examination of the subcellular localization of AFD-causing mutants can reveal the mechanism underlying cellular trafficking deficits. To minimize genetic GALA modification, we employed a biarsenical labeling protocol with tetracysteine (TC-tag) detection. We tested the efficiency of halogen substituted biarsenical probes to interact with C-terminally TC-tagged GALA peptide at pH 4.5 in vitro and identified F2FlAsH-EDT2 as a superior detection reagent for GALA. This probe provides improved signal/noise ratio in labeled COS-7 cells transiently expressing TC-tagged GALA. The investigated fluorescence-based LCI technology of TC-tagged lysosomal protein using an improved biarsenical probe can be used to identify novel compounds that promote proper trafficking of mutant GALA to lysosomal compartments and rescue the mutant phenotype.-Bohl, C., Pomorski, A., Seemann, S., Knospe, A.-M., Zheng, C., Krężel, A., Rolfs, A., Lukas, J. Fluorescent probes for selective protein labeling in lysosomes: a case of α-galactosidase A. © FASEB.

  16. Green fluorescent protein labeling of food pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gensberger, Eva Theres; Kostić, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Labeling of bacteria with marker genes, such as green fluorescent protein, is a useful and practicable tool for tracking and enumerating bacterial cells in a complex environment e.g. discrimination from the indigenous background population. In this study, novel TurboGFP prokaryotic expression vector was utilized for labeling of Yersinia species. Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A, biovar 2, biovar 4 and Y. pseudotuberculosis were successfully transformed with the vector and expressed bright green fluorescence that was even detectable visually by eye. No adverse effects were observed in growth behavior of the labeled strains compared to wild type (parental) strains and vector maintenance for longer time periods could be achieved for Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A, Y. enterocolitica biovar 2 and Y. pseudotuberculosis.

  17. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sotoma, Shingo; Iimura, Jun; Igarashi, Ryuji; Hirosawa, Koichiro M.; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface. PMID:28335184

  18. Contractile basis of ameboid movement. VII. The distribution of fluorescently labeled actin in living amebas

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The technique of molecular cytochemistry has been used to follow the distribution of fluorescently labeled actin in living Chaos carolinensis and Amoeba proteus during ameboid movement and various cellular processes. The distribution of 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein- labeled actin was compared with that of Lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl chloride-labeled ovalbumin microinjected into the same cell and recorded with an image intensification microscope system. Actively motile cells demonstrated a rather uniform distribution of actin throughout most of the cytoplasm, except in the tail ectoplasm and in plasma gel sheets, where distinct actin structures were observed. In addition, actin-containing structures were induced in the cortex during wound healing, concanavalin A capping, pinocytosis, and contractions elicited by phalloidin injections. The formation of distinct fluorescent actin structures has been correlated with contractile activities. PMID:6893200

  19. Direct labeling of serum proteins by fluorescent dye for antibody microarray.

    PubMed

    Klimushina, M V; Gumanova, N G; Metelskaya, V A

    2017-05-06

    Analysis of serum proteome by antibody microarray is used to identify novel biomarkers and to study signaling pathways including protein phosphorylation and protein-protein interactions. Labeling of serum proteins is important for optimal performance of the antibody microarray. Proper choice of fluorescent label and optimal concentration of protein loaded on the microarray ensure good quality of imaging that can be reliably scanned and processed by the software. We have optimized direct serum protein labeling using fluorescent dye Arrayit Green 540 (Arrayit Corporation, USA) for antibody microarray. Optimized procedure produces high quality images that can be readily scanned and used for statistical analysis of protein composition of the serum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation of Fluorescent Microcystin Derivatives by Direct Arginine Labelling and Their Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grundler, Verena; Faltermann, Susanne; Fent, Karl; Gademann, Karl

    2015-07-27

    Microcystin is the most prevalent toxin produced by cyanobacteria and poses a severe threat to livestock, humans and entire ecosystems. We report the preparation of a series of fluorescent microcystin derivatives by direct arginine labelling of the unprotected peptides at the guanidinium side chain. This new method allows a simple late-stage diversification strategy for native peptides devoid of protecting groups under mild conditions. A series of fluorophores were conjugated to microcystin-LR in good to very good yield. The fluorescent probes displayed biological activity comparable to that of unlabelled microcystin, in both phosphatase inhibition assays and toxicity tests on the crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus. In addition, we demonstrate that the fluorescent probes penetrated Huh7 cells. Whole-animal imaging was performed on T. platyurus: labelled compound was mainly observed in the digestive tract.

  1. Aptamer fluorescence anisotropy sensors for adenosine triphosphate by comprehensive screening tetramethylrhodamine labeled nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Lv, Qin; Wang, Hailin

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported a fluorescence anisotropy (FA) approach for small molecules using tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) labeled aptamer. It relies on target-binding induced change of intramolecular interaction between TMR and guanine (G) base. TMR-labeling sites are crucial for this approach. Only terminal ends and thymine (T) bases could be tested for TMR labeling in our previous work, possibly causing limitation in analysis of different targets with this FA strategy. Here, taking the analysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as an example, we demonstrated a success of conjugating TMR on other bases of aptamer adenine (A) or cytosine (C) bases and an achievement of full mapping various labeling sites of aptamers. We successfully constructed aptamer fluorescence anisotropy (FA) sensors for adenosine triphosphate (ATP). We conjugated single TMR on adenine (A), cytosine (C), or thymine (T) bases or terminals of a 25-mer aptamer against ATP and tested FA responses of 14 TMR-labeled aptamer to ATP. The aptamers having TMR labeled on the 16th base C or 23rd base A were screened out and exhibited significant FA-decreasing or FA-increasing responses upon ATP, respectively. These two favorable TMR-labeled aptamers enabled direct FA sensing ATP with a detection limit of 1 µM and the analysis of ATP in diluted serum. The comprehensive screening various TMR labeling sites of aptamers facilitates the successful construction of FA sensors using TMR-labeled aptamers. It will expand application of TMR-G interaction based aptamer FA strategy to a variety of targets.

  2. Distribution of fluorescently labeled tubulin injected into sand dollar eggs from fertilization through cleavage

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Porcine brain tubulin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was able to polymerize by itself and co-polymerize with tubulin purified from starfish sperm flagella. When we injected the FITC- labeled tubulin into unfertilized eggs of the sand dollar, Clypeaster japonicus, and the eggs were then fertilized, the labeled tubulin was incorporated into the sperm aster. When injected into fertilized eggs at streak stage, the tubulin was quickly incorporated into each central region of growing asters. It was clearly visualized that the labeled tubulin, upon reaching metaphase, accumulated in the mitotic apparatus and later disappeared over the cytoplasm during interphase. The accumulation of the fluorescence in the mitotic apparatus was observed repeatedly at successive cleavage. After lysis of the fertilized eggs with a microtubule-stabilizing solution, fluorescent fibrous structures around the nucleus and those of the sperm aster and the mitotic apparatus were preserved and coincided with the fibrous structures observed by polarization and differential interference microscopy. We found the FITC-labeled tubulin to be incorporated into the entire mitotic apparatus within 20-30 s when injected into the eggs at metaphase or anaphase. This rapid incorporation of the labeled tubulin into the mitotic apparatus suggests that the equilibrium between mitotic microtubules and tubulin is attained very rapidly in the living eggs. Axonemal tubulin purified from starfish sperm flagella and labeled with FITC was also incorporated into microtubular structures in the same fashion as the FITC-labeled brain tubulin. These results suggest that even FITC-labeled heterogeneous tubulins undergo spatial and stage-specific regulation of assembly-disassembly in the same manner as does sand dollar egg tubulin. PMID:3920225

  3. A simple fluorescence labeling method for studies of protein oxidation, protein modification, and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Andrew M; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2012-01-15

    Proteins are sensitive to oxidation, and oxidized proteins are excellent substrates for degradation by proteolytic enzymes such as the proteasome and the mitochondrial Lon protease. Protein labeling is required for studies of protein turnover. Unfortunately, most labeling techniques involve (3)H or (14)C methylation, which is expensive, exposes researchers to radioactivity, generates large amounts of radioactive waste, and allows only single-point assays because samples require acid precipitation. Alternative labeling methods have largely proven unsuitable, either because the probe itself is modified by the oxidant(s) being studied or because the alternative labeling techniques are too complex or too costly for routine use. What is needed is a simple, quick, and cheap labeling technique that uses a non-radioactive marker, binds strongly to proteins, is resistant to oxidative modification, and emits a strong signal. We have devised a new reductive method for labeling free carboxyl groups of proteins with the small fluorophore 7-amino-4-methycoumarin (AMC). When bound to target proteins, AMC fluoresces very weakly but when AMC is released by proteinases, proteases, or peptidases, it fluoresces strongly. Thus, without acid precipitation, the proteolysis of any target protein can be studied continuously, in multiwell plates. In direct comparisons, (3)H-labeled proteins and AMC-labeled proteins exhibited essentially identical degradation patterns during incubation with trypsin, cell extracts, and purified proteasome. AMC-labeled proteins are well suited to studying increased proteolytic susceptibility after protein modification, because the AMC-protein bond is resistant to oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite and is stable over time and to extremes of pH, temperature (even boiling), freeze-thaw, mercaptoethanol, and methanol. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. tRNA fluorescent labeling at 3' end inducing an aminoacyl-tRNA-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Quagliuolo, L; Iorio, E L; Giovane, A

    1993-04-01

    A fluorescent tRNA derivative labeled at 3'-O position of the ultimate adenosine residue by reaction, under mild conditions, of tRNA with isatoic anhydride [3,1-benzoxazine-2,4(1H)-dione] was obtained. The labeling selectivity was determined by several criteria: digestion with RNase, followed by HPLC of the digest, produces only one labeled nucleoside, identified as 3'-O-anthraniloyladenosine; the ratio of the absorbance at 260 nm to 332 nm also suggests a 1:1 molar ratio between the nucleic acid and the fluorophore; finally, the incapacity of the labeled tRNA to be charged by the specific aminoacyltransferase further demonstrates the engagement of the 3'-O position. Although the 3'-O-anthraniloyl-labeled tRNA does not seem to be functionally active, as far as the aminoacyl charging activity is concerned, surprisingly we found that it is able to form the ternary complex with elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and GTP with an affinity consistently higher than uncharged tRNA. From fluorescence anisotropy measurements the ternary complex dissociation constant was estimated as 73 nM for Escherichia coli and 140 nM for yeast anthraniloyl-tRNA(Phe). These results may be interpreted in terms of the particular structure of the anthraniloyl group that makes the labeled tRNA similar to an aminoacyl-tRNA.

  5. Label-free fluorescent aptasensor for potassium ion using structure-switching aptamers and berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanqing; Chen, Yanxia; Wei, Yanli; Li, Huanhuan; Dong, Chuan

    2015-02-01

    A simple, rapid and label-free fluorescent aptasensor was fabricated for the detection of potassium ion (K+ ion) in aqueous solution using K+ ion-stabilized single stranded DNA (ssDNA) with G-rich sequence as the recognition element and a fluorescent dye, berberine, as the fluorescence probe. In the presence of K+ ion, the G-rich ssDNA is promoted to form the aptamer-target complex with a G-quadruplex conformation, and berberine binding to the G-quadruplex structure results in the enhancement of its fluorescence. The fluorescence intensity of the sensing system displayed a calibration response for K+ ion in the range of 0-1600 μM with a detection limit of 31 nM (S/N = 3) and a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.45%. This label-free fluorescence aptasensor is conveniently and effectively applicable for analysis of K+ ion in blood serum samples with the recovery range of 81.7-105.3%. The assay for detection of potassium ion is easy, economical, robust, and stable in rough conditions.

  6. Tracking SVOCs' Transfer from Products to Indoor Air and Settled Dust with Deuterium-Labeled Substances.

    PubMed

    Sukiene, Vilma; Gerecke, Andreas C; Park, Yu-Mi; Zennegg, Markus; Bakker, Martine I; Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Hungerbühler, Konrad; von Goetz, Natalie

    2016-04-19

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be released from products and distributed in the indoor environment, including air and dust. However, the mechanisms and the extent of substance transfer into air and dust are not well understood. Therefore, in a small-scale field study the transfer of nine SVOCs was investigated: Four artificial consumer products were doped with eight deuterium-labeled plasticizers (phthalates and adipates) and installed in five homes to investigate the emission processes of evaporation, abrasion, and direct transfer. Intentional release was studied with a commercial spray containing a pyrethroid. During the 12 week study, indoor air and settled dust samples were collected and analyzed. On the basis of our measurement results, we conclude that the octanol-air partitioning coefficient Koa is a major determinant for the substance transfer into either air or dust: A high Koa implies that the substance is more likely to be found in dust than in air. The emission process also plays a role: For spraying, we found higher dust and air concentrations than for evaporation. In contrast, apartment parameters like air exchange rate or temperature had just a minor influence. Another important mechanistic finding was that although transfer from product to dust currently is postulated to be mostly mediated by air, direct transport from product to dust on the product surface was also observed.

  7. Development of Quantum Dots-Labeled Antibody Fluorescence Immunoassays for the Detection of Morphine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Han, Yufeng; Lin, Li; Deng, Nannan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Yuan

    2017-02-15

    Quantum dots (QDs)-labeled antibody fluorescence immunoassays (FLISA) for the detection of morphine were developed. Quantum dots (CdSe/ZnS), which contained carboxyl, were used to label antimorphine antibody by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminoprophyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide, which were used as coupling reagents. The CdSe/ZnS QDs labeled antimorphine antibody (QDs labeled Ab) was characterized by fluorescence spectrum and gel electrophoresis. Plate-based FLISA and nitrocellulose membrane-based flow-through FLISA were developed and applied to quantitative and qualitative detection of morphine. Under the optimal conditions for plate-based FLISA, the linear range spanned from 3.2 × 10(-4) to 1 mg/L (R(2) = 0.9905), and the detection limit was 2.7 × 10(-4) mg/L. The visual detection limit for morphine by membrane-based flow-through FLISA was 0.01 mg/L. These results demonstrated that the developed fluorescence immunoassays could be applied as highly sensitive and convenient tools for rapid detection of morphine, which make it ideally suited for on-site screening of poppy shell added illegally in hot pot soup base.

  8. Characterization and quantification of humic substances 2D-Fluorescence by usage of extended size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Schmidt, Wido; Imhof, Lutz; Grübel, Anika; Jähn, Camilla; Georgi, Denise; Petzoldt, Heike

    2016-04-15

    In this article, two methods for in-depth analysis of humic substances fluorescence are presented. The first one allows the combined analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) with chromatography technique. The main issue is the coupling of size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with spectroscopy by the use of an absorption and a fluorescence spectrometer as additional detectors. These allow a detailed characterization of humic substances depending on their molecular size, concentration and optical properties. For the evaluation of the resulting complex data, a model based on non-negative matrix factorization, which is also presented in this article, was developed. From the results of the examined humic substances standards, the second method was developed. It allows the characterization and quantification of humic substances fluorescence of a natural water sample solely on the basis of an excitation-emission matrix. The validation of the model is carried out within the framework of extensive analysis of real water samples.

  9. Use of quantum dots as mass and fluorescence labels in microarray biosensing.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Chiara; Plavisch, Lauren; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-15

    In this work, we demonstrate the efficacy of a Quantum Dot (QD) mass label strategy to enhance sensitivity in an interferometric technique called interferometric reflectance imaging sensor (IRIS). This biomass detection platform confers the advantage of absolute mass quantification and lower cost, easily implementable equipment. We discuss the advantages of this label when used in parallel with fluorescence detection. QDs represent a unique opportunity to improve sensitivity in both mass-label detection methods due to their large detectable mass, as well as in fluorescence detection, as they fluoresce without quenching. Streptavidin-conjugated QDs (SA-QDs) have been investigated as such a dual-role probe because of their large shape and mass, their 655nm emission peak for fluorescent detection platforms, and their robust insensitivity to photobleaching and quenching. In particular we explored their dual role in a microarrays immunoassay designed to detect antibodies against β-lactoglobulin, a common milk allergen. The SA-QDs formed a large detectable monolayer of 6.2ng/mm(2) in the saturation conditions, a mass signal corroborated by previous studies by Platt et al..

  10. Interactive fluorophore and quencher pairs for labeling fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E

    2008-03-01

    The use of fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes that generate a fluorescence signal only when they bind to their target enables real-time monitoring of nucleic acid amplification assays. Real-time nucleic acid amplification assays markedly improves the ability to obtain qualitative and quantitative results. Furthermore, these assays can be carried out in sealed tubes, eliminating carryover contamination. Fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes are available in a wide range of different fluorophore and quencher pairs. Multiple hybridization probes, each designed for the detection of a different nucleic acid sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, can be added to the same nucleic acid amplification reaction, enabling the development of high-throughput multiplex assays. In order to develop robust, highly sensitive and specific real-time nucleic acid amplification assays it is important to carefully select the fluorophore and quencher labels of hybridization probes. Selection criteria are based on the type of hybridization probe used in the assay, the number of targets to be detected, and the type of apparatus available to perform the assay. This article provides an overview of different aspects of choosing appropriate labels for the different types of fluorescent hybridization probes used with different types of spectrofluorometric thermal cyclers currently available.

  11. Application of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent labels for diagnosis of brain glial cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Patrícia M. A.; Santos, Beate S.; Menezes, Frederico D.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Oliveira, Fernando J. M., Jr.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Romão, Luciana; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Amaral, Jane C. O. F.; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    In this work we present the preparation, characterization and conjugation of colloidal core shell CdS-Cd(OH) II quantum dots to health and cancer glial rats living cells in culture media. The particles were obtained via colloidal synthesis in aqueous medium, with final pH=7.3-7.4. Laser Scan Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) and Fluorescence Microscopy were used to evaluate fluorescence intensities and patterns of health and cancer (glioblastoma) glial cells labeled with the quantum dots in different time intervals. Health and cancer glial cells clearly differ in their fluorescence intensities and patterns. These different fluorescence intensities and patterns may be associated to differences concerning cellular membrane and metabolic features of health and cancer cells. The results obtained indicate the potential of the methodology for fast and precise cancer diagnostics.

  12. A fast, low cost, and highly efficient fluorescent DNA labeling method using methyl green.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Daniel; Aparicio, Gonzalo; Morande, Pablo E; Zolessi, Flavio R

    2014-09-01

    The increasing need for multiple-labeling of cells and whole organisms for fluorescence microscopy has led to the development of hundreds of fluorophores that either directly recognize target molecules or organelles, or are attached to antibodies or other molecular probes. DNA labeling is essential to study nuclear-chromosomal structure, as well as for gel staining, but also as a usual counterstain in immunofluorescence, FISH or cytometry. However, there are currently few reliable red to far-red-emitting DNA stains that can be used. We describe herein an extremely simple, inexpensive and robust method for DNA labeling of cells and electrophoretic gels using the very well-known histological stain methyl green (MG). MG used in very low concentrations at physiological pH proved to have relatively narrow excitation and emission spectra, with peaks at 633 and 677 nm, respectively, and a very high resistance to photobleaching. It can be used in combination with other common DNA stains or antibodies without any visible interference or bleed-through. In electrophoretic gels, MG also labeled DNA in a similar way to ethidium bromide, but, as expected, it did not label RNA. Moreover, we show here that MG fluorescence can be used as a stain for direct measuring of viability by both microscopy and flow cytometry, with full correlation to ethidium bromide staining. MG is thus a very convenient alternative to currently used red-emitting DNA stains.

  13. DNA nicks and increased sensitivity of DNA to fluorescence in situ end labeling during functional spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Haaf, T

    1998-09-01

    Terminal transferase can be used to quantitate DNA strand breaks in situ by labeling free 3'-hydroxyl ends with exogenous nucleotides. Endogenous nicks in DNA temporally appear and disappear during functionally significant structural rearrangements of chromatin. Fluorescence in situ end labeling of mouse and rat testicular cells demonstrated that functional spermiogenesis is associated with abundant DNA nicks that occur in elongating spermatids, most likely as a result of nucleoprotein changes during terminal differentiation. Detectable DNA breaks were not observed in round spermatids and epididymal sperm.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorescent cap analogues for mRNA labelling

    PubMed Central

    Ziemniak, Marcin; Szabelski, Mariusz; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Nowicka, Anna; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Rhoads, Robert E.; Wieczorek, Zbigniew; Jemielity, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and properties of five dinucleotide fluorescent cap analogues labelled at the ribose of the 7-methylguanosine moiety with either anthraniloyl (Ant) or N-methylanthraniloyl (Mant), which have been designed for the preparation of fluorescent mRNAs via transcription in vitro. Two of the analogues bear a methylene modification in the triphosphate bridge, providing resistance against either the Dcp2 or DcpS decapping enzymes. All these compounds were prepared by ZnCl2-mediated coupling of a nucleotide P-imidazolide with a fluorescently labelled mononucleotide. To evaluate the utility of these compounds for studying interactions with cap-binding proteins and cap-related cellular processes, both biological and spectroscopic features of those compounds were determined. The results indicate acceptable quantum yields of fluorescence, pH independence, environmental sensitivity, and photostability. The cap analogues are incorporated by RNA polymerase into mRNA transcripts that are efficiently translated in vitro. Transcripts containing fluorescent caps but unmodified in the triphosphate chain are hydrolysed by Dcp2 whereas those containing a α-β methylene modification are resistant. Model studies exploiting sensitivity of Mant to changes of local environment demonstrated utility of the synthesized compounds for studying cap-related proteins. PMID:24273643

  15. Innovative fluorescent magnetic albumin microbead-assisted cell labeling and intracellular imaging of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Wei, Fang; Yan, Shuang; Zhang, Huiru; Tan, Xiaorong; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Guangzhou; Cui, Liuqing; Li, Cuixiang; Wang, Liang; Li, Yatao

    2014-04-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based polymer microbeads utilized as carriers are attractive materials widely applied in the biomedical field. However, the deficiency of toxicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability for polymer materials often limits the application of these microbeads. In the present study, magnetic albumin microbeads (MAMbs), i.e., human serum albumin-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, are synthesized to label human U251 glioblastoma multiforme cells. The effects of MAMbs on the biological behavior of U251 glioblastoma cells, including their proliferation, cell viability, cytoskeletal structure, cell cycle, and apoptosis rate, are investigated. Moreover, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-MAMbs are fabricated by reaction with fluorescent dye FITC used for intracellular imaging of U251 glioblastoma cells. MAMbs possess undetectable cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility with U251 glioblastoma cells, as demonstrated by the biological behavior and morphology of U251 cells exposed to MAMbs. Furthermore, the constructed fluorescent MAMbs allow effective intracellular imaging, as illustrated by fluorescence microscopic analysis. The fabricated fluorescent MAMbs have promising perspectives in biomedical research, especially in cell-targeted labeling and intracellular fluorescence magnetic dual-mode imaging in cancer-targeted diagnosis and therapy. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Fluorescently labeled substrates for monitoring α1,3-fucosyltransferase IX activity.

    PubMed

    Lunau, Nathalie; Seelhorst, Katrin; Kahl, Stefanie; Tscherch, Kathrin; Stacke, Christina; Rohn, Sascha; Thiem, Joachim; Hahn, Ulrich; Meier, Chris

    2013-12-16

    Fucosylation is often the final process in glycan biosynthesis. The resulting glycans are involved in a variety of biological processes, such as cell adhesion, inflammation, or tumor metastasis. Fucosyltransferases catalyze the transfer of fucose residues from the activated donor molecule GDP-β-L-fucose to various acceptor molecules. However, detailed information about the reaction processes is still lacking for most fucosyltransferases. In this work we have monitored α1,3-fucosyltransferase activity. For both donor and acceptor substrates, the introduction of a fluorescent ATTO dye was the last step in the synthesis. The subsequent conversion of these substrates into fluorescently labeled products by α1,3-fucosyltransferases was examined by high-performance thin-layer chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry as well as dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy, which revealed that both fluorescently labeled donor GDP-β-L-fucose-ATTO 550 and acceptor N-acetyllactosamine-ATTO 647N were accepted by recombinant human fucosyltransferase IX and Helicobacter pylori α1,3-fucosyltransferase, respectively. Analysis by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy allowed a quick and versatile estimation of the progress of the enzymatic reaction and therefore this method can be used as an alternative method for investigating fucosyltransferase reactions.

  17. On chip preconcentration and fluorescence labeling of model proteins using monolithic columns: device fabrication, optimization, and automation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Pagaduan, Jayson V.; Yu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are developed with monolithic columns for preconcentration and on-chip labeling of model proteins. Monoliths are prepared in microchannels via photopolymerization, and the properties of monoliths are optimized by varying the composition and concentration of monomers to improve flow and extraction. On-chip labeling of proteins is achieved by driving solutions through the monolith using voltage and incubating fluorescent dye with protein retained in the monolith. Subsequently, the labeled proteins are eluted by applying voltages to reservoirs on the microdevice and then detected by laser-induced fluorescence. Monoliths prepared from octyl methacrylate show the best combination of protein retention while still allowing unattached fluorescent label to be eluted in a separate fraction with 50% acetonitrile. Finally, automated on-chip extraction and fluorescence labeling of a model protein is successfully demonstrated. This work provides facile sample pretreatment, and therefore offers promising potential for future integrated bioanalysis microchips. PMID:25012353

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic properties, and biological applications of eight novel chlorinated fluorescent proteins-labeling probes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianglong; Tian, Min; Fan, Wutu; Pan, Yalei; Zhai, Yuankun; Niu, Yinbo; Li, Chenrui; Lu, Tingli; Mei, Qibing

    2014-05-01

    Eight novel chlorinated fluorescent proteins-labeling probes with a linker and reactive group were prepared in 7 steps by the reaction of chlorinated resorcinols with 3, 6-dichloro-4-carboxyphthalic anhydride in the presence of methanesulfonic acid. Structures of target compounds and intermediates were determined via IR, MS, (1)H NMR and element analysis. The spectral properties of the chlorinated fluoresceins were studied. These fluorescent probes showed absorbance peaks at 508-536 nm and fluorescence peaks at 524-550 nm. It was found that they have absorption and emission maxima at long wavelengths and high fluorescence quantum yields. Emission spectra of chlorinated fluoresceins shifted towards long wavelength with increase in chlorine. The probes were used for fluorescence imaging of cells in order to investigate whether they can conjugate to cells. The fluorescence imaging of living cells showed that they were localized in cell nucleus. However, they were localized in cytosol of chemically fixed cells. These probes will be useful reagents for the preparation of stable fluorescent conjugates.

  19. Label free selective detection of estriol using graphene oxide-based fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, H. S.; Sao, Reshma; Vaish, Rahul

    2014-07-01

    Water-soluble and fluorescent Graphene oxide (GO) is biocompatible, easy, and economical to synthesize. Interestingly, GO is also capable of quenching fluorescence. On the basis of its fluorescence and quenching abilities, GO has been reported to serve as an energy acceptor in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor. GO-based FRET biosensors have been widely reported for sensing of proteins, nucleic acid, ATP (Adenosine triphosphate), etc. GO complexes with fluorescent dyes and enzymes have been used to sense metal ions. Graphene derivatives have been used for sensing endocrine-disrupting chemicals like bisphenols and chlorophenols with high sensitivity and good reproducibility. On this basis, a novel GO based fluorescent sensor has been successfully designed to detect estriol with remarkable selectivity and sensitivity. Estriol is one of the three estrogens in women and is considered to be medically important. Estriol content of maternal urine or plasma acts as an important screening marker for estimating foetal growth and development. In addition, estriol is also used as diagnostic marker for diseases like breast cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance, lupus erythematosus, endometriosis, etc. In this present study, we report for the first time a rapid, sensitive with detection limit of 1.3 nM, selective and highly biocompatible method for label free detection of estriol under physiological conditions using fluorescence assay.

  20. Interference of low-molecular substances with the thioflavin-T fluorescence assay of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Noormägi, Andra; Primar, Kateryna; Tõugu, Vello; Palumaa, Peep

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal fibrillization of amyloidogenic peptides/proteins has been linked to various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease as well as with type-II diabetes mellitus. The kinetics of protein fibrillization is commonly studied by using a fluorescent dye Thioflavin T (ThT) that binds to protein fibrils and exerts increased fluorescence intensity in bound state. Recently, it has been demonstrated that several low-molecular weight compounds like Basic Blue 41, Basic Blue 12, Azure C, and Tannic acid interfere with the fluorescence of ThT bound to Alzheimers' amyloid-β fibrils and cause false positive results during the screening of fibrillization inhibitors. In the current study, we demonstrated that the same selected substances also decrease the fluorescence signal of ThT bound to insulin fibrils already at submicromolar or micromolar concentrations. Kinetic experiments show that unlike to true inhibitors, these compounds did neither decrease the fibrillization rate nor increase the lag-period. Absence of soluble insulin in the end of the experiment confirmed that these compounds do not disaggregate the insulin fibrils and, thus, are not fibrillization inhibitors at concentrations studied. Our results show that interference with ThT test is a general phenomenon and more attention has to be paid to interpretation of kinetic results of protein fibrillization obtained by using fluorescent dyes.

  1. Effects of aluminum-induced aggregation on the fluorescence of humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpless, C.M.; McGown, L.B.

    1999-09-15

    Aluminum-induced aggregates of terrestrial and aquatic humic acid standards from the International Humic Substances Society are shown to be fluorescent by means of a multiwavelength fluorescence anisotropy experiment in which the data were treated with a model for nonspherical particles. While aggregates of aquatic humic acids appear in the fluorescence signal at both short and long excitation wavelengths, aggregates of terrestrial humic acids are detected only at the long Wavelength. Furthermore, the results indicate that emission obtained at longer excitation wavelengths is representative of smaller particles. At pH 4, the aquatic humic acids appear to exist in an extended conformation, whereas the terrestrial humic acids show less extension. The size and shape of the fluorescent particles display a complex dependence on Al concentration. Both enhancement and quenching of fluorescence are observed in the total luminescence spectra upon Al addition. However, quenching is shown to be the result of decreased humic acid concentration due to precipitation by Al rather than photophysical processes.

  2. The use of 3-aminophthalimide as a pro-chemiluminescent label in chemiluminescence and fluorescence-based cellular assays.

    PubMed

    Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Wilden, Jonathan; Mani, Ali-Reza; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey J F; Damelin, Leonard H

    2009-02-01

    We present a labeling system for direct chemiluminescence-based cellular bioassays using the stable pro-chemiluminescent, luminol precursor, 3-aminophthalimide (API). API-coupled reporter molecules are detected chemiluminometrically after treatment with hydrazine, which converts the API label to luminol. API derivatives containing a variety of functional groups are readily synthesized, allowing for ease of coupling via the imide nitrogen to a host of reporter molecules. The fluorescent nature of APIs further allows for dual fluorescence and chemiluminescence studies. To highlight the utility of this label, we show that API-labeled insulin can be successfully utilized in cellular binding and transport assays and that an API-coupled mitochondrial probe (API-triphenylphosphonium(+)) can be used to both fluorescently and chemiluminometrically investigate mitochondrial function. We also assess the use of API as a polysaccharide and nucleic acid label, and we show that API-labeled palmitic acid undergoes cellular transport and lipid metabolism.

  3. Dynamic labelling of neural connections in multiple colours by trans-synaptic fluorescence complementation

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, Lindsey J.; Zaharieva, Emanuela E.; Kearney, Patrick J.; Alpert, Michael H.; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Turan, Zeynep; Lee, Chi-Hon; Gallio, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Determining the pattern of activity of individual connections within a neural circuit could provide insights into the computational processes that underlie brain function. Here, we develop new strategies to label active synapses by trans-synaptic fluorescence complementation in Drosophila. First, we demonstrate that a synaptobrevin-GRASP chimera functions as a powerful activity-dependent marker for synapses in vivo. Next, we create cyan and yellow variants, achieving activity-dependent, multi-colour fluorescence reconstitution across synapses (X-RASP). Our system allows for the first time retrospective labelling of synapses (rather than whole neurons) based on their activity, in multiple colours, in the same animal. As individual synapses often act as computational units in the brain, our method will promote the design of experiments that are not possible using existing techniques. Moreover, our strategies are easily adaptable to circuit mapping in any genetic system. PMID:26635273

  4. Site-specific Fluorescent Labeling of Poly-histidine Sequences Using a Metal-chelating Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Beena; Szymanska, Aneta; Gierasch, Lila M.

    2010-01-01

    Coupling genetically encoded target sequences with specific and selective labeling strategies has made it possible to utilize fluorescence spectroscopy in complex mixtures to investigate the structure, function, and dynamics of proteins. Thus, there is a growing need for a repertoire of such labeling approaches to deploy based on a given application and to utilize in combination with one another by orthogonal reactivity. We have developed a simple approach to synthesize a fluorescent probe that binds to a poly-histidine sequence. The amino group of cysteine was converted into nitrilotriacetate to create a metal-chelating cysteine molecule, Cys-nitrilotriacetate. Two Cys-nitrilotriacetate molecules were then cross-linked using dibromobimane to generate a fluorophore capable of binding a His-tag on a protein, NTA2-BM. NTA2-BM is a potential fluorophore for selective tagging of proteins in vivo. PMID:17313455

  5. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for quality assessment of humic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, Patrycja

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were partly carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545. Fluorescence spectroscopy belongs to modern, non-destructive, rapid and relatively cheap methods, as well as for many years it was successfully used in studies of organic compounds in the fields of medicine, biology and chemistry. On the other hand, soil organic matter is a group of compounds with a complex spatial structure showing a large number of groups with different kinds of fluorophores. This could suggest the possibility of application of fluorescence spectroscopy in assessing the quality of humic substances as well as in monitoring of their chemical transformations. The aim of study was chemical description of humic and fulvic acids based on fluorescence spectra, as well as an attempt of evaluation of changes occurring under the influence of different pH and during interactions with various concentrations of metal. The humic and fulvic acids were isolated from chemically different soils. The measurements were carried out on Hitachi fluorescence spectrometer in solutions with a concentration of humic acids 40mg dm-3, at pH from 3 to 7, and for the evaluation of the metal impact: with increasing Zn concentrations (0-50mg dm-3). The fluorescence spectra were recorded in the form of synchronous and emission-excitation matrices (EEM). Studies have shown the presence of different groups of fluorophores. Synchronous spectra were characterized by a well-separated bands showing fluorescence in the area of low, medium and high wavelengths, suggesting the presence of structures, both weakly and strongly humified. EEM spectra revealed map of fluorophores within wide ranges of emission and excitation. Fluorophores differed in both position and intensity. The highest intensity was observed for compounds with the lowest humification degree which might be due to high amount

  7. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  8. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  9. Dual labeling of lipopolysaccharides for SPECT-CT imaging and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duheron, Vincent; Moreau, Mathieu; Collin, Bertrand; Sali, Wahib; Bernhard, Claire; Goze, Christine; Gautier, Thomas; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Deckert, Valérie; Brunotte, François; Lagrost, Laurent; Denat, Franck

    2014-03-21

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or endotoxins are amphipathic, pro-inflammatory components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In the host, LPS can trigger a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. To bring insight into in vivo tissue distribution and cellular uptake of LPS, dual labeling was performed with a bimodal molecular probe designed for fluorescence and nuclear imaging. LPS were labeled with DOTA-Bodipy-NCS, and pro-inflammatory properties were controlled after each labeling step. LPS were then radiolabeled with (111)In and subsequently injected intravenously into wild-type, C57B16 mice, and their in vivo behavior was followed by single photon emission computed tomography coupled with X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and fluorescence microscopy. Time course of liver uptake of radiolabeled LPS ((111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS) was visualized over a 24-h period in the whole animal by SPECT-CT. In complementary histological analyses with fluorescent microscopy, the bulk of injected (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to localize early within the liver. Serum kinetics of unlabeled and DOTA-Bodipy-labeled LPS in mouse plasma were similar as ascertained by direct quantitation of β-hydroxymyristate, and DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to retain the potent, pro-inflammatory property of the unlabeled molecule as assessed by serum cytokine assays. It is concluded that the dual labeling process, involving the formation of covalent bonds between a DOTA-Bodipy-NCS probe and LPS molecules is relevant for imaging and kinetic analysis of LPS biodistribution, both in vivo and ex vivo. Data of the present study come in direct and visual support of a lipopolysaccharide transport through which pro-inflammatory LPS can be transported from the periphery to the liver for detoxification. The (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS probe arises here as a relevant tool to identify key components of LPS detoxification in vivo.

  10. Fluorescently labelled multiplex lateral flow immunoassay based on cadmium-free quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, Natalia V; Sobolev, Aleksander M; Tessier, Mickael D; Hens, Zeger; Goryacheva, Irina Yu; De Saeger, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    A sensitive tool for simultaneous qualitative detection of two mycotoxins based on use of non-cadmium quantum dots (QDs) is presented for the first time. QDs have proven themselves as promising fluorescent labels for biolabeling and chemical analysis. With an increasing global tendency to regulate and limit the use of hazardous elements, indium phosphide (InP) QDs are highlighted as environmentally-friendly alternatives to the highly efficient and well-studied, but potentially toxic Cd- and Pb-based QDs. Here, we developed water-soluble InP QDs-based fluorescent nanostructures. They consisted of core/shell InP/ZnS QDs enrobed in a silica shell that allowed the water solubility (QD@SiO2). Then we applied the QD@SiO2 as novel, silica shell-encapsulated fluorescent labels in immunoassays for rapid multiplexed screening. Two mycotoxins, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, were simultaneously detected in maize and wheat, since the two QD@SiO2 labelled conjugates emit at two different, individually detectable wavelengths. The cutoff values for the simultaneous determination were 50 and 500μgkg(-1) for zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, respectively, in both maize and wheat. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to confirm the result.

  11. Binding effect of fluorescence labeled glycyrrhetinic acid with GA receptors in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Qi; Dai, Chun-Mei; Zheng, Yan; Shi, Shu-Dan; Hu, Hai-Yang; Chen, Da-Wei

    2017-11-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) is a natural active component from licorice, which is broadly used in traditional Chinese medicine. Lots of glycyrrhetinic acid receptors (GA-R) are proved to locate on the surface of liver cells. Many reports about the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment were dependent on GA modified carriers. However, the reality of GA-R in HCC cells was not clear. In this paper, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA) was labeled with fluorescence (FITC) by chemical synthesis. Together with the binding effect of fluorescence labeled glycyrrhetinic acid (FITC-GA), the competitive action of 18β-GA with GA-R was investigated in HCC cells. The results showed that in HepG2 cells, 18β-GA and FITC-GA presented similar cytotoxicity. The specific binding saturation of GA showed the dissociation constant (Kd) was 7.457±2.122pmol/L and the maximum binding counts (Bmax) was 2.385±0.175pmol/2.5×10(6) cells, respectively. FITC-GA bound to cytomembrane specifically and 18β-GA competed to bind the sites significantly in HepG2 cells. Therefore, there is binding effect between fluorescence labeled GA and GA-R. The GA-R on HCC cells is confirmed as expected, which provides a useful reference of active target modified by GA and a novel approach for receptors and ligands study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual labeling of a binding protein allows for specific fluorescence detection of native protein.

    PubMed

    Karlström, A; Nygren, P A

    2001-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer has been investigated in the context of specific detection of unlabeled proteins. A model system based on the staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-IgG interaction was designed, in which a single domain was engineered to facilitate site-specific incorporation of fluorophores. An Asn23Cys mutant of the B domain from SPA was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently labeled at the introduced unique thiol and at an amino group, using N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (1,5-IAEDANS) and succinimidyl 6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoate (NBD-X, SE), respectively. Biosensor analysis of purified doubly labeled protein showed that high-affinity binding to the Fc region of IgG was retained. The fluorescence emission spectrum of the doubly labeled protein showed a shift in the relative emission of the two fluorophores in the presence of Fc3(1) fragments, which bind specifically to the B domain. In addition, the fluorescence emission ratio 480/525 nm was shown to increase with increasing concentration of Fc3(1), whereas the presence of a control protein did not affect the emission ratio over the same concentration range.

  13. Conformational detection of prion protein with biarsenical labeling and FlAsH fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Bradley M.; Nisbet, Rebecca M.; Han, Sen; Cappai, Roberto; Hatters, Danny M.; Hill, Andrew F.

    2009-03-13

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) into a disease associated form (PrP{sup Sc}). Recombinant PrP can be refolded into either an {alpha}-helical rich conformation ({alpha}-PrP) resembling PrP{sup C} or a {beta}-sheet rich, protease resistant form similar to PrP{sup Sc}. Here, we generated tetracysteine tagged recombinant PrP, folded this into {alpha}- or {beta}-PrP and determined the levels of FlAsH fluorescence. Insertion of the tetracysteine tag at three different sites within the 91-111 epitope readily distinguished {beta}-PrP from {alpha}-PrP upon FlAsH labeling. Labelling of tetracysteine tagged PrP in the {alpha}-helical form showed minimal fluorescence, whereas labeling of tagged PrP in the {beta}-sheet form showed high fluorescence indicating that this region is exposed upon conversion. This highlights a region of PrP that can be implicated in the development of diagnostics and is a novel, protease free mechanism for distinguishing PrP{sup Sc} from PrP{sup C}. This technique may also be applied to any protein that undergoes conformational change and/or misfolding such as those involved in other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases.

  14. A Fluorescent, Reagentless Biosensor for ADP Based on Tetramethylrhodamine-Labeled ParM

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence assays for ADP detection are of considerable current interest, both in basic research and in drug discovery, as they provide a generic method for measuring the activity of ATPases and kinases. The development of a novel fluorescent biosensor is described that is based on a tetramethylrhodamine-labeled, bacterial actin homologue, ParM. The design of the biosensor takes advantage of the large conformational change of ParM on ADP binding and the strong quenching of the tetramethylrhodamine fluorescence by stacking of the dye. ParM was labeled with two tetramethylrhodamines in close proximity, whereby the fluorophores are able to interact with each other. ADP binding alters the distance and relative orientation of the tetramethylrhodamines, which leads to a change in this stacking interaction and so in the fluorescence intensity. The final ADP biosensor shows ∼15-fold fluorescence increase in response to ADP binding. It has relatively weak affinity for ADP (Kd = 30 μM), enabling it to be used at substoichiometric concentrations relative to ADP, while reporting ADP concentration changes in a wide range around the Kd value, namely, submicromolar to tens of micromolar. The biosensor strongly discriminates against ATP (>100-fold), allowing ADP detection against a background of millimolar ATP. At 20 °C, the labeled ParM binds ADP with a rate constant of 9.5 × 104 M−1 s−1 and the complex dissociates at 2.9 s−1. Thus, the biosensor is suitable for real-time measurements, and its performance in such assays is demonstrated using a sugar kinase and a mammalian protein kinase. PMID:20158267

  15. Fluorescent Photo-conversion: A second chance to label unique cells.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Adam J; Shinogle, Heather E; Moore, David S; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    Not all cells behave uniformly after treatment in tissue engineering studies. In fact, some treated cells display no signs of treatment or show unique characteristics not consistent with other treated cells. What if the "unique" cells could be isolated from a treated population, and further studied? Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2, allow for the ability to selectively identify unique cells with a secondary label within a primary labeled treated population. In the current study, select cells were identified and labeled through photo-conversion of Dendra2-transfected human Wharton's Jelly cells (hWJCs) for the first time. Robust photo-conversion of green-to-red fluorescence was achieved consistently in arbitrarily selected cells, allowing for precise cell identification of select hWJCs. The current study demonstrates a method that offers investigators the opportunity to selectively label and identify unique cells within a treated population for further study or isolation from the treatment population. Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2, offer the ability over non-photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, to analyze unique individual cells within a treated population, which allows investigators to gain more meaningful information on how a treatment affects all cells within a target population.

  16. A label-free fluorescence turn-on sensor for rapid detection of cysteine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Liu, Hongli; Wang, Chen; Hu, Hui; Wang, Yuhui; Zhou, Xiaodong; Hu, Jiming

    2015-06-01

    A Hg(2+)-mediated fluorescence turn-on sensor for cysteine (Cys) detection was developed using the nucleic acid minor groove binding dye DAPI. In this work, two fully complementary DNA sequences, a T-rich single-stranded molecule (ssDNA) and an A-rich single-stranded molecule, were employed to constitute consecutive "AT/TA" base pairs, which could strongly enhance the fluorescence of DAPI. In the absence of cysteine, Hg(2+) reacted with T-rich single-stranded DNA and "T-Hg(2+)-T" base pairs formed, this seriously disrupted consecutive AT base pairs. As a result, the fluorescence of DAPI was not increased efficiently. However, considering that cysteine binds strongly to Hg(2+), the structure of the "T-Hg(2+)-T" complexes was destroyed in the presence of cysteine, resulting in the re-formation of consecutive AT base pairs and increased DAPI fluorescence. Obviously, the amount of cysteine could be easily measured based on the enhancement of DAPI fluorescence, and it took only 20 min to complete the whole cysteine-sensing process. Therefore, a label-free fluorescent "turn-on" sensor for the rapid detection of cysteine was designed, and the detection limit of this sensor was as low as 2.4 nM, which was much lower than those of the most of the previously reported cysteine sensors.

  17. Fluorescent Staining of Tea Pathogenic Fungi in Tea Leaves Using Fluorescein-labeled Lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kengo; Yoshida, Katsuyuki; Sonoda, Ryoichi

    Fluorochrome-labeled lectin, fluorescein conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (F-WGA) was applied to stain tea pathogenic fungi in tea leaf tissue. Infected leaves were fixed and decolorized with a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid, and cleared with 10% KOH for whole mount before staining with F-WGA. Hyphae of Pestalotiopsis longiseta, Pseudocercospora ocellata, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum theae-sinensis fluoresced brightly in whole mount and sectioned samples of infected leaf tissue. In browned tissue, hyphae did not fluoresce frequently in whole mount sample. Autofluorescence of leaf tissue was strong in browned tissue of sections, it was removed by 10% KOH treatment before staining. Penetration hyphae of C. theae-sinensis in cell wall of trichome and hyphae in basal part of trichome did not fluoresced frequently. In whole mount samples of tea leaf infected with Exobasidium vexans and E. reticulatum, hymenia appeared on leaf surface fluoresced, but hyphae in leaf tissue did not fluoresce. In sectioned samples, hyphae fluoresced brightly when sections were treated with 10% KOH before staining.

  18. Label-free in vivo imaging of human leukocytes using two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence enables label-free morphological and functional imaging of various human blood cells. Specifically, we achieved distinctive morphological contrast to visualize morphology of important leukocytes, such as polymorphonuclear structure of granulocyte and mononuclear feature of agranulocyte, through the employment of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence signals. In addition, NADH fluorescence images clearly reveal the morphological transformation process of neutrophils during disease-causing bacterial infection. Our findings also show that time-resolved NADH fluorescence can be potentially used for functional imaging of the phagocytosis of pathogens by leukocytes (neutrophils) in vivo. In particular, we found that free-to-bound NADH ratios measured in infected neutrophils increased significantly, which is consistent with a previous study that the energy consumed in the phagocytosis of neutrophils is mainly generated through the glycolysis pathway that leads to the accumulation of free NADH. Future work will focus on further developing and applying label-free imaging technology to investigate leukocyte-related diseases and disorders.

  19. Stability of fluorescent labels in PLGA polymeric nanoparticles: Quantum dots versus organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mottaleb, Mona M A; Beduneau, Arnaud; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-10-15

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are currently being investigated for various therapeutic, diagnostic and drug delivery applications. The study of their interactions and fate in biological systems is frequently performed via their fluorescent labeling and following them using fluorescent microscopy. Quantum dots are proposed as stable fluorescent label and compared to other organic dyes (Nile red and DiI) in terms of their entrapment, diffusion in different aqueous or lipophilic media and photostability. In vitro transfer to hydrophilic PBS solution showed that after 8h, 4.2±2.2, 15.5±2.0 and 0.9±0.02% was released from the QDs, NR and DiI nanoparticles, respectively. However, higher diffusion rates were observed in the lipophilic medium chain triglyceride and artificial sebum for all the dyes used. Fluorescent intensity of the three different markers was found to be stable over a period of 24h. Continuous illumination with laser beam using a confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated the superior stability of quantum dots compared to the other organic dyes. Skin permeation experiments have shown that QDs were the most representative marker for the polymeric nanoparticles skin penetration.

  20. Fluorescence study of conformational properties of melanotropins labeled with aminobenzoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, A S; Souza, E S; dos Reis Barbosa, S; Nakaie, C R

    2001-01-01

    The native hormone alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and its more potent analog [Nle(4),D-Phe(7)]alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha MSH), labeled at the amino terminal with the fluorescent aminobenzoic acid (Abz) isomers, were examined by fluorescence methods. We observed energy transfer between the tryptophan(9) residue acting as donor and Abz as acceptor, the transfer being more pronounced to the ortho-form of the acceptor. Within the hypothesis that different peptide conformations coexist in equilibrium during the fluorescence decay, we supposed that the intensity decay was modulated by an acceptor-donor distance distribution function f(r). From the time-resolved fluorescence experimental data, we recovered the distance distribution between Abz and Trp(9), using the CONTIN program, within the framework of the Förster resonance energy transfer model. The methodology proved to be useful to provide quantitative information about conformational dynamics of melanotropins and its dependency on the solvent. In aqueous medium, alpha-MSH has a broad Abz-Trp(9) distance distribution, reflecting the structural flexibility of the peptide. Three different distance populations could be identified in the labeled analog NDP-alpha MSH in water, indicating distinct conformational states for the synthetic peptide, compared with the native hormone. Measurements in trifluoroethanol resulted in the recovery of two Abz-Trp(9) distance populations, both for the native and the analog hormones, reflecting the decrease, induced by the solvent, of the conformational states available to the peptides. PMID:11463659

  1. Geometrical characterization of fluorescently labelled surfaces from noisy 3D microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Elijah; Serwane, Friedhelm; Campàs, Otger

    2017-09-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy enables fast 3D imaging of biological and inert systems alike. In many studies, it is important to detect the surface of objects and quantitatively characterize its local geometry, including its mean curvature. We present a fully automated algorithm to determine the location and curvatures of an object from 3D fluorescence images, such as those obtained using confocal or light-sheet microscopy. The algorithm aims at reconstructing surface labelled objects with spherical topology and mild deformations from the spherical geometry with high accuracy, rather than reconstructing arbitrarily deformed objects with lower fidelity. Using both synthetic data with known geometrical characteristics and experimental data of spherical objects, we characterize the algorithm's accuracy over the range of conditions and parameters typically encountered in 3D fluorescence imaging. We show that the algorithm can detect the location of the surface and obtain a map of local mean curvatures with relative errors typically below 2% and 20%, respectively, even in the presence of substantial levels of noise. Finally, we apply this algorithm to analyse the shape and curvature map of fluorescently labelled oil droplets embedded within multicellular aggregates and deformed by cellular forces. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Tomographic sensing and localization of fluorescently labeled circulating cells in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric; Swamy, Tushar; Runnels, Judith; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Sensing and enumeration of specific types of circulating cells in small animals is an important problem in many areas of biomedical research. Microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry methods have been developed previously, but these are typically limited to sampling of very small blood volumes, so that very rare circulating cells may escape detection. Recently, we described the development of a ‘diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer’ (DFFC) that allows sampling of much larger blood vessels and therefore circulating blood volumes in the hindlimb, forelimb or tail of a mouse. In this work, we extend this concept by developing and validating a method to tomographically localize circulating fluorescently labeled cells in the cross section of a tissue simulating optical flow phantom and mouse limb. This was achieved using two modulated light sources and an array of six fiber-coupled detectors that allowed rapid, high-sensitivity acquisition of full tomographic data sets at 10 Hz. These were reconstructed into two-dimensional cross-sectional images using Monte Carlo models of light propagation and the randomized algebraic reconstruction technique. We were able to obtain continuous images of moving cells in the sample cross section with 0.5 mm accuracy or better. We first demonstrated this concept in limb-mimicking optical flow photons with up to four flow channels, and then in the tails of mice with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells. This approach increases the overall diagnostic utility of our DFFC instrument.

  3. Fluorescent-labeled bioconjugates of the opioid peptides biphalin and DPDPE incorporating fluorescein-maleimide linkers.

    PubMed

    Stefanucci, Azzurra; Lei, Wei; Hruby, Victor J; Macedonio, Giorgia; Luisi, Grazia; Carradori, Simone; Streicher, John M; Mollica, Adriano

    2017-06-01

    The conjugation of fluorescent labels to opioid peptides is an extremely challenging task, which needs to be overcome to create new classes of probes for biological assays. Three opioid peptide analogs of biphalin and [D-Pen2,5]-Enkephalin (DPDPE) containing a fluorescein-maleimide motif were synthesized. The biphalin analog 17 binds to opioid receptors with Ki(μ) = 530 ± 90 nM and Ki(δ) = 69.8 ± 16.4 nM. We then tested the ability of the compounds to stimulate G-protein-coupling, 17 activated μ-receptor expressing cells (EC50 = 16.7 ± 6.7 nM, EMax = 76 ± 4%) as well as δ-receptor expressing cells (EC50 = 42 ± 10 nM, EMax = 34 ± 8%). However, 17 was not able to fluorescently label receptor in live or fixed cells. Our data suggest that the biphalin scaffold could be employed to develop fluorescent ligands with the appropriate fluorescent motif, and suggest a means for further probe development.

  4. An Optimized Protocol for Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay Using Infrared Fluorescent Dye-labeled Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Alqadah, Amel; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-11-29

    Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) are an instrumental tool to characterize the interactions between proteins and their target DNA sequences. Radioactivity has been the predominant method of DNA labeling in EMSAs. However, recent advances in fluorescent dyes and scanning methods have prompted the use of fluorescent tagging of DNA as an alternative to radioactivity for the advantages of easy handling, saving time, reducing cost, and improving safety. We have recently used fluorescent EMSA (fEMSA) to successfully address an important biological question. Our fEMSA analysis provides mechanistic insight into the effect of a missense mutation, G73E, in the highly conserved HMG transcription factor SOX-2 on olfactory neuron type diversification. We found that mutant SOX-2(G73E) protein alters specific DNA binding activity, thereby causing olfactory neuron identity transformation. Here, we present an optimized and cost-effective step-by-step protocol for fEMSA using infrared fluorescent dye-labeled oligonucleotides containing the LIM-4/SOX-2 adjacent target sites and purified SOX-2 proteins (WT and mutant SOX-2(G73E) proteins) as a biological example.

  5. On-Chip Fluorescent Labeling using Reversed-phase Monoliths and Microchip Electrophoretic Separations of Selected Preterm Birth Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Sonker, Mukul; Yang, Rui; Sahore, Vishal; Kumar, Suresh; Woolley, Adam T

    2016-11-21

    On-chip preconcentration, purification, and fluorescent labeling are desirable sample preparation steps to achieve complete automation in integrated microfluidic systems. In this work, we developed electrokinetically operated microfluidic devices for solid-phase extraction and fluorescent labeling of preterm birth (PTB) biomarkers. Reversed-phase monoliths based on different acrylate monomers were photopolymerized in cyclic olefin copolymer microdevices and studied for the selective retention and elution of a fluorescent dye and PTB biomarkers. Octyl methacrylate-based monoliths with desirable retention and elution characteristics were chosen and used for on-chip fluorescent labeling of three PTB biomarkers. Purification of on-chip labeled samples was done by selective elution of unreacted dye prior to sample. Automated and rapid on-chip fluorescent labeling was achieved with similar efficiency to that obtained for samples labeled off chip. Additionally, protocols for microchip electrophoresis of several off-chip-labeled PTB biomarkers were demonstrated in poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic devices. This study is an important step toward the development of integrated on-chip labeling and separation microfluidic devices for PTB biomarkers.

  6. Labeling of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by hexamethylene diamine modified fluorescent carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wei; Dong, Yan; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Shiqi; Ge, Xin; Sui, Lili; Wang, Jingwen

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized by a solvothermal method with glucose as carbon source and surface-modified with 1,6-hexamethylene diamine. In this hybrid CDs, the modification played important role for improving the fluorescent performance by introducing nitrogenous compound to passivate CD's surface, making the CDs emit strong fluorescence. The as-prepared CDs were linked with mouse anti-human Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) antibody and goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (IgG) to directly and indirectly label fixed human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, respectively. The cytotoxicity of these CDs were also tested using the human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. No apparent cytotoxicity was observed, which suggested the potential application of the as-prepared CDs in bioimaging.

  7. Fluorescent Labeling and Biodistribution of Latex Nanoparticles Formed by Surfactant-Free RAFT Emulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Poon, Cheuk Ka; Tang, Owen; Chen, Xin-Ming; Kim, Byung; Hartlieb, Matthias; Pollock, Carol A; Hawkett, Brian S; Perrier, Sébastien

    2016-12-14

    The authors report the preparation of a novel range of functional polyacrylamide stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles, obtained by surfactant-free reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) emulsion polymerization, their fluorescent tagging, cellular uptake, and biodistribution. The authors show the versatility of the RAFT emulsion process for the design of functional nanoparticles of well-defined size that can be used as drug delivery vectors. Functionalization with a fluorescent tag offers a useful visualization tool for tracing, localization, and clearance studies of these carriers in biological models. The studies are carried out by labeling the sterically stabilized latex particles chemically with rhodamine B. The fluorescent particles are incubated in a healthy human renal proximal tubular cell line model, and intravenously injected into a mouse model. Cellular localization and biodistribution of these particles on the biological models are explored.

  8. Protein-retention expansion microscopy of cells and tissues labeled using standard fluorescent proteins and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tillberg, Paul W.; Chen, Fei; Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Zhao, Yongxin; Yu, Chih-Chieh (Jay); English, Brian P.; Gao, Linyi; Martorell, Anthony; Suk, Ho-Jun; Yoshida, Fumiaki; DeGennaro, Ellen M.; Roossien, Douglas H.; Gong, Guanyu; Seneviratne, Uthpala; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Desimone, Robert; Cai, Dawen; Boyden, Edward S.

    2016-01-01

    Expansion microscopy (ExM) enables imaging of preserved specimens with nanoscale precision on diffraction limited instead of specialized super-resolution microscopes. ExM works by physically separating fluorescent probes after anchoring them to a swellable gel. The first expansion microscopy method was unable to retain native proteins in the gel and used custom made reagents not widely available. Here, we describe protein retention ExM (proExM), a variant of ExM that anchors proteins to the swellable gel allowing the use of conventional fluorescently labeled antibodies and streptavidin, and fluorescent proteins. We validate and demonstrate utility of proExM for multi-color super-resolution (~70 nm) imaging of cells and mammalian tissues on conventional microscopes. PMID:27376584

  9. Fluorescent labeling of degradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) for cellular nanoparticles tracking in living cells.

    PubMed

    Freichels, Hélène; Danhier, Fabienne; Préat, Véronique; Lecomte, Philippe; Jérôme, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescent-labeled aliphatic polyesters are essential materials for in vitro and in vivo studies of the behavior of these biodegradable polymers in interaction with cells or in a body. In particular, the direct cellular localization of drug delivery systems based on these materials allows better understanding of the internalization mechanism and determination of the pharmacokinetics. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) is a rapidly degradable copolymer widely used in pharmaceutics and nanomedecine. It was prepared by ring-opening polymerization of lactide and glycolide in order to obtain a well-defined material to investigate conditions allowing the covalent linkage of a fluorescent dye (fluorescein) while preserving the macromolecular characteristics of the polymer. The success of the functionalization was ascertained by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  10. (211)At labeled substance P (5-11) as potential radiopharmaceutical for glioma treatment.

    PubMed

    Lyczko, Monika; Pruszynski, Marek; Majkowska-Pilip, Agnieszka; Lyczko, Krzysztof; Was, Bogdan; Meczynska-Wielgosz, Sylwia; Kruszewski, Marcin; Szkliniarz, Katarzyna; Jastrzebski, Jerzy; Stolarz, Anna; Bilewicz, Aleksander

    2017-10-01

    The purposes of the present work were to label substance P (5-11) with (211)At using a rhodium(III) complex with a bifunctional ligand-2-(1,5,9,13-tetrathiacyclohexadecan-3-yloxy)acetic acid ([16aneS4]-COOH) and to assess the in vitro stability and toxicity of the obtained radiobioconjugate. Two approaches were evaluated to obtain (131)I/(211)At-Rh[16aneS4]-SP5-11 radiobioconjugates, based on 2-step and 1-step syntheses. In the first method (131)I/(211)At-Rh[16aneS4]-COOH complexes were obtained that required further coupling to a biomolecule. In the second approach, the bioconjugate [16aneS4]-SP5-11 was synthesized and further labeled with (131)I and (211)At through the utilization of a Rh(III) metal cation bridge. The synthesized compounds were analyzed by HPLC, TLC and paper electrophoresis. The (131)I/(211)At-Rh[16aneS4]-COOH complexes were obtained in high yield and possessed good stability in PBS and CSF. Preliminary studies on coupling of (131)I-Rh[16aneS4]-COOH to substance P (5-11) in 2-step synthesis showed that this procedure was too long with respect to (211)At half-life, prompting us to improve it by finally using a 1-step synthesis. This strategy not only shortened the labeling time, but also increased final yield of (131)I/(211)At-Rh[16aneS4]-SP5-11 radiobioconjugates. The stability of both compounds in PBS and CSF was high. Toxicity studies with the (211)At-Rh[16aneS4]-SP5-11 demonstrated that radiobioconjugate significantly reduced T98G cell viability in a dose dependent manner reaching 20% of survival at the highest radioactivity 1200kBq/mL. The radiobioconjugate (211)At-Rh[16aneS4]-SP5-11 revealed its potential in killing glioma T98G cells during in vitro studies; therefore further animal studies to are required to determine its in vivo stability and treatment potential in normal and xenografted mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging of transfection and intracellular release of intact, non-labeled DNA using fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrakova, V.; Benson, V.; Buncek, M.; Fiserova, A.; Ledvina, M.; Stursa, J.; Cigler, P.; Nesladek, M.

    2016-06-01

    Efficient delivery of stabilized nucleic acids (NAs) into cells and release of the NA payload are crucial points in the transfection process. Here we report on the fabrication of a nanoscopic cellular delivery carrier that is additionally combined with a label-free intracellular sensor device, based on biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamond particles. The sensing function is engineered into nanodiamonds by using nitrogen-vacancy color centers, providing stable non-blinking luminescence. The device is used for monitoring NA transfection and the payload release in cells. The unpacking of NAs from a poly(ethyleneimine)-terminated nanodiamond surface is monitored using the color shift of nitrogen-vacancy centers in the diamond, which serve as a nanoscopic electric charge sensor. The proposed device innovates the strategies for NA imaging and delivery, by providing detection of the intracellular release of non-labeled NAs without affecting cellular processing of the NAs. Our system highlights the potential of nanodiamonds to act not merely as labels but also as non-toxic and non-photobleachable fluorescent biosensors reporting complex molecular events.Efficient delivery of stabilized nucleic acids (NAs) into cells and release of the NA payload are crucial points in the transfection process. Here we report on the fabrication of a nanoscopic cellular delivery carrier that is additionally combined with a label-free intracellular sensor device, based on biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamond particles. The sensing function is engineered into nanodiamonds by using nitrogen-vacancy color centers, providing stable non-blinking luminescence. The device is used for monitoring NA transfection and the payload release in cells. The unpacking of NAs from a poly(ethyleneimine)-terminated nanodiamond surface is monitored using the color shift of nitrogen-vacancy centers in the diamond, which serve as a nanoscopic electric charge sensor. The proposed device innovates the strategies for

  12. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  13. Quantum-dot-labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the microorganism Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Peng, Jun; Lu, Zhe-Xue; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2006-05-12

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as a kind of nonisotopic biological labeling material have many unique fluorescent properties relative to conventional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, such as composition- and size-dependent absorption and emission, a broad absorption spectrum, photostability, and single-dot sensitivity. These properties make them a promising stable and sensitive label, which can be used for long-term fluorescent tracking and subcellular location of genes and proteins. Here, a simple approach for the construction of QD-labeled DNA probes was developed by attaching thiol-ssDNA to QDs via a metal-thiol bond. The as-prepared QD-labeled DNA probes had high dispersivity, bioactivity, and specificity for hybridization. Based on such a kind of probe with a sequence complementary to multiple clone sites in plasmid pUC18, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the tiny bacterium Escherichia coli has been realized for the first time.

  14. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  15. Mapping of heavy metal ion sorption to cell-extracellular polymeric substance-mineral aggregates by using metal-selective fluorescent probes and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hao, Likai; Li, Jianli; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Biofilms, organic matter, iron/aluminum oxides, and clay minerals bind toxic heavy metal ions and control their fate and bioavailability in the environment. The spatial relationship of metal ions to biomacromolecules such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilms with microbial cells and biogenic minerals is complex and occurs at the micro- and submicrometer scale. Here, we review the application of highly selective and sensitive metal fluorescent probes for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) that were originally developed for use in life sciences and propose their suitability as a powerful tool for mapping heavy metals in environmental biofilms and cell-EPS-mineral aggregates (CEMAs). The benefit of using metal fluorescent dyes in combination with CLSM imaging over other techniques such as electron microscopy is that environmental samples can be analyzed in their natural hydrated state, avoiding artifacts such as aggregation from drying that is necessary for analytical electron microscopy. In this minireview, we present data for a group of sensitive fluorescent probes highly specific for Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Hg(2+), illustrating the potential of their application in environmental science. We evaluate their application in combination with other fluorescent probes that label constituents of CEMAs such as DNA or polysaccharides and provide selection guidelines for potential combinations of fluorescent probes. Correlation analysis of spatially resolved heavy metal distributions with EPS and biogenic minerals in their natural, hydrated state will further our understanding of the behavior of metals in environmental systems since it allows for identifying bonding sites in complex, heterogeneous systems.

  16. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80–200 nm, microvesicles: ~200–1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for

  17. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer.

    PubMed

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80-200 nm, microvesicles: ~200-1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for routine

  18. Preparation, characterization and pharmacokinetics of fluorescence labeled propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengli; Li, Chunxia; Xue, Yiting; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Hongbing; Zhao, Xia; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi

    2014-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence labeling method was developed and validated for the microanalysis of a sulfated polysaccharide drug,namely propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS), in rat plasma. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was selected to label PSS, and 1, 6-diaminohexane was used to link PSS and FITC in order to prepare FITC-labeled PSS (F-PSS) through a reductive amination reaction. F-PSS was identified by UV-Vis, FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectrum. The cell stability and cytotoxicity of F-PSS were tested in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The results indicated that the labeling efficiency of F-PSS was 0.522% ± 0.0248% and the absolute bioavailability was 8.39%. F-PSS was stable in MDCK cells without obvious cytotoxicity. The method was sensitive and reliable; it showed a good linearity, precision, recovery and stability. The FITC labeling method can be applied to investigating the absorption and metabolism of PSS and other polysaccharides in biological samples.

  19. Live imaging of endogenous PSD-95 using ENABLED: a conditional strategy to fluorescently label endogenous proteins.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Dale A; Tillo, Shane E; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V; Guo, Caiying; Mao, Tianyi; Zhong, Haining

    2014-12-10

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416698-15$15.00/0.

  20. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  1. Synthesis of a fluorescently labeled compound for the detection of arsenic-induced apoptotic HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Femia, A Lis; Temprana, C Facundo; Amor, M Silvia; Grasselli, Mariano; Alonso, Silvia Del V

    2012-03-01

    Arsenic compounds have shown medical usefulness since they proved to be effective in causing complete remission of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In this work we obtained a fluorescently labeled arsenic compound that can be used with current fluorescence techniques for basic and applied research, focused on arsenic-induced apoptosis studies. This compound is an arsanilic acid bearing a covalently linked FITC that was chemically synthesized and characterized by fluorescence, UV-Vis, mass and FTIR spectrometry. In addition, we assessed its apoptotic activity as well as its fluorescent labeling properties in HL60 cell line as a leukemia cell model through flow cytometry. We obtained a compound with a 1:1 FITC:arsenic ratio and a 595 m/z, confirming its structure by FTIR. This compound proved to be useful at inducing apoptosis in the leukemia cell model and labeling this apoptotic cell population, in such a way that the highest FITC fluorescence correlated with the highest arsenic amount.

  2. In Vitro Osteogenic Potential of Green Fluorescent Protein Labelled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Osteoprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Gopu; Li, Mingming; Zou, Yu; Li, Lulu; Handral, Harish K.; Rosa, Vinicus; Cao, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapy using stem cells in bone regeneration has gained increasing interest. Various studies suggest the clinical utility of osteoprogenitors-like mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration. However, limited availability of mesenchymal stem cells and conflicting evidence on their therapeutic efficacy limit their clinical application. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are potentially an unlimited source of healthy and functional osteoprogenitors (OPs) that could be utilized for bone regenerative applications. However, limited ability to track hESC-derived progenies in vivo greatly hinders translational studies. Hence, in this study, we aimed to establish hESC-derived OPs (hESC-OPs) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to investigate their osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro. We fluorescently labelled H9-hESCs using a plasmid vector encoding GFP. The GFP-expressing hESCs were differentiated into hESC-OPs. The hESC-OPsGFP+ stably expressed high levels of GFP, CD73, CD90, and CD105. They possessed osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro as demonstrated by increased expression of COL1A1, RUNX2, OSTERIX, and OPG transcripts and mineralized nodules positive for Alizarin Red and immunocytochemical expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen-I. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs can maintain their GFP expression for the long term and their potential for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. In future, these fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs could be used for noninvasive assessment of bone regeneration, safety, and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28003831

  3. Assessing antibody microarrays for space missions: effect of long-term storage, gamma radiation, and temperature shifts on printed and fluorescently labeled antibodies.

    PubMed

    de Diego-Castilla, Graciela; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Rivas, Luis A; Parro, Víctor

    2011-10-01

    Antibody microarrays are becoming frequently used tools for analytical purposes. A key factor for optimal performance is the stability of the immobilized (capturing) antibodies as well as those that have been fluorescently labeled to achieve the immunological test (tracers). This is especially critical for long-distance transport, field testing, or planetary exploration. A number of different environmental stresses may affect the antibody integrity, such as dryness, sudden temperature shift cycles, or, as in the case of space science, exposure to large quantities of the highly penetrating gamma radiation. Here, we report on the effect of certain stabilizing solutions for long-term storage of printed antibody microarrays under different conditions. We tested the effect of gamma radiation on printed and freeze- or vacuum-dried fluorescent antibodies at working concentrations (tracer antibodies), as well as the effect of multiple cycles of sudden and prolonged temperature shifts on the stability of fluorescently labeled tracer antibody cocktails. Our results show that (i) antibody microarrays are stable at room temperature when printed on stabilizing spotting solutions for at least 6 months, (ii) lyophilized and vacuum-dried fluorescently labeled tracer antibodies are stable for more than 9 months of sudden temperature shift cycles (-20°C to 25°C and 50°C), and (iii) both printed and freeze- or vacuum-dried fluorescent tracer antibodies are stable after several-fold excess of the dose of gamma radiation expected during a mission to Mars. Although different antibodies may exhibit different susceptibilities, we conclude that, in general, antibodies are suitable for use in planetary exploration purposes if they are properly treated and stored with the use of stabilizing substances.

  4. Hoechst fluorescence intensity can be used to separate viable bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells from viable non-bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.; Schell, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is a powerful compound to study the mitotic activity of a cell. Most techniques that identify BrdU-labeled cells require conditions that kill the cells. However, the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-permeable Hoechst dyes is reduced by the incorporation of BrdU into DNA, allowing the separation of viable BrdU positive (BrdU+) cells from viable BrdU negative (BrdU-) cells. METHODS: Cultures of proliferating cells were supplemented with BrdU for 48 h and other cultures of proliferating cells were maintained without BrdU. Mixtures of viable BrdU+ and viable BrdU- cells from the two proliferating cultures were stained with Hoechst 33342. The viable BrdU+ and BrdU- cells were sorted into different fractions from a mixture of BrdU+ and BrdU- cells based on Hoechst fluorescence intensity and the ability to exclude the vital dye, propidium iodide. Subsequently, samples from the original mixture, the sorted BrdU+ cell population, and the sorted BrdU- cell population were immunostained using an anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and evaluated using flow cytometry. RESULTS: Two mixtures consisting of approximately 55% and 69% BrdU+ cells were sorted into fractions consisting of greater than 93% BrdU+ cells and 92% BrdU- cells. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. CONCLUSIONS: Hoechst fluorescence intensity in combination with cell sorting is an effective tool to separate viable BrdU+ from viable BrdU- cells for further study. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Hoechst fluorescence intensity can be used to separate viable bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells from viable non-bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.; Schell, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is a powerful compound to study the mitotic activity of a cell. Most techniques that identify BrdU-labeled cells require conditions that kill the cells. However, the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-permeable Hoechst dyes is reduced by the incorporation of BrdU into DNA, allowing the separation of viable BrdU positive (BrdU+) cells from viable BrdU negative (BrdU-) cells. METHODS: Cultures of proliferating cells were supplemented with BrdU for 48 h and other cultures of proliferating cells were maintained without BrdU. Mixtures of viable BrdU+ and viable BrdU- cells from the two proliferating cultures were stained with Hoechst 33342. The viable BrdU+ and BrdU- cells were sorted into different fractions from a mixture of BrdU+ and BrdU- cells based on Hoechst fluorescence intensity and the ability to exclude the vital dye, propidium iodide. Subsequently, samples from the original mixture, the sorted BrdU+ cell population, and the sorted BrdU- cell population were immunostained using an anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and evaluated using flow cytometry. RESULTS: Two mixtures consisting of approximately 55% and 69% BrdU+ cells were sorted into fractions consisting of greater than 93% BrdU+ cells and 92% BrdU- cells. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. CONCLUSIONS: Hoechst fluorescence intensity in combination with cell sorting is an effective tool to separate viable BrdU+ from viable BrdU- cells for further study. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. 21 CFR 1306.24 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., dispensing, and storage of the controlled substance listed in Schedule III, IV, or V; and (4) The system... controlled substance listed in Schedule III, IV, or V is dispensed at one time; (2) The controlled substance...

  7. 21 CFR 1306.24 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., dispensing, and storage of the controlled substance listed in Schedule III, IV, or V; and (4) The system... controlled substance listed in Schedule III, IV, or V is dispensed at one time; (2) The controlled substance...

  8. Identification of powdered Chinese herbal medicines by fluorescence microscopy, Part 1: Fluorescent characteristics of mechanical tissues, conducting tissues, and ergastic substances.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Qiong; Liang, Zhi-Tao; Li, Qin; Yang, Hua; Chen, Hu-Biao; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Li, Ping

    2011-03-01

    The light microscope has been successfully used in identification of Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) for more than a century. However, positive identification is not always possible. Given the popularity of fluorescence microscopy in bioanalysis, researchers dedicated to finding new ways to identify CHMs more effectively are now turning to fluorescence microscopy for authentication purposes. Some studies on distinguishing confused species from the same genus and on exploring distributions of chemicals in tissues of CHMs by fluorescence microscopy have been reported; however, no systematic investigations on fluorescent characteristics of powdered CHMs have been reported. Here, 46 samples of 16 CHMs were investigated. Specifically, the mechanical tissues including stone cells and fibers, the conducting tissues including three types of vessels, and ergastic substances including crystals of calcium oxalate and secretions, in various powdered CHMs were investigated by both light microscope and fluorescence microscope. The results showed many microscopic features emit fluorescence that makes them easily observed, even against complex backgrounds. Under the fluorescence microscope, different microscopic features from the same powdered CHM or some same features from different powdered CHMs emitted the different fluorescence, making this information very helpful for the authentication of CHMs in powder form. Moreover, secretions with unique chemical profiles from different powdered CHMs showed different fluorescent characteristics. Hence, fluorescence microscopy could be a useful additional method for the authentication of powdered CHMs if the fluorescent characteristics of specific CHMs are known.

  9. Examining the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins in situ with site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Richards, Ryan; Dempski, Robert E

    2011-05-29

    Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology (TEVC) is a powerful tool to investigate the mechanism of ion transport1 for a wide variety of membrane proteins including ion channels, ion pumps, and transporters. Recent developments have combined site-specific fluorophore labeling alongside TEVC to concurrently examine the conformational dynamics at specific residues and function of these proteins on the surface of single cells. We will describe a method to study the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins by simultaneously monitoring fluorescence and current changes using voltage-clamp fluorometry. This approach can be used to examine the molecular motion of membrane proteins site-specifically following cysteine replacement and site-directed fluorophore labeling. Furthermore, this method provides an approach to determine distance constraints between specific residues. This is achieved by selectively attaching donor and acceptor fluorophores to two mutated cysteine residues of interest. In brief, these experiments are performed following functional expression of the desired protein on the surface of Xenopus leavis oocytes. The large surface area of these oocytes enables facile functional measurements and a robust fluorescence signal. It is also possible to readily change the extracellular conditions such as pH, ligand or cations/anions, which can provide further information on the mechanism of membrane proteins. Finally, recent developments have also enabled the manipulation of select internal ions following co-expression with a second protein. Our protocol is described in multiple parts. First, cysteine scanning mutagenesis proceeded by fluorophore labeling is completed at residues located at the interface of the transmembrane and extracellular domains. Subsequent experiments are designed to identify residues which demonstrate large changes in fluorescence intensity (<5%) upon a conformational change of the protein. Second, these changes in fluorescence

  10. Fate and fouling characteristics of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in ultrafiltration of terrestrial humic substances.

    PubMed

    Quang, Viet Ly; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Maqbool, Tahir; Hur, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) membrane fouling caused by terrestrial input of dissolved organic matter (DOM), especially during high flood periods, is poorly understood. In this study, we examined the fouling characteristics of three different terrestrial humic substances (HS) on regenerated cellulose (RC) UF membranes with the pore sizes of 30 k-3 kDa via conventional bulk HS measurements as well as an advanced fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) identified one protein-like (C1) and three humic-like fluorescent components (C2-C4) from soil and leaf-derived HS. The fate of the different fluorescent components was individually tracked for the UF processes. The higher removal rates were found generally on the order of high molecular weight (HMW) C1 to smaller sized humic-like components (C4 > C3 > C2) regardless of the HS sources, implying the importance of HS molecular sizes on the UF operation. Among the humic-like components, C2 was the most associated with irreversible fouling, while other two humic-like components contributed more to reversible fouling. For soil-derived HS, C4 can be suggested as a good surrogate for membrane fouling, as evidenced by the highest correlation between the removal rates and the total fouling indices among the tested HS variables including conventional bulk parameters. Our study demonstrated a promising application of EEM-PARAFAC for probing membrane fouling of terrestrial DOM, which provided additional insight into the fate of different fluorescent components on the UF processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel murine model of Fusarium solani keratitis utilizing fluorescent labeled fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmin; Wang, Liya; Li, Zhijie; Liu, Susu; Xie, Yanting; He, Siyu; Deng, Xianming; Yang, Biao; Liu, Hui; Chen, Guoming; Zhao, Huiwen; Zhang, Junjie

    2013-05-01

    Fungal keratitis is a common disease that causes blindness. An effective animal model for fungal keratitis is essential for advancing research on this disease. Our objective is to develop a novel mouse model of Fusarium solani keratitis through the inoculation of fluorescent-labeled fungi into the cornea to facilitate the accurate and early identification and screening of fungal infections. F. solani was used as the model fungus in this study. In in vitro experiment, the effects of Calcofluor White (CFW) staining concentration and duration on the fluorescence intensity of F. solani were determined through the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI); the effects of CFW staining on the growth of F. solani were determined by the colony diameter. In in vivo experiment, the F. solani keratitis mice were induced and divided into a CFW-unlabeled and CFW-labeled groups. The positive rate, corneal lesion score and several positive rate determination methods were measured. The MFIs of F. solani in the 30 μg/ml CFW-30 min, 90 μg/ml CFW-10 min and 90 μg/ml CFW-30 min groups were higher than that in the 10 μg/ml CFW-10 min group (P < 0.01). Compared with the 30 μg/ml CFW-30 min group, only the 90 μg/ml CFW-30 min group showed higher MFI (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the colony diameter in the CFW unstained group compared with that in the 10, 30, 90, 270, or 810 μg/ml CFW groups stained for either 10 or 30 min (P > 0.05). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed for the positive rate or the corneal lesion scores between the CFW-unlabeled and the CFW-labeled group. On day 1 and 2, the positive rates of the infected corneas in the scraping group were lower than those in the fluorescence microscopy group (P < 0.05). On day 3, these observe methods showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Thus, these experiments established a novel murine model of F. solani keratitis utilizing fluorescent labeled fungi. This model

  12. Imaging of transfection and intracellular release of intact, non-labeled DNA using fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Petrakova, V; Benson, V; Buncek, M; Fiserova, A; Ledvina, M; Stursa, J; Cigler, P; Nesladek, M

    2016-06-09

    Efficient delivery of stabilized nucleic acids (NAs) into cells and release of the NA payload are crucial points in the transfection process. Here we report on the fabrication of a nanoscopic cellular delivery carrier that is additionally combined with a label-free intracellular sensor device, based on biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamond particles. The sensing function is engineered into nanodiamonds by using nitrogen-vacancy color centers, providing stable non-blinking luminescence. The device is used for monitoring NA transfection and the payload release in cells. The unpacking of NAs from a poly(ethyleneimine)-terminated nanodiamond surface is monitored using the color shift of nitrogen-vacancy centers in the diamond, which serve as a nanoscopic electric charge sensor. The proposed device innovates the strategies for NA imaging and delivery, by providing detection of the intracellular release of non-labeled NAs without affecting cellular processing of the NAs. Our system highlights the potential of nanodiamonds to act not merely as labels but also as non-toxic and non-photobleachable fluorescent biosensors reporting complex molecular events.

  13. Improved detection of fluorescently labeled microspheres and vessel architecture with an imaging cryomicrotome.

    PubMed

    van Horssen, Pepijn; Siebes, Maria; Hoefer, Imo; Spaan, Jos A E; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M

    2010-08-01

    Due to spectral overlap, the number of fluorescent labels for imaging cryomicrotome detection was limited to 4. The aim of this study was to increase the separation of fluorescent labels. In the new imaging cryomicrotome, the sample is cut in slices of 40 microm. Six images are taken for each cutting plane. Correction for spectral overlap is based on linear combinations of fluorescent images. Locations of microspheres are determined by using the system point spread function. Five differently colored microspheres were injected in vivo distributed over two major coronaries, the left anterior descending and left circumflex artery. Under absence of collateral flow, microspheres outside of target perfusion territories were not found and the procedure did not generate false positive detection when spectral overlap was relevant. In silico-generated microspheres were used to test the effect of background image, transparency correction, and color separation. The percentage of microspheres undetected was 2.3 +/- 0.8% in the presence and 1.5 +/- 0.4% in the absence of background structures with a density of 900 microspheres per color per cm(3). The image analysis method presented here, allows for an increased number of experimental conditions that can be investigated in studies of regional myocardial perfusion.

  14. Quantifying size-dependent interactions between fluorescently labeled polystyrene nanoparticles and mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently used in a wide variety of fields such as technology, medicine and industry. Due to the novelty of these applications and to ensure their success, a precise characterization of the interactions between NPs and cells is essential. Findings The current study explores the uptake of polystyrene NPs by 1321N1 human astrocytoma and A549 human lung carcinoma cell lines. In this work we show for the first time a comparison of the uptake rates of fluorescently labeled carboxylated polystyrene (PS) NPs of different sizes (20, 40 and 100 nm) in two different cell types, keeping the number of NPs per unit volume constant for all sizes. We propose a reliable methodology to control the dose of fluorescently labeled NPs, by counting individual NPs using automated particle detection from 3D confocal microscopy images. The possibility of detecting individual NPs also allowed us to calculate the size of each nanoparticle and compare the fluorescence of single NPs across different sizes, thereby providing a robust platform for normalization of NP internalization experiments as measured by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our findings show that 40 nm NPs are internalized faster than 20 nm or 100 nm particles in both cell lines studied, suggesting that there is a privileged size gap in which the internalization of NPs is higher. PMID:23006133

  15. A reusable sensor for the label-free detection of specific oligonucleotides by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nöll, Gilbert; Su, Qiang; Heidel, Björn; Yu, Yaming

    2014-01-01

    The development of a reusable molecular beacon (MB)-based sensor for the label-free detection of specific oligonucleotides using surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) as the readout method is described. The MBs are chemisorbed at planar gold surfaces serving as fluorescence quenching units. Target oligonucleotides of 24 bases can be detected within a few minutes at high single-mismatch discrimination rates.

  16. A low-toxic artificial fluorescent glycoprotein can serve as an efficient cytoplasmic labeling in living cell.

    PubMed

    Si, Jiangju; Liang, Dawei; Kong, Dan; Wu, Sufang; Yuan, Lan; Xiang, Yan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-06

    To maintain the virtue of good optical property and discard the dross of conventional fluorescent staining dyes, we provide a strategy for designing new fluorescent scaffolds. In this study, a novel fluorescent labeling glycoprotein (chitosan-poly-L-cysteine, CPC) was synthesized through graft copolymerization. CPC gives emission peak at 465-470 nm when excited at 386 nm. The submicro-scale CPC microspheres could be localized and persisted specifically in the cytoplasm of living cells, with strong blue fluorescence. Moreover, CPC was highly resistant to photo bleaching, the fluorescence was remained stable for up to 72 h as the cells grew and developed. The glycoprotein CPC was bio-compatible and in zero grade cytotoxicity as quantified by MTT assay. The fluorescent labeling process with our newly designed glycoprotein CPC is exceptionally efficient.

  17. Immunostaining for substance P receptor labels GABAergic cells with distinct termination patterns in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Katona, I; Gulyás, A I; Shigemoto, R; Freund, T F

    1997-02-17

    A specific antiserum against substance P receptor (SPR) labels nonprincipal neurons in the cerebral cortex of the rat (T. Kaneko et al. [1994], Neuroscience 60:199-211; Y. Nakaya et al. [1994], J. Comp. Neurol. 347:249-274). In the present study, we aimed to identify the types of SPR-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus according to their content of neurochemical markers, which label interneuron populations with distinct termination patterns. Markers for perisomatic inhibitory cells, parvalbumin and cholecystokinin (CCK), colocalized with SPR in pyramidallike basket cells in the dentate gyrus and in large multipolar or bitufted cells within all hippocampal subfields respectively. A dense meshwork of SPR-immunoreactive spiny dendrites in the hilus and stratum lucidum of the CA3 region belonged largely to inhibitory cells terminating in the distal dendritic region of granule cells, as indicated by the somatostatin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) content. In addition, SPR and NPY were colocalized in numerous multipolar interneurons with dendrites branching close to the soma. Twenty-five percent of the SPR-immunoreactive cells overlapped with calretinin-positive neurons in all hippocampal subfields, showing that interneurons specialized to contact other gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic cells may also contain SPR. On the basis of the known termination pattern of the colocalized markers, we conclude that SPR-positive interneurons are functionally heterogeneous and participate in different inhibitory processes: (1) perisomatic inhibition of principal cells (CCK-containing cells, and parvalbumin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus), (2) feedback dendritic inhibition in the entorhinal termination zone (somatostatin and NPY-containing cells), and (3) innervation of other interneurons (calretinin-containing cells).

  18. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of fluorescently labelled amyloid β 1-40 and α-synuclein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fluorescent tags, including small organic molecules and fluorescent proteins, enable the localization of protein molecules in biomedical research experiments. However, the use of these labels may interfere with the formation of larger-scale protein structures such as amyloid aggregates. Therefore, we investigate the effects of some commonly used fluorescent tags on the morphologies of fibrils grown from the Alzheimer's disease-associated peptide Amyloid β 1-40 (Aβ40) and the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS). Results Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we verify that N-terminal labeling of Aβ40 with AMCA, TAMRA, and Hilyte-Fluor 488 tags does not prevent the formation of protofibrils and amyloid fibrils of various widths. We also measure the two-photon action cross-section of Aβ40 labelled with Hilyte Fluor 488 and demonstrate that this tag is suitable for use with two-photon fluorescence techniques. Similarly, we find that Alexa Fluor 488 labelling of αS variant proteins near either the N or C terminus (position 9 or 130) does not interfere with the formation of amyloid and other types of αS fibrils. We also present TEM images of fibrils grown from αS C-terminally labelled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Near neutral pH, two types of αS-EGFP fibrils are observed via TEM, while denaturation of the EGFP tag leads to the formation of additional species. Conclusions We demonstrate that several small extrinsic fluorescent tags are compatible with studies of amyloid protein aggregation. However, although fibrils can be grown from αS labelled with EGFP, the conformation of the fluorescent protein tag affects the observed aggregate morphologies. Thus, our results should assist researchers with label selection and optimization of solution conditions for aggregation studies involving fluorescence techniques. PMID:22182687

  19. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianwei; Yao, Peng; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qunye

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs. Methods and Results Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye) could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela) and suspended cells (K562) even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein) to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it. Conclusions These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results. PMID

  20. Multidimensional fluorescence studies of the phenolic content of dissolved organic carbon in humic substances.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Todd; Ross, Annemarie D; Chiarelli, Joseph; Kenny, Jonathan E

    2012-03-01

    Indicators suggest that the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in natural waters may be increasing. Climate change has been proposed as a potential contributor to the trend, and under such a mechanism, the phenolic content of DOC may also be increasing. This study explores the assessment of the phenolic character of DOC using multidimensional fluorescence spectroscopy as a more convenient alternative to traditional wet chemistry methods. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) is applied to fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) of humic samples to analyze inherent phenolic content. The PARAFAC results are correlated with phenol concentrations derived from the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent-based method. The reagent-based method reveals that the phenolic content of five International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) samples varies from approximately 5.2 to 22 ppm Tannic Acid Equivalents (TAE). A four-component PARAFAC fit is applied to the EEMs of the IHSS sample dataset and it is determined by PARAFAC score correlations with phenol concentrations from the reagent-based method that components C2, C3, and C4 have the highest probability of containing phenolic groups. The results show the potential for PARAFAC analysis of multidimensional fluorescence data for monitoring the phenolic content of DOC. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. Binding of dicamba to soluble and bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from aerobic activated sludge: a fluorescence quenching study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiangliang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daoyong; Chen, Xi; Song, Wenjuan; Wu, Fengchang

    2010-05-15

    Binding of dicamba to soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) from aerobic activated sludge was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Two protein-like fluorescence peaks (peak A with Ex/Em=225 nm/342-344 nm and peak B with Ex/Em=275/340-344 nm) were identified in SEPS and BEPS. Humic-like fluorescence peak C (Ex/Em=270-275 nm/450-460 nm) was only found in BEPS. Fluorescence of the peaks A and B for SEPS and peak A for BEPS were markedly quenched by dicamba at all temperatures whereas fluorescence of peaks B and C for BEPS was quenched only at 298 K. A dynamic process dominated the fluorescence quenching of peak A of both SEPS and BEPS. Fluorescence quenching of peak B and C was governed a static process. The effective quenching constants (logK(a)) were 4.725-5.293 for protein-like fluorophores of SEPS and 4.23-5.190 for protein-like fluorophores of BEPS, respectively. LogK(a) for humic-like substances was 3.85. Generally, SEPS had greater binding capacity for dicamba than BEPS, and protein-like substances bound dicamba more strongly than humic-like substances. Binding of dicamba to SEPS and BEPS was spontaneous and exothermic. Electrostatic force and hydrophobic interaction forces play a crucial role in binding of dicamba to EPS.

  2. Simple non-fluorescent polarity labeling of microtubules for molecular motor assays.

    PubMed

    Soppina, Virupakshi; Rai, Arpan; Mallik, Roop

    2009-06-01

    Transport of intracellular organelles along the microtubule cytoskeleton occurs in a bidirectional manner due to opposing activity of microtubule-associated motor proteins of the kinesin and dynein families. Regulation of this opposing activity and the resultant motion is believed to generate a polarized distribution of many organelles within the cell. The bidirectional motion can be reconstituted on in vitro assembled microtubules using organelles extracted from cells. This provides an opportunity to understand the regulation of intracellular transport through quantitative analysis of the motion of organelles in a controlled environment. Such analysis requires the use of polarity-labeled microtubules to resolve the plus and minus components of bidirectional motion. However, existing methods of in vitro microtubule polarity labeling are unsuitable for high-resolution recording of motion. Here we present a simple and reliable method that uses avidin-coated magnetic beads to prepare microtubules labeled at the minus end. The microtubule polarity can be identified without any need for fluorescence excitation. We demonstrate video-rate high-resolution imaging of single cellular organelles moving along plus and minus directions on labeled microtubules. Quantitative analysis of this motion indicates that these organelles are likely to be driven by multiple dynein motors in vivo.

  3. Biological Characteristics of Fluorescent Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Labeled Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-wei; Bai, Yu; Guo, Hui-hui

    2017-01-01

    Tracking transplanted stem cells is necessary to clarify cellular properties and improve transplantation success. In this study, we investigate the effects of fluorescent superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) (Molday ION Rhodamine-B™, MIRB) on biological properties of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and monitor hDPSCs in vitro and in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Morphological analysis showed that intracellular MIRB particles were distributed in the cytoplasm surrounding the nuclei of hDPSCs. 12.5–100 μg/mL MIRB all resulted in 100% labeling efficiency. MTT showed that 12.5–50 μg/mL MIRB could promote cell proliferation and MIRB over 100 μg/mL exhibited toxic effect on hDPSCs. In vitro MRI showed that 1 × 106 cells labeled with various concentrations of MIRB (12.5–100 μg/mL) could be visualized. In vivo MRI showed that transplanted cells could be clearly visualized up to 60 days after transplantation. These results suggest that 12.5–50 μg/mL MIRB is a safe range for labeling hDPSCs. MIRB labeled hDPSCs cell can be visualized by MRI in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that MIRB is a promising candidate for hDPSCs tracking in hDPSCs based dental pulp regeneration therapy. PMID:28298928

  4. Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers: evaluating fluorescent labels and functional surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Anderson, Aaron S; Grace, W Kevin; Shively, John E; Swanson, Basil I

    2009-02-01

    The sensor team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a waveguide-based optical biosensor for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease. We have previously demonstrated the application of this technology to the sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum and nipple aspirate fluid from breast cancer patients. In this publication, we report improvements to this technology that will facilitate transition to a point-of-care diagnostic system and/or robust research tool. The first improvement involved replacing phospholipid bilayers used for waveguide functionalization with self-assembled monolayers. These thin films are stable, specific, and robust silane-based surfaces that reduce nonspecific binding and enhance the signal to background ratio. Second, we have explored four different fluorescent labeling paradigms to determine the optimal procedure for use in the assay. Labeling the detector antibody with an organic dye (AlexaFluor 647) in the hinge region allows for unusual signal enhancement with repeat excitation (at 635 nm) in our assay format, thereby facilitating a better signal resolution at lower concentrations of the antigen. We have also labeled the detector antibody with photostable quantum dots through either the amine groups of lysine (Fc, NH) or using a histidine tag in the hinge region of the antibody (Hinge, H). Both labeling strategies allow for acceptable signal resolution, but quantum dots show much greater resistance to photobleaching than organic dyes.

  5. Polyvalent lactose-quantum dot conjugate for fluorescent labeling of live leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Yang, Yang; Han, Rongcheng; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Lijun; Hong, Yuankai; Li, Zhongjun; Sha, Yinlin

    2010-06-01

    Oligosaccharides play crucial roles in many biorecognition processes by the so-called "cluster glycosidic effect". We here report a facile synthesis of lactose-CdSeS/ZnS quantum dot conjugate (Lac-QDs) by use of 1-thiol-beta-D-lactose via ligand exchange, which exhibits significantly high affinity and specificity to leukocytes in contrast to the monovalent lactose. Structural analyses indicate that there are about 132 lactosyl molecules assembled on single QDs and the hydrodynamic diameter is small, close to 8.2 nm. Further, Lac-QDs display good fluorescence and physicochemical stability in physiological conditions, as well as extremely low cytotoxicity. These properties facilitate the use of Lac-QDs in fluorescent labeling of live leukocytes.

  6. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M.; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S.; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C.; Carlson, Markus A.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Paguirigan, Amy L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical ‘painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a ‘paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the ‘paint', we select and ‘paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  7. Quantification of surface functionalities on graphene, boron nitride and borocarbonitrides by fluorescence labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Manaswee; Sreedhara, M. B.; Pramoda, K.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2017-09-01

    Considering the important role played by surface functionalities, we have obtained quantitative estimates of the functionalities on graphene, BN and borocarbonitrides, by employing fluorescence labeling. Thus, the surface concentrations of carbonyl, carboxylic and hydroxyl groups on the graphene surface are 2.31 × 1020, 28.17 × 1020 and 0.08 × 1020 per gram respectively. We do not observe carbonyl groups on reduced graphene oxide. The surface concentration of the amine group on BN is 0.01 × 1020 per gram. Borocarbonitrides contain amine and oxygen functionalities, with composition dependent concentrations. Supercapacitor performance and ORR activity of the borocarbonitrides are presented along with their surface areas.

  8. Correlative fluorescence and scanning transmission electron microscopy of quantum dot-labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Bandmann, Vera; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, STEM can be accomplished in two ways. The microchip with the labeled cells and one microchip with a spacer are assembled into a special microfluidic device and imaged with dedicated high-voltage STEM. Alternatively, thin edges of cells can be studied with environmental scanning electron microscopy with a STEM detector, by placing a microchip with cells in a cooled wet environment. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluations of fluorescent or 149Promethium labeled Trastuzumab-polyethylenimine

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan; Nayak, Tapan; Cutler, Cathy; Atcher, Robert

    2015-12-30

    Radioimmunotherapy utilize a targeting antibody coupled to a therapeutic isotope to target and treat a tumor or disease. In this study we examine the synthesis and cell binding of a polymer scaffold containing a radiotherapeutic isotope and a targeting antibody. Methods: The multistep synthesis of a fluorescent or 149Promethium-labeled Trastuzumab-polyethyleneimine (PEI), Trastuzumab, or PEI is described. In vitro uptake, internalization and/or the binding affinity to the Her2/neu expressing human breast adenocarcinoma SKBr3 cells was investigated with the labeled compounds. Fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab-PEI was internalized more into cells at 2 and 18 h than fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab or PEI. The fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab was concentrated on the cell surface at 2 and 18 h and the labeled PEI had minimal uptake. DOTA-PEI was prepared and contained an average of 16 chelates per PEI; the compound was radio-labeled with 149Promethium and conjugated to Trastuzumab. The purified 149Pm-DOTA-PEI-Trastuzumab had a radiochemical purity of 96.7% and a specific activity of 0.118 TBq/g. The compound demonstrated a dissociation constant for the Her2/neu receptor of 20.30 ± 6.91 nM. In conclusion, the results indicate the DOTA-PEI-Trastuzumab compound has potential as a targeted therapeutic carrier, and future in vivo studies should be performed.

  10. [Study on the microstructure of fluorescent labelling ghee microcapsules by Tomoscan imaging].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zheng, Wei-wan; Zou, Jin; Zhang, Xue-chun; Liu, Fan

    2011-03-01

    In the present paper, fluorescein isothiocyanate was chosen as a fluorescence probe to mark casein protein in alkaline conditions. The interaction of the casein protein marked or not marked and fluorescein isothiocyanate was preliminarily discussed by the spectrum changes of UV-absorption and fluorescence spectrometry. Fluorescent marker was separated from SephadexG-50 chromatography column. With it as an emulsifier, the fluorescently-labeled ghee microcapsules were prepared by spray drying. And using laser scanning confocal microscope by tomoscan imaging to detect the microstructure of ghee microcapsules with the excitation of 488 nm argon-ion laser, the results showed that the casein protein assembled in the membrane surface of oil-water interface and microcapsules. The ghee microcapsules had two forms, namely mononuclear and multinuclear. The microcapsule was spherical. Its surface was smooth with no crack and no hollow. Its wall surface was intact and wall structure was relatively dense. The particle size showed obvious difference. Small particles attached to large particles, forming partial agglomerating powders to contribute to enhancing the solubility of microcapsules. These prove that the ghee microcapsule is an ideal microcapsule product.

  11. Novel In Vivo Model for Combinatorial Fluorescence Labeling in Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaolan; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Nickkholgh, Bita; Cline, J. Mark; Balaji, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The epithelial layer of prostate glands contains several types of cells, including luminal and basal cells. Yet there is paucity of animal models to study the cellular origin of normal or neoplastic development in the prostate to facilitate the treatment of heterogenous prostate diseases by targeting individual cell lineages. METHODS We developed a mouse model that expresses different types of fluorescent proteins (XFPs) specifically in prostatic cells. Using an in vivo stochastic fluorescent protein combinatorial strategy, XFP signals were expressed specifically in prostate of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and PKD1 double knock-out mice under the control of PB-Cre promoter. RESULTS In vivo XFP signals were observed in prostate of PKD1 knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and PTEN PKD1 double knock-out mice, which developed normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic prostate, respectively. The patchy expression pattern of XFPs in neoplasia tissue indicated the clonal origin of cancer cells in the prostate. CONCLUSIONS The transgenic mouse models demonstrate combinatorial fluorescent protein expression in normal and cancerous prostatic tissues. This novel prostate-specific fluorescent labeled mouse model, which we named Prorainbow, could be useful in studying benign and malignant pathology of prostate. PMID:25753731

  12. Linking fluorescence spectroscopy to diffuse soil source for dissolved humic substances in the Daning River, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Bing-Hui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter collected in Daning River (China) in July 2009 was investigated with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and fluorescence spectroscopy with the aim of identifying the origin of dissolved humic substance (HS) components. Two HS-like fluorescence components (peak M and C) with excitation/emission (ex/em) maxima at 305/406 nm and 360/464 nm showed relatively uniform distribution in the vertical direction for each sampling site but a trend of accumulation down the river, independent of the highly heterogeneous water environment as implicated by water quality parameters (i.e., water temperature, algae density, chlorophyll a, dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon, pH, conductivity and turbidity), while an amino acid/protein-like component (peak T; ex/em = 280/334 nm) was quite variable in its spatial distribution, implying strong influence from point sources (e.g. sewage discharge) and local microbial activities. The fluorescence intensity (F max in Raman units) at these ex/em wavelength pairs fell in the range of 0.031-0.358, 0.051-0.224 and 0.026-0.115 for peak T, M and C, respectively. In addition, the F max values of peak C covaried with M (i.e. C = 0.503 ×M, p < 0.01, R (2) = 0.973). Taken together, these results indicate that peak M and C originated primarily and directly from the same soil sources that were diffusive in the catchment, but peak T was more influenced by local point sources (e.g. wastewater discharge) and in situ microbial activities. This study presents new insights into the currently controversial origin of some HS components (e.g."peak M", as commonly referred to in the literature). This study highlights that natural water samples should be collected at various depths in addition to along a river/stream flow path so as to better evaluate the origin of HS fluorescence components.

  13. Development of Pseudorabies Virus Strains Expressing Red Fluorescent Proteins: New Tools for Multisynaptic Labeling Applications

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Bruce W.; Kaufman, Jessica D.; Randall, Jessica A.; Pickard, Gary E.

    2003-01-01

    The transsynaptic retrograde transport of the pseudorabies virus Bartha (PRV-Bartha) strain has become an important neuroanatomical tract-tracing technique. Recently, dual viral transneuronal labeling has been introduced by employing recombinant strains of PRV-Bartha engineered to express different reporter proteins. Dual viral transsynaptic tracing has the potential of becoming an extremely powerful method for defining connections of single neurons to multiple neural circuits in the brain. However, the present use of recombinant strains of PRV expressing different reporters that are driven by different promoters, inserted in different regions of the viral genome, and detected by different methods limits the potential of these recombinant virus strains as useful reagents. We previously constructed and characterized PRV152, a PRV-Bartha derivative that expresses the enhanced green fluorescent protein. The development of a strain isogenic to PRV152 and differing only in the fluorescent reporter would have great utility for dual transsynaptic tracing. In this report, we describe the construction, characterization, and application of strain PRV614, a PRV-Bartha derivative expressing a novel monomeric red fluorescent protein, mRFP1. In contrast to viruses expressing DsRed and DsRed2, PRV614 displayed robust fluorescence both in cell culture and in vivo following transsynaptic transport through autonomic circuits afferent to the eye. Transneuronal retrograde dual PRV labeling has the potential to be a powerful addition to the neuroanatomical tools for investigation of neuronal circuits; the use of strain PRV614 in combination with strain PRV152 will eliminate many of the pitfalls associated with the presently used pairs of PRV recombinants. PMID:12941921

  14. Dynamic interactions of fluorescently labeled microtubule-associated proteins in living cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) from calf brain were fluorescently labeled with 6-iodoacetamido fluorescein (I-AF). The modified MAPs (especially enriched for MAP2) were fully active in promoting tubulin polymerization in vitro and readily associated with cytoplasmic filaments when microinjected into living cultured cells. Double-labeling experiments indicated that the microinjected AF-MAPs were incorporated predominantly, if not exclusively, into cytoplasmic microtubules in untreated cells or paracrystals induced within vinblastine-treated cells. Similar results were obtained with different cell types (neuronal, epithelial, and fibroblastic) of diverse origin (man, mouse, chicken, and rat kangaroo). Mobility measurements of the microinjected AF-MAPs using the method of fluorescence-photobleaching recovery (FPR) revealed two populations of AF-MAPs with distinct dynamic properties: One fraction represents the soluble pool of MAPs and is mobile with a diffusion coefficient of D = 3 X 10(-9) cm2/s. The other fraction of MAPs is associated with the microtubules and is essentially immobile on the time scale of FPR experiments. However, it showed slow fluorescence recovery with an apparent half time of approximately 5 min. The slow recovery of fluorescence on defined photobleached microtubules occurred most probably by the incorporation of AF-MAPs from the soluble cytoplasmic pool into the bleached area. The bleached spot on defined microtubules remained essentially immobile during the slow recovery phase. These results suggest that MAPs can associate in vivo with microtubules of diverse cell types and that treadmilling of MAP2-containing microtubules in vivo, if it exists, is slower than 4 micron/h. PMID:6547721

  15. A novel fluorescent label based on organic dye-doped silica nanoparticles for HepG liver cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxiao; Duan, Jinghua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Lin, Xia; He, Chunmei

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we report a method for the recognition of HepG liver cancer cells with the use of a novel fluorescent label based on organic dye-doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles. The novel organic dye-doped silica nanoparticles are prepared with a water-in-oil microemulsion technique. The silica network is produced by the controlled synchronous hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane and 3-amino-propyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The organic dye fluorescein isothiocyanate is doped inside as a luminescent signaling element, through covalent bonding to the amino group of APTES. The organic dye-doped core-shell nanoparticles are highly luminescent and exhibit minimal dye leaching and excellent photostability. A novel fluorescent label method based on biological fluorescent nanoparticles has been developed. The dye-doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles are covalently immobilized with anti-human liver cancer monoclonal antibody HAb18. We have used antibody-labeled fluorescent nanoparticles to recognize HepG liver cancer cells. It has been observed that the bioassay based on the organic dye-doped nanoparticles can identify the target cells selectively and efficiently. The fluorescent nanoparticle label also exhibits high photostability.

  16. HyperSpectral imaging microscopy for identification and quantitative analysis of fluorescently-labeled cells in highly autofluorescent tissue

    PubMed Central

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Annamdevula, Naga; Boni, John; Stocker, Samantha; Grant, Kristin; Troyanovsky, Boris; Rich, Thomas C.; Alvarez, Diego F.

    2012-01-01

    Standard fluorescence microscopy approaches rely on measurements at single excitation and emission bands to identify specific fluorophores and the setting of thresholds to quantify fluorophore intensity. This is often insufficient to reliably resolve and quantify fluorescent labels in tissues due to high autofluorescence. Here we describe the use of hyperspectral analysis techniques to resolve and quantify fluorescently labeled cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. This approach allowed accurate detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP) emission spectra, even when GFP intensity was as little as 15% of the autofluorescence intensity. GFP-expressing cells were readily quantified with zero false positives detected. In contrast, when the same images were analyzed using standard (single-band) thresholding approaches, either few GFP cells (high thresholds) or substantial false positives (intermediate and low thresholds) were detected. These results demonstrate that hyperspectral analysis approaches uniquely offer accurate and precise detection and quantification of fluorescence signals in highly autofluorescent tissues. PMID:21987373

  17. Real-time label-free quantitative fluorescence microscopy-based detection of ATP using a tunable fluorescent nano-aptasensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Sohn, Il-Yung; Son, Young-Min; Lee, Won-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-11-01

    Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces, thereby providing cytotoxicity assessment. Compared with conventional fluorescence spectrometry methods, our highly efficient, universally applicable, and rational approach will facilitate broader implementation of imaging-based biosensing platforms for the quantitative evaluation of a range of target molecules.Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (r

  18. Fluorescently labeled adrenomedullin allows real-time monitoring of adrenomedullin receptor trafficking in living cells.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Ria; Kaiser, Anette; Holze, Cathleen; Babilon, Stefanie; Köbberling, Johannes; Riedl, Bernd; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2015-12-01

    The human adrenomedullin (ADM) is a 52 amino acid peptide hormone belonging to the calcitonin family of peptides, which plays a major role in the development and regulation of cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. For potential use in clinical applications, we aimed to investigate the fate of the peptide ligand after binding and activation of the adrenomedullin receptor (AM1), a heterodimer consisting of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a G protein-coupled receptor, associated with the receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). Full length and N-terminally shortened ADM peptides were synthesized using Fmoc/tBu solid phase peptide synthesis and site-specifically labeled with the fluorophore carboxytetramethylrhodamine (Tam) either by amide bond formation or copper(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, Tam-labeled ligands allowed the observation of co-internalization of the whole ligand-receptor complex in living cells co-transfected with fluorescent fusion proteins of CLR and RAMP2. Application of a fluorescent probe to track lysosomal compartments revealed that ADM together with the CLR/RAMP2-complex is routed to the degradative pathway. Moreover, we found that the N-terminus of ADM is not a crucial component of the peptide sequence in terms of AM1 internalization behavior.

  19. Resonant waveguide grating biosensor-enabled label-free and fluorescence detection of cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Zaytseva, Natalya; Lynn, Jeffery G.; Wu, Qi; Mudaliar, Deepti J.; Sun, Haiyan; Kuang, Patty Q.; Fang, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is fundamental to many distinct aspects of cell biology, and has been an active topic for label-free biosensors. However, little attention has been paid to study the impact of receptor signaling on the cell adhesion process. We here report the development of resonant waveguide grating biosensor-enabled label-free and fluorescent approaches, and their use for investigating the adhesion of an engineered HEK-293 cell line stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) onto distinct surfaces under both ambient and physiological conditions. Results showed that cell adhesion is sensitive to both temperature and ECM coating, and distinct mechanisms govern the cell adhesion process under different conditions. The β2-AR agonists, but not its antagonists or partial agonists, were found to be capable of triggering signaling during the adhesion process, leading to an increase in the adhesion of the engineered cells onto fibronectin-coated biosensor surfaces. These results suggest that the dual approach presented is useful to investigate the mechanism of cell adhesion, and to identify drug molecules and receptor signaling that interfere with cell adhesion. PMID:24319319

  20. Vital fluorescent labeling for confocal scanning microscopic study of living cell invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Allan Z.; Chen, Jian M.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Wang, Jane C.

    1997-07-01

    Invasion by cells with malignant or transformed phenotypes precedes destruction of adjacent tissue and fatal cell metastasis. State-of-the-art confocal laser scanning technology facilitates both in vitro and in vivo research into cell invasion and metastasis. In particular, studies performed with living cells yield more precise information than those with fixed cells, giving new insight into cell invasion and metastasis. We have tested a variety of vital florescent dyes and fluorogenic protease substrates in our studies of invasion of cartilage by transformed synoviocytes or osteosarcoma cells. The fluorescent dyes tested include Calcein acetoxy methyl-FITC (Calcein), Hoechst 33342 (Hoechst), CellTracker, DiI, DiO, DiD, and ethidium bromide (EB). The fluorogenic protease substrate used Meoxysuccinyl-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-AFC (MOS-GPLGP-AFC) for detection of collagenase activity. We found that Calcein-FITC labeling permitted the clearest direct observation of the penetration of transformed synoviocytes and osteosarcoma cells into cartilage. Even better results were obtained when chondrocyte nuclei were counter-stained with Hoechst 33342. During the invasion process, collagenase activity was observed around the synoviocyte in the cartilage matrix labeled with the fluorogenic collagenase substrate. We concluded that of the vital fluorescent dyes tested, a combined application of Calcein-FITC, Hoechst 23223, and MOS- GPLGP-AFC is most appropriate for the study of the cell invasion process.

  1. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I.

    2014-05-01

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  2. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I

    2014-05-16

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  3. Novel fluorescently labeled peptide compounds for detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein at high specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Oe, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Yoji; Ebina, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    The probes for specific detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in plasma and in atherosclerotic plaques are expected to be useful for the identification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for atherosclerosis. In this study, to develop a fluorescent peptide probe for specific detection of ox-LDL, we investigated the interaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled peptides with ox-LDL using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two heptapeptides (KWYKDGD and KP6) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the N-terminus to FITC in the presence/absence of 6-amino-n-caproic acid (AC) linker to FITC--(FITC-AC)KP6 and (FITC)KP6--both bound with high specificity to ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, a tetrapeptide (YKDG) labeled with FITC at the N-terminus and a pentapeptide (YKDGK) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the C-terminus to FITC did not bind selectively to ox-LDL. Furthermore, (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 bound with high specificity to the protein in mouse plasma (probably ox-LDL fraction). These findings strongly suggest that (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 may be effective novel fluorescent probes for specific detection of ox-LDL.

  4. [Comparison of sorting of fluorescently and magnetically labelled dental pulp stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kerényi, Farkas; Tarapcsák, Szabolcs; Hrubi, Edit; Baráthne, Szabó Ágnes; Hegedüs, Viktória; Balogh, Sára; Bágyi, Kinga; Varga, Gábor; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells are present in many tissues, such as dental pulp. Stem cells can be easily isolated from dental pulp because third molars are often removed from patients. Stem cells could be separated from the tissue derived heterogeneous cell population. There are two main methods to separate a cell type from the other ones: the fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and the magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). The aim of this study was to compare these methods' effect on cell surviving and population growth after sorting on dental pulp cells. The anti-STRO-1 antibody was used as primary antibody to specifically label stem cells. Two secondary antibodies were used: magnetic or fluorescent labelled. We sorted the cells by MACS or by FACS or by combination of both (MACS-FACS). Our results show that the effectivity of MACS and FACS sorting are comparable while of MACS-FACS was significantly higher (MACS 79.53 ± 5.78%, FACS 88.27 ± 3.70%, MACS-FACS 98.43 ± 0.67%). The cell surviving and the post-sorting population growth, on the contrary, are very different. The cell population is growing on first week after MACS but after FACS did not. Moreover, after MACS-FACS, on first week the cell number of population decreased. Taken together, our results suggest to use MACS instead of FACS, at least in case of sorting dental pulp stem cells with anti-STRO-1 antibody.

  5. Versatile Synthesis and Fluorescent Labeling of ZIF-90 Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher G; Stavila, Vitalie; Conroy, Marissa A; Feng, Patrick; Slaughter, Brandon V; Ashley, Carlee E; Allendorf, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    We describe a versatile method for the synthesis and fluorescent labeling of ZIF-90 nanoparticles (NPs). Gram-scale quantities of NPs can be produced under mild conditions, circumventing the need for high temperatures and extended reaction periods required by existing procedures. Monitoring the reaction in situ using UV-vis spectroscopy reveals that ZIF-90 NP nucleation in solution starts within seconds. In addition to reporting a method to reproducibly form sub-100 nm ZIF-90 particles, we show that particles of various sizes can be produced, ranging from 30 to 1000 nm, by altering amine chemistry or reaction temperature. The presence of linker aldehyde groups on the NP surface allows for postsynthetic labeling with amine-functionalized fluorescent dyes, providing utility for imaging within biological systems. In vitro cell studies show that ZIF-90 NPs have a high rate of cellular internalization, provide finite degradation periods of the order of several weeks, and are biocompatible with six different cell lines (>90% viable when incubated with NPs for up to 7 days). These features highlight the potential for use of ZIF-90 nanostructures in bioimaging and targeted drug delivery applications.

  6. Fluorescently Labeled Human Papillomavirus Pseudovirions for Use in Virus Entry Experiments.

    PubMed

    Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Schelhaas, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect skin or mucosal epidermis. The simplistic capsid consists of a major capsid protein L1, a minor capsid protein L2, and a double-stranded circular DNA of about 8 kB in size. The development of HPV-based vectors [i.e., pseudovirions (PsV)] as tools to study the initial infection has facilitated our understanding of HPV entry. The covalent coupling of fluorescent molecules to these PsV allows following the viruses en route to the nucleus, i.e., the site of replication. In the first section, we describe a facile method to covalently label HPV PsV that retain their infectivity. In this method, fluorophores coupled to a reactive succinimidyl ester are covalently attached to amine residues in the virion in a one-step chemical reaction. In the second section of this unit, several assays are outlined that use the fluorescently labeled virions for entry studies in live and fixed cells.

  7. Retrograde Fluorescent Labeling Allows for Targeted Extracellular Single-unit Recording from Identified Neurons In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lyons-Warren, Ariel M.; Kohashi, Tsunehiko; Mennerick, Steven; Carlson, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of this method is to record single-unit responses from an identified population of neurons. In vivo electrophysiological recordings from individual neurons are critical for understanding how neural circuits function under natural conditions. Traditionally, these recordings have been performed 'blind', meaning the identity of the recorded cell is unknown at the start of the recording. Cellular identity can be subsequently determined via intracellular1, juxtacellular2 or loose-patch3 iontophoresis of dye, but these recordings cannot be pre-targeted to specific neurons in regions with functionally heterogeneous cell types. Fluorescent proteins can be expressed in a cell-type specific manner permitting visually-guided single-cell electrophysiology4-6. However, there are many model systems for which these genetic tools are not available. Even in genetically accessible model systems, the desired promoter may be unknown or genetically homogenous neurons may have varying projection patterns. Similarly, viral vectors have been used to label specific subgroups of projection neurons7, but use of this method is limited by toxicity and lack of trans-synaptic specificity. Thus, additional techniques that offer specific pre-visualization to record from identified single neurons in vivo are needed. Pre-visualization of the target neuron is particularly useful for challenging recording conditions, for which classical single-cell recordings are often prohibitively difficult8-11. The novel technique described in this paper uses retrograde transport of a fluorescent dye applied using tungsten needles to rapidly and selectively label a specific subset of cells within a particular brain region based on their unique axonal projections, thereby providing a visual cue to obtain targeted electrophysiological recordings from identified neurons in an intact circuit within a vertebrate CNS. The most significant novel advancement of our method is the use of fluorescent labeling

  8. Dual fluorescent labelling of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum for the analysis of the ABC type transporter pfmdr2.

    PubMed

    Rosental, Benyamin; Hadad, Uzi; Sinay, Rosa; Braiman, Alex; Porgador, Angel; Pollack, Yaakov

    2012-11-08

    The study of the Plasmodium falciparum heavy metal transporter gene pfmdr2 employed radioactive labelled heavy metal. As the use of radioactive isotopes shrank considerably during the last few years, resulting in the cessation of the production of some isotopes, amongst them Cadmium109 which was used for that purpose, a different approach had to be developed. Herein, a dual fluorescent labelling of heavy metals accumulation in the P. falciparum parasite is proposed as an alternative to the use of radioactive labelled heavy metals. Plasmodium falciparum Cd resistant and sensitive strains at the trophozoite stage were used in this study. The cells were cultured at different CdCl2 concentrations and for different time periods followed by staining of the infected red blood cells with Fluo-3/AM for Cd detection and Hoechst 33342 for parasite DNA labelling. The fluorescent analysis was done by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The results show that the sensitive strain has a higher Fluo-3/AM fluorescence in a Cd concentration and time dependent manner, whereas in the resistant strain Fluo-3/AM fluorescence levels were negligible and increased only at high concentrations of Cd and at long incubation periods, but to a much lesser extent than the sensitive strain. No Cd uptake is observed in uninfected red blood cells populations originating from cultures infected with either sensitive or resistant strain. In addition, confocal microscopy overlay of Fluo-3/AM and Hoechst staining shows that the Cd metal accumulates in the parasite itself. The dual fluorescent labelling is a valid method for detecting heavy metal accumulation in P. falciparum. Furthermore, in contrast to the use of radioactive labelled heavy metal, the fluorescent labelling enables us to differentiate between the different populations existing in a P. falciparum infected red blood cells cultures and thus actually study a phenomenon at the level of a single cell.

  9. Proliferation/apoptosis determination by tissue cytometry in gastrointestinal fresh frozen sections using triple labeling and automated scanning fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, Jozsef; Sipos, Ferenc; Ficsor, Levente; Varga, Viktor S.; Tulassay, Zsolt; Tarnok, Attila; Molnár, Béla

    2006-02-01

    Proliferation/apoptosis balance is an important information in gastrointestinal ulcerative and malignant diseases. Immunohistochemical staining and visual counting is routine procedure. Recently we reported a new scanning fluorescence technique for automated motorized microscopes (SFM). Development of triple fluorescent labeling method for proliferating/apoptotic/resting cells and application of SFM for the automated analysis and counting on gastric biopsy specimen. Routine antral biopsy specimens by gastroscopy were fresh frozen and 5 micron sections were prepared. Proliferation was detected using a PCNA antibody, anti-mouse-biotin and streptavidin-Texas-Red labeling system. Apoptotic cells was labeled using the TUNEL reaction with FITC bound nucleotids. DAPI nuclear counter staining was applied. Labeled sections were scanned and digitized in the three fluorescent channels. SFM was modified to detect epithelial surface, glands in the biopsy specimen. Automated nuclei detection, PCNA and TUNEL detection was performed, ratio was calculated. In parallel standard biopsies were labeled with PCNA and AEC. TUNEL reaction was performed. Up to 1000 epithelial cells were manually counted. The mean PCNA labeling in healthy samples were 45,3+/-12,4%, that significantly increased to 56.4+/-8.7% in H. Pylori positive cases. Positive TUNEL reaction was found in 2,9+/-1,1% in H. pylori negative cases, while in the H. Pylori positive cases the apoptotic ratio was significantly increased (14.1+/-3.2%, p<0.05). Significant correlation in apoptosis/proliferation ratio between the SFM and routine methods could be observed (p<0,05). SFM procedure proved to be more time efficient both in labeling, both in detection procedures. Triple fluorescent labeling and automated fluorescence microscopy is an applicable tool for the proliferation, apoptosis determination in fresh frozen samples.

  10. Photodamage of Lipid Bilayers by Irradiation of a Fluorescently Labeled Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A.; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptides can translocate into cells by endocytosis and upon light irradiation, lyse the endocytic vesicles. This photo-inducible endosomolytic activity of Fl-CPPs can be used to efficiently deliver macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids and other small organic molecules into the cytosol of live cells. The requirement of a light trigger to induce photolysis provides a more spatial and temporal control to the intracellular delivery process. Methods In this report, we examine the molecular level mechanisms by which cell-penetrating peptides such as TAT when labeled with small organic fluorophore molecules acquire a photo-induced lytic activity using a simplified model of lipid vesicles. Results The peptide TAT labeled with 5(6)-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine binds to negatively charged phospholipids, thereby bringing the fluorophore in close proximity to the membrane of liposomes. Upon light irradiation, the excited fluorophore produces reactive oxygen species at the lipid bilayer and oxidation of the membrane is achieved. In addition, the fluorescent peptide causes aggregation of photo-oxidized lipids, an activity that requires the presence of arginine residues in the peptide sequence. Conclusions These results suggest that the cell penetrating peptide plays a dual role. On one hand, TAT targets a conjugated fluorophore to membranes. On the other hand, TAT participates directly in the destabilization of photosensitized membranes. Peptide and fluorophore therefore appear to act in synergy to destroy membranes efficiently. General Significance Understanding the mechanism behind Fl-CPP mediated membrane photodamage will help to design optimally photo-endosomolytic compounds. PMID:24135456

  11. Handheld confocal laser endomicroscopic imaging utilizing tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to identify experimental glioma cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Georges, Joseph; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F; Feuerstein, Burt G; Preul, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that handheld confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can be used with various nonspecific fluorescent dyes to improve the microscopic identification of brain tumor and its boundaries. Here, we show that CLE can be used experimentally with tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to define glioma margins in vivo. Thirteen rats underwent craniectomy and in vivo imaging 21 days after implantation with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled U251 (n = 7) cells or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing F98 cells (n = 6). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated EGFR fluorescent antibody (FITC-EGFR) was applied for contrast in F98 tumors. Confocal images of normal brain, obvious tumor, and peritumoral zones were collected using the CLE system. Bench-top confocal microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were correlated with CLE images. GFP and FITC-EGFR fluorescence of glioma cells were detected by in vivo visible-wavelength fluorescence CLE. CLE of GFP-labeled tumors revealed bright individual satellite tumor cells within peritumoral tissue, a definitive tumor border, and subcellular structures. Imaging with FITC-EGFR labeling provided weaker contrast in F98-EGFR tumors but was able to delineate tumor cells. Imaging with both methods in various tumor regions correlated with standard confocal imaging and clinical histology. These data suggest that in vivo CLE of selectively tagged neoplasms could allow specific interactive identification of tumoral areas. Imaging of GFP and FITC-EGFR provides real-time histologic information precisely related to the site of microscopic imaging of tumor.

  12. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H G; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-02

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ≈150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.

  13. Cell and tissue dynamics during Tribolium embryogenesis revealed by versatile fluorescence labeling approaches

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Matthew A.; Akam, Michael; Pavlopoulos, Anastasios

    2013-01-01

    Studies on new arthropod models such as the beetle Tribolium castaneum are shifting our knowledge of embryonic patterning and morphogenesis beyond the Drosophila paradigm. In contrast to Drosophila, Tribolium embryos exhibit the short-germ type of development and become enveloped by extensive extra-embryonic membranes, the amnion and serosa. The genetic basis of these processes has been the focus of active research. Here, we complement genetic approaches with live fluorescence imaging of Tribolium embryos to make the link between gene function and morphogenetic cell behaviors during blastoderm formation and differentiation, germband condensation and elongation, and extra-embryonic development. We first show that transient labeling methods result in strong, homogeneous and persistent expression of fluorescent markers in Tribolium embryos, labeling the chromatin, membrane, cytoskeleton or combinations thereof. We then use co-injection of fluorescent markers with dsRNA for live imaging of embryos with disrupted caudal gene function caused by RNA interference. Using these approaches, we describe and compare cell and tissue dynamics in Tribolium embryos with wild-type and altered fate maps. We find that Tribolium germband condensation is effected by cell contraction and intercalation, with the latter being dependent on the anterior-posterior patterning system. We propose that germband condensation drives initiation of amnion folding, whereas expansion of the amniotic fold and closure of the amniotic cavity are likely driven by contraction of an actomyosin cable at the boundary between the amnion and serosa. Our methodology provides a comprehensive framework for testing quantitative models of patterning, growth and morphogenetic mechanisms in Tribolium and other arthropod species. PMID:23861059

  14. Cell and tissue dynamics during Tribolium embryogenesis revealed by versatile fluorescence labeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Benton, Matthew A; Akam, Michael; Pavlopoulos, Anastasios

    2013-08-01

    Studies on new arthropod models such as the beetle Tribolium castaneum are shifting our knowledge of embryonic patterning and morphogenesis beyond the Drosophila paradigm. In contrast to Drosophila, Tribolium embryos exhibit the short-germ type of development and become enveloped by extensive extra-embryonic membranes, the amnion and serosa. The genetic basis of these processes has been the focus of active research. Here, we complement genetic approaches with live fluorescence imaging of Tribolium embryos to make the link between gene function and morphogenetic cell behaviors during blastoderm formation and differentiation, germband condensation and elongation, and extra-embryonic development. We first show that transient labeling methods result in strong, homogeneous and persistent expression of fluorescent markers in Tribolium embryos, labeling the chromatin, membrane, cytoskeleton or combinations thereof. We then use co-injection of fluorescent markers with dsRNA for live imaging of embryos with disrupted caudal gene function caused by RNA interference. Using these approaches, we describe and compare cell and tissue dynamics in Tribolium embryos with wild-type and altered fate maps. We find that Tribolium germband condensation is effected by cell contraction and intercalation, with the latter being dependent on the anterior-posterior patterning system. We propose that germband condensation drives initiation of amnion folding, whereas expansion of the amniotic fold and closure of the amniotic cavity are likely driven by contraction of an actomyosin cable at the boundary between the amnion and serosa. Our methodology provides a comprehensive framework for testing quantitative models of patterning, growth and morphogenetic mechanisms in Tribolium and other arthropod species.

  15. A simple and sensitive label-free fluorescence sensing of heparin based on Cdte quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, B; Shahshahanipour, M; Ensafi, Ali A

    2016-06-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive label-free fluorescence method was developed for the determination of trace amounts of an important drug, heparin. This new method was based on water-soluble glutathione-capped CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) as the luminescent probe. CdTe QDs were prepared according to the published protocol and the sizes of these nanoparticles were verified through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) with an average particle size of about 7 nm. The fluorescence intensity of glutathione-capped CdTe QDs increased with increasing heparin concentration. These changes were followed as the analytical signal. Effective variables such as pH, QD concentration and incubation time were optimized. At the optimum conditions, with this optical method, heparin could be measured within the range 10.0-200.0 ng mL(-1) with a low limit of detection, 2.0 ng mL(-1) . The constructed fluorescence sensor was also applied successfully for the determination of heparin in human serum. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Easy visualization of the protist Oxyrrhis marina grazing on a live fluorescently labelled heterotrophic nanoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cereceda, Mercedes; Williams, Richard A J; Novarino, Gianfranco

    2008-07-01

    Planktonic heterotrophic flagellates are ubiquitous eukaryotic microorganisms that play a crucial role in carbon and nutrient fluxes through pelagic food webs. Here we illustrate for the first time a grazing model of planktonic dinoflagellate, Oxyrrhis marina, on the heterotrophic nanoflagellate Goniomonas amphinema, using the DNA-binding fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. A solution of 1 microg/mL of the fluorochrome allowed viability of the prey for at least 48 hours, provided low fluorescence quenching, and labelled the flagellate without masking the cytoplasm. After 2 hours of contact between the fluorescent prey and the predator, O. marina population had preyed on live G. amphinema at an ingestion rate of 2.2 prey Oxyrrhis (-1) h(-1). Results show that this model is a time-effective and inexpensive approach for the direct observation of heterotrophic flagellate grazing. The fact that prey remain alive while predation occurs, as well as the low rate of quenching, could be of help in studying the fate of real-time trophic interactions between protists in microbial webs.

  17. Calcium ion fluorescence detection using liposomes containing Alexa-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuvan; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2002-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation and characterization of calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes and their application for the determination of calcium ions in aqueous samples. Calmodulin (CaM), a calcium ion-binding protein labeled with the fluorophore Alexa-488 is embedded in the membrane of unilamellar liposomes. Upon calcium ion binding, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change that exposes its hydrophobic core and affects the fluorescence intensity of the attached fluorophore. Characterization studies of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes reveal that embedding calmodulin molecules in the bilayer membrane of liposomes extends the lifetime of the calcium ion binding activity of calmodulin by about fourfold compared to the lifetime of its calcium-binding activity in free solution. Moreover, the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes is about threefold higher than the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM in solution. The improvement in the calcium ion detection properties is attributed to the interaction between calmodulin, a membranal protein, and the hydrophobic phospholipids of the liposomes. The analytical properties of the calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes are discussed.

  18. Three-State Fluorescence of a 2-Functionalized Pyrene-Based RNA Label.

    PubMed

    Reuss, Andreas J; Grünewald, Christian; Gustmann, Henrik; Engels, Joachim W; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2017-04-13

    The pyrene-based RNA-fluorescence label 2-(2-pyrenylethynyl) adenosine (2PyA) shows triexponential fluorescence, which depends strongly on the excitation wavelength. Most strikingly, a structured, long-lived fluorescence is observed in solution at room temperature after excitation into the S2 state, which is shifted hypsochromically by 30 nm compared to excitation into the S1 state. This very unusual behavior is investigated in detail with steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy, ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations with both wave functions (CC2-level) and density-functional theory (DFT). 2PyA is found to emit simultaneously from two different intramolecular charge transfer states (mesomeric and twisted, MICT and TICT) which are populated most efficiently via the S1 state and a pyrene-like locally excited (LE) state. Rotational momentum derived from excess excitation energy is required to populate twisted LE configurations. Therefore, the LE state is most efficiently accessible via excitation to the S2. The stabilization of the different substates is related to two distinct reaction coordinates: the adenine-pyrene distance and the adenine-pyrene tilt angle, respectively.

  19. Determination of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and some of its metabolites in urine and serum by high-performance liquid chromatography using fluorescent pre-column labelling.

    PubMed

    Staffeldt, B; Brockmöller, J; Roots, I

    1991-11-15

    Pre-column labelling techniques are described for the determination of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (CMC) and its metabolites in urine and plasma samples by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) without prior extraction. All substances containing an amino group were converted into fluorescent fluorenylmethyl derivatives with 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC). Deaminated or N-acetylated carbocysteine metabolites were coupled with 1-pyrenyldiazomethane (PDAM) to give fluorescent PDAM esters. Similar results were obtained with the two commercially available and stable diazomethane derivatives PDAM and 9-anthryldiazomethane (ADAM). Following double derivatization with PDAM and FMOC, in a single chromatographic run with two fluorescence detectors connected in series, amines and amino(carboxylic) acids could be detected by their FMOC residues and, simultaneously, carboxylic acids were detected as fluorescent PDAM esters. The (R) and (S) enantiomers of the sulphoxides of CMC, of methylcysteine and of N-acetyl CMC were separated, although the reversed-phase HPLC system did not contain a chiral additive or stationary phase designed for the separation of enantiomers. The methods do not include liquid extraction steps and can therefore be performed either manually or automatically using an HPLC autosampler. These methods were used for the investigation of a disputed pharmacogenetic polymorphism of S-oxidation of CMC in humans, which until now has most often been studied using paper chromatography. The described techniques were applied to the determination of CMC and its metabolites in human urine and plasma samples.

  20. The effect of overhanging nucleotides on fluorescence properties of hybridising oligonucleotides labelled with Alexa-488 and FAM fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Noble, J E; Wang, L; Cole, K D; Gaigalas, A K

    2005-03-01

    In order to rationally select and design probes for real-time PCR, we have determined the influence of the overhang region of the complementary strand on the resulting fluorescence from a hybridising probe. A series of target oligonucleotides, each with a unique 3' overhang (4 bases), was hybridised to either 5' fluorescein (FAM)- or Alexa-488-labelled probes, and the changes in fluorescence properties were monitored. We found that the number of guanine bases in the overhang region of the target oligonucleotides was proportional to the amount of fluorescence quenching observed for both the FAM and Alexa-488 dyes. FAM appeared to be more sensitive to guanine-induced quenching with three and four guanine bases resulting in greater than a twofold decrease in the quantum yield of the fluorophore compared to the no-overhang target. In addition, we found that adenine bases caused fluorescence quenching of the Alexa-488-labelled probe, whereas the FAM-labelled probe appeared insensitive. The quenching data, generated with the steady-state fluorescence measurements, displayed a linear correlation with that obtained using a fluorescent thermal cycler, suggesting the applicability to real-time PCR measurements. Anisotropy data from the series of duplexes correlated with the fluorescence quantum yield, suggesting that quenching was accompanied by increased dye mobility.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of radioactive and fluorescent residualizing labels for monitoring protein degradation in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Residualizing labels for proteins, such as dilactitol-{sup 125}I-tyramine, are tracers which have been used to identify the tissue and cellular sites of catabolism of long-lived plasma proteins, such as albumin. The radioactive degradation products formed from labeled proteins are relatively large and hydrophilic. These tracers accumulate in lysosomes following uptake and catabolism of the carrier protein. However, the gradual loss of the catabolites from cells has limited the usefulness of these radioactive labels in studies on longer-lived proteins. The objective of this dissertation was to design a radioactive residualizing label, Inulin-{sup 125}I-tyramine ({sup 125}I-InTn), that would be retained more efficiently in cells than existing labels and to develop and evaluate the first fluorescent residualizing label, N,N-dilactitol-N{prime}-fluoresceinyl-ethylenediamine (DLF).

  2. Detection of miRNA in cell cultures by using microchip electrophoresis with a fluorescence-labeled riboprobe.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Shohei; Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Abe, Kaori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of a microRNA (miRNA), miR-222 isolated from the PC12 cell line, was performed by use of the ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay, cyanine 5 (Cy5)-labeled miR-222 riboprobe, and a Hitachi SV1210 microchip electrophoresis system, which can be used to evaluate the integrity of total RNA. The fluorescence intensity corresponding to the protected RNA fragment increased in a dose-dependent manner with respect to the complementary-strand RNA. More highly sensitive detection of miRNA by microchip electrophoresis than by conventional method using fluorescence-labeled riboprobe could be obtained in 180 s. An obvious increase in miR-222 expression induced by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells could be observed. These results clearly indicate the potential of microchip electrophoresis for the analysis of miRNA using RNase protection assay with a fluorescence-labeled riboprobe.

  3. Detection of miRNA in Cell Cultures by Using Microchip Electrophoresis with a Fluorescence-Labeled Riboprobe

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Shohei; Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Abe, Kaori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of a microRNA (miRNA), miR-222 isolated from the PC12 cell line, was performed by use of the ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay, cyanine 5 (Cy5)-labeled miR-222 riboprobe, and a Hitachi SV1210 microchip electrophoresis system, which can be used to evaluate the integrity of total RNA. The fluorescence intensity corresponding to the protected RNA fragment increased in a dose-dependent manner with respect to the complementary-strand RNA. More highly sensitive detection of miRNA by microchip electrophoresis than by conventional method using fluorescence-labeled riboprobe could be obtained in 180 s. An obvious increase in miR-222 expression induced by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells could be observed. These results clearly indicate the potential of microchip electrophoresis for the analysis of miRNA using RNase protection assay with a fluorescence-labeled riboprobe. PMID:22969361

  4. Post-modification of a MOF through a fluorescent-labeling technology for the selective sensing and adsorption of Ag+ in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lejie; Jian, Yuan; Wang, Jian; He, Cheng; Li, Xuezhao; Liu, Tao; Duan, Chunying

    2012-09-14

    A new approach inspired by fluorescent labeling technology to fluorescently functionalize MOFs via post-modification is reported. A fluorescein-containing MOF FITC@BTPY-NH(2) was synthesized for selective sensing and adsorption of Ag(+) in aqueous solution.

  5. In situ fluorescence labelling of jasmonic acid binding sites in plant tissues with cadmium-free quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qiumei; Yu, Ying; Cao, Yujuan; Lin, Bixia; Wei, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescence labelling of plant hormone binding sites is an important analytical technique in research on the molecular mechanisms of plant hormone activities. The authors synthesised a jasmonic acid (JA)-conjugated ZnS:Mn quantum dot (QD) probe, with a cubic structure and average hydrodynamic sizes of about 17.0 nm. The maximum fluorescence emission of the probe was recorded at about 585 nm. The probe was used for fluorescence labelling of JA binding sites in mung bean seedling tissues. Analysis revealed that the probe exhibited high selectivity to JA binding sites and good performance in eliminating interference from background fluorescence in plant tissues. In addition, the probe did not exhibit any apparent biotoxicity, and is much more suitable than probes constructed from CdTe QDs for the analysis of biological samples.

  6. Fluorescent vancomycin and terephthalate comodified europium-doped layered double hydroxides nanoparticles: synthesis and application for bacteria labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianchao; Fan, Hai; Wang, Nan; Ai, Shiyun

    2014-09-01

    Vancomycin (Van)- and terephthalate (TA)-comodified europium-doped layered double hydroxides (Van-TA-Eu-LDHs) nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a two-step method, in which, TA acted as a sensitizer to enhance the fluorescent property and Van was modified on the surface of LDH to act as an affinity reagent to bacteria. The obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and fluorescent spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the prepared Van- and TA-comodified europium-doped layered double hydroxides (Van-TA-Eu-LDHs) nanoparticles with diameter of 50 nm in size showed highly efficient fluorescent property. Furthermore, due to the high affinity of Van to bacteria, the prepared Van-TA-Eu-LDHs nanoparticles showed efficient bacteria labelling by fluorescent property. The prepared nanoparticles may have wide applications in the biological fields, such as biomolecular labelling and cell imaging.

  7. A rapid method for manual or automated purification of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids for sequencing, genotyping, and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Springer, Amy L; Booth, Lisa R; Braid, Michael D; Houde, Christiane M; Hughes, Karin A; Kaiser, Robert J; Pedrak, Casandra; Spicer, Douglas A; Stolyar, Sergey

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescent dyes provide specific, sensitive, and multiplexed detection of nucleic acids. To maximize sensitivity, fluorescently labeled reaction products (e.g., cycle sequencing or primer extension products) must be purified away from residual dye-labeled precursors. Successful high-throughput analyses require that this purification be reliable, rapid, and amenable to automation. Common methods for purifying reaction products involve several steps and require processes that are not easily automated. Prolinx, Inc. has devel oped RapXtract superparamagnetic separation technology affording rapid and easy-to-perform methods that yield high-quality product and are easily automated. The technology uses superparamagnetic particles that specifically remove unincorporated dye-labeled precursors. These particles are efficiently pelleted in the presence of a magnetic field, making them ideal for purification because of the rapid separations that they allow. RapXtract-purified sequencing reactions yield data with good signal and high Phred quality scores, and they work with various sequencing dye chemistries, including BigDye and near-infrared fluorescence IRDyes. RapXtract technology can also be used to purify dye primer sequencing reactions, primer extension reactions for genotyping analysis, and nucleic acid labeling reactions for microarray hybridization. The ease of use and versatility of RapXtract technology makes it a good choice for manual or automated purification of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids.

  8. Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV−) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV− centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20 ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10 ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23 Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo. PMID:24994610

  9. Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV- centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20 ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10 ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23 Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo.

  10. Improved preparation of acellular nerve scaffold and application of PKH26 fluorescent labeling combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging system in nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Xiaolei; Li, Xiulan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Yanjun; Zhang, Yang; Li, Bing; Ma, Xinlong

    2013-11-27

    Acellular nerve scaffold has been widely used for peripheral nerve defect treatment. However, the structure of traditional acellular nerve scaffold is dense; the interval porosity and void diameter are too small to meet the requirement of cell seeding, which limits the application. This study was designed to prepare a novel acellular nerve scaffold by the technique of hypotonic buffer combined with freeze-drying, and use PKH26 fluorescent labeling combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging system to evaluate the biological behavior of tissue-engineered nerve in vitro and in vivo. According to light and electron microscopy, the scaffold, which microarchitecture was similar to the fibrous framework of rabbit sciatic nerves, was cell-free and rich in laminin, collagen I and collagen III. In vitro experiment showed that the novel acellular nerve scaffold could provide a 3-D environment to support the attachment, proliferation and migration of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). ADSCs labeled with fluorescent dye PKH26 were then seeded on scaffolds and implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. After 4 weeks, nerve-like tissue rounded by vessels formed. Cells in the tissue seemed to confirm that they originated from the labeled ADSCs, as confirmed by in vivo fluorescent imaging. In conclusion, the prepared novel acellular nerve scaffold can be used as a new kind of nerve scaffold material, which is more conducible for seeding cells; And PKH26 fluorescent labeling and in vivo fluorescent imaging can be useful for cell tracking and analyzing cell-scaffold constructs in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bio-orthogonal Fluorescent Labelling of Biopolymers through Inverse-Electron-Demand Diels-Alder Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Demeter, Orsolya; Kele, Péter

    2017-03-16

    Bio-orthogonal labelling schemes based on inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition have attracted much attention in chemical biology recently. The appealing features of this reaction, such as the fast reaction kinetics, fully bio-orthogonal nature and high selectivity, have helped chemical biologists gain deeper understanding of biochemical processes at the molecular level. Listing the components and discussing the possibilities and limitations of these reagents, we provide a recent snapshot of the field of IEDDA-based biomolecular manipulation with special focus on fluorescent modulation approaches through the use of bio-orthogonalized building blocks. At the end, we discuss challenges that need to be addressed for further developments in order to overcome recent limitations and to enable researchers to answer biomolecular questions in more detail. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  12. Bio‐orthogonal Fluorescent Labelling of Biopolymers through Inverse‐Electron‐Demand Diels–Alder Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Demeter, Orsolya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bio‐orthogonal labelling schemes based on inverse‐electron‐demand Diels–Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition have attracted much attention in chemical biology recently. The appealing features of this reaction, such as the fast reaction kinetics, fully bio‐orthogonal nature and high selectivity, have helped chemical biologists gain deeper understanding of biochemical processes at the molecular level. Listing the components and discussing the possibilities and limitations of these reagents, we provide a recent snapshot of the field of IEDDA‐based biomolecular manipulation with special focus on fluorescent modulation approaches through the use of bio‐orthogonalized building blocks. At the end, we discuss challenges that need to be addressed for further developments in order to overcome recent limitations and to enable researchers to answer biomolecular questions in more detail. PMID:28070925

  13. Monitoring intraspecies competition in a bacterial cell population by cocultivation of fluorescently labelled strains.

    PubMed

    Stannek, Lorena; Egelkamp, Richard; Gunka, Katrin; Commichau, Fabian M

    2014-01-18

    Many microorganisms such as bacteria proliferate extremely fast and the populations may reach high cell densities. Small fractions of cells in a population always have accumulated mutations that are either detrimental or beneficial for the cell. If the fitness effect of a mutation provides the subpopulation with a strong selective growth advantage, the individuals of this subpopulation may rapidly outcompete and even completely eliminate their immediate fellows. Thus, small genetic changes and selection-driven accumulation of cells that have acquired beneficial mutations may lead to a complete shift of the genotype of a cell population. Here we present a procedure to monitor the rapid clonal expansion and elimination of beneficial and detrimental mutations, respectively, in a bacterial cell population over time by cocultivation of fluorescently labeled individuals of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The method is easy to perform and very illustrative to display intraspecies competition among the individuals in a bacterial cell population.

  14. Photonic Crystal Surfaces as a General Purpose Platform for Label-Free and Fluorescent Assays.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Brian T

    2010-04-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces can be designed to provide a wide range of functions that are used to perform biochemical and cell-based assays. Detection of the optical resonant reflections from photonic crystal surfaces enables high sensitivity label-free biosensing, while the enhanced electromagnetic fields that occur at resonant wavelengths can be used to enhance the detection sensitivity of any surface-based fluorescence assay. Fabrication of photonic crystals from inexpensive plastic materials over large surface areas enables them to be incorporated into standard formats that include microplates, microarrays, and microfluidic channels. This report reviews the design of photonic crystal biosensors, their associated detection instrumentation, and biological applications. Applications including small molecule high throughput screening, cell membrane integrin activation, gene expression analysis, and protein biomarker detection are highlighted. Recent results in which photonic crystal surfaces are used for enhancing the detection of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, and the development of high resolution photonic crystal-based laser biosensors are also described.

  15. Hydroxylated Fluorescent Dyes for Live-Cell Labeling: Synthesis, Spectra and Super-Resolution STED.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Alexey N; Belov, Vladimir N; Kolmakov, Kirill; Sokolov, Viktor V; Shojaei, Heydar; Sidenstein, Sven C; Kamin, Dirk; Matthias, Jessica; Vlijm, Rifka; Engelhardt, Johann; Hell, Stefan W

    2017-09-07

    Hydroxylated rhodamines, carbopyronines, silico- and germanorhodamines with absorption maxima in the range of 530-640 nm were prepared and applied in specific labeling of living cells. The direct and high-yielding entry to germa- and silaxanthones tolerates the presence of protected heteroatoms and may be considered for the syntheses of various sila- and germafluoresceins, as well as -rhodols. Application in stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy revealed a resolution of 50-75 nm in one- and two-color imaging of vimentin-HaloTag fused protein and native tubulin. The established structure-property relationships allow for prediction of the spectral properties and the positions of spirolactone/zwitterion equilibria for the new analogues of rhodamines, carbo-, silico-, and germanorhodamines using simple additive schemes. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Preparation of fluorescent-dye-labeled cDNA from RNA for microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ares, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes how to prepare fluorescently labeled cDNA for hybridization to microarrays. It consists of two steps: first, a mixture of anchored oligo(dT) and random hexamers is used to prime amine-modified cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase using a modified deoxynucleotide with a reactive amine group (aminoallyl-dUTP) and an RNA sample as a template. Second, the cDNA is purified and exchanged into bicarbonate buffer so that the amine groups in the cDNA react with the dye N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters, covalently joining the dye to the cDNA. The dye-coupled cDNA is purified again, and the amount of dye incorporated per microgram of cDNA is determined.

  17. Mapping of Heavy Metal Ion Sorption to Cell-Extracellular Polymeric Substance-Mineral Aggregates by Using Metal-Selective Fluorescent Probes and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianli; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms, organic matter, iron/aluminum oxides, and clay minerals bind toxic heavy metal ions and control their fate and bioavailability in the environment. The spatial relationship of metal ions to biomacromolecules such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilms with microbial cells and biogenic minerals is complex and occurs at the micro- and submicrometer scale. Here, we review the application of highly selective and sensitive metal fluorescent probes for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) that were originally developed for use in life sciences and propose their suitability as a powerful tool for mapping heavy metals in environmental biofilms and cell-EPS-mineral aggregates (CEMAs). The benefit of using metal fluorescent dyes in combination with CLSM imaging over other techniques such as electron microscopy is that environmental samples can be analyzed in their natural hydrated state, avoiding artifacts such as aggregation from drying that is necessary for analytical electron microscopy. In this minireview, we present data for a group of sensitive fluorescent probes highly specific for Fe3+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Hg2+, illustrating the potential of their application in environmental science. We evaluate their application in combination with other fluorescent probes that label constituents of CEMAs such as DNA or polysaccharides and provide selection guidelines for potential combinations of fluorescent probes. Correlation analysis of spatially resolved heavy metal distributions with EPS and biogenic minerals in their natural, hydrated state will further our understanding of the behavior of metals in environmental systems since it allows for identifying bonding sites in complex, heterogeneous systems. PMID:23974141

  18. High fluorescent and stable semiconductor quantum dots for red blood cells labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Patricia M. A.; Santos, Beate S.; de Menezes, Frederico D.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos L.; Barjas Castro, Maria L.; Castro, Vagner; Lima, Paulo R. M.

    2005-04-01

    We present a simple and efficient method for marking living human red blood cells using CdS (Cadmium Sulfide) quantum dots (QDs). The nanocrystals were obtained via colloidal synthesis in aqueous medium with final pH=7 using sodium polyphosphate as the stabilizing agent. The methodology implementation is simple, do not requires additional capping layers nor narrow size QDs distribution. The synthesized nanoparticles were conjugated to monoclonal A anti-body. The resulting conjugates QDs/anti-A were incubated with human erythrocytes of blood groups A and O for 30 min at 37°C. The living cells in contact with the quantum dots maintained their properties for several days showing the low level of citotoxicity of the quantum dots. The conjugation of CdS QDs/anti-A show simultaneous red and green fluorescence when excited with 543 and 488 nm respectively. The efficiency of the conjugation QDs/anti-body to the erythrocytes, for each system, was monitored by confocal microscopy. The comparative analysis of the micrographs was done with the luminescence intensity maps of the samples obtained under constant capture conditions, such as, pinhole, filters, beam splitters and photomultiplier gain. The conjugates QDs/anti-A intensely marked group A erythrocytes and did not show any luminescence for group O erythrocytes, showing the sensitivity of the labeling procedure. In conclusion, we show the viability of the use of high luminescent and stable quantum dots as fluorescent labels for human erythrocytes with a methodology of simple implementation and the possibility to use them to distinguish different blood groups.

  19. Advantages of fluorescent microspheres compared with colloidal gold as a label in immunochromatographic lateral flow assays.

    PubMed

    Xie, Quan-Yuan; Wu, Yan-Hua; Xiong, Qi-Rong; Xu, Heng-Yi; Xiong, Yong-Hua; Liu, Kun; Jin, Yong; Lai, Wei-Hua

    2014-04-15

    Label selection is of vital importance for immunochromatographic assays. In this study, the fluorescent microsphere test strip and colloidal gold immunochromatographic test strip (FM-ICTS and CG-ICTS) were developed for the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the basis of the sandwich format. Two types of labels, namely, colloidal gold particles (CG) and carboxyl-modified fluorescent microspheres (FMs), were compared while coupling with anti-E. coli O157:H7 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The FM-ICTS and CG-ICTS were also compared. Results show that the coupling rate between FMs and mAb was higher than that between CG and mAb. Under optimum conditions, the sensitivity of FM-ICTS was eight times higher than that of CG-ICTS. Approximately 0.1 μg of mAb was used in every FM-ICTS, whereas 0.4 μg of mAb was used in every CG-ICTS. The coefficient of variation of FM-ICTS and CG-ICTS was 4.8% and 16.7%, respectively. The FM-ICTS and CG-ICTS can be stored at room temperature for 12 months and specific to five E. coli O157:H7 strains. Milk sample inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 were tested by the FM-ICTS and CG-ICTS. The FM-ICTS sensitivity was 10(4) CFU/ml while the CG-ICTS sensitivity was 10(5) CFU/ml. The sensitivity, consumption of antibodies, and coefficient of variation of FM-ICTS were better than those of CG-ICTS for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ~150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of

  1. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Maltas, Esra; Malkondu, Sait; Uyar, Pembegul; Ozmen, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    N,N'-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93μM on 25mg of nanoparticles by using UV-vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Permeabilization of mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes for in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, S J; O'Donnell, A G; Embley, T M

    1994-10-01

    The application of whole-cell hybridization using labelled oligonucleotide probes in microbial systematics and ecology is limited by difficulties in permeabilizing many Gram-positive organisms. In this investigation paraformaldehyde treatment, acid methanolysis and acid hydrolysis were evaluated as a means of permeabilizing mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes prior to hybridization with a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probe designed to bind to a conserved sequence of bacterial 16S rRNA. Methods were evaluated on stationary-phase cultures of Gordona bronchialis, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Nocardia asteroides, N. brasiliensis, Rhodococcus equi, R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous and Tsukamurella paurometabola, none of which could be probed following 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde fixation. For comparison and to test the general applicability of mild acid pretreatments, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida were also studied. The data showed that most of the mycolic-acid-containing organisms were successfully permeabilized by mild acid hydrolysis in 1 M HCl at 37 degrees C. Cells were treated for different lengths of time. In general, the mycolic-acid-containing organisms required between 30 and 50 min hydrolysis, whereas B. subtilis, E. coli and P. putida were rendered permeable in only 10 min. Interestingly, L. plantarum could not be permeabilized using acid hydrolysis even after 60 min exposure to 1 M HCl.

  3. Label-free fluorescence detection of melamine with a truncated aptamer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunmei; Xiang, Yu; Guo, Hongli; Shi, Hanchang

    2016-07-21

    The 2008 Chinese milk scandal caused by the adulteration of melamine encouraged the public to pay attention to melamine detection in milk products and other food stuffs. To allow simple and rapid detection of melamine, we previously isolated an 88 nt melamine aptamer (called Rd29C33) using the structure-switching SELEX. However, this 88 nt oligonucleotide is costly to synthesize, and may also complicate the rational design of biosensors for melamine detection. To overcome this obstacle, we truncated Rd29C33 at several sites, and a 34 nt Rd29C33-T7 melamine aptamer was finally found to show comparable binding affinity and better selectivity to melamine compared to the original 88 nt Rd29C33. Furthermore, a label-free bioassay method for melamine detection was designed by using Rd29C33-T7 and thiazole orange (TO). The addition of melamine to a mixture of Rd29C33-T7 and TO caused the release of TO from Rd29C33-T7, resulting in a decrease of the fluorescence intensity of the solution. A detection limit of 0.12 μM for melamine was achieved using this label-free method. Good recovery ranging from 82.6% to 97.2% for melamine detection in whole milk samples suggested the promise of this bioassay method for application in monitoring melamine in real food stuffs.

  4. Preparation and characterization of Fe3O4/CdTe magnetic/fluorescent nanocomposites and their applications in immuno-labeling and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pan; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Chang; Fang, Jin; Wang, Meng; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jingpu; Mao, Chuanbin; Xu, Shukun

    2010-01-19

    The synthesis of a new kind of magnetic, fluorescent multifunctional nanoparticles (approximately 30 nm in diameter) was demonstrated, where multiple fluorescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) are covalently linked to and assembled around individual silica-coated superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles and active carboxylic groups are presented on the surface for easy bioconjugation with biomolecules. The Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were first functionalized with thiol groups, followed by chemical conjugation with multiple thioglycolic acid modified CdTe QDs to form water-soluble Fe(3)O(4)/CdTe magnetic/fluorescent nanocomposites. X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and magnetometry were applied to fully characterize the multifunctional nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were found to exhibit magnetic and fluorescent properties favorable for their applications in magnetic separation and guiding as well as fluorescent imaging. The carboxyl groups on the nanocomposite surface were proved to be chemically active and readily available for further bioconjugation with biomolecules such as bovine serum albumin and antibodies, enabling the applications of the nanocomposites for specific recognition of biological targets. The Fe(3)O(4)/CdTe magnetic/fluorescent nanocomposites conjugated with anti-CEACAM8 antibody were successfully employed for immuno-labeling and fluorescent imaging of HeLa cells.

  5. 21 CFR 1306.14 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dispensed at one time; (2) The controlled substance listed in Schedule II is not in the possession of the... regarding the proper administration, control, dispensing, and storage of the controlled substance listed in Schedule II; and (4) The system employed by the pharmacist in filling a prescription is adequate to...

  6. 21 CFR 1306.14 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dispensed at one time; (2) The controlled substance listed in Schedule II is not in the possession of the... regarding the proper administration, control, dispensing, and storage of the controlled substance listed in Schedule II; and (4) The system employed by the pharmacist in filling a prescription is adequate to...

  7. Optimized delivery of fluorescently labeled proteins in live bacteria using electroporation.

    PubMed

    Sustarsic, Marko; Plochowietz, Anne; Aigrain, Louise; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Zenkin, Nikolay; Kapanidis, Achillefs

    2014-07-01

    Studying the structure and dynamics of proteins in live cells is essential to understanding their physiological activities and mechanisms, and to validating in vitro characterization. Improvements in labeling and imaging technologies are starting to allow such in vivo studies; however, a number of technical challenges remain. Recently, we developed an electroporation-based protocol for internalization, which allows biomolecules labeled with organic fluorophores to be introduced at high efficiency into live E. coli (Crawford et al. in Biophys J 105 (11):2439-2450, 2013). Here, we address important challenges related to internalization of proteins, and optimize our method in terms of (1) electroporation buffer conditions; (2) removal of dye contaminants from stock protein samples; and (3) removal of non-internalized molecules from cell suspension after electroporation. We illustrate the usability of the optimized protocol by demonstrating high-efficiency internalization of a 10-kDa protein, the ω subunit of RNA polymerase. Provided that suggested control experiments are carried out, any fluorescently labeled protein of up to 60 kDa could be internalized using our method. Further, we probe the effect of electroporation voltage on internalization efficiency and cell viability and demonstrate that, whilst internalization increases with increased voltage, cell viability is compromised. However, due to the low number of damaged cells in our samples, the major fraction of loaded cells always corresponds to non-damaged cells. By taking care to include only viable cells into analysis, our method allows physiologically relevant studies to be performed, including in vivo measurements of protein diffusion, localization and intramolecular dynamics via single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer.

  8. Direct fluorescent-dye labeling of α-tubulin in mammalian cells for live cell and super resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Schvartz, Tomer; Aloush, Noa; Goliand, Inna; Segal, Inbar; Nachmias, Dikla; Arbely, Eyal; Elia, Natalie

    2017-08-23

    Genetic code expansion and bioorthogonal labeling offer, for the first time, a way for direct, site-specific labeling of proteins with fluorescent-dyes in live cells. Although the small size and superb photophysical parameters of fluorescent-dyes offer unique advantages for high-resolution microscopy, this approach has yet to be embraced as a tool in live cell imaging. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of this approach by applying it for α-tubulin labeling. After a series of calibrations, we site-specifically labeled α-tubulin with Silicon Rhodamine (SiR) in live mammalian cells in an efficient and robust manner. SiR-labeled tubulin successfully incorporated into endogenous microtubules at high density, enabling video recording of microtubule dynamics in interphase and mitotic cells. Applying this labeling approach to structured illumination microscopy (SIM) resulted an increase in resolution, highlighting the advantages in using a smaller, brighter tag. Therefore, using our optimized assay, genetic code expansion provides an attractive tool for labeling proteins with a minimal, bright tag in quantitative high-resolution imaging. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  9. Fluorescence labeling of carbonylated lipids and proteins in cells using coumarin-hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Venukumar; Ni, Zhixu; Fedorova, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Carbonylation is a generic term which refers to reactive carbonyl groups present in biomolecules due to oxidative reactions induced by reactive oxygen species. Carbonylated proteins, lipids and nucleic acids have been intensively studied and often associated with onset or progression of oxidative stress related disorders. In order to reveal underlying carbonylation pathways and biological relevance, it is crucial to study their intracellular formation and spatial distribution. Carbonylated species are usually identified and quantified in cell lysates and body fluids after derivatization using specific chemical probes. However, spatial cellular and tissue distribution have been less often investigated. Here, we report coumarin-hydrazide, a fluorescent chemical probe for time- and cost-efficient labeling of cellular carbonyls followed by fluorescence microscopy to evaluate their intracellular formation both in time and space. The specificity of coumarin-hydrazide was confirmed in time- and dose-dependent experiments using human primary fibroblasts stressed with paraquat and compared with conventional DNPH-based immunocytochemistry. Both techniques stained carbonylated species accumulated in cytoplasm with strong perinuclear clustering. Using a complimentary array of analytical methods specificity of coumarin-hydrazide probe towards both protein- and lipid-bound carbonyls has been shown. Additionally, co-distribution of carbonylated species and oxidized phospholipids was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorescent dye-labelled polymer synthesis by nitroxide mediated radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Jozef; Chmela, Štefan; Hrčková, Ľudmila; Hrdlovič, Pavol

    2012-07-01

    New applications of polymers at advanced technologies demand increased requirements on their properties. These properties are influenced by molecular as well as supramolecular structure. Controlled radical polymerization mediated by stable nitroxides (NMP) or substituted alkoxyamines offers simple method for preparation of polymers with programmable structure of macromolecules which possess remarkable better physical as well as chemical properties. They can be used as a macro initiators for the synthesis of block copolymers. At the present time it has been generally accepted that the extent of "livingness" is high for all conversions [1-4]. To verify this statement a series of fluorescent dye-labelled regulators has been synthesized, spectrally characterized and used as the mediators of styrene and n-butyl acrylate polymerization. Direct quantification of dormant species concentration (extent of livingness) and calculation of molar mass of marked polymers was performed by absorption and/or emission spectroscopy. Controlled radical polymerization mediated by stable nitroxides bearing fluorescence mark represents unconventional approach for monitoring and evaluation of mechanism and kinetics of polymerization process. Results indicate that the extent of livingness is strongly influenced by conversion as well as mediator concentration. There is a clear tendency toward to decreasing amount of dormant species with increasing monomer conversion. Moreover, lower mediator concentration decreases livingness of polymerization process.

  11. Simultaneous confocal recording of multiple fluorescent labels with improved channel separation.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, K; Aslund, N; Mossberg, K; Philip, J

    1994-12-01

    Confocal microscopes are often used to study specimens labelled with fluorophores. A commonly used method for simultaneous recording of the distribution of multiple fluorophores is to divide the fluorescent light emitted by the specimen into different wavelength regions using dichroic and bandpass filters. These different wavelength regions are then distributed to multiple detectors. However, the broad and overlapping spectra of commonly used fluorophores often result in considerable crosstalk between channels. A new technique, intensity-modulated multiple-beam scanning (IMS) microfluorometry, can be used to reduce this cross-talk substantially. The IMS technique is implemented with two laser beams of different wavelengths, intensity-modulated at different frequencies, which illuminate the specimen simultaneously. The two laser wavelengths predominantly excite one fluorophore each. Fluorescent light from the specimen is divided into two wavelength regions (red and green) which are detected by two photomultiplier tubes. The output signals from the photomultiplier tubes are connected to lock-in amplifiers. The effect of using modulated laser beams, in combination with lock-in amplifiers, is strongly to reduce cross-talk between the channels. The performance of the IMS technique using various types of specimen is compared with the results obtained using the conventional multi-detector method.

  12. Fluorescent Labeling of Proteins and Its Application to SDS-PAGE and Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Alba, F Javier; Bartolomé, Salvador; Bermúdez, Antonio; Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes very simple fluorescent methods developed in our laboratory allowing the rapid monitoring of total protein patterns on both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels and western blots. The noncovalent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino-5H-benzo[α]phenoxazine-5-one) is used for the sensitive staining of proteins in SDS gels. This method is compatible with the electroblotting of protein bands and with the staining of the resulting blot with the covalent dye MDPF (2-methoxy-2,4-diphenyl-3(2H)-furanone). These staining procedures are applied sequentially; there is no need to run a duplicate unstained gel for protein blotting. Furthermore, since only the adduct formed by the reaction of MDPF with proteins is fluorescent, there is no need to destain the membrane after protein labeling. In addition, MDPF staining is compatible with further immunodetection of specific bands with polyclonal antibodies. Finally, using the adequate conditions described below, MDPF staining does not preclude the N-terminal sequence analysis of proteins in selected bands.

  13. Alexa fluor-labeled fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals for bioimaging solid cellulose in spatially structured microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Grate, Jay W; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G; Kelly, Ryan T; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J; Brockman, Fred J; Wilkins, Michael J

    2015-03-18

    Methods to covalently conjugate Alexa Fluor dyes to cellulose nanocrystals, at limiting amounts that retain the overall structure of the nanocrystals as model cellulose materials, were developed using two approaches. In the first, aldehyde groups are created on the cellulose surfaces by reaction with limiting amounts of sodium periodate, a reaction well-known for oxidizing vicinal diols to create dialdehyde structures. Reductive amination reactions were then applied to bind Alexa Fluor dyes with terminal amino-groups on the linker section. In the absence of the reductive step, dye washes out of the nanocrystal suspension, whereas with the reductive step, a colored product is obtained with the characteristic spectral bands of the conjugated dye. In the second approach, Alexa Fluor dyes were modified to contain chloro-substituted triazine ring at the end of the linker section. These modified dyes then were reacted with cellulose nanocrystals in acetonitrile at elevated temperature, again isolating material with the characteristic spectral bands of the Alexa Fluor dye. Reactions with Alexa Fluor 546 are given as detailed examples, labeling on the order of 1% of the total glucopyranose rings of the cellulose nanocrystals at dye loadings of ca. 5 μg/mg cellulose. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals were deposited in pore network microfluidic structures (PDMS) and proof-of-principle bioimaging experiments showed that the spatial localization of the solid cellulose deposits could be determined, and their disappearance under the action of Celluclast enzymes or microbes could be observed over time. In addition, single molecule fluorescence microscopy was demonstrated as a method to follow the disappearance of solid cellulose deposits over time, following the decrease in the number of single blinking dye molecules with time instead of fluorescent intensity.

  14. Facile labelling of graphene oxide for superior capacitive energy storage and fluorescence applications.

    PubMed

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2016-04-14

    The majority of supercapacitor research studies on graphene materials today have been based upon developing electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) using reduced graphenes. In contrast, graphene oxide (GO) is often neglected as a supercapacitor candidate due to its low electrical conductivity and surface area. Nonetheless, we present herein a fast (1 h) labelling of GO with o-phenylenediamine (PD) to produce PD-GO, exploiting inherent oxygen groups in creating new functionalities that exhibit capacitive enhancement from pseudo-capacitance. A high specific capacitance of 191 F g(-1) was obtained (at 0.2 A g(-1)), comparable to recent binder-free graphene supercapacitors. The large surface-normalized capacitance of up to 628 μF cm(-2) is also many times greater than the intrinsic capacitance of single-layer graphene (21 μF cm(-2)) as a result of additional pseudo-capacitance. A high capacity retention of ∼85% with each 10-fold increase in current density further indicates excellent rate performance. Hence, this approach in enhancing GO pseudo-capacitance may be similarly feasible as graphene EDLCs. Additionally, PD-GO was also found to exhibit a bright green fluorescence with a 540 nm maximum. The strongest fluorescence intensities arose from the smallest PD-GO fragments, and we attribute the origin to localised sp(2) domains and newly formed phenazine edge groups. The dual enhancement of dissimilar properties such as capacitance and fluorescence emphasizes the continued significance of covalent functionalisation towards tuning of properties in graphene-type materials.

  15. In Vitro Dynamic Visualization Analysis of Fluorescently Labeled Minor Capsid Protein IX and Core Protein V by Simultaneous Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ugai, Hideyo; Wang, Minghui; Le, Long P.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses represent a promising therapeutic medicine for human cancer therapy, but successful translation to human clinical trials requires careful evaluation of these viral characteristics. While the function of the adenovirus proteins have been analyzed in detail, the dynamics of adenovirus infection remain largely unknown due to technological constraints which prevent adequate tracking of the adenovirus particles after infection. Fluorescent labeling of the adenoviral particles is one new strategy designed to directly analyze dynamic processes of viral infection in virus-host cell interactions. We hypothesized that the double labeling technique of adenovirus with fluorescent proteins would allow us to properly analyze intracellular viruses and the fate of viral proteins in live analysis of adenovirus as compared to a single labeling. Thus, we generated a fluorescently labeled adenovirus with both a red fluorescent minor capsid protein IX (pIX-mRFP1) and a green fluorescent minor core protein V (pV-EGFP), resulting in Ad5-IX-mRFP1-E3-V-EGFP. The fluorescent signals for pIX-mRFP1 and pV-EGFP were detected within 10 min in living cells. However, the growth curve analysis of Ad5-IX-mRFP1-E3-V-EGFP showed approximately 150-fold reduced production of the viral progeny at 48 hours post-infection (h.p.i.) as compared to Ad5. Interestingly, pIX-mRFP1 and pV-EGFP were initially localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleolus, respectively, at 18 h.p.i. These proteins were observed in the nucleus during the late stage of infection and the relocalization of the proteins was observed in an adenoviral replication-dependent manner. These results indicate that the simultaneous detection of adenovirus using dual-fluorescent proteins is suitable for real-time analysis, including identification of infected cells, and monitoring viral spread, which will be required for complete evaluation of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:19853616

  16. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay.

  17. 21 CFR 1306.14 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... listed in Schedule II shall affix to the package a label showing date of filling, the pharmacy name and... required by law. (b) If the prescription is filled at a central fill pharmacy, the central fill pharmacy shall affix to the package a label showing the retail pharmacy name and address and a unique...

  18. 21 CFR 1306.24 - Labeling of substances and filing of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Schedule III, IV, or V shall affix to the package a label showing the pharmacy name and address, the serial... required by law. (b) If the prescription is filled at a central fill pharmacy, the central fill pharmacy shall affix to the package a label showing the retail pharmacy name and address and a unique...

  19. 21 CFR 1306.14 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... listed in Schedule II shall affix to the package a label showing date of filling, the pharmacy name and... required by law. (b) If the prescription is filled at a central fill pharmacy, the central fill pharmacy shall affix to the package a label showing the retail pharmacy name and address and a unique...

  20. 21 CFR 1306.24 - Labeling of substances and filing of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Schedule III, IV, or V shall affix to the package a label showing the pharmacy name and address, the serial... required by law. (b) If the prescription is filled at a central fill pharmacy, the central fill pharmacy shall affix to the package a label showing the retail pharmacy name and address and a unique...

  1. 21 CFR 1306.24 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Schedule III, IV, or V shall affix to the package a label showing the pharmacy name and address, the serial... required by law. (b) If the prescription is filled at a central fill pharmacy, the central fill pharmacy shall affix to the package a label showing the retail pharmacy name and address and a unique identifier...

  2. 21 CFR 1306.14 - Labeling of substances and filling of prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... listed in Schedule II shall affix to the package a label showing date of filling, the pharmacy name and... required by law. (b) If the prescription is filled at a central fill pharmacy, the central fill pharmacy shall affix to the package a label showing the retail pharmacy name and address and a unique identifier...

  3. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticle-labeled mesenchymal stem cells for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy of in vivo gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jing; Ji, Jiajia; Song, Hua; Qian, Qirong; Wang, Kan; Wang, Can; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-06-01

    How to find early gastric cancer cells in vivo is a great challenge for the diagnosis and therapy of gastric cancer. This study is aimed at investigating the feasibility of using fluorescent magnetic nanoparticle (FMNP)-labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to realize targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy of in vivo gastric cancer. The primary cultured mouse marrow MSCs were labeled with amino-modified FMNPs then intravenously injected into mouse model with subcutaneous gastric tumor, and then, the in vivo distribution of FMNP-labeled MSCs was observed by using fluorescence imaging system and magnetic resonance imaging system. After FMNP-labeled MSCs arrived in local tumor tissues, subcutaneous tumor tissues in nude mice were treated under external alternating magnetic field. The possible mechanism of MSCs targeting gastric cancer was investigated by using a micro-multiwell chemotaxis chamber assay. Results show that MSCs were labeled with FMNPs efficiently and kept stable fluorescent signal and magnetic properties within 14 days, FMNP-labeled MSCs could target and image in vivo gastric cancer cells after being intravenously injected for 14 days, FMNP-labeled MSCs could significantly inhibit the growth of in vivo gastric cancer because of hyperthermia effects, and CCL19/CCR7 and CXCL12/CXCR4 axis loops may play key roles in the targeting of MSCs to in vivo gastric cancer. In conclusion, FMNP-labeled MSCs could target in vivo gastric cancer cells and have great potential in applications such as imaging, diagnosis, and hyperthermia therapy of early gastric cancer in the near future.

  4. Development of a fluorescent label tool based on lanthanide nanophosphors for viral biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quoc Minh; Huong Tran, Thu; Huong Nguyen, Thanh; Khuyen Hoang, Thi; Binh Nguyen, Thanh; Do, Khanh Tung; Tran, Kim Anh; Hien Nguyen, Dang; Luan Le, Thi; Quy Nguyen, Thi; Dung Dang, Mai; Thu Nguyen, Nu Anh; Nguyen, Van Man

    2012-09-01

    We report for the first time the preparation of luminescent lanthanide nanomaterial (LLN) linked bioconjugates and their application as a label tool for recognizing virus in the processing line of vaccine industrial fabrication. Several LLNs with the nanostructure forms of particles or rods/wires with europium (III) and terbium (III) ions in lattices of vanadate, phosphate and metal organic complex were prepared to develop novel fluorescent conjugates able to be applied as labels in fluorescence immunoassay analysis of virus/vaccine. With regard to the LLNs, we have successfully synthesized nanoparticles around 10 nm of YVO4:Eu(III), with high emission in the red spectral region, nanorod and nanowire of TbPO4·H2O and Eu1-xTbxPO4·H2O, width 5-7 nm and length 300 nm, showing very bright luminescence in green, and core/shell nanosized Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) complexes with naphthoyl trifluoroacetone and tri-n-octylphosphineoxide (Eu.NTA.TOPO@PVP, EuXTb1-X.NTA.TOPO). The appropriated core/shell structures can play a double role, one for enhancing luminescence efficiency and another for providing nanophosphors with better stability in water media for facilitating the penetration of nanophosphor core into a biomedical environment. The organic functionalizations of the obtained LLNs were done through their surface encapsulation with a functional polysiloxane including active groups such as amine (NH2), thiocyanate (SCN) or mecarpto (SH). The properties of functional sol-gel matrix have great influence on the luminescence properties, especially luminescence intensity of YVO4:Eu(III), Eu.NTA.TOPO@PVP, TbPO4·H2O and EuxTb1-xPO4·H2O. Bioconjugation processes of the functionalized LLNs have been studied with some bioactive molecules such as biotin, protein immunoglobulin G (IgG) or bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results of LLN-bioconjugate linking with IgG for recognizing virus (vaccine) will be presented in brief. It is consistent to state that the LLN bioconjugates

  5. Molecular imaging needles: dual-modality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence imaging of labeled antibodies deep in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Scolaro, Loretta; Lorenser, Dirk; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Kirk, Rodney W.; Kramer, Anne S.; Yeoh, George C.; Godbout, Nicolas; Sampson, David D.; Boudoux, Caroline; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging using optical techniques provides insight into disease at the cellular level. In this paper, we report on a novel dual-modality probe capable of performing molecular imaging by combining simultaneous three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and two-dimensional fluorescence imaging in a hypodermic needle. The probe, referred to as a molecular imaging (MI) needle, may be inserted tens of millimeters into tissue. The MI needle utilizes double-clad fiber to carry both imaging modalities, and is interfaced to a 1310-nm OCT system and a fluorescence imaging subsystem using an asymmetrical double-clad fiber coupler customized to achieve high fluorescence collection efficiency. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first dual-modality OCT and fluorescence needle probe with sufficient sensitivity to image fluorescently labeled antibodies. Such probes enable high-resolution molecular imaging deep within tissue. PMID:26137379

  6. A label-free amplified fluorescence DNA detection based on isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zhu, Wenping; Zhang, Jinwen; Jiang, Jianhui; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2013-07-07

    A label-free fluorescent DNA biosensor has been presented based on isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction (ICSDPR) combined with graphene oxide (GO) binding. The proposed method is simple and cost-effective with a low detection limit of 4 pM, which compares favorably with other GO-based homogenous DNA detection methods.

  7. Fluorescence energy transfer efficiency in labeled yeast cytochrome c: a rapid screen for ion biocompatibility in aqueous ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Sheila N; Zhao, Hua; Pandey, Siddharth; Heller, William T; Bright, Frank; Baker, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence energy transfer de-quenching assay was implemented to follow the equilibrium unfolding behaviour of site-specific tetramethylrhodamine-labelled yeast cytochrome c in aqueous ionic liquid solutions; additionally, this approach offers the prospect of naked eye screening for biocompatible ion combinations in hydrated ionic liquids.

  8. Allelic divergence and cultivar-specific SSR alleles revealed by capillary electrophoresis using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers in sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electrophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 each...

  9. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide interacting with individual tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Erin J.; Austin, Christopher J. D.; Aitken, Jade B.; Vogt, Stefan; Jolliffe, Katrina A.; Harris, Hugh H.; Rendina, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells. PMID:23412478

  10. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide interacting with individual tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Erin J; Austin, Christopher J D; Aitken, Jade B; Vogt, Stefan; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Harris, Hugh H; Rendina, Louis M

    2013-03-01

    The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells.

  11. Label-free near-infrared reflectance microscopy as a complimentary tool for two-photon fluorescence brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Costantini, Irene; Margoni, Emilia; Iannello, Giulio; Bria, Alessandro; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-11-01

    In vivo two-photon imaging combined with targeted fluorescent indicators is currently extensively used for attaining critical insights into brain functionality and structural plasticity. Additional information might be gained from back-scattered photons from the near-infrared (NIR) laser without introducing any exogenous labelling. Here, we describe a complimentary and versatile approach that, by collecting the reflected NIR light, provides structural details on axons and blood vessels in the brain, both in fixed samples and in live animals under a cranial window. Indeed, by combining NIR reflectance and two-photon imaging of a slice of hippocampus from a Thy1-GFPm mouse, we show the presence of randomly oriented axons intermingled with sparsely fluorescent neuronal processes. The back-scattered photons guide the contextualization of the fluorescence structure within brain atlas thanks to the recognition of characteristic hippocampal structures. Interestingly, NIR reflectance microscopy allowed the label-free detection of axonal elongations over the superficial layers of mouse cortex under a cranial window in vivo. Finally, blood flow can be measured in live preparations, thus validating label free NIR reflectance as a tool for monitoring hemodynamic fluctuations. The prospective versatility of this label-free technique complimentary to two-photon fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated in a mouse model of photothrombotic stroke in which the axonal degeneration and blood flow remodeling can be investigated.

  12. Method for sequential staining of GTL-banded metaphases with fluorescent-labeled chromosome-specific paint probes.

    PubMed

    Jalal, S M; Law, M E; Christensen, E R; Spurbeck, J L; Dewald, G W

    1993-04-01

    We describe a method for use of fluorescent-labeled whole chromosome-specific paint probes on GTL-banded metaphases to utilize the combined potential of these techniques for defining chromosome abnormalities. The efficacy of this method was tested on 6 cases involving different chromosome abnormalities and various tissues, including blood, amniotic fluid, skin fibroblasts, and bone marrow.

  13. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of exonuclease activity using SYBR Green I as probe.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Li, Baoxin

    2015-01-01

    A label-free and sensitive fluorescence assay for exonuclease activity is developed using commercially available SYBR Green I (SG) dye as signal probe. A proof-of-concept of this assay has been demonstrated by using exonuclease III (Exo III) as a model enzyme. In this assay, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can bind SG, resulting in a strong fluorescence signal of SG. Upon the addition of Exo III, dsDNA would be digested, and SG emits very weak fluorescence. Thus, Exo III activity can be facilely measured with a simple fluorescence reader. This method has a linear detection range from 1 U/mL to 200 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.7 U/mL. This label-free approach is selective, simple, convenient and cost-efficient without any complex DNA sequence design or fluorescence dye label. The method not only provides a platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of exonuclease but also shows great potential in biological process researches, drug discovery, and clinic diagnostics.

  14. Streamlined purification of fluorescently labeled Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein (PhoS) suitable for rapid-kinetics applications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dustin D; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Selinger, L Brent

    2017-09-20

    Fluorescently labeled phosphate-binding proteins can be used as biomolecular tools to measure the release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from enzymes in real time, enabling the detailed kinetic analysis of dephosphorylating enzymes using rapid-kinetics approaches. Previously reported methods to purify fluorescently labeled phosphate-binding proteins (PhoS) from Escherichia coli are laborious, and a simplified approach is needed. Here, we report the characterization of a cytosol-localized variant (A197C) of PhoS that allows a streamlined purification for subsequent covalent conjugation with a fluorescent dye. We demonstrate that export of PhoS into the periplasmic space is not required for the fluorescence-based detection of Pi binding. Furthermore, we report the addition of a C-terminal His-tag, simplifying the purification of PhoS from the cytosol via Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography, yielding a fully functional fusion protein (HC PhoS A197C). We demonstrate the utility of fluorescently labeled HC PhoS A197C for rapid-kinetics applications by measuring, using stopped-flow, the Pi release kinetics from LepA/EF4 following 70S ribosome-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. Altogether, the approach developed here allows for the high-yield and simplified in-house production of a Pi detection system suitable for rapid-kinetics approaches with comparable sensitivity to the commercially available Phosphate Sensor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Label-Free Fluorescent Detection of Trypsin Activity Based on DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanocluster-Peptide Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Cai-Xia; Wang, Li-Hui; Feng, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Yao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Trypsin is important during the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The detection of trypsin activity is currently limited because of the need for the substrate to be labeled with a fluorescent tag. A label-free fluorescent method has been developed to monitor trypsin activity. The designed peptide probe consists of six arginine molecules and a cysteine terminus and can be conjugated to DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) by Ag-S bonding to enhance fluorescence. The peptide probe can also be adsorbed to the surface of graphene oxide (GO), thus resulting in the fluorescence quenching of DNA-AgNCs-peptide conjugate because of Förster resonance energy transfer. Once trypsin had degraded the peptide probe into amino acid residues, the DNA-AgNCs were released from the surface of GO, and the enhanced fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs was restored. Trypsin can be determined with a linear range of 0.0–50.0 ng/mL with a concentration as low as 1 ng/mL. This label-free method is simple and sensitive and has been successfully used for the determination of trypsin in serum. The method can also be modified to detect other proteases. PMID:27834849

  16. Volume labeling with Alexa Fluor dyes and surface functionalization of highly sensitive fluorescent silica (SiO2) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Foster, Carmen M.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T.

    2013-10-01

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or ``free'' surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface-modified fluorescent particles with cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems.A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2

  17. Fast and single-step immunoassay based on fluorescence quenching within a square glass capillary immobilizing graphene oxide-antibody conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Henares, Terence G; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2016-05-23

    A single-step, easy-to-use, and fast capillary-type immunoassay device composed of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating containing two kinds of antibody-reagents, including an antibody-graphene oxide conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody, was developed in this study. The working principle involved the spontaneous dissolution of the PEG coating, diffusion of reagents, and subsequent immunoreaction, triggered by the capillary action-mediated introduction of a sample solution. In a sample solution containing the target antigen, two types of antibody reagents form a sandwich-type antigen-antibody complex and fluorescence quenching takes place via fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the labelled fluorescent molecules and graphene oxide. Antigen concentration can be measured based on the decrease in fluorescence intensity. An antigen concentration-dependent response was obtained for the model target protein sample (human IgG, 0.2-10 μg mL(-1)). The present method can shorten the reaction time to within 1 min (approximately 40 s), while conventional methods using the same reagents require reaction times of approximately 20 min because of the large reaction scale. The proposed method is one of the fastest immunoassays ever reported. Finally, the present device was used to measure human IgG in diluted serum samples to demonstrate that this method can be used for fast medical diagnosis.

  18. Volume Labeling with Alexa-Fluor Dyes and Surface Functionalization of Highly Sensitive Fluorescent SiO2 Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Foster, Carmen M; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Nallathamby, Prakash D; Mortensen, Ninell P; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or free surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface modified fluorescent particles with cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems.

  19. Volume labeling with Alexa Fluor dyes and surface functionalization of highly sensitive fluorescent silica (SiO2) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Nallathamby, Prakash D; Foster, Carmen M; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Mortensen, Ninell P; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T

    2013-11-07

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or "free" surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface-modified fluorescent particles with cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems.

  20. Handheld confocal laser endomicroscopic imaging utilizing tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to identify experimental glioma cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Georges, Joseph; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F.; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Preul, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have reported that handheld confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can be used with various nonspecific fluorescent dyes to improve the microscopic identification of brain tumor and its boundaries. Here, we show that CLE can be used experimentally with tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to define glioma margins in vivo. Methods: Thirteen rats underwent craniectomy and in vivo imaging 21 days after implantation with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled U251 (n = 7) cells or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing F98 cells (n = 6). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated EGFR fluorescent antibody (FITC-EGFR) was applied for contrast in F98 tumors. Confocal images of normal brain, obvious tumor, and peritumoral zones were collected using the CLE system. Bench-top confocal microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were correlated with CLE images. Results: GFP and FITC-EGFR fluorescence of glioma cells were detected by in vivo visible-wavelength fluorescence CLE. CLE of GFP-labeled tumors revealed bright individual satellite tumor cells within peritumoral tissue, a definitive tumor border, and subcellular structures. Imaging with FITC-EGFR labeling provided weaker contrast in F98-EGFR tumors but was able to delineate tumor cells. Imaging with both methods in various tumor regions correlated with standard confocal imaging and clinical histology. Conclusions: These data suggest that in vivo CLE of selectively tagged neoplasms could allow specific interactive identification of tumoral areas. Imaging of GFP and FITC-EGFR provides real-time histologic information precisely related to the site of microscopic imaging of tumor. PMID:28144472

  1. Fluorescence of sediment humic substance and its effect on the sorption of selected endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, W L; Ni, J R; Xu, N; Sun, L Y

    2007-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) have a critical influence on the sorption of organic contaminants by soils and sediments. This paper describes investigations into the sorption behavior of three representative endocrine disruptors, bisphenol A (BPA), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), onto sediments and HS extracted sediments using a batch technique. The organic carbon-normalized partition coefficients (K(oc)) for the extracted HS (K(oc)(hs)) were calculated, and the fluorescence spectra of the HS extraced from different sediment samples were gained using excitation/emission matrix (EEM). Particular attention was paid to the correlations between the fluorescence characteristics of HS and the log K(oc)(hs) of selected endocrine disruptors. The results show that the log K(oc)(hs) values range from 3.14 to 4.09 for BPA, from 3.47 to 4.33 for E2, and from 3.65 to 4.32 for EE2. Two characteristic excitation-emission peaks were observed for HS samples extracted from sediments. They are located at Ex/Em=250-260 nm/400-450 nm (peak alpha') and Ex/Em=310-330 nm/390-400 nm (peak alpha) respectively. The alpha' and alpha peak relative intensities I(alpha')/I(alpha) vary from 0.46 to 1.64 for different extracted HS samples. The similarity between fulvic acids (FA) Ex/Em pairs and those observed for HS indicates that FA is the predominant fraction of HS extracted from sediments. Moreover, the log K(oc)(hs) values of BPA, E2, and EE2 have a negative linear correlation to I(alpha')/I(alpha) values. Peak alpha is often attributed to relatively stable and high molecular weight aromatic fulvic-like matter. Therefore, the result presented here reveals that the abundance of aromatic rings in HS molecular structure plays a critical role in the sorption of selected endocrine disruptors.

  2. Fluorescence labeling, purification, and immobilization of a double cysteine mutant calmodulin fusion protein for single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael W; Urbauer, Ramona J Bieber; Zaidi, Asma; Williams, Todd D; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Johnson, Carey K

    2004-02-15

    We present a method of labeling and immobilizing a low-molecular-weight protein, calmodulin (CaM), by fusion to a larger protein, maltose binding protein (MBP), for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Immobilization in an agarose gel matrix eliminates potential interactions of the protein and the fluorophore(s) with a glass surface and allows prolonged monitoring of protein dynamics. The small size of CaM hinders its immobilization in low-weight-percentage agarose gels; however, fusion of CaM to MBP via a flexible linker provides sufficient restriction of translational mobility in 1% agarose gels. Cysteine residues were engineered into MBP.CaM (MBP-T34C,T110C-CaM) and labeled with donor and acceptor fluorescent probes yielding a construct (MBP.CaM-DA) which can be used for single-molecule single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) experiments. Mass spectrometry was used to verify the mass of MBP.CaM-DA. Assays measuring the activity of CaM reveal minimal activity differences between wild-type CaM and MBP.CaM-DA. Single-molecule fluorescence images of the donor and acceptor dyes were fit to a two-dimensional Gaussian function to demonstrate colocalization of donor and acceptor dyes. FRET is demonstrated both in bulk fluorescence spectra and in fluorescence trajectories of single MBP.CaM-DA molecules. The extension of this method to other biomolecules is also proposed.

  3. Use of fluorescently labelled calmodulins as tools to measure subcellular calmodulin activation in living dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Milikan, J M; Bolsover, S R

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescently labelled calmodulins to probe the activity of calmodulin in living dorsal root ganglion cells. Calmodulin labelled with the fluorophore 5-([4,6 dichlorotriazin-2yl]amino)-fluorescein (FL-CaM) does not change its fluorescence when it binds calcium, while calmodulin labelled at lysine 75 with 2-chloro-(6-(4-N,N-diethylamino-phenyl)-1,4,5-triazin-4-yl (TA-CaM), an environment-sensitive probe, increases its fluorescence when it binds calcium. We micro-injected FL-CaM or TA-CaM into rat dorsal root ganglion cells and found that both probes localise to the cell nucleus. In contrast, endogenous cellular calmodulin, in dorsal root ganglion cells as in hippocampal neurones, is predominantly cytosolic unless the neurones are depolarised, then it moves to the nucleus. FL-CaM and TA-CaM, introduced into dorsal root ganglion cells via a patch pipette, also immediately move to the nucleus, indicating that the nuclear localisation is a property of the labelled calmodulins. Although the subcellular distribution of FL-CaM and TA-CaM does not necessarily match that of endogenous calmodulin, we show that FL-CaM can be used as a control for TA-CaM when studying calmodulin activation in different cellular compartments.

  4. Generation of an intramolecular three-color fluorescence resonance energy transfer probe by site-specific protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Voss, Stephanie; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Xi; Gerhard, Frank; Wu, Yao-Wen

    2014-02-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a valuable tool for studying protein structure, folding and interactions. The steep distance dependence of the FRET efficiency requires the donor and acceptor to be in close proximity (1-7.5 nm) to exhibit sufficient energy transfer. One possibility to overcome this limitation is the usage of a FRET cascade that utilizes more than one FRET pair. Essential for realizing this FRET cascade is the site-specific introduction of multiple fluorophores to a given protein, which remains a great challenge. In this study, orthogonal labeling techniques, including fluorescent protein tagging, oxime ligation and kinetically controlled cysteine conjugation, are employed to introduce three fluorophores at specific sites of Rab1b GTPase, yielding a triple-labeled FRET probe. The generated protein probe exhibits efficient energy transfer from the primary donor enhanced green fluorescent protein over the intermediate acceptor rhodamine to the final acceptor Dy630. The labeling strategy opens up a new avenue for multi-color labeling of proteins, facilitating long-distance FRET studies. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Is seeing believing? An assessment of the impact of fluorescent labelling on protein structure and interaction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Michelle K.; James, Susan; McNamara, Ruth; McManus, Jennifer J.

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent labelling is extensively used in conjunction with spectroscopy and microscopy for the in-vivo and in-vitro study of proteins. However, there is little data quantifying how this impacts on the protein in terms of its net interaction potential and its structure. Human ?D-crystallin (HGD), a protein found in the eye lens at high concentrations, undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and has a well-studied phase diagram. LLPS is indicative of short-ranged attractive interactions between the proteins and the conditions this occurs under are sensitive to changes in the protein itself (e.g. mutations, dimer formation) and its environmental conditions (e.g. pH, salt concentration). HGD is produced recombinantly in E. coli and fluorescently labelled via covalent attachment after purification. Comparison of the coexistence curves for labelled and unlabelled protein indicates if there has been a change in the net interaction potential and various spectroscopic techniques are used to elucidate structural changes between the labelled and unlabelled protein. These studies are important for understanding the relationship between in-vitro phase diagram experiments and those conducted in complex biological fluids, such as plasma or cells where fluorescent tagging is required. The authors acknowledge Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) (grant number 11/RFP.1/PHY3165). J.J. McManus acknowledges SFI Stokes Lectureship.

  6. Tumorigenicity and Validity of Fluorescence Labelled Mesenchymal and Epithelial Human Oral Cancer Cell Lines in Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei Xin; Zheng, Li Wu; Ma, Li; Huang, Hong Zhang; Yu, Ru Qing; Zwahlen, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Tumorigenicity and metastatic activity can be visually monitored in cancer cells that were labelled with stable fluorescence. The aim was to establish and validate local and distant spread of subcutaneously previously injected fluorescence transduced human tongue cancer cell lines of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype in nude mice. A total of 32 four-week-old male athymic Balb/c nude mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n = 8). A single dose of 0.3 mL PBS containing 1 × 107 of four different cancer cell-lines (UM1, UM1-GFP, UM2, and UM2-RFP) was injected subcutaneously into the right side of their posterolateral back. Validity assessment of the labelled cancer cells' tumorigenicity was assessed by physical examination, imaging, and histology four weeks after the injection. The tumor take rate of cancer cells was similar in animals injected with either parental or transduced cancer cells. Transduced cancer cells in mice were easily detectable in vivo and after cryosection using fluorescent imaging. UM1 cells showed increased tumor take rate and mean tumor volume, presenting with disorganized histopathological patterns. Fluorescence labelled epithelial and mesenchymal human tongue cancer cell lines do not change in tumorigenicity or cell phenotype after injection in vivo.

  7. Fluorescently-labeled RNA packaging into HIV-1 particles: Direct examination of infectivity across central nervous system cell types

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruqiang; El-Hage, Nazira; Dever, Seth M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV penetrates the central nervous system (CNS), and although it is clear that microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes are infected, whether certain other cell types such as neurons are infected remains unclear. Here, we confirmed the finding that RNAs of both cellular and viral origins are present in native HIV-1 particles and exploited this phenomenon to directly examine HIV-1 infectivity of CNS cell types. Using in vitro transcribed mRNAs that were labeled with a fluorescent dye, we showed that these fluorescent mRNAs were packaged into HIV-1 particles by directly examining infected cells using fluorescence microscopy. Cells in culture infected with these labeled HIV-1 particles showed the fluorescent signals of labeled mRNAs by a distinct pattern of punctate, focal signals within the cells which was used to demonstrate that the CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 strain was able to enter microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes, but not neurons. The strategy used in the present study may represent a novel approach of simplicity, robustness and reliability for versatile applications in HIV studies, such as the determination of infectivity across a broad range of cell types and within subpopulations of an individual cell type by direct visualization of viral entry into cells. PMID:26272129

  8. Fluorescently-labeled RNA packaging into HIV-1 particles: Direct examination of infectivity across central nervous system cell types.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruqiang; El-Hage, Nazira; Dever, Seth M

    2015-11-01

    HIV penetrates the central nervous system (CNS), and although it is clear that microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes are infected, whether certain other cell types such as neurons are infected remains unclear. Here, we confirmed the finding that RNAs of both cellular and viral origins are present in native HIV-1 particles and exploited this phenomenon to directly examine HIV-1 infectivity of CNS cell types. Using in vitro transcribed mRNAs that were labeled with a fluorescent dye, we showed that these fluorescent mRNAs were packaged into HIV-1 particles by directly examining infected cells using fluorescence microscopy. Cells in culture infected with these labeled virions showed the fluorescent signals of mRNA labels by a distinct pattern of punctate, focal signals within the cells which was used to demonstrate that the CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 strain was able to enter microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes, but not neurons. The strategy used in the present study may represent a novel approach of simplicity, robustness and reliability for versatile applications in HIV studies, such as the determination of infectivity across a broad range of cell types and within sub-populations of an individual cell type by direct visualization of viral entry into cells.

  9. Creating and virtually screening databases of fluorescently-labelled compounds for the discovery of target-specific molecular probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamstra, Rhiannon L.; Dadgar, Saedeh; Wigg, John; Chowdhury, Morshed A.; Phenix, Christopher P.; Floriano, Wely B.

    2014-11-01

    Our group has recently demonstrated that virtual screening is a useful technique for the identification of target-specific molecular probes. In this paper, we discuss some of our proof-of-concept results involving two biologically relevant target proteins, and report the development of a computational script to generate large databases of fluorescence-labelled compounds for computer-assisted molecular design. The virtual screening of a small library of 1,153 fluorescently-labelled compounds against two targets, and the experimental testing of selected hits reveal that this approach is efficient at identifying molecular probes, and that the screening of a labelled library is preferred over the screening of base compounds followed by conjugation of confirmed hits. The automated script for library generation explores the known reactivity of commercially available dyes, such as NHS-esters, to create large virtual databases of fluorescence-tagged small molecules that can be easily synthesized in a laboratory. A database of 14,862 compounds, each tagged with the ATTO680 fluorophore was generated with the automated script reported here. This library is available for downloading and it is suitable for virtual ligand screening aiming at the identification of target-specific fluorescent molecular probes.

  10. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  11. PNA-DNA hybridization study using labeled streptavidin by voltammetry and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyun; Tiefenauer, Louis; Tian, Shengjun; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2006-01-15

    Using ferrocene-streptavidin conjugates as amplifiers, we recently have demonstrated the simultaneous detection of DNA hybridization to peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-modified gold surfaces at the femtomole level by electrochemical and surface plasmon resonance techniques (Liu, J.; Tian, S.; Tiefenauer, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Knoll, W. Anal. Chem. 2005, 77, 2756-2761). In this paper, a detailed study of the binding behavior of PNA-DNA is presented by square wave voltammetry and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The different binding constants for fully matched and single-mismatched DNA were obtained. The effect of the buffer concentration on the PNA-DNA hybrids was investigated using labeled streptavidin by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and SPFS. At high ionic strength, both the CV and SPFS signals were restrained dramatically, which is most probably due to a conformational change of the short-strand PNA-DNA helices on the surface. We conclude that the combination of electrochemical techniques with SPFS is very useful for the study of short DNA structure transformation.

  12. Photonic Crystal Surfaces as a General Purpose Platform for Label-Free and Fluorescent Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Brian T.

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces can be designed to provide a wide range of functions that are used to perform biochemical and cell-based assays. Detection of the optical resonant reflections from photonic crystal surfaces enables high sensitivity label-free biosensing, while the enhanced electromagnetic fields that occur at resonant wavelengths can be used to enhance the detection sensitivity of any surface-based fluorescence assay. Fabrication of photonic crystals from inexpensive plastic materials over large surface areas enables them to be incorporated into standard formats that include microplates, microarrays, and microfluidic channels. This report reviews the design of photonic crystal biosensors, their associated detection instrumentation, and biological applications. Applications including small molecule high throughput screening, cell membrane integrin activation, gene expression analysis, and protein biomarker detection are highlighted. Recent results in which photonic crystal surfaces are used for enhancing the detection of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, and the development of high resolution photonic crystal-based laser biosensors are also described. PMID:20383277

  13. Dynamic two-photon imaging of cerebral microcirculation using fluorescently labeled red blood cells and plasma.

    PubMed

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    To explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma flow in three-dimensional (3D) microvascular networks of the cerebral cortex, we performed two-photon microscopic imaging of the cortical microvasculature in genetically engineered rats in which the RBCs endogenously express green fluorescent protein (GFP). Water-soluble quantum dots (Qdots) were injected intravenously into the animals to label the plasma, and concurrent imaging was performed for GFP-RBCs and Qdot plasma. The RBC and plasma distributions were compared between resting state and forepaw stimulation-induced neural activation. The RBC and plasma images showed detectable signals up to a depth of 0.4 and 0.6 mm from the cortical surface, respectively. A thicker plasma layer (2-5 μm) was seen in venous vessels relative to the arterial vessels. In response to neural activation, the RBCs were redistributed among the parenchymal capillary networks. In addition, individual capillaries showed a variable ratio of RBC and plasma distributions before and after activation, indicative of dynamic changes of hematocrit in single capillaries. These results demonstrate that this transgenic animal model may be useful in further investigating the mechanism that controls dynamic RBC flow in single capillaries and among multiple capillary networks of the cerebral microcirculation.

  14. Fluorescence labelling of phosphatase activity in digestive glands of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Płachno, B J; Adamec, L; Lichtscheidl, I K; Peroutka, M; Adlassnig, W; Vrba, J

    2006-11-01

    A new ELF (enzyme labelled fluorescence) assay was applied to detect phosphatase activity in glandular structures of 47 carnivorous plant species, especially Lentibulariaceae, in order to understand their digestive activities. We address the following questions: (1) Are phosphatases produced by the plants and/or by inhabitants of the traps? (2) Which type of hairs/glands is involved in the production of phosphatases? (3) Is this phosphatase production a common feature among carnivorous plants or is it restricted to evolutionarily advanced species? Our results showed activity of the phosphatases in glandular structures of the majority of the plants tested, both from the greenhouse and from sterile culture. In addition, extracellular phosphatases can also be produced by trap inhabitants. In Utricularia, activity of phosphatase was detected in internal glands of 27 species from both primitive and advanced sections and different ecological groups. Further positive reactions were found in Genlisea, Pinguicula, Aldrovanda, Dionaea, Drosera, Drosophyllum, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus. In Utricularia and Genlisea, enzymatic secretion was independent of stimulation by prey. Byblis and Roridula are usually considered as "proto-carnivores", lacking digestive enzymes. However, we found high activity of phosphatases in both species. Thus, they should be classified as true carnivores. We suggest that the inflorescence of Byblis and some Pinguicula species might also be an additional "carnivorous organ", which can trap a prey, digest it, and finally absorb available nutrients.

  15. Affinity fluorescence-labeled peptides for the early detection of cancer in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Lu, Shaoying; Piraka, Cyrus; Appelman, Henry; Kwon, Rich; Soetikno, Roy; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Wang, Thomas D.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence-labeled peptides that affinity bind to neoplastic mucsosa are promising for use as a specific contrast agent in the detection of pre-malignant tissue in the esophagus. This method is can be used to identify expression of biological markers associated with dysplasia on endoscopic imaging as a guide for biopsy and represents a novel method for the early detection and prevention of cancer. We demonstrate the use of phage display to select affinity peptides and identify the sequence "ASYNYDA" that binds with high target-to-background ratio to dysplastic esophageal mucosa compared to that of intestinal metaplasia. Validation of preferential binding is demonstrated for neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. An optimal tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 85% was found at the relative threshold of 0.60 with a target-to-background ratio of 1.81 and an area under the ROC curve of 0.87. Peptides are a novel class of ligand for targeted detection of pre-malignant mucosa for purposes of screening and surveillance.

  16. The thiourea group modulates the fluorescence emission decay of fluorescein-labeled molecules.

    PubMed

    Klonis, Nectarios; Sawyer, William H

    2003-05-01

    We have investigated the spectral properties and emission characteristics of fluorescein-5-thiocarbamoyl-N,N'-caproate (FITC-ACA) to examine the origin of the complex emission decay often observed in fluorescein-labeled molecules. The covalent attachment of fluorescein to epsilon-amino-n-caproic acid does not perturb the prototropic transitions of the chromophore or the general fluorescence characteristics of the various prototropic forms. However, both the monoanion and dianion forms of FITC-ACA are quenched relative to free fluorescein and exhibit a complex emission decay that is described by two discrete lifetimes. The thiourea group that links the chromophore to the caproic acid is shown to modulate the emission properties of the FITC-ACA. We show that the emission decay can also be analyzed using the asymmetric distribution model of Alcala et al. In this analysis, the tauL and tauu parameters that represent the lower and upper lifetime limits of the distribution reflect the quenched (0 ns) and unquenched lifetimes, respectively. The beta parameter that describes the distribution of lifetimes between the two limiting states can be related to the quenching efficiency of the thiourea group and to the structure and dynamics of the FITC-ACA molecule.

  17. Fluorescent trimethyl-substituted naphthyridine as a label-free signal reporter for one-step and highly sensitive fluorescent detection of DNA in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiamian; Wang, Xiuyun; Wu, Shuo; Che, Ruping; Luo, Pinchen; Meng, Changgong

    2017-01-15

    A facile label-free sensing method is developed for the one-step and highly sensitive fluorescent detection of DNA, which couples the specific C-C mismatch bonding and fluorescent quenching property of a trimethyl-substituted naphthyridine dye (ATMND) with the exonuclease III (Exo III) assisted cascade target recycling amplification strategy. In the absence of target DNA, the DNA hairpin probe with a C-C mismatch in the stem and more than 4 bases overhung at the 3' terminus could entrap and quench the fluorescence of ATMND and resist the digestion of Exo III, thus showing a low fluorescence background. In the presence of the target, however, the hybridization event between the two protruding segments and the target triggers the digestion reaction of Exo III, recycles the initial target, and simultaneously releases both the secondary target analogue and the ATMND caged in the stem. The released initial and secondary targets take part in another cycle of digestion, thus leading to the release of a huge amount of free ATMND for signal transducing. Based on the fluorescence recovery, the as-proposed label-free fluorescent sensing strategy shows very good analytical performances towards DNA detection, such as a wide linear range from 10pM to 1μM, a low limit of detection of 6pM, good selectivity, and a facile one-step operation at room temperature. Practical sample analysis in serum samples indicates the method has good precision and accuracy, which may thus have application potentials for point-of-care screening of DNA in complex clinical and environmental samples.

  18. Development And Evaluation Of Stable Isotope And Fluorescent Labeling And Detection Methodologies For Tracking Injected Bacteria During In Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Fuller; Tullis C. Onstott

    2003-12-17

    This report summarizes the results of a research project conducted to develop new methods to label bacterial cells so that they could be tracked and enumerated as they move in the subsurface after they are introduced into the groundwater (i.e., during bioaugmentation). Labeling methods based on stable isotopes of carbon (13C) and vital fluorescent stains were developed. Both approaches proved successful with regards to the ability to effectively label bacterial cells. Several methods for enumeration of fluorescently-labeled cells were developed and validated, including near-real time microplate spectrofluorometry that could be performed in the field. However, the development of a novel enumeration method for the 13C-enriched cells, chemical reaction interface/mass spectrometry (CRIMS), was not successful due to difficulties with the proposed instrumentation. Both labeling methodologies were successfully evaluated and validated during laboratory- and field-scale bacterial transport experiments. The methods developed during this research should be useful for future bacterial transport work as well as other microbial ecology research in a variety of environments. A full bibliography of research articles and meeting presentations related to this project is included (including web links to abstracts and full text reprints).

  19. Site-specific labeling of genetically encoded azido groups for multicolor, single-molecule fluorescence imaging of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Tian, He; Sakmar, Thomas P; Huber, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Heptahelical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate transmembrane signal transduction to facilitate intercellular communication. GPCRs assemble in the membrane bilayer with a variety of cytoplasmic adapter and scaffold proteins to form molecular machines, or "signalosomes," which undergo complex dynamic assembly and disassembly reactions. Despite significant recent advances in structural studies of GPCRs and their associated cytoplasmic components, understanding transmembrane signaling in four dimensions with chemical precision requires new approaches. One promising approach to study allosteric effects involved in signalosome reaction pathways is to use multicolor single-molecule detection (SMD) fluorescence experiments in biochemically defined systems. We describe here the methodological foundation for automated, multicolor, single-molecule fluorescence studies of the structural and compositional dynamics of macromolecular complexes involved in signal transduction. We present a general, simple, and robust method for stoichiometric, site-specific fluorescence labeling of expressed GPCRs. The method is based on bioorthogonal conjugation of a fluorescent reporter group to a genetically encoded azido group introduced into expressed GPCRs using amber codon suppression. We then present a strategy to reconstitute labeled GPCRs in native-like membranes and to tether-oriented samples onto surfaces amenable for interrogation by total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) spectroscopy. We describe how to assemble an automated four-color epifluorescence microscope with SMD-TIRF optics. Finally, we discuss how to adapt engineered samples for high-throughput imaging with the aim of understanding the kinetic relationships between ligand binding and the dynamic regulation of the GPCR signalosome.

  20. Trifunctional fluorescent unnatural nucleoside: Label free detection of T-T/C-C base mismatches, abasic site and bulge DNA.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar; Talukdar, Sangita

    2017-08-01

    The detection and targeting of both the mismatched and abasic DNA is highly important which would ultimately help in designing new diagnostics and chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, sensing and targeting the bulge sequence with a fluorescent probe would be useful to study the role of bulges in nucleic acid function or could have significant therapeutic potential. Thus, detection of specific bulges by small fluorescent molecules is an attractive research area since the past several years. Many attempts have been made to prepare such compounds. We report herein a label free strategy for the detection of pyrimidine base mismatches (T/T and C/C), sensing of abasic site, and pyrimidine base bulge DNA using an unnatural tetrazolylpyrene nucleoside ((TPy)B(Do)) as a bare fluorescent probe. The H-bonding/hydrophobic force mediated interactions allow the sensing of all three deformed DNA via an enhancement of fluorescence signal using our simple "Just-Mix and Read" strategy. The binding of the probe to all the three deformed DNA duplexes is accompanied by an increase in the thermal melting stability of the deformed DNAs. That the probe binds efficiently to the minor groove near the deformed site was evident from spectroscopic studies. All the spectral evidences open up a multitude of possibilities for using our probe, tetrazolylpyrene nucleoside, as an efficient fluorescent light-up bio-probe for label free DNA detection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  2. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  3. Fluorescence-based sensing of glucose using engineered glucose/galactose-binding protein: A comparison of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and environmentally sensitive dye labelling strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Faaizah; Gnudi, Luigi; Pickup, John C.

    2008-01-04

    Fluorescence-based glucose sensors using glucose-binding protein (GBP) as the receptor have employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and environmentally sensitive dyes, but with widely varying sensitivity. We therefore compared signal changes in (a) a FRET system constructed by transglutaminase-mediated N-terminal attachment of Alexa Fluor 488/555 as donor and QSY 7 as acceptor at Cys 152 or 182 mutations with (b) GBP labelled with the environmentally sensitive dye badan at C152 or 182. Both FRET systems had a small maximal fluorescence change at saturating glucose (7% and 16%), badan attached at C152 was associated with a 300% maximal fluorescence increase with glucose, though with badan at C182 there was no change. We conclude that glucose sensing based on GBP and FRET does not produce a larger enough signal change for clinical use; both the nature of the environmentally sensitive dye and its site of conjugation seem important for maximum signal change; badan-GBP152C has a large glucose-induced fluorescence change, suitable for development as a glucose sensor.

  4. Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques. PMID:26095660

  5. Eradication of osteosarcoma by fluorescence-guided surgery with tumor labeling by a killer-reporter adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-05-01

    In a previous study, we developed fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) for osteosarcoma using an orthotopic model with 143B human osteosarcoma cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) implanted into the intramedullary cavity of the tibia in nude mice. The FGS-treated mice had a significantly higher disease-free survival (DFS) rate than the bright-light surgery (BLS). However, although FGS significantly reduced the recurrence of the primary tumor, it did not reduce lung metastasis. In the present study, we utilized the OBP-401 telomerase-dependent killer-reporter adenovirus, carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP), to label human osteosarcoma in situ in orthotopic mouse models. OBP-401-illuminated human osteosarcoma cell lines, 143B and MNNG/HOS cells in vitro and in vivo. OBP-401 tumor illumination enabled effective FGS of the 143B-derived orthotopic mouse model of human osteosarcoma model as well as FGS eradication of residual cancer cells after BLS. OBP-401-assisted FGS significantly inhibited local recurrence and lung metastasis after surgery, thereby prolonging DFS and overall survival (OS), achieving a very important improvement of therapeutic outcomes over our previously reported FGS study. These therapeutic benefits of FGS were demonstrated using a clinically-viable methodology of direct labeling of human osteosarcoma in situ with the OBP-401 killer-reporter adenovirus in contrast with previous reports, which used genetically engineered labeled cells or antibody-based fluorescent labels for FGS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:836-844, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Phagocytosis of live versus killed or fluorescently labeled bacteria by macrophages differ in both magnitude and receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Peruń, Angelika; Biedroń, Rafał; Konopiński, Maciej K; Białecka, Anna; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2017-05-01

    Scavenger receptor (SR)-mediated opsonin-independent phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages has been suggested to represent an important, early mechanism of anti-bacterial host defense. However, although the ability to bind bacteria has been demonstrated to be a shared feature of all types of SRs, in many cases the evidence is limited to the demonstration of increased binding of killed, fluorescently labeled bacteria to non-phagocytic cells transfected with these receptors. We sought to verify the ability of SRs to mediate non-opsonic phagocytosis of live Escherichia coli (Ec) and Staphylococcus aureus (Sa), model species of Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, respectively, and to assess the relative contributions of different SRs expressed on murine macrophages in this process. We found that the class A SR SR-A/CD204 was the major receptor mediating phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled Sa, whereas different SRs had highly redundant roles in the phagocytosis of live Sa. Conversely, different SRs contributed to the phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled Ec. In comparison, phagocytosis of live Ec was of much lower magnitude and was selectively mediated by SR-A. These results question the use of fluorescently labeled bacteria as valid replacements for live bacteria. The low magnitude of opsonin-independent phagocytosis of Ec and unimpaired phagocytosis of Sa in SR-A- or CD36-deficient macrophages indicate that the defect in this process might not be responsible for the reported impaired bacteria clearance in mice deficient in these receptors. We postulate that this impairment might result to a larger extent from inhibition of intracellular bacteria killing caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines, produced in excessive amounts by SR-deficient cells in response to bacterial products.

  7. Multisegment one-step RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of influenza A virus genome for use in diagnostic microarray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasin, A. V.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Plotnikova, M. A.; Klotchenko, S. A.; Chervyakova, O. V.; Strochkov, V. M.; Taylakova, E. T.; Elpaeva, E. A.; Komissarov, A. B.; Egorov, V. V.; Koshemetov, J. K.; Kiselev, O. I.; Mamadaliev, S. M.

    2011-04-01

    Microarray technology is one of the most challenging methods of influenza A virus subtyping, which is based on the antigenic properties of viral surface glycoproteins - hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. On the example of biochip for detection of influenza A/H5N1 virus we showed the possibility of using multisegment RTPCR method for amplification of fluorescently labeled cDNA of all possible influenza A virus subtypes with a single pair of primers in influenza diagnostic microarrays.

  8. Fluorescent labelling of in situ hybridisation probes through the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Susann; Manetto, Antonio; Cassinelli, Valentina; Fuchs, Jörg; Ma, Lu; Raddaoui, Nada; Houben, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    In situ hybridisation is a powerful tool to investigate the genome and chromosome architecture. Nick translation (NT) is widely used to label DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). However, NT is limited to the use of long double-stranded DNA and does not allow the labelling of single-stranded and short DNA, e.g. oligonucleotides. An alternative technique is the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), at which azide and alkyne functional groups react in a multistep process catalysed by copper(I) ions to give 1,4-distributed 1,2,3-triazoles at a high yield (also called 'click reaction'). We successfully applied this technique to label short single-stranded DNA probes as well as long PCR-derived double-stranded probes and tested them by FISH on plant chromosomes and nuclei. The hybridisation efficiency of differently labelled probes was compared to those obtained by conventional labelling techniques. We show that copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition-labelled probes are reliable tools to detect different types of repetitive sequences on chromosomes opening new promising routes for the detection of single copy gene. Moreover, a combination of FISH using such probes with other techniques, e.g. immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cell proliferation assays using 5-ethynyl-deoxyuridine, is herein shown to be easily feasible.

  9. Specific Biarsenical Labeling of Cell Surface Proteins Allows Fluorescent- and Biotin-tagging of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Prion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Yuzuru; Shi, Zhen-Dan; Ruddy, Brian; Dorward, David W.; Greene, Lois

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent tagging is a powerful tool for imaging proteins in living cells. However, the steric effects imposed by fluorescent tags impair the behavior of many proteins. Here, we report a novel technique, Instant with DTT, EDT, And Low temperature (IDEAL)-labeling, for rapid and specific FlAsH-labeling of tetracysteine-tagged cell surface proteins by using prion protein (PrP) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) as models. In prion-infected cells, FlAsH-labeled tetracysteine-tagged PrP converted from the normal isoform (PrPsen) to the disease-associated isoform (PrPres), suggesting minimal steric effects of the tag. Pulse-chase analysis of PrP and APP by fluorescent gel imaging demonstrated the utility of IDEAL labeling in investigating protein metabolism by identifying an as-yet-unrecognized C-terminal fragment (C3) of PrPsen and by characterizing the kinetics of PrPres and APP metabolism. C3 generation and N-terminal truncation of PrPres were inhibited by the anti-prion compound E64, a cysteine protease inhibitor. Surprisingly, E64 did not inhibit the synthesis of new PrPres, providing insight into the mechanism by which E64 reduces steady-state PrPres levels in prion-infected cells. To expand the versatility of tetracysteine tagging, we created new Alexa Fluor- and biotin-conjugated tetracysteine-binding molecules that were applied to imaging PrP endocytosis and ultrastructural localization. IDEAL-labeling extends the use of biarsenical derivatives to extracellular proteins and beyond microscopic imaging. PMID:18987338

  10. Analysis of high affinity self-association by fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation of labeled proteins: opportunities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Lomash, Suvendu; Glasser, Carla; Mayer, Mark L; Schuck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (SV) is a powerful first-principle technique for the study of protein interactions, and allows a rigorous characterization of binding stoichiometry and affinities. A recently introduced commercial fluorescence optical detection system (FDS) permits analysis of high-affinity interactions by SV. However, for most proteins the attachment of an extrinsic fluorophore is an essential prerequisite for analysis by FDS-SV. Using the glutamate receptor GluA2 amino terminal domain as a model system for high-affinity homo-dimerization, we demonstrate how the experimental design and choice of fluorescent label can impact both the observed binding constants as well as the derived hydrodynamic parameter estimates for the monomer and dimer species. Specifically, FAM (5,6-carboxyfluorescein) was found to create different populations of artificially high-affinity and low-affinity dimers, as indicated by both FDS-SV and the kinetics of dimer dissociation studied using a bench-top fluorescence spectrometer and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer. By contrast, Dylight488 labeled GluA2, as well as GluA2 expressed as an EGFP fusion protein, yielded results consistent with estimates for unlabeled GluA2. Our study suggests considerations for the choice of labeling strategies, and highlights experimental designs that exploit specific opportunities of FDS-SV for improving the reliability of the binding isotherm analysis of interacting systems.

  11. Topology of OxlT, the oxalate transporter of Oxalobacter formigenes, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Jia, Z; Jung, T; Maloney, P C

    2001-04-01

    The topology of OxlT, the oxalate:formate exchange protein of Oxalobacter formigenes, was established by site-directed fluorescence labeling, a simple strategy that generates topological information in the context of the intact protein. Accessibility of cysteine to the fluorescent thiol-directed probe Oregon green maleimide (OGM) was examined for a panel of 34 single-cysteine variants, each generated in a His(9)-tagged cysteine-less host. The reaction with OGM was readily scored by examining the fluorescence profile after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of material purified by Ni2+ linked affinity chromatography. A position was assigned an external location if its single-cysteine derivative reacted with OGM added to intact cells; a position was designated internal if OGM labeling required cell lysis. We also showed that labeling of external, but not internal, positions was blocked by prior exposure of cells to the impermeable and nonfluorescent thiol-specific agent ethyltrimethylammonium methanethiosulfonate. Of the 34 positions examined in this way, 29 were assigned unambiguously to either an internal or external location; 5 positions could not be assigned, since the target cysteine failed to react with OGM. There was no evidence of false-positive assignment. Our findings document a simple and rapid method for establishing the topology of a membrane protein and show that OxlT has 12 transmembrane segments, confirming inferences from hydropathy analysis.

  12. Topology of OxlT, the Oxalate Transporter of Oxalobacter formigenes, Determined by Site-Directed Fluorescence Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Liwen; Jia, Zhenzhen; Jung, Thomas; Maloney, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    The topology of OxlT, the oxalate:formate exchange protein of Oxalobacter formigenes, was established by site-directed fluorescence labeling, a simple strategy that generates topological information in the context of the intact protein. Accessibility of cysteine to the fluorescent thiol-directed probe Oregon green maleimide (OGM) was examined for a panel of 34 single-cysteine variants, each generated in a His9-tagged cysteine-less host. The reaction with OGM was readily scored by examining the fluorescence profile after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of material purified by Ni2+-linked affinity chromatography. A position was assigned an external location if its single-cysteine derivative reacted with OGM added to intact cells; a position was designated internal if OGM labeling required cell lysis. We also showed that labeling of external, but not internal, positions was blocked by prior exposure of cells to the impermeable and nonfluorescent thiol-specific agent ethyltrimethylammonium methanethiosulfonate. Of the 34 positions examined in this way, 29 were assigned unambiguously to either an internal or external location; 5 positions could not be assigned, since the target cysteine failed to react with OGM. There was no evidence of false-positive assignment. Our findings document a simple and rapid method for establishing the topology of a membrane protein and show that OxlT has 12 transmembrane segments, confirming inferences from hydropathy analysis. PMID:11274108

  13. Label-free triple-helix aptamer as sensing platform for "signal-on" fluorescent detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Nan; Wang, Quanbo; Lei, Jianping; Liu, Lin; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-01-01

    The design of a label-free aptamer for separation of recognition sequence from signal reporter is significant to ensure the high-efficiency affinity between aptamer and target. This work develops a label-free triple-helix aptamer (THA) as sensing platform for "signal-on" fluorescent detection of thrombin. THA was composed of aptamer sequence and help DNA 1 (H1), which contained the complementary sequence of hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) labeled help DNA 2 (H2). The specific recognition event between aptamer and thrombin triggered the dismission of THA to release H1. The released H1 then reacted with the signal probe of H2/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite to form H1-H2 duplex, leading to the fluorescence recovery of H2 due to the detachment of H1-H2 duplex from the surface of GO. With employment of THA as a signal transducer and GO as a "superquencher", this method shows a sensitive response to thrombin with a wide concentration range from 5 to 1200 nM. The limit of detection is 1.8 nM (S/N=3) with excellent selectivity. Considering the universality of THA, the proposed aptasensor would provide a platform for homogeneous fluorescent detection of a wide range of analytes.

  14. Rationally designed fluorescently labeled sulfate-binding protein mutants: evaluation in the development of a sensing system for sulfate.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Suresh; Salins, Lyndon L E; Mark Ensor, C; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-06-05

    Periplasmic binding proteins from E. coli undergo large conformational changes upon binding their respective ligands. By attaching a fluorescent probe at rationally selected unique sites on the protein, these conformational changes in the protein can be monitored by measuring the changes in fluorescence intensity of the probe which allow the development of reagentless sensing systems for their corresponding ligands. In this work, we evaluated several sites on bacterial periplasmic sulfate-binding protein (SBP) for attachment of a fluorescent probe and rationally designed a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Eight different mutants of SBP were prepared by employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to introduce a unique cysteine residue at a specific location on the protein. The sites Gly55, Ser90, Ser129, Ala140, Leu145, Ser171, Val181, and Gly186 were chosen for mutagenesis by studying the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of SBP. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe (MDCC) was then attached site-specifically to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the unique cysteine residue introduced. Each fluorescent probe-conjugated SBP mutant was characterized in terms of its fluorescence properties and Ser171 was determined to be the best site for the attachment of the fluorescent probe that would allow for the development of a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Three different environment-sensitive fluorescent probes (1,5-IAEDANS, MDCC, and acylodan) were studied with the SBP171 mutant protein. A calibration curve for sulfate was constructed using the labeled protein and relating the change in the fluorescence intensity with the amount of sulfate present in the sample. The detection limit for sulfate was found to be in the submicromolar range using this system. The selectivity of the sensing system was demonstrated by evaluating its response to other anions. A fast and selective sensing system with detection limits for sulfate in the

  15. Rationally designed fluorescently labeled sulfate-binding protein mutants: evaluation in the development of a sensing system for sulfate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, Suresh; Salins, Lyndon L E.; Mark Ensor, C.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins from E. coli undergo large conformational changes upon binding their respective ligands. By attaching a fluorescent probe at rationally selected unique sites on the protein, these conformational changes in the protein can be monitored by measuring the changes in fluorescence intensity of the probe which allow the development of reagentless sensing systems for their corresponding ligands. In this work, we evaluated several sites on bacterial periplasmic sulfate-binding protein (SBP) for attachment of a fluorescent probe and rationally designed a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Eight different mutants of SBP were prepared by employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to introduce a unique cysteine residue at a specific location on the protein. The sites Gly55, Ser90, Ser129, Ala140, Leu145, Ser171, Val181, and Gly186 were chosen for mutagenesis by studying the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of SBP. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe (MDCC) was then attached site-specifically to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the unique cysteine residue introduced. Each fluorescent probe-conjugated SBP mutant was characterized in terms of its fluorescence properties and Ser171 was determined to be the best site for the attachment of the fluorescent probe that would allow for the development of a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Three different environment-sensitive fluorescent probes (1,5-IAEDANS, MDCC, and acylodan) were studied with the SBP171 mutant protein. A calibration curve for sulfate was constructed using the labeled protein and relating the change in the fluorescence intensity with the amount of sulfate present in the sample. The detection limit for sulfate was found to be in the submicromolar range using this system. The selectivity of the sensing system was demonstrated by evaluating its response to other anions. A fast and selective sensing system with detection limits for sulfate in the

  16. Rationally designed fluorescently labeled sulfate-binding protein mutants: evaluation in the development of a sensing system for sulfate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, Suresh; Salins, Lyndon L E.; Mark Ensor, C.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins from E. coli undergo large conformational changes upon binding their respective ligands. By attaching a fluorescent probe at rationally selected unique sites on the protein, these conformational changes in the protein can be monitored by measuring the changes in fluorescence intensity of the probe which allow the development of reagentless sensing systems for their corresponding ligands. In this work, we evaluated several sites on bacterial periplasmic sulfate-binding protein (SBP) for attachment of a fluorescent probe and rationally designed a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Eight different mutants of SBP were prepared by employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to introduce a unique cysteine residue at a specific location on the protein. The sites Gly55, Ser90, Ser129, Ala140, Leu145, Ser171, Val181, and Gly186 were chosen for mutagenesis by studying the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of SBP. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe (MDCC) was then attached site-specifically to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the unique cysteine residue introduced. Each fluorescent probe-conjugated SBP mutant was characterized in terms of its fluorescence properties and Ser171 was determined to be the best site for the attachment of the fluorescent probe that would allow for the development of a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Three different environment-sensitive fluorescent probes (1,5-IAEDANS, MDCC, and acylodan) were studied with the SBP171 mutant protein. A calibration curve for sulfate was constructed using the labeled protein and relating the change in the fluorescence intensity with the amount of sulfate present in the sample. The detection limit for sulfate was found to be in the submicromolar range using this system. The selectivity of the sensing system was demonstrated by evaluating its response to other anions. A fast and selective sensing system with detection limits for sulfate in the

  17. Use of Lucifer yellow VS as a label in fluorescent immunoassays illustrated by the determination of albumin in serum.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M P; Rocks, B F; Riley, C

    1983-07-01

    The use of a new label for fluoroimmunoassay is described. Lucifer yellow VS is a highly fluorescent vinyl sulphone dye which, under mild conditions, forms covalent bonds with amino and sulphydryl groups but is extremely stable in water. A large Stokes shift (110 nm) and an emission maximum at 540 nm give Lucifer yellow further advantages over the more commonly used labels. The use of the dye as a label has been demonstrated by developing a heterogeneous fluoroimmunoassay for human serum albumin. The fluoroimmunoassay gave comparable results to those obtained using a less specific colorimetric dye-binding assay (r = 0.97, n = 20). The advantages, limitations, and other potential uses of Lucifer yellow are discussed.

  18. Feature analysis for classification of trace fluorescent labeled protein crystallization images.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Madhav; Dinc, Imren; Sigdel, Madhu S; Dinc, Semih; Pusey, Marc L; Aygun, Ramazan S

    2017-01-01

    Large number of features are extracted from protein crystallization trial images to improve the accuracy of classifiers for predicting the presence of crystals or phases of the crystallization process. The excessive number of features and computationally intensive image processing methods to extract these features make utilization of automated classification tools on stand-alone computing systems inconvenient due to the required time to complete the classification tasks. Combinations of image feature sets, feature reduction and classification techniques for crystallization images benefiting from trace fluorescence labeling are investigated. Features are categorized into intensity, graph, histogram, texture, shape adaptive, and region features (using binarized images generated by Otsu's, green percentile, and morphological thresholding). The effects of normalization, feature reduction with principle components analysis (PCA), and feature selection using random forest classifier are also analyzed. The time required to extract feature categories is computed and an estimated time of extraction is provided for feature category combinations. We have conducted around 8624 experiments (different combinations of feature categories, binarization methods, feature reduction/selection, normalization, and crystal categories). The best experimental results are obtained using combinations of intensity features, region features using Otsu's thresholding, region features using green percentile G90 thresholding, region features using green percentile G99 thresholding, graph features, and histogram features. Using this feature set combination, 96% accuracy (without misclassifying crystals as non-crystals) was achieved for the first level of classification to determine presence of crystals. Since missing a crystal is not desired, our algorithm is adjusted to achieve a high sensitivity rate. In the second level classification, 74.2% accuracy for (5-class) crystal sub

  19. Native purification and labeling of RNA for single molecule fluorescence studies

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Suddala, Krishna C.; Walter, Nils G.

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery that non-coding RNAs are considerably more abundant and serve a much wider range of critical cellular functions than recognized over previous decades of research into molecular biology has sparked a renewed interest in the study of structure-function relationships of RNA. To perform their functions in the cell, RNAs must dominantly adopt their native conformations, avoiding deep, non-productive kinetic traps that may exist along a frustrated (rugged) folding free energy landscape. Intracellularly, RNAs are synthesized by RNA polymerase and fold co-transcriptionally starting from the 5’ end, sometimes with the aid of protein chaperones. By contrast, in the laboratory RNAs are commonly generated by in vitro transcription or chemical synthesis, followed by purification in a manner that includes the use of high concentrations of urea, heat and UV light (for detection), resulting in the denaturation and subsequent refolding of the entire RNA. Recent studies into the nature of heterogeneous RNA populations resulting from this process have underscored the need for non-denaturing (native) purification methods that maintain the co-transcriptional fold of an RNA. Here, we present protocols for the native purification of an RNA after its in vitro transcription and for fluorophore and biotin labeling methods designed to preserve its native conformation for use in single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) inquiries into its structure and function. Finally, we present methods for taking smFRET data and for analyzing them, as well as a description of plausible overall preparation schemes for the plethora of non-coding RNAs. PMID:25352138

  20. Diurnal feeding rhythms in north sea copepods measured by Gut fluorescence, digestive enzyme activity and grazing on labelled food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, M. A.; Oosterhuis, S. S.

    Results obtained with three methods for measuring feeding rhythms of copepods were different. Gut fluorescence showed clear day-night variation during 2 out of 3 cruises at the Oyster Ground in the North Sea. The species studied ( Pseudocalanus, Temora, Centropages, Calanus) had highest gut fluorescence during the night in May and September, the larger species demonstrating the largest difference. Gut fluorescence was positively correlated with ambient chlorophyll concentrations. Gut clearance rate was not dependent on temperature but on gut fullness. Gut passage times at high gut fluorescence levels were ˜25 minutes, at low levels 2 hours. In grazing experiments with 14C labelled food, filtering rates declined after 5 to 15 minutes, presumably before the first defecation of radioactive material. Filtering rates in Temora were higher at night than by day during May and July, but not in Pseudocalanus and Calanus during September. No diurnal pattern of amylase and tryptic activity was found, except in July for amylase but then probably due to vertical migration. The activity of these digestive enzymes appeared to be least and gut fluorescence most suitable for the detection of grazing rhythms. The occurrence of high fluorescence levels at night in all species studied suggests that intermittent feeding by copepods on phytoplankton is a general phenomenon from spring to autumn. The increase in foraging activity appeared to start well before complete darkness, during May and July even one hour or more before sunset.

  1. Label-free silicon quantum dots as fluorescent probe for selective and sensitive detection of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangna; Deng, Jianhui; Yi, Yinhui; Li, Haitai; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-07-01

    In this work, label-free silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) were used as a novel fluorescence probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Cu(2+). The fluorescence of the SiQDs was effectively quenched by H2O2 from the reaction of ascorbic acid with O2, and hydroxyl radicals from Fenton reaction between H2O2 and Cu(+). The fluorescence intensity of SiQDs was quenched about 25% in 15 min after the addition of H2O2 (1mM). While the SiQDs was incubated with AA (1mM) and Cu(2+) (1 µM) under the same conditions, the fluorescence intensity of SiQDs decreased about 55%. Obviously, the recycling of Cu(2+) in the test system may lead to a dramatical decrease in the fluorescence of SiQDs. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the rate of fluorescence quenching of SiQDs was linearly dependent on the Cu(2+) concentration ranging from 25 to 600 nM with the limit of detection as low as 8 nM, which was much lower than that of existing methods. Moreover, the probe was successfully applied to the determination of Cu(2+) in different environmental water samples and human hair.

  2. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters based label-free fluorescent molecular beacon for the detection of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Xie, Minhao; Zhu, Xue; Xu, Lan; Yang, Runlin; Huang, Biao; Zhu, Xiaoli

    2014-02-15

    A general and reliable fluorescent molecular beacon is proposed in this work utilizing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). The fluorescent molecular beacon has been employed for sensitive determination of the concentration of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and its inhibition. A well-designed oligonucleotide containing three functional regions (an aptamer region for adenosine assembly, a sequence complementary to the region of the adenosine aptamer, and an inserted six bases cytosine-loop) is adopted as the core element in the strategy. The enzymatic reaction of adenosine catalyzed by ADA plays a key role as well in the regulation of the synthesis of the DNA-templated AgNCs, i.e. the signal indicator. The intensity of the fluorescence signal may thereby determine the concentration of the enzyme and its inhibitor. The detection limit of the ADA can be lowered to 0.05 UL(-1). Also, 100 fM of a known inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine hydrochloride (EHNA) is enough to present distinguishable fluorescence emission. Moreover, since the fluorescent signal indicator is not required to be bound with the oligonucleotide, this fluorescent molecular beacon may integrate the advantages of both the label-free and signal-on strategies.

  3. Humic-like substances from urban waste as auxiliaries for photo-Fenton treatment: a fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC study.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, S García; Costante, M; Vicente, R; Mora, M; Amat, A M; Arques, A; Carlos, L; Einschlag, F S García

    2017-01-18

    In this work, analysis of excitation-emission-matrices (EEM) has been employed to gain further insight into the characterization of humic like substances (HLS) obtained from urban wastes (soluble bio-organic substances, SBOs). In particular, complexation of these substances with iron and changes along a photo-Fenton process have been studied. Recorded EEMs were decomposed by using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Three fluorescent components were identified by PARAFAC modeling of the entire set of SBO solutions studied. The EEM peak locations (λex/λem) of these components were 310-330 nm/400-420 nm (C1), 340-360 nm/450-500 nm (C2), and 285 nm/335-380 nm (C3). Slight variations of the maximum position of each component with the solution pH were observed. The interaction of SBO with Fe(iii) was characterized by determining the stability constants of the components with Fe(iii) at different pH values, which were in the order of magnitude of the ones reported for humic substances and reached their highest values at pH = 5. Photochemical experiments employing SBO and Fe(iii), with and without H2O2, showed pH-dependent trends for the evolution of the modeled components, which exhibited a strong correlation with the efficiency reported for the photo-Fenton processes in the presence of SBO at different pH values.

  4. Development of oral osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro and localization of fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonates to hard and soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Bae, Susan; Sun, Shuting; Aghaloo, Tara; Oh, Ju-Eun; McKenna, Charles E; Kang, Mo K; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Tetradis, Sotirios; Park, No-Hee; Kim, Reuben H

    2014-08-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are anti-resorptive agents commonly used to treat bone-related diseases; however, soft tissue-related side-effects are frequently reported in some BP users, such as oral or gastrointestinal (GI) ulcerations. BPs are stable analogs of pyrophosphate and have high affinity to hydroxyapatite, allowing them to bind to the bone surfaces and exert suppressive effects on osteoclast functions. However, the underlying mechanisms as to how bone-seeking BPs also exert cytotoxic effects on soft tissue remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the localization of nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs) in hard and soft tissue using fluorescently-labeled N-BPs in vitro. We developed osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro to recapitulate the hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity. A histological examination of the osteomucosal tissue constructs revealed a differentiated epithelium over the bone containing osteocytes and the periosteum, similar to that observed in the rat palatal tissues. Following treatment with the fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonate, AF647-ZOL, the osteomucosal constructs exhibited fluorescent signals, not only in the bone, but also in the epithelium. No fluorescent signals were observed from the control- or ZOL-treated constructs, as expected. Collectively, the data from the present study suggest that N-BPs localize to epithelial tissue and that such a localization and subsequent toxicity of N-BPs may be associated, at least in part, with soft tissue-related side-effects.

  5. Development of oral osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro and localization of fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonates to hard and soft tissue

    PubMed Central

    BAE, SUSAN; SUN, SHUTING; AGHALOO, TARA; OH, JU-EUN; McKENNA, CHARLES E.; KANG, MO K.; SHIN, KI-HYUK; TETRADIS, SOTIRIOS; PARK, NO-HEE; KIM, REUBEN H.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are anti-resorptive agents commonly used to treat bone-related diseases; however, soft tissue-related side-effects are frequently reported in some BP users, such as oral or gastrointestinal (GI) ulcerations. BPs are stable analogs of pyrophosphate and have high affinity to hydroxyapatite, allowing them to bind to the bone surfaces and exert suppressive effects on osteoclast functions. However, the underlying mechanisms as to how bone-seeking BPs also exert cytotoxic effects on soft tissue remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the localization of nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs) in hard and soft tissue using fluorescently-labeled N-BPs in vitro. We developed osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro to recapitulate the hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity. A histological examination of the osteomucosal tissue constructs revealed a differentiated epithelium over the bone containing osteocytes and the periosteum, similar to that observed in the rat palatal tissues. Following treatment with the fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonate, AF647-ZOL, the osteomucosal constructs exhibited fluorescent signals, not only in the bone, but also in the epithelium. No fluorescent signals were observed from the control- or ZOL-treated constructs, as expected. Collectively, the data from the present study suggest that N-BPs localize to epithelial tissue and that such a localization and subsequent toxicity of N-BPs may be associated, at least in part, with soft tissue-related side-effects. PMID:24920042

  6. A facile label-free G-quadruplex based fluorescent aptasensor method for rapid detection of ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haisheng; Ma, Changbei; Ning, Feng; Chen, Hanchun; He, Hailun; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The present work demonstrates a simple, rapid and label-free ATP detection method using a fluorescent aptasensor that is based on G-quadruplex formation. In the absence of ATP, the Thioflavin T (ThT) dye binds to the G-rich ATP aptamer and forms an ATP aptamer/ThT G-quadruplex complex, which results in high fluorescence intensity. Upon addition of ATP, the ATP aptamer/ThT complex will be replaced by the formation of an ATP aptamer/ATP complex. During this process, separation of the ThT dye from the ATP aptamer/ThT complex decreases the fluorescence intensity of the reaction mixture dramatically. This fluorescence aptasensor is highly sensitive and rapid, with a detection limit of 18 nM and a total reaction time of only 10 min. Furthermore, this method is cost-effective and simple, removing the requirement for labeling the detection reagents with a fluorophore-quencher pair.

  7. Spin the light off: rapid internal conversion into a dark doublet state quenches the fluorescence of an RNA spin label.

    PubMed

    Gustmann, Henrik; Lefrancois, Daniel; Reuss, Andreas J; Gophane, Dnyaneshwar B; Braun, Markus; Dreuw, Andreas; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2017-10-04

    The spin label Çm and the fluorophore Çmf are close isosteric relatives: the secondary amine Çmf can be easily oxidized to a nitroxide group to form Çm. Thus, both compounds can serve as EPR and fluorescence labels, respectively, and their high structural similarity allows direct comparison of EPR and fluorescence data, e.g. in the context of investigations of RNA conformation and dynamics. Detailed UV/vis-spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetime and the quantum yield of Çmf are directly affected by intermolecular interactions, which makes it a sensitive probe of its microenvironment. On the other hand, Çm undergoes effective fluorescence quenching in the ps-time domain. The established quenching mechanisms that are usually operational for fluorophore-nitroxide compounds, do not explain the spectroscopic data for Çm. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the lowest excited doublet state D1, which has no equivalent in Çmf, is a key state of the ultrafast quenching mechanism. This dark state is localized on the nitroxide group and is populated via rapid internal conversion.

  8. Efficient Blind Spectral Unmixing of Fluorescently Labeled Samples Using Multi-Layer Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Isabel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The ample variety of labeling dyes and staining methods available in fluorescence microscopy has enabled biologists to advance in the understanding of living organisms at cellular and molecular level. When two or more fluorescent dyes are used in the same preparation, or one dye is used in the presence of autofluorescence, the separation of the fluorescent emissions can become problematic. Various approaches have been recently proposed to solve this problem. Among them, blind non-negative matrix factorization is gaining interest since it requires little assumptions about the spectra and concentration of the fluorochromes. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for blind spectral separation that addresses some of the shortcomings of existing solutions: namely, their dependency on the initialization and their slow convergence. We apply this new algorithm to two relevant problems in fluorescence microscopy: autofluorescence elimination and spectral unmixing of multi-labeled samples. Our results show that our new algorithm performs well when compared with the state-of-the-art approaches for a much faster implementation. PMID:24260120

  9. A simple fluorescence labeling method to visualize the three-dimensional arrangement of collagen fibers in the equine periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Staszyk, Carsten; Gasse, Hagen

    2004-04-01

    In order to display the collagen-fiber arrangement in the equine periodontal ligament an inexpensive and easy staining procedure with fluorescein was applied to paraffin sections. After fluorescein labeling a section was suitable for successful examination with three special microscopical systems: a) fluorescence microscopy b) phase contrast microscopy and c) polarized light microscopy. Collagen fibers were clearly displayed as compact structures in the fluorescence microscope. This distinct feature of the fluorescent image generated an almost three-dimensional impression of the fiber arrangement. Phase contrast microscopy and polarized light microscopical investigations of the same section supplemented the findings with further structural details. This contributed to demonstration of the complex architecture of the PDL, i. e. the varying sizes of the fiber bundles, their specific spatial alignment, and the entheses to the dental cementum.

  10. A sandwich-like strategy for the label-free detection of oligonucleotides by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS).

    PubMed

    Su, Qiang; Nöll, Gilbert

    2016-10-21

    For the detection of oligonucleotides a sandwich-like detection strategy has been developed by which the background fluorescence is significantly lowered in comparison with surface-bound molecular beacons. Surface bound optical molecular beacons are DNA hairpin structures comprising a stem and a loop. The end of the stem is modified with a fluorophore and a thiol anchor for chemisorption on gold surfaces. In the closed state the fluorophore is in close proximity to the gold surface, and most of the fluorescence is quenched. After hybridization with a target the hairpin opens, the fluorophore and surface become separated, and the fluorescence drastically increases. Using this detection method the sensitivity is limited by the difference in the fluorescence intensity in the closed and open state. As the background fluorescence is mainly caused by non-quenched fluorophores, a strategy to reduce the background fluorescence is to cut the beacon in two halves. First a thiolated ssDNA capture probe strand (first half) is chemisorbed to a gold surface together with relatively short thiol spacers. Next the target is hybridized by one end to the surface-anchored capture probe and by the other to a fluorophore-labeled reporter probe DNA (second half). The signal readout is done by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). Using this detection strategy the background fluorescence can be significantly lowered, and the detection limit is lowered by more than one order of magnitude. The detection of a target takes only a few minutes and the sensor chips can be used for multiple detection steps without a significant decrease in performance.

  11. Biokinetic and dosimetric investigations of 14C-labeled substances in man using AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Sören; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Svegborn, Sigrid Leide; Nosslin, Bertil; Nilsson, Lars-Erik; Thorsson, Ola; Valind, Sven; Åberg, Magnus; Östberg, Henrik; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenström, Kristina; Erlandsson, Bengt; Faarinen, Mikko; Kiisk, Madis; Magnusson, Carl-Erik; Persson, Per; Skog, Göran

    2001-07-01

    Up to now, radiation dose estimates from radiopharmaceuticals, labeled with pure β-emitting radionuclides, e.g., 14C or 3H have been very uncertain. Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) we have derived new and improved data for 14C-triolein and 14C-urea and are currently running a program related to the biokinetics and dosimetry of 14C-glycocholic acid and 14C-xylose. The results of our investigations have made it possible to widen the indications for the clinical use of the 14C-urea test for Helicobacter pylori infection in children. The use of ultra-low activities, which is possible with AMS (down to 1/1000 of that used for liquid scintillation counting), has opened the possibility for metabolic investigations on children as well as on other sensitive patient groups like new-borns, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. Using the full potential of AMS, new 14C-labeled drugs could be tested on humans at a much earlier stage than today, avoiding uncertain extrapolations from animal models.

  12. Radical generating coordination complexes as tools for rapid and effective fragmentation and fluorescent labeling of nucleic acids for microchip hybridization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J. J.; Chernov, B. N.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Bavykin, S. G.; Biochip Technology Center; Northwestern Univ.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2002-01-01

    DNA microchip technology is a rapid, high-throughput method for nucleic acid hybridization reactions. This technology requires random fragmentation and fluorescent labeling of target nucleic acids prior to hybridization. Radical-generating coordination complexes, such as 1,10-phenanthroline-Cu(II) (OP-Cu) and Fe(II)-EDTA (Fe-EDTA), have been commonly used as sequence nonspecific 'chemical nucleases' to introduce single-strand breaks in nucleic acids. Here we describe a new method based on these radical-generating complexes for random fragmentation and labeling of both single- and double-stranded forms of RNA and DNA. Nucleic acids labeled with the OP-Cu and the Fe-EDTA protocols revealed high hybridization specificity in hybridization with DNA microchips containing oligonucleotide probes selected for identification of 16S rRNA sequences of the Bacillus group microorganisms.We also demonstrated cDNA- and cRNA-labeling and fragmentation with this method. Both the OP-Cu and Fe-EDTA fragmentation and labeling procedures are quick and inexpensive compared to other commonly used methods. A column-based version of the described method does not require centrifugation and therefore is promising for the automation of sample preparations in DNA microchip technology as well as in other nucleic acid hybridization studies.

  13. Label-free fluorescence detection of aromatic compounds in chip electrophoresis applying two-photon excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Beyreiss, Reinhild; Geißler, David; Ohla, Stefan; Nagl, Stefan; Posch, Tjorben Nils; Belder, Detlev

    2013-09-03

    In this study, we introduce time-resolved fluorescence detection with two-photon excitation at 532 nm for label-free analyte determination in microchip electrophoresis. In the developed method, information about analyte fluorescence lifetimes is collected by time-correlated single-photon counting, improving reliable peak assignment in electrophoretic separations. The determined limits of detection for serotonin, propranolol, and tryptophan were 51, 37, and 280 nM, respectively, using microfluidic chips made of fused silica. Applying two-photon excitation microchip separations and label-free detection could also be performed in borosilicate glass chips demonstrating the potential for label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV-transparent devices. Microchip electrophoresis with two-photon excited fluorescence detection was then applied for analyses of active compounds in plant extracts. Harmala alkaloids present in methanolic plant extracts from Peganum harmala could be separated within seconds and detected with on-the-fly determination of fluorescence lifetimes.

  14. Capture antibody targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (CAT-FISH): dual labeling allows for increased specificity in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Stroot, Joyce M; Leach, Kelly M; Stroot, Peter G; Lim, Daniel V

    2012-02-01

    Pathogen detection using biosensors is commonly limited due to the need for sensitivity and specificity in detecting targets within mixed populations. These issues were addressed through development of a dual labeling method that allows for both liquid-phase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and capture antibody targeted detection (CAT-FISH). CAT-FISH was developed using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus as representative bacteria, and processing techniques were evaluated with regard to FISH intensities and antibody recognition. The alternative fixative solution, methacarn, proved to be superior to standard solid-phase paraformaldehyde fixation procedures, allowing both FISH labeling and antibody recognition. CAT-FISH treated cells were successfully labeled with FISH probes, captured by immunomagnetic separation using fluorescent cytometric array beads, and detected using a cytometric array biosensor. CAT-FISH treated cells were detectable with LODs comparable to the standard antibody-based technique, (~10(3)cells/ml in PBS), and the technique was also successfully applied to two complex matrices. Although immunomagnetic capture and detection using cytometric arrays were demonstrated, CAT-FISH is readily applicable to any antibody-based fluorescence detection platform, and further optimization for sensitivity is possible via inclusion of fluorescently tagged antibodies. Since the confidence level needed for positive identification of a detected target is often paramount, CAT-FISH was developed to allow two separate levels of specificity, namely nucleic acid and protein signatures. With proper selection of FISH probes and capture antibodies, CAT-FISH may be used to provide rapid detection of target pathogens from within complex matrices with high levels of confidence.

  15. Fluorescent labeling of Acanthamoeba assessed in situ from corneal sectioned microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Susana; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Merayo-Lloves, Jesus; Acuña, A. Ulises; Hornillos, Valentin; Carrillo, Eugenia; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; del Olmo-Aguado, Susana; del Aguila, Carmen; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Rivas, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious pathogenic corneal disease, with challenging diagnosis. Standard diagnostic methods include corneal biopsy (involving cell culture) and in vivo reflection corneal microscopy (in which the visualization of the pathogen is challenged by the presence of multiple reflectance corneal structures). We present a new imaging method based on fluorescence sectioned microscopy for visualization of Acanthamoeba. A fluorescent marker (MT-11-BDP), composed by a fluorescent group (BODIPY) inserted in miltefosine (a therapeutic agent against Acanthamoeba), was developed. A custom-developed fluorescent structured illumination sectioned corneal microscope (excitation wavelength: 488 nm; axial/lateral resolution: 2.6 μm/0.4-0.6 μm) was used to image intact enucleated rabbit eyes, injected with a solution of stained Acanthamoeba in the stroma. Fluorescent sectioned microscopic images of intact enucleated rabbit eyes revealed stained Acanthamoeba trophozoites within the stroma, easily identified by the contrasted fluorescent emission, size and shape. Control experiments show that the fluorescent maker is not internalized by corneal cells, making the developed marker specific to the pathogen. Fluorescent sectioned microscopy shows potential for specific diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Corneal confocal microscopy, provided with a fluorescent channel, could be largely improved in specificity and sensitivity in combination with specific fluorescent marking. PMID:23082290

  16. Monoclonal antibody-targeted fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled biomimetic nanoapatites: a promising fluorescent probe for imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Oltolina, Francesca; Gregoletto, Luca; Colangelo, Donato; Gómez-Morales, Jaime; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Prat, Maria

    2015-02-10

    Multifunctional biomimetic nanoparticles (NPs) are acquiring increasing interest as carriers in medicine and basic research since they can efficiently combine labels for subsequent tracking, moieties for specific cell targeting, and bioactive molecules, e.g., drugs. In particular, because of their easy synthesis, low cost, good biocompatibility, high resorbability, easy surface functionalization, and pH-dependent solubility, nanocrystalline apatites are promising candidates as nanocarriers. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of bioinspired apatite nanoparticles to be used as fluorescent nanocarriers targeted against the Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor, which is considered a tumor associated cell surface marker of many cancers. To this aim the nanoparticles have been labeled with Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) by simple isothermal adsorption, in the absence of organic, possibly toxic, molecules, and then functionalized with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against such a receptor. Direct labeling of the nanoparticles allowed tracking the moieties with spatiotemporal resolution and thus following their interaction with cells, expressing or not the targeted receptor, as well as their fate in vitro. Cytofluorometry and confocal microscopy experiments showed that the functionalized nanocarriers, which emitted a strong fluorescent signal, were rapidly and specifically internalized in cells expressing the receptor. Indeed, we found that, once inside the cells expressing the receptor, mAb-functionalized FITC nanoparticles partially dissociated in their two components, with some mAbs being recycled to the cell surface and the FITC-labeled nanoparticles remaining in the cytosol. This work thus shows that FITC-labeled nanoapatites are very promising probes for targeted cell imaging applications.

  17. Label-free detection of kanamycin based on a G-quadruplex DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yun-Peng; Liu, Chun; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Han-Chang

    2015-01-30

    This work was the first to report that the kanamycin-binding DNA aptamer (5'-TGG GGG TTG AGG CTA AGC CGA-3') can form stable parallel G-quadruplex DNA (G4-DNA) structures by themselves and that this phenomenon can be verified by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on these findings, we developed a novel label-free strategy for kanamycin detection based on the G4-DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay with thiazole orange (TO) as the fluorescence probe. In the proposed strategy, TO became strongly fluorescent upon binding to kanamycin-binding G4-DNA. However, the addition of kanamycin caused the displacement of TO from the G4-DNA-TO conjugate, thereby resulting in decreased fluorescent signal, which was inversely related to the kanamycin concentration. The detection limit of the proposed assay decreased to 59 nM with a linear working range of 0.1 μM to 20 μM for kanamycin. The cross-reactivity against six other antibiotics was negligible compared with the response to kanamycin. A satisfactory recovery of kanamycin in milk samples ranged from 80.1% to 98.0%, confirming the potential of this bioassay in the measurement of kanamycin in various applications. Our results also served as a good reference for developing similar fluorescent G4-DNA-based bioassays in the future.

  18. Label-free detection of kanamycin based on a G-quadruplex DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yun-Peng; Liu, Chun; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Han-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This work was the first to report that the kanamycin-binding DNA aptamer (5'-TGG GGG TTG AGG CTA AGC CGA-3') can form stable parallel G-quadruplex DNA (G4-DNA) structures by themselves and that this phenomenon can be verified by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on these findings, we developed a novel label-free strategy for kanamycin detection based on the G4-DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay with thiazole orange (TO) as the fluorescence probe. In the proposed strategy, TO became strongly fluorescent upon binding to kanamycin-binding G4-DNA. However, the addition of kanamycin caused the displacement of TO from the G4-DNA-TO conjugate, thereby resulting in decreased fluorescent signal, which was inversely related to the kanamycin concentration. The detection limit of the proposed assay decreased to 59 nM with a linear working range of 0.1 μM to 20 μM for kanamycin. The cross-reactivity against six other antibiotics was negligible compared with the response to kanamycin. A satisfactory recovery of kanamycin in milk samples ranged from 80.1% to 98.0%, confirming the potential of this bioassay in the measurement of kanamycin in various applications. Our results also served as a good reference for developing similar fluorescent G4-DNA-based bioassays in the future.

  19. Molecular switching fluorescence based high sensitive detection of label-free C-reactive protein on biochip.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinul; Yu, Hyunung; Lee, Hee Gu; Kang, Seong Ho

    2010-11-15

    A novel detection technique on biochip for the quantification of label-free C-reactive protein (CRP) based on molecular switching of fluorescence (MSF) is demonstrated by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It alters fluorescence intensity of fluoreseinamine isomer 1 (FAI) upon binding with its specific ligand, O-phosphorylethanolamine (PEA). In the MSF-based detection, FAI was used as an ink, printed on a 3-glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (GPTS)-coated glass coverslip. With the addition of GPTS conjugated PEA solution to the FAI-printed coverslip, the fluorescence intensity was remarkably decreased. Addition of CRP increased fluorescence intensity linearly in the range of 800 aM to 500 fM (R=0.997). The MSF-based biochip assay for the estimation of CRP in human sera showed ∼200 times increased detection sensitivity in less than a third of the time to obtain results using a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This biochip detection is a promising new technique for the quantification of CRP molecules from trace amounts of clinical samples.

  20. Measuring the velocity of fluorescently labelled red blood cells with a keyhole tracking algorithm.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Aldasoro, C C; Akerman, S; Tozer, G M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a tracking algorithm to measure the velocity of fluorescently labelled red blood cells travelling through microvessels of tumours, growing in dorsal skin flap window chambers, implanted on mice. Preprocessing removed noise and artefacts from the images and then segmented cells from background. The tracking algorithm is based on a 'keyhole' model that describes the probable movement of a segmented cell between contiguous frames of a video sequence. When a history of cell movement exists, past, present and a predicted landing position of the cells will define two regions of probability that resemble the shape of a keyhole. This keyhole model was used to determine if cells in contiguous frames should be linked to form tracks and also as a postprocessing tool to join split tracks and discard links that could have been formed due to noise or uncertainty. When there was no history, a circular region around the centroid of the parent cell was used as a region of probability. Outliers were removed based on the distribution of the average velocities of the tracks. Since the position and time of each cell is recorded, a wealth of statistical measures can be obtained from the tracks. The algorithm was tested on two sets of experiments. First, the vasculatures of eight tumours with different geometries were analyzed; average velocities ranged from 86 to 372 microm s(-1), with minimum and maximum track velocities 7 and 1212 microm s(-1), respectively. Second, a longitudinal study of velocities was performed after administering a vascular disrupting agent to two tumours and the time behaviour was analyzed over 24 h. In one of the tumours there is a complete shutdown of the vasculature whereas in the other there is a clear decrease of velocity at 30 min, with subsequent recovery by 6 h. The tracking algorithm enabled the simultaneous measurement of red blood cell velocity in multiple vessels within an intravital video sequence, enabling analysis of

  1. Antigenicity of sulfanilamide and its metabolites using fluorescent-labelled compounds.

    PubMed

    Eyanagi, R; Toda, A; Ishii, Y; Saito, H; Soeda, S; Shimeno, H; Shigematsu, H

    2005-09-01

    In order to clarify the onset mechanisms of drug-induced allergies, three fluorescent-labelled compounds were synthesized by subjecting sulfanilamide (SA), a base compound for sulfonamides, and its active metabolites, i.e. sulfanilamide hydroxylamine and sulfanilamide nitroso, to dansylation using dansylchloride. In other words, 5-dimethylamino-N-(4-aminobenzyl)-naphthalenesulfonamide (DNS-4ABA), 5-dimethylamino-N-(4-hydroxylaminobenzyl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (DNS-4HABA) and 5-dimethylamino-N-(4-nitrosobenzyl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (DNS-4NSBA) were synthesized as model haptens. When analysed by HPLC, a conjugate of DNS-4HABA and glutathione (GSH) with nucleophilic amino acids had two peaks (P-1 and P-2). FAB-MS and 1H-NMR revealed that the DNS-4HABA-GSH conjugate consisted of sulphinamide and semimercaptal. The reactivity of GSH to DNS-4ABA, DNS-4HABA and DNS-4NSBA was quantified by HPLC using an oxidization system (horseradish peroxidase/H2O2). The results show that production of DNS-4NSBA-GSH-conjugate was four to eight times higher than that of DNS-4HABA-GSH conjugate, but that DNS-4ABA did not bind with GSH. Skin reactions were assessed using guinea pigs, and strong delayed erythema was seen with DNS-4NSBA, which bound most strongly with GSH, whereas weak delayed erythema was seen with DNS-4ABA, which did not bind with GSH. This suggests a correlation between GSH conjugate production and skin reactions. DNS-4HABA enzymatically bound with proteins in rat and guinea pig liver cytosol and microsomal fractions. The proteins that bound to DNS-4HABA were purified by HPLC and then subjected to N-terminal amino acid analysis. Ubiquitin (10 kDa) and fatty acid binding protein (30 kDa) were detected in the rat liver cytosol fraction; retinol-dehydrogenase (35 kDa) in the rat microsomal fraction; and glutathione-S-transferase B (mmu) (25 kDa) in the guinea pig liver cytosol fraction. When DNS-4HABA or DNS-4NSBA binds to proteins that play important roles in the body

  2. Direct study of fluorescently-labelled barley β-glucan fate in an in vitro human colon digestion model.

    PubMed

    Beeren, Sophie R; Christensen, Caspar E; Tanaka, Hidenori; Jensen, Morten G; Donaldson, Iain; Hindsgaul, Ole

    2015-01-22

    β-Glucans from cereals are β(1-3)(1-4)-mixed linkage linear homopolysaccharides of D-glucopyranosyl residues, recently recognised as functional components of foods with benefits in maintaining the health of the digestive tract not least through a prebiotic effect. Here we describe the development of methodology to facilitate the study of β-glucans as prebiotics. Relatively short β-glucan fragments (DP 6-50) were produced by partial hydrolysis of β-glucan fibres with Lichenase then functionalised at their reducing end with a tetramethylrhodamine dye. Their enzymatic break down by human colon microbiota in an in vitro fermentation model was examined. Digestion products were isolated by virtue of their fluorescence labels, identified and characterised using capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Complete digestion of the labelled substrates was indicated, as fluorescently labelled glucose was obtained as the final product. Furthermore, a pathway of enzymatic breakdown was proposed on the basis of a time course experiment; initial fast hydrolysis with an endo-1,3(4)-β-glucanase was followed by slow degradation with an exo-1,4-β-glucanase and finally slow action of an exo-1,3-β-glucanase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. (18)F-positron-emitting/fluorescent labeled erythrocytes allow imaging of internal hemorrhage in a murine intracranial hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; An, Fei-Fei; Chan, Mark; Friedman, Beth; Rodriguez, Erik A; Tsien, Roger Y; Aras, Omer; Ting, Richard

    2017-03-01

    An agent for visualizing cells by positron emission tomography is described and used to label red blood cells. The labeled red blood cells are injected systemically so that intracranial hemorrhage can be visualized by positron emission tomography (PET). Red blood cells are labeled with 0.3 µg of a positron-emitting, fluorescent multimodal imaging probe, and used to non-invasively image cryolesion induced intracranial hemorrhage in a murine model (BALB/c, 2.36 × 10(8) cells, 100 µCi, <4 mm hemorrhage). Intracranial hemorrhage is confirmed by histology, fluorescence, bright-field, and PET ex vivo imaging. The low required activity, minimal mass, and high resolution of this technique make this strategy an attractive alternative for imaging intracranial hemorrhage. PET is one solution to a spectrum of issues that complicate single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). For this reason, this application serves as a PET alternative to [(99m)Tc]-agents, and SPECT technology that is used in 2 million annual medical procedures. PET contrast is also superior to gadolinium and iodide contrast angiography for its lack of clinical contraindications.

  4. Three-dimensional visualization of green fluorescence protein-labelled Edwardsiella tarda in whole Medaka larvae.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, C; Tomiyama, H; Kashiwada, S

    2017-04-01

    The invasive fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda is common in aquatic environments and causes the environmentally and economically destructive emphysematous putrefactive disease called edwardsiellosis. In order to understand the organism's infection pathway, medaka larvae (Oryzias latipes) were immersion-infected with E. tarda labelled with green fluorescence protein (GFP) and then visualized in three dimensions under confocal laser microscopy and light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. Confocal microscopy revealed GFP-labelled E. tarda in the mouth, head, gill bridges, gill cover, skin, membrane fin, gastrointestinal tract and air bladder, and in the caudal vein, somite veins, caudal artery and caudal capillaries. Light-sheet microscopy additionally showed GFP-labelled E. tarda in the pharyngeal cavity, muscle of the pectoral fin and cardiac atrium and ventricle. These findings suggest that during its infection of fish, E. tarda initially adheres to, and invades, the epithelial cells of the skin, gills and gastrointestinal tract (through the pharyngeal cavity); E. tarda then enters the blood vessels to access organs, including the air bladder and heart.

  5. Nanocrystal clusters in combination with spectral imaging to improve sensitivity in antibody labeling applications of fluorescent nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, John S.; Panza, Janice L.; Bootman, Matt

    2007-02-01

    Composition-tunable nanocrystals are fluorescent nanoparticles with a uniform particle size and with adjustable optical characteristics. When used for optical labeling of biomolecular targets these and other nanotechnology solutions have enabled new approaches which are possible because of the high optical output, narrow spectral signal, consistent quantum efficiency across a broad emission range and long lived fluorescent behavior of the nanocrystals. When coupled with spectral imaging the full potential of multiplexing multiple probes in a complex matrix can be realized. Spectral imaging can be used to improve sensitivity of narrowband fluorophores through application of chemometric image processing techniques used to reduce the influence of autofluorescence background. Composition-tunable nanocrystals can be complexed together to form nanoclusters which have the advantage of significantly stronger signal and therefore a higher sensitivity. These nanoclusters can be targeted in biomolecular systems using standard live-cell labeling and immunohistochemistry based techniques. Composition-tunable nanocrystals and nanoclusters have comparable mass and brightness across a wide emission range. This enables the production of nanocrystal-based probes that have comparable reactivity and sensitivity over a large color range. We present spectral imaging results of antibody targeted nanocrystal cluster labeling of target proteins in cultured cells and a Western blot experiment. The combination of spectral imaging with the use of clusters of nanocrystals further improves the sensitivity over either of the approaches independently.

  6. An ellipsoidal mirror for detection of laser-induced fluorescence in capillary electrophoresis system: applications for labelled antibody analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodat, Audrey; Kalck, Fabien; Poinsot, Véréna; Feurer, Bernard; Couderc, François

    2008-02-01

    An LIF detector was integrated into a CE system which uses a ball lens to focus the laser beam on the CE capillary. The detector employs an ellipsoid that is glued on the capillary window, to permit the collection of the fluorescence in the capillary. This 'trapped' fluorescence stays in the capillary because the angle of the silica/air interface is greater than the critical angle. The performance of this new detector setup is found to be identical to the collinear setup using the same ball lens. An application to the analysis of FITC-labeled IgG was optimized using a 14 cm effective length capillary. The LOD of an FITC-labeled IgG2 at an excitation wavelength of 488 nm was 150 pg/mL, which was 10 times better than the LOD recorded with slab gel silver staining. Using a tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-labeled IgG2 and a 532 nm excitation wavelength the LOD is 50 pg/mL. The electropherograms of four different commercial FITC conjugates of IgG were studied. The presence of aggregates was observed in two samples while close kinetics of reduction was observed between free aggregates and high aggregates concentration samples. The integrated LIF detector provides an extremely powerful and convenient tool for antibody analysis and should be useful for therapeutic MAb control in pharmaceutical facilities.

  7. Synthesis and site-directed fluorescence labeling of azido proteins using eukaryotic cell-free orthogonal translation systems.

    PubMed

    Quast, Robert B; Claussnitzer, Iris; Merk, Helmut; Kubick, Stefan; Gerrits, Michael

    2014-04-15

    Eukaryotic cell-free systems based on wheat germ and Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells were equipped with an orthogonal amber suppressor tRNA-synthetase pair to synthesize proteins with a site-specifically incorporated p-azido-l-phenylalanine residue in order to provide their chemoselective fluorescence labeling with azide-reactive dyes by Staudinger ligation. The specificity of incorporation and bioorthogonality of labeling within complex reaction mixtures was shown by means of translation and fluorescence detection of two model proteins: β-glucuronidase and erythropoietin. The latter contained the azido amino acid in proximity to a signal peptide for membrane translocation into endogenous microsomal vesicles of the insect cell-based system. The results indicate a stoichiometric incorporation of the azido amino acid at the desired position within the proteins. Moreover, the compatibility of cotranslational protein translocation, including glycosylation and amber suppression-based incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine within a cell-free system, is demonstrated. The presented approach should be particularly useful for providing eukaryotic and membrane-associated proteins for investigation by fluorescence-based techniques.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of fluorescence-labelled silica core-shell and noble metal-decorated ceria nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rennhak, Markus; Reller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The present review article covers work done in the cluster NPBIOMEM in the DFG priority programme SPP 1313 and focuses on synthesis and characterization of fluorescent silica and ceria nanoparticles. Synthetic methods for labelling of silica and polyorganosiloxane/silica core–shell nanoparticles with perylenediimide derivatives are described, as well as the modification of the shell with thiol groups. Photometric methods for the determination of the number of thiol groups and an estimate for the number of fluorescent molecules per nanoparticles, including a scattering correction, have been developed. Ceria nanoparticles decorated with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) are models for the decomposition products of automobile catalytic converters which appear in the exhaust gases and finally interact with biological systems including humans. The control of the degree of agglomeration of small ceria nanoparticles is the basis for their synthesis. Almost monodisperse agglomerates (40 ± 4–260 ± 40 nm diameter) can be prepared and decorated with noble metal nanoparticles (2–5 nm diameter). Fluorescence labelling with ATTO 647N gave the model particles which are now under biophysical investigation. PMID:25671137

  9. A novel single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for silver(I) ion detection in water, drugs, and food.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu; Hu, Wei

    2014-05-28

    Due to the high toxicity of silver(I) ions, a method for the rapid, sensitive, and selective detection for silver(I) ions in water, pharmaceutical products, and food is of great importance. Herein, a novel single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide (OND) probe based on cytosine-Ag(I)-cytosine coordination and the inherent fluorescence quenching ability of the G-quadruplex is designed to detect silver(I) ions. The formation of a hairpin structure in the OND-Ag(I) complex brings the hexachloro fluorescein (HEX) labeled at the 5'-end of the OND probe close to the G-quadruplex located at the 3'-end of the OND probe, leading to a fluorescence quenching due to photoinduced electron transfer between HEX and the G-quadruplex. Through this method, silver(I) ions can be detected quantitatively, the linear response range is from 1 to 100 nmol/L with a detection limit of 50 pmol/L, and no obvious interference occurs with other metal ions with a 10-fold concentration. This assay is simple, sensitive, and selective, and it can be used to detect silver(I) ions in actual water, drug, and food samples.

  10. Cell membrane labeling of Eimeria tenella sporozoites with the fluorescent dye PKH-67 GL for tracking parasite-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2001-07-01

    The fluorescent cell linker dye PKH-67 GL was used as a vital stain for sporozoites of Eimeria tenella for tests on viability, invasion of cultured primary chick kidney cells, flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The effect of PKH-67 GL on sporozoites was tested at a range of concentrations of dye and sporozoites. In flow cytometric analysis, 0.5-40x10(-6) M of PKH-67 GL labeled sporozoites to some degree, with the percentage of labeled sporozoites increasing with higher dye concentrations. The optimum concentration was 2x10(-6) M, allowing easy observation by fluorescence microscopy. Morphological changes in the sporozoite at concentrations greater than 5x10(-6) M were accompanied by loss of viability according to a propidium iodide inclusion assay. Sporozoite penetration of primary chick kidney cells was unaffected by the optimal level of 2x10(-6) M, allowing observation of intracellular activities. Overall, the cell linker dye greatly facilitated observation of E. tenella in vitro and in flow cytometric analysis.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of fluorescence-labelled silica core-shell and noble metal-decorated ceria nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Rudolf; Rennhak, Markus; Reller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The present review article covers work done in the cluster NPBIOMEM in the DFG priority programme SPP 1313 and focuses on synthesis and characterization of fluorescent silica and ceria nanoparticles. Synthetic methods for labelling of silica and polyorganosiloxane/silica core-shell nanoparticles with perylenediimide derivatives are described, as well as the modification of the shell with thiol groups. Photometric methods for the determination of the number of thiol groups and an estimate for the number of fluorescent molecules per nanoparticles, including a scattering correction, have been developed. Ceria nanoparticles decorated with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) are models for the decomposition products of automobile catalytic converters which appear in the exhaust gases and finally interact with biological systems including humans. The control of the degree of agglomeration of small ceria nanoparticles is the basis for their synthesis. Almost monodisperse agglomerates (40 ± 4-260 ± 40 nm diameter) can be prepared and decorated with noble metal nanoparticles (2-5 nm diameter). Fluorescence labelling with ATTO 647N gave the model particles which are now under biophysical investigation.

  12. Synthesis and properties of acridone-labeled base-discriminating fluorescent (BDF) nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshio; Hanawa, Kazuo; Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Motegi, Kaori; Saito, Isao

    2006-01-01

    We have developed novel acridone-labelled BDF probe which showed its potential in recognizing opposite matched base from its target sequence via enhancement of fiuorescence intensity. This probe emit at a longer wavelength than previously reported pyrene-labelled BDF probe and thus can be used in DNA chip.

  13. Two-photon excited fluorescence detection at 420 nm for label-free detection of small aromatics and proteins in microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Philipp; Schüttpelz, Mark; Sauer, Markus; Belder, Detlev

    2007-12-01

    Two photon excited (TPE) fluorescence detection was applied to native fluorescence detection of aromatics in microchip electrophoresis (MCE). This technique was evaluated as an alternative to common one photon excitation in the deep UV spectral range. TPE enables fluorescence detection of unlabeled aromatic compounds, even in non-deep UV-transparent microfluidic chips. In this study, we demonstrate the proof of concept of native TPE fluorescence detection of small aromatics in commercial microfluidic glass chips. Label-free TPE fluorescence detection of native proteins and small aromatics in MCE was achieved within the micromolar concentration range, utilising 420 nm excitation light.

  14. A comprehensive structural evaluation of humic substances using several fluorescence techniques before and after ozonation. Part II: evaluation of structural changes following ozonation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco J; Schlenger, Patrick; García-Valverde, María

    2014-04-01

    The main objective of this work (Part II) is to evaluate the usefulness of fluorescence techniques to monitor structural changes in humic substances produced by the ozonation treatment, using all the current fluorescence techniques: Emission scan fluorescence (ESF), synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS), total luminescence spectroscopy (TLS or EEM) through the use of both 2-D contour maps and 3-D plots, fluorescence index and the λ0.5 parameter. Four humic substances were studied in this work: three of them were provided by the International Humic Substances Society (Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Standard: SUFA, Suwannee River Humic Acid Standard: SUHA and Nordic Reservoir Fulvic Acid Reference: NOFA) and the other one was a commercial humic acid widely used as a surrogate for aquatic humic substances in various studies (Aldrich Humic Acid: ALHA). The lowest ozone dosage tested (0.25mg O3/mg TOC) caused no appreciable change in the different types of fluorescence spectra under study, therefore the structural change produced in the humic macromolecules may be considered of little significance. Concerning EEM and synchronous spectra, the two natural fulvic acids (SUFA and NOFA) showed a decrease in fluorescence intensity as ozone dosage increased, but the natural humic acid (SUHA) showed a different behaviour: an initial increase in fluorescence intensity at medium ozone dosages (1.5 mg O3/mg TOC) followed by an intensity decrease for the higher ozone dose (7.5 mg O3/mg TOC). Regarding synchronous spectra, the moderate dosage of 1.5 mg O3/mg TOC led to an increase in the fluorescence of the protein-like peak at λsyn=285 nm for the natural humic substances. The results obtained for the fluorescence index and λ0.5 may suggest that the greatest degradation of aromatic structures within the humic macromolecule occurs at high ozone dosages, whereas the predominant effect at moderate dosages would be the break-up of the humic macromolecule into lower molecular weight

  15. Stereological assessment of extracellular polymeric substances, exo-enzymes, and specific bacterial strains in bioaggregates using fluorescence experiments.

    PubMed

    Adav, Sunil S; Lin, Justin Chun-Te; Yang, Zhen; Whiteley, Chris G; Lee, Duu-Jong; Peng, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Peng

    2010-01-01

    This review addresses the introduction of fluorescent molecular tags into exo-enzymes and extra polymeric substances of bioaggregates and the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to map their role, purpose and quantitative description of the biological processes they undertake. Multiple color staining coupled with CLSM and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and flow cytometry have identified the individual polymeric substances, whether they are proteins, lipids, polysaccharides, nucleic acids or antibodies, as well as the microorganisms in the bioaggregate. Procedures are presented for simultaneous multicolor staining with seven different fluorochromes - SYTOX Blue for nucleic acids; Nile red for lipids; Calcofluor white [CW] for beta-polysaccharides; concanavalin A [Con A] for alpha-poly-saccharides; fluorescein-isothiocyanate [FITC] for proteins; SYTO 63 for live microbial cells and Calcium Green for monitoring calcium levels in the microbial cells. For the distribution of certain microbial strains, metabolic enzymes and extrapolymeric substances to be quantitatively described the generated colored images are converted into digital forms under specific predefined criteria. Procedures and computer software programs (Amira; MATLAB) are presented in order to quantitatively establish grid patterns from the CLSM images. The image is digitized using a threshholding algorithm followed by a reconstruction of the image as a volumetric grid for finite element simulation. The original color image is first converted to a grey followed by resizing, detection and modification of bilevel images and finally a total reversal of the image colors. The grid file is then used by specific computer software (Gambit, Fluent) for further numerical studies incorporating chemical reactions, transport processes and computational fluid dynamics including intra-bioaggregate fluid flow, and heat and mass transfer within the bioaggregate matrix. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc

  16. Monitoring the diffusion behavior of Na,K-ATPase by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) upon fluorescence labelling with eGFP or Dreiklang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Cornelia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Vukojević, Vladana; Friedrich, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of lateral mobility of membraneembedded proteins in living cells with high spatial and temporal precision is a challenging task of optofluidics. Biological membranes are complex structures, whose physico-chemical properties depend on the local lipid composition, cholesterol content and the presence of integral or peripheral membrane proteins, which may be involved in supramolecular complexes or are linked to cellular matrix proteins or the cytoskeleton. The high proteinto- lipid ratios in biomembranes indicate that membrane proteins are particularly subject to molecular crowding, making it difficult to follow the track of individual molecules carrying a fluorescence label. Novel switchable fluorescence proteins such as Dreiklang [1], are, in principle, promising tools to study the diffusion behavior of individual molecules in situations of molecular crowding due to excellent spectral control of the ON- and OFF-switching process. In this work, we expressed an integral membrane transport protein, the Na,K-ATPase comprising the human α2-subunit carrying an N-terminal eGFP or Dreiklang tag and human β1-subunit, in HEK293T cells and measured autocorrelation curves by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Furthermore,we measured diffusion times and diffusion constants of eGFP and Dreiklang by FCS, first, in aqueous solution after purification of the proteins upon expression in E. coli, and, second, upon expression as soluble proteins in the cytoplasm of HEK293T cells. Our data show that the diffusion behavior of the purified eGFP and Dreiklang in solution as well as the properties of the proteins expressed in the cytoplasm are very similar. However, the autocorrelation curves of eGFP- and Dreiklanglabeled Na,K-ATPase measured in the plasma membrane exhibit marked differences, with the Dreiklang-labeled construct showing shorter diffusion times. This may be related to an additional, as yet unrecognized quenching process that occurs on the same time

  17. Monitoring the diffusion behavior of Na,K-ATPase by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) upon fluorescence labelling with eGFP or Dreiklang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Cornelia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Vukojević, Vladana; Friedrich, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of lateral mobility of membraneembedded proteins in living cells with high spatial and temporal precision is a challenging task of optofluidics. Biological membranes are complex structures, whose physico-chemical properties depend on the local lipid composition, cholesterol content and the presence of integral or peripheral membrane proteins, which may be involved in supramolecular complexes or are linked to cellular matrix proteins or the cytoskeleton. The high proteinto- lipid ratios in biomembranes indicate that membrane proteins are particularly subject to molecular crowding, making it difficult to follow the track of individual molecules carrying a fluorescence label. Novel switchable fluorescence proteins such as Dreiklang [1], are, in principle, promising tools to study the diffusion behavior of individual molecules in situations of molecular crowding due to excellent spectral control of the ON- and OFF-switching process. In this work, we expressed an integral membrane transport protein, the Na,K-ATPase comprising the human α2-subunit carrying an N-terminal eGFP or Dreiklang tag and human β1-subunit, in HEK293T cells and measured autocorrelation curves by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Furthermore,we measured diffusion times and diffusion constants of eGFP and Dreiklang by FCS, first, in aqueous solution after purification of the proteins upon expression in E. coli, and, second, upon expression as soluble proteins in the cytoplasm of HEK293T cells. Our data show that the diffusion behavior of the purified eGFP and Dreiklang in solution as well as the properties of the proteins expressed in the cytoplasm are very similar. However, the autocorrelation curves of eGFP- and Dreiklanglabeled Na,K-ATPase measured in the plasma membrane exhibit marked differences, with the Dreiklang-labeled construct showing shorter diffusion times. This may be related to an additional, as yet unrecognized quenching process that occurs on the same time

  18. A method for evaluating the host range of bacteriophages using phages fluorescently labeled with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU).

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sayaka; Okano, Hironori; Tanji, Yasunori; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    The evaluation of bacteriophage (phage) host range is a significant issue in understanding phage and prokaryotic community interactions. However, in conventional methods, such as plaque assay, target host strains must be isolated, although almost all environmental prokaryotes are recalcitrant to cultivation. Here, we introduce a novel phage host range evaluation method using fluorescently labeled phages (the FLP method), which consists of the following four steps: (i) Fluorescently labeled phages are added to a microbial consortium, and host cells are infected and fluorescently labeled. (ii) Fluorescent cells are sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. (iii) 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from sorted cells are analyzed, and specific oligonucleotide probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are designed. (iv) Cells labeled with both fluorescently labeled phage and FISH probe are identified as host cells. To verify the feasibility of this method, we used T4 phage and Escherichia coli as a model. We first used nucleic acid stain reagents for phage labeling; however, the reagents also stained non-host cells. Next, we employed the Click-iT EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) assay kit from Invitrogen for phage labeling. Using EdU-labeled T4 phage, we could specifically detect E. coli cells in a complex microbial consortium from municipal sewage. We also confirmed that FISH could be applied to the infected E. coli cells. These results suggest that this FLP method using the EdU assay kit is a useful method for evaluating phage host range and may have a potential application for various types of phages, even if their prokaryotic hosts are currently unculturable.

  19. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines.

  20. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  1. Preparation and application of new fluorescein-labeled fumonisins B1 in fluorescence polarization analysis technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To prepare a new fluorescent tracer against common mycotoxins such as fumonisin B1 in order to replace 6-(4,6-Dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (6-DTAF), an expensive marker, and to develop a technique for quick detection of fumonisin B1 based on the principle of fluorescence polarizati...

  2. Label-free fluorescent detection of thrombin activity based on a recombinant enhanced green fluorescence protein and nickel ions immobilized nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Lei, Chunyang; Nie, Zhou; Guo, Manli; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-11-15

    Herein, a novel label-free fluorescent assay has been developed to detect the activity of thrombin and its inhibitor, based on a recombinant enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and Ni(2+) ions immobilized nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs). The EGFP, containing a thrombin cleavage site and a hexahistidine sequence (His-tag) at its N-terminal, was adsorbed onto Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs through Ni(2+)-hexahistidine interaction, and dragged out of the solution by magnetic separation. Thrombin can selectively digest EGFP accompanied by His-tag peptide sequence leaving, and the resulting EGFP cannot be captured by Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs and kept in supernatant. Hence the fluorescence change of supernatant can clearly represent the activity of thrombin. Under optimized conditions, such assay showed a relatively low detection limit (3.0×10(-4) U mL(-1)), and was also used to detect the thrombin inhibitor, Hirudin, and further applied to detect thrombin activity in serum. Combined with the satisfactory reusability of Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs, our method presents a promising candidate for simple, sensitive, and cost-saving protease activity detecting and inhibitor screening.

  3. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA fluorescent labeling with naphtho[1,2,3-cd]indol-6(2H)-one for investigation of protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, Svetlana V; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Kuznetsova, Anastasya S; Khalyavina, Juliya G; Tropina, Darya A; Lavrikova, Tatyana I; Kargina, Olga I; Gornostaev, Leonid M

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescently labeled DNA to study protein-DNA interactions was synthesized using the Cu(I)-catalysed cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. For this purpose, a new azido-containing fluorophore based on the naphtho[1,2,3-cd]indol-6(2H)-one derivative was obtained. The fluorescent properties of naphtho[1,2,3-cd]indol-6(2H)-one derivatives and labeled DNA were studied. The new fluorescent DNA conjugate was shown to be a useful tool to study complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA-length-dependent quenching of fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles with gold, graphene oxide and MoS2 nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Balcioglu, Mustafa; Rana, Muhit; Robertson, Neil; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2014-08-13

    We controlled the fluorescence emission of a fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle using three different nanomaterials with ultraefficient quenching capabilities. The control over the fluorescence emission was investigated via spacing introduced by the surface-functionalized single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA molecules were conjugated on different templates, either on the surface of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles or gold and nanographene oxide. The efficiency of the quenching was determined and compared with various fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle and nanoquencher combinations using DNA molecules with three different lengths. We have found that the template for DNA conjugation plays significant role on quenching the fluorescence emission of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles. We have observed that the size of the DNA controls the quenching efficiency when conjugated only on the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles by setting a spacer between the surfaces and resulting change in the hydrodynamic size. The quenching efficiency with 12mer, 23mer and 36mer oligonucleotides decreased to 56%, 54% and 53% with gold nanoparticles, 58%, 38% and 32% with nanographene oxide, 46%, 38% and 35% with MoS2, respectively. On the other hand, the presence, not the size, of the DNA molecules on the other surfaces quenched the fluorescence significantly with different degrees. To understand the effect of the mobility of the DNA molecules on the nanoparticle surface, DNA molecules were attached to the surface with two different approaches. Covalently immobilized oligonucleotides decreased the quenching efficiency of nanographene oxide and gold nanoparticles to ∼22% and ∼21%, respectively, whereas noncovalently adsorbed oligonucleotides decreased it to ∼25% and ∼55%, respectively. As a result, we have found that each nanoquencher has a powerful quenching capability against a fluorescent nanoparticle, which can be

  6. Quantitative Detection Method of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles Based on Eu(3+) Fluorescent Labeling in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunfei; Perera, Thalagalage Shalika Harshani; Li, Fang; Han, Yingchao; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-11-04

    One major challenge for application of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) in nanomedicine is the quantitative detection method. Herein, we exploited one quantitative detection method for nHAP based on the Eu(3+) fluorescent labeling via a simple chemical coprecipitation method. The trace amount of nHAP in cells and tissues can be quantitatively detected on the basis of the fluorescent quantitative determination of Eu(3+) ions in nHAP crystal lattice. The lowest concentration of Eu(3+) ions that can be quantitatively detected is 0.5 nM using DELFIA enhancement solution. This methodology can be broadly applicable for studying the tissue distribution and metabolization of nHAP in vivo.

  7. "Molecular beacon"-hosted thioflavin T: Applications for label-free fluorescent detection of iodide and logic operations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Ling-Fei; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we presented a simple, label-free and rapid-responsive fluorescence assay for iodide (I(-)) detection based on "molecular beacon (MB)"-hosted thioflavin T (ThT), achieving a limit of detection as low as 158 nM. The proposed method exhibited very good selectivity to I(-) ions over other anions interference due to the strong binding force between I(-) ions with Hg(2+). Upon the addition of I(-) ions, it would capture Hg(2+) from a T-Hg(2+)-T complex belonging to the MB-like DNA hairpin structure, which eventually quenched the initial fluorescence as output. In addition, it was successfully applied for operation of an integrated DNA logic gate system and to the determination of I(-) in real samples such as human urine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dual-Mode SERS-Fluorescence Immunoassay Using Graphene Quantum Dot Labeling on One-Dimensional Aligned Magnetoplasmonic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fengming; Zhou, Hongjian; Tan, Tran Van; Kim, Jeonghyo; Koh, Kwangnak; Lee, Jaebeom

    2015-06-10

    A novel dual-mode immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence was designed using graphene quantum dot (GQD) labels to detect a tuberculosis (TB) antigen, CFP-10, via a newly developed sensing platform of linearly aligned magnetoplasmonic (MagPlas) nanoparticles (NPs). The GQDs were excellent bilabeling materials for simultaneous Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL). The one-dimensional (1D) alignment of MagPlas NPs simplified the immunoassay process and enabled fast, enhanced signal transduction. With a sandwich-type immunoassay using dual-mode nanoprobes, both SERS signals and fluorescence images were recognized in a highly sensitive and selective manner with a detection limit of 0.0511 pg mL(-1).

  9. Resolution of phospholipid conformational heterogeneity in model membranes by spin-label EPR and frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Squier, T C; Mahaney, J E; Yin, J J; Lai, C S; Lakowicz, J R

    1991-01-01

    We have utilized both fluorescent and nitroxide derivatives of stearic acid as probes of membrane structural heterogeneity in phospholipid vesicles under physiological conditions, as well as conditions of varying ionic strengths and temperatures where spectral heterogeneity has been previously observed and attributed to multiple ionization states of the probes. To identify the source of this spectral heterogeneity, we have utilized complimentary measurements of the relaxation properties (lifetimes) and motion of both (a) spin labeled and anthroyloxy derivatives of stearic acid (i.e., SASL and AS) and (b) a diphenylhexatriene derivative of phosphatidylcholine (DPH-PC) in single component membranes containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We use an 15N stearic-acid spin label for optimal sensitivity to membrane heterogeneity. The lifetime and dynamics of the fluorescent phospholipid analogue DPH-PC (with no ionizable groups over this pH range) were compared with those of AS, allowing us to discriminate between changes in membrane structure and the ionization of the label. The quantum yield and rotational dynamics of DPH-PC are independent of pH, indicating that changes in pH do not affect the conformation of the host phospholipids. However, both EPR spectra of SASL and the lifetime or dynamics of AS are affected profoundly by changes in solution pH. The apparent pKa's of these two probes in DMPC membranes were determined to be near pH 6.3, implying that at physiological pH and ionic strength these stearic-acid labels exist predominantly as a single ionized population in membranes. Therefore, the observed temperature- and ionic-strength-dependent alterations in the spectra of SASL as well as the lifetime or dynamics of AS in DMPC membranes at neutral pH are due to changes in membrane structure rather than the ionization of the probes. The possibility that ionic gradients across biological membranes induce alterations in phospholipid structures, thereby

  10. Fluorescence hyperspectral imaging technique for the foreign substance detection on fresh-cut lettuce

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nondestructive methods based on fluorescence hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques were developed in order to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands for detecting worms on fresh-cut lettuce were investigated using the one-way ANOVA analysis and correlation analysis. The worm detec...

  11. Label-free fluorescent sensor for lead ion detection based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Luo, Yanfang; Liu, Le; He, Lan; Xing, Haibo; Zhou, Pei

    2014-10-01

    A label-free fluorescent DNA sensor for the detection of lead ions (Pb(2+)) based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation is proposed in this article. A guanine (G)-rich oligonucleotide, T30695, was used as a recognition probe, and a DNA intercalator, SYBR Green I (SG), was used as a signal reporter. In the absence of Pb(2+), the SG intercalated with the single-stranded random-coil T30695 and emitted strong fluorescence. While in the presence of Pb(2+), the random-coil T30695 would fold into a G-quadruplex structure and the SG could barely show weak fluorescence, and the fluorescence intensity was inversely proportional to the involving amount of Pb(2+). Based on this, a selective lead ion sensor with a limit of detection of 3.79 ppb (parts per billion) and a detection range from 0 to 600 ppb was constructed. Because detection for real samples was also demonstrated to be reliable, this simple, low-cost, sensitive, and selective sensor holds good potential for Pb(2+) detection in real environmental samples.

  12. Integrated fluorescence detection of labeled biomolecules using a prism-like PDMS microfluidic chip and lateral light excitation.

    PubMed

    Novo, Pedro; Chu, Virginia; Conde, João Pedro

    2014-06-21

    Microfabricated amorphous silicon photodiodes were integrated with prism-like PDMS microfluidics for the detection and quantification of fluorescence signals. The PDMS device was fabricated with optical quality surfaces and beveled sides. A 405 nm laser beam perpendicular to the lateral sides of the microfluidic device excites the fluorophores in the microchannel at an angle of 70° to the normal to the microchannel/photodiode surface. This configuration, which makes use of the total internal reflection of the excitation beam and the isotropy of the fluorescence emission, minimizes the intensity of excitation light that reaches the integrated photodetector. A difference of two orders of magnitude was achieved in the reduction of the detection noise level as compared with a normally incident excitation configuration. A limit-of-detection of 5.6 × 10(10) antibodies per square centimeter was achieved using antibodies labeled with a model organic fluorophore. Furthermore, the results using the lateral excitation scheme are in good proportionality agreement with those by fluorescence quantification using wide-field fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme a synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Demant, E J; Nystrøm, B T

    2001-08-01

    The fluorescence-based long-chain fatty acid probe BSA-HCA (bovine serum albumin labeled with 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-acetic acid) is shown to respond to binding of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters by quenching of the 450 nm fluorescence emission. As determined by spectrofluorometric titration, binding affinities for palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-CoA (Kd = 0.2-0.4 microM) are 5-10 times lower than those for the corresponding nonesterified fatty acids. In the presence of detergent (Chaps, Triton X-100, n-octylglucoside) above the critical micelle concentration, acyl-CoA partitions from BSA-HCA and into the detergent micelles. This allows BSA-HCA to be used as a fluorescent probe for continuous recording of fatty acid concentrations in detergent solution with little interference from acyl-CoA. Using a calibration of the fluorescence signal with fatty acids in the C14 to C20 chain-length range, fatty acid consumption by Pseudomonas fragi and rat liver microsomal acyl-CoA synthetase activities are measured down to 0.05 microM/min with a data sampling rate of 10 points per second. This new method provides a very promising spectrofluorometric approach to the study of acyl-CoA synthetase reaction kinetics at physiologically relevant (nM) aqueous phase concentrations of fatty acid substrates and at a time resolution that cannot be obtained in isotopic sampling or enzyme-coupled assays.

  14. Uptake and distribution of fluorescently labeled cobalamin in neoplastic and healthy breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Michelle J.; McGreevy, James M.; Holden, Joseph A.; West, Frederick G.; Grissom, Charles B.

    2000-05-01

    Fluorescent analogs of cobalamin (vitamin B12) have been developed as diagnostic markers of cancer cells. These compounds are recognized by transcobalamin, a cobalamin transport protein, with high affinity, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. The cellular sequestration and gross distribution of fluorescent cobalamin bioconjugates in breast tissue is being examined by epifluorescence microscopy. The distribution of each compound is being evaluated in proliferative and non-proliferative tissue, i.e. normal tissue and breast carcinoma. The results of preliminary studies suggest that fluorescent analogs of cobalamin may be a useful tool in therapeutic breast operations to define tumor margins and to distinguish neoplastic breast tissue from healthy breast tissue.

  15. Multifunctional Core@Shell Magnetic Nanoprobes for Enhancing Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fluorescent Labeling in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yin, Ting; Gao, Guo; Shapter, Joseph G; Lai, Weien; Huang, Peng; Qi, Wen; Song, Jie; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-05-31

    Core@shell magnetic nanoparticles (core@shell MNPs) are attracting widespread attention due to their enhancement properties for potential applications in hyperthermia treatment, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnostics, and so forth. Herein, we developed a facile thermal decomposition method for controllable synthesis of a superparamagnetic, monodispersed core@shell structure (Co@Mn = CoFe2O4@MnFe2O4) with uniform size distribution (σ < 5%, dc ≈ 15 nm). The CoFe2O4 core could enhance magnetic anisotropy, and the MnFe2O4 shell could improve the magnetization value. The Co@Mn MNPs were transferred into aqueous solution with an amphiphilic polymer (labeled 2% TAMRA) and functionalized with PEG2k and target molecules (folic acid, FA) to fabricate multifunctional PMATAMRA-Co@Mn-PEG2k-FA nanoprobes. The obtained PMATAMRA-Co@Mn-PEG2k-FA nanoprobes exhibit good biocompatibility, high T2 relaxation values, and long-term fluorescence stability (at least 6 months). Our results demonstrate that the synthesized PMATAMRA-Co@Mn-PEG2k-FA nanoprobes can effectively enhance the targeted MRI and fluorescent labeling in vitro and in vivo. The research outcomes will contribute to the rational design of new nanoprobes and provide a promising pathway to promote core@shell nanoprobes for further clinical contrast MRI and photodynamic therapy in the near future.

  16. Determination of thiophenols with a novel fluorescence labelling reagent: analysis of industrial wastewater samples with SPE extraction coupled with HPLC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanan; Lv, Zhengxian; Sun, Zhiwei; Wu, Chuanxiang; Ji, Zhongyin; You, Jinmao

    2016-05-01

    A simple, sensitive, and selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using 9-(2-iodoethyl)acridone (IEA) as a novel fluorescence derivatizing agent for the simultaneous determination of six thiophenols has been developed. An efficient Pb(2+)-modified OASIS-MCX cartridge was used and could get good recoveries. IEA was successfully used to label thiophenols with high sensitivity and excellent selectivity. The effects of different solvents, pH, and surfactants on fluorescence properties of derivatives were investigated. To obtain the best labeling efficiency, derivatizing parameters including pH value, temperature, and concentration of IEA, as well as types of catalysts were also evaluated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the separation could be achieved within 12 min with limits of detection (LODs) in the range of 0.6-5.8 μg L(-1) and relative standard deviations (RSDs) < 3.9%. This is the first time that IEA was applied to the analysis of thiophenols, and the established method has been successfully applied to the trace level detection of thiophenols in industrial wastewater samples.

  17. One-Pot Synthesis of Biocompatible CdSe/CdS Quantum Dots and Their Applications as Fluorescent Biological Labels.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chuanxin; Zhang, Hui; Du, Ning; Chen, Bingdi; Huang, Hai; Wu, Yulian; Yang, Deren

    2011-12-01

    We developed a novel one-pot polyol approach for the synthesis of biocompatible CdSe quantum dots (QDs) using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as a capping ligand at 240°C. The morphological and structural characterization confirmed the formation of biocompatible and monodisperse CdSe QDs with several nanometers in size. The encapsulation of CdS thin layers on the surface of CdSe QDs (CdSe/CdS core-shell QDs) was used for passivating the defect emission (650 nm) and enhancing the fluorescent quantum yields up to 30% of band-to-band emission (530-600 nm). Moreover, the PL emission peak of CdSe/CdS core-shell QDs could be tuned from 530 to 600 nm by the size of CdSe core. The as-prepared CdSe/CdS core-shell QDs with small size, well water solubility, good monodispersity, and bright PL emission showed high performance as fluorescent cell labels in vitro. The viability of QDs-labeled 293T cells was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2-diphenyltertrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed the satisfactory (>80%) biocompatibility of as-synthesized PAA-capped QDs at the Cd concentration of 15 μg/ml.

  18. Atomic force microscopy for analyzing metaphase chromosomes: comparison of AFM images with fluorescence labeling images of banding patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    The combined use of fluorescence microscopy with atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been introduced to analyze the replication-banding patterns of human chromosomes. Human lymphocytes synchronized with excess thymidine are treated with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) during the late S phase. EdU-labeled DNA is detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor 488(®) azide, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with EdU incorporated during the late S phase show a banding pattern similar to the G-banding pattern of normal human chromosomes. The comparison between the fluorescence and AFM image of the same chromosome indicates the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arms, which correspond to G-positive and G-negative bands, respectively. This technique of EdU-labeled replication bands combined with AFM is useful to analyze the structure of chromosomes in relation to the banding pattern.

  19. Assessment of fluorescent-labeled bacteria for evaluation of in vivo uptake of bacteria (Vibrio spp.) by crustacean larvae.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rodriguez, S A; Simões, N; Jones, D A; Roque, A; Gomez-Gil, B

    2003-01-01

    Available methods to study crustacean digestive tract colonization by bacteria are laborious, time-consuming, and do not permit in vivo assays and observation. This paper reports on a rapid and consistent technique to apply a fluorescent label to bacteria, which can then be presented to filter-feeding crustacea such as Artemia and penaeid larvae for later in situ bacterial distribution observation. Three luminescent Vibrio spp. were stained and observed inside Artemia nauplii, shrimp zoea and mysis stages, Vibrio harveyi type strain ATCC 14126, M(1) (pathogenic) and Ea (non-pathogenic). Factors such as dye (DTAF) concentration, exposure time/temperature and sonication time were evaluated. Viability of the dye and stained bacteria were tested at 4, -20 and -70 degrees C storage temperatures for up to 81 days. Results show that 4 and -20 degrees C storage temperatures are not recommended. At -70 degrees C, both bacteria and dye are optimally preserved. Monodispersed fluorescent-labeled bacterial cells can be observed inside the digestive tract of crustacean larvae at a density of inoculation as high as 5.2 x 10(6) CFU ml(-1). After 2 to 4 h, some leaching occurs, increasing difficulty in observation, although after 24 h, it is still possible to observe monodispersed FLB inside the digestive tract of crustacean larvae. Autofluorescence may complicate observation when filter-feeding crustacean larvae are co-fed with microalgae.

  20. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  1. Combinations of fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C in phospholipid films.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Taneva, S G; Perez-Gil, J; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1997-01-01

    Hydrophobic pulmonary surfactant (PS) proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) modulate the surface properties of PS lipids. Epifluorescence microscopy was performed on solvent-spread monolayers of fluorescently labeled porcine SP-B (R-SP-B, labeled with Texas Red) and SP-C (F-SP-C, labeled with fluorescein) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) (at protein concentrations of 10 and 20 wt%, and 10 wt% of both) under conditions of cyclic compression and expansion. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectroscopy of R-SP-B and F-SP-C indicated that the proteins were intact and labeled with the appropriate fluorescent probe. The monolayers were compressed and expanded for four cycles at an initial rate of 0.64 A2 x mol(-1) x s(-1) (333 mm2 x s x [-1]) up to a surface pressure pi approximately 65 mN/m, and pi-area per residue (pi-A) isotherms at 22 +/- 1 degrees C were obtained. The monolayers were microscopically observed for the fluorescence emission of the individual proteins present in the film lipid matrix, and their visual features were video recorded for image analysis. The pi-A isotherms of the DPPC/protein monolayers showed characteristic "squeeze out" effects at pi approximately 43 mN/m for R-SP-B and 55 mN/m for F-SP-C, as had previously been observed for monolayers of the native proteins in DPPC. Both proteins associated with the expanded (fluid) phase of DPPC monolayers remained in or associated with the monolayers at high pi (approximately 65 mN/m) and redispersed in the monolayer upon its reexpansion. At comparable pi and area/molecule of the lipid, the proteins reduced the amounts of condensed (gel-like) phase of DPPC monolayers, with F-SP-C having a greater effect on a weight basis than did R-SP-B. In any one of the lipid/protein monolayers the amounts of the DPPC in condensed phase were the same at equivalent pi during compression and expansion and from cycle to cycle. This indicated that only minor loss of components from these systems

  2. Fluorescent probes as a tool for labelling and tracking the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Sarah M; Leung, Tommy L F; Bishop, Phillip J

    2011-09-09

    The dissemination of the virulent pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has contributed to the decline and extinction of many amphibian species worldwide. Several different strains have been identified, some of which are sympatric. Interactions between co-infecting strains of a pathogen can have significant influences on disease epidemiology and evolution; therefore the dynamics of multi-strain infections is an important area of research. We stained Bd cells with 2 fluorescent BODIPY fatty acid probes to determine whether these can potentially be used to distinguish and track Bd cell lines in multi-strain experiments. Bd cells in broth culture were stained with 5 concentrations of green-fluorescent BODIPY FL and red-fluorescent BODIPY 558/568 and visualised under an epifluorescent microscope for up to 16 d post-dye. Dyed strains were also assessed for growth inhibition. The most effective concentration for both dyes was 10 pM. This concentration of dye produced strong fluorescence for 12 to 16 d in Bd cultures held at 23 degrees C (3 to 4 generations), and did not inhibit Bd growth. Cells dyed with BODIPY FL and BODIPY 558/568 can be distinguished from each other on the basis of their fluorescence characteristics. Therefore, it is likely that this technique will be useful for research into multi-strain dynamics of Bd infections.

  3. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y

    2012-08-31

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  4. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells. PMID:22713456

  5. Electrophoresis of polar fluorescent tracers through the nerve sheath labels neuronal populations for anatomical and functional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, Matthew D.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2017-01-01

    The delivery of tracers into populations of neurons is essential to visualize their anatomy and analyze their function. In some model systems genetically-targeted expression of fluorescent proteins is the method of choice; however, these genetic tools are not available for most organisms and alternative labeling methods are very limited. Here we describe a new method for neuronal labelling by electrophoretic dye delivery from a suction electrode directly through the neuronal sheath of nerves and ganglia in insects. Polar tracer molecules were delivered into the locust auditory nerve without destroying its function, simultaneously staining peripheral sensory structures and central axonal projections. Local neuron populations could be labelled directly through the surface of the brain, and in-vivo optical imaging of sound-evoked activity was achieved through the electrophoretic delivery of calcium indicators. The method provides a new tool for studying how stimuli are processed in peripheral and central sensory pathways and is a significant advance for the study of nervous systems in non-model organisms. PMID:28084413

  6. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    PubMed

    Vancová, Marie; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons) on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  7. Fluorescently Labeled Virus Probes Show that Natural Virus Populations Can Control the Structure of Marine Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hennes, K. P.; Suttle, C. A.; Chan, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescently stained viruses were used as probes to label, identify, and enumerate specific strains of bacteria and cyanobacteria in mixed microbial assemblages. Several marine virus isolates were fluorescently stained with YOYO-1 or POPO-1 (Molecular Probes, Inc.) and added to seawater samples that contained natural microbial communities. Cells to which the stained viruses adsorbed were easily distinguished from nonhost cells; typically, there was undetectable binding of stained viruses to natural microbial assemblages containing >10(sup6) bacteria ml(sup-1) but to which host cells were not added. Host cells that were added to natural seawater were quantified with 99% (plusmn) 2% (mean (plusmn) range) efficiency with fluorescently labeled virus probes (FLVPs). A marine bacterial isolate (strain PWH3a), tentatively identified as Vibrio natriegens, was introduced into natural microbial communities that were either supplemented with nutrients or untreated, and changes in the abundance of the isolate were monitored with FLVPs. Simultaneously, the concentrations of viruses that infected strain PWH3a were monitored by plaque assay. Following the addition of PWH3a, the concentration of viruses infecting this strain increased from undetectable levels (<1 ml(sup-1)) to 2.9 x 10(sup7) and 8.3 x 10(sup8) ml(sup-1) for the untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. The increase in viruses was associated with a collapse in populations of strain PWH3a from ca. 30 to 2% and 43 to 0.01% of the microbial communities in untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that FLVPs can be used to identify and quantify specific groups of bacteria in mixed microbial communities. The data show as well that viruses which are present at low abundances in natural aquatic viral communities can control microbial community structure. PMID:16535146

  8. Binding kinetics of a fluorescently labeled bisphosphonate as a tool for dynamic monitoring of bone mineral deposition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tower, Robert J; Campbell, Graeme M; Müller, Marc; Will, Olga; Glüer, Claus C; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2014-09-01

    Bone mineral deposition during the modeling of new bone and remodeling of old bone can be perturbed by several pathological conditions, including osteoporosis and skeletal metastases. A site-specific marker depicting the dynamics of bone mineral deposition would provide insight into skeletal disease location and severity, and prove useful in evaluating the efficacy of pharmacological interventions. Fluorescent labels may combine advantages of both radioisotope imaging and detailed microscopic analyses. The purpose of this study was to determine if the fluorescent bisphosphonate OsteoSense could detect localized changes in bone mineral deposition in established mouse models of accelerated bone loss (ovariectomy) (OVX) and anabolic bone gain resulting from parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment. We hypothesized that the early rate of binding, as well as the total amount of bisphosphonate, which binds over long periods of time, could be useful in evaluating changes in bone metabolism. Evaluation of the kinetic uptake of bisphosphonates revealed a significant reduction in both the rate constant and plateau binding after OVX, whereas treatment with PTH resulted in a 36-fold increase in the bisphosphonate binding rate constant compared with untreated OVX controls. Localization of bisphosphonate binding revealed initial binding at sites of ossification adjacent to the growth plate and, to a lesser extent, along more distal trabecular and cortical elements. Micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to confirm that initial bisphosphonate binding is localized to sites of low tissue mineral density, associated with new bone mineral deposition. Our results suggest monitoring binding kinetics based on fluorescently labeled bisphosphonates represents a highly sensitive, site-specific method for monitoring changes in bone mineral deposition with the potential for translation into human applications in osteoporosis and bone metastatic processes and their treatment.

  9. Fluorescently Labeled Virus Probes Show that Natural Virus Populations Can Control the Structure of Marine Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Hennes, K P; Suttle, C A; Chan, A M

    1995-10-01

    Fluorescently stained viruses were used as probes to label, identify, and enumerate specific strains of bacteria and cyanobacteria in mixed microbial assemblages. Several marine virus isolates were fluorescently stained with YOYO-1 or POPO-1 (Molecular Probes, Inc.) and added to seawater samples that contained natural microbial communities. Cells to which the stained viruses adsorbed were easily distinguished from nonhost cells; typically, there was undetectable binding of stained viruses to natural microbial assemblages containing >10(sup6) bacteria ml(sup-1) but to which host cells were not added. Host cells that were added to natural seawater were quantified with 99% (plusmn) 2% (mean (plusmn) range) efficiency with fluorescently labeled virus probes (FLVPs). A marine bacterial isolate (strain PWH3a), tentatively identified as Vibrio natriegens, was introduced into natural microbial communities that were either supplemented with nutrients or untreated, and changes in the abundance of the isolate were monitored with FLVPs. Simultaneously, the concentrations of viruses that infected strain PWH3a were monitored by plaque assay. Following the addition of PWH3a, the concentration of viruses infecting this strain increased from undetectable levels (<1 ml(sup-1)) to 2.9 x 10(sup7) and 8.3 x 10(sup8) ml(sup-1) for the untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. The increase in viruses was associated with a collapse in populations of strain PWH3a from ca. 30 to 2% and 43 to 0.01% of the microbial communities in untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that FLVPs can be used to identify and quantify specific groups of bacteria in mixed microbial communities. The data show as well that viruses which are present at low abundances in natural aquatic viral communities can control microbial community structure.

  10. Detection of human neutrophil elastase by aptamer affinity capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence using specified site fluorescently labeled aptamer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunlong; Wang, Hailin; Zhao, Qiang

    2017-09-29

    As a multifunctional serine protease, human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays critical roles in a variety of physiopathological processes, such as acute lung injury, emphysema, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. The quantification of HNE is important in many applications. In this paper, we report an aptamer affinity capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) assay for detection of HNE using a tetramethylrhodamine (TMR)-labeled DNA aptamer probe. The affinity complex of HNE and DNA aptamer probe was well separated from the unbound aptamer probe in CE separation based on the difference of electrophoretic mobility. Broad complex peaks appeared due to possible multiple binding. The 45-mer aptamer having TMR labeling on the 40th T base was used as affinity probe, as larger complex peaks were obtained. We investigated the effects of various metal cations (Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+)) in sample buffer on the binding of HNE and the aptamer in CE-LIF analysis. The presence of Na(+), K(+), or Mg(2+) in sample buffer caused a decrease of complex peaks, and Mg(2+) showed a larger effect. Under optimized conditions, this aptamer CE-LIF assay enabled the detection of HNE at 0.5 nM. This assay showed good specificity and allowed for detection of HNE spiked in diluted human serum sample. Graphical abstract The complex of HNE and DNA aptamer probe was isolated from the unbound aptamer probe in CE separation due to difference of electrophoretic mobility, allowing a CE-LIF assay for HNE.

  11. A fluorescent thermometer based on a pyrene-labeled thermoresponsive polymer.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Christian; Vollrath, Antje; Hoogenboom, Richard; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2010-01-01

    Thermoresponsive polymers that undergo a solubility transition by variation of the temperature are important materials for the development of 'smart' materials. In this contribution we exploit the solubility phase transition of poly(methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate), which is accompanied by a transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, for the development of a fluorescent thermometer. To translate the polymer phase transition into a fluorescent response, the polymer was functionalized with pyrene resulting in a change of the emission based on the microenvironment. This approach led to a soluble polymeric fluorescent thermometer with a temperature range from 11 °C to 21 °C. The polymer phase transition that occurs during sensing is studied in detail by dynamic light scattering.

  12. A Fluorescent Thermometer Based on a Pyrene-Labeled Thermoresponsive Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Christian; Vollrath, Antje; Hoogenboom, Richard; Schubert, Ulrich S.

    2010-01-01

    Thermoresponsive polymers that undergo a solubility transition by variation of the temperature are important materials for the development of ‘smart’ materials. In this contribution we exploit the solubility phase transition of poly(methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate), which is accompanied by a transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, for the development of a fluorescent thermometer. To translate the polymer phase transition into a fluorescent response, the polymer was functionalized with pyrene resulting in a change of the emission based on the microenvironment. This approach led to a soluble polymeric fluorescent thermometer with a temperature range from 11 °C to 21 °C. The polymer phase transition that occurs during sensing is studied in detail by dynamic light scattering. PMID:22163636

  13. Color-matched and fluorescence-labeled esophagus phantom and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We developed a stable, reproducible three-dimensional optical phantom for the evaluation of a wide-field endoscopic molecular imaging system. This phantom mimicked a human esophagus structure with flexibility to demonstrate body movements. At the same time, realistic visual appearance and diffuse spectral reflectance properties of the tissue were simulated by a color matching methodology. A photostable dye-in-polymer technology was applied to represent biomarker probed “hot-spot” locations. Furthermore, fluorescent target quantification of the phantom was demonstrated using a 1.2 mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope with concurrent fluorescence-reflectance imaging. PMID:23403908

  14. Generation of a fluorescently labeled endogenous protein library in living human cells.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Alex; Danon, Tamar; Cohen, Ariel; Milo, Ron; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Lustig, Gila; Liron, Yuvalal; Alon, Uri; Perzov, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    We present a protocol to tag proteins expressed from their endogenous chromosomal locations in individual mammalian cells using central dogma tagging. The protocol can be used to build libraries of cell clones, each expressing one endogenous protein tagged with a fluorophore such as the yellow fluorescent protein. Each round of library generation produces 100-200 cell clones and takes about 1 month. The protocol integrates procedures for high-throughput single-cell cloning using flow cytometry, high-throughput cDNA generation and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, semi-automatic protein localization screening using fluorescent microscopy and freezing cells in 96-well format.

  15. Color-matched and fluorescence-labeled esophagus phantom and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    We developed a stable, reproducible three-dimensional optical phantom for the evaluation of a wide-field endoscopic molecular imaging system. This phantom mimicked a human esophagus structure with flexibility to demonstrate body movements. At the same time, realistic visual appearance and diffuse spectral reflectance properties of the tissue were simulated by a color matching methodology. A photostable dye-in-polymer technology was applied to represent biomarker probed "hot-spot" locations. Furthermore, fluorescent target quantification of the phantom was demonstrated using a 1.2 mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope with concurrent fluorescence-reflectance imaging.

  16. Label-free silicon nanodots featured ratiometric fluorescent aptasensor for lysosomal imaging and pH measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Guo, Shan; Cheng, Shibo; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2017-03-22

    The homeostasis of lysosomal pH is crucial in cell physiology. Developing small fluorescent nanosensors for lysosome imaging and ratiometric measurement of pH is highly demanded yet challenging. Herein, a pH-sensitive fluorescein tagged aptamer AS1411 has been utilized to covalently modify the label-free fluorescent silicon nanodots via a crosslinker for construction of a ratiometric pH biosensor. The established aptasensor exhibits the advantages of ultrasmall size, hypotoxicity, excellent pH reversibility and good photostability, which favors its application in an intracellular environment. Using human breast MCF-7 cancer cells and MCF-10A normal cells as the model, this aptasensor shows cell specificity for cancer cells and displays a wide pH response range of 4.5-8.0 in living cells. The results demonstrate that the pH of MCF-7 cells is 5.1, which is the expected value for acidic organelles. Lysosome imaging and accurate measurement of pH in MCF-7 cells have been successfully conducted based on this nanosensor via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry.

  17. Labeling-free fluorescent detection of DNA hybridization through FRET from pyrene excimer to DNA intercalator SYBR green I.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruyi; Xu, Chen; Dong, Jie; Wang, Guojie

    2015-03-15

    A novel labeling-free fluorescence complex probe has been developed for DNA hybridization detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism from pyrene excimer of pyrene-functionalized poly [2-(N, N-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PFP) to SYBR Green I (SG, a specific intercalator of double-stranded DNA) in a cost-effective, rapid and simple manner. The complex probe consists of the positively charged PFP, SG and negatively charged single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Upon adding a complementary strand to the complex probe solution, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was formed, followed by the intercalation of SG into dsDNA. The pyrene excimer emission was overlapped with the absorption of SG very well and the electrostatic interactions between PFP and dsDNA kept them in close proximity, enabling efficient FRET from pyrene excimer to SG. The fluorescence of SG in the duplex DNA resulting from FRET can be successfully applied to detect DNA hybridization with high sensitivity for a very low detection limit of 10nM and excellent selectivity for detection of single base pair mismatch.

  18. Resurfaced fluorescent protein as a sensing platform for label-free detection of copper(II) ion and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chunyang; Wang, Zhen; Nie, Zhou; Deng, Honghua; Hu, Huiping; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-02-03

    Protein engineering by resurfacing is an efficient approach to provide new molecular toolkits for biotechnology and bioanalytical chemistry. H39GFP is a new variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) containing 39 histidine residues in the primary sequence that was developed by protein resurfacing. Herein, taking H39GFP as the signal reporter, a label-free fluorometric sensor for Cu(2+) sensing was developed based on the unique multivalent metal ion-binding property of H39GFP and fluorescence quenching effect of Cu(2+) by electron transfer. The high affinity of H39GFP with Cu(2+) (Kd, 16.2 nM) leads to rapid detection of Cu(2+) in 5 min with a low detection limit (50 nM). Using acetylthiocholine (ATCh) as the substrate, this H39GFP/Cu(2+) complex-based sensor was further applied for the turn-on fluorescence detection of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The assay was based on the reaction between Cu(2+) and thiocholine, the hydrolysis product of ATCh by AChE. The proposed sensor is highly sensitive (limit of detection (LOD) = 0.015 mU mL(-1)) and is feasible for screening inhibitors of AChE. Furthermore, the practicability of this method was demonstrated by the detection of pesticide residue (carbaryl) in real food samples. Hence, the successful applications of H39GFP in the detection of metal ion and enzyme activity present the prospect of resurfaced proteins as versatile biosensing platforms.

  19. Generation of fluorescently labeled cell lines, C3A hepatoma cells, and human adult skin fibroblasts to study coculture models.

    PubMed

    Samluk, Anna; Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2013-07-01

    Hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures are widely used in studies on the role of homo- and heterotypic interactions in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In this article, for the first time, establishment of the coculture model employing hepatoma C3A cells and human skin fibroblasts, stably expressing fluorescent markers, is described. Suitability of the model in studying coculture conditions using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry was examined. C3A cells spontaneously formed island-like growth patterns surrounded by fibroblasts. The "islands" size and resulting intensity of the homo- and heterotypic interactions can easily be tuned by applying various plated cells ratios. We examined the capability of the hepatoma cells to produce albumin in hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests showed that greater number of fibroblasts in coculture, resulting in smaller sizes of hepatoma "islands," and thus, a larger heterotypic interface, promoted higher albumin synthesis. The use of fluorescently labeled cells in flow cytometry measurements enabled us to separately gate two cell populations and to evaluate protein expression only in/on cells of interest. Flow cytometry confirmed ELISA results indicating the highest albumin production in hepatoma cells cocultured with the greatest number of fibroblasts and the inhibited protein synthesis in coculture with osteosarcoma cells.

  20. Bivalent Display of Dicysteine on Peptide Nucleic Acids for Homogenous DNA/RNA Detection through in Situ Fluorescence Labelling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ge-Min; Seitz, Oliver

    2017-01-17

    Fluorogenic probes that signal the presence of specific DNA or RNA sequences are key enabling tools for molecular disease diagnosis and imaging studies. Usually, at least one fluorophore is attached through covalent bonding to an oligonucleotide probe. However, the additional conjugation step increases costs. Here we introduce a method that avoids the requirement for the preparation of fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotides and provides the opportunity to alter the fluorogenic reporter dye without resynthesis. The method is based on adjacent hybridization of two dicysteine-containing peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to form a bipartite tetracysteine motif that binds profluorescent bisarsenical dyes such as FIAsH, ReAsH or CrAsH. Binding is accompanied by strong increases in fluorescence emission (with response factors of up to 80-fold and high brightness up to 50 mL mol(-1)  cm(-1) ). The detection system provides sub-nanomolar limits of detection and allows discrimination of single nucleotide variations through more than 20-fold changes in fluorescence intensity. To demonstrate its usefulness, the FIAsH-based readout of the bivalent CysCys-PNA display was interfaced with a rolling-circle amplification (RCA) assay used to detect disease-associated microRNA let-7a. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from pyrene to perylene labels for nucleic acid hybridization assays under homogeneous solution conditions

    PubMed Central

    Masuko, Masayuki; Ohuchi, Shohkichi; Sode, Koji; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Shimadzu, Akira

    2000-01-01

    We characterized the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from pyrene (donor) to perylene (acceptor) for nucleic acid assays under homogeneous solution conditions. We used the hybridization between a target 32mer and its complementary two sequential 16mer deoxyribonucleotides whose neighboring terminals were each respectively labeled with a pyrene and a perylene residue. A transfer efficiency of ~100% was attained upon the hybridization when observing perylene fluorescence at 459 nm with 347-nm excitation of a pyrene absorption peak. The Förster distance between two dye residues was 22.3 Å (the orientation factor of 2/3). We could change the distance between the residues by inserting various numbers of nucleotides into the center of the target, thus creating a gap between the dye residues on a hybrid. Assuming that the number of inserted nucleotides is proportional to the distance between the dye residues, the energy transfer efficiency versus number of inserted nucleotides strictly obeyed the Förster theory. The mean inter-nucleotide distance of the single-stranded portion was estimated to be 2.1 Å. Comparison between the fluorescent properties of a pyrene–perylene pair with those of a widely used fluorescein–rhodamine pair showed that the pyrene–perylene FRET is suitable for hybridization assays. PMID:10734211

  2. Fluorescent labeling of pectic oligosaccharides with 2-aminobenzamide and enzyme assay for pectin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tadashi; Ichita, Junji; Matsue, Hajime; Ono, Hiroshi; Maeda, Ikuko

    2002-06-05

    Oligogalacturonides [oligomers composed of (1-->4)-linked alpha-D-galactosyluronic acid residues] with degrees of polymerization (DP) from 1 to 10, and a tri-, penta-, and heptasaccharide generated from the backbone of rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) were labeled at their reducing ends using aqueous 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride in over 90% yield. These derivatives were analyzed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) and structurally characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) and by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The 2AB-labeled oligogalacturonides and RG-I oligomers are fragmented by endo- and exo-polygalacturonase and by Driselase, respectively. 2AB-labeled oligogalacturonide is an exogenous acceptor for galacturonosyltransferase of transferring galacturonic acid from UDP-GalA. Thus, the 2AB-labeled oligogalacturonides and RG-I oligomers are useful for studying enzymes involved in pectin degradation and biosynthesis and may be of value in determining the biological functions of pectic fragments in plants.

  3. Modulating fluorescence anisotropy of terminally labeled double-stranded DNA via the interaction between dye and nucleotides for rational design of DNA recognition based applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongduan; Wei, Hejia; Zou, Mingjian; Xu, Xiao; Xia, Bin; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2015-03-03

    Effective signal enhancement for fluorescence anisotropy in a simple manner is most desirable for fluorescence anisotropy method development. This work aimed to provide insights into the fluorescence anisotropy of terminally labeled double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to facilitate a facile and universal design strategy for DNA recognition based applications. We demonstrated that fluorescence anisotropy of dsDNA could be regulated by the nature of dyes, the molecular volume, and the end structure of dsDNA. Fluorescence anisotropy ascended with the increased number of base pairs up to 18 bp and leveled off thereafter, indicating the molecular volume was not the only factor responsible for fluorescence anisotropy. By choosing dyes with the positively charged center, high fluorescence anisotropy signal was obtained due to the confinement of the segmental motion of dyes through the electrostatic interaction. By properly designing the end structure of dsDNA, fluorescence anisotropy could be further improved by enlarging the effective overall rotational volume, as supported by two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(1)H nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY). With the successful enhancement of the fluorescence anisotropy for terminally labeled dsDNA, simple and universal designs were demonstrated by sensing of major classes of analytes from macromolecules (DNA and protein) to small molecules (cocaine).

  4. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  5. Label-Free Bacterial Imaging with Deep-UV-Laser-Induced Native Fluorescence ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bhartia, Rohit; Salas, Everett C.; Hug, William F.; Reid, Ray D.; Lane, Arthur L.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a near-real-time optical imaging method that works via the detection of the intrinsic fluorescence of life forms upon excitation by deep-UV (DUV) illumination. A DUV (<250-nm) source enables the detection of microbes in their native state on natural materials, avoiding background autofluorescence and without the need for fluorescent dyes or tags. We demonstrate that DUV-laser-induced native fluorescence can detect bacteria on opaque surfaces at spatial scales ranging from tens of centimeters to micrometers and from communities to single cells. Given exposure times of 100 μs and low excitation intensities, this technique enables rapid imaging of bacterial communities and cells without irreversible sample alteration or destruction. We also demonstrate the first noninvasive detection of bacteria on in situ-incubated environmental experimental samples from the deep ocean (Lo'ihi Seamount), showing the use of DUV native fluorescence for in situ detection in the deep biosphere and other nutrient-limited environments. PMID:20817797

  6. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  7. On the origin of multiexponential fluorescence decays from 2-aminopurine-labeled dinucleotides.

    PubMed

    Remington, Jacob M; Philip, Abbey M; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2016-10-21

    The fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine (2Ap) has been used for decades to study local conformational fluctuations in DNA. Steady-state and time-resolved measurements of 2Ap fluorescence have been used to predict specific conformational states through suitable modeling of the quenching of the fluorescence of a 2Ap residue incorporated site-specifically into a DNA strand. The success of this approach has been limited by a lack of understanding of the precise factors responsible for the complex, multiexponential decays observed experimentally. In this study, dinucleotides composed of 2Ap and adenine were studied by the time-correlated single-photon counting technique to investigate the causes of heterogeneous emission kinetics. Contrary to previous reports, we argue that emission from 2Ap that is stacked with a neighboring base contributes negligibly to the emission signals recorded more than 50 ps after excitation, which are instead dominated by emission from unstacked 2Ap. We find that the decay kinetics can be modeled using a continuous lifetime distribution, which arises from the inherent distance dependence of electron transfer rates without the need to postulate a small number of discrete states with decay times derived from multiexponential fits. These results offer a new perspective on the quenching of 2Ap fluorescence and expand the information that can be obtained from experiments.

  8. On the origin of multiexponential fluorescence decays from 2-aminopurine-labeled dinucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Jacob M.; Philip, Abbey M.; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2016-10-01

    The fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine (2Ap) has been used for decades to study local conformational fluctuations in DNA. Steady-state and time-resolved measurements of 2Ap fluorescence have been used to predict specific conformational states through suitable modeling of the quenching of the fluorescence of a 2Ap residue incorporated site-specifically into a DNA strand. The success of this approach has been limited by a lack of understanding of the precise factors responsible for the complex, multiexponential decays observed experimentally. In this study, dinucleotides composed of 2Ap and adenine were studied by the time-correlated single-photon counting technique to investigate the causes of heterogeneous emission kinetics. Contrary to previous reports, we argue that emission from 2Ap that is stacked with a neighboring base contributes negligibly to the emission signals recorded more than 50 ps after excitation, which are instead dominated by emission from unstacked 2Ap. We find that the decay kinetics can be modeled using a continuous lifetime distribution, which arises from the inherent distance dependence of electron transfer rates without the need to postulate a small number of discrete states with decay times derived from multiexponential fits. These results offer a new perspective on the quenching of 2Ap fluorescence and expand the information that can be obtained from experiments.

  9. New Environment-Sensitive Multichannel DNA Fluorescent Label for Investigation of the Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Barthes, Nicolas P. F.; Michel, Benoît Y.; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5′-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified. PMID:24925085

  10. A Modular Labeling Strategy for In Vivo PET and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Nanoparticle Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Zhang, Yachao; Longo, Valerie A.; Irwin, Chrisopher P.; Binderup, Tina; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Fayad, Zahi A.; Lewis, Jason S.; Mulder, Willem J.M.; Reiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Advances in preclinical molecular imaging have generated new opportunities to noninvasively visualize the biodistribution and tumor targeting of nanoparticle therapeutics. Capitalizing on recent achievements in this area, we sought to develop an 89Zr-based labeling strategy for liposomal nanoparticles that accumulate in tumors via passive targeting mechanisms. Methods 89Zr-labeled liposomes were prepared using 2 different approaches: click labeling and surface chelation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies, as well as PET/CT imaging of the radiolabeled nanoparticles, were performed on a mouse model of breast cancer. In addition, a dual PET/optical probe was prepared by incorporation of a near-infrared fluorophore and tested in vivo by PET and near-infrared fluorescence imaging. Results The surface chelation approach proved to be superior in terms of radiochemical yield and stability, as well as in vivo performance. Accumulation of these liposomes in tumor peaked at 24 h after injection and was measured to be 13.7 ± 1.8 percentage injected dose per gram. The in vivo performance of this probe was not essentially perturbed by the incorporation of a near-infrared fluorophore. Conclusion We have developed a highly modular and efficient strategy for the labeling of liposomal nanoparticles with 89Zr. In xenograft and orthotopic mouse models of breast cancer, we demonstrated that the biodistribution of these nanoparticles can be visualized by PET imaging. In combination with a near-infrared dye, these liposomal nanoparticles can serve as bimodal PET/optical imaging agents. The liposomes target malignant growth, and their bimodal features may be useful for simultaneous PET and intraoperative imaging. PMID:25060196

  11. A modular labeling strategy for in vivo PET and near-infrared fluorescence imaging of nanoparticle tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Zhang, Yachao; Longo, Valerie A; Irwin, Chrisopher P; Binderup, Tina; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Fayad, Zahi A; Lewis, Jason S; Mulder, Willem J M; Reiner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Advances in preclinical molecular imaging have generated new opportunities to noninvasively visualize the biodistribution and tumor targeting of nanoparticle therapeutics. Capitalizing on recent achievements in this area, we sought to develop an (89)Zr-based labeling strategy for liposomal nanoparticles that accumulate in tumors via passive targeting mechanisms. (89)Zr-labeled liposomes were prepared using 2 different approaches: click labeling and surface chelation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies, as well as PET/CT imaging of the radiolabeled nanoparticles, were performed on a mouse model of breast cancer. In addition, a dual PET/optical probe was prepared by incorporation of a near-infrared fluorophore and tested in vivo by PET and near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The surface chelation approach proved to be superior in terms of radiochemical yield and stability, as well as in vivo performance. Accumulation of these liposomes in tumor peaked at 24 h after injection and was measured to be 13.7 ± 1.8 percentage injected dose per gram. The in vivo performance of this probe was not essentially perturbed by the incorporation of a near-infrared fluorophore. We have developed a highly modular and efficient strategy for the labeling of liposomal nanoparticles with (89)Zr. In xenograft and orthotopic mouse models of breast cancer, we demonstrated that the biodistribution of these nanoparticles can be visualized by PET imaging. In combination with a near-infrared dye, these liposomal nanoparticles can serve as bimodal PET/optical imaging agents. The liposomes target malignant growth, and their bimodal features may be useful for simultaneous PET and intraoperative imaging. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  12. Gene Replacement and Fluorescent Labeling to Study the Functional Role of Exopolysaccharides in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Bravo, Nuria; Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Miguel A.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo

    2017-01-01

    An extracellular layer of exopolysaccharides (EPS) covers the surface of some Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains, which could be of relevance for its probiotic performance. In order to understand the functional characteristics of B. animalis subsp. lactis, two isogenic strains that differ in their EPS-producing phenotype, due to a single mutation in the gene Balat_1410, were studied. By means of a double crossover recombination strategy, successfully used for the first time in bifidobacteria, Balat_1410 in the type strain B. animalis subsp. lactis DSM10140 was replaced by a mutated gene containing a non-synonymous mutation previously associated with the appearance of a mucoid-ropy phenotype. Nuclear magnetic resonanc