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Sample records for fluoride salts flinak

  1. On the exploration of molten salt (FLiNaK) interaction with plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Sup; Park, Hyonjae; Lho, Taihyeop

    2011-10-01

    We investigated possibility of application of molten salt as a liquid wall in plasma confinement device. Plasma interactions of molten salt - FLiNaK (LiF 46.5 mol% + NaF 11.5% + KF 42 mol%) were investigated by OES(Optical Emission Spectroscopy) and RGA(Residual Gas Analyzer). The plasma was generated with ECR source and the molten salt was maintained as liquid with SUS 316 mold-heater. Optical and mass spectrums were measured during hydrogen plasma interaction with the molten salt and qualitative analysis of resultant species was done. Chemical/physical erosion of FLiNaK after interaction of hydrogen plasma was studied with ICP-MS and IC (Ion Chromatography). Viscosity change of FLiNaK after plasma interaction was measured. Based on the preliminary measurement result, a plasma interaction system with flowing molten salt was designed.

  2. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2014-01-01

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer

  3. First-principles molecular dynamics modeling of the molten fluoride salt with Cr solute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, H. O.; Bengtson, A.; Vörtler, K.; Saha, S.; Sakidja, R.; Morgan, D.

    2014-06-01

    Fluoride salts and their interactions with metals are of wide interest for the nuclear community. In this work, first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) was employed to study both pure molten fluoride salt and fluoride salt with dissolved solute Cr ions (a common corrosion product) at high temperature (823-1423 K). Two types of molten fluoride salts, namely flibe (LiF-BeF2) and flinak (LiF-NaF-KF), with the Cr0, Cr2+ and Cr3+ ions were chosen as a target system for the FPMD modeling. The prediction of thermo-kinetic properties of pure fluoride salt, such as the equilibrium volume, density, bulk modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, and self-diffusion coefficient, provide useful extensions of existing data and verify the accuracy of the FPMD simulation in modeling of fluoride salts. The FPMD modeling of solute Cr in fluoride salt shows the effect of Cr valence on diffusivity and local structure in the salt.

  4. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  5. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Delcul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  6. Development of a Forced-Convection Liquid-Fluoride-Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Wilson, Dane F; Peretz, Fred J; Wilgen, John B; Romanoski, Glenn R; Kisner, Roger A; Holcomb, David Eugene; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne; Aaron, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    A small forced-convection molten-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. Objectives of the experiment include reestablishing infrastructure needed for fluoride-salt loop testing, developing a unique inductive heating technique for performing heat transfer (or other) experiments, measuring heat transfer characteristics in a liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled pebble bed, and demonstrating the use of silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural component for salt systems. The salt loop will consist of an Inconel 600 piping system, a sump-type pump, a SiC test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger, as well as auxiliary systems needed to pre-heat the loop, transport salt into and out of the loop, and maintain an inert cover gas over the salt. A 30,000 Hz inductive heating system will be used to provide up to 250 kW of power to a 15 cm diameter SiC test section containing a packed bed of 3 cm graphite spheres. A SiC-to-Inconel 600 joint will use a conventional nickel/grafoil spiral wound gasket sandwiched between SiC and Inconel flanges. The loop system can provide up to 4.5 kg/s of salt flow at a head of 0.125 MPa and operate at a pressure just above atmospheric. Pebble Reynolds numbers of up to 2600 are possible with this configuration. A sump system is provided to drain and store the salt when not in use. Instrumentation on the loop will include pressure, temperature, and flow measurements, while the test section will be instrumented to provide pebble and FLiNaK temperatures.

  7. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  8. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  9. Salt fluoridation in Germany since 1991.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Andreas G

    2005-01-01

    Since 1991, fluoridated salt has been on sale in household-size packages in Germany. Potassium or sodium fluoride is added to iodized salt until the fluoride concentration reaches 250 mg/kg. The use of fluoridated salt to prevent caries is officially recommended by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde (DGZMK) and several other associations and groups interested in public health. In the course of the past thirteen years, the market share of fluoridated and iodized domestic salt rose to 63.1% in Germany. However, this positive development must not obscure the fact that fluoridated and iodized salt is still not allowed to be used in restaurant or cafeteria kitchens. This restriction now needs to be revoked in view of the fact that many children, adolescents and adults take their main meals in cafeterias or restaurants. Scientific studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that using fluoridated and iodized salt in cafeteria kitchens poses no problem whatever.

  10. Fluoride metabolism when added to salt.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Gary M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the general characteristics of the metabolism of fluoride particularly as it occurs when ingested with fluoridated salt. Following the absorption of salt-borne fluoride from the stomach and intestines, its metabolism is identical to that of water-borne fluoride or other vehicles containing ionized fluoride. Because fluoridated salt is almost always ingested with food, however, absorption from the gastrointestinal tract may be delayed or reduced. Reports dealing with this subject have shown that fluoride absorption is delayed and, therefore, peak plasma concentrations are lower than when fluoride is ingested with water. The amount of ingested fluoride that is finally absorbed, however, is not appreciably affected unless the meal is composed mainly of components with high calcium concentrations. In this case, the extent of absorption can be reduced by as much as 50%. Fluoridated salt is also ingested less frequently than fluoridated water. Data are presented to show that the dose size and frequency of ingestion have only minor effects on fluoride retention in the body and on the concentrations in plasma, bone and enamel. Finally, calculations are presented to show that the risk of acute toxicity from fluoridated salt is virtually non-existent.

  11. An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Aaron, Adam M; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A; Peretz, Fred J; Robb, Kevin R; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, Dane F

    2014-01-01

    The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

  12. Development of a high-resolution Thomson scattering system for plasma interactions with molten salt (FLiNaK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. Y.

    2014-10-01

    A high-resolution Thomson scattering system is presently being developed to measure the electron temperature and density profile during plasma interaction with molten salt. The system uses a 20-Hz Nd:YAG laser operating at the second harmonic (532 nm). The collection lens, having a 1:10 magnification ratio, measures 63 points along the 10-cm profile. The scattered light is transmitted by using an optical-fiber bundle, and is analyzed with a triple-grating spectrometer to further reduce stray light. Its spectral resolution is expected to be 0.03 nm. An intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera consisting of a gated image intensifier coupled to the CCD camera is used to record the spectral distribution of the scattered light. An additional feature of operating the ICCD camera at 40-Hz to record the background signal is incorporated.

  13. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Neil; Whalen, J. Marc; Chacon, Lisa

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  14. Investigation on corrosion behavior of Ni-based alloys in molten fluoride salt using synchrotron radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Zheng, Junyi; Lu, Yanling; Li, Zhijun; Zou, Yang; Yu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-09-01

    Ni-based alloys have been selected as the structural materials in molten-salt reactors due to their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties. In this paper, the corrosion behavior of some Ni-based superalloys including Inconel 600, Hastelloy X and Hastelloy C-276 were investigated in molten fluoride salts at 750 °C. Morphology and microstructure of corroded samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), synchrotron radiation X-ray microbeam fluorescence (μ-XRF) and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) techniques. Results from μ-XRF and SR-XRD show that the main depleted alloying element of Ni-based alloys in molten fluoride salt is Cr. In addition, the results indicate that Mo can enhance the corrosion resistance in molten FLiNaK salts. Among the above three Ni-based alloys, Hastelloy C-276 exhibits the best corrosion resistance in molten fluoride salts 750 °C. Higher-content Mo and lower-content Cr in Hastelloy C-276 alloy were responsible for the better anti-corrosive performance, compared to the other two alloys.

  15. Protection of nuclear graphite toward liquid fluoride salt by isotropic pyrolytic carbon coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiujie; Song, Jinliang; Xu, Li; Tan, Jie; Xia, Huihao; Zhang, Baoliang; He, Zhoutong; Gao, Lina; Zhou, Xingtai; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhu, Zhiyong; Bai, Shuo

    2013-11-01

    Infiltration studies were performed on uncoated nuclear graphite and isotropic pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coated graphite in molten FLiNaK salt at 650 °C under argon atmosphere at 1, 3 and 5 atm. Uncoated graphite shows weight gain more obviously than that of PyC coated graphite. Nuclear graphite with PyC coating exhibits excellent infiltration resistance in molten salt due to the small open porosity as conformed from scanning electron microscopy and mercury injection experiments.

  16. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  17. Increasing the public health effectiveness of fluoridated salt.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Thomas M

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at assessing the public health potential of salt fluoridation schemes. There is now solid evidence which shows that the cariostatic effectiveness of universal salt fluoridation is equivalent to that of water fluoridation in both the permanent and primary dentition. In countries of continental Europe, only domestic salt is fluoridated, and its consistent use may be expected to warrant a 30% reduction of caries prevalence. However, the effectiveness in the population at large is lower because only part of the population uses the fluoridated domestic salt. Under these conditions, it must be assumed that the effectiveness is further reduced because families in low S-E strata use fluoridated salt (FS) less frequently than those in the higher S-E strata who are known to use preventive methods like toothbrushing twice a day with a fluoride dentifrice more regularly. Model calculations tend to show that in Germany, where FS has reached a market share of 60%, the overall effectiveness is 14% instead of 30%. For France with a market share of 30% of the fluoridated domestic salt, model calculations lead to an overall effectiveness of 8%. In order to obtain a substantial decline of caries in the entire population, it is important to aim for a high market share of the FS of 80%, or preferably 90%. This goal can be reached with a relatively small budget. The task of health ministries would be to promote the switch from unfluoridated salt to FS; however, such promotion is often withheld by health ministries. It is possible, through modest price increases of salt, to finance effective campaigns inducing the majority of the population to use the fluoridated variety. On a world wide scale, fluoridation of salt has established itself as an efficient public health measure. It may be particularly beneficial for developing countries because it is by far the cheapest method and it is compatible with the use of fluoridated toothpastes.

  18. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize salt corrosion as well as providing a general discussion of heat transfer loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and freeze-up vulnerability.

  19. Fluoride excretion of adults living in border regions with either water or salt fluoridation.

    PubMed

    Guindy, Joseph S; Gysin, Ralph; Kränzlin, Marius; Gasser, Thomas C; Hauck, Kirsten; Meyer, Jürg

    2006-01-01

    The canton of Basel-Stadt was the only canton in Switzerland which introduced drinking water fluoridation (DWF) at 1 ppm (mg/l). All other cantons have relied on fluoridated domestic salt at 250 ppm F as the main vehicle for basic fluoride exposure. It has been suggested that persons living and working in the DWF areas or persons commuting to the DWF areas may be exposed to higher than optimal doses of fluoride. The objective of this present study was to determine the urinary fluoride excretion of adults living and or working in neighboring areas of either salt or water fluoridation. In this study, 24-hour urine was collected from 69 healthy subjects and tested for fluoride concentration. The mean fluoride concentration for all participants was 0.55 +/- 0.25 ppm (mg/l) ranging from 1.14 to 0.09 ppm. The mean fluoride excretion was 0.95 +/- 0.47 mg F/d ranging from 0.18 to 2.12 mg F/d. The 33 subjects living in a DWF region showed a mean urine fluoride concentration of 0.64 +/- 0.24 ppm (mg/l) and a mean fluoride excretion of 1.14 +/- 0.48 mg F/d. Those 36 subjects living in a region without DWF showed a mean urine fluoride concentration of 0.47 +/- 0.24 ppm (mg/l) and a mean fluoride excretion of 0.78 +/- 0.40 mg F/d. A significant difference between the two means of the groups living in regions with or without DWF was detected when the Mann-Whitney statistical test was applied (p < 0.005). The combined intake of fluoridated drinking water and fluoridated table salt in the sub-group of 11 subjects who commuted showed an overall increase in fluoride urine concentration. The measured values, however, were not significantly different from the other sub-groups.

  20. Quality control in the production of fluoridated food grade salt.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Fluoridated food grade salt has been manufactured in Switzerland for 50 years. Since correct dosing is important not only for effective caries prophylaxis but also in order to guarantee food safety, the production of fluoridated salt must be accurately monitored. The authorities do not impose any specific requirements as regards the purity of the fluoride compounds that are used, nor the homogeneity or dosing accuracy that should be attained during the manufacture of fluoridated salt. The quality requirements to be observed and the means by which these standards are to be ensured must largely be determined by the producer himself as part of the "self-monitoring" that is stipulated by the law. Depending on whether fluoridated salt is manufactured in a continuous or discontinuous process and on whether the fluoride is added as a solution or in solid form, a plant-specific testing plan must be drawn up for the implementation of quality monitoring. On the basis of statutory requirements, a food manufacturer must subject all the processes which he carries out to a risk analysis (HACCP study). Monitoring of the dosing of fluoride must be classified as a Critical Control Point (CCP). Three well-established testing methods which have been validated in ring tests are available to determine the fluoride content in food grade salt (a potentiometric, an ion-chromatographic and a photometric method). In practice, the potentiometric method has proven to be a simple, accurate and comparably low-priced process and is widely used.

  1. Liquid Fluoride Salt Experimentation Using a Small Natural Circulation Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne; Williams, David F; Elkassabgi, Yousri M.; Caja, Joseph; Caja, Mario; Jordan, John; Salinas, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    A small molten fluoride salt experiment has been constructed and tested to develop experimental techniques for application in liquid fluoride salt systems. There were five major objectives in developing this test apparatus: Allow visual observation of the salt during testing (how can lighting be introduced, how can pictures be taken, what can be seen) Determine if IR photography can be used to examine components submerged in the salt Determine if the experimental configuration provides salt velocity sufficient for collection of corrosion data for future experimentation Determine if a laser Doppler velocimeter can be used to quantify salt velocities. Acquire natural circulation heat transfer data in fluoride salt at temperatures up to 700oC All of these objectives were successfully achieved during testing with the exception of the fourth: acquiring velocity data using the laser Doppler velocimeter. This paper describes the experiment and experimental techniques used, and presents data taken during natural circulation testing.

  2. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years, and

  3. [Ethical aspects of the fluoridation of water, salt, and milk].

    PubMed

    Rippe, K P

    2009-05-01

    The article discusses two ethical aspects of the fluoridation of water, salt, and milk. First, it considers whether fluoridation contradicts the right of self-determination. Second, it discusses the chances and risks of fluoridation. The answer to the first question depends on whether people can choose other options. Freedom of choice is not simply the right to choose between different options. It is a right which defends the moral integrity of persons. Nobody should be coerced to eat or drink something which he or she rejects morally. In the political sphere, personal rights of persons can be restricted if and only if it is necessary, if there is a public interest, and if the restriction of the right is reasonable. Regarding fluoridation, even in the best risk-chance scenario, some persons have to expect a net harm. Therefore, the reasoning in favor of fluoridation has to have a specific purpose. The proclaimed reasoning is that fluoridation will benefit the worst off and is therefore a demand of justice. But this argument fails as there are other options to benefit the worst off. Even in the best risk-chance scenario, only one option is morally permissible: the fluoridation of salt, which respects the freedom of choice.

  4. Chemistry control and corrosion mitigation of heat transfer salts for the fluoride salt reactor (FHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, B. C.; Sellers, S. R.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Scheele, R. D.

    2012-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was a prototype nuclear reactor which operated from 1965 to 1969 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The MSRE used liquid fluoride salts as a heat transfer fluid and solvent for fluoride based {sup 235}U and {sup 233}U fuel. Extensive research was performed in order to optimize the removal of oxide and metal impurities from the reactor's heat transfer salt, 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} (FLiBe). This was done by sparging a mixture of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen gas through the FLiBe at elevated temperatures. The hydrofluoric acid reacted with oxides and hydroxides, fluorinating them while simultaneously releasing water vapor. Metal impurities such as iron and chromium were reduced by hydrogen gas and filtered out of the salt. By removing these impurities, the corrosion of reactor components was minimized. The Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison is currently researching a new chemical purification process for fluoride salts that make use of a less dangerous cleaning gas, nitrogen trifluoride. Nitrogen trifluoride has been predicted as a superior fluorinating agent for fluoride salts. These purified salts will subsequently be used for static and loop corrosion tests on a variety of reactor materials to ensure materials compatibility for the new FHR designs. Demonstration of chemistry control methodologies along with potential reduction in corrosion is essential for the use of a fluoride salts in a next generator nuclear reactor system. (authors)

  5. Interaction of Pipeline Materials with Molten Fluoride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimo, Tomáš; Matal, Oldřich; Nesvadba, Lukáś; Dvořák, Vladimír; Kanický, Viktor; Sulovský, Petr; Machát, Jiří

    2007-12-01

    Molten fluoride salts are very promising carriers for the transport of large amounts of heat for example from a high temperature nuclear reactor to a plant which generates hydrogen by chemical processes or from a nuclear reactor to a heat exchanger being a part of the equipment needed to realize the Brayton cycle with a very high power efficiency. Therefore, in the framework of our project, experimental and theoretical investigations of the interactions of fluoride salts as heat carriers needed as high potential and structural materials for pipelines in order to transport heat at temperatures above 600◦C were started. Experimental investigations of Fe-based and Ni-based materials in molten fluoride salts at high temperatures and with different exposure times were performed. Two components salts (LiF-NaF and NaF-NaBF4) and three components salts (LiF-NaF-ZrF4 and LiF-NaF-RbF) were chosen in the experiments. The salt analysis was focussed on the content of metallic elements before and after the exposure of the samples to the salt melts. It was done by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and by titrimetric techniques. The thickness of the material zone affected by the salt melts, characterized by an enriched / reduced content of elements in comparison to the mean original content, and the material attacked zone, characterized by very tiny channels or chains of pores or pits formed preferably at grain boundaries, were the subject of the analysis performed by electron microscopy / microprobe techniques. Theoretical models for the transport of elements in the material samples exposed to salt melts using experimental data were also developed.

  6. Alloys compatibility in molten salt fluorides: Kurchatov Institute related experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexandr

    2013-10-01

    In the last several years, there has been an increased interest in the use of high-temperature molten salt fluorides in nuclear power systems. For all molten salt reactor designs, materials selection is a very important issue. This paper summarizes results, which led to selection of materials for molten salt reactors in Russia. Operating experience with corrosion thermal convection loops has demonstrated good capability of the “nickel-molybdenum alloys + fluoride salt fueled by UF4 and PuF3 + cover gas” system up to 750 °C. A brief description is given of the container material work in progress. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys in stressed and unloaded conditions studies was also tested in different molten salt mixtures at temperatures up to 700-750 °C, also with measurement of the redox potential. HN80MTY alloy with 1% added Al is the most resistant to tellurium intergranular cracking of Ni-base alloys under study.

  7. Acceptability of Salt Fluoridation in a Rural Latino Community in the United States: An Ethnographic Study.

    PubMed

    Barker, Judith C; Guerra, Claudia; Gonzalez-Vargas, M Judy; Hoeft, Kristin S

    2016-01-01

    Compared to other population groups in the United States, caries (tooth decay) is a disproportionately prevalent disease among Latino populations, especially among low-income and rural sub-groups and children under five years of age. Fluoride is a primary preventive for caries. While water fluoridation is a major and effective public health means for delivering fluoride on a mass scale, it does not reach many rural areas or population groups such as Latinos who eschew drinking water from municipal sources. This study examines the acceptability to such groups of salt fluoridation, an alternate means of delivering fluoride long used on a global scale. An ethnographic study in California's rural Central Valley was performed. Thirty individual interviews and 5 focus groups (N = 61) were conducted in Spanish to investigate low-income Latino migrant caregivers' experiences, views and understandings of domestic salt, oral health, caries prevention and fluoride. Audio data were transcribed, translated, coded and thematically analyzed. Table salt was readily available and frequently consumed. Both adult and child daily sodium consumption was high. Despite a general feeling that it was good, and present in dentifrices or dietary supplements, most participants had little knowledge about fluoride. Concerns were raised about cardio-vascular and other possibly deleterious effects if an increase in salt consumption occurred because fluoridated salt was viewed as having 'extra' benefits. Once informed about fluoride's safety and role in caries prevention, most participants expressed willingness to use fluoridated salt, especially if it benefitted children. Reassurance about its safety and benefits, and demonstration of its taste, were important aspects of acceptance. Taste was paramount. Participants would not consume more fluoridated salt than their current salt as that would result in unpleasant changes in food flavor and taste. While salt fluoridation is acceptable, the

  8. Evaluation of the direct and diffusion methods for the determination of fluoride content in table salt

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mier, E. Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E.; Buckley, Christine M.; Margineda, Jorge; Zero, Domenick T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess methods currently used for analyzing fluoridated salt in order to identify the most useful method for this type of analysis. Basic research design Seventy-five fluoridated salt samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for fluoride content, with and without pretreatment, using direct and diffusion methods. Element analysis was also conducted in selected samples. Fluoride was added to ultra pure NaCl and non-fluoridated commercial salt samples and Ca and Mg were added to fluoride samples in order to assess fluoride recoveries using modifications to the methods. Results Larger amounts of fluoride were found and recovered using diffusion than direct methods (96%–100% for diffusion vs. 67%–90% for direct). Statistically significant differences were obtained between direct and diffusion methods using different ion strength adjusters. Pretreatment methods reduced the amount of recovered fluoride. Determination of fluoride content was influenced both by the presence of NaCl and other ions in the salt. Conclusion Direct and diffusion techniques for analysis of fluoridated salt are suitable methods for fluoride analysis. The choice of method should depend on the purpose of the analysis. PMID:20088217

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Alloys in Molten Fluoride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guiqiu

    The molten fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature nuclear reactor (FHR) has been proposed as a candidate Generation IV nuclear reactor. This reactor combines the latest nuclear technology with the use of molten fluoride salt as coolant to significantly enhance safety and efficiency. However, an important challenge in FHR development is the corrosion of structural materials in high-temperature molten fluoride salt. The structural alloys' degradation, particularly in terms of chromium depletion, and the molten salt chemistry are key factors that impact the lifetime of nuclear reactors and the development of future FHR designs. In support of materials development for the FHR, the nickel base alloy of Hastelloy N and iron-chromium base alloy 316 stainless steel are being actively considered as critical structural alloys. Enriched 27LiF-BeF2 (named as FLiBe) is a promising coolant for the FHR because of its neutronic properties and heat transfer characteristics while operating at atmospheric pressure. In this study, the corrosion behavior of Ni-5Cr and Ni-20Cr binary model alloys, and Hastelloy N and 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe with and without graphite were investigated through various microstructural analyses. Based on the understanding of the corrosion behavior and data of above four alloys in molten FLiBe, a long-term corrosion prediction model has been developed that is applicable specifically for these four materials in FLiBe at 700ºC. The model uses Cr concentration profile C(x, t) as a function of corrosion distance in the materials and duration fundamentally derived from the Fick's diffusion laws. This model was validated with reasonable accuracy for the four alloys by fitting the calculated profiles with experimental data and can be applied to evaluate corrosion attack depth over the long-term. The critical constant of the overall diffusion coefficient (Deff) in this model can be quickly calculated from the experimental measurement of alloys' weight

  10. Acceptability of Salt Fluoridation in a Rural Latino Community in the United States: An Ethnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Judith C.; Hoeft, Kristin S.

    2016-01-01

    Compared to other population groups in the United States, caries (tooth decay) is a disproportionately prevalent disease among Latino populations, especially among low-income and rural sub-groups and children under five years of age. Fluoride is a primary preventive for caries. While water fluoridation is a major and effective public health means for delivering fluoride on a mass scale, it does not reach many rural areas or population groups such as Latinos who eschew drinking water from municipal sources. This study examines the acceptability to such groups of salt fluoridation, an alternate means of delivering fluoride long used on a global scale. An ethnographic study in California’s rural Central Valley was performed. Thirty individual interviews and 5 focus groups (N = 61) were conducted in Spanish to investigate low-income Latino migrant caregivers’ experiences, views and understandings of domestic salt, oral health, caries prevention and fluoride. Audio data were transcribed, translated, coded and thematically analyzed. Table salt was readily available and frequently consumed. Both adult and child daily sodium consumption was high. Despite a general feeling that it was good, and present in dentifrices or dietary supplements, most participants had little knowledge about fluoride. Concerns were raised about cardio-vascular and other possibly deleterious effects if an increase in salt consumption occurred because fluoridated salt was viewed as having ‘extra’ benefits. Once informed about fluoride’s safety and role in caries prevention, most participants expressed willingness to use fluoridated salt, especially if it benefitted children. Reassurance about its safety and benefits, and demonstration of its taste, were important aspects of acceptance. Taste was paramount. Participants would not consume more fluoridated salt than their current salt as that would result in unpleasant changes in food flavor and taste. While salt fluoridation is acceptable

  11. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Development Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Flanagan, George F; Mays, Gary T; Pointer, William David; Robb, Kevin R; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics and fully passive safety. This paper provides an overview of a technology development pathway for expeditious commercial deployment of first-generation FHRs. The paper describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. First-generation FHRs do not appear to require any technology breakthroughs, but will require significant technology development and demonstration. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, the development roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant; the lack of an approved licensing framework; the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials; and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  12. Study on hydrogen retention produced from reaction of FLiNaK in ECR plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjae; Choi, Yong-Sup; Lho, Taiheop; Plasma Fundamental Technology Development Team

    2011-10-01

    In this study, hydrogen retention from the interaction between an electron cyclone resonance (ECR) plasma and a molten salt, has been experimentally investigated. FLiNaK, which is comprised of LiF (46.5 mol%), NaF (11.5 mol%), and KF (42 mol%), has been used as a molten salt. The molten salt was prepared at the base pressure of 2 × 10-6 torr and 500°C which is above the melting point. However, the chamber pressure was increased up to 3 × 105 mTorr owing to the outgassing from the mixture. The experiments have been perfromed at the working pressure of 1 mTorr at different reaction times. The electron temperature and the ion density in hydrogen ECR plasma were measured by making use of Langmuir probe. Retention of hydrogen in FLiNaK was investigated by means of TDS (Thermal Desorption Spectrometry) method. The chemical species produced from the interaction between the plasma and the molten salt by an optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and a residual gas analyzer (RGA) have been also observed.

  13. Method for converting UF5 to UF4 in a molten fluoride salt

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Melvin R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.; Kelmers, A. Donald

    1977-01-01

    The reduction of UF.sub.5 to UF.sub.4 in a molten fluoride salt by sparging with hydrogen is catalyzed by metallic platinum. The reaction is also catalyzed by platinum alloyed with gold reaction equipment.

  14. Corrosion of oxide dispersion strengthened iron-chromium steels and tantalum in fluoride salt coolant: An in situ compatibility study for fusion and fusion-fission hybrid reactor concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph; Ferreira, James; de Caro, Magdalena Serrano; Rubenchik, Alexander; Kimura, Akihiko

    2011-12-01

    Primary candidate classes of materials for future nuclear power plants, whether they be fission, fusion or hybrids, include oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels which rely on a dispersion of nano-oxide particles in the matrix for both mechanical strength and swelling resistance, or tantalum alloys which have an inherent neutron-induced swelling resistance and high temperature strength. For high temperature operation, eutectic molten lithium containing fluoride salts are attractive because of their breeding capability as well as their relatively high thermal capacity, which allow for a higher average operating temperature that increases power production. In this paper we test the compatibility of Flinak (LiF-NaF-KF) salts on ODS steels, comparing the performance of current generation ODS steels developed at Kyoto University with the commercial alloy MA956. Pure tantalum was also tested for comparative purposes. In situ data was obtained for temperatures ranging from 600 to 900 °C using a custom-built high temperature electrochemical impedance spectroscopy cell. Results for ODS steels show that steel/coolant interfacial resistance increases from 600 to 800 °C due to an aluminum enriched layer forming at the surface, however an increase in temperature to 900 °C causes this layer to break up and aggressive attack to occur. Performance of current generation ODS steels surpassed that of the MA956 ODS steel, with an in situ impedance behavior similar or better than that of pure tantalum.

  15. Development of fluoride reprocessing technologies devoted to molten-salt reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, Jan; Marecek, Martin; Tulackova, Radka; Chuchvalcova Bimova, Karolina

    2007-07-01

    Main fuel processing and reprocessing technologies proposed for Molten Salt Reactor fuel cycle are pyrochemical or pyrometallurgical, majority of them are fluoride technologies. It is based on the fact that Molten Salt Reactor fuel is in the chemical form of molten fluorides and the reprocessing technology is needed to be an 'on-line' process. The corresponding pyrochemical separation processes proposed for MSR fuel processing and reprocessing are mainly fluoride volatilization processes, molten salt / liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media and gas extraction from the molten salt medium. Techniques based on fluoride volatilization and on electrochemical separation from fluoride molten salt media are under development in the Czech Republic. Whereas the Fluoride Volatility Method is proposed to be the main 'Front-end' technology of the MSR used as the actinide burner (transmuter), the electro-separation methods should be dedicated to the 'on-line' reprocessing of the circulating MSR fuel and should be used as for MSR incinerating transuranium fuel as for MSR working within the {sup 232}Th - {sup 233}U fuel cycle. (authors)

  16. Densities of some molten fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Liquid densities were determined for a number of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications, using a procedure that consisted of measuring the loss of weight of an inert bob in the melt. The density apparatus was calibrated with pure LiF and NaF at different temperatures. Density data for safe binary and ternary fluoride salt eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds are presented. In addition, a comparison was made between the volumetric heat storage capacity of different salt mixtures.

  17. Assessment of the Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride for Purifying Coolant and Heat Transfer Salts in the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2010-09-28

    This report provides an assessment of the use of nitrogen trifluoride for removing oxide and water-caused contaminants in the fluoride salts that will be used as coolants in a molten salt cooled reactor.

  18. PILOT-SCALE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS USING VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.; Pak, D. J.

    2012-09-11

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. In 2011, SRNL adapted the technology for the removal of fluoride from fluoride-bearing salts. The method involved an in situ reaction between potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the fluoride salt to yield potassium fluoride (KF) and the corresponding oxide. The KF and excess KOH can be distilled below 1000{deg}C using vacuum salt distillation (VSD). The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated by a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attaned, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile material in the feed boat. Studies discussed in this report were performed involving the use of non-radioactive simulants in small-scale and pilot-scale systems as well as radioactive testing of a small-scale system with plutonium-bearing materials. Aspects of interest include removable liner design considerations, boat materials, in-line moisture absorption, and salt deposition.

  19. Disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts from the Molten Salt Reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) is an 8 MW reactor that was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1965 through 1969. The reactor used a unique liquid salt fuel, composed of a mixture of LIF, BeF{sub 2}, ZrF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}, and operated at temperatures above 600{degrees}C. The primary fuel salt circulation system consisted of the reactor vessel, a single fuel salt pump, and a single primary heat exchanger. Heat was transferred from the fuel salt to a coolant salt circuit in the primary heat exchanger. The coolant salt was similar to the fuel salt, except that it contains only LiF (66%) and BeF, (34%). The coolant salt passed from the primary heat exchanger to an air-cooled radiator and a coolant salt pump, and then returned to the primary heat exchanger. Each of the salt loops was provided with drain tanks, located such that the salt could be drained out of either circuit by gravity. A single drain tank was provided for the non-radioactive coolant salt. Two drain tanks were provided for the fuel salt. Since the fuel salt contained radioactive fuel, fission products, and activation products, and since the reactor was designed such that the fuel salt could be drained immediately into the drain tanks in the event of a problem in the fuel salt loop, the fuel salt drain tanks were provided with a system to remove the heat generated by radioactive decay. A third drain tank connected to the fuel salt loop was provided for a batch of flush salt. This batch of salt, similar in composition to the coolant salt, was used to condition the fuel salt loop after it had been exposed to air and to flush the fuel salt loop of residual fuel salt prior to accessing the reactor circuit for maintenance or experimental activities. This report discusses the disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salt.

  20. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

    2011-08-10

    Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current

  1. Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  2. Materials corrosion in molten LiF-NaF-KF eutectic salt under different reduction-oxidation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, R. S.; Cheng, W. J.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Wang, C. J.; Allen, T. R.

    2012-07-01

    Molten fluoride salts such as FLiNaK (LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol %) have been proposed for use as secondary reactor coolants, media for transfer of high temperature process heat from nuclear reactors to chemical plants, and for concentrated solar power thermal energy storage. In molten fluoride salts, passive oxide films are chemically unstable, and corrosion is driven largely by the thermodynamically driven dissolution of alloying elements into the molten salt environment. Two alloys, Hastelloy{sup R} N and 316L stainless steel were exposed to molten FLiNaK salt in a 316L stainless steel crucible under argon cover gas for 1000 hours at 850 deg. C. Graphite was present in some of the crucibles with the goal of studying corrosion behavior of relevant reactor material combinations. In addition, a technique to reduce alloy corrosion through modification of the reduction-oxidation state was tested by the inclusion of zirconium to the system. Corrosion of 316L stainless steel was noted to occur primarily through surface depletion of chromium, an effect that was enhanced by the presence of graphite. Hastelloy{sup R} N experienced weight gain through electrochemical plating of corrosion products derived from the 316L stainless steel crucible. In the presence of zirconium, both alloys gained weight through plating of zirconium and as a result formed intermetallic layers. (authors)

  3. Protection of nuclear graphite toward fluoride molten salt by glassy carbon deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardet, V.; Gomes, S.; Delpeux, S.; Dubois, M.; Guérin, K.; Avignant, D.; Renaudin, G.; Duclaux, L.

    2009-02-01

    Molten salt reactor represents one of the promising future Generation IV nuclear reactors families where the fuel, a liquid molten fluoride salt, is circulating through the graphite reactor core. The interactions between nuclear graphite and fluoride molten salt and also the graphite surface protection were investigated in this paper by powder X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray microanalysis. Nuclear graphite discs were covered by two kinds of protection deposit: a glassy carbon coating and a double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon. Different behaviours have been highlighted according to the presence and the nature of the coated protection film. Intercalation of molten salt between the graphite layers did not occur. Nevertheless the molten salt adhered more or less to the surface of the graphite disc, filled more or less the graphite surface porosity and perturbed more or less the graphite stacking order at the disc surface. The behaviour of unprotected graphite was far to be satisfactory after two days of immersion of graphite in molten salt at 500 °C. The best protection of the graphite disc surface, with the maximum of inertness towards molten salt, has been obtained with the double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon.

  4. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  5. Engineering Database of Liquid Salt Thermophysical and Thermochemical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Matthias A. Ebner; Piyush Sabharwall; Phil Sharpe

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a review of thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of candidate molten salt coolants, which may be used as a primary coolant within a nuclear reactor or heat transport medium from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to a processing plant, for example, a hydrogen-production plant. Thermodynamic properties of four types of molten salts, including LiF-BeF2 (67 and 33 mol%, respectively; also known as FLiBe), LiF-NaF-KF (46.5, 11.5, and 52 mol%, also known as FLiNaK), and KCl-MgCl2 (67 and 33 mol%), and sodium nitrate-sodium nitrite-potassium nitrate (NaNO3–NaNO2–KNO3, (7-49-44 or 7-40-53 mol%) have been investigated. Limitations of existing correlations to predict density, viscosity, specific heat capacity, surface tension, and thermal conductivity, were identified. The impact of thermodynamic properties on the heat transfer, especially Nusselt number was also discussed. Stability of the molten salts with structural alloys and their compatibility with the structural alloys was studied. Nickel and alloys with dense Ni coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides but not so in chlorides. Of the chromium containing alloys, Hastelloy N appears to have the best corrosion resistance in fluorides, while Haynes 230 was most resistant in chloride. In general, alloys with increasing carbon and chromium content are increasingly subject to corrosion by the fluoride salts FLiBe and FLiNaK, due to attack and dissolution of the intergranular chromium carbide. Future research to obtain needed information was identified.

  6. Measurement of the Melting Point Temperature of Several Lithium-Sodium-Beryllium Fluoride Salt (Flinabe) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.M; Nygren, R.E.; Lutz, T.J.; Tanaka, T.J; Ulrickson, M.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Troncosa, K.P.

    2005-04-15

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium fluorides studied for molten salt fission reactors, has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for fusion applications. The melting points of 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} and LiF-BeF{sub 2} are 460 deg. C and 363 deg. C, but LiF-BeF{sub 2} is rather viscous and has less lithium for breeding. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing liquid for the first wall and blanket were investigated. Flinabe (a mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2} and NaF) was selected for a molten salt design because a melting temperature below 350 deg. C appeared possible and this provided an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a stainless steel crucible under vacuum. One had an apparent melting temperature of 305 deg. C. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, melting procedures and temperature curves for the melting and cooling are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible is reported in an accompanying paper.

  7. Equilibrium distribution of samarium and europium between fluoride salt melts and liquid bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnit'ko, A. V.; Ignat'ev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The extraction of samarium and europium from a melt of a molar composition 73LiF-27BeF2 into liquid bismuth with additions of lithium as a reducing agent at a temperature of 600-610°C was studied. The equilibrium distribution coefficients of samarium and europium were measured. In the metal fluoride salt melt under study, the valence of samarium and europium was shown to be equal to two.

  8. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  9. Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

  10. Intergranular fracture of lithium fluoride-22 percent calcium fluoride hypereutectic salt at 800 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Subramanium V.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Substantial strain-hardening was noted during the initial stages of deformation in constant-velocity compression tests conducted on as-cast samples of the LiF-22 mol pct CaF2 hypereutectic salt at 800 K. The deformed specimens exhibited extensive grain-boundary cracking and cavitation, suggesting that such cracking, in conjunction with interfacial sliding, is important for cavity nucleation at grain boundaries and at the LiF-CaF2 interfaces. Cavity growth and interlinkage occur through the preferential failure of the weaker LiF phase.

  11. The determination of UO/sub 2/ and UF/sub 4/ in fused fluoride salts

    SciTech Connect

    Batiste, D.J.; Lee, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of uranium oxide solubilities in fused fluoride salts is important in the electrolytic preparation of uranium metal. This project was initiated to develop a method for the determination of UO/sub 2/ separately from UF/sub 4/ in UF/sub 4/-CaF/sub 2/-LiF fused salts. Previous methods used for the determination of UO/sub 2/ in fused fluoride salts involved inert gas fusions where oxygen was liberated as CO/sub 2/, and hydrofluorination where oxygen was released as H/sub 2/O; but the special equipment used for these procedures was no longer available. These methods assumed that all of the oxygen liberated was due to UO/sub 2/ and does not consider impurities from reagents and other oxygen sources that amount to a bias of approximately 0.3 wt %. This titrimetric method eliminates the bias by selectively extracting the UF/sub 4/ with a Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solution. The remaining uranium oxide residue is treated and titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint with NBS standard K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/. An aliquot of the Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ extract is also titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint, this uranium component is determined and calculated as UF/sub 4/. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Measurement of the melting point temperature of several lithium-sodium-beryllium fluoride salt (FLINABE) mixtures.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Nygren, Richard Einar; Lutz, Thomas Joseph; McDonald, Jimmie M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2004-09-01

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium flourides, was studied for molten salt fission reactors and has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for the fusion applications. 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at 460 C. LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at a lower temperature, 363 C, but is rather viscous and has less lithium breeder. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing ternary molten salt for the first wall surface and blanket were investigated. The molten salt (FLiNaBe, a ternary mixture of LiF, BeF2 and NaF) salt was selected because a melting temperature below 350 C that would provide an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor application appeared possible. This information came from a Russian binary phase diagram and a US ternary phase diagram in the 1960's that were not wholly consistent. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and, BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a small stainless steel crucible under vacuum. The proportions of the three salts were selected to yield conglomerate salts with as low a melting temperature as possible. The temperature of the salts and the crucible were recorded during the melting and subsequent re-solidification using a thermocouple directly in the salt pool and two thermocouples embedded in the crucible. One mixture had an apparent melting temperature of 305 C. Particular attention was paid to the cooling curve of the salt temperature to observe evidence of any mixed intermediate phases between the fully liquid and fully solid states. The clarity, texture, and thickness were observed and noted as well. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, and the melting procedure are described. The temperature curves for the melting and cooling of each of the mixtures are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible was also done and is reported in a separate

  13. The current status of fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) technology and its overlap with HIF target chamber concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Raluca O.; Peterson, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    The fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) is a class of fission reactor designs that use liquid fluoride salt coolant, TRISO coated particle fuel, and graphite moderator. Heavy ion fusion (HIF) can likewise make use of liquid fluoride salts, to create thick or thin liquid layers to protect structures in the target chamber from ablation by target X-rays and damage from fusion neutron irradiation. This presentation summarizes ongoing work in support of design development and safety analysis of FHR systems. Development work for fluoride salt systems with application to both FHR and HIF includes thermal-hydraulic modeling and experimentation, salt chemistry control, tritium management, salt corrosion of metallic alloys, and development of major components (e.g., pumps, heat exchangers) and gas-Brayton cycle power conversion systems. In support of FHR development, a thermal-hydraulic experimental test bay for separate effects (SETs) and integral effect tests (IETs) was built at UC Berkeley, and a second IET facility is under design. The experiments investigate heat transfer and fluid dynamics and they make use of oils as simulant fluids at reduced scale, temperature, and power of the prototypical salt-cooled system. With direct application to HIF, vortex tube flow was investigated in scaled experiments with mineral oil. Liquid jets response to impulse loading was likewise studied using water as a simulant fluid. A set of four workshops engaging industry and national laboratory experts were completed in 2012, with the goal of developing a technology pathway to the design and licensing of a commercial FHR. The pathway will include experimental and modeling efforts at universities and national laboratories, requirements for a component test facility for reliability testing of fluoride salt equipment at prototypical conditions, requirements for an FHR test reactor, and development of a pre-conceptual design for a commercial reactor.

  14. Estimated heats of fusion of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The heats of fusion of several fluoride salt mixtures with melting points greater than 973 K were estimated from a coupled analysis of the available thermodynamic data and phase diagrams. Simple binary eutectic systems with and without terminal solid solutions, binary eutectics with congruent melting intermediate phases, and ternary eutectic systems were considered. Several combinations of salts were identified, most notable the eutectics LiF-22CaF2 and NaF-60MgF2 which melt at 1039 and 1273 K respectively which posses relatively high heats of fusion/gm (greater than 0.7 kJ/g). Such systems would seemingly be ideal candidates for the light weight, high energy storage media required by the thermal energy storage unit in advanced solar dynamic power systems envisioned for the future space missions.

  15. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Flanagan, George F; Mays, Gary T; Pointer, William David; Robb, Kevin R; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  16. Systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Levy, Steven Marc

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that fluoride, through different applications and formulas, works to control caries development. The first observations of fluoride's effects on dental caries were linked to fluoride naturally present in the drinking water, and then from controlled water fluoridation programs. Other systemic methods to deliver fluoride were later suggested, including dietary fluoride supplements such as salt and milk. These systemic methods are now being questioned due to the fact that many studies have indicated that fluoride's action relies mainly on its post-eruptive effect from topical contact with the tooth structure. It is known that even the methods of delivering fluoride known as 'systemic' act mainly through a topical effect when they are in contact with the teeth. The effectiveness of water fluoridation in many geographic areas is lower than in previous eras due to the widespread use of other fluoride modalities. Nevertheless, this evidence should not be interpreted as an indication that systemic methods are no longer relevant ways to deliver fluoride on an individual basis or for collective health programs. Caution must be taken to avoid excess ingestion of fluoride when prescribing dietary fluoride supplements for children in order to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis, particularly if there are other relevant sources of fluoride intake - such as drinking water, salt or milk and/or dentifrice. Safe and effective doses of fluoride can be achieved when combining topical and systemic methods.

  17. Systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Levy, Steven Marc

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that fluoride, through different applications and formulas, works to control caries development. The first observations of fluoride's effects on dental caries were linked to fluoride naturally present in the drinking water, and then from controlled water fluoridation programs. Other systemic methods to deliver fluoride were later suggested, including dietary fluoride supplements such as salt and milk. These systemic methods are now being questioned due to the fact that many studies have indicated that fluoride's action relies mainly on its post-eruptive effect from topical contact with the tooth structure. It is known that even the methods of delivering fluoride known as 'systemic' act mainly through a topical effect when they are in contact with the teeth. The effectiveness of water fluoridation in many geographic areas is lower than in previous eras due to the widespread use of other fluoride modalities. Nevertheless, this evidence should not be interpreted as an indication that systemic methods are no longer relevant ways to deliver fluoride on an individual basis or for collective health programs. Caution must be taken to avoid excess ingestion of fluoride when prescribing dietary fluoride supplements for children in order to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis, particularly if there are other relevant sources of fluoride intake - such as drinking water, salt or milk and/or dentifrice. Safe and effective doses of fluoride can be achieved when combining topical and systemic methods. PMID:21701196

  18. Fluoride pollution in a salt marsh: movement between soil, vegetation, and sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Baars, A.J.; van Beek, H.; Spierenburg, T.J.; de Graaf, G.J.; Beeftink, W.G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Boom, J.; Pekelder, J.J.

    1987-12-01

    The river Scheldt (southwestern part of The Netherlands) is responsible for a considerable pollution of its estuary with organic and inorganic waste, which becomes manifest particularly in the salt marshes. Of these marshes, the 3400 ha nature reserve of the Saeftinge sale marsh constitutes a representative example of such a valuable tidal brackish ecosystem. This marsh is partly grazed by sheep, thus contributing to its original character and assisting in the preservation of the local flora and fauna. Preceding reports indicated a significant degree of contamination with heavy metals, which were shown to enter food chains. The present study focuses on fluoride, an environmental contaminant known to be spread by water and air, and, although assumed to be beneficial in small quantities, a potential threat for plants and animals, particularly herbivores.

  19. Preliminary requirements for a Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Test Reactor (FHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, M.; Forsberg, C.; Forget, B.; Hu, L. W.

    2012-07-01

    A Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) design is being developed at MIT to provide the first demonstration and test of a salt-cooled reactor using high-temperature fuel. The first step is to define the requirements. The top level requirements are (1) provide the confidence that a larger demonstration reactor is warranted and (2) develop the necessary data for a larger-scale reactor. Because requirements will drive the design of the FHTR, a significant effort is being undertaken to define requirements and understand the tradeoffs that will be required for a practical design. The preliminary requirements include specifications for design parameters and necessary tests of major reactor systems. Testing requirements include demonstration of components, systems, and procedures for refueling, instrumentation, salt temperature control to avoid coolant freezing, salt chemistry and volume control, tritium monitoring and control, and in-service inspection. Safety tests include thermal hydraulics, neutronics - including intrinsic core shutdown mechanisms such as Doppler feedback - and decay heat removal systems. Materials and coolant testing includes fuels (including mechanical wear and fatigue) and system corrosion behavior. Preliminary analysis indicates a thermal power output below 30 MW, an initial core using pebble-bed or prismatic-block fuel, peak outlet temperatures of at least 700 deg. C, and use of FLi{sup 7}Be ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}) coolant. The option to change-out the reactor core, fuel type, and major components is being investigated. While the FHTR will be used for materials testing, its primary mission is as a reactor system performance test to enable the design and licensing of a FHR demonstration power reactor. (authors)

  20. Core Design Characteristics of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High Temperature Demonstration Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R; Qualls, A L; Betzler, Benjamin R; Carbajo, Juan J; Greenwood, Michael Scott; Hale, Richard Edward; Harrison, Thomas J; Powers, Jeffrey J; Robb, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs) are a promising reactor technology option with significant knowledge gaps to implementation. One potential approach to address those technology gaps is via a small-scale demonstration reactor with the goal of increasing the technology readiness level (TRL) of the overall system for the longer term. The objective of this paper is to outline a notional concept for such a system, and to address how the proposed concept would advance the TRL of FHR concepts. Development of the proposed FHR Demonstration Reactor (DR) will enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. Important capabilities that will be demonstrated by building and operating the FHR DR include core design methodologies; fabrication and operation of high temperature reactors; salt procurement, handling, maintenance, and ultimate disposal; salt chemistry control to maximize vessel life; tritium management; heat exchanger performance; pump performance; and reactivity control. The FHR DR is considered part of a broader set of FHR technology development and demonstration efforts, some of which are already underway. Nonreactor test efforts (e.g., heated salt loops or loops using simulant fluids) can demonstrate many technologies necessary for commercial deployment of FHRs. The FHR DR, however, fulfills a crucial role in FHR technology development by advancing the technical maturity and readiness level of the system as a whole.

  1. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M; Flanagan, George F; Peretz, Fred J; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  2. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Peterson, Per; Calderoni, Pattrick; Scheele, Randall; Casekka, Andrew; McNamara, Bruce

    2015-01-22

    -evaluate thermophysical properties of flibe and flinak. Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has focused on evaluating the fluorinating gas nitrogen trifluoride as a potential salt purification agent. Work there was performed on removing hydroxides and oxides from flinak salt under controlled conditions. Lastly, the University of California Berkeley has spent considerable time designing and simulating reactor components with fluoride salts at high temperatures. Despite the hurdles presented by the innate chemical hazards, considerable progress has been made. The stage has been set to perform new research on salt chemical control which could advance the fluoride salt cooled reactor concept towards commercialization. What were previously thought of as chemical undesirable, but nuclear certified, alloys have been shown to be theoretically compatible with fluoride salts at high temperatures. This preliminary report has been prepared to communicate the construction of the basic infrastructure required for flibe, as well as suggest original research to performed at the University of Wisconsin. Simultaneously, the contents of this report can serve as a detailed, but introductory guide to allow anyone to learn the fundamentals of chemistry, engineering, and safety required to work with flibe salt.

  3. Preparation of pyrolytic carbon coating on graphite for inhibiting liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration for molten salt breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinliang; Zhao, Yanling; He, Xiujie; Zhang, Baoliang; Xu, Li; He, Zhoutong; Zhang, DongSheng; Gao, Lina; Xia, Huihao; Zhou, Xingtai; Huai, Ping; Bai, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    A fixed-bed deposition method was used to prepare rough laminar pyrolytic carbon coating (RLPyC) on graphite for inhibiting liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration during use in molten salt breeder reactor. The RLPyC coating possessed a graphitization degree of 44% and had good contact with graphite substrate. A high-pressure reactor was constructed to evaluate the molten salt infiltration in the isostatic graphite (IG-110, TOYO TANSO CO., LTD.) and RLPyC coated graphite under 1.01, 1.52, 3.04, 5.07 and 10.13 × 105 Pa for 12 h. Mercury injection and molten-salt infiltration experiments indicated the porosity and the salt-infiltration amount of 18.4% and 13.5 wt% under 1.52 × 105 Pa of IG-110, which was much less than 1.2% and 0.06 wt% under 10.13 × 105 Pa of the RLPyC, respectively. A vacuum device was constructed to evaluate the Xe135 penetration in the graphite. The helium diffusion coefficient of RLPyC coated graphite was 2.16 × 10-12 m2/s, much less than 1.21 × 10-6 m2/s of the graphite. Thermal cycle experiment indicated the coatings possessed excellent thermal stability. The coated graphite could effectively inhibit the liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration.

  4. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Elkassabgi, Yousri M.; De Leon, Gerardo I.; Fetterly, Caitlin N.; Ramos, Jorge A.; Cunningham, Richard Burns

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental

  5. Study on the electrochemical extraction of rare earth elements from FLINAK

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Dewu; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Feng; Tian, Lifang; Li, Qingnuan

    2013-07-01

    Electrochemical behaviors of rare earth elements, such as NdF{sub 3}, GdF{sub 3}, SmF{sub 3}, YF{sub 3}, and EuF{sub 3}, were investigated in a LiF-NaF-KF (46.5-11.5-42.0 mol %, FLINAK, m. p. 454 Celsius degrees) solvent. The results indicated that it is possible to extract Nd, Gd and Y directly by electrochemical deposition since the reductions of those cations to metal are located in the electrochemical window of the FLINAK eutectic, while the reductions of Sm and Eu metal are out of the range of the medium. Subsequently electro-deposition of Nd was carried out with two kinds of cathodic materials, namely, an inert cathode, Pt, and a reactive electrode, Cu. The collected products were characterized by various techniques revealing that a Nd-rich product was obtained. (authors)

  6. Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-15

    This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

  7. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

    2011-11-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

  8. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A. L.; Betzler, Benjamin R.; Brown, Nicholas R.; Carbajo, Juan; Greenwood, Michael Scott; Hale, Richard Edward; Harrison, Thomas J.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Terrell, Jerry W.

    2015-12-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  9. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, Denis; Zhang, Dajie

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  10. Purification and Chemical Control of Molten Li2BeF 4 for a Fluoride Salt Cooled Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian Christopher

    Out of the many proposed generation IV, high-temperature reactors, the molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising. The first large scale MSR, the molten salt reactor experiment (MSRE), operated from 1965 to 1969 using Li2BeF4, or flibe, as a coolant and solvent for uranium fluoride fuel, at maximum temperatures of 654°C, for over 15000 hours. The MSRE experienced no concept breaking surprises and was considered a success. Newly proposed designs of molten salt reactors use solid fuels, making them less exotic compared to the MSRE. However, any molten salt reactor will require a great deal of research pertaining to the chemical and mechanical mastery of molten salts in order to prepare it for commercialization. To supplement the development of new molten salt reactors, approximately 100 kg of flibe was purified using the standard hydrofluorination process. Roughly half of the purified salt was lithium-7 enriched salt from the secondary loop of the MSRE. Purification rids the salt of impurities and reduces its capacity for corrosion, also known as the redox potential. The redox potential of flibe was measured at various stages of purification for the first time using a dynamic beryllium reference electrode. These redox measurements have been superimposed with metal impurities measurements found by neutron activation analysis. Lastly, reductions of flibe with beryllium metal have been investigated. Over reductions have been performed, which have shown to decrease redox potential while seemingly creating a beryllium-beryllium halide system. Recommendations of the lowest advisable redox potential for corrosion tests are included along with suggestions for future work.

  11. Fluoride salts and container materials for thermal energy storage applications in the temperature range 973 to 1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Multicomponent fluoride salt mixtures were characterized for use as latent heat of fusion heat storage materials in advanced solar dynamic space power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 973 to 1400 K. The melting points and eutectic composition for many systems with published phase diagrams were verified, and several new eutectic compositions were identified. Additionally, the heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The extent of corrosion of various metals by fluoride melts was estimated from thermodynamic considerations, and equilibrium conditions inside a containment vessel were calculated as functions of the initial moisture content of the salt and free volume above the molten salt. Preliminary experimental data on the corrosion of commercial, high-temperature alloys in LiF-19.5CaF2 and NaF-27CaF2-36MgF2 melts are presented and compared to the thermodynamic predictions.

  12. Fluoride salts and container materials for thermal energy storage applications in the temperature range 973 - 1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Multicomponent fluoride salt mixtures were characterized for use as latent heat of fusion heat storage materials in advanced solar dynamic space power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 973 to 1400 K. The melting points and eutectic composition for many systems with published phase diagrams were verified, and several new eutectic compositions were identified. Additionally, the heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The extent of corrosion of various metals by fluoride melts was estimated from thermodynamic considerations, and equilibrium conditions inside a containment vessel were calculated as functions of the initial moisture content of the salt and free volume above the molten salt. Preliminary experimental data on the corrosion of commercial, high-temperature alloys in LiF-19.5CaF2 and NaF-27CaF2-36MgF2 melts are presented and compared to the thermodynamic predictions.

  13. Development of strong-sense validation benchmarks for the fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, E. D.

    2012-07-01

    The Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of reactor concepts currently under development for the U. S. Dept. of Energy. The FHR is defined as a Generation IV reactor that features low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. Recent experimental work using simulant fluids have been performed to demonstrate key 'proof of principle' FHR concepts and have helped inform the reactor design process. An important element of developing FHR technology is to sufficiently validate the predictive accuracy of the computer codes used to model system response. This paper presents a set of thermal-hydraulics experiments, defined as Strong-Sense Benchmarks (SSB's), which will help establish the FHR validation domain for simulant fluid suitability. These SSB's are more specifically designed to investigate single-phase natural circulation which is the dominant mode of FHR decay heat removal during off-normal conditions. SSB s should be viewed as engineering reference standards and differ from traditional confirmatory experiments in the sense that they are more focused on fundamental physics as opposed to reproducing high levels of physical similarity with the prototypical design. (authors)

  14. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30

    The goal of this NERI project was to perform research on high temperature fluoride and chloride molten salts towards the long-term goal of using these salts for transferring process heat from high temperature nuclear reactor to operation of hydrogen production and chemical plants. Specifically, the research focuses on corrosion of materials in molten salts, which continues to be one of the most significant challenges in molten salts systems. Based on the earlier work performed at ORNL on salt properties for heat transfer applications, a eutectic fluoride salt FLiNaK (46.5% LiF-11.5%NaF-42.0%KF, mol.%) and a eutectic chloride salt (32%MgCl2-68%KCl, mole %) were selected for this study. Several high temperature candidate Fe-Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, were exposed to molten FLiNaK with the goal of understanding corrosion mechanisms and ranking these alloys for their suitability for molten fluoride salt heat exchanger and thermal storage applications. The tests were performed at 850C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion was noted to occur predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries Alloy weight-loss due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys weight-loss was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present for the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. Experiments involving molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in Incoloy-800H crucibles under an argon cover gas showed a significantly lower corrosion for this alloy than when tested in a graphite crucible. Graphite significantly accelerated alloy corrosion due to the reduction of Cr from solution by graphite and formation

  15. Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Sherrell R; Gehin, Jess C; Holcomb, David Eugene; Carbajo, Juan J; Ilas, Dan; Cisneros, Anselmo T; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Corwin, William R; Wilson, Dane F; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Qualls, A L; Peretz, Fred J; Flanagan, George F; Clayton, Dwight A; Bradley, Eric Craig; Bell, Gary L; Hunn, John D; Pappano, Peter J; Cetiner, Sacit M

    2011-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

  16. Fluoride salts as phase change materials for thermal energy storage in the temperature range 1000-1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermediate compounds in binary and ternary fluoride salt systems were characterized for potential use as latent heat of fusion phase change materials to store thermal energy in the temperature range 1000-1400 K. The melting points and eutectic compositions for many systems with published phase diagrams were experimentally verified and new eutectic compositions having melting points between 1000 and 1400 K were identified. Heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting compounds were experimentally measured by differential scanning calorimetry. For a few systems in which heats of mixing in the melts have been measured, heats of fusion of the eutectics were calculated from thermodynamic considerations and good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated values. Several combinations of salts with high heats of fusion per unit mass (greater than 0.7 kJ/g) have been identified for possible use as phase change materials in advanced solar dynamic space power applications.

  17. Enrichment of fluoride in groundwater under the impact of saline water intrusion at the salt lake area of Yuncheng basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin; Li, Yilian; Guo, Qinghai

    2007-12-01

    Long-term intake of high-fluoride groundwater causes endemic fluorosis. This study, for the first time, discovered that the salt lake water intrusion into neighboring shallow aquifers might result in elevation of fluoride content of the groundwater. Two cross-sections along the groundwater flow paths were selected to study the geochemical processes controlling fluoride concentration in Yuncheng basin, northern China. There are two major reasons for the observed elevation of fluoride content: one is the direct contribution of the saline water; the other is the undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to fluorite due to salt water intrusion, which appears to be more important reason. The processes of the fluorine activity reduction and the change of Na/Ca ratio in groundwater induced by the intrusion of saline water favor further dissolution of fluorine-bearing mineral, and it was modeled using PHREEQC. With the increase in Na concentration (by adding NaCl or Na2SO4 as Na source, calcium content kept invariable), the increase of NaF concentration was rapid at first and then became slower; and the concentrations of HF, HF{2/-}, CaF+, and MgF+ were continuously decreasing. The geochemical conditions in the study area are advantageous to the complexation of F- with Na+ and the decline of saturation index of CaF2, regardless of the water type (Cl-Na or SO4-Na type water).

  18. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of bamboo salt and sodium fluoride in human gingival fibroblasts--An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jin; Choi, Choong-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Dental caries preventive agents, such as sodium fluoride (NaF) and bamboo salt (BS), are known to cause cellular growth that is characterized by morphological and gene expression changes. This study was designed to investigate the dual effect of NaF and BS on interleukin (IL)-1β-induced gingival inflammation. Under in vitro experimental conditions, exposure to a subcytotoxic dose of IL-1β enhanced human gingival fibroblast inflammation, as characterized by increased levels of inflammation-associated proteins. A combination of NaF and BS significantly protected fibroblasts from IL-1β-induced cellular deterioration. Exposure to NaF and BS induced the cell growth and no changes in viability were found with the Lactate Dehydrogenase Assay (LDH) assay at the NaF and BS concentration analyzed. Molecular analysis demonstrated that NaF and BS increased resistance to inflammation by reduction of IL-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production. In addition, NaF and BS decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-8, and TNF-α mRNA in IL-1β-induced human gingival fibroblast cells. The study identifies a new role for NaF and BS in the IL-1β-induced inflammation of gingival fibroblasts and provides a potential target for gingival protection.

  20. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles; Hu, Lin-wen; Peterson, Per; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-01-21

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  1. Corrosion of Ferritic Steels in High Temperature Molten Salt Coolants for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; El-Dasher, B; de Caro, M S; Ferreira, J

    2008-11-25

    Corrosion of ferritic steels in high temperature molten fluoride salts may limit the life of advanced reactors, including some hybrid systems that are now under consideration. In some cases, the steel may be protected through galvanic coupling with other less noble materials with special neutronic properties such a beryllium. This paper reports the development of a model for predicting corrosion rates for various ferritic steels, with and without oxide dispersion strengthening, in FLiBe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) and FLiNaK (Li-Na-K-F) coolants at temperatures up to 800 C. Mixed potential theory is used to account for the protection of steel by beryllium, Tafel kinetics are used to predict rates of dissolution as a function of temperature and potential, and the thinning of the mass-transfer boundary layer with increasing Reynolds number is accounted for with dimensionless correlations. The model also accounts for the deceleration of corrosion as the coolants become saturated with dissolved chromium and iron. This paper also reports electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of steels at their corrosion potentials in high-temperature molten salt environments, with the complex impedance spectra interpreted in terms of the interfacial charge transfer resistance and capacitance, as well as the electrolyte conductivity. Such in situ measurement techniques provide valuable insight into the degradation of materials under realistic conditions.

  2. Biomarkers of fluoride in children exposed to different sources of systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Buzalaf, M A R; Rodrigues, M H C; Pessan, J P; Leite, A L; Arana, A; Villena, R S; Forte, F D S; Sampaio, F C

    2011-02-01

    There has been no comparison between fluoride concentrations in urine and nails of children exposed to different sources of systemic fluoride. The aim of this study was to compare the relationship between fluoride intake with urinary fluoride excretion and fluoride concentrations in fingernails and toenails of children receiving fluoride from artificially fluoridated water (0.6-0.8 mg F/L, n = 25), naturally fluoridated water (0.6-0.9 mg F/L, n = 21), fluoridated salt (180-200 mg F/Kg, n = 26), and fluoridated milk (0.25 mg F, n = 25). A control population was included (no systemic fluoride, n = 24). Fluoride intake from diet and dentifrice, urinary fluoride excretion, and fluoride concentrations in fingernails/toenails were evaluated. Fluoride was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode. Urinary fluoride excretion in the control community was significantly lower when compared with that in the fluoridated cities, except for the naturally fluoridated community. However, the same pattern was not as evident for nails. Both urinary fluoride output and fluoride concentrations in fingernails/toenails were significantly correlated to total fluoride intake. However, the correlation coefficients for fluoride intake and urinary fluoride output were lower (r = 0.28, p < 0.01) than those observed for fingernails/toenails (r = 0.36, p < 0.001), suggesting that nails might be slightly better indicators of fluoride intake at the individual level.

  3. Graft polymerization of acrylic acid and methacrylic acid onto poly(vinylidene fluoride) powder in presence of metallic salt and sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bo; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Bowu; Yang, Xuanxuan; Li, Linfan; Yu, Ming; Li, Jingye

    2011-02-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) powder was grafted with acrylic acid (AAc) or methacrylic acid (MAA) by the pre-irradiation induced graft polymerization technique. The presence of graft chains was proven by FT-IR spectroscopy. The degree of grafting (DG) was calculated by the acid-base back titration method. The synergistic effect of acid and Mohr's salt on the grafting kinetics was examined. The results indicated that adding sulfuric acid and Mohr's salt simultaneously in AAc or MAA solutions led to a strong enhancement in the degree of grafting. The grafted PVDF powder was cast into microfiltration (MF) membranes using the phase inversion method and some properties of the obtained MF membranes were characterized.

  4. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  5. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  6. Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

    2008-07-09

    An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

  7. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  8. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature. PMID:27352462

  9. Optimal Fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John R.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal fluoridation has been defined as that fluoride exposure which confers maximal cariostasis with minimal toxicity and its values have been previously determined to be 0.5 to 1 mg per day for infants and 1 to 1.5 mg per day for an average child. Total fluoride ingestion and urine excretion were studied in Marin County, California, children in 1973 before municipal water fluoridation. Results showed fluoride exposure to be higher than anticipated and fulfilled previously accepted criteria for optimal fluoridation. Present and future water fluoridation plans need to be reevaluated in light of total environmental fluoride exposure. PMID:1130041

  10. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  11. Selective recognition of fluoride salts by vasarenes: a key role of a self-assembled in situ dimeric entity via an exceptionally short [O-H-O](-) H-bond.

    PubMed

    Bengiat, R; Gil, M; Klein, A; Bogoslavsky, B; Cohen, S; Dubnikova, F; Yardeni, G; Zilbermann, I; Almog, J

    2016-06-01

    A self-assembled supramolecular dimeric entity via an exceptionally short (2.404 Å) and strong (22.9 kcal mol(-1)) [O-H-O](-) hydrogen bond is the key to the special reactivity of vasarenes with fluoride salts. Vasarene is a self-assembled, vase-shaped compound, obtained by the reaction between ninhydrin and phloroglucinol. Analogous compounds are prepared by replacing the phloroglucinol with other polyhydroxy aromatics. Vasarenes show special affinity towards compounds of the type M(+)F(-), where M being a large monovalent cation, producing ion-pair-vasarene adducts. The first step in the proposed mechanism is the dissociation of the M(+)F(-) salt releasing F(-) to the solution, which may provide an explanation as to why only MF salts, which include large monovalent cations, undergo this reaction. From a practical point of view, the ease of their preparation and their special affinity towards fluoride salts make vasarenes potential means for salt separation. The readily formed dimeric structure with the very short [O-H-O](-) negative charge-assisted H-bond (-CAHB) can also be further used as a model in theoretical studies of such systems and understanding their role in biological processes. PMID:26804131

  12. Experimental Validation of Passive Safety System Models: Application to Design and Optimization of Fluoride-Salt-Cooled, High-Temperature Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibaum, Nicolas

    The development of advanced nuclear reactor technology requires understanding of complex, integrated systems that exhibit novel phenomenology under normal and accident conditions. The advent of passive safety systems and enhanced modular construction methods requires the development and use of new frameworks to predict the behavior of advanced nuclear reactors, both from a safety standpoint and from an environmental impact perspective. This dissertation introduces such frameworks for scaling of integral effects tests for natural circulation in fluoride-salt-cooled, high-temperature reactors (FHRs) to validate evaluation models (EMs) for system behavior; subsequent reliability assessment of passive, natural- circulation-driven decay heat removal systems, using these validated models; evaluation of life cycle carbon dioxide emissions as a key environmental impact metric; and recommendations for further work to apply these frameworks in the development and optimization of advanced nuclear reactor designs. In this study, the developed frameworks are applied to the analysis of the Mark 1 pebble-bed FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) under current investigation at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  13. Urinary fluoride excretion in children aged 3 to 5 years exposed to fluoridated salt at 60 to 90 mgF/Kg in two Venezuelan cities. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Ana M; Febres-Cordero, Carolina; Feldman, Sonia; Arasme, Marlene A; Pedauga, Daniel F; González, Henry; Rojas-Sánchez, Fátima

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to obtain information on the total urinary fluoride concentration and excretion of Venezuelan children at the age of 3 to 5 years, as part of a program to monitor fluoride ingestion. A 24 hour urine sample was collected from each of 63 children, between 3 and 5 years of age and analyzed for (i) total urinary volume (ml), (ii) urinary flow rate (ml/h), (iii) fluoride concentration (ppm) and (iv)fluoride excretion rate (microg/h). The group comprised 32 boys and 31 girls who resided in two different communities, 32 in Caracas, DC and 31 in San Juan de los Morros, Guarico state. Fluoride analyses were done with an ion-specific electrode. Age and gender did not affect total urine volume, urinary flow rate, or urinary fluoride concentration and excretion rate. The children from San Juan de los Morros had a significantly higher total urinary volume (426.45 +/- 36.31 ml) and flow rate (17.09 +/- 1.57ml/h) than children from Caracas (297.06 +/- 23.59 ml and 12.40 +/- 0.98, respectively) (p=0.0039). Significant differences were also observed when the urinary fluoride excretion rate of the two communities was compared. Mean urinary fluoride concentrations did not differ significantly (p < 0.05) between the two communities. These values were 0.67 +/- 0.40, 0.57 +/- 0.34, 0.76 +/- 0.27 ppmF in the 3, 4 and 5 year-old children of Caracas and 0.69 +/- 0.33, 0.65 +/- 0.20, 0.63 +/- 0.36 mgF in San Juan de los Morros children. The results showed low urinary fluoride concentration and excretion, indicating that children residing in the evaluated communities are receiving fluoride below the recommended optimal range.

  14. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) with Silicon-Carbide-Matrix Coated-Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C. W.; Terrani, Kurt A; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2012-01-01

    The FHR is a new reactor concept that uses coated-particle fuel and a low-pressure liquid-salt coolant. Its neutronics are similar to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The power density is 5 to 10 times higher because of the superior cooling properties of liquids versus gases. The leading candidate coolant salt is a mixture of {sup 7}LiF and BeF{sub 2} (FLiBe) possessing a boiling point above 1300 C and the figure of merit {rho}C{sub p} (volumetric heat capacity) for the salt slightly superior to water. Studies are underway to define a near-term base-line concept while understanding longer-term options. Near-term options use graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel where the graphite is both a structural component and the primary neutron moderator. It is the same basic fuel used in HTGRs. The fuel can take several geometric forms with a pebble bed being the leading contender. Recent work on silicon-carbide-matrix (SiCm) coated-particle fuel may create a second longer-term fuel option. SiCm coated-particle fuels are currently being investigated for use in light-water reactors. The replacement of the graphite matrix with a SiCm creates a new family of fuels. The first motivation behind the effort is to take advantage of the superior radiation resistance of SiC compared to graphite in order to provide a stable matrix for hosting coated fuel particles. The second motivation is a much more rugged fuel under accident, repository, and other conditions.

  15. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  16. Neutronics and Depletion Methods for Parametric Studies of Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors with Slab Fuel Geometry and Multi-Batch Fuel Management Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cisneros, Anselmo T.; Ilas, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a 3400 MWth fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) that uses TRISO particle fuel compacted into slabs rather than spherical fuel pebbles or cylindrical fuel compacts. Simplified methods are required for parametric design studies such that analyzing the entire feasible design space for an AHTR is tractable. These simplifications include fuel homogenization techniques to increase the speed of neutron transport calculations in depletion analysis and equilibrium depletion analysis methods to analyze systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. This paper presents three elements of significant novelty. First, the reactivity-equivalent physical transformation (RPT) methodology usually applied in systems with coated particle fuel in cylindrical and spherical geometries was extended to slab geometries. Secondly, based on this newly developed RPT method for slab geometries, a methodology that uses Monte Carlo depletion approaches was further developed to search for the maximum discharge burnup in a multi-batch system by iteratively estimating the beginning of equilibrium cycle composition and sampling different discharge burnups. This iterative equilibrium depletion search (IEDS) method fully defines an equilibrium fuel cycle (keff, power, flux and composition evolutions across space and time), but is computationally demanding, although feasible on single-processor workstations. Finally, an analytical method, the non-linear reactivity model, was developed by expanding the linear reactivity model to include an arbitrary number of higher order terms to extrapolate single-batch depletion results to estimate the maximum discharge burnup and BOEC keff in systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. Results from this method were benchmarked against equilibrium depletion analysis results using the IEDS.

  17. Neutronics and Depletion Methods for Parametric Studies of Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors with Slab Fuel Geometry and Multi-Batch Fuel Management Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cisneros, Anselmo T.; Ilas, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a 3400 MWth fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) that uses TRISO particle fuel compacted into slabs rather than spherical or cylindrical fuel compacts. Simplified methods are required for parametric design studies such that analyzing the entire feasible design space for an AHTR is tractable. These simplifications include fuel homogenization techniques to increase the speed of neutron transport calculations in depletion analysis and equilibrium depletion analysis methods to analyze systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. This paper presents three elements of significant novelty. First, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) methodology usually applied in systems with coated-particle fuel in cylindrical and spherical geometries has been extended to slab geometries. Secondly, based on this newly developed RPT method for slab geometries, a methodology that uses Monte Carlo depletion approaches was further developed to search for the maximum discharge burnup in a multi-batch system by iteratively estimating the beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC) composition and sampling different discharge burnups. This Iterative Equilibrium Depletion Search (IEDS) method fully defines an equilibrium fuel cycle (keff, power, flux, and composition evolutions) but is computationally demanding, although feasible on single-processor workstations. Finally, an analytical method, the Non-Linear Reactivity Model, was developed by expanding the linear reactivity model to include an arbitrary number of higher order terms so that single-batch depletion results could be extrapolated to estimate the maximum discharge burnup and BOEC keff in systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. Results from this method were benchmarked against equilibrium depletion analysis results using the IEDS.

  18. SEPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM FROM MOLTEN SALT REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.H.; Strain, J.E.; Cuneo, D.R.; Kelly, M.J.

    1963-11-12

    A method for selectively precipitating protactinium from a neutron- irradiated fused fluoride salt composition comprising at least one metal fluoride selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal fluoride and an alkaline earth metal fluoride containing dissolved thorium-232 values is presented. An inorganic metal oxide corresponding to any of the metal fluorides of the composition is also added. (AEC)

  19. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Bottled Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Consumers drink ... questions about bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, ...

  20. Removal of fluoride from fluoride contaminated industrial waste water by electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijaya A; Nanoti, Madan V

    2003-01-01

    Wastewater containing fluoride are generally treated with lime or calcium salt supplemented with aluminium salts. Wastewater generated from different industries does not always behave in the same way due to the presence of interfering contaminants. A number of techniques have been developed and studied for the removal of excessive fluoride. Most of these are based on use of aluminium salt. In alum coagulation the sorption properties of product of hydrolysis of aluminium salts and capacity of fluoride for complex formation plays a very important role. These hydrolysis products of aluminium can be produced by passing direct current through aluminium electrode. The text presented in the paper deals with the various aspect of removal of fluoride by electrolysis using aluminium electrode from fluoride chemical based industrial wastewater. PMID:14672366

  1. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.J.; Sheft, I.

    1959-08-11

    A method is presented for preparing the halides of elements which are relatively non-reactive with halogenating agents. The method involves reacting a mixture of an oxygen containing salt of a difficulty halogenated metal with an oxygen containing salt of an easily halogenated metal with a halogenating agent. Accordingly plutonium tetrafluoride is produced by reacting a mixture of plutonium dioxide and uranium octaoxide with bromine trifluoride. The reaction proceeds smoothly at moderate temperatures and the resulting plutonium trifluoride may be readily separated from many impurities which form volatile fluorides by volatilizing these volatile fluorides from the reaction chamber.

  2. The effective use of fluorides in public health.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A.; Petersen, Poul Erik; Lennon, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research and development was concerned with waterborne fluorides, both naturally occurring and added, and their effects on the prevalence and incidence of dental caries and dental fluorosis. In the latter half of the 20th century, the focus of research was on fluoride toothpastes and mouth rinses. More recently, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on: recent water fluoridation schemes in California, USA; salt fluoridation in Jamaica; milk fluoridation in Chile; and the development of "affordable" fluoride toothpastes in Indonesia. Common themes are the concern to reduce demands for compliance with fluoride regimes that rely upon action by individuals and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher-than-acceptable levels. PMID:16211158

  3. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  4. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Clifton M; Holahan, Erin C; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing is needed. A new filter-paper absorption method to assess the 1-min bioavailable fluoride concentration was developed to meet this need. This method utilizes coiled filter paper that rapidly absorbs the aqueous phase of the dentifrice slurry followed by centrifugation to recover that fluid for fluoride measurement via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The analytical method was used to successfully determine the total fluoride and 1-min bioavailable fluoride in eight dentifrice products containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (Na2FPO3, MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), or NaF with amorphous calcium phosphate (NaF + ACP). The results showed that some of the dentifrices tested had significantly lower potentially available fluoride than the total fluoride. For a MFP-containing sample, aged seven years past its expiry date, there was significant reduction in the bioavailable fluoride compared to MFP products that were not aged. Other than the aged MFP and the SnF2-containing samples the bioavailable fluoride for all products tested had at least 80 % of the label fluoride concentration. The filter paper absorption method yielded reproducible results for the products tested with MFP samples showing the largest variations. PMID:25821392

  5. PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AMMONIUM URANIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, A.S.; Mooney, R.B.

    1953-08-25

    This patent relates to the preparation of ammonium uranium fluoride. The process comprises adding a water soluble fluoride to an aqueous solution of a uranous compound containing an ammonium salt, and isolating the resulting precipitate. This patent relates to the manufacture of uranium tetnafluoride from ammonium uranium fluoride, NH/sub 4/UF/sub 5/. Uranium tetrafluoride is prepared by heating the ammonium uranium fluoride to a temperature at which dissociation occurs with liberation of ammonium fluoride. Preferably the process is carried out under reduced pressure, or in a current of an inert gas.

  6. Removal of nanoaerosol during the bubbling of the salt melt of beryllium and lithium fluorides for the preparation of reactor radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnit'ko, A. V.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.

    2010-06-01

    The parameters of aerosol particles formed in the course of the spontaneous thermal condensation of vapors and bubbling a 66LiF-34BeF2 (mol %) eutectic salt mixture with helium have been studied. For this purpose, a vertical bubbling mode at T ≈ 900 K and an ampule device for obtaining reactor radioisotopes for medical applications were used. The rate of the bulk removal and the chemical composition of aerosols were measured. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was bimodal, and the mass concentration of the particles exceeded by far the maximum permissible concentration (MPC). The characteristics of regenerated nickel multilayer nanofilters for ultrahigh filtration of aerosols from the salt liquid melt were analyzed.

  7. Heterolysis of Dihydrogen by Silver Alkoxides and Fluorides.

    PubMed

    Tate, Brandon K; Nguyen, Jenna T; Bacsa, John; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2015-07-01

    Alkoxide-bridged disilver cations react with dihydrogen to form hydride-bridged cations, releasing free alcohol. Hydrogenolysis of neutral silver fluorides affords hydride-bridged disilver cations as their bifluoride salts. These reactions proceed most efficiently when the supporting ligands are expanded N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) derived from 6- and 7-membered cyclic amidinium salts. Kinetics studies show that silver fluoride hydrogenolysis is first-order in both silver and dihydrogen.

  8. How Does Fluoride Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes How Does Fluoride Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Does Fluoride Work? Print A A A Text Size There's fluoride ... even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth healthy? Let's find out. Fluoride ...

  9. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water Print A ... to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  10. Dietary fluoride intake by children receiving different sources of systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M H C; Leite, A L; Arana, A; Villena, R S; Forte, F D S; Sampaio, F C; Buzalaf, M A R

    2009-02-01

    There has been no comparison of fluoride (F) intake by pre-school children receiving more traditional sources of systemic F. The aim of this study was to estimate the dietary F intake by children receiving F from artificially fluoridated water (AFW-Brazil, 0.6-0.8 mg F/L), naturally fluoridated water (NFW-Brazil, 0.6-0.9 mg F/L), fluoridated salt (FS-Peru, 180-200 mg F/Kg), and fluoridated milk (FM-Peru, 0.25 mg F). Children (n=21-26) aged 4-6 yrs old participated in each community. A non-fluoridated community (NoF) was evaluated as the control population. Dietary F intake was monitored by the "duplicate plate" method, with different constituents (water, other beverages, and solids). F was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode. Data were tested by Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn's tests (p<0.05). Mean (+/- SD) F intake (mg/Kg b.w./day) was 0.04+/-0.01(b), 0.06+/-0.02(a,b), 0.05+/-0.02(a,b), 0.06+/-0.01(a), and 0.01+/-0.00(c) for AFW/NFW/FS/FM/NoF, respectively. The main dietary contributors for AFW/NFW and FS/FM/NoF were water and solids, respectively. The results indicate that the dietary F intake must be considered before a systemic method of fluoridation is implemented.

  11. High-temperature corrosion behavior of Ni-16Mo-7Cr-4Fe superalloy containing yttrium in molten LiF-NaF-KF salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-li; He, Shang-ming; Zhou, Xing-tai; Huai, Ping; Li, Zhi-jun; Li, Ai-guo; Yu, Xiao-han

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion tests of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr-4Fe superalloy containing various yttrium contents were performed in molten FLiNaK (LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol%) salt at 850 °C for 620 h, with the goals of investigating the effects of yttrium on the corrosion resistance of Ni-16Mo-7Cr-4Fe alloy and understanding the corrosion mechanisms. The addition of an appropriate amount of yttrium promotes the formation of a Y-rich layer near the surface and inhibits the diffusion of the susceptive elements.

  12. Preparation and optimization of calcium fluoride particles for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Koeser, Joachim; Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Pieles, Uwe; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-07-01

    Fluorides are used in dental care due to their beneficial effect in tooth enamel de-/remineralization cycles. To achieve a desired constant supply of soluble fluorides in the oral cavity, different approaches have been followed. Here we present results on the preparation of CaF2 particles and their characterization with respect to a potential application as enamel associated fluoride releasing reservoirs. CaF2 particles were synthesized by precipitation from soluble NaF and CaCl2 salt solutions of defined concentrations and their morphology analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. CaF2 particles with defined sizes and shapes could be synthesized by adjusting the concentrations of the precursor salt solutions. Such particles interacted with enamel surfaces when applied at fluoride concentrations correlating to typical dental care products. Fluoride release from the synthesized CaF2 particles was observed to be largely influenced by the concentration of phosphate in the solution. Physiological solutions with phosphate concentration similar to saliva (3.5 mM) reduced the fluoride release from pure CaF2 particles by a factor of 10-20 × as compared to phosphate free buffer solutions. Fluoride release was even lower in human saliva. The fluoride release could be increased by the addition of phosphate in substoichiometric amounts during CaF2 particle synthesis. The presented results demonstrate that the morphology and fluoride release characteristics of CaF2 particles can be tuned and provide evidence of the suitability of synthetic CaF2 particles as enamel associated fluoride reservoirs.

  13. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Walker, Larry R; Santella, Michael L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  14. Hydrolysis of iron and chromium fluorides: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, José L; Dufour, Javier; Negro, Carlos; López-Mateos, Federico

    2008-06-15

    Fluoride complexes of metallic ions are one of the main problems when processing industrial effluents with high content of fluoride anion. The most important case is derived from pickling treatment of stainless steel, which is performed with HNO3/HF mixtures to remove oxides scale formed over the metal surface. Waste from this process, spent pickling liquor, must be treated for recovering metallic and acid content. Conventional treatments produce a final effluent with high quantity of fluoride complexes of iron and chromium. This work proposes a hydrolysis treatment of these solid metal fluorides by reacting them with a basic agent. Metal oxides are obtained, while fluoride is released to solution as a solved salt, which can be easily recovered as hydrofluoric acid. Solid iron and chromium fluorides, mainly K2FeF5(s) and CrF3(s), obtained in the UCM treatment process, were employed in this work. Optimal hydrolysis operating conditions were obtained by means of a factorial design: media must be basic but pH cannot be higher than 9.5, temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C and alkali concentration (potassium hydroxide) below 1.1 mol L(-1). Secondary reactions have been detected, which are probably due to fluoride adsorption onto obtained oxides surface. Mechanism of reaction consists of several stages, involving solid fluoride dissolution and complexes decomposition. Hydrolysis kinetics has been modeled with classical crystal dissolution kinetics, based on mass transfer phenomena. PMID:17988794

  15. Fluoride in UK rivers.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Davies, Helen; Smith, Jennifer

    2003-10-01

    Fluoride concentrations in eastern UK rivers (the Humber, Tweed, Wear, Great Ouse and Thames) are described based on information collected within the Land-Ocean Interaction Study (LOIS) and by the Environment Agency (EA) of England and Wales. The results show varied fluoride concentrations across the region, with a range from <0.01 to >10 mg l(-1); and mean, median and range in mean concentrations of 0.30, 0.21 and 0.05-3.38 mg l(-1) (excluding one outlier point), respectively. Within the main rivers and tributaries, the mean fluoride concentration varied from approximately 0.5 to over 2 mg l(-1) and the highest values occurred within the Don basin (Don, Dearne and Rother) and parts of the Trent basin (upper Tame and mid-upper Derbyshire Derwent) in highly industrialised and urbanised areas (Sheffield and Rotherham in the Don basin; Birmingham and Derby on the Trent). For localised inputs to the rivers, fluoride concentrations were slightly higher, and considerably higher in one outlier case. Correspondingly, the other rivers examined typically had mean fluoride concentrations between approximately 0.2 and 0.5 mg l(-1), but fluoride concentrations were lower in the headwater areas. As there is much less information on fluoride levels in upland areas, extensive data collected as part of an acid waters survey are used to show that fluoride concentrations are generally less than 0.1 mg l(-1) for the upland UK. The data are summarised in terms of both fluoride concentrations and flux, and the values are cross-referenced to other determinands collected within LOIS. The high positive correlation with boron and negative correlation with flow show the importance of point source (sewage) inputs of fluoride, while strong positive correlations between fluoride and barium indicate the relative importance of vein mineralisation in the bedrock in supplying fluoride to the waters of the Yorkshire Ouse and its tributaries. There seems to be some process that limits the fluoride

  16. Fluoride in UK rivers.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Davies, Helen; Smith, Jennifer

    2003-10-01

    Fluoride concentrations in eastern UK rivers (the Humber, Tweed, Wear, Great Ouse and Thames) are described based on information collected within the Land-Ocean Interaction Study (LOIS) and by the Environment Agency (EA) of England and Wales. The results show varied fluoride concentrations across the region, with a range from <0.01 to >10 mg l(-1); and mean, median and range in mean concentrations of 0.30, 0.21 and 0.05-3.38 mg l(-1) (excluding one outlier point), respectively. Within the main rivers and tributaries, the mean fluoride concentration varied from approximately 0.5 to over 2 mg l(-1) and the highest values occurred within the Don basin (Don, Dearne and Rother) and parts of the Trent basin (upper Tame and mid-upper Derbyshire Derwent) in highly industrialised and urbanised areas (Sheffield and Rotherham in the Don basin; Birmingham and Derby on the Trent). For localised inputs to the rivers, fluoride concentrations were slightly higher, and considerably higher in one outlier case. Correspondingly, the other rivers examined typically had mean fluoride concentrations between approximately 0.2 and 0.5 mg l(-1), but fluoride concentrations were lower in the headwater areas. As there is much less information on fluoride levels in upland areas, extensive data collected as part of an acid waters survey are used to show that fluoride concentrations are generally less than 0.1 mg l(-1) for the upland UK. The data are summarised in terms of both fluoride concentrations and flux, and the values are cross-referenced to other determinands collected within LOIS. The high positive correlation with boron and negative correlation with flow show the importance of point source (sewage) inputs of fluoride, while strong positive correlations between fluoride and barium indicate the relative importance of vein mineralisation in the bedrock in supplying fluoride to the waters of the Yorkshire Ouse and its tributaries. There seems to be some process that limits the fluoride

  17. [Arsenic (V) removal from drinking water by ferric salt and aluminum salt coagulation/microfiltration process].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-bo; Wu, Shui-bo; Gu, Ping

    2007-10-01

    Two lab-scale coagulation/microfiltration membrane reactors were used to compare the arsenic removal from drinking water by ferric salt and aluminum salt coagulation/microfiltration process. FeCl3 and Al2(SO4)3 were appointed as the coagulants. The results show that the arsenic removal efficiency of the two processes are almost equal. Arsenic concentration can be lowered from about 100 microg/L to below 10 microg/L and the lowest is 1.68 microg x L(-1). All of the turbidity of the treated water is less than 0.1 NTU. The concentrations of ferric, aluminum and SO4(2-) of the treated water are entirely satisfied the standard of drinking water. After treated by ferric salt process, pH value of the treated water is increased about 0.5. However, aluminum salt process does not change pH of the drinking water. The concentration ratio of the ferric salt process is 1,791 which is about 2.54 times of the aluminum salt process. Arsenic concentration of the sludge of ferric salt process is also higher greatly than that of the aluminum salt process. Therefore, the volume of the sludge produced by the ferric salt process is smaller than that of the aluminum salt process when equal amount of drinking water was treated. Accordingly, ferric salt process should be used when only high concentration arsenic existed in drinking water. On the other hand, fluoride also can be removed simultaneously while arsenic was removed by aluminum salt process. The amount of coagulant needed is the amount of coagulant required to remove fluoride separately. Fluoride can not be removed from drinking water by the ferric salt process. It was concluded that aluminum salt process should be used to remove arsenic and fluoride simultaneously from high arsenic and high fluoride coexisted drinking water.

  18. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  19. Stable isotope ( 18O) investigations on the processes controlling fluoride contamination of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, P. S.; Deb, D. L.; Tyagi, S. K.

    1996-10-01

    Groundwater is being used extensively in the Delhi area for both irrigation and raw water requirement. Fluoride contamination in groundwater is therefore a matter of concern for the planners and managers of water resources. Stable isotope ( 18O) and fluoride signatures in groundwater have been discussed, in this context, to characterise the sources and controlling processes of fluoride contamination. The study indicates that almost 50% of the area is affected by fluoride contamination beyond the maximum permissible limit. The wide range (0.10-16.5 ppm) in fluoride concentration suggests contributions from both point and non-point sources. Very high fluoride levels in groundwater are mostly found in the vicinity of brick kilns. Significant quantities of evaporated (isotopically enriched) rainfall, irrigation water and surface runoff water from surrounding farmland also percolate along with fluoride salts from the soils to the groundwater system. The process of adsorption and dispersion of fluoride species in the soil as well as lateral mixing of groundwater along specific flow-paths control the groundwater fluoride and 18O composition. The groundwater system has more than two isotopically distinct non-point source origins, causing spatial and temporal variations in fluoride concentration. Issues related to harmful effects of excessive use of high-fluoride groundwater and management options have also been discussed.

  20. Perspectives in the effective use of fluoride in Asia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Phantumvanit, P

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations worldwide. The diverse disease patterns across and within countries are related to socio-behavioral determinants, demographic factors, environmental conditions, and the availability and accessibility of oral health services, in particular, exposure to disease prevention programs (Petersen, 2003, 2008a). Benefits of fluoride for caries prevention have been substantiated in many countries (Petersen and Lennon, 2004; Jones et al., 2005). In the second half of the 20th century, this focus shifted to the development and evaluation of fluoride toothpastes and rinses and, to a lesser extent, to alternatives to water fluoridation, such as salt and milk fluoridation. Most recently, efforts have been made to summarize this extensive database through systematic reviews of fluoride administration (McDonagh et al., 2000; Marinho et al., 2003; Australian Government, 2007). The Asian workshop held in Phan-Nga, Thailand, during March 22-24, 2011, aimed to discuss current information on fluoride and dental caries, as well as to try identifying barriers and opportunities that countries of Asia may have for implementing such programs. In addition, the intention was to give recommendations for including fluoride schemes within national public health programs.

  1. Perspectives in the effective use of fluoride in Asia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Phantumvanit, P

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations worldwide. The diverse disease patterns across and within countries are related to socio-behavioral determinants, demographic factors, environmental conditions, and the availability and accessibility of oral health services, in particular, exposure to disease prevention programs (Petersen, 2003, 2008a). Benefits of fluoride for caries prevention have been substantiated in many countries (Petersen and Lennon, 2004; Jones et al., 2005). In the second half of the 20th century, this focus shifted to the development and evaluation of fluoride toothpastes and rinses and, to a lesser extent, to alternatives to water fluoridation, such as salt and milk fluoridation. Most recently, efforts have been made to summarize this extensive database through systematic reviews of fluoride administration (McDonagh et al., 2000; Marinho et al., 2003; Australian Government, 2007). The Asian workshop held in Phan-Nga, Thailand, during March 22-24, 2011, aimed to discuss current information on fluoride and dental caries, as well as to try identifying barriers and opportunities that countries of Asia may have for implementing such programs. In addition, the intention was to give recommendations for including fluoride schemes within national public health programs. PMID:22262703

  2. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken through the gums have changes in the enamel that covers the teeth. Faint white lines or streaks may appear, but ... regarding fluoride intake from reconstituted infant formula and ... Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs. J Am Dent ...

  3. Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

    1984-12-21

    This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

  4. Fluorides in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Padilla, O; Davis, M J

    2001-02-01

    Water fluoridation is known to be the most successful public health measure of the 20th century. More than half a century later, we are still reaping the benefits of fluoridation. We now know that the most important mechanism of fluoride action occurs through daily low-dose exposures. The battle between demineralization and remineralization occurs constantly, and fluoride shifts the balance to the latter. This dynamic, daily process far supersedes the pre-eruptive fluoride incorporation in importance. Fluoride, however, is now available in a variety of very different forms, useful in waging the war on caries. Nevertheless, opponents of this therapeutic agent maintain that its widespread use should be curtailed. Although the benefits of fluoride can no longer be disputed, fluoride supplementation must be supported and approached with consideration of total fluoride exposure. PMID:11280144

  5. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  6. Quantitative measure for the "nakedness" of fluoride ion sources.

    PubMed

    Christe, Karl O; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2003-08-01

    A quantitative measure for the donor strength or "nakedness" of fluoride ion donors is presented. It is based on the free energy change associated with the transfer of a fluoride ion from the donor to a given acceptor molecule. Born-Haber cycle calculations were used to calculate both the free energy and the enthalpy change for this process. The enthalpy change is given by the sum of the fluoride ion affinity of the acceptor (as defined in strict thermodynamic convention) and the lattice energy difference (DeltaU(POT)) between the fluoride ion donor and the salt formed with the acceptor. Because, for a given acceptor, the fluoride affinity has a constant value, the relative enthalpy (and also the corresponding free energy) changes are governed exclusively by the lattice energy differences. In this study, BF(3), PF(5), AsF(5), and SbF(5) were used as the acceptors, and the following seven fluoride ion donors were evaluated: CsF, N(CH(3))(4)F (TMAF), N-methylurotropinium fluoride (MUF), hexamethylguanidinium fluoride (HMGF), hexamethylpiperidinium fluoride (HMPF), N,N,N-trimethyl-1-adamantylammonium fluoride (TMAAF), and hexakis(dimethylamino)phosphazenium fluoride (HDMAPF). Smooth relationships between the enthalpy changes and the molar volumes of the donor cations were found which asymptotically approach constant values for infinitely large cations. Whereas CsF is a relatively poor F(-) donor [(U(POT)(CsF) - U(POT)(CsSbF(6))) = 213 kJ mol(-)(1)], when compared to N(CH(3))(4)F [(U(POT)(TMAF) - U(POT)(TMASbF(6))) = 69 kJ mol(-)(1)], a 4 times larger cation (phosphazenium salt) and an infinitely large cation are required to decrease DeltaU(POT) to 17 and 0 kJ mol(-)(1), respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that very little is gained by increasing the cation size past a certain level and that secondary factors, such as chemical and physical properties, become overriding considerations.

  7. Hot filament technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Perry, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Molten salts, such as lithium fluoride, are attractive candidates for thermal energy storage in solar dynamic space power systems because of their high latent heat of fusion. However, these same salts have poor thermal conductivities which inhibit the transfer of heat into the solid phase and out of the liquid phase. One concept for improving the thermal conductivity of the thermal energy storage system is to add a conductive filler material to the molten salt. High thermal conductivity pitch-based graphite fibers are being considered for this application. Although there is some information available on the thermal conductivity of lithium fluoride solid, there is very little information on lithium fluoride liquid, and no information on molten salt graphite fiber composites. This paper describes a hot filament technique for determining the thermal conductivity of molten salts. The hot filament technique was used to find the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride at 930 C, and the thermal conductivity values ranged from 1.2 to 1.6 W/mK. These values are comparable to the slightly larger value of 5.0 W/mK for lithium fluoride solid. In addition, two molten salt graphite fiber composites were characterized with the hot filament technique and these results are also presented.

  8. Fluoride in the UK diet.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Carrie

    2014-08-12

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral that can be obtained from foods and fluids originating from soils containing fluoride, as well as by drinking water that has been fluoridated. While consuming adequate fluoride intake can deliver benefits for dental and bone health, there have been concerns that excessive fluoride intake could lead to dental fluorosis, or even cause harm to bones. This article considers the balance of evidence in this area, and discusses the benefits and potential risks of fluoride in the UK diet. The role of tea as a major contributor to normal fluoride intake is highlighted, alongside some positive implications of this. Information is also provided to help nurses and midwives communicate the latest advice and guidance on fluoride to their patients. PMID:25095960

  9. Fluoride in the UK diet.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Carrie

    2014-08-12

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral that can be obtained from foods and fluids originating from soils containing fluoride, as well as by drinking water that has been fluoridated. While consuming adequate fluoride intake can deliver benefits for dental and bone health, there have been concerns that excessive fluoride intake could lead to dental fluorosis, or even cause harm to bones. This article considers the balance of evidence in this area, and discusses the benefits and potential risks of fluoride in the UK diet. The role of tea as a major contributor to normal fluoride intake is highlighted, alongside some positive implications of this. Information is also provided to help nurses and midwives communicate the latest advice and guidance on fluoride to their patients.

  10. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... from my well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended ... if the water from my well has fluoride levels that are higher than the recommended level for ...

  11. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

    1999-08-17

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

  12. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; LaCamera, Alfred F.; Troup, R. Lee; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

  13. Recovery of protactinium from molten fluoride nuclear fuel compositions

    DOEpatents

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Bamberger, C.; Ross, R.G.

    1973-12-25

    A method is provided for separating protactinium from a molten fluonlde salt composition consisting essentially of at least one alkali and alkaline earth metal fluoride and at least one soluble fluoride of uranium or thorium which comprises oxidizing the protactinium in said composition to the + 5 oxidation state and contacting said composition with an oxide selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal oxide, an alkaline earth oxide, thorium oxide, and uranium oxide, and thereafter isolating the resultant insoluble protactinium oxide product from said composition. (Official Gazette)

  14. Comparison of the Biological Impacts of the Fluoride Compounds by Graphical Risk Visualization Map Technique.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Kan; Kono, Rei; Ueno, Takaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Dote, Tomotaro; Yokoyama, Hirotaka; Kono, Koichi; Tamaki, Junko

    2015-09-01

    Various fluoride compounds are widely used in industry. The present risk assessment study was conducted using a series of inorganic binary fluorides of the type XFn, where X(n) = Na(+), K(+), Li(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Nd(3+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Y(3+), Yb(2+), and Zn(2+). The aqueous solutions of these salts were orally administrated to 16 experimental groups (one for each of the salts tested). The levels of fluoride, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase in cumulative 24-h urine samples and creatinine clearance were measured to assess possible acute renal damages. The levels of fluoride, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase were also determined in serum samples to assess possible acute hepatic damages. The results reveal that sodium fluoride (NaF), potassium fluoride (KF), and zinc fluoride tetrahydrate (ZnF2 (.)4H2O) can carry the fluoride ion into the bloodstream and that it is excreted via urine more readily than the other compounds tested. These fluorides were assigned the highest risk impact factor. Most of the rare earth fluorides are insoluble in water while those groups 2 and 13 of the periodic table are slightly soluble, so that they do not have a significant negative risk. These findings suggest that the biological impact of fluoride depends on the accompanying counter ion and its solubility. The risk map obtained in the present study shows that the graphical visualization map technique employed is a valuable new tool to assess the toxicological risk of chemical compounds.

  15. Direct measurements of stratospheric fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mroz, E. J.; Lazrus, A. L.; Bonelli, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Stratospheric fluoride mass mixing ratios were measured by passing stratospheric air through filters half of which is impregnated in a base. Measurements of stratospheric fluoride were obtained at altitudes from 15 to 40 km at latitude 30-33 N and longitude 95-105 W at different months of the year. The significant amount of fluoride collected on the base-impregnated portion of the filters suggests that fluoride is present in the stratosphere as an acid gas. The mixing ratios decrease markedly at altitudes less than 20-25 km, suggesting the troposphere as the major sink for stratospheric fluoride.

  16. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  17. Other Fluoride Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... in preventing tooth decay in people of all ages. Use the information listed below to compare the other fluoride products ... even among children younger than 6 years of age. Proper application technique ... cleared for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as ...

  18. Ferrimyoglobin-Fluoride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an experiment which is designed to investigate the reaction of the protein ferrimyoglobin with fluoride. The activity uses readily available apparatus and the technique of optical absorbance for measurement of concentrations. Experimental design, procedures, and treatment of the equilibrium data are detailed. (CW)

  19. Fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wangwang; Kovalsky, Peter; He, Di; Waite, T David

    2015-11-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an emerging water desalination technology in which pairs of porous electrodes are electrically charged to remove ionic species from water. In this work, the feasibility of fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode CDI was investigated. Initially, the effects of flow rate, initial fluoride concentration, and initial coexisting NaCl concentration on fluoride removal were studied. The steady-state fluoride concentration declined as the initial fluoride concentration decreased while initial NaCl concentration remained constant. Due to the competitive electrosorption between fluoride and chloride for limited pore surface sites, a higher initial chloride concentration resulted in a higher equilibrium dissolved fluoride concentration. A simplified one-dimensional transport model for dual anions was developed and found to reliably describe the dynamic process of removal of both fluoride and chloride ions in CDI cells over a range of well-defined operating conditions. Based on the ability of the model to describe fluoride removal, it was extended to description of nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters and also found to perform well. Thus, the approach to description of ion removal, at least in batch studies, appears robust and should assist in optimization of design and operating conditions such that optimal removal of trace ionic species is achieved even when high background concentrations of salt are present. PMID:26278188

  20. Fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wangwang; Kovalsky, Peter; He, Di; Waite, T David

    2015-11-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an emerging water desalination technology in which pairs of porous electrodes are electrically charged to remove ionic species from water. In this work, the feasibility of fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode CDI was investigated. Initially, the effects of flow rate, initial fluoride concentration, and initial coexisting NaCl concentration on fluoride removal were studied. The steady-state fluoride concentration declined as the initial fluoride concentration decreased while initial NaCl concentration remained constant. Due to the competitive electrosorption between fluoride and chloride for limited pore surface sites, a higher initial chloride concentration resulted in a higher equilibrium dissolved fluoride concentration. A simplified one-dimensional transport model for dual anions was developed and found to reliably describe the dynamic process of removal of both fluoride and chloride ions in CDI cells over a range of well-defined operating conditions. Based on the ability of the model to describe fluoride removal, it was extended to description of nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters and also found to perform well. Thus, the approach to description of ion removal, at least in batch studies, appears robust and should assist in optimization of design and operating conditions such that optimal removal of trace ionic species is achieved even when high background concentrations of salt are present.

  1. Fluoride in weathered rock aquifers of southern India: Managed Aquifer Recharge for mitigation.

    PubMed

    Brindha, K; Jagadeshan, G; Kalpana, L; Elango, L

    2016-05-01

    Climatic condition, geology, and geochemical processes in an area play a major role on groundwater quality. Impact of these on the fluoride content of groundwater was studied in three regions-part of Nalgonda district in Telangana, Pambar River basin, and Vaniyar River basin in Tamil Nadu, southern India, which experience semi-arid climate and are predominantly made of Precambrian rocks. High concentration of fluoride in groundwater above 4 mg/l was recorded. Human exposure dose for fluoride through groundwater was higher in Nalgonda than the other areas. With evaporation and rainfall being one of the major contributors for high fluoride apart from the weathering of fluoride rich minerals from rocks, the effect of increase in groundwater level on fluoride concentration was studied. This study reveals that groundwater in shallow environment of all three regions shows dilution effect due to rainfall recharge. Suitable managed aquifer recharge (MAR) methods can be adopted to dilute the fluoride rich groundwater in such regions which is explained with two case studies. However, in deep groundwater, increase in fluoride concentration with increase in groundwater level due to leaching of fluoride rich salts from the unsaturated zone was observed. Occurrence of fluoride above 1.5 mg/l was more in areas with deeper groundwater environment. Hence, practicing MAR in these regions will increase the fluoride content in groundwater and so physical or chemical treatment has to be adopted. This study brought out the fact that MAR cannot be practiced in all regions for dilution of ions in groundwater and that it is essential to analyze the fluctuation in groundwater level and the fluoride content before suggesting it as a suitable solution. Also, this study emphasizes that long-term monitoring of these factors is an important criterion for choosing the recharge areas.

  2. [CHRONIC FLUORIDE INTOXICATION AS A RISK FACTOR FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS].

    PubMed

    Korotenko, O Yu; Panev, N I; Zakharenkov, V V; Filimonov, S N; Semenova, E A; Panev, R N

    2015-01-01

    In workers employed in the aluminum industry, the main harmful production factor is exposure to fluoride salts, which can cause chronic fluoride intoxication. For the assessment of the impact of chronic fluoride intoxication on the development of atherosclerosis, we conducted a comprehensive survey of 87 aluminum-metal makers with chronic fluoride intoxication and 43 aluminum-metal makers without occupational diseases, mean age--52.1 ± 0.4 years. There were considered the presence and severity of atherosclerosis of brachiocephalic arteries, and the arteries of the lower extremities in the studied group, there was evaluated the effect of other risk factors for atherosclerosis (smoking, presence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia). With the use of Doppler ultrasound of the arteries it was revealed that in metallurgists with chronic fluoride intoxication atherosclerosis was detected in 73.6% versus 55.8% in persons of the comparison group. The performed analysis of the prevalence of main risk factors for atherosclerosis showed that in metal makers with chronic fluoride intoxication in combination with atherosclerosis hypertension is more common (in 54.7%) than in metallurgists with chronic fluoride intoxication without atherosclerosis--only 26.1%. According to the frequency of occurrence of smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia, there were no significant differences between the metallurgists with chronic fluoride intoxication, with and without atherosclerosis, and the control group, the increase in LDL cholesterol occurs significantly more often in metal-makers with chronic fluoride intoxication in combination with atherosclerosis if compared to workers without occupational diseases. Thus, chronic fluoride intoxication acts as a risk factor in the development of atherosclerosis: atherosclerosis in metal-makers with chronic fluoride intoxication occurs more frequently than in workers who do not have professional pathology

  3. Fluoride in weathered rock aquifers of southern India: Managed Aquifer Recharge for mitigation.

    PubMed

    Brindha, K; Jagadeshan, G; Kalpana, L; Elango, L

    2016-05-01

    Climatic condition, geology, and geochemical processes in an area play a major role on groundwater quality. Impact of these on the fluoride content of groundwater was studied in three regions-part of Nalgonda district in Telangana, Pambar River basin, and Vaniyar River basin in Tamil Nadu, southern India, which experience semi-arid climate and are predominantly made of Precambrian rocks. High concentration of fluoride in groundwater above 4 mg/l was recorded. Human exposure dose for fluoride through groundwater was higher in Nalgonda than the other areas. With evaporation and rainfall being one of the major contributors for high fluoride apart from the weathering of fluoride rich minerals from rocks, the effect of increase in groundwater level on fluoride concentration was studied. This study reveals that groundwater in shallow environment of all three regions shows dilution effect due to rainfall recharge. Suitable managed aquifer recharge (MAR) methods can be adopted to dilute the fluoride rich groundwater in such regions which is explained with two case studies. However, in deep groundwater, increase in fluoride concentration with increase in groundwater level due to leaching of fluoride rich salts from the unsaturated zone was observed. Occurrence of fluoride above 1.5 mg/l was more in areas with deeper groundwater environment. Hence, practicing MAR in these regions will increase the fluoride content in groundwater and so physical or chemical treatment has to be adopted. This study brought out the fact that MAR cannot be practiced in all regions for dilution of ions in groundwater and that it is essential to analyze the fluctuation in groundwater level and the fluoride content before suggesting it as a suitable solution. Also, this study emphasizes that long-term monitoring of these factors is an important criterion for choosing the recharge areas. PMID:26822219

  4. Fluoride Consumption and Its Impact on Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Farfán, María Dolores; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Juárez-López, Lilia Adriana; Jacinto-Alemán, Luis Fernando; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries and dental fluorosis among Mexican preschoolers and school-aged children in a non-endemic zone for fluorosis and to measure its biological indicators. Methods DMFT, DMFS, dmft, dmfs, and CDI indexes were applied. Fluoride urinary excretion and fluoride concentrations in home water, table salt, bottled water, bottled drinks, and toothpaste were determined. Results Schoolchildren presented fluorosis (CDI = 0.96) and dental caries (DMFT = 2.64 and DMFS = 3.97). Preschoolers presented dmft = 4.85 and dmfs = 8.80. DMFT and DMFS were lower in children with mild to moderate dental fluorosis (DF). Variable fluoride concentrations were found in the analyzed products (home water = 0.18–0.44 ppm F, table salt = 0–485 ppm F, bottled water = 0.18–0.47 ppm F, juices = 0.08–1.42 ppm F, nectars = 0.07–1.30 ppm F, bottled drinks = 0.10–1.70 ppm F, toothpaste = 0–2,053 ppm F). Mean daily fluoride excretion was 422 ± 176 μg/24 h for schoolchildren and 367 ± 150 μg/24 h for preschoolers. Conclusions Data from our study show that, despite values of excretion within an optimal fluoride intake range, the prevalence of caries was significant in both groups, and 60% of the 11- to 12-year-old children presented with dental fluorosis. In addition, variable fluoride concentrations in products frequently consumed by children were found. PMID:21318021

  5. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  6. Salt Selection for the LS-VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.; Clarno, K.T.

    2006-07-01

    Molten fluorides were initially developed for use in the nuclear industry as the high temperature fluid-fuel for a Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The Office of Nuclear Energy is exploring the use of molten fluorides as a primary coolant (rather than helium) in an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) design, also know as the Liquid-Salt cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This paper provides a review of relevant properties for use in evaluation and ranking of candidate coolants for the LS-VHTR. Nuclear, physical, and chemical properties were reviewed and metrics for evaluation are recommended. Chemical properties of the salt were examined for the purpose of identifying factors that effect materials compatibility (i.e., corrosion). Some preliminary consideration of economic factors for the candidate salts is also presented. (authors)

  7. Factors affecting the bioaccessibility of fluoride from seafood products.

    PubMed

    Rocha, R A; de la Fuente, B; Clemente, M J; Ruiz, A; Vélez, D; Devesa, V

    2013-09-01

    Fluoride is considered important for health because of its beneficial effect on the prevention of dental caries and on bone development in the child population. However, excessive intake has negative effects. The main pathway for exposure is oral, through consumption of drinking water, and some food products. Therefore its bioaccessibility (quantity of the element solubilized during the digestive process) is a parameter to be considered when estimating the risk/benefit associated with this element. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of the digestion phase, gastrointestinal digestion factors (pH, pepsin and bile salt concentrations) and the presence of cations on the bioaccessibility of fluoride from seafood products. The results show that the solubilization of fluoride takes place entirely during the gastric phase. Its bioaccessibility is strongly influenced by conditions that favor the formation of insoluble complexes of fluoride with other elements present in the matrix. The factors that are most influential in reducing its bioaccessibility are the increase in pH in the gastric phase, the presence of cations, especially in the intestinal phase, and a low concentration of bile salts.

  8. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  9. Surface tension of molten mixtures of fluorides of lithium, beryllium, and thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenkov, A.A.; Chevinskii, Y.F.; Kurbatov, N.N.; Raspopin, S.P.

    1984-12-01

    Melts of mixtures of fluorides of lithium, beryllium, thorium and uranium satisfy most completely the many requirements imposed on fuel composites and breeder-zone materials in a liquid-salt nuclear reactor, and therefore there is a need for information on the physicochemical properties of such melts. This paper reports on a study in which the surface tension of three-component melts containing fluorides of thorium, beryllium and lithium were measured by the maximum-pressure method in a gas bubble. The salts investigated were placed in glass carbon crucibles. The material used for the capillaries was nickel, which is resistant to the action of fluoride melts. As the working gas, the authors used argon from which the traces of moisture and oxygen had been removed. The surface tension was calculated by the Cantor-Schrodinger method and in the investigations close attention was paid to the preparation of the appropriate anhydrous salts.

  10. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    PubMed

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body. PMID:26475300

  11. WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-11-25

    The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

  12. PREPARATION OF ANHYDROUS F-18 FLUORIDE, T. Tewson. Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals S165; 52, Supplement 1 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Tewson, T.

    2009-07-01

    The original specific aims of the grant where cut back considerably as the study section reduced both the time and the budget for the project. The objective of the grant was to show that fluorine-18 fluoride could be prepared completely anhydrous and thus substantially more reactive than conventionally dried fluoride using the method of Sun and DiMagno. This method involved using conventionally dried fluoride to prepare an aromatic fluoride in which the aromatic ring is substituted with electron withdrawing groups. The aryl fluoride is then dried and purified and the fluoride is displaced with an anhydrous nucleophile. Using fluorine-19 and macroscopic scale reactions the reactions work well and give anhydrous fluoride salts that are both more reactive and more selective in their reactions than conventionally dried fluoride. The original substrate chosen for the reaction was bromopentacyanobenzene (1). This compound proved to be easy to make but very hard to purify. As an alternative hexabromobenzene, which is commercially available in high purity, was tried. This reacted cleanly with conventionally dried F-18 fluoride in acetonitrile to give [{sup 18}F]-fluoropentabromobenzene (2), which could be dried by passage of the solution over alumina, which also removed any unreacted fluoride. The fluorine-18 fluoride could be liberated from (2) by displacement with an anhydrous nucleophilic tetra-alkylammonium salt but the anion had to be chosen with considerable care. The reaction is potentially reversible especially as, on the no carrier added scale, there is inevitably an excess of hexabromobenzene and so the displacing nucleophile is chosen to deactivate the aromatic compound to further nucleophilic displacement reactions. To this end tetrabutylammonium azide and tetrabutylammonium phenolate have been tried. Both work but the phenolate is probably the better choice. The F-18 fluoride produced by this process is substantially more reactive than conventionally dried

  13. Determination of Stability Constants of Hydrogen and Aluminum Fluorides with a Fluoride-Selective Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    2003-01-06

    The ability to directly determine free fluoride ion concentration (or mean activity) simplifies gathering and interpretation of experimental data for studies of metal complexes. In this work, the new lanthanum fluoride electrode was used to measure free fluoride ion in an investigation of the hydrogen-fluoride and aluminum-fluoride systems in NH4NO3.

  14. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  15. Vapor liquid equilibria on the ternary lithium fluoride-sodium fluoride-beryllium fluoride system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Grant Takeshi

    Molten mixtures of LiF, NaF, and BeF2 (FLiNaBe) have been proposed as a liquid first wall for selected fusion reactor designs. Because currently envisaged reactor technologies for igniting and/or sustaining a, fusion reaction require vacuum conditions, the volatility of these liquids is an issue for concern. Many physical properties of the ternary LiF-NaF-BeF 2 (FLiNaBe) system have already been studied as part of the molten salt reactor program, but the vapor pressure has not been measured. A study of the vapor liquid equilibrium of FLiNaBe by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Knudsen Cell Mass Spectrometry (KCMS) is presented. The ternary system is treated as a pseudo-binary system by fixing the ratio of LiF:NaF and varying the amount of BeF2. Measurements have been performed over a composition range of 0.3--0.8 mole fraction BeF2 and from 875--975K. Experimental data, are correlated in terms of the BeF 2 activity coefficient. Measurements were also carried out on the binary systems LiF-BeF2 and NaF-BeF2. Measured values of the BeF2 activity coefficient in the binary LiF-BeF2 and NaF-BeF2 systems compare satisfactorily with previous results published in the research literature. The vapor phase of FLiNaBe was found to consist of primarily the species BeF2, LiBeF3, and NaBeF 3 over the temperature and composition range studied. Mixtures of BeF2-containing fluoride salts are highly non-ideal; the BeF2 activity coefficient exhibits both positive and negative deviations from ideality over the composition range studied. An associated solution model with 3 adjustable parameters is used to fit the BeF2 activity coefficient data of the LiF-BeF2 and NaF-BeF2 systems. The parameters obtained from fitting binary data are then used to fit the ternary system. The extension of the model to the ternary system results in a single additional parameter that can only be determined from fitting ternary data. Overall the agreement between the model and experimental data is within

  16. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  17. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  18. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  19. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  20. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  1. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. The binary system difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride forms a homogeneous liquid phase, and the others form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes at the experimental conditions.

  2. The molten salt reactor adventure

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1985-08-01

    A personal history of the development of molten salt reactors in the United States is presented. The initial goal was an aircraft propulsion reactor, and a molten fluoride-fueled Aircraft Reactor Experiment was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1954. In 1956, the objective shifted to civilian nuclear power, and reactor concepts were developed using a circulating UF4-ThF4 fuel, graphite moderator, and Hastelloy N pressure boundary. The program culminated in the successful operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment in 1965 to 1969. By then the Atomic Energy Commission's goals had shifted to breeder development; the molten salt program supported on-site reprocessing development and study of various reactor arrangements that had potential to breed. Some commercial and foreign interest contributed to the program which, however, was terminated by the government in 1976. The current status of the technology and prospects for revived interest are summarized.

  3. Advantages of liquid fluoride thorium reactor in comparison with light water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul Majid, Amran Ab.; Al-Areqi, Wadeeah M.

    2015-04-29

    Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR) is an innovative design for the thermal breeder reactor that has important potential benefits over the traditional reactor design. LFTR is fluoride based liquid fuel, that use the thorium dissolved in salt mixture of lithium fluoride and beryllium fluoride. Therefore, LFTR technology is fundamentally different from the solid fuel technology currently in use. Although the traditional nuclear reactor technology has been proven, it has perceptual problems with safety and nuclear waste products. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential advantages of LFTR in three aspects such as safety, fuel efficiency and nuclear waste as an alternative energy generator in the future. Comparisons between LFTR and Light Water Reactor (LWR), on general principles of fuel cycle, resource availability, radiotoxicity and nuclear weapon proliferation shall be elaborated.

  4. Advantages of liquid fluoride thorium reactor in comparison with light water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul; Majid, Amran Ab.; Al-Areqi, Wadeeah M.

    2015-04-01

    Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR) is an innovative design for the thermal breeder reactor that has important potential benefits over the traditional reactor design. LFTR is fluoride based liquid fuel, that use the thorium dissolved in salt mixture of lithium fluoride and beryllium fluoride. Therefore, LFTR technology is fundamentally different from the solid fuel technology currently in use. Although the traditional nuclear reactor technology has been proven, it has perceptual problems with safety and nuclear waste products. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential advantages of LFTR in three aspects such as safety, fuel efficiency and nuclear waste as an alternative energy generator in the future. Comparisons between LFTR and Light Water Reactor (LWR), on general principles of fuel cycle, resource availability, radiotoxicity and nuclear weapon proliferation shall be elaborated.

  5. Rapid Synthesis of Aryl Fluorides in Continuous Flow through the Balz-Schiemann Reaction.

    PubMed

    Park, Nathaniel H; Senter, Timothy J; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2016-09-19

    The Balz-Schiemann reaction remains a highly utilized means for preparing aryl fluorides from anilines. However, the limitations associated with handling aryl diazonium salts often hinder both the substrate scope and scalability of this reaction. To address this, a new continuous flow protocol was developed that eliminates the need to isolate the aryl diazonium salts. The new process has enabled the fluorination of an array of aryl and heteroaryl amines. PMID:27558308

  6. Comparison of the toxicity of fluoridation compounds in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Rice, Julie R; Boyd, Windy A; Chandra, Dave; Smith, Marjolein V; Den Besten, Pamela K; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    Fluorides are commonly added to drinking water in the United States to decrease the incidence of dental caries. Silicofluorides, such as sodium hexafluorosilicate (Na2 SiF6 ) and fluorosilicic acid (H2 SiF6 ), are mainly used for fluoridation, although fluoride salts such as sodium fluoride (NaF) are also used. Interestingly, only the toxicity of NaF has been examined and not that of the more often used silicofluorides. In the present study, the toxicities of NaF, Na2 SiF6 , and H2 SiF6 were compared. The toxicity of these fluorides on the growth, feeding, and reproduction in the alternative toxicological testing organism Caenorhabditis elegans was examined. Exposure to these compounds produced classic concentration-response toxicity profiles. Although the effects of the fluoride compounds varied among the 3 biological endpoints, no differences were found between the 3 compounds, relative to the fluoride ion concentration, in any of the assays. This suggests that silicofluorides have similar toxicity to NaF.

  7. Study of fluoride content in groundwater of Nawa Tehsil in Nagaur, Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Radha; Bhardwaj, Nagendra; Saini, Yashoda

    2011-01-01

    There is a severe fluoride problem in Nawa tehsil of Nagaur district. Villagers are suffering from dental fluorosis and skeletal fluorosis. So an extensive geochemical study of 27 villages of eastern, south-eastern and southern zone of Nawa tehsil was done. Total 46 ground water samples were collected and analyzed for various physicochemical parameters as well as fluoride content. The ground water samples collected in clean polyethylene plastic containers were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved salts, calcium, magnesium, total hardness, chloride and alkalinity. The fluoride concentration in the three different zones ranged from 0.64 to 14.62 mg l(-1) where 13.04% samples were found within permissible limit while 86.96% had fluoride beyond permissible limit (> 1.5 mg l(-1)). It was found that among the three different zones south-eastern zone was under serious fluoride contamination where fluoride concentration ranged between 1.10 to 14.62 mg l(-1). In the eastern zone fluoride concentration was recorded from 1.52 to 5.13 mg l(-1) whereas in the southern zone it was found between 0.64 to 3.63 mg l(-1).

  8. Synthesis of fluoride-releasing carbonate apatites for bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yokoyama, Daiki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; LeGeros, Racquel Z

    2007-06-01

    Fluoride (F-)-substituted B-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHAP) powders were prepared for application as bone substitute materials having the ability to enhance bone formation and to suppress bone resorption due to the therapeutic effect of F-. F- was adsorbed on CHAP in a sodium fluoride solution followed by heating at 700 degrees C in carbon dioxide flow to substitute F- for the hydroxyl ion in the CHAP structure. The F- contents in the F-substituted CHAP powders were 16-22 times greater than that in normal adult human bones. The carbonate ion contents in the F-substituted CHAP powders corresponded to or were higher than that in normal adult human bones. F-substituted CHAP powder with CO3(2-) and F- contents of 11.03 and 0.66 wt%, respectively, slowly released F- in a physiological salt solution to a sufficiently high F- level. The F- concentration slowly increased and reached 67.20 +/- 4.81 microg l(-1), which was 1.5-9.3 times higher than that in the body fluid of normal adult humans, near the therapeutic window of F-, and far lower than the estimated toxic level. Therefore, the F-substituted CHAP can promote bone formation. The present F-substituted CHAP has the advantage of slow F- release over sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate which are highly soluble salts and cannot be sintered into a ceramic body.

  9. Observations of the freeze/thaw performance of lithium fluoride by motion picture photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    To gain direct observation of the molten salt phase change, a novel containerless technique was developed where the high surface tension of lithium fluoride was used to suspend a bead of the molten salt inside a specially designed wire cage. By varying the current passing through the wire, the cage also served as a variable heat source. In this way, the freeze/thaw performance of the lithium fluoride could be photographed by motion picture photography without the influence of container walls. The motion picture photography of the lithium fluoride sample revealed several zones during the phase change, a solid zone and a liquid zone, as expected, and a slush zone that was predicted by thermal analysis modeling.

  10. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  11. Do Fluoride Ions Protect Teeth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Begins with the procedure and results from an investigation on the effect of fluoride on the reaction between eggshell (substitute teeth) and dilute ethanoic acid. Describes an elegantly modified and improvised apparatus. (DDR)

  12. Evaluation of Salt Coolants for Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, David F

    2008-01-01

    Molten fluorides were initially developed for use in the nuclear industry as the high-temperature fluid fuel for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is exploring the use of molten salts as primary and secondary coolants in a new generation of solid-fueled, thermal-spectrum, hightemperature reactors. This paper provides a review of relevant properties for use in evaluation and ranking of salt coolants for high-temperature reactors. Nuclear, physical, and chemical properties were reviewed, and metrics for evaluation are recommended. Chemical properties of the salt were examined to identify factors that affect materials compatibility (i.e., corrosion). Some preliminary consideration of economic factors for the candidate salts is also presented.

  13. Compatibility of molten salts with advanced solar dynamic receiver materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal-coated graphite fibers are being considered as a thermal conductivity enhancement filler material for molten salts in solar dynamic thermal energy storage systems. The successful metal coating chosen for this application must exhibit acceptable wettability and must be compatible with the molten salt environment. Contact angle values between molten lithium fluoride and several metal, metal fluoride, and metal oxide substrates have been determined at 892 C using a modification of the Wilhelmy plate technique. Reproducible contact angles with repeated exposure to the molten LiF indicated compatibility.

  14. PROCESS OF PREPARING A FLUORIDE OF TETRAVLENT URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Wheelwright, E.J.

    1959-02-17

    A method is described for producing a fluoride salt pf tetravalent uranium suitable for bomb reduction to metallic uranium. An aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate is treated with acetic acid and a nitrite-suppressor and then contacted with metallic lead whereby uranium is reduced from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state and soluble lead acetate is formed. Sulfate ions are then added to the solution to precipitate and remove the lead values. Hydrofluoric acid and alkali metal ions are then added causing the formation of an alkali metal uranium double-fluoride in which the uranium is in the tetravalent state. After recovery, this precipitate is suitable for using in the limited production of metallic uranium.

  15. Viscosity of molten lithium, thorium and beryllium fluorides mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzlyakov, Alexander V.; Ignatiev, Victor V.; Abalin, Sergei S.

    2011-12-01

    Considering development of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) concept, following Molten Salt fluorides mixtures have been chosen as an object for viscosity studies in this work (in mol%): 78LiF-22ThF 4; 71LiF-27ThF 4-2BeF 2 and 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2. Additionally, the effect of the 3 mol% CeF 3 additives on viscosity of the molten 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2 (mol%) salt mixture has been investigated experimentally. The method of torsional oscillations of cylindrical crucible filled by molten fluorides mixture has been chosen for kinematic viscosity measurement at temperatures up to 800-850 °C. In temperature ranges, where melts behave as normal liquids, dependences on viscosity vs. temperature are received: ν = А exp [B/T(K)], where ν - kinematic viscosity, m 2/s; T - temperature, K. The kinematic viscosity Rout mean squares (RMS) estimated in the assumption about dispersion homoscedasticity is (0.04-0.12) × 10 -6 (m 2/s). Discrepancies left in the data of viscosity for molten mixtures of LiF, BeF 2 and ThF 4 received by different researchers need further investigations in this area to be continued.

  16. The synthesis and structural characterization of novel transition metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Casteel, W.J. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    High purity KMF[sub 6] and K[sub 2]MF[sub 6] salts (M = Mo,Re, Ru, Os, Ir, Pt) are obtained from reduction hexafluorides. A rhombohedral unit cell is observed for KReF[sub 6]. Fluoride ion capture by Lewis acids from the hexafluorometallate (IV) salts affords high purity tetrafluorides for M = Mo, Re, Ru, Os, and Pd. The structure of RuF[sub 4] is determined from X-ray synchrotron and neutron powder data. Unit cells based on theorthorhombic PdF[sub 4] type cell are derived from X-ray powder data for ReF[sub 4] and OsF[sub 4]. Fluoride ion capture from KAgF[sub 4] provides the thermally unstable trifluoride as a bright, red, diamagnetic solid. The structure solution of AgF[sub 3] and redetermination of the AuF[sub 3] structure from X-ray synchrotron and neutron powder data demonstrate that the two are isostnictural. Thermal decomposition product of AgF[sub 3] is the mixed valence compound Ag[sup II]Ag[sub 2][sup III]F[sub 8]. Several new salts containing the (Ag - F)[sub n][sup n+] chain cation are prepared. The first linear (Ag - F)[sub n][sup n+] chain is observed in AgF[sup +]BF[sub 4 [sup [minus

  17. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface; with more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix/mineral interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the doserelated decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffleended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As

  18. Analytical chemistry of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Smith, F.P.; Snyder, C.T.

    1997-02-01

    Component phases of Al salt cake or products from processing salt cake, resist dissolution, a key first step in most analysis procedures. In this work (analysis support to a study of conversion of salt cake fines to value-added oxide products), analysis methods were adapted or devised for determining leachable salt, total halides (Cl and F), Al metal, and elemental composition. Leaching of salt cake fines was by ultrasonic agitation with deionized water. The leachate was analyzed for anions by ion chromatography and for cations by ICP-atomic emission spectroscopy. Only chloride could be measured in the anions, and charge balances between cations and chloride were near unity, indicating that all major dissolved species were chloride salts. For total halides, the chloride and fluorides components were first decomposed by KOH fusion, and the dissolved chloride and fluoride were measured by ion chromatography. Al metal in the fines was determined by a hydrogen evolution procedure adapted for submilligram quantities of metallic Al: the Al was reacted with HCl in a closed system containing a measured amount of high-purity He. After reaction, the H/He ratio was measured by mass spectroscopy. Recoveries of Al metal standards (about 30mg) averaged 93%. Comparison of the acid evolution with caustic reaction of the Al metal showed virtually identical results, but reaction was faster in the acid medium. Decomposition of the salt cake with mineral acids left residues that had to be dissolved by fusion with Na carbonate. Better dissolution was obtained by fusing the salt cake with Li tetraborate; the resulting solution could be used for accurate Al assay of salt cake materials by classical 8-hydroxyquinolate gravimetry.

  19. [Natural fluorides. The distinction between technically produced and naturally occurring fluorides in caries prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Newesely, H

    1977-06-01

    In the controversial discussion of the bio-availability of fluoride in caries prophylaxis by fluoridation, fluorides coming from the geochemical circulation to the biochemical circulation are sometimes differentiated from synthetic fluorides introduced into fluoride medication. The question as to whether such a differentiation is essential can be answered from the physical-chemical point of view. This requires a wide field of scientific research starting with geochemistry and the knowledge of fluoride deposits, sedimentology, hydrology, technology of inorganic and organic fluorine compounds, thermodynamics of dissolved fluorides, up to biocrystallography and biochemistry of fluorine. PMID:267571

  20. Anodic oxidation of sulfide ions in molten lithium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C.L.; Gilbert, J.B. II . Applied Research Lab.)

    1994-10-01

    The study of sulfur and sulfide oxidation in molten salt systems is of current interest in high energy battery, and metallurgical applications. Cyclic voltammetry experiments have been performed on lithium sulfide in a lithium fluoride electrolyte at 1,161 K using a graphite working electrode and a platinum quasi-reference electrode. Two distinct oxidation mechanisms are observed for the sulfide ions. The first oxidation produces sulfur and at a higher potential a disulfide species is proposed to have formed. Both oxidations appear to be reversible and diffusion controlled.

  1. Beryllium Interactions in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Smolik; M. F. Simpson; P. J. Pinhero; M. Hara; Y. Hatano; R. A. Anderl; J. P. Sharpe; T. Terai; S. Tanaka; D. A. Petti; D.-K. Sze

    2006-01-01

    Molten flibe (2LiF·BeF2) is a candidate as a cooling and tritium breeding media for future fusion power plants. Neutron interactions with the salt will produce tritium and release excess free fluorine ions. Beryllium metal has been demonstrated as an effective redox control agent to prevent free fluorine, or HF species, from reacting with structural metal components. The extent and rate of beryllium solubility in a pot design experiments to suppress continuously supplied hydrogen fluoride gas has been measured and modeled[ ]. This paper presents evidence of beryllium loss from specimens, a dependence of the loss upon bi-metal coupling, i.e., galvanic effect, and the partitioning of the beryllium to the salt and container materials. Various posttest investigative methods, viz., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to explore this behavior.

  2. High-fluoride groundwater.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  3. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  4. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  5. A Manual for Rural School Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprouse, Larman W.; Brooks, John

    The product of a 1972 Dental Health Branch contract with the U.S. Public Health Service, this manual is designed to aid in the development of school fluoridation programs and presents: background information on general concepts relating to the action of fluoride on teeth; discussions dealing with community and school fluoridation studies; and the…

  6. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Santella, Michael L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  7. Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic organic solvent-aqueous salt solution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Mokshina, N. Ya.; Zykov, A. V.

    2010-03-01

    Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic solvent ( n-butanol, isopropanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, and their mixtures)-aqueous salt (potassium chloride, sodium fluoride, and ammonium sulfate salting-out agents) solution systems were calculated. The synergic effect and optimum proportions of components in the solvent mixture for efficient extraction of vitamin B2 from aqueous solutions were established.

  8. Void control in the crystallization of lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Perry, William D.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of tungsten-coated graphite fibers on the radiant heat transfer characteristics of salt-fiber composites was studied by measuring the onset of melting as a function of applied furnace power. As the fiber concentration was increased from 0 to 5.40 percent fiber by weight, the furnace temperature required to melt the lithium fluoride also increased. Upon cooling, each of the crystalline salt-fiber composites were cut open with a diamond saw to expose the void. Optical photographs of the voids revealed a trend in void location and size, with the largest void, and the least change in the outer dimension of the boule upon cooling, occurring in the sample with the most fiber.

  9. Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries: a summary of the current situation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs; contributing factors relate to misconceptions about the mechanisms of fluoride, low priority given to oral health in national health policy and strategic plans, and lack of interest among public health administrators. A workshop on the effective use of fluoride in Asia took place in Phang-Nga, Thailand, in 2011. A series of country presentations addressed some of the topics mentioned above; in addition, speakers from countries of the region provided examples of successful fluoride interventions and discussed program limitations, barriers encountered, and solutions, as well as possibilities for expanding coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition, the use of affordable fluoride-containing toothpastes should be encouraged. The workshop identified: strengths and weaknesses of ongoing community-based fluoride programs, as well as the interest of countries in a particular method; the requirement for World Health Organization (WHO) technical assistance on various aspects, including fluoridation process, feasibility studies, and implementation of effective epidemiological surveillance of the program; exchange of information; and the need for inter-country collaboration. It was acknowledged that program process and evaluation at the local and country levels need further dissemination. The meeting was co-sponsored by the World Health Organization, the International Association for Dental Research, and the World Dental Federation.

  10. The synthesis and structural characterization of novel transition metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Casteel, W.J. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    High purity KMF{sub 6} and K{sub 2}MF{sub 6} salts (M = Mo,Re, Ru, Os, Ir, Pt) are obtained from reduction hexafluorides. A rhombohedral unit cell is observed for KReF{sub 6}. Fluoride ion capture by Lewis acids from the hexafluorometallate (IV) salts affords high purity tetrafluorides for M = Mo, Re, Ru, Os, and Pd. The structure of RuF{sub 4} is determined from X-ray synchrotron and neutron powder data. Unit cells based on theorthorhombic PdF{sub 4} type cell are derived from X-ray powder data for ReF{sub 4} and OsF{sub 4}. Fluoride ion capture from KAgF{sub 4} provides the thermally unstable trifluoride as a bright, red, diamagnetic solid. The structure solution of AgF{sub 3} and redetermination of the AuF{sub 3} structure from X-ray synchrotron and neutron powder data demonstrate that the two are isostnictural. Thermal decomposition product of AgF{sub 3} is the mixed valence compound Ag{sup II}Ag{sub 2}{sup III}F{sub 8}. Several new salts containing the (Ag - F){sub n}{sup n+} chain cation are prepared. The first linear (Ag - F){sub n}{sup n+} chain is observed in AgF{sup +}BF{sub 4 {sup {minus}}} which crystallizes in a tetragonal unit. AgFAuF{sub 4} has a triclinic unit cell and is isostructural with CuFAuF{sub 4}. AgFAuF{sub 6} has an orthorhombic unit cell and appears to be isostructural with AgFAsF{sub 6}. A second mixed valence silver fluoride, Ag{sup II}Ag{sup III}F{sub 5}, is prepared, which magnetic measurements indicate is probably an AgF{sup +} salt. Magnetic data for all of the AgF{sup +} salts exhibit low magnitude, temperature independent paramagnetism characteristic of metallic systems. Cationic AG(II) in acidic AHF solutions is a powerful oxidizer, capable of oxidizing Xe to Xe(II) and O{sub 2} to O{sub 2}{sup +}. Reactions with C{sub 6}F{sub 6} and C{sub 3}F{sub 6} suggest an electron capture mechanism for cationic AG(II) oxidations.

  11. Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors - history and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlíř, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core and also by the requirements of continuous 'on-line' reprocessing of the spent fuel. The history of Molten Salt Reactors reaches the period of fifties and sixties, when the first experimental Molten Salt Reactors were constructed and tested in ORNL (US). Several molten salt techniques dedicated to fresh molten salt fuel processing and spent fuel reprocessing were studied and developed in those days. Today, after nearly thirty years of discontinuance, a renewed interest in the Molten Salt Reactor technology is observed. Current experimental R&D activities in the area of Molten Salt Reactor technology are realized by a relatively small number of research institutions mainly in the EU, Russia and USA. The main effort is directed primarily to the development of separation processes suitable for the molten salt fuel processing and reprocessing technology. The techniques under development are molten salt/liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media, fused salt volatilization techniques and gas extraction from the molten salt medium.

  12. Fluoride in chilies from southwestern china.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Shehong; Wang, Mingguo; Liu, Xiaojing; Zheng, Baoshan

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the fluoride contents in the chilies from southwest China and other countries in order to calculate the difference in fluoride levels in the fresh chilies. The standard method in China for analysis of fluoride in food (GB/T 5009.18-2003) was applied to determinate the fluoride content in chilies. By determining the fluoride content in 176 fresh chili samples from 77 counties in southwest China and 31 chili samples from other countries, the research not only aims to find the regularity of fluoride distribution in fresh chili, but also to determine the origin of fluoride in fresh chili in China compared with the foreign samples. The geometric mean of fluoride content in the fresh chili was 8.9 mg kg(-1) (dry weight, 176 samples, confidence level: 95%). According to the study on the contents of fluoride in fresh chili, it seems that the fluoride content standard for vegetables in GB2762-2005 in China is inappropriate for chili, and 24.7 mg kg(-1)(dry weight) and 5.2 mg kg(-1) (fresh weight) in recommend as the fluoride contaminated discrimination values for fresh chili.

  13. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    PubMed

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small.

  14. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  15. [Fluoride accumulation and distribution in mulberry insects near fluoride pollution sources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuyin; Lu, Shenggao

    2002-01-01

    Fluoride accumulation and the relative fluoride loading of different body parts in wild mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mandarina M.), mulberry geometrid (Pathonandria atrineata B.), and mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) near fluoride pollution sources were studied. Comparison of the fluoride content of insect bodies and mulberry leaves showed that insects collected from polluted sites had increased fluoride accumulation. The digestive tract of the insect had much higher fluoride content than the other parts of the body and was considered to be the important organ of fluoride accumulation. There were also wide differences in fluoride accumulation between different insect species within the same polluted site. The highly significantly correlation between fluoride contents of wild mulberry silkworm, mulberry geometrid, and mulberry silkworm with that of the mulberry leaves on which they were collected was found.

  16. The effect of fluoridation and its discontinuation on fluoride profiles in the alveolar bone of rat.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, Kyohei; Nakagaki, Haruo; Tsuboi, Shinji; Okumura, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Tomoko; Thuy, Tran Thu; Robinson, Colin

    2005-10-01

    We investigated the effect of fluoridation and its discontinuation on fluoride content in the alveolar portion of the mandible in rats. Drinking water with three different fluoride contents (0, 50, 100 ppmF) was given to rats for three different periods (4, 13 and 25 weeks). Fluoride concentrations were measured in the crest, the middle, and the apical parts of the alveolar bone and in the body of the mandible. Furthermore, after fluoridated drinking water was given to rats for 4 or 13 weeks, distilled water was given to them for 21 or 12 weeks respectively; and the effect of the discontinuation on fluoride profiles was investigated. Layer samples were analyzed by abrasive microsampling. Fluoride and phosphorus concentrations were determined by ion-specific electrode and colorimetric procedures, respectively. There was an increase in fluoride concentrations in the mandible in proportion to the fluoride content in the drinking water and the duration of fluoridation. After fluoridation was discontinued, fluoride concentrations in the surface layers of the mandible presented a decrease. Among the four different parts of the mandible, the upper part of the alveolar bone and the alveolar crest part presented the highest rates of reduction. The relative reduction rate of fluoride concentration was closely related to the duration of discontinuation. The alveolar crest was affected most by the discontinuation of fluoridation, presenting the greatest reduction.

  17. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (<0.5 mg/L) is beneficial in promoting dental health by reducing dental caries, whereas higher concentrations (>1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects.

  18. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  19. Determining the optimal fluoride concentration in drinking water for fluoride endemic regions in South India.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopalan; Jaswanth, A; Gopalakrishnan, S; Siva Ilango, S; Aditya, G

    2009-10-01

    Fluoride ion in drinking water is known for both beneficial and detrimental effects on health. The prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the intake of large quantities of fluoride through drinking water owing to more than 90% bioavailability. The objective of this study is to predict optimal fluoride level in drinking water for fluoride endemic regions by comprising the levels of fluoride and other water quality parameters in drinking water, prevalence of fluorosis, fluoride intake through water, food and beverages such as tea and coffee and also considering the progressive accumulation of fluoride in animal bones, by comparing with non fluoride endemic areas comprise of the same geological features with the aid of regression analysis. Result of this study shows that increase of fluoride level above 1.33 mg/l in drinking water increases the community fluorosis index (CFI) value more than 0.6, an optimum index value above which fluorosis is considered to be a public health problem. Regression plot between water fluoride and bone fluoride levels indicates that, every increase of 0.5mg/l unit of water fluoride level increases the bone fluoride level of 52 mg/kg unit within 2 to 3 years. Furthermore, the consumption of drinking water containing more than 0.65 mg/l of fluoride can raise the total fluoride intake per day more than 4 mg, which is the optimum fluoride dose level recommended for adults by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. From the result, the people in fluoride endemic areas in South India are advised to consume drinking water with fluoride level within the limit of 0.5 to 0.65 mg/l to avoid further fluorosis risk.

  20. Global affordability of fluoride toothpaste

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ann S; Yee, Robert; Holmgren, Christopher J; Benzian, Habib

    2008-01-01

    Objective Dental caries remains the most common disease worldwide and the use of fluoride toothpaste is a most effective preventive public health measure to prevent it. Changes in diets following globalization contribute to the development of dental caries in emerging economies. The aim of this paper is to compare the cost and relative affordability of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries. The hypothesis is that fluoride toothpaste is not equally affordable in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Methods Data on consumer prices of fluoride toothpastes were obtained from a self-completion questionnaire from 48 countries. The cost of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries was compared and related to annual household expenditure as well as to days of work needed to purchase the average annual usage of toothpaste per head. Results The general trend seems to be that the proportion of household expenditure required to purchase the annual dosage of toothpaste increases as the country's per capita household expenditure decreases. While in the UK for the poorest 30% of the population only 0.037 days of household expenditure is needed to purchase the annual average dosage (182.5 g) of the lowest cost toothpaste, 10.75 days are needed in Kenya. The proportion of annual household expenditure ranged from 0.02% in the UK to 4% in Zambia to buy the annual average amount of lowest cost toothpaste per head. Conclusion Significant inequalities in the affordability of this essential preventive care product indicate the necessity for action to make it more affordable. Various measures to improve affordability based on experiences from essential pharmaceuticals are proposed. PMID:18554382

  1. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, Ella A.; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity. PMID:26727989

  2. Potable groundwater quality in some villages of Haryana, India: focus on fluoride.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Mukul; Arora, Shalu

    2007-04-01

    The fluoride concentration in ground water was determined in ten villages of Rohtak district of Haryana state (India). The fluoride concentration in the underground water of these villages varied from 0.034-2.09 mg/l. Various other water quality parameters, viz., pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved salts, total hardness, total alkalinity sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride and sulfate were also measured. A systematic calculation of correlation coefficients among different physicochemical parameters indicated considerable variations among the analyzed samples with respect to their chemical composition. Majority of the samples do not comply with Indian as well as WHO standards for most of the water quality parameters measured. Overall water quality was found unsatisfactory for drinking purposes. Fluoride content was higher than permissible limit in 50% samples.

  3. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used... fluoride resins consist of basic resins produced by the polymerization of vinylidene fluoride. (b)...

  4. [Alternative ways of fluoride supplementation in childhood (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, K E; Bergmann, R L

    1977-02-01

    Fluorine is a nutritionally essential trace element. Fluoride concentration in drinking water of West Germany is very low, with rare exceptions. Fluoride intake with food therefore is inadequate. Consequently, for maintenance of normal dental health, fluoride has to be supplemented by some way. A number of methods of fluoride supplementation are being discussed in this paper and compared to drinking waster fluoridation.

  5. Inverse temperature dependence of electrical conductivity of solutions of lithium salts in aprotic media

    SciTech Connect

    Plakhotnik, V.N.; Tovmash, N.F.; Kovtum, Yu.V.

    1987-08-01

    Solutions of lithium salts in aprotic dipolar solvents are studied in this paper for their use as electrolytes in lithium batteries. The temperature dependence and isotherms of the electric conductivity of molten salts of lithium fluorides with arsenic and boron are assessed against a range of solvents including tetrahydrofuran, propylene carbonate, 1,3-dioxolane, gamma-butyrolactone, water, hydrogen, and dimethoxyethane. Ionization potentials are given and molar ratios for the salts and solvents are tabulated.

  6. Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title: Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Background Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Methods Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Conclusions The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. PMID:24929594

  7. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments.

    PubMed

    Souza, Daniela Correia Cavalcante; Maltz, Marisa; Hashizume, Lina Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38) were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  8. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  9. Salivary fluoride levels after use of high-fluoride dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min(-1)) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P < 0.01). Even after 120 min, salivary F concentration was still higher than the baseline values for both dentifrices (P < 0.001). High-F dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk.

  10. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  11. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  12. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  13. Fluoride laser crystals: old and new

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenssen, Hans P.; Cassanho, Arlete

    2006-02-01

    The development of oxide and fluoride materials as gain materials of choice for solid state lasers ranges from early materials such as Calcium Fluoride and Calcium Tungstate crystals to the now ubiquitous Nd hosts YLF, YAG and Vanadate. Among Tunable laser materials, MgF II - an early favorite, gave way to superior oxides such as Alexandrite and Ti:Sapphire only to be followed by development of still newer tunable fluoride media, notably, fluoride colquiriites such as Cr-doped LiSAF and LiCaF. Newer fluoride crystals, such as Barium Yttrium Fluoride BaY II F 8 (BYF), KY 3F 10 (KYF) and the tunable Cr doped LiCaGaF 6 are attractive laser materials, but their growth has not been optimized. Key advantages of two of these new crystals are discussed. Crystal growth results for BYF and Cr:LiCaGaF 6 as well as some material characterization are presented.

  14. Systematic review of water fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Marian S; Whiting, Penny F; Wilson, Paul M; Sutton, Alex J; Chestnutt, Ivor; Cooper, Jan; Misso, Kate; Bradley, Matthew; Treasure, Elizabeth; Kleijnen, Jos

    2000-01-01

    Objective To review the safety and efficacy of fluoridation of drinking water. Design Search of 25 electronic databases and world wide web. Relevant journals hand searched; further information requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Main outcome measures Decayed, missing, and filled primary/permanent teeth. Proportion of children without caries. Measure of effect was the difference in change in prevalence of caries from baseline to final examination in fluoridated compared with control areas. For potential adverse effects, all outcomes reported were used. Results 214 studies were included. The quality of studies was low to moderate. Water fluoridation was associated with an increased proportion of children without caries and a reduction in the number of teeth affected by caries. The range (median) of mean differences in the proportion of children without caries was −5.0% to 64% (14.6%). The range (median) of mean change in decayed, missing, and filled primary/permanent teeth was 0.5 to 4.4 (2.25) teeth. A dose-dependent increase in dental fluorosis was found. At a fluoride level of 1 ppm an estimated 12.5% (95% confidence interval 7.0% to 21.5%) of exposed people would have fluorosis that they would find aesthetically concerning. Conclusions The evidence of a beneficial reduction in caries should be considered together with the increased prevalence of dental fluorosis. There was no clear evidence of other potential adverse effects. PMID:11021861

  15. FLUORIDATION CHEMISTRY: EQUILIBRIA AND KINETICS OF FLUORIDE AND FLUORO-COMPLEXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most common fluoridating agents used by major American waterworks are hexafluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6) and sodium hexxafluorosilicate (Na2SiF6). According to the 1992 Water Fluoridation Census where 10,002 utilities responded affirmatively to fluoridating their water, 59
    % ...

  16. PRECIPITATION OF URANIUM PEROXIDE OF LOW FLUORIDE CONTENT FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    King, E.J.; Clark, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    S>A method is described for the preparation of fluoride free uraniunn peroxide precipitates, even though the solution from which the precipitation is made is contaminated with fluorides. This is accomplished by add ing aluminum ions to the solution, where they complex any fluoride present and prevent its precipitation with the uramum peroxide.

  17. Colorimetric detection of in situ metal acetates and fluorides by a bipyridyl-linked Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Sivalingam; Zo, Hye Jin; Park, Jong S; Velmathi, Sivan

    2014-12-01

    Here, we present a new bipyridyl moiety linked Schiff base (bipy-1) that is well characterized using spectroscopic techniques. Colorimetric and UV-vis titrations were used to study the photophysical properties of bipy-1 in the presence of various tetrabutyl ammonium salt of anions and metal salts containing different counter cations. bipy-1 showed selective recognition of dimethyl sulphoxide solution of tetrabutyl ammonium salt of F(-) ion accompanied with a UV-vis band at 529 nm and interesting binding of aqueous Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides, as confirmed by distinct color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange and a strong band around 480-510 nm in the UV-vis spectrum. However, in the presence of Co, Ni, and Cu countercations, any form of metal acetate/fluorides was found to be able to respond to similar color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange, showing a band around 480-510 nm. This type of output clearly indicates that the in situ formation of Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides also coordinates with bipyridyl nitrogen atoms.

  18. Colorimetric detection of in situ metal acetates and fluorides by a bipyridyl-linked Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Sivalingam; Zo, Hye Jin; Park, Jong S; Velmathi, Sivan

    2014-12-01

    Here, we present a new bipyridyl moiety linked Schiff base (bipy-1) that is well characterized using spectroscopic techniques. Colorimetric and UV-vis titrations were used to study the photophysical properties of bipy-1 in the presence of various tetrabutyl ammonium salt of anions and metal salts containing different counter cations. bipy-1 showed selective recognition of dimethyl sulphoxide solution of tetrabutyl ammonium salt of F(-) ion accompanied with a UV-vis band at 529 nm and interesting binding of aqueous Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides, as confirmed by distinct color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange and a strong band around 480-510 nm in the UV-vis spectrum. However, in the presence of Co, Ni, and Cu countercations, any form of metal acetate/fluorides was found to be able to respond to similar color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange, showing a band around 480-510 nm. This type of output clearly indicates that the in situ formation of Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides also coordinates with bipyridyl nitrogen atoms. PMID:25319616

  19. Fluoride coatings make effective lubricants in molten sodium environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Coating bearing surfaces with calcium fluoride-barium fluoride film provides effective lubrication against sliding friction in molten sodium and other severe environments at high and low temperatures.

  20. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  1. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  2. Fluoride in drinking water and dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Antonijevic, Biljana; Carevic, Momir; Mandic, Jelena; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Lekic, Charles P

    2010-08-01

    In this study we determined the fluoride content in drinking water and hair of 12-year-old schoolchildren from different Serbian municipalities, i.e. Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja. The analyses were performed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Average fluoride levels were 0.10, 0.15, 0.79 and 11 ppm in well water, 0.07, 0.10, 0.17 and 0.15 ppm in tap water, 19.3, 21.5, 25.4, and 32.5 ppm in hair samples, in Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja, respectively. Correlation analysis indicated statistically significant positive relationship between fluoride in wells water and fluoride in hair, for all municipalities: correlation coefficients were 0.54 (p < 0.05), 0.89, 0.97 and 0.99 (p < 0.001), in Vranjska Banja, Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, and Kacarevo, respectively. Positive correlation was obtained also between fluoride in tap water and hair samples in all regions under the study, with statistical significance only in Valjevo municipality, p < 0.05. Dental examination of schoolchildren confirmed dental fluorosis only in the region of Vranjska Banja. Moreover, in endemic fluorotic region of Vranjska Banja, positive and statistically significant correlations were confirmed between fluoride in well water and dental fluorosis level (r = 0.61; p < 0.01) and additionally between fluoride in hair and dental fluorosis level (0.62; p < 0.01). The primary findings from this study have shown that fluoride content in hair is highly correlated with fluoride content in drinking water and dental fluorosis level, indicating that hair may be regarded as biomaterial of high informative potential in evaluating prolonged exposure to fluorides and to individuate children at risk of fluorosis regardless of the phase of teeth eruption. PMID:20580811

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Longevity of Fluoride Release From three Different Fluoride Varnishes – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, NM; Poornima, P; Nagaveni, NB; Neena, IE; Bharath, KP

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride varnishes play a pivotal role in inhibition of dental caries by increasing remineralization. Aim To determine the longevity of fluoride release from 3 different fluoride varnishes over a period of time through salivary fluoride estimation. Materials and Methods Twenty four extracted human deciduous anterior teeth were divided into four groups, i.e., ClinproTM XT, Flouritop SR, Flourprotector and Control group. Fluoride varnishes were applied on 3mm x 3mm window on labial surface of the teeth and then the teeth were immersed and stored in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in ppm was measured after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. Fluoride release at each time interval for different groups was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Post Hoc Tukey’s test. Results Although all the fluoride varnishes released fluoride, with greatest release observed during 1st week by Fluoritop SR (66.92±16.30ppm), ClinproTM XT Varnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than Fluoritop SR and Fluorprotector during 6 months analysis (p<0.05). Fluorprotector showed the lowest rate of F release among all the groups compared. Conclusion Over a period of 6 months ClinproTM XT Varnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than other tested products. PMID:27656559

  4. Differences in loosely bound fluoride formation and anticaries effect of resin-based fluoride varnishes.

    PubMed

    Maas, Jorge R S; Junior, Italo M Faraco; Lodi, Carolina S; Delbem, Alberto C B

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE.  Our in vitro study evaluated calcium fluoride formation in enamel and the anticaries effect of seven resin-based varnishes under cariogenic challenge. METHODS.  Enamel blocks were subjected to pH cycling. The experimental groups received fluoride varnish application, the positive control received topical fluoride gel treatment, and the negative control did not receive any treatment. The pH cycling surface hardness (SH1 ) and integrated loss of subsurface hardness (ΔKHN) were then determined. We measured the amount of fluoride released into the demineralizing and remineralizing (DE-RE) solutions used in pH cycling. The fluoride concentration in the enamel was determined 24 h after application of the products as loosely bound fluoride and firmly bound fluoride. RESULTS.  Higher deposits of loosely bound fluoride were observed for Duofluorid, followed by Biophat. For Duraphat, Bifluorid, Duraflur, and Duofluorid, no difference was observed in the SH1 and ΔKHN values, with the lowest mineral loss compared to the other groups. The Bifluorid and Duofluorid groups released high fluoride amounts into the DE-RE, and statistically significant difference was noted between them. CONCLUSIONS.  The anticaries effect showed no correlation with higher deposited fluoride amounts, resin type, or fluoride source.

  5. Fluoride Concentration in Dentin of Exfoliated Primary Teeth as a Biomarker for Cumulative Fluoride Exposure

    PubMed Central

    dela Cruz, G.G.; Rozier, R.G.; Bawden, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R2. A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure. PMID:18832828

  6. Fluoride concentration in dentin of exfoliated primary teeth as a biomarker for cumulative fluoride exposure.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, G G; Rozier, R G; Bawden, J W

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R(2). A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure.

  7. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed.

  8. The effect of fluoride contents in fluoridated hydroxyapatite on osteoblast behavior.

    PubMed

    Qu, Haibo; Wei, Mei

    2006-01-01

    Fluoridated hydroxyapatite (FHA) discs with various fluoride contents (0-0.567 mol F(-)/mol) [corrected] have been used to investigate the effect of fluoride content on osteoblastic cell behavior. SAOS-3 rat osteosarcoma cells were cultured on FHA discs for different time periods. The cell behavior was examined in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, morphology and differentiation. The fluoride content in FHA discs strongly affected the cell activities. More cell attachment and proliferation were observed on the fluoride-containing FHA discs than on pure hydroxyapatite (HA). The fluoride content also affected the differentiation behavior of osteoblastic cells. Cells on FHA discs demonstrated a higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity than those on pure HA after 2 [corrected] weeks of culturing. These results suggested that fluoride ions have a significant impact on different osteoblastic cell activities.

  9. Crystallinity and solubility behavior of iron-containing fluoridated hydroxyapatites.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Takahashi, J; Kimura, H

    1986-09-01

    Iron-containing fluoridated hydroxyapatites with various fluoride contents were synthesized at 80 degrees C and pH 7.4 using FeCl2 X nH2O as a source of iron. The Fe2+ uptake of fluoridated apatites was independent of fluoride concentration in the solution. a-Axis dimensions of Fe-containing apatites decreased with the degree of fluoridation in addition to the decrease related to the substitution of Fe2+ ions. All Fe-containing fluoridated apatites were less well crystallized than Fe-free fluoridated apatites previously reported, although with increasing degree of fluoridation, the crystallinity behavior of the former apatites appeared analogous to that of the latter apatites. In contrast to this inhibited crystallinity behavior, the apparent solubility of Fe-containing fluoridated apatites decreased more than that of Fe-free fluoridated apatites at low fluoride content.

  10. Inventories and mobilization of unsaturated zone sulfate, fluoride, and chloride related to land use change in semiarid regions, southwestern United States and Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Stonestrom, David A.; Reedy, Robert C.; Leaney, Fred W.; Gates, John; Cresswell, Richard G.

    2009-07-01

    Unsaturated zone salt reservoirs are potentially mobilized by increased groundwater recharge as semiarid lands are cultivated. This study explores the amounts of pore water sulfate and fluoride relative to chloride in unsaturated zone profiles, evaluates their sources, estimates mobilization due to past land use change, and assesses the impacts on groundwater quality. Inventories of water-extractable chloride, sulfate, and fluoride were determined from borehole samples of soils and sediments collected beneath natural ecosystems (N = 4), nonirrigated ("rain-fed") croplands (N = 18), and irrigated croplands (N = 6) in the southwestern United States and in the Murray Basin, Australia. Natural ecosystems contain generally large sulfate inventories (7800-120,000 kg/ha) and lower fluoride inventories (630-3900 kg/ha) relative to chloride inventories (6600-41,000 kg/ha). Order-of-magnitude higher chloride concentrations in precipitation and generally longer accumulation times result in much larger chloride inventories in the Murray Basin than in the southwestern United States. Atmospheric deposition during the current dry interglacial climatic regime accounts for most of the measured sulfate in both U.S. and Australian regions. Fluoride inventories are greater than can be accounted for by atmospheric deposition in most cases, suggesting that fluoride may accumulate across glacial/interglacial climatic cycles. Chemical modeling indicates that fluorite controls fluoride mobility and suggests that water-extractable fluoride may include some fluoride from mineral dissolution. Increased groundwater drainage/recharge following land use change readily mobilized chloride. Sulfate displacement fronts matched or lagged chloride fronts by up to 4 m. In contrast, fluoride mobilization was minimal in all regions. Understanding linkages between salt inventories, increased recharge, and groundwater quality is important for quantifying impacts of anthropogenic activities on groundwater

  11. Inventories and mobilization of unsaturated zone sulfate, fluoride, and chloride related to land use change in semiarid regions, southwestern United States and Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, B.R.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Reedy, R.C.; Leaney, F.W.; Gates, J.; Cresswell, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Unsaturated zone salt reservoirs are potentially mobilized by increased groundwater recharge as semiarid lands are cultivated. This study explores the amounts of pore water sulfate and fluoride relative to chloride in unsaturated zone profiles, evaluates their sources, estimates mobilization due to past land use change, and assesses the impacts on groundwater quality. Inventories of water-extractable chloride, sulfate, and fluoride were determined from borehole samples of soils and sediments collected beneath natural ecosystems (N = 4), nonirrigated ("rain-fed") croplands (N = 18), and irrigated croplands (N = 6) in the southwestern United States and in the Murray Basin, Australia. Natural ecosystems contain generally large sulfate inventories (7800-120,000 kg/ha) and lower fluoride inventories (630-3900 kg/ha) relative to chloride inventories (6600-41,000 kg/ha). Order-of-magnitude higher chloride concentrations in precipitation and generally longer accumulation times result in much larger chloride inventories in the Murray Basin than in the southwestern United States. Atmospheric deposition during the current dry interglacial climatic regime accounts for most of the measured sulfate in both U.S. and Australian regions. Fluoride inventories are greater than can be accounted for by atmospheric deposition in most cases, suggesting that fluoride may accumulate across glacial/ interglacial climatic cycles. Chemical modeling indicates that fluorite controls fluoride mobility and suggests that water-extractable fluoride may include some fluoride from mineral dissolution. Increased groundwater drainage/recharge following land use change readily mobilized chloride. Sulfate displacement fronts matched or lagged chloride fronts by up to 4 m. In contrast, fluoride mobilization was minimal in all regions. Understanding linkages between salt inventories, increased recharge, and groundwater quality is important for quantifying impacts of anthropogenic activities on groundwater

  12. Fluoride dentifrices: current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Mellberg, J R

    1991-02-01

    Toothpastes have developed from the poorly effective formulations using incompatible abrasive systems to the highly effective products now being given credit for the decline in dental caries in most developed countries. The earliest toothpastes used sodium fluoride but this was soon replaced by stannous fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate and amine fluoride. Monofluorophosphate has the advantage that it is compatible with a wide variety of abrasive systems. Although most toothpastes world-wide currently contain monofluorophosphate, sodium fluoride formulations are growing in availability because of the development of compatible abrasives. Clinical caries trials have indicated that, with proper formulation, there is little or no difference in effectiveness among toothpastes prepared with different fluoride agents, but that increasing the fluoride concentration will enhance the anti-caries effect. The addition of other active agents to fluoride toothpaste has been a relatively recent occurrence, and it is important to be assured that they do not interfere with the anti-caries activity of fluoride. Pyrophosphate, a calculus control agent, is one additive that was considered to be a potential problem; however, human and animal tests have shown that both caries and calculus inhibiting effects can be obtained from a single formulation. With the use of modern methodology to evaluate toothpaste formulations before clinical trials, many new products containing anti-calculus and other agents will probably become available in the coming years.

  13. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Reiner, Robert H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1990-01-01

    A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  14. Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F.; Fedorov, P. P.

    2009-07-15

    Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  15. Xenon fluoride solutions effective as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, H. H.; Quarterman, L. A.; Sheft, I.

    1967-01-01

    Solutions of xenon fluorides in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride have few disruptive effects and leave a residue consisting of gaseous xenon, which can be recovered and refluorinated. This mild agent can be used with materials which normally must be fluorinated with fluorine alone at high temperatures.

  16. Welsh water should reinstate fluoridation on Anglesey.

    PubMed

    Hulse, G; Kenrick, A; Thomas, C H; Thomas, A; Davies, D J; Lennon, M A

    1995-01-21

    In 1992, Welsh Water withdrew the successful water fluoridation scheme on Anglesey. Despite evidence of the benefits of water fluoridation and the rise in number of children with tooth decay since the scheme's withdrawal, Welsh Water is still not prepared to re-establish the scheme.

  17. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  18. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  19. Recent advancements in fluoride: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankita; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Ingle, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    To review advancements of fluoride in dentistry, a search of 21 electronic databases and World Wide Web was conducted. Relevant journals were hand searched and further information was requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Fluoride has become an important tool in preventive dentistry. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. Fluoride therapy in the form of varnish, gel, mouth rinse, or toothpaste has been used extensively as a caries-preventive intervention for over three decades. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader about new research related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. PMID:26539383

  20. Recent advancements in fluoride: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ankita; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Ingle, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    To review advancements of fluoride in dentistry, a search of 21 electronic databases and World Wide Web was conducted. Relevant journals were hand searched and further information was requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Fluoride has become an important tool in preventive dentistry. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. Fluoride therapy in the form of varnish, gel, mouth rinse, or toothpaste has been used extensively as a caries-preventive intervention for over three decades. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader about new research related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. PMID:26539383

  1. Method of treating fluoride contaminated wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.K.; Kakaria, V.K.

    1988-04-05

    A method for treating spent aluminum smelting potliner material containing fluoride contaminants is described which comprises: adding silica to the material to form a mixture thereof; elevating the temperature of the mixture within the range of 1,000/sup 0/ to 1,700/sup 0/C. to form a slag; providing sufficient silica in the mixture and forming the slag in the presence of sufficient water for pyrohydrolysis conditions resulting in the volatilization of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants mostly in the form of hydrogen fluoride; and cooling the slag remaining after volatilizatiion of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants to produce an insoluble silicate glass-residue containing any remaining portion of the fluoride contaminants in an immobile state.

  2. Environmental evaluation of fluoride in drinking water at "Los Altos de Jalisco," in the central Mexico region.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Roberto; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    Naturally occurring fluoride has been detected and quantified in drinking water in several cities of the "Los Altos de Jalisco" (LAJ) region. LAJ is located in the northeastern part of the state of Jalisco-Mexico, covering an area of 16,410 km2 with a population of 696,318 in 20 municipalities. Drinking water comes mainly from groundwater aquifers, located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is a volcanic region characterized by hydrothermal activity. Results indicated that water supply from 42% of the municipalities had a fluoride concentration over the Mexican standards of 1.5 mg/L. It is important to notice that there are three cities, Lagos de Moreno (1.66-5.88 mg/L F(-)), Teocaltiche (3.82-18.58 mg/L F(-)), and Encarnación de Díaz (2.58-4.40 mg/L F(-)) where all water samples resulted in fluoride concentration over the maximum contaminant level. The total population from these three cities is over 122,000 inhabitants. Another important city with high levels of fluoride in the water supply was Tepatitlán de Morelos (2 wells with 6.54 and 13.47 mg/L F(-)). In addition to water supply, 30 samples of brand-name bottled water were tested. Surprisingly, 8 samples (27%) demonstrated fluoride level over the standards, mainly Agua de Lagos with 5.27 mg/L. Fluoridated table salt (200-300 mg/kg F(-)) is another important source of fluoride. A large number of people living in the region, mainly school children, might be under adverse health risk because they are consuming contaminated drinking water. It is well known that long-term exposure to water with high levels of fluoride produces severe health problems.

  3. Combinatorial incorporation of fluoride and cobalt ions into calcium phosphates to stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Zeinab Tahmasebi; Gharraee, Nazli; Malhotra, Angad; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-02-29

    Bone healing requires two critical mechanisms, angiogenesis and osteogenesis. In order to improve bone graft substitutes, both mechanisms should be addressed simultaneously. While the individual effects of various bioinorganics have been studied, an understanding of the combinatorial effects is lacking. Cobalt and fluoride ions, in appropriate concentrations, are known to individually favor the vascularization and mineralization processes, respectively. This study investigated the potential of using a combination of fluoride and cobalt ions to simultaneously promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis in human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). Using a two-step biomimetic method, wells of tissue culture plates were coated with a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer without or with the incorporation of cobalt, fluoride, or both. In parallel, hMSCs were cultured on uncoated well plates, and cultured with cobalt and/or fluoride ions within the media. The results revealed that cobalt ions increased the expression of angiogenic markers, with the effects being stronger when the ions were added as a dissolved salt in cell medium as compared to incorporation into CaP. Cobalt ions generally suppressed the ALP activity, the expression of osteogenic genes, and the level of mineralization, regardless of delivery method. Fluoride ions, individually or in combination with cobalt, significantly increased the expression of many of the selected osteogenic markers, as well as mineral deposition. This study demonstrates an approach to simultaneously target the two essential mechanisms in bone healing: angiogenesis and osteogenesis. The incorporation of cobalt and fluoride into CaPs is a promising method to improve the biological performance of fully synthetic bone graft substitutes.

  4. Combinatorial incorporation of fluoride and cobalt ions into calcium phosphates to stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Zeinab Tahmasebi; Gharraee, Nazli; Malhotra, Angad; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-02-01

    Bone healing requires two critical mechanisms, angiogenesis and osteogenesis. In order to improve bone graft substitutes, both mechanisms should be addressed simultaneously. While the individual effects of various bioinorganics have been studied, an understanding of the combinatorial effects is lacking. Cobalt and fluoride ions, in appropriate concentrations, are known to individually favor the vascularization and mineralization processes, respectively. This study investigated the potential of using a combination of fluoride and cobalt ions to simultaneously promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis in human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). Using a two-step biomimetic method, wells of tissue culture plates were coated with a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer without or with the incorporation of cobalt, fluoride, or both. In parallel, hMSCs were cultured on uncoated well plates, and cultured with cobalt and/or fluoride ions within the media. The results revealed that cobalt ions increased the expression of angiogenic markers, with the effects being stronger when the ions were added as a dissolved salt in cell medium as compared to incorporation into CaP. Cobalt ions generally suppressed the ALP activity, the expression of osteogenic genes, and the level of mineralization, regardless of delivery method. Fluoride ions, individually or in combination with cobalt, significantly increased the expression of many of the selected osteogenic markers, as well as mineral deposition. This study demonstrates an approach to simultaneously target the two essential mechanisms in bone healing: angiogenesis and osteogenesis. The incorporation of cobalt and fluoride into CaPs is a promising method to improve the biological performance of fully synthetic bone graft substitutes. PMID:26929187

  5. Corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anie; Sridhar, Sathyanarayanan; Aghyarian, Shant; Watkins-curry, Pilanda; Chan, Julia Y.; Pozzi, Alessandro; Rodrigues, Danieli C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) representing acidic environments and fluoride treatments was studied. Material and Methods Zirconia rods were immersed in 1.23% and 0.123% APF solutions and maintained at 37°C for determined periods of time. Surfaces of all specimens were imaged using digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sample mass and dimensions were measured for mass loss determination. Samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to detect changes in crystallinity. A biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to detect ion dissolution of material into the immersion media. Results Digital microscopy revealed diminishing luster of the materials and SEM showed increased superficial corrosion of zirconia submerged in 1.23% APF. Although no structural change was found, the absorption of salts (sodium phosphate) onto the surface of the materials bathed in 0.123% APF was significant. EIS indicated a greater change of impedance for the immersion solutions with increasing bathing time. Conclusion Immersion of zirconia in APF solutions showed deterioration limited to the surface, not extending to the bulk of the material. Inferences on zirconia performance in acidic oral environment can be elucidated from the study. PMID:27008257

  6. Dental fluorosis and skeletal fluoride content as biomarkers of excess fluoride exposure in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Death, Clare; Coulson, Graeme; Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Morris, William K; Hufschmid, Jasmin

    2015-11-15

    Particulate and gaseous fluoride emissions contaminate vegetation near fluoride-emitting industries, potentially impacting herbivorous wildlife in neighboring areas. Dental fluorosis has been associated with consumption of fluoride-contaminated foliage by juvenile livestock and wildlife in Europe and North America. For the first time, we explored the epidemiology and comparative pathology of dental fluorosis in Australian marsupials residing near an aluminium smelter. Six species (Macropus giganteus, Macropus rufogriseus, Wallabia bicolor, Phascolarctos cinereus, Trichosurus vulpecula, Pseudocheirus peregrinus) demonstrated significantly higher bone fluoride levels in the high (n=161 individuals), compared to the low (n=67 individuals), fluoride areas (p<0.001). Necropsy examinations of all six species from the high-fluoride area near the smelter revealed dental lesions considered characteristic of dental fluorosis in eutherian mammals. Within the high-fluoride area, 67% of individuals across the six species showed dental enamel lesions, compared to 3% in the low-fluoride areas. Molars that erupted before weaning were significantly less likely to display pathological lesions than those developing later, and molars in the posterior portion of the dental arcade were more severely fluorotic than anterior molars in all six species. The severity of dental lesions was positively associated with increasing bone fluoride levels in all species, revealing a potential biomarker of excess fluoride exposure.

  7. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  9. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  10. Fluoridation and Defluoridation. Training Module 2.230.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, L. D.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoridation and fluoride feeding equipment. Enclosed are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts and transparency masters. The module considers the principles and purposes of fluoridation, methods of feeding fluoride,…

  11. Low-fluoride dentifrice and gastrointestinal fluoride absorption after meals.

    PubMed

    Cury, J A; Del Fiol, F S; Tenuta, L M A; Rosalen, P L

    2005-12-01

    A low-fluoride (F) dentifrice has been recommended to reduce the risk of dental fluorosis, but its anti-caries efficacy is questionable compared with that of conventional dentrifices (1000-1100 microg F/g). The tested hypothesis was that conventional dentifrices might be safe if used soon after meals, since food interferes with F absorption. In a crossover, double-blind study, 11 volunteers ingested a dentifrice slurry containing 0 (placebo), 550 (low F), or 1100 microg F/g in 3 gastric content situations: on fasting, or 15 min after breakfast or lunch. F was analyzed in saliva and 24-hour urine samples. The conventional dentifrice ingested after lunch resulted in only 10% higher F absorption than the low-F ingested on fasting. Analysis of the data suggests that the risk of fluorosis could be reduced by the use of either a low-F dentifrice or a conventional dentifrice, if toothbrushing occurred soon after meals.

  12. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings. PMID:23840230

  13. Review of fluoride removal from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, M; Anand, S; Mishra, B K; Giles, Dion E; Singh, P

    2009-10-01

    Fluoride in drinking water has a profound effect on teeth and bones. Up to a small level (1-1.5mg/L) this strengthens the enamel. Concentrations in the range of 1.5-4 mg/L result in dental fluorosis whereas with prolonged exposure at still higher fluoride concentrations (4-10mg/L) dental fluorosis progresses to skeletal fluorosis. High fluoride concentrations in groundwater, up to more than 30 mg/L, occur widely, in many parts of the world. This review article is aimed at providing precise information on efforts made by various researchers in the field of fluoride removal for drinking water. The fluoride removal has been broadly divided in two sections dealing with membrane and adsorption techniques. Under the membrane techniques reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, dialysis and electro-dialysis have been discussed. Adsorption, which is a conventional technique, deals with adsorbents such as: alumina/aluminium based materials, clays and soils, calcium based minerals, synthetic compounds and carbon based materials. Studies on fluoride removal from aqueous solutions using various reversed zeolites, modified zeolites and ion exchange resins based on cross-linked polystyrene are reviewed. During the last few years, layered double oxides have been of interest as adsorbents for fluoride removal. Such recent developments have been briefly discussed.

  14. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J.

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  15. [Fluoride-induced nephrotoxicity: factor fiction?].

    PubMed

    Nuscheler, M; Conzen, P; Schwender, D; Peter, K

    1996-02-01

    In the 1960s, the widespread use of the inhalational anaesthetic methoxyflurane was associated with a significant occurrence of postoperative renal dysfunction. This was attributed to hepatic biotransformation of methoxyflurane and subsequent release of inorganic fluoride ions into the circulation. Based upon the clinical experience with methoxyflurane, serum fluoride concentrations exceeding 50 mumol/l were considered to be nephrotoxic. Without further reevaluation, this 50 mumol/l threshold was subsequently applied to other fluorinated anaesthetics as well. Enflurane and even isoflurane may, when used during prolonged operations, also yield anorganic fluoride levels in excess of 50 mumol/l. Nevertheless, no cases of renal dysfunction attributable to prolonged use of these anesthetics have been reported. About 4% of the new inhalational anaesthetic sevoflurane is metabolized, and fluoride concentrations exceeding those after enflurane are frequently measured. Numerous studies have examined the nephrotoxic potential of sevoflurane degradation products. However, fluoride-related toxicity has been observed neither in animal nor in clinical studies, including prolonged administration and patients with pre-existing renal disease. New insights into the intrarenal metabolisation of volatile anaesthetics may well explain the absence of nephrotoxicity after sevoflurane. The threshold for fluoride nephrotoxicity of 50 mumol/l, still given in many medical text-books, can no longer be applied as an indicator of nephrotoxicity after isoflurane, enflurane or sevoflurane. Therefore, the elevated serum fluoride concentrations consistently recorded following anaesthesia with sevoflurane are devoid of clinical significance. PMID:8775101

  16. Fluoride Plus Functionalized β-TCP

    PubMed Central

    Karlinsey, R.L.; Pfarrer, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    With more than 50 years of clinical success, fluoride serves as the gold standard agent for preventing tooth decay. In particular, the action of fluoride facilitates saliva-driven remineralization of demineralized enamel and alters solubility beneficially. Still, tooth decay remains problematic, and one way to address it may be through the development of new mineralizing agents. Laboratory and clinical studies have demonstrated that the combination of fluoride and functionalized β-tricalcium phosphate (fTCP) produces stronger, more acid-resistant mineral relative to fluoride, native β-TCP, or fTCP alone. In contrast to other calcium-based approaches that seem to rely on high levels of calcium and phosphate to drive remineralization, fTCP is a low-dose system designed to fit within existing topical fluoride preparations. The functionalization of β-TCP with organic and/or inorganic molecules provides a barrier that prevents premature fluoride-calcium interactions and aids in mineralization when applied via common preparations and procedures. While additional clinical studies are warranted, supplementing with fTCP to enhance fluoride-based nucleation activity, with subsequent remineralization driven by dietary and salivary calcium and phosphate, appears to be a promising approach. PMID:22899679

  17. Deposition of fluoride on enamel surfaces released from varnishes is limited to vicinity of fluoridation site

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, A. M.; Yakin, M.; Becker, K.; Buchalla, W.; Attin, R.; Wiegand, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the in-situ study was to determine fluoride uptake in non-fluoridated, demineralized enamel after application of fluoride varnishes on enamel samples located at various distances from the non-fluoridated samples. All enamel samples used were demineralized with acidic hydroxyethylcellulose before the experiment. Intra-oral appliances were worn by ten volunteers in three series: (1, Mirafluorid, 0.15% F; 2, Duraphat, 2.3% F and 3, unfluoridated controls) of 6 days each. Each two enamel samples were prepared from 30 bovine incisors. One sample was used for the determination of baseline fluoride content (BFC); the other was treated according to the respective series and fixed in the intra-oral appliance for 6 days. Additionally, from 120 incisors, each four enamel samples were prepared (one for BFC). Three samples (a–c) were placed into each appliance at different sites: (a) directly neighboured to the fluoridated specimen (=next), (b) at 1-cm distance (=1 cm) and (c) in the opposite buccal aspect of the appliance (=opposite). At these sites, new unfluoridated samples were placed at days 1, 3 and 5, which were left in place for 1 day. The volunteers brushed their teeth and the samples with fluoridated toothpaste twice per day. Both the KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride were determined in all samples to determine fluoride uptake and were statistically analyzed. One day, after fluoridation with Duraphat, KOH-soluble fluoride uptake in specimen a (=next) was significantly higher compared to the corresponding samples of both the control and Mirafluorid series, which in turn were not significantly different from each other. At all other sites and time points, fluoride uptake in the enamel samples were not different from controls for both fluoride varnishes. Within the first day after application, intra-oral-fluoride release from the tested fluoride varnish Duraphat leads to KOH-soluble fluoride uptake only in enamel samples located in close

  18. Quantification of fluoride in food by microwave acid digestion and fluoride ion-selective electrode.

    PubMed

    Rocha, René A; Rojas, Dayana; Clemente, María Jesús; Ruiz, Antonio; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2013-11-13

    To quantify fluoride in food it is necessary to extract the fluoride from the matrix. Dry ashing (alkali fusion) and facilitated diffusion are the methods most commonly used, but their application requires lengthy treatments. The present study proposes the use of a microwave oven and 7 mol/L nitric acid for simple, rapid digestion of foods for fluoride analysis. The analyte is subsequently quantified by fluoride ion-selective electrode. The various steps of the method were optimized and an in-house validation was performed. The limit of quantification (0.130 mg/kg), trueness (92%), recovery (84-101%), and precision (1-8%) were determined. These analytical characteristics are satisfactory and show the suitability of the method for analysis of fluoride in foods of various kinds. The method's ease of application and the use of equipment normally found in food analysis laboratories may help to further increase research on fluoride concentrations in foods consumed by the population.

  19. Fluoride concentration in drinking water of Karachi city (Pakistan).

    PubMed

    Siddique, Azhar; Mumtaz, Majid; Saied, Sumayya; Karim, Zahida; Zaigham, Nayyer A

    2006-09-01

    The ground and municipal water supply samples of Karachi city were analyzed for their fluoride contents. The fluoride contents in water samples collected from the subsurface and river sources were found below the WHO recommended value for the general health of the people. However, in some industrial areas the groundwater sample showed higher level of fluoride concentration. Continuous monitoring of water resources and cautious fluoridation is suggested to maintain proper status of fluoride concentration in the drinking water.

  20. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  1. The effect of fluoride impregnated dental floss on enamel fluoride uptake in vitro and streptococcus mutans colonization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaet, R; Wei, S H

    1977-01-01

    The conclusions reached from this investigation can be summarized as follows: Fluoride can be incorporated into unwaxed dental floss. Placement of the fluoride impregnated dental floss in acid-buffer solution results in the release of most of the fluoride in the floss. Interproximal surfaces of teeth treated in vitro with fluoride impregnated dental floss acquired significantly (approximately three fold) more enamel fluoride than those treated with plain dental floss. The number of in vivo interproximal areas harboring Streptococcus mutans was reduced significantly after treatment with fluoride impregnated dental floss. Further studies should be done to establish the biological, physiochemical, manufacturing, and practical aspects of fluoride impregnated dental floss.

  2. Effect of oral calcium and calcium + fluoride treatments on mouse bone properties during suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, S. J.; Luttges, M. W.; Allen, K. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The bone effects of oral dosages of calcium chloride with or without supplementary sodium fluoride were assessed in antiorthostatically suspended mice. Two calcium dosages were used to replace half (3.1 mM) or all(6.3 mM) of the dietary calcium lost due to reduced food intake by the suspended mice. Two groups of 6.3 mM CaCl2-treated mice were additionally treated with 0.25 or 2.5 mM NaF. The results indicate that supplementation of the mouse drinking water with calcium salts prevents bone changes induced by short-term suspension, while calcium salts in combination with fluoride are less effective as fluoride dosage increases. However, the calcium supplements change the relationship between the femur mechanical properties and the mineral composition of the bone. Because of this, it appears that oral calcium supplements are effective through a mechanism other than simple dietary supplementation and may indicate a dependence of bone consistency on systemic and local fluid conditions.

  3. The effects of fluoridated water on bone strength.

    PubMed

    Turner, C H; Akhter, M P; Heaney, R P

    1992-07-01

    Fluoride from fluoridated water accumulates not only in the enamel of teeth but also in the skeleton. The effects of fluoridated water on the skeleton are not well understood, yet there is some evidence that fluoridated water consumption increases the incidence of fractures. In the present study, femoral bending strength was measured in rats on fluoride intakes that ranged from low levels to levels well above natural high fluoride drinking water. Bone strength followed a biphasic relationship with bone fluoride content. Fluoride had a positive effect on bone strength for lower fluoride intakes and a negative influence on bone strength for higher fluoride intakes. The vertebral fluoride content at which femoral strength was maximum was between 1,100 and 1,500 ppm. The increase in femoral strength at this fluoride level was not accompanied by an increase in femoral bone density. The optimal fluoride content is within the range of bone fluoride contents found in persons living in regions with fluoridated water (1 ppm) for greater than 10 years.

  4. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  5. REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

    1960-08-30

    A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

  6. Fluoride content in plaque solids and fluid after ingestion of fluoridated milk.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Buckley, Christine; Weitz, Andrea; Villa, Alberto; Zero, Domenick T

    2013-09-01

    This study explored differences in dental biofilm solids and fluid fluoride after ingestion of NaF or Na2FPO3 in milk or non-fluoridated milk. Eighteen volunteers ingested 1 mg fluoride in 200 mL of milk or 200 mL of non-fluoridated milk. Biofilm samples were collected at baseline, 30, 60, and 240 min and biofilm solids and fluid were micro-analyzed for fluoride. Analysis of variance was performed and the total delivery, retention, and clearance of fluoride to biofilm solids and fluid were estimated as the area under the curve between 0 and 240 min. No statistically significant differences were found for baseline values. Biofilm fluid fluoride values ranged from 0.11 ± 0.05 to 0.21 ± 0.08 µg F/mL while biofilm solid values ranged from 0.62 ± 0.39 to 1.75 ± 1.16 µg F/g. Biofilm fluid values were significantly lower at 60 min for Na2FPO3 in milk. Clearance profiles for biofilm fluid diverged after the initial 60 min. Na2FPO3 had a smaller area under the curve from 60 to 240 min than NaF. Results of this study indicate that the release and clearance of fluoride in biofilm vary among fluoridation compounds and that the concentrations in biofilm solids and fluid also vary and are not correlated to each other in many cases.

  7. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Mohammadi, Elham; Zandi, Shiva; Teymouri, Pari; Mahvi, Amir Hossien; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan). The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea) and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea), respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas (P < 0.05). However, the additives had no significant effect on the fluoride release into the infusions (P > 0.05). Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers. PMID:27042093

  8. Effects of treatment with sodium fluoride and subsequent starvation on fluoride content of earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    The two experiments described here originated during a long-term investigation into the occurrence and movement of pollutant fluoride in a terrestrial ecosystem. Moles (Talpa europaea) whose diet consist largely of various species of earthworm Lumbricidae, are one of the species under investigation. Bone fluoride in moles was found to be higher, on average, than in foxes or small rodents. Moles probably acquire fluoride from their earthworm diet. Earthworms do not have any readily identifiable tissue in which to store large amounts of fluoride but, for their size, they have a considerable amount of soil in their gut, up oto 20% of their dry weight. Preliminary measurements of fluoride in whole earthworms suggested that observed levels could probably be accounted for by fluoride bound in the mineral part of contained soil and released during preparatory ashing. Two experiments to investigate this situation are described; here their aims were: to expose earthworms kept in soil to different concentrations of sodium fluoride; to measure resulting fluoride in earthworms when soil was removed from their gut by starvation for varying periods of time; and to compare amounts of fluoride in whole starved earthworms with those in starved earthworms from which remaining soil had also been physically removed by dissection and washing.

  9. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Mohammadi, Elham; Zandi, Shiva; Teymouri, Pari; Mahvi, Amir Hossien; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan). The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea) and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea), respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas (P < 0.05). However, the additives had no significant effect on the fluoride release into the infusions (P > 0.05). Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers. PMID:27042093

  10. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Mohammadi, Elham; Zandi, Shiva; Teymouri, Pari; Mahvi, Amir Hossien; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan). The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea) and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea), respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas (P < 0.05). However, the additives had no significant effect on the fluoride release into the infusions (P > 0.05). Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers.

  11. Inhaled magnesium fluoride reverse bronchospasma.

    PubMed

    Gandia, Fedoua; Rouatbi, Sonia; Latiri, Imed; Guénard, Hervé; Tabka, Zouhair

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is a global health problem. Asthma attacks are becoming more severe and more resistant to usual treatment by beta(2) agonists nebulisation. The search for a new product that could reduce the morbidity of asthmatic disease seems necessary. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of inhaled magnesium fluoride (MgF(2)) with that of magnesium sulphate (MgSO(4)) 15% alone and sodium fluoride (NaF) 0.5 M alone in rats pre-contracted by methacholine (MeCh). Fifty six adult male Wistar rats of medium weight 259 +/- 15 g were divided randomly into five groups. They inhaled respectively: MeCh, MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid, MgSO(4) 15% single and NaF (0.5 M) single. Airway resistances were measured after each dose of MeCh by pneumomultitest equipment. Results indicated that (1) MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid and MgSO(4) reversed significantly the methacholine-induced bronchial constriction in rats and had a bronchodilating effect at the moment of its administration (2) MgF(2) + acetic acid led to a greater decrease (P<0.05) of bronchial resistances when compared to that obtained from MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, NaF exclusively and MgSO(4) alone (3) inhaled NaF alone led to a significant bronchorelaxing effect (P<0.05) that starts at the sixth dose of MeCh (17 mg/L). As a matter of fact, MgF(2) dissolved in acetic acid and delivered in aerosol form reduces significantly bronchial spasm. In conclusion, MgF(2) can be used as a bronchodilator for diseases with bronchospasma such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  12. [Fluoride contents of rat molars following the administration of amine-fluoride-containing caries preventives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Novikov, L L; Treide, A; Kolesnik, A G; Novikova, N V; Jacobi, J

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on fifty Wistar rats were conducted with the object of studying the incorporation of fluoride into the enamel of molars subsequent to the administration of amine-fluoride-containing caries preventives. - Use of two toothpastes with low fluoride contents of 0.125% and 0.18% F, respectively, and two higher-fluoride (1% F) solutions resulted in a marked increase in the concentration of fluoride in the superficial layers of dental enamel.

  13. Shock Induced Birefringence in Lithium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N C

    2001-06-01

    We have used an ellipsometer to measure the birefringence of lithium fluoride in shock compression experiments. In previous x-ray diffraction experiments, single crystal [100] LiF has been reported to remain cubic at moderate pressures.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of fluoride fluorescent sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijji, Yousef M.; Wairia, Gilbert; Edwards, Achelle; Iwunze, Maurice; Kennedy, Alvin P., Sr.; Williams, Richard J.

    2004-12-01

    Due to the importance of fluoride in clinical treatment of osteoporosis and its toxicity from over accumulation in bones there is an increased interest in developing selective optical methods for the detection of fluoride anion. Anion recognition and sensing are of interest because of their importance in biological environmental assays and efforts are paid for developing sensitive methods. We synthesized salicylidene furfurylamine 1 and studied spectral properties. Compound 1 fluoresced strongly and the fluorescence was strongly enhanced in the presence of anions as fluoride at low concentrations. A substantially red-shifted emission in acetonitrile was observed. The excitation at 390 nm and the emission was observed at 469nm. Fluoride showed strong absorption and fluorescence enhancement with a significant Stokes shift. Acetate, dihydrogen phosphate, showed small effect, while chloride, bromide had no significant effect.

  15. AES analysis of barium fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, G. N.; Makhnjuk, V. I.; Rumjantseva, S. M.; Shchekochihin, Ju. M.

    1993-06-01

    AES analysis of thin films of metal fluorides is a difficult problem due to charging and decomposition of such films under electron bombardment. We have developed a simple algorithm for a reliable quantitative AES analysis of metal fluoride thin films (BaF 2 in our work). The relative AES sensitivity factors for barium and fluorine were determined from BaF 2 single-crystal samples. We have investigated the dependence of composition and stability of barium fluoride films on the substrate temperature during film growth. We found that the instability of BaF 2 films grown on GaAs substrates at high temperatures (> 525°C) is due to a loss of fluorine. Our results show that, under the optimal electron exposure conditions, AES can be used for a quantitative analysis of metal fluoride thin films.

  16. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  17. Differential Toxicities of Nickel Salts to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Dean; Birdsey, Jennifer M; Wendolowski, Mark A; Dobbin, Kevin K; Williams, Phillip L

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on assessing whether nickel (Ni) toxicity to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was affected by the molecular structure of the Ni salt used. Nematodes were exposed to seven Ni salts [Ni sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO4·6H2O), Ni chloride hexahydrate (NiCl2·6H2O), Ni acetate tetrahydrate (Ni(OCOCH3)2·4H2O), Ni nitrate hexahydrate (N2NiO6·6H2O), anhydrous Ni iodide (NiI2), Ni sulfamate hydrate (Ni(SO3NH2)2·H2O), and Ni fluoride tetrahydrate (NiF2·4H2O)] in an aquatic medium for 24 h, and lethality curves were generated and analyzed. Ni fluoride, Ni iodide, and Ni chloride were most toxic to C. elegans, followed by Ni nitrate, Ni sulfamate, Ni acetate, and Ni sulfate. The LC50 values of the halogen-containing salts were statistically different from the corresponding value of the least toxic salt, Ni sulfate. This finding is consistent with the expected high bioavailability of free Ni ions in halide solutions. We recommend that the halide salts be used in future Ni testing involving aquatic invertebrates. PMID:27278637

  18. Fuel salt and container material studies for MOSART transforming system

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatiev, V.; Feynberg, O.; Merzlyakov, A.; Surenkov, A.; Zagnitko, A.; Afonichkin, V.; Bovet, A.; Khokhlov, V.; Subbotin, V.; Gordeev, M.; Panov, A.; Toropov, A.

    2013-07-01

    A study is under progress to examine the feasibility of single stream Molten Salt Actinide Recycling and Transmuting system without and with Th support (MOSART) fuelled with different compositions of actinide tri-fluorides (AnF{sub 3}) from used LWR fuel. New fast-spectrum design options with homogeneous core and fuel salts with high enough solubility for AnF{sub 3} are being examined because of new goals. The flexibility of single fluid MOSART concept with Th support is underlined, particularly, possibility of its operation in self-sustainable mode (Conversion Ratio: CR=1) using different loadings and make up. The paper summarizes the most current status of fuel salt and container material data for the MOSART concept received within ISTC-3749 and ROSATOM-MARS projects. Key physical and chemical properties of various fluoride fuel salts are reported. The issues like salt purification, the electroreduction of U(IV) to U(III) in LiF-ThF{sub 4} and the electroreduction of Yb(III) to Yb(II) in LiF-NaF are detailed.

  19. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  20. Prediction of the thermophysical properties of molten salt fast reactor fuel from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, A. E.; Corradini, D.; Dewan, L.; Chartrand, P.; Simon, C.; Madden, P. A.; Salanne, M.

    2014-05-01

    Molten fluorides are known to show favourable thermophysical properties which make them good candidate coolants for nuclear fission reactors. Here we investigate the special case of mixtures of lithium fluoride and thorium fluoride, which act both as coolant and as fuel in the molten salt fast reactor concept. By using ab initio parameterised polarisable force fields, we show that it is possible to calculate the whole set of properties (density, thermal expansion, heat capacity, viscosity and thermal conductivity) which are necessary for assessing the heat transfer performance of the melt over the whole range of compositions and temperatures. We then deduce from our calculations several figures of merit which are important in helping the optimisation of the design of molten salt fast reactors.

  1. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1997-03-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the three binary systems (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride) have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. All of the systems form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes.

  2. Well waters fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, I Si; Okoro, O Io; Ugwuja, E I

    2012-04-01

    Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05). The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011), it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride. PMID:23022857

  3. Delivery Challenges for Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Xylitol

    PubMed Central

    Featherstone, John DB

    2006-01-01

    The progression or reversal of dental caries is determined by the balance between pathological and protective factors. It is well established that a) fluoride inhibits demineralization and enhances remineralization, b) chlorhexidine reduces the cariogenic bacterial challenge, and c) xylitol is non-cariogenic and has antibacterial properties. The challenge that we face is how best to deliver these anti-caries entities at true therapeutic levels, over time, to favorably tip the caries balance. High caries risk people, including children with Early Childhood Caries (ECC), are a special challenge, since high cariogenic bacterial activity can override fluoride therapy. Current fluoride and chlorhexidine varnishes deliver all their activity within about 24 hours. Early studies with experimental slow release fluoride devices retained elevated levels of fluoride for months in a therapeutic range but have not been pursued. Preventive dentistry has largely ignored the benefits of reducing the bacterial challenge, partially due to primitive and inadequate delivery systems. For example, Chlorhexidine applied as a rinse partially reduces some bacteria but not others that are hiding within the biofilm. Better antibacterials and better delivery systems are needed. Xylitol delivered by gum or lozenge appears to be effective clinically in reducing cariogenic bacteria and caries levels, but novel systems that deliver therapeutic amounts when needed would be a major advance, especially for young children. Reducing the cariogenic bacterial challenge and enhancing the effect of fluoride by the use of new sustained-delivery systems would have a major effect on dealing with caries as a disease. PMID:16934125

  4. Topical laser application enhances enamel fluoride uptake and tribological properties.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Y-R; Lin, T-T; Huang, J-S; Peng, S-R; Shieh, D-B

    2013-07-01

    Topical fluoride treatment prevents dental caries. However, the resulting calcium-fluoride-like deposits are soft and have poor wear resistance; therefore, frequent treatment is required. Lasers quickly heat surfaces and can be made portable and suitable for oral remedies. We examined the morphology, nanohardness, elastic modulus, nanowear, and fluoride uptake of fluoride-treated enamel followed by CO2 laser irradiation for 5 and 10 sec, respectively. We found that laser treatments significantly increased the mechanical properties of the calcium-fluoride-like deposits. The wear resistance of the calcium-fluoride-like deposits improved about 34% after laser irradiation for 5 sec and about 40% following irradiation for 10 sec. We also found that laser treatments increased fluoride uptake by at least 23%. Overall, laser treatment significantly improved fluoride incorporation into dental tissue and the wear resistance of the protective calcium-fluoride layer.

  5. Thermal-hydraulics of internally heated molten salts and application to the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorina, Carlo; Cammi, Antonio; Luzzi, Lelio; Mikityuk, Konstantin; Ninokata, Hisashi; Ricotti, Marco E.

    2014-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactors (MSR) are an innovative kind of nuclear reactors and are presently considered in the framework of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF-IV) for their promising performances in terms of low resource utilization, waste minimization and enhanced safety. A unique feature of MSRs is that molten fluoride salts play the distinctive role of both fuel (heat source) and coolant. The presence of an internal heat generation perturbs the temperature field and consequences are to be expected on the heat transfer characteristics of the molten salts. In this paper, the problem of heat transfer for internally heated fluids in a straight circular channel is first faced on a theoretical ground. The effect of internal heat generation is demonstrated to be described by a corrective factor applied to traditional correlations for the Nusselt number. It is shown that the corrective factor can be fully characterized by making explicit the dependency on Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. On this basis, a preliminary correlation is proposed for the case of molten fluoride salts by interpolating the results provided by an analytic approach previously developed at the Politecnico di Milano. The experimental facility and the related measuring procedure for testing the proposed correlation are then presented. Finally, the developed correlation is used to carry out a parametric investigation on the effect of internal heat generation on the main out-of-core components of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR), the reference circulating-fuel MSR design in the GIF-IV. The volumetric power determines higher temperatures at the channel wall, but the effect is significant only in case of large diameters and/or low velocities.

  6. Fluoride concentration in plaque in adolescents after topical application of different fluoride varnishes.

    PubMed

    Sköld-Larsson, K; Modéer, T; Twetman, S

    2000-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the fluoride (F) concentration in plaque after a single topical application of different fluoride varnishes with contrasting levels of F. Thirty adolescents (12-17 years) with fixed orthodontic appliances were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Bifluoride (6% F), Duraphat (2.23% F) and Fluor Protector (0.1% F). The varnishes were applied after professional cleaning in one upper quadrant, leaving the opposite quadrant untreated according to the split-mouth technique. Pooled plaque samples from each quadrant were collected at baseline and 3 days, 7 days and 30 days after the varnish treatment, and fluoride was analysed by microdiffusion. All fluoride varnishes increased the fluoride concentration in plaque compared with baseline, and the mean values varied between 23 and 138 ng F/mg after 3 days, depending on varnish F concentration. Compared with the control quadrant, statistically significant elevations were recorded for Bifluoride after 3 days and 7 days and Duraphat after 3 days, while no significant differences were revealed in the Fluor Protector group. The fluoride concentration in plaque was back to baseline levels for all participants in the Duraphat group after 7 days, while some individuals in the Bifluoride and Fluor Protector groups still registered slightly increased levels after 30 days. The results suggest that fluoride varnish treatments resulted in elevated fluoride levels in plaque adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances for a period of up to 1 week, although different patterns was disclosed for the various brands.

  7. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  8. Hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Research cited from the international literature adresses various aspects of hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Topics covered include flows, laser outputs, molecular relaxation, molecular rotation, energy conversion efficiency, reaction kinetics, and laser materials. Continous wave and pulsed laser are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 53 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  9. Oral fluoride levels 1 h after use of a sodium fluoride rinse: effect of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Gerald L; Schumacher, Gary E; Chow, Laurence C; Tenuta, Livia M A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the concentration of free fluoride in oral fluids is an important goal in the use of topical fluoride agents. Although sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is a common dentifrice ingredient, the influence of this ion on plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SLS on these parameters and to examine the effect of this ion on total (or whole) plaque fluoride, an important source of plaque fluid fluoride after a sufficient interval following fluoride administration, and on total salivary fluoride, a parameter often used as a surrogate measure of salivary fluid fluoride. Ten subjects accumulated plaque for 48 h before rinsing with a 12 mmol/l NaF (228 µg/g F) rinse containing or not containing 0.5% (w/w) SLS. SLS had no statistically significant effect on total plaque and total saliva fluoride but significantly increased salivary fluid and plaque fluid fluoride (by 147 and 205%, respectively). These results suggest that the nonfluoride components of topical agents can be manipulated to improve the fluoride release characteristics from oral fluoride reservoirs and that statistically significant change may be observed in plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride concentrations that may not be observed in total plaque and total saliva fluoride concentrations.

  10. A comparative assessment of fluoride concentration available in saliva using daily prescribed topical fluoride agents

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Manjit; Tewari, Amrit; Chawla, H. S.; Sachdev, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the availability of fluoride concentration in saliva following the use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in 7–15 year-old school children of Chandigarh (n = 90). The children were nonfluoride users. Baseline saliva samples were collected. The subjects were exposed to two test agents, i.e., fluoride mouthrinse (0.05%, 225 ppm F) and dentifrice (1000 ppm F) for 7 days and on the day 8, saliva samples were collected over a 20 hrs period. Wash out period of 31/2 months was there before the subjects were exposed to the second test agent. Fluoride in saliva was estimated using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Written informed consent was taken. Statistical Analysis: Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was applied to test the normality of the variables. Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the fluoride concentration available in saliva at respective time intervals subsequent to use of the two test agents. Results: Fluoride concentration was elevated in saliva compared to baseline for both the test agents. Fluoride mouthrinse (0.05% sodium fluoride [NaF]) and dentifrice (1000 ppm monofluorophosphate [MFP]) showed a biphasic clearance. Peak in saliva occurred at 15 mins postuse. Night-time use resulted in higher concentration of fluoride in saliva compared to baseline. There was statistically significantly higher fluoride concentration available in saliva for the dentifrice at 5 hrs, 10 hrs, and 20 hrs postuse (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Subsequent to the use of NaF (0.05%) daily mouthrinse and MFP dentifrice (1000 ppm) the fluoride concentration in saliva remained elevated to a level of 0.12 ppm for mouthrinse and 0.14 ppm for dentifrice compared to baseline (0.03 ppm) up to 20 hrs postuse. The therapeutic window though not yet established but suggested is 0.1–1 ppm for prevention of demineralization, indicating that daily use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice provides fluoride concentration in

  11. Influence of the method of fluoride administration on toxicity and fluoride concentrations in Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Schuler, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Young Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were administered NaF for 16 d either in their diet or by esophageal intubation. Based on the total fluoride ion (Emg F-) intake over the l6-d experimental period, fluoride administered by intubation was at least six times more toxic than that fed in the diet. Dietary concentrations of 1,000 ppm F- (Emg F- for 16 d = approx. 144) produced no mortality, whereas intubated doses produced 73% or greater mortality in all groups administered 54 mg F- /kg/d or more (Emg F- for 16 d _ approx. 23 mg). GraphIc companson of the regression of log F- ppm in femurs/mg F- intake showed that fluoride levels in the femurs of quail administered fluoride by intubation were higher than in those administered fluoride in the diet.

  12. Effects of Systemic Fluoride and in vitro Fluoride Treatment on Enamel Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H.; Czajka-Jakubowska, A.; Spencer, N.J.; Mansfield, J.F.; Robinson, C.; Clarkson, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    Systemically administered fluoride at a concentration of 75 ppm increases the surface roughness of developing enamel crystals in rats, which may be significant in advancing our understanding of the biological mechanism of fluorosis. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the increased surface roughness may be a result of surface restructuring by the direct action of fluoride at the crystal surface. We examined the fluoride dose-dependent roughening of enamel crystal surfaces in vivo, in the rat, and whether this roughening could be mimicked by the in vitro treatment of rat enamel crystals with neutral pH fluoride solutions. Our results showed that enamel crystal surface roughness increased after treatment with increasing fluoride ion concentrations, whether applied in vitro or administered systemically. This suggests a mechanism, alongside others, for the increased surface roughness of crystals in fluorotic enamel. PMID:17062747

  13. Mechanism of Electrophilic Fluorination with Pd(IV): Fluoride Capture and Subsequent Oxidative Fluoride Transfer†, ‡

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Jochen R.; Lee, Eunsung; Boursalian, Gregory B.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophilic fluorinating reagents derived from fluoride are desirable for the synthesis of 18F-labeled molecules for positron emission tomography (PET). Here, we study the mechanism by which a Pd(IV)-complex captures fluoride and subsequently transfers it to nucleophiles. The intermediate Pd(IV)-F is formed with high rates even at the nano- to micromolar fluoride concentrations typical for radiosyntheses with 18F due to fast formation of an outer-sphere complex between fluoride and Pd(IV). The subsequent fluorine transfer from the Pd(IV)-F complex is proposed to proceed through an unusual SET/fluoride transfer/SET mechanism. The findings detailed in this manuscript provide a theoretical foundation suitable for addressing a more general approach for electrophilic fluorination with high specific activity 18F PET imaging. PMID:24376910

  14. Ionic conductivity and transport properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)-based solid polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreha, Merhawi; Subrahmanyam, A. R.; Siva Kumar, J.

    2016-08-01

    Polymer electrolytes containing poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) and various concentrations of lithium triflate were prepared to determine the optimal polymer-salt composition for maximum ionic conductivity. Complex formation was ascertained from X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies. The conductivity measurements reveal that the ionic conductivity of the polymer electrolytes containing various salt concentrations increases with temperature and obeys the Arrhenius rule. It is found that the electrolyte containing 25 wt.% of lithium triflate exhibits the highest room temperature conductivity. Moreover, Ionic transference measurements show predominance of ionic motion.

  15. Feasibility of the electrochemical way in molten fluorides for separating thorium and lanthanides and extracting lanthanides from the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamelot, P.; Massot, L.; Hamel, C.; Nourry, C.; Taxil, P.

    2007-01-01

    An alternative way of reprocessing nuclear fuel by hydrometallurgy could be using treatment with molten salts, particularly fluoride melts. Moreover, one of the six concepts chosen for GEN IV nuclear reactors (Technology Roadmap - http://gif.inel.gov/roadmap/) is the molten salt reactor (MSR). The originality of the concept is the use of molten salts as liquid fuel and coolant. During the running of the reactor, fission products, particularly lanthanides, accumulate in the melt and have to be eliminated to optimise reactor operation. This study concerns the feasibility of the separation actinides-lanthanides-solvent by selectively electrodepositing the elements to be separated on an inert (Mo, Ta) or a reactive (Ni) cathodic substrate in molten fluoride media. The main results of this work lead to the conclusions that: The solvents to be used for efficient separation must be fluoride media containing lithium as cation. Inert substrates are suitable for actinide/lanthanide separation; nickel substrate is more suitable for the extraction of lanthanides from the solvent, owing to the depolarisation occurring in the cathodic process through alloy formation.

  16. Extended storage-in-place or MSRE fuel salt and flush salt

    SciTech Connect

    Notz, K.J.

    1985-09-01

    The solidified fuel salt and flush salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) have been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the reactor was shut down in 1969. The fluoride salt eutectic, containing 37 kg of uranium plus plutonium and fission products, is safely contained in three heavy-walled Hastelloy tanks, which are located inside a reinforced concrete cell. Removal of these salts to a remote location is not feasible until an appropriate repository has been identified, built, and placed in operation. Since this may take many years, extended storage-in-place was critically evaluated. The evaluation, which involved a preliminary assessment of several options for enhancing the integrity of in-place storage, including containment improvements, the addition of chemical getters and neutron poisons, and entombment in concrete, showed that this approach was a rational and safe solution to the problem for the short term. Entombment is essentially nonreversible, but the other options are open-ended; they do not limit the future selection of a final disposal option. Specific actions and improvements that would enhance safe containment during extended storage and would also be of future benefit, regardless of which disposal option is finally selected, were identified. 20 refs., 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Measurement of solubility of plutonium trifluoride and rare-earth fluorides in molten LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, V.S.; Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.

    1996-12-01

    Data on behavior of plutonium fluoride and fission products (FP) dissolved in fuel composition are needed to calculate the duration of an operating cycle of the ADTT facility (Accelerator-Driver Transmutation Technologies) and to determine the effect of their equilibrium concentrations on nuclear-physical characteristics of reactor operation. The data on the FP fluoride solubility in the molten salts are of great important for some industrial processes (electrolytical metal deposition, development of physical-chemical mean for processes of chemical technology, etc.) As noted above, some information on this question is given in monography and articles. Data concerning fluoride salts are given in reports. However, it was impossible to make the substantial analysis of mutual solubility of fluoride melts. The primary investigation of CeF{sub 3} and neodymium, samarium and lanthanum fluorides showed that the solubility of the melt LiF-BeF{sub 2} and LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4} was a linear function of reverse temperature and increases from lanthanum to samarium in the row of rare-earth elements. Disagreement in estimation of plutonium trifluoride solubility and incomplete data on the solubility of rare-earth elements prompted this study.

  18. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Holcomb, David Eugene; Flanagan, George F; Patton, Bruce W; Howard, Rob L; Harrison, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  19. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  20. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  1. The Northland fluoridation advocacy programme: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Sunitha; Thomas, David R

    2008-12-01

    On 20 July 2006, the Far North District Council resolved to fluoridate Kaitaia and Kaikohe. This was the first such initiative by any Territorial Local Authority (TLA) in New Zealand for 23 years, and resulted from a fluoridation advocacy programme. This paper describes the programme implementation, assesses its consistency with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and critically examines the collaboration between the fluoride advocate and the key stakeholders. Process evaluation identified three main categories of programme implementation: policy advocacy, community action projects, and media advocacy. The collaboration of iwi, Maori health providers and the community suggests that the programme was consistent with the principles (partnership, participation and protection) ofthe Treaty ofWaitangi. Media advocacy played an important role in reflecting and engaging community views on fluoridation, and it influenced decision-making by the Far North District Council. The simultaneous, combined 'top-down and bottom-up' approach was an effective and successful strategy for fluoridation advocacy in the community. Less integrated approaches implemented on their own (such as the 'top down' approach in Whangarei and the 'bottom-up' approach in Dargaville) were not effective. PMID:19180864

  2. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    PubMed

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. PMID:26574102

  3. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    PubMed

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room.

  4. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  5. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Breaker, Ronald R

    2014-07-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in Bacillus subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound is potentiated by fluoride. Polymyxin B, another membrane-targeting antibiotic with a different mechanism of action, shows no such improvement. These results, along with previous findings, indicate that certain compounds that destabilize bacterial cell envelopes can enhance the toxicity of fluoride.

  6. Method for the analysis of total fluoride in fluoride-releasing dental varnishes.

    PubMed

    Carey, C M; Coleman, S S

    2014-01-01

    Today's fluoride-releasing varnishes (F-varnish) contain a wide variety of ingredients which present analytical challenges for measuring their total fluoride content. This study reports improved methods to measure fluoride content in F-varnishes. Six different commercially available F-varnishes that contain difluorosilane (0.1% F) or NaF (2.26% F) alone or in combination with calcium-phosphates were analyzed. In a vial, 1-3 drops (0.05-0.15 g) of varnish product was dispensed, dissolved in chloroform, equilibrated in TISAB and analyzed via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The average weight percentage of fluoride for all F-varnishes containing NaF ranged from 2.03 to 2.24% F, which is within 90% of the declared label concentration of 2.26% F. Analysis of the difluorosilane-containing product required an additional hydrolysis step. ANOVA found no significant difference between the 5% NaF varnishes at p < 0.05. This method for fluoride analysis yields reliable and reproducible results and can be used for a wide variety of F-varnishes. The standard uncertainty for this method is ±4%. This method may become the basis for national and international standards that ensure the F-varnish products used in clinical practice have the fluoride content declared in the product literature.

  7. A study of fluoride groundwater occurrence in Nathenje, Lilongwe, Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msonda, K. W. M.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Fabiano, E.

    A study was carried out to determine fluoride concentration in groundwaters of Nathenje area situated in Lilongwe District in the central region of Malawi. Water samples were collected from 176 boreholes and shallow wells during different months in 2001 and 2002. Samples were then analysed for fluoride by using a fluoride electrode and an ion selective meter. The results showed that fluoride concentrations for the rainy season varied from <0.5 to 6.98 ± 0.01 mg/l with 52.9% of the boreholes above the World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum permissible limit of 1.5 mg/l. Fluoride concentrations for dry season ranged from <0.5 to 7.02 ± 0.02 mg/l with 50.8% of boreholes above 1.5 mg/l. Fluoride concentrations for the two seasons were significantly different from each other ( p < 0.05). Fluoride data was used to produce a fluoride distribution map. From the map, it was observed that fluoride concentrations in this area followed a pattern. The central part of Nathenje had high fluoride concentration of between 2 and 7.02 mg/l and these high fluoride values seemed to extend eastwards beyond the boundary of the study area. However, the southern and western parts had <1 mg/l of fluoride. The high groundwater fluoride values seem to be associated with the weathered basement complex containing biotite that is a probable source of fluoride. The other suspected sources of fluoride in Nathenje groundwater could be due to the dissolution of hornblende, fluorite and amphibole, which are reported to occur in rocks and soils in this area. There was evidence of dental fluorosis in areas where the fluoride concentration was high.

  8. FLUORIDE: A REVIEW OF USE AND EFFECTS ON HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Kanduti, Domen; Sterbenk, Petra; Artnik, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual’s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Aim: The aim of our research was to review the literature about fluoride toxicity and to inform physicians, dentists and public health specialists whether fluoride use is expedient and safe. Methods: Data we used in our review were systematically searched and collected from web pages and documents published from different international institutions. Results: Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment but we consume it in small amounts. Exposure can occur through dietary intake, respiration and fluoride supplements. The most important factor for fluoride presence in alimentation is fluoridated water. Methods, which led to greater fluoride exposure and lowered caries prevalence, are considered to be one of the greatest accomplishments in the 20th century`s public dental health. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Fluoride can be transmitted through the plasma into the mother’s milk; however, the concentration is low. The most important action of fluoride is topical, when it is present in the saliva in the appropriate concentration. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel. Acute toxicity can occur after ingesting one or more doses of fluoride over a short time period which then leads to poisoning. Today, poisoning is mainly due to unsupervised ingestion of products for dental and oral hygiene and over-fluoridated water. Conclusion: Even though fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations, it`s topical use is safe. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their

  9. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.; Willard, J.E.

    1961-08-01

    A method is described for dissolving lanthanum fluoride precipitates which is applicable to lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation processes for recovery of plutonium values from aqueous solutions. The lanthanum fluoride precipitate is contacted with an aqueous acidic solution containing dissolved zirconium in the tetravalent oxidation state. The presence of the zirconium increases the lanthanum fluoride dissolved and makes any tetravalent plutonium present more readily oxidizable to the hexavalent state. (AEC)

  10. Barium solubility in colquiriite fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Yaobo Yin; Keszler, D.A. )

    1993-12-01

    Several crystals in the family of Colquiriite fluorides LiAEMF[sub 6] (AE = Ca, Sr; M = Al, Ga, Cr) have been reported to function as efficient, broadly tunable laser materials when doped with the ion Cr[sup 3+]. The optical characteristics of the Cr[sup 3+] ion are considerably affected by the specific AE atom in the crystal. In this paper the systems LiSr[sub 1[minus]x]Ba[sub x]MF[sub 6](M = Al, Ga) have been studied by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Solubility limits of x = 0.06 for the Al compound and x = 0.20 for the Ga compound have been established. The structures of LiSr[sub 0.94(1)]Ba[sub 0.06]AlF[sub 6] and LiSr[sub 0.80(1)]Ba[sub 0.20]GaF[sub 6] corresponding to these limits are isotypic to the mineral Colquiriite. Each crystallizes in space group P[bar 3]1c: LiSr[sub 0.94]Ba[sub 0.06]AlF[sub 6]: a = 5.096(1) [angstrom], c = 10.269(2) [angstrom], R = 0.034, R[sub w] = 0.041; and LiSr[sub 0.80]Ba[sub 0.20]GaF[sub 6]: a = 5.173(1) [angstrom], c = 10.415(1) [angstrom], R = 0.028, R[sub w] = 0.033. The trigonal F planes about the Al and Ga atoms are rotated, one relative to the other, by 68.0 and 69.0[degrees], respectively.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of fluoride in toddlers after application of 5% sodium fluoride dental varnish.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Peter; Taves, Donald M; Kim, Amy S; Watson, Gene E; Horst, Jeremy A

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of dental caries (tooth decay) among preschool children is increasing, driven partially by an earlier age of onset of carious lesions. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends application of 5% sodium fluoride varnish at intervals increasing with caries risk status, as soon as teeth are present. However, the varnishes are marketed for treatment of tooth sensitivity and are regulated as medical devices rather than approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention of dental caries (tooth decay). The objective of this research is to examine the safety of use in toddlers by characterizing the absorption and distribution profile of a currently marketed fluoride varnish. We measured urinary fluoride for 5 hours after application of fluoride varnish to teeth in 6 toddlers aged 12 to 15 months. Baseline levels were measured on a separate day. The urine was extracted from disposable diapers, measured by rapid diffusion, and extrapolated to plasma levels. The mean estimated plasma fluoride concentration was 13 μg/L (SD, 9 μg/L) during the baseline visit and 21 μg/L (SD, 8 μg/L) during the 5 hours after treatment. Mean estimated peak plasma fluoride after treatment was 57 μg/L (SD, 22 μg/L), and 20 μg/kg (SD, 4 μg/L) was retained on average. Retained fluoride was 253 times lower than the acute toxic dose of 5 mg/kg. Mean plasma fluoride after placement of varnish was within an SD of control levels. Occasional application of fluoride varnish following American Academy of Pediatrics guidance is safe for toddlers.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Fluoride in Toddlers After Application of 5% Sodium Fluoride Dental Varnish

    PubMed Central

    Taves, Donald M.; Kim, Amy S.; Watson, Gene E.; Horst, Jeremy A.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of dental caries (tooth decay) among preschool children is increasing, driven partially by an earlier age of onset of carious lesions. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends application of 5% sodium fluoride varnish at intervals increasing with caries risk status, as soon as teeth are present. However, the varnishes are marketed for treatment of tooth sensitivity and are regulated as medical devices rather than approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention of dental caries (tooth decay). The objective of this research is to examine the safety of use in toddlers by characterizing the absorption and distribution profile of a currently marketed fluoride varnish. We measured urinary fluoride for 5 hours after application of fluoride varnish to teeth in 6 toddlers aged 12 to 15 months. Baseline levels were measured on a separate day. The urine was extracted from disposable diapers, measured by rapid diffusion, and extrapolated to plasma levels. The mean estimated plasma fluoride concentration was 13 μg/L (SD, 9 μg/L) during the baseline visit and 21 μg/L (SD, 8 μg/L) during the 5 hours after treatment. Mean estimated peak plasma fluoride after treatment was 57 μg/L (SD, 22 μg/L), and 20 μg/kg (SD, 4 μg/L) was retained on average. Retained fluoride was 253 times lower than the acute toxic dose of 5 mg/kg. Mean plasma fluoride after placement of varnish was within an SD of control levels. Occasional application of fluoride varnish following American Academy of Pediatrics guidance is safe for toddlers. PMID:25136045

  13. Changes in plaque fluoride levels by school-based fluoride rinsing and tablet programs in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Abu Nasir Mohammad Nazmul; Sampaio, Fabio Correia; von der Fehr, Frithjof Ramm; Arneberg, Pål

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of school-based fluoride rinsing and tablet programs on plaque fluoride levels. A total of 42 children (8-9 years) were selected from two neighboring schools in Dhaka, Bangladesh. After caries recordings, vestibular plaque samples from the maxillary central incisors and mandibular first molars were collected and frozen on day 0 (baseline). The subjects of one school (rinsing group, n = 15) rinsed with 0.05% NaF, while those from the other school (tablet group, n = 16) used a 0.5 mg F tablet on the 5 school days during a 3-week period. The surfaces were sampled on the first and last school day every week. The fluoride and protein contents of each sample were analyzed using micro-techniques. The median plaque fluoride levels were 9.1 ppm at baseline in the rinsing group and 2.5 ppm in the tablet group (P < 0.05). This difference could in part be related to reported fluoride toothpaste usage. After 4 days on the fluoride programs, plaque fluoride levels in the rinsing group increased to 27.3, 24.5 and 14.2 ppm in the 3 consecutive weeks. The corresponding values after tablet usage were 8.0, 6.5 and 7.1 ppm, respectively. After 3 days without fluoride during the weekends, levels declined towards baseline values in both groups. Hence, the plaque fluoride levels in 8 to 9-year-old Bangladeshi children were increased by both rinsing and tablet programs, but the effect was not detectable 3 days later.

  14. Fluoride in drinking water and its removal.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi; Maheshwari, R C

    2006-09-01

    Excessive fluoride concentrations have been reported in groundwaters of more than 20 developed and developing countries including India where 19 states are facing acute fluorosis problems. Various technologies are being used to remove fluoride from water but still the problem has not been rooted out. In this paper, a broad overview of the available technologies for fluoride removal and advantages and limitations of each one have been presented based on literature survey and the experiments conducted in the laboratory with several processes. It has been concluded that the selection of treatment process should be site specific as per local needs and prevailing conditions as each technology has some limitations and no one process can serve the purpose in diverse conditions.

  15. Addition of methanetrisulfonyl fluoride to unsaturated bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Yagupol'skii, Yu.L.; Gerus, I.I.; Savina, T.I.

    1988-06-10

    The reactions of methanetrisulfonyl fluoride, HC(SO/sub 2/F)/sub 3/ with acrylic acid derivatives lead to addition products containing the tris(fluorosulfonyl)methyl group, while methyl vinyl ketone gives an unstable adduct. The methyl ester of propiolic acid is converted to a mixture of cis- and trans-tris(fluorosulfonyl)-crotonic acid esters. The reaction of cyclohexene with methanesulfonyl fluoride leads to dimerization of the olefin and the cyclohexyl derivative is formed in low yield. Sulfonyl fluoride acts as catalyst for the conversion of cyclohexene to dimer and only a small portion of the cyclohexyl cation reacts with the weakly nucleophilic /sup /minus//C(SO/sub 2/F)/sub 3/ anion.

  16. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  17. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  18. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely used as components of food-contact coatings...

  19. Uses of sodium fluoride varnish in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Chu, C H; Lo, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Fluoride varnish is developed to prolong the contact time between fluoride and tooth surface, so that the tooth becomes more resistant to caries attack. The active ingredient of fluoride varnish is usually 5% sodium fluoride, (22,600 ppm fluoride). Studies have found that fairly insoluble globules of calcium fluoride-like material formed on the tooth surface after topical fluoride application. These globules act as a reservoir of fluoride in the mouth for a prolonged period of time. Systematic reviews corroborate evidence for the efficacy of fluoride varnish in the prevention of dental caries. Sodium fluoride varnish is used to prevent caries development, arrest early enamel and even soft dentine caries through promotion of remineralization of carious tooth substance. It is also used to treat tooth hypersensitivity. Some use it as a provisional luting agent by itself or combined with other provisional luting agents for cementing provisional crowns. Fluoride varnish has recently gained much attention in dentistry because it is quick and easy to apply. It sets rapidly on teeth, and gagging and swallowing is unusual. Side-effects or complications of its use are rare. Studies show that fluoride varnish is safe for young children and the risk of dental fluorosis is minimal. The simplicity of its application makes it very suitable and practical for use in dental clinics and outreach dental services, especially in young children and in other special needs groups.

  20. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely used as components of food-contact coatings...

  1. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  2. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  3. 40 CFR 60.222 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.222 Section... Industry: Diammonium Phosphate Plants § 60.222 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 30 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed...

  4. 40 CFR 180.575 - Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for... § 180.575 Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues. (a)(1) General. Tolerances are established for residues of sulfuryl fluoride in or on the following commodities from the postharvest fumigation...

  5. 40 CFR 60.232 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.232 Section... Industry: Triple Superphosphate Plants § 60.232 Standard for fluorides. On and after the date on which the... gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 100 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.20...

  6. 40 CFR 60.242 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.242 Section... Industry: Granular Triple Superphosphate Storage Facilities § 60.242 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and... atmosphere from any affected facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 0.25...

  7. 40 CFR 180.575 - Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for... § 180.575 Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues. (a)(1) General. Tolerances are established for residues of sulfuryl fluoride in or on the following commodities from the postharvest fumigation...

  8. 40 CFR 60.212 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.212 Section... Industry: Superphosphoric Acid Plants § 60.212 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 5.0 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5...

  9. Fluoride release and uptake capacities of fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Attar, Nuray; Turgut, Melek D

    2003-01-01

    Many fluoride-releasing dental materials are being sold on the basis of their cariostatic properties. However, the amount fluoride release of these materials is still uncertain. This study investigated the fluoride release and uptake characteristics of four flowable resin composites (Heliomolar Flow, Tetric Flow, Wave, Perma Flo), one flowable compomer (Dyract flow), one conventional glass ionomer cement mixed with two different powder/liquid ratios (ChemFlex Syringeable and ChemFlex Condensable), one packable resin composite (SureFil), one ion-releasing composite (Ariston pHc) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). Seven discs (6-mm diameter and 1.5-mm height) were prepared for each material. Each disc was immersed in 3.5 ml of deionized water within a plastic vial and stored at 37 degrees C. The deionized water was changed every 24 hours and the release of fluoride was measured for 30 days. At the end of this period, the samples were recharged with 2 ml of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for four minutes. Then, all samples were reassessed for an additional 10 days. The fluoride release of all samples was measured with a specific fluoride electrode and an ionanalyzer. Statistical analyses were conducted using two-way repeated measure ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests. For all tested materials, the greatest fluoride release was observed after the first day of the study (p<0.01) but gradually diminished with time. During the test period, Tetric Flow released the lowest amount of fluoride; however, no statistically significant difference was found from Wave and Heliomolar Flow (p>0.05). Ariston pHc released the highest amount of fluoride, followed by ChemFlex Syringeable, Vitremer and ChemFlex Condensable. There were statistically significant differences among these materials (p<0.05). Fluoride release of all materials were significantly increased after the first day following refluoridation and Ariston pHc released the greatest

  10. Enhanced fluoride sorption by mechanochemically activated kaolinites.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, S; Sundaram, C Sairam; Sukumar, Rugmini

    2008-05-01

    Kaolinite clay obtained from the mines was processed and studied for its fluoride sorption capacity. The surface area of the clay mineral was increased from 15.11 m(2)/g (raw) to 32.43 m(2)/g (activated) by mechanochemical activation. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to optimize various equilibrating conditions like the effect of contact time, dosage, pH for both raw and micronized kaolinites (RK and MK). The effect of other interfering anions on the defluoridation capacity (DC) of the sorbents was studied. Sorption of fluoride by the sorbents was observed over a wide pH range of 3-11. The studies revealed there is an enhanced fluoride sorption on MK. FTIR and XRD were used for the characterization of the sorbent. The surface morphology of the clay material was observed using SEM. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313 and 323 K. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Sorption intensity (1/n) (0.770-0.810) has been evaluated using Freundlich isotherm, whereas the values of sorption capacity Q(0) (0.609, 0.714 and 0.782 mg/g) and binding energy b (0.158, 0.145 and 0.133 L/mg) at three different temperatures have been estimated using Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption process was found to be controlled by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of fluoride on MK is endothermic and a spontaneous process. The kinetic studies indicate that the sorption of fluoride on MK follows pseudo-first-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  11. Implications of fluoride--an endless uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Pillai, K Sadasivan; Stanley, V Amalan

    2002-01-01

    Fluorosis has become pandemic and it has assumed global status in the public health point of view. The paper deals with the health issues pertaining to fluorosis with special emphasis in the Indian context. It explains the equivocal evidences of fluoride-related problems and discusses the control measures of fluorosis. In general, it reveals how fluoride is useful at very low concentrations and at the same time brings forth manifestation of clinical abnormalities at higher concentrations that are the basis of the principles of toxicology.

  12. Graphite Fluoride Fiber Composites For Heat Sinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fiber/polymer composite materials consist of graphite fluoride fibers in epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene, or polyimide resin. Combines high electrical resistivity with high thermal conductivity and solves heat-transfer problems of many electrical systems. Commercially available in powder form, for use as dry lubricant or cathode material in lithium batteries. Produced by direct fluorination of graphite powder at temperature of 400 to 650 degree C. Applications include printed-circuit boards for high-density power electronics, insulators for magnetic-field cores like those found in alternators and transformers, substrates for thin-film resistors, and electrical-protection layers in aircraft de-icers.

  13. Reconstructing temporal variation of fluoride uptake in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from a high-fluoride area by analysis of fluoride distribution in dentine.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Horst; Rhede, Dieter; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Kierdorf, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Trace element profiling in the incrementally formed dentine of mammalian teeth can be applied to reconstruct temporal variation of incorporation of these elements into the tissue. Using an electron microprobe, this study analysed fluoride distribution in dentine of first and third mandibular molars of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a high-fluoride area, to assess temporal variation in fluoride uptake of the animals. Fluoride content in the early-formed dentine of first molars was significantly lower than in the late-formed dentine of these teeth, and was also lower than in both, the early and the late-formed dentine of third molars. As early dentine formation in M1 takes place prior to weaning, this finding indicates a lower dentinal fluoride uptake during the pre-weaning compared to the post-weaning period. This is hypothetically attributed to the action of a partial barrier to fluoride transfer from blood to milk in lactating females and a low bioavailability of fluoride ingested together with milk. Another factor contributing to lower plasma fluoride levels in juveniles compared to adults is the rapid clearance of fluoride from blood plasma in the former due to their intense skeletal growth. The combined action of these mechanisms is considered to explain why in kangaroos from high-fluoride areas, the (early-formed) first molars are not affected by dental fluorosis while the (later-formed) third and fourth molars regularly exhibit marked to severe fluorotic lesions. PMID:26736058

  14. Reconstructing temporal variation of fluoride uptake in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from a high-fluoride area by analysis of fluoride distribution in dentine.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Horst; Rhede, Dieter; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Kierdorf, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Trace element profiling in the incrementally formed dentine of mammalian teeth can be applied to reconstruct temporal variation of incorporation of these elements into the tissue. Using an electron microprobe, this study analysed fluoride distribution in dentine of first and third mandibular molars of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a high-fluoride area, to assess temporal variation in fluoride uptake of the animals. Fluoride content in the early-formed dentine of first molars was significantly lower than in the late-formed dentine of these teeth, and was also lower than in both, the early and the late-formed dentine of third molars. As early dentine formation in M1 takes place prior to weaning, this finding indicates a lower dentinal fluoride uptake during the pre-weaning compared to the post-weaning period. This is hypothetically attributed to the action of a partial barrier to fluoride transfer from blood to milk in lactating females and a low bioavailability of fluoride ingested together with milk. Another factor contributing to lower plasma fluoride levels in juveniles compared to adults is the rapid clearance of fluoride from blood plasma in the former due to their intense skeletal growth. The combined action of these mechanisms is considered to explain why in kangaroos from high-fluoride areas, the (early-formed) first molars are not affected by dental fluorosis while the (later-formed) third and fourth molars regularly exhibit marked to severe fluorotic lesions.

  15. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by direct contact membrane distillation: theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Boubakri, Ali; Bouchrit, Raja; Hafiane, Amor; Bouguecha, Salah Al-Tahar

    2014-09-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was used for fluoride removal from aqueous solution. This study has been carried out on heat and mass transfer analyses in DCMD. The dusty-gas model was used to analyze the mass transfer mechanism and to calculate the permeate flux. The heat transfer is analyzed based on energy balance, and the different layers are considered as a series of thermal resistances. Mass transfer analysis showed that the transition Knudsen-molecular diffusion is the dominant mechanism to describe the transport of water vapor through the pores of the PVDF membrane. The most significant operating parameter is the feed temperature. The permeate increases sensitively with feed temperature and velocity, and it shows insignificant change with feed salts concentration. Heat transfer analysis showed the conduction through the matrix of the membrane presents the major part of available energy. The increasing feed temperature leads to increase thermal efficiency (TE) and decrease temperature polarization coefficient (TPC). The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical values. Therefore, it is suggested to work at high feed temperature, which will benefit both the thermal efficiency and permeate flux. The experimental results proved that DCMD process is able to produce almost fluoride-free water suitable for many beneficial uses.

  16. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by direct contact membrane distillation: theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Boubakri, Ali; Bouchrit, Raja; Hafiane, Amor; Bouguecha, Salah Al-Tahar

    2014-09-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was used for fluoride removal from aqueous solution. This study has been carried out on heat and mass transfer analyses in DCMD. The dusty-gas model was used to analyze the mass transfer mechanism and to calculate the permeate flux. The heat transfer is analyzed based on energy balance, and the different layers are considered as a series of thermal resistances. Mass transfer analysis showed that the transition Knudsen-molecular diffusion is the dominant mechanism to describe the transport of water vapor through the pores of the PVDF membrane. The most significant operating parameter is the feed temperature. The permeate increases sensitively with feed temperature and velocity, and it shows insignificant change with feed salts concentration. Heat transfer analysis showed the conduction through the matrix of the membrane presents the major part of available energy. The increasing feed temperature leads to increase thermal efficiency (TE) and decrease temperature polarization coefficient (TPC). The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical values. Therefore, it is suggested to work at high feed temperature, which will benefit both the thermal efficiency and permeate flux. The experimental results proved that DCMD process is able to produce almost fluoride-free water suitable for many beneficial uses. PMID:24756674

  17. Molten Salt Fuel Cycle Requirements for ADTT Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. F.; Del Cul, G. D.; Toth, L. M.

    1999-06-07

    The operation of an ADT system with the associated nuclear reactions has a profound effect upon the chemistry of the fuel - especially with regards to container compatibility and the chemical separations that may be required. The container can be protected by maintaining the redox chemistry within a relatively narrow, non-corrosive window. Neutron economy as well as other factors require a sophisticated regime of fission product separations. Neither of these control requirements has been demonstrated on the scale or degree of sophistication necessary to support an ADT device. We review the present situation with respect to fluoride salts, and focus on the critical issues in these areas which must be addressed. One requirement for advancement in this area - a supply of suitable materials - will soon be fulfilled by the remediation of ORNL's Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, and the removal of a total of 11,000 kg of enriched (Li-7 > 99.9%) coolant, flush, and fuel salts.

  18. [Exposure of Poznan inhabitants to fluorides. II. Fluorides in urine and hair of school children].

    PubMed

    Oporowska-Moszyk, K; Seńczuk, W

    1997-01-01

    In view of the plans of fresh water fluoridation in Poznań the necessity arose of obtaining of information about the exposure to fluoride compounds. The reported study was carried out in Poznań and environs. Urine and hair samples of children were obtained. The determinations were done with a ion- selective electrode. The mean fluoride concentrations in urine were between 0.3 and 0.9 mg F-/dm3. The concentration in hair was 2.2 mg F-/g in Poznań and 3.3 mg F-/g in Luboń. These values were, however, not exceeding the acceptable ones. In Luboń the concentrations of fluorides in hair was 50% higher than in Poznań. The authors believe that the possible cause was Fertilizer Chemical Works in that location.

  19. Aluminium contamination from fluoride assisted dissolution of metallic aluminium.

    PubMed

    Tennakone, K; Wickramanayake, S; Fernando, C A

    1988-01-01

    Trace amounts (microg g(-1) quantities) of fluoride ion are found to catalyse the dissolution of metallic aluminium in very slightly acidic or alkaline aqueous media. Possibly hazardous levels of aluminium could get leached from cooking utensils if fluoridated water or fluoride rich foodstuffs are used. The fluoride assisted corrosion of aluminium is most dramatic in oxalic, tartaric acids or sodium bicarbonate. Carbon dioxide also corrodes aluminium in the presence of the fluoride ion, generating colloidal hydrated aluminium oxide which is readily soluble in dilute organic and mineral acids. PMID:15092668

  20. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deng, Y.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1-10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50??C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006-2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from <1% at low pH values to >99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H+ and Al3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3-30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10-6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F-, and major complexes (HF(aq)0, AlF2+, AlF2+ and AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-, FeF2+, FeF2+, MgF+ and BF2(OH)2- may comprise 1-10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al. ?? 2011.

  1. Appropriate uses of fluorides for children: guidelines from the Canadian Workshop on the Evaluation of Current Recommendations Concerning Fluorides.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prevent fluorosis caused by excessive fluoride ingestion by revising recommendations for fluoride intake by children. OPTIONS: Limiting fluoride ingestion from fluoridated water, fluoride supplements and fluoride dentifrices. OUTCOMES: Reduction in the prevalence of dental fluorosis and continued prevention of dental caries. EVIDENCE: Before the workshop, experts prepared comprehensive literature reviews of fluoride therapies, fluoride ingestion and the prevalence and causes of dental fluorosis. The papers, which were peer-reviewed, revised and circulated to the workshop participants, formed the basis of the workshop discussions. VALUES: Recommendations to limit fluoride intake were vigorously debated before being adopted as the consensus opinion of the workshop group. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Decrease in the prevalence of dental fluorosis with continuing preventive effects of fluoride use. The only significant cost would be in preparing new, low-concentration fluoride products for distribution. RECOMMENDATIONS: Fluoride supplementation should be limited to children 3 years of age and older in areas where there is less than 0.3 ppm of fluoride in the water supply. Children in all areas should use only a "pea-sized" amount of fluoride dentifrice no more than twice daily under the supervision of an adult. VALIDATION: These recommendations are almost identical to changes to recommendations for the use of fluoride supplements recently proposed by a group of European countries. SPONSORS: The workshop was organized by Dr. D. Christopher Clark, of the University of British Columbia, and Drs. Hardy Limeback and Ralph C. Burgess, of the University of Toronto, and funded by Proctor and Gamble Inc., Toronto, the Medical Research Council of Canada and Health Canada (formerly the Department of National Health and Welfare). The recommendations were formally adopted by the Canadian Dental Association in April 1993. PMID:8261348

  2. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Water in Chennai, Tamilnadu

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Karunya; Rajapandian, K.; Gurunathan, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Context The optimum level of fluoride in drinking water is 0.7 to 1.2 ppm. Decreased fluoride concentration leads to increased risk of caries and increased concentration can lead to dental or skeletal fluorosis. One crore liters of water is supplied to Chennai and surrounding areas through pouches and bottles which carters about one third of city population. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the fluoride concentration in top 10 bottled waters in Chennai and to check the accuracy of their labelling. Materials and Methods Top selling bottled waters, 6 multinational and 4 Non- multinational brands were selected for the study. Three different batches of each brand were purchased. The labels of the bottled were removed after collecting the details regarding fluoride content. All the bottles were numbered and sent for fluoride content analysis using SPADNS calorimetric method. Results All the brands and batches which were analysed for the study had less than optimal fluoride content and there is a significant variation in fluoride concentration of each brand and among different batches of same brand bottled waters. The range of fluoride level in tested samples was between 0.27 to 0.59. Only one brand’s label had information regarding the fluoride content. Conclusion Standardization of fluoride levels in bottled waters and labelling of fluoride content should become mandatory. PMID:26557612

  3. Diffusion of fluoride through the rat enamel organ in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bawden, J.W.; Deaton, T.G.; Crenshaw, M.A.

    1987-08-01

    This study investigated the diffusion of fluoride through the enamel organ in vitro. The rat molar explants used were entirely in the secretory stage or predominantly in the maturation stage of enamel formation. The removal of the enamel organ or metabolic inhibition with iodoacetate caused significant increases in enamel fluoride uptake at both stages of enamel formation. Inhibition with dinitrophenol caused a significant increase only in the maturation phase. Uptake of fluoride in enamel was related to the fluoride concentration in the medium, except in the maturation stage explants, where increasing the medium fluoride concentration from 0.05 ppm to 0.08 ppm did not significantly increase fluoride uptake at any of the three observation times. The findings indicate that the enamel organ exists as a diffusion-limiting membrane to the movement of fluoride from the extracellular fluid compartment to the developing enamel.

  4. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  5. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis. PMID:27086437

  6. Fluoride in the prey of barn owls (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Thomson, A G

    1987-01-01

    Bone fluoride in short-tailed voles (Microtus agrestis) and common shrews (Sorex araneus), the prey of barn owls (Tyto alba), was studied on Anglesey, North Wales. The average fluoride content of M. agrestis skulls obtained from a location 0.9 km from an aluminium reduction plant was significantly greater than that of skulls from another location 22 km from the source of industrial fluoride pollution. At both locations, mean fluoride levels of skulls extracted from owl pellets and those of voles trapped mechanically were broadly similar but important differences existed. Near the aluminium reduction plant, owls caught voles and shrews with a much wider range of fluoride levels than occurred at a single trapping site. However, there was no evidence for selection of heavily fluoridated prey. Within 1 km of the aluminium reduction plant, six trapping sites yielded S. araneus with a fourfold difference between the highest and lowest mean bone fluoride level. PMID:15092770

  7. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  8. Solid electrolytes for fluoride ion batteries: ionic conductivity in polycrystalline tysonite-type fluorides.

    PubMed

    Rongeat, Carine; Reddy, M Anji; Witter, Raiker; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2014-02-12

    Batteries based on a fluoride shuttle (fluoride ion battery, FIB) can theoretically provide high energy densities and can thus be considered as an interesting alternative to Li-ion batteries. Large improvements are still needed regarding their actual performance, in particular for the ionic conductivity of the solid electrolyte. At the current state of the art, two types of fluoride families can be considered for electrolyte applications: alkaline-earth fluorides having a fluorite-type structure and rare-earth fluorides having a tysonite-type structure. As regard to the latter, high ionic conductivities have been reported for doped LaF3 single crystals. However, polycrystalline materials would be easier to implement in a FIB due to practical reasons in the cell manufacturing. Hence, we have analyzed in detail the ionic conductivity of La(1-y)Ba(y)F(3-y) (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.15) solid solutions prepared by ball milling. The combination of DC and AC conductivity analyses provides a better understanding of the conduction mechanism in tysonite-type fluorides with a blocking effect of the grain boundaries. Heat treatment of the electrolyte material was performed and leads to an improvement of the ionic conductivity. This confirms the detrimental effect of grain boundaries and opens new route for the development of solid electrolytes for FIB with high ionic conductivities. PMID:24444763

  9. Geological sources of fluoride and acceptable intake of fluoride in an endemic fluorosis area, southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Battaleb-Looie, Sedigheh; Moore, Farid; Jacks, Gunnar; Ketabdari, Mohammad Reza

    2012-10-01

    The present study is the first attempt to put forward possible source(s) of fluoride in the Dashtestan area, Bushehr Province, southern Iran. In response to reports on the high incidence of dental fluorosis, 35 surface and groundwater samples were collected and analysed for fluoride. The results indicate that dissolved fluoride in the study area is above the maximum permissible limit recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). An additional 35 soil and rock samples were also collected and analysed for fluoride, and rock samples were subjected to petrographic investigations and X-ray diffraction. The results of these analyses show that the most likely source for fluoride in the groundwater is from clay minerals (chlorite) and micas (muscovite, sericite, and biotite) in the soils and rocks in the area. We also note that due to the high average temperatures all year round and excessive water consumption in the area, the optimum fluoride dose level should be lower than that recommended by the WHO.

  10. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.; Paiva, Saul M.; Tenuta, Livia M. A.; Cury, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children’s toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p < 0.05), no difference between types of toothpaste was found regarding the ingested dose based on TSF (0.039 ± 0.005 and 0.039 ± 0.005 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p > 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used. PMID:24189183

  11. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  12. Surface crystallization of a fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Doremus, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Growth of crystals on the surface of a Zr-Ba-La fluoride glass was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Small, dark crystal nucleated rapidly and grew to a size of about 10 microns; then they stopped growing, and wrinkled regions emerged, covering the entire crystal surface.

  13. Aqueous vinylidene fluoride polymer coating composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, Edward J. (Inventor); Christofas, Alkis (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A water-based coating composition which may be air dried to form durable, fire resistant coatings includes dispersed vinylidene fluoride polymer particles, emulsified liquid epoxy resin and a dissolved emulsifying agent for said epoxy resin which agent is also capable of rapidly curing the epoxy resin upon removal of the water from the composition.

  14. Polyvinylidene fluoride film as a capacitor dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dematos, H. V.

    1981-01-01

    Thin strips of polyvinylidene fluoride film (PVDF) with vacuum deposited electrodes were made into capacitors by conventional winding and fabrication techniques. These devices were used to identify and evaluate the performance characteristics offered by the PVDF in metallized film capacitors. Variations in capacitor parameters with temperature and frequence were evaluated and compared with other dielectric films. Their impact on capacitor applications is discussed.

  15. Structural and technical details of the Kirkwood-Buff integrals from the optimization of ionic force fields: focus on fluorides.

    PubMed

    Fyta, M

    2012-03-01

    Results on the structural details of Kirkwood-Buff integrals obtained from the optimization of ionic force fields are presented. We have proposed and make use of an optimization scheme for ionic force fields, which is based on the modification of the cation-anion mixing rules, the calculation of the thermodynamics properties of various monovalent salt solutions according to the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions and the comparison to relevant experimental findings. Here, we complete and extend our calculations and analysis as we focus on the technical details of this optimization procedure and the case of fluorides, which have been proven difficult to handle. Important insight is given on the dependence of the radial distribution functions, the short-ranged potentials of mean force, and the Kirkwood-Buff integrals of the salt solutions on the different scaling factors in the mixing rules. Specifically, the way the structural details and inherent characteristics of the above properties are affected by the quantitative and qualitative differences in the mixing rules for a variety of common biologically relevant monovalent salts is mainly addressed. We conclude on the efficiency of this scheme, again with a focus on the fluorides. In the end, we provide a variation of the ion-pair mixing rules scaling factors with salt concentration to identify regimes for which different mixing rules prefactors lead to well-optimized force fields. All results are obtained through Molecular Dynamics simulations using previously optimized force fields for the monovalent ions.

  16. IMPACT OF FLUORIDE ON DENTAL HEALTH QUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Medjedovic, Eida; Medjedovic, Senad; Deljo, Dervis; Sukalo, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fluoride is natural element that strengthens teeth and prevents their decay. Experts believe that the best way to prevent cavities is the use of fluoride from multiple sources. Studies even show that in some cases, fluoride can stop already started damage of the teeth. In children younger than 6 years fluoride is incorporated into the enamel of permanent teeth, making the teeth more resistant to the action of bacterial and acids in food. Goal: The aim of this study is to determine the effects of improving the health status of teeth after six months treatment with the use of topical fluoridation 0.5% NaF, and the level and quality of the impact of treatment with chemical 0.5% NaF on the dental health of children at age from 8 to 15 years, in relation to gender and chronological age. This study included school children aged 8 to 15 years who visited health and dental services dependent in Mostar. Results: It is obvious that after the implementation of treatment with 5% NaF by the method of topical fluoridation, health status of subjects from the experimental group significantly improved, so that at the final review 89.71% or 61 subjects of the experimental group had healthy (cured teeth), tooth with dental caries only 5.88% or 4 respondents tooth with dental caries and filling 4.41% or 3 respondents, extracted baby tooth 14.71% or 10 respondents, while for 13.24% of respondents was identified state with still unerupted teeth. Our findings are indirectly confirmed that the six-month treatment of fluoridation with 5% NaF, contributed to statistically significant improvement in overall oral health of the experimental group compared to the control group which was not treated by any dental treatment. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there is a statistically significant difference in the evaluated parameters of oral health of children in the control group compared to the studied parameters of oral health the experimental group of children at the final

  17. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  18. Decline of caries prevalence after the cessation of water fluoridation in the former East Germany.

    PubMed

    Künzel, W; Fischer, T; Lorenz, R; Brühmann, S

    2000-10-01

    In contrast to the anticipated increase in dental caries following the cessation of water fluoridation in the cities Chemnitz (formerly Karl-Marx-Stadt) and Plauen, a significant fall in caries prevalence was observed. This trend corresponded to the national caries decline and appeared to be a new population-wide phenomenon. Additional surveys (N=1017) carried out in the formerly-fluoridated towns of Spremberg (N=9042) and Zittau (N=6232) were carried out in order to support this unexpected epidemiological finding. Pupils from these towns, aged 8/9-, 12/13- and 15/16-years, have been examined repeatedly over the last 20 years using standardised caries-methodological procedures. While the data provided additional support for the established fact of a caries reduction brought about by the fluoridation of drinking water (48% on average), it has also provided further support for the contention that caries prevalence may continue to fall after the reduction of fluoride concentration in the water supply from about 1 ppm to below 0.2 ppm F. Caries levels for the 12-year-olds of both towns significantly decreased during the years 1993-96, following the cessation of water fluoridation. In Spremberg, DMFT fell from 2.36 to 1.45 (38.5%) and in Zittau from 2.47 to 1.96 (20.6%). These findings have therefore supported the previously observed change in the caries trend of Chemnitz and Plauen. The mean of 1.81 DMFT for the 12-year-olds, computed from data of the four towns, is the lowest observed in East Germany during the past 40 years. The causes for the changed caries trend were seen on the one hand in improvements in attitudes towards oral health behaviour and, on the other hand, to the broader availability and application of preventive measures (F-salt, F-toothpastes, fissure sealants etc.). There is, however, still no definitive explanation for the current pattern and further analysis of future caries trends in the formerly fluoridated towns would therefore seem to be

  19. PySALT: SALT science pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, S. M.; Still, M.; Schellart, P.; Balona, L.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Kniazev, A.; Kotze, M.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Pickering, T. E.; Potter, S.; Romero Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Wiliams, T.; Zietsman, E.

    2012-07-01

    The PySALT user package contains the primary reduction and analysis software tools for the SALT telescope. Currently, these tools include basic data reductions for RSS and SALTICAM in both imaging, spectroscopic, and slot modes. Basic analysis software for slot mode data is also provided. These tools are primarily written in python/PyRAF with some additional IRAF code.

  20. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    PubMed Central

    MOIMAZ, Suzely Adas Saliba; SALIBA, Nemre Adas; SALIBA, Orlando; SUMIDA, Doris Hissako; de SOUZA, Neila Paula; CHIBA, Fernando Yamamoto; GARBIN, Cléa Adas Saliba

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods: Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results: A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720) had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754) were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373) were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L). Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions: The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis. PMID:23559106

  1. Fluoride in the environment and its metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Vinay Kumar; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Damodaran, Thukkaram

    2011-01-01

    The presence of environmental fluoride and its impact on human health is well documented. When consumed in adequate quantity, fluoride prevents dental caries, assists in the formation of dental enamels, and prevents deficiencies in bone mineralization. At excessive exposure levels, ingestion of fluoride causes dental fluorosis skeletal fluorosis, and manifestations such as gastrointestinal, neurological, and urinary problems. The distribution of fluoride in the environment is uneven and largely is believed to derive from geogenic causes. The natural sources of fluoride are fluorite, fluorapatite, and cryolite, whereas anthropogenic sources include coal burning, oil refining, steel production, brick-making industries, and phosphatic fertilizer plants, among others. Among the various sources of fluoride in the environment, those of anthropogenic origin have occasionally been considered to be major ones. The gourndwater is more susceptible to fluoride accumulation and contamination than are other environmental media, primarily because of its contact with geological substrates underneath. The high fluoride concentration in water usually reflects the solubility of fluoride (CaF₂). High concentrations are also often associated with soft, alkaline, and calcium-deficient waters. The fluoride compounds that occur naturally in drinking water are almost totally bioavailable (90%) and are completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. As a result, drinking water is considered to be the potential source of fluoride that causes fluorosis. Because the bioavailability of fluoride is generally reduced in humans when consumed with milk or a calcium-rich diet, it is highly recommended that the inhabitants of fluoride-contaminated areas should incorporate calcium-rich foods in their routine diet. Guidelines for limiting the fluoride intake from drinking water have been postulated by various authorities. Such limits are designed to protect public health and should reflect all

  2. Fluoride estimation and its correlation with other physicochemical parameters in drinking water of some areas of Balochistan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chandio, Tasawar Ali; Khan, Muhammad Nasiruddin; Sarwar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    The fluoride level in drinking water is an important parameter and has to be controlled in order to prevent dental and skeletal fluorosis. The objective of this study is to assess fluoride content and other water quality parameters in the samples taken from open wells, tube wells, and karezes of Mastung, Mangochar, and Pringabad areas of Balochistan province. A total number of 96 drinking water samples out of 150 were found unfit for human consumption. Area-wise analysis show that the samples from 39 sites from Mastung, 12 from Mangochar, and 13 from Pringabad were found in the risk of dental fluorosis of mild to severe nature. However, 12 sampling sites from Mastung, 8 from Mangochar, and 2 from Pringabad were identified as the risks of mottling and skeletal fluorosis or other bone abnormalities. The highest concentration of F(-) has been observed as 14 mg L(-1) in Mastung. Correlation analysis show that fluoride solubility in drinking water is pH dependent; and the salts of Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), and SO4(2-) contribute to attain the favorable pH for dissolution of fluoride compounds in drinking water. Principal component analysis shows that the geochemical composition of the rocks is only responsible for groundwater contamination. On the basis of the results, defloridation of the identified sampling sites and continuous monitoring of drinking water at regular basis is recommended at government level to avoid further fluorosis risks. PMID:26215829

  3. Fluoride estimation and its correlation with other physicochemical parameters in drinking water of some areas of Balochistan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chandio, Tasawar Ali; Khan, Muhammad Nasiruddin; Sarwar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    The fluoride level in drinking water is an important parameter and has to be controlled in order to prevent dental and skeletal fluorosis. The objective of this study is to assess fluoride content and other water quality parameters in the samples taken from open wells, tube wells, and karezes of Mastung, Mangochar, and Pringabad areas of Balochistan province. A total number of 96 drinking water samples out of 150 were found unfit for human consumption. Area-wise analysis show that the samples from 39 sites from Mastung, 12 from Mangochar, and 13 from Pringabad were found in the risk of dental fluorosis of mild to severe nature. However, 12 sampling sites from Mastung, 8 from Mangochar, and 2 from Pringabad were identified as the risks of mottling and skeletal fluorosis or other bone abnormalities. The highest concentration of F(-) has been observed as 14 mg L(-1) in Mastung. Correlation analysis show that fluoride solubility in drinking water is pH dependent; and the salts of Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), and SO4(2-) contribute to attain the favorable pH for dissolution of fluoride compounds in drinking water. Principal component analysis shows that the geochemical composition of the rocks is only responsible for groundwater contamination. On the basis of the results, defloridation of the identified sampling sites and continuous monitoring of drinking water at regular basis is recommended at government level to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  4. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed. PMID:24719570

  5. Water fluoridation: a critical review of the physiological effects of ingested fluoride as a public health intervention.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Stephen; Awofeso, Niyi

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed.

  6. Low-salt diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from foods that are always high in salt. Some common ones are: Processed foods, such as cured or smoked meats, bacon, hot dogs, sausage, bologna, ham, and salami ... salt with other seasonings. Pepper, garlic, herbs, and lemon ...

  7. The fluids in salt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of fluid inclusions in salt, the geological processes through which these fluids evolve, and the possible problems such inclusions pose for nuclear waste disposal in salt beds or domes are reviewed.-J.A.Z.

  8. What Are Bath Salts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are bath salts becoming more popular? Marsha Lopez Hi, Lauren. Nope! Actually quite the opposite! This family ... and how dangerous for your body? Michelle Rankin Hi ParkerPanella - Bath salts are drugs known as synthetic ...

  9. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  10. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  11. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 1. Scandium Group (Sc, Y, La)

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary; Zeng, Dewen

    2014-03-15

    This work presents an assessment of solubility data for rare earth metal fluorides (generally of trivalent metals and of CeF{sub 4}) in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were seldom studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or binary salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. The literature has been covered through the end of 2013.

  12. Molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    In this volume, the historical background, scope, problems, economics, and future applications of molten salt technologies are discussed. Topics presented include molten salts in primary production of aluminum, general principles and handling and safety of the alkali metals, first-row transition metals, group VIII metals and B-group elements, solution electrochemistry, transport phenomena, corrosion in different molten salts, cells with molten salt electrolytes and reactants, fuel cell design, hydrocracking and liquefaction, heat storage in phase change materials, and nuclear technologies.

  13. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  14. Influence of the freezing process upon fluoride binding to hemeproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, A S; Brill, A S

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride association with ferric myoglobins and hemoglobins in aqueous buffers above freezing has been well studied. We chose this reaction to investigate the feasibility of observing titration intermediates and estimating dissociation constants at the freezing temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Dependence of apparent dissociation constant upon protein concentration was observed, a factor of four decrease in protein accompanied by about a fourfold increase in the apparent tightness of binding in the range of protein concentration studied. Binding was also found to depend upon cooling rate and concentration of additives (serum albumin, sucrose, glycerol). These effects appear to be associated with freezing-induced concentration of ligand, a process described in the literature. Bands of high concentration of electrolyte accompany solute rejection during ice growth, sweeping by slowing moving macromolecules. Thus, just before being trapped in the solid, the protein can experience a greater concentration of salt than in the original liquid. A mathematical model of this process, based upon simplifying assumptions about nucleation and ice-crystal growth rates in super-cooled solution, shows how the average concentration of mobile solute species can depend upon the concentration of all species present. Semiquantitative computer simulations of the actual, more complex, freezing are also presented and lead to estimates of ice particle size which are then compared with estimates from the former model. PMID:1651121

  15. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  16. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  17. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  18. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  19. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  20. Evaluation of Fluorine-Trapping Agents for Use During Storage of the MSRE Fuel Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Brynestad, J.; Williams, D.F.

    1999-05-01

    A fundamental characteristic of the room temperature Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel is that the radiation from the retained fission products and actinides interacts with this fluoride salt to produce fluorine gas. The purpose of this investigation was to identify fluorine-trapping materials for the MSRE fuel salt that can meet both the requirement of interim storage in a sealed (gastight) container and the vented condition required for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Sealed containers will be needed for interim storage because of the large radon source that remains even in fuel salt stripped of its uranium content. An experimental program was undertaken to identify the most promising candidates for efficient trapping of the radiolytic fluorine generated by the MSRE fuel salt. Because of the desire to avoid pressurizing the closed storage containers, an agent that traps fluorine without the generation of gaseous products was sought.

  1. The status of community water fluoridation in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Easley, M W

    1990-01-01

    Community water fluoridation has served the American public extremely well as the cornerstone of dental caries prevention activities for 45 years. The dental and general health benefits associated with the ingestion of water-borne fluorides have been well known by researchers for an even longer period. Continued research has repeatedly confirmed the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries for Americans regardless of age, race, ethnicity, religion, educational status, or socioeconomic level. Despite the obvious benefits associated with this proven public health measure, slow progress has been made toward achieving the 1990 national fluoridation objectives as listed in "Promoting Health/Preventing Disease: Objectives for the Nation." This paper documents the lagging pace of community fluoridation by reviewing and analyzing data reported in "Fluoridation Census, 1985," a document published in late 1988 by the Public Health Service's Centers for Disease Control. Failure to attain the 1990 objectives is attributable to a combination of circumstances, including their low priority within many local, State, and Federal health agencies, inadequate funding at all levels of government, lack of a coordinated and focused national fluoridation effort, failure of most States to require fluoridation, lack of Federal legislation mandating fluoridation, general apathy of most health professional organizations toward fluoridation, misconceptions by the public about effectiveness and safety and, finally, unrelenting opposition by a highly vocal minority of the lay public.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2116635

  2. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  3. Fluoride content of clay minerals and argillaceous earth materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.; Glass, H.D.; White, W.A.; Trandel, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A reliable method, utilizing a fluoride ion-selective electrode, is described for the determination of fluoride in clays and shales. Interference by aluminum and iron is minimal. The reproducibility of the method is about ??5% at different levels of fluoride concentration. Data are presented for various clay minerals and for the <2-??m fractions of marine and nonmarine clays and shales. Fluoride values range from 44 ppm (0.0044%) for nontronite from Colfax, WA, to 51,800 ppm (5.18%) for hectorite from Hector, CA. In general, clays formed under hydrothermal conditions are relatively high in fluoride content, provided the hydrothermal waters are high in fluoride content. Besides hectorite, dickite from Ouray, CO, was found to contain more than 50 times as much fluoride (6700 ppm) as highly crystalline geode kaolinite (125 ppm). The clay stratum immediately overlying a fluorite mineralized zone in southern Illinois was found to have a higher fluoride content than the same stratum in a nonmineralized zone approximately 1 mile away. Nonmarine shales in contact with Australian coals were found to be lower in fluoride content than were marine shales in contact with Illinois coals. It is believed that, in certain instances, peak shifts on DTA curves of similar clay minerals are the result of significant differences in their fluoride content. ?? 1977.

  4. A comparative study of fluoride release from two different sealants

    PubMed Central

    Ananda, Shimoga-Raju

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The introduction of fluoride releasing sealants and glass ionomer cements as fissure sealants adds another dimension to prevention of pit and fissure caries. The ability of resin sealants and glass ionomer cements to release fluoride on a long term basis to the sealed enamel and the adjacent unsealed pit and fissure and cuspal incline enamel may allow for further reduction in pit and fissure caries experience for children. Hence, the study was conducted to compare the amount of fluoride release in the plaque after placing fluoride releasing pit and fissure sealants and glass ionomer fissure sealants used in Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach. To compare the fluoride release of both the materials at the different time intervals. Material and Methods: A total of 60 school going children were included in this study. Before application of the sealants, baseline plaque fluoride levels were estimated from all the study subjects. After application of sealants again the same was estimated at an interval of 24 hour, 9 days, 2 weeks and 4 weeks. Results: The peak plaque fluoride levels were achieved at 24 hours after application of fissure sealants in all the groups. Conclusions: Within the limitation of the study, the present study indicated that fluoride releasing fissure sealants may act as a source of fluoride in plaque which will help in preventing pit and fissure and smooth surface caries in the tooth sealed with fissure sealants. Key words:Plaque fluoride, pit and fissures sealants, dental caries. PMID:25674315

  5. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation. PMID:27105409

  6. Caries prevention through the fluoridation of milk. A review.

    PubMed

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 50 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization from the early 1980s onwards. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in milk, and increased concentrations of fluoride in saliva, dental plaque, dental enamel and dentine, and urine, after consumption of fluoridated milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s--some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programs. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. At present, milk fluoridation programs are running continuously in about ten countries of the world. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk program. The program should aim to provide fluoridated milk for at least 200 days per year and should commence before the children are 4 years of age.

  7. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain.

    PubMed

    van Loveren, C; Hoogenkamp, M A; Deng, D M; ten Cate, J M

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR were preincubated at pH 7 or 4 with NaF, the amine fluorides Olaflur and Dectaflur and amine chloride controls. After preincubations, enolase and ATPase activities of the cells were assessed. Enolase activity was more inhibited after preincubation at pH 7 with NaF than with Olaflur. Amine chloride stimulated, although not with statistical significance, the enolase activity of both strains. After preincubation at pH 4 the enolases were strongly inactivated, but the fluoride-resistant strain's enolase to a lesser extent. The results suggested that amine acts to protect enolase activity against the detrimental low pH effect. Gene sequencing showed that the enolase genes of the fluoride-resistant and fluoride-sensitive strain were identical. ATPase activity was not reduced after NaF preincubation at either pH 7 or pH 4. The amine fluorides and their chloride controls in the preincubation mixture reduced the ATPase activity significantly at both pH values. In conclusion, our results showed that preincubation with amine fluoride did not inhibit enolase activity more effectively than NaF. The amine part of the molecule may protect enolase activity against preincubations at low pH. ATPase activity was not inhibited by NaF preincubation but was significantly inhibited after preincubation with amine fluorides and amine chlorides.

  8. Estimation of the development possibility of the ABC/ATW fuel cycle based on LiF-BeF{sub 2} fuel salt. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, A.V.; Naumov, V.S.

    1994-12-31

    The aim of the first chapter was generalization of data on solubility and equilibrium states of fission product and actinide fluorides in fluoride salt melts-solvents and fuel composition melts based on LiF-BeF{sub 2} mixture which was proposed as fuel basis for ABC/ATW facility. The second chapter is devoted to description of processes proposed for the chemical-technological complex of the ABC/ATW facility and their physico-chemical peculiarities. The complex is responsible for the removal of fission products and actinides from irradiated fuel salt.

  9. Analysis of differentially expressed genes between fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals in midgut of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Qian, Heying; Li, Gang; He, Qingling; Zhang, Huaguang; Xu, Anying

    2016-08-15

    Fluoride tolerance is an economically important trait of silkworm. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the dominant endurance to fluoride (Def) gene in Bombyx mori has been constructed before. Here, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of midgut of fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals of Def NILs by using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools, and identified differentially expressed genes between these individuals. A total of 3,612,399 and 3,567,631 clean tags for the libraries of fluoride-endurable and fluoride-sensitive individuals were obtained, which corresponded to 32,933 and 43,976 distinct clean tags, respectively. Analysis of differentially expressed genes indicates that 241 genes are differentially expressed between the two libraries. Among the 241 genes, 30 are up-regulated and 211 are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. Pathway enrichment analysis demonstrates that genes related to ribosomes, pancreatic secretion, steroid biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, and glycerolipid metabolism are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. qRT-PCR was conducted to confirm the results of the DGE. The present study analyzed differential expression of related genes and tried to find out whether the crucial genes were related to fluoride detoxification which might elucidate fluoride effect and provide a new way in the fluorosis research. PMID:27106117

  10. Comparison of salivary fluoride concentrations after administration of a bioadhesive slow-release tablet and a conventional fluoride tablet.

    PubMed

    Bottenberg, P; Cleymaet, R; de Muynck, C; Remon, J P; Coomans, D; Slop, D

    1992-08-01

    The in-vitro and in-vivo fluoride release of bioadhesive, slow-release tablets prepared from a mixture of polyethylene glycol polymers, containing 0.1 mg of fluoride as NaF was studied, and their ability to sustain fluoride levels in saliva were compared with conventional fluoride tablets with the same fluoride content. In-vitro release experiments showed that the bioadhesive tablets needed 8 h to release all their fluoride compared with less than 1 h for the conventional fluoride tablets. In-vivo, the bioadhesive tablets had a retention period of 6 h and could sustain a salivary fluoride level of more than 10 microM above the baseline for 7 h. The conventional fluoride tablets achieved a peak concentration of 0.5 mM directly after dissolution in the mouth, but the fluoride level could not be sustained for longer than 1 h. A good agreement was found between the in-vitro swelling behaviour of the bioadhesive tablets and their in-vitro and in-vivo release characteristics and their in-vivo retention time. PMID:1359097

  11. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, Norman F.; Williams, Joe L.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  12. Fluoride ion encapsulation by Mg[superscript 2+] ions and phosphates in a fluoride riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Aiming; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-06-26

    Significant advances in our understanding of RNA architecture, folding and recognition have emerged from structure-function studies on riboswitches, non-coding RNAs whose sensing domains bind small ligands and whose adjacent expression platforms contain RNA elements involved in the control of gene regulation. We now report on the ligand-bound structure of the Thermotoga petrophila fluoride riboswitch, which adopts a higher-order RNA architecture stabilized by pseudoknot and long-range reversed Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen A {sm_bullet} U pair formation. The bound fluoride ion is encapsulated within the junctional architecture, anchored in place through direct coordination to three Mg{sup 2+} ions, which in turn are octahedrally coordinated to water molecules and five inwardly pointing backbone phosphates. Our structure of the fluoride riboswitch in the bound state shows how RNA can form a binding pocket selective for fluoride, while discriminating against larger halide ions. The T. petrophila fluoride riboswitch probably functions in gene regulation through a transcription termination mechanism.

  13. Fluoride ion encapsulation by Mg2+ ions and phosphates in a fluoride riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aiming; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2012-06-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of RNA architecture, folding and recognition have emerged from structure-function studies on riboswitches, non-coding RNAs whose sensing domains bind small ligands and whose adjacent expression platforms contain RNA elements involved in the control of gene regulation. We now report on the ligand-bound structure of the Thermotoga petrophila fluoride riboswitch, which adopts a higher-order RNA architecture stabilized by pseudoknot and long-range reversed Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen A•U pair formation. The bound fluoride ion is encapsulated within the junctional architecture, anchored in place through direct coordination to three Mg(2+) ions, which in turn are octahedrally coordinated to water molecules and five inwardly pointing backbone phosphates. Our structure of the fluoride riboswitch in the bound state shows how RNA can form a binding pocket selective for fluoride, while discriminating against larger halide ions. The T. petrophila fluoride riboswitch probably functions in gene regulation through a transcription termination mechanism. PMID:22678284

  14. Calcium fluoride recovery from fluoride wastewater in a fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Aldaco, R; Garea, A; Irabien, A

    2007-02-01

    In order to contribute to better resource efficiency and industrial waste management leading to a sustainable production and consumption pattern new processes must be developed, which should be operated in such a way that waste production is reduced or avoided. Fluoride removal by precipitation generates huge amounts of a water rich sludge. Calcium fluoride is not recovered from the waste streams and it is not recycled due to the high water content and the low quality of the sludge. Crystallization process in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) appears as an alternative technology to the conventional chemical precipitation process. In the crystallization process in a FBR silica sand is usually used as seed material, however silica is a deleterious impurity because it causes losses in the yield of HF and its content should be less than 1%. In this paper, granular calcite has been used as seed material in order to obtain synthetic calcium fluoride. According to the composition (CaF(2)>97%, SiO(2)<1%), the synthetic calcium fluoride from the crystallization process in a FBR is able to be recycled as raw material for the manufacture of hydrofluoric acid leading to a reduction of raw materials consumption. The crystallization process in a FBR to remove fluoride from industrial wastewaters contributes to an environmental friendly production, because it allows to reduce the waste production as well as to increase the recovery of materials.

  15. Fluoride release and uptake abilities of different fissure sealants

    PubMed Central

    Andenna, Gianluigi; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Cucca, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Background The long-term capability of resin sealants and glass ionomer cements to release fluoride is associated to a reduction in pit and fissure caries. The regular use of fluoride varnishes/toothpastes can result in the absorption of fluoride into the sealant. The objective of the present study was to assess the fluoride release/uptake capacities of different fissure sealants. Material and Methods Three different fissure sealants (Fuji Triage/GC, Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco) were examined. Ten discs of each material were prepared. Each disc was incubated with distilled water and then the solution analyzed for diluted for fluoride concentration, using a combination of fluoride electrode (OrionGP 1 S/N 13824, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA) connected to an expandable ion analyzer (Orion 720A, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA). Standard curves between 1 and 100 ppm F- were used to calibrate the electrode. Cumulative fluoride release was measured on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 21, 35 and 49, then two different fluoride varnishes/pastes (Profluorid Varnish/Voco, MI Paste Plus/GC), were applied to the sealants tested, and fluoride release (after reuptake) was measured on days 56, 70 and 84. Results Kruskal Wallis test confirmed significant differences in fluoride release between Fuji Triage/GC and Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco from day 1 (P < 0.001). The application of fluoride varnish Profluorid Varnish enhanced the fluoride release for all sealants (P < 0.05). MI Paste Plus enhanced the fluoride release for all sealants except for Fuji Triage/GC (P > 0.05). Conclusions The GIC-based sealant (Fuji Triage/GC) released significantly more fluoride than the resin sealants tested. The exposure to the fluoridated varnish (Profluorid Varnish) significantly recharged the sealants tested more than the CPP-ACPF toothpaste (MI Paste Plus). Key words:Fissure sealants, fluoride release, fluoride uptake, glass ionomer cements. PMID:27398179

  16. Influences of charcoal and bamboo charcoal amendment on soil-fluoride fractions and bioaccumulation of fluoride in tea plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongjian; Zhang, Zhengzhu; Wan, Xiaochun

    2012-10-01

    High levels of fluoride in tea plants pose a potential health risk to humans who drink tea. It has been demonstrated that tea plant fluoride is closely related to the available fluoride in soil. But approaches that could be used to regulate the availability of fluoride in soil have been rarely seen. This study aims to investigate how the addition of charcoal and bamboo charcoal affected soil fluoride availability and bioaccumulation of fluoride in tea plants. In a microcosm experiment, tea plants were grown in the tea garden soil mixed with different amounts of charcoal and bamboo charcoal [that is, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 % (w/w)]. Soil-fluoride fractions and fluoride accumulated in tea plants were determined using the sequential extraction and ion selective electrode method. Obtained results showed that both charcoal and bamboo charcoal additions significantly enhanced the concentrations of Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluoride, but significantly reduced the concentrations of water-soluble and exchangeable fluoride (p < 0.05) in soil. Charcoal and bamboo charcoal additions also significantly decreased the amounts of fluoride in tea roots and tea leaves (p < 0.05). However, the additions of charcoal and bamboo charcoal had no impacts on the tea quality, as indexed by the concentrations of polysaccharides, polyphenols, amino acids, and caffeine in tea leaves. These results suggested that application of charcoal and bamboo charcoal may provide a useful method to reduce the availability of fluoride in soil and the subsequent fluoride uptake by tea plants.

  17. Design and development of sustainable remediation process for mitigation of fluoride contamination in ground water and field application for domestic use.

    PubMed

    Gwala, Poonam; Andey, Subhash; Nagarnaik, Pranav; Ghosh, Sarika Pimpalkar; Pal, Prashant; Deshmukh, Prashant; Labhasetwar, Pawan

    2014-08-01

    Decentralised household chemo defluoridation unit (CDU) was developed and designed based on a combination of coagulation and sorption processes. Chemo-defluoridation process was optimised to reduce use of chemicals and increase acceptability among beneficiaries without affecting palatability of water. Chemical dose optimization undertaken in the laboratory using jar test revealed the optimum calcium salt to initial fluoride ratio of 60 for fluoride removal. Performance of CDU was evaluated in the laboratory for removal efficiency, water quality parameters, filter bed cleaning cycle and desorption of fluoride. CDU evaluation in the laboratory with spiked water (5 mg/L) and field water (~4.2 mg/L) revealed treated water fluoride concentration of less than 1mg/L. Seventy five CDUs were installed in households at Sakhara Village, Yavatmal District in Maharashtra State of India. Monthly monitoring of CDUs for one year indicated reduction of the raw water fluoride concentration from around 4 mg/L to less than 1mg/L. Post implementation survey after regular consumption of treated drinking water by the users for one year indicated user satisfaction and technological sustainability. PMID:24560102

  18. Design and development of sustainable remediation process for mitigation of fluoride contamination in ground water and field application for domestic use.

    PubMed

    Gwala, Poonam; Andey, Subhash; Nagarnaik, Pranav; Ghosh, Sarika Pimpalkar; Pal, Prashant; Deshmukh, Prashant; Labhasetwar, Pawan

    2014-08-01

    Decentralised household chemo defluoridation unit (CDU) was developed and designed based on a combination of coagulation and sorption processes. Chemo-defluoridation process was optimised to reduce use of chemicals and increase acceptability among beneficiaries without affecting palatability of water. Chemical dose optimization undertaken in the laboratory using jar test revealed the optimum calcium salt to initial fluoride ratio of 60 for fluoride removal. Performance of CDU was evaluated in the laboratory for removal efficiency, water quality parameters, filter bed cleaning cycle and desorption of fluoride. CDU evaluation in the laboratory with spiked water (5 mg/L) and field water (~4.2 mg/L) revealed treated water fluoride concentration of less than 1mg/L. Seventy five CDUs were installed in households at Sakhara Village, Yavatmal District in Maharashtra State of India. Monthly monitoring of CDUs for one year indicated reduction of the raw water fluoride concentration from around 4 mg/L to less than 1mg/L. Post implementation survey after regular consumption of treated drinking water by the users for one year indicated user satisfaction and technological sustainability.

  19. Production of sintered porous metal fluoride pellets

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, L.W.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1973-12-25

    Porous pellets characterized by a moderately reactive crust and a softer core of higher reactivity are produced by forming agglomerates containing a metal fluoride powder and a selected amount ofwater. The metal fluoride is selected to be sinterable and essentially non-reactive with gaseous fluorinating agents. The agglomerates are contacted with a gaseous fluorinating agent under controlled conditions whereby the heat generated by localized reaction of the agent and water is limited to values effccting bonding by localized sintering. Porous pellets composed of cryolite (Na/sub 3/AlF/sub 6/) can be used to selectively remove trace quantities of niobium pentafluoride from a feed gas consisting predominantly of uranium hexafluoride. (Official Gazette)

  20. Fluoride complexation of element 104, rutherfordium.

    PubMed

    Haba, Hiromitsu; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Hirata, Masaru; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Ichikawa, Shin-Ichi; Nagame, Yuichiro; Yasuda, Ken-Ichiro; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Kaneko, Tetsuya; Goto, Shin-Ichi; Ono, Sawako; Hirai, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Hisaaki; Shigekawa, Mitsuru; Shinohara, Atsushi; Oura, Yasuji; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Sueki, Keisuke; Kikunaga, Hidetoshi; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Tsuruga, Naoya; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Sakama, Minoru; Enomoto, Shuich; Schädel, Matthias; Brüchle, Willy; Kratz, Jens V

    2004-04-28

    Fluoride complexation of element 104, rutherfordium (Rf), produced in the 248Cm(18O,5n)261Rf reaction has been studied by anion-exchange chromatography on an atom-at-a-time scale. The anion-exchange chromatographic behavior of Rf was investigated in 1.9-13.9 M hydrofluoric acid together with those of the group-4 elements Zr and Hf produced in the 18O-induced reactions on Ge and Gd targets, respectively. It was found that the adsorption behavior of Rf on anion-exchange resin is quite different from those of Zr and Hf, suggesting the influence of relativistic effects on the fluoride complexation of Rf.

  1. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    DOE PAGES

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet materialmore » in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.« less

  2. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

  3. Site of Fluoride Accumulation in Navel Orange Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chong W.; Thompson, C. Ray

    1966-01-01

    Fluoride-polluted navel orange leaves, Citrus sinensis (Linn.) Osbeck, were fractionated into the subcellular components in hexane/carbon tetrachloride mixtures having various densities. Fluoride was determined at each fraction. Analyses were also made for the subcellular distribution of chlorophyll, nitrogen, and DNA to assess the extent of cross-contamination of each component. The fraction containing cell wall, nuclei, and partly broken cells apparently contained a major amount of fluoride. However, if allowance was made for the cross-contamination of chloroplasts and chloroplast fragments, the fraction of chloroplasts was found to be the site of the highest fluoride accumulation. When each particulate component was washed with water after drying, the combined washings contained more than 50% of the total fluoride of the isolated fractions. The usual method of subcellular fractionation with aqueous solvent shifted the major site of fluoride accumulation from the fraction of chloroplasts to that of the supernatant. PMID:5908632

  4. Necessity to review the Brazilian regulation about fluoride toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Caldarelli, Pablo Guilherme; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of the Brazilian legislation about fluoride toothpaste. A search was conducted in LILACS, Medline and SciELO databases about the fluoride concentration found in Brazilians toothpastes, using descriptors on health. Publications since 1981 have shown that some Brazilian toothpastes are not able to maintain, during their expiration time, a minimum of 1,000 ppm F of soluble fluoride in the formulation. However, the Brazilian regulation (ANVISA, Resolution 79, August 28, 2000) only sets the maximum total fluoride (0.15%; 1,500 ppm F) that a toothpaste may contain but not the minimum concentration of soluble fluoride that it should contain to have anticaries potential, which according to systematic reviews should be 1,000 ppm F. Therefore, the Brazilian regulation on fluoride toothpastes needs to be revised to assure the efficacy of those products for caries control.

  5. Necessity to review the Brazilian regulation about fluoride toothpastes

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Caldarelli, Pablo Guilherme; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of the Brazilian legislation about fluoride toothpaste. A search was conducted in LILACS, Medline and SciELO databases about the fluoride concentration found in Brazilians toothpastes, using descriptors on health. Publications since 1981 have shown that some Brazilian toothpastes are not able to maintain, during their expiration time, a minimum of 1,000 ppm F of soluble fluoride in the formulation. However, the Brazilian regulation (ANVISA, Resolution 79, August 28, 2000) only sets the maximum total fluoride (0.15%; 1,500 ppm F) that a toothpaste may contain but not the minimum concentration of soluble fluoride that it should contain to have anticaries potential, which according to systematic reviews should be 1,000 ppm F. Therefore, the Brazilian regulation on fluoride toothpastes needs to be revised to assure the efficacy of those products for caries control. PMID:26487295

  6. Distribution of fluoride in ground water of West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathes, M.V.; Waldron, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, to evaluate the distribution of fluoride in ground water of West Virginia. Fluoride is a natural chemical constituent in domestic and public water supplies in West Virginia. Fluoride concentrations of about 1.0 milligram per liter in drinking water are beneficial to dental health. Concentrations greater than 2.0 milligrams per liter, however, could harm teeth and bones. Fluoride concentra- tions in ground water of West Virginia range from less than 0.1 to 12 milligrams per liter. Fluoride concentrations that exceed 2.0 milligrams per liter are found in wells drilled to all depths, wells drilled in all topographic settings, and wells drilled into most geologic units. Most fluoride concentrations that exceed 2.0 milligrams per liter are located at sites clustered in the northwestern part of the State.

  7. Necessity to review the Brazilian regulation about fluoride toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Caldarelli, Pablo Guilherme; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of the Brazilian legislation about fluoride toothpaste. A search was conducted in LILACS, Medline and SciELO databases about the fluoride concentration found in Brazilians toothpastes, using descriptors on health. Publications since 1981 have shown that some Brazilian toothpastes are not able to maintain, during their expiration time, a minimum of 1,000 ppm F of soluble fluoride in the formulation. However, the Brazilian regulation (ANVISA, Resolution 79, August 28, 2000) only sets the maximum total fluoride (0.15%; 1,500 ppm F) that a toothpaste may contain but not the minimum concentration of soluble fluoride that it should contain to have anticaries potential, which according to systematic reviews should be 1,000 ppm F. Therefore, the Brazilian regulation on fluoride toothpastes needs to be revised to assure the efficacy of those products for caries control. PMID:26487295

  8. Bone fluoride concentrations in beluga whales from Canada.

    PubMed

    Mikaelian, I; Qualls, C W; De Guise, S; Whaley, M W; Martineau, D

    1999-04-01

    Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary have been reported to have dental and bone abnormalities. To determine whether these lesions could be caused by high exposure to fluorides, we measured bone fluoride levels in eight beluga whales stranded on the shores of the St. Lawrence Estuary (Quebec, Canada), and in nine beluga whales killed by Inuit hunters in the Hudson Bay (North Western Territories, Canada). In both groups, fluoride concentrations were higher than those found in terrestrial mammals intoxicated by fluorides. Unexpectedly, fluoride concentration was significantly higher in beluga whales from the Hudson Bay (mean +/- SD: 10.365 +/- 1.098 ppm) than in beluga whales from the St. Lawrence Estuary (4.539 +/- 875 ppm) and was positively correlated with age in the latter population. Differences in diet might explain the differences in fluoride concentrations found between these two populations.

  9. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A; Jager, D H J; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush abrasion. Eleven volunteers wore for 3 weeks, during working hours, appliances containing 2 control and 2 FV-treated human enamel samples. Erosion took place extraorally 3 times a day (5 min) in the soft drink Sprite. At the end of each experimental day one control and one FV sample (C-er+abr and FV-er+abr) were brushed (5 s) with fluoridated dentrifice. The remaining control and FV sample (C-er and FV-er) were left unbrushed. Enamel volume loss was quantified by optical profilometry at day 5, 10 and 15. A statistically significant progression in enamel loss was found for the C-er, C-er+abr and FV-er+abr groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively) but not for the FV-er group (p = 0.053). The values of cumulative normalized volume loss (x10(8) mum) at day 15 were: C-er 5.53 +/- 2.14, C-er+abr 5.70 +/- 2.07, FV-er 0.79 +/- 0.67 and FV-er+abr 2.76 +/- 1.35. The FV-er and FV-er+abr groups showed significant lower volume loss than the C-er group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively) and the C-er+abr group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). The results indicate that fluoride varnish is effective in the reduction of erosive wear. PMID:17167261

  10. How and when to prescribe sodium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Shambaugh, G E

    1989-03-01

    Sodium fluoride has now been used for 24 years in an effort to slow down or arrest sensorineural hearing nerve deterioration in patients with stapedial otosclerosis or after stapedectomy, as well as in patients with pure cochlear otosclerosis. Extensive clinical experience in thousands of patients with this therapy has demonstrated its value in arresting previously progressive sensorineural hearing loss. For a long time there were those who objected to this therapy on the basis that it had not been adequately proven by double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. They have been answered by Bretlau's study in Denmark and Fisch's from Switzerland; both investigators confirmed on small groups the value of sodium fluoride by double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Extensive research by Professor Petrovic of Strasbourg while at our tissue culture laboratory at Northwestern University demonstrated the action of sodium fluoride on bone. A nicely designed study with radioactive strontium by Linthicum, House, and Althaus demonstrated its value in promoting maturation of a spongiotic focus. Today there is no reason to hesitate in prescribing this useful, effective, and safe medication to promote maturation of otospongiotic lesions, and thus to slow down or to arrest progression in sensorineural hearing loss.

  11. Bone scintigraphy in fluoride treated osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Kleerekoper, M.; Parker, D.A.

    1985-05-01

    Quantitative bone scintigraphy was performed on 23 white females with post-menopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures. These patients were then entered into a randomized, double-blind clinical trial or sodium fluoride therapy (NaF=14, placebo=9) which included repeat bone scintigraphy every six months. Scintigraphic images were acquired for 500K counts per image over the total body with computer acquisition over the posterior thoracic and lumbar spine. Images were obtained on a wide field-of-view gamma camera two hours after injecting 15 mCi of Tc-99m MDP. Data analysis showed a significant reduction in the activity ratio of abnormal vertebral body to normal vertebral body in those patients treated with sodium fluoride (paired t-test p=0.0095). No significant change was observed in the control group of (p=0.142). These results suggest that sodium fluoride therapy promotes more rapid healing of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. They also demonstrate the utility of serial quantitative bone scintigraphy in assessing osteoporotic patients with vertebral compression fractures.

  12. Integral equation study of liquid hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, C.; Lombardero, M.; Anta, J. A.; Lomba, E.

    2001-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a well-known hydrogen bonded substance, in many aspects related to liquid water, and for which a wide variety of interaction models have recently been proposed. We have studied two of these models by means of a reference hypernetted chain equation in order to assess the ability of this latter approach to describe the properties of this highly associative system. Our calculations, when compared with molecular dynamic results, show that the integral equation reproduces quantitatively both the structure and the thermodynamics of liquid hydrogen fluoride over a wide range of thermodynamic states. However, the integral equation approach is apparently unable to produce estimates for the phase diagram since the low-density (gas phase) side of the binodal curve lies inside the nonsolution region of the equation. This failure can be understood as the result of the inability of standard integral equation theories to account for the behavior of low density strongly associative systems like highly charged electrolytes or, in this case, the gaseous phase of hydrogen fluoride.

  13. Effects of a documented hydrogen fluoride leak

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    At about 6 a.m. on June 19, 1984, 1037 liters of pressurized HF liquid escaped from a storage tank through a 2 mm diameter hole. 48 hours after the leak was discovered and sealed, visible injury to vegetation was observed 2 miles downwind of the source in a tear drop pattern. Injury symptoms ranged from a slight browning of leaves and needles to death of twigs and leaves and needles. Poplar, white pine, spruce, oak, red maple and several herbaceous plant species were injured. Ragweed was not injured but sensitive fern was severely injured. Goldenrod was also injured but recovered within 3 weeks after exposure. White pine trees within 1/4 of a mile from the source were killed. Fluoride analysis of tissues from upwind and downwind trees and herbaceous plants revealed fluoride tissue levels ranging from 5 to 34,000 ppm. Examples of distance/concentration are given. Soils revealed fluoride levels of about 1 ppm at all locations.

  14. 40 CFR 60.202 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.202 Section... Industry: Wet-Process Phosphoric Acid Plants § 60.202 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 10.0 g/Mg of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.020...

  15. 40 CFR 60.192 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.192 Section... Plants § 60.192 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which the initial performance test... total fluorides, as measured according to § 60.195, in excess of: (1) 1.0 kg/Mg (2.0 lb/ton) of...

  16. Fluoride use in caries prevention in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Clark, Melinda B; Slayton, Rebecca L

    2014-09-01

    Dental caries remains the most common chronic disease of childhood in the United States. Caries is a largely preventable condition, and fluoride has proven effectiveness in the prevention of caries. The goals of this clinical report are to clarify the use of available fluoride modalities for caries prevention in the primary care setting and to assist pediatricians in using fluoride to achieve maximum protection against dental caries while minimizing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis.

  17. Electrochemical and Structural Properties of Polyvinylidene Fluoride - Silver Triflate Solid Polymer Electrolyte System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthanthiraraj, S. Austin; Paul, B. Joseph

    2006-06-01

    A new polymer gel electrolyte system consisting of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and silver triflate (AgCF3SO3) has been investigated and reported in the present work. Thin film specimens of PVDF + x wt.% AgCF3SO3 (where x = 10, 20, 30, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 respectively) were prepared by solution casting technique using dimethyl formamide (DMF) as the common solvent. Complex impedance measurements were carried out on all the specimens in the frequency range 20 Hz - 1 M Hz within the temperature domain 298 to 333 K. The room temperature ionic conductivity of the polymer electrolyte was found to increase from 10-5 to 10-3 Scm-1 i.e. by two orders of magnitude with increasing concentration of silver triflate from 10 to 60 wt.%, whereas the activation energy decreased with an increase in concentration of the dopant salt. The ionic transference number values determined by Wagner's polarization technique showed an increase from 0.33 to 0.99 with an increase in the concentration of silver triflate salt. These results have clearly indicated that the ionic conduction is significant in the case of higher salt concentrations viz., > 20 wt.%. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns have revealed a decrease in the crystallinity of the polymer electrolyte due to complex formation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral studies have also confirmed the complex formation between polyvinylidene fluoride and silver triflate owing to the appearance of new absorption bands and gradual shifts observed in certain peaks.

  18. Aluminum fluoride inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor inactivation and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Housley, P.R. )

    1990-04-10

    Fluoride, in the presence of aluminum ions, reversibly inhibits the temperature-mediated inactivation of unoccupied glucocorticoid receptors in cytosol preparations from mouse L cells. The effect is concentration-dependent, with virtually complete stabilization of specific glucocorticoid-binding capacity at 2 mM fluoride and 100 microM aluminum. These concentrations of aluminum and fluoride are ineffective when used separately. Aluminum fluoride also stabilizes receptors toward inactivation by gel filtration and ammonium sulfate precipitation. Aluminum fluoride prevents temperature-dependent transformation of steroid-receptor complexes to the DNA-binding state. Aluminum fluoride does not inhibit calf intestine alkaline phosphatase, and unoccupied receptors inactivated by this enzyme in the presence of aluminum fluoride can be completely reactivated by dithiothreitol. The effects of aluminum fluoride are due to stabilization of the complex between the glucocorticoid receptor and the 90-kDa mammalian heat-shock protein hsp90, which suggests that aluminum fluoride interacts directly with the receptor. Endogenous thermal inactivation of receptors in cytosol is not accompanied by receptor dephosphorylation. However, inactivation is correlated with dissociation of hsp90 from the unoccupied receptor. These results support the proposal that hsp90 is required for the receptor to bind steroid and dissociation of hsp90 is sufficient to inactivate the unoccupied receptor.

  19. Formulation and Characterization of Antibacterial Fluoride-releasing Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuwei; Townsend, Janice; Wang, Yapin; Lee, Eun Chee; Evans, Katie; Hender, Erica; Hagan, Joseph L.; Xu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to formulate and characterize experimental antibacterial fluoride-releasing sealants and compare them with commercial sealants for fluoride release, recharge, adhesion, and microleakage. Methods Two experimental sealants (Exp-1, Exp-2) containing a synthesized antibacterial fluoride-releasing monomer and fluoride-releasing filler were formulated. Exp-2 also contained NovaMin nanoparticles. Commercial sealants Clinpro (CL) FluoroShield (FS), and SeLECT Defense (E34) were also included. Fluoride release from disk samples in deionized water was measured daily using an ion-selective electrode for 14 days, and after recharging with Neutra-Foam (2.0% sodium fluoride), fluoride was measured for 5 days. Microtensile bonding strengths (MTBS) to enamel were tested after 24-hour storage in water at 37°C or thermocycling 5-55°C for 1,000 cycles. A microleakage test was conducted on extracted teeth using a dye-penetration method. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey’s honestly significant difference test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Exp-1 and Exp-2 had significantly higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities than CL and FL (P<.05). All tested sealants had similar MTBS before and after thermocycling. Exp-2 and Exp-1 had significantly lower microleakage scores (P<.05) than other groups. Conclusion The experimental sealants had higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities and similar or better retention than commercial sealants. PMID:23635887

  20. [Allergy caused by sodium fluoride glycerin: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jihong

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, though more and more ulcerations of oral mucosa caused by allergy to drug occurred clinically, allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin is extremely rare. A case of allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin occurred in Qianfoshan Campus Hospital of Shandong University. After treatment by sodium fluoride glycerin, there was mucosal edema, a large number of red miliary granules in buccal and palatal mucosa. After 3 hours, there were swallowing difficulties, but no breathing difficulties. Next day large ulcers of oral mucosa developed. The patient was cured 7 days after treatment. Fluoride-sensitive test result was positive.

  1. The dentist’s role in promoting community water fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    Melbye, Molly L.R.; Armfield, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Overview Community water fluoridation is an important public health intervention that reduces oral health disparities and increases the health of the population. Promotion of its safety and effectiveness is critical to maintaining its widespread acceptance and ensuring its continued use. Dentists are a potentially important source of knowledge regarding the oral health benefits and safety of water fluoridation. However, few dentists regularly discuss fluorides, and water fluoridation in particular, with patients. The authors aim to describe and discuss the role and importance of dentists’ promotion of public water fluoridation, barriers to dentists’ involvement and some approaches that might influence dentists to promote water fluoridation more actively. Conclusions and Practice Implications Ongoing promotion of fluoridation by dentists is a key factor in ensuring sustained municipal water fluoridation. However, current undergraduate dental curricula do not adequately prepare dentists for this role, and continuing dental education may be insufficient to change clinical practice. Although smoking-cessation literature can shed some light on how to proceed, changing dentists’ practice behavior remains a largely unstudied topic. Dental associations are a key resource for dentists, providing information that can assist them in becoming advocates for water fluoridation. PMID:23283928

  2. Fluoride Varnish Efficacy in Preventing Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, J.A.; Ramos-Gomez, F.; Jue, B.; Shain, S.; Hoover, C.I.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Gansky, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of fluoride varnish (5% NaF, Duraphat®, Colgate) added to caregiver counseling to prevent early childhood caries, we conducted a two-year randomized, dental-examiner-masked clinical trial. Initially, 376 caries-free children, from low-income Chinese or Hispanic San Francisco families, were enrolled (mean age ± standard deviation, 1.8 ± 0.6 yrs). All families received counseling, and children were randomized to the following groups: no fluoride varnish, fluoride varnish once/year, or fluoride varnish twice/year. An unexpected protocol deviation resulted in some children receiving less active fluoride varnish than assigned. Intent-to-treat analyses showed a fluoride varnish protective effect in caries incidence, p < 0.01. Analyzing the number of actual, active fluoride varnish applications received resulted in a dose-response effect, p < 0.01. Caries incidence was higher for ‘counseling only’ vs. ‘counseling + fluoride varnish assigned once/year’ (OR = 2.20, 95% CI 1.19-4.08) and ‘twice/year’ (OR = 3.77, 95% CI 1.88-7.58). No related adverse events were reported. Fluoride varnish added to caregiver counseling is efficacious in reducing early childhood caries incidence. PMID:16434737

  3. Cariostatic effect of fluoride-containing restorative materials associated with fluoride gels on root dentin

    PubMed Central

    BORGES, Fernanda Tavares; CAMPOS, Wagner Reis da Costa; MUNARI, Lais Sant'ana; MOREIRA, Allyson Nogueira; PAIVA, Saul Martins; MAGALHÃES, Claudia Silami

    2010-01-01

    Secondary caries is still the main cause of restoration replacement, especially on the root surface Objective This in vitro study evaluated the cariostatic effects of fluoride-containing restorative materials associated with fluoride gels, on root dentin. Materials and Methods A randomized complete block design was used to test the effects of the restorative systems, fluoride regimes and the interactions among them at different distances from restoration margins. Standardized cavities were prepared on 240 bovine root specimens and randomly assigned to 15 groups of treatments (n=16). Cavities were filled with the following restorative materials: Ketac-Fil (3M-ESPE); Vitremer (3M-ESPE); Dyract/Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Charisma/Gluma One Bond (Heraeus Kulzer) and the control, Z250/Single Bond (3M-ESPE). The specimens were subjected to a pH-cycling model designed to simulate highcaries activity. During the cycles, 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride, 2.0% neutral sodium fluoride or deionized/distilled water (control) was applied to the specimens for 4 min. The surface Knoop microhardness test was performed before (KHNi) and after (KHNf) the pH cycles at 100, 200 and 300 mm from the margins. Dentin microhardness loss was represented by the difference in initial and final values (KHNi - KHNf). Data were analyzed by Friedman's and Wilcoxon's tests, ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%). Results The interaction of restorative systems and topical treatments was not significant (p=0.102). Dentin microhardness loss was lowest closer to the restoration. Ketac-fil presented the highest cariostatic effect. Vitremer presented a moderate effect, while Dyract and Charisma did not differ from the control, Z250. The effects of neutral and acidulated fluoride gels were similar to each other and higher than the control. Conclusion Conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements as well as neutral and acidulated fluoride gels inhibit the progression of artificial caries adjacent to

  4. A study to investigate fluoride contamination and fluoride exposure dose assessment in lateritic zones of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Samal, Alok C; Bhattacharya, Piyal; Mallick, Anusaya; Ali, Md Motakabber; Pyne, Jagadish; Santra, Subhas C

    2015-04-01

    To assess the status of severity of fluoride contamination in lateritic Bankura and Purulia districts of West Bengal, concentrations of fluoride in different water sources and agricultural field soils were investigated. The fluoride content (mg/l) was observed to differ with aquifer depths: 0.19-0.47 in dug wells, 0.01-0.17 in shallow tube wells, and 0.07-1.6 in deep tube wells. Fluoride within the World Health Organization (WHO) prescribed range (1.0-1.5 mg/l) was estimated only in ~17% of the total collected water samples while ~67% showed <0.7 mg/l fluoride and thus may impede in the production and maintenance of healthy teeth and bones of the residents, especially children. Fluoride in water was found to be significantly correlated (r = 0.63) with pH. The exposure dose of fluoride (mg/kg/day) from drinking water in infants, children, and adults was estimated in the ranges 0.02-0.53, 0.01-0.24, and 0.01-0.14, respectively against the standard value of 0.05. A clear risk of dental fluorosis is apparent in infants and children of the study area. The fluoride in soil (55-399 mg/kg) was detected to be significantly correlated with the fluoride content in deep tube wells and soil pH (r = 0.56 and 0.71, respectively). The relationships of soil fluoride with total hardness and that with phosphate were not significant. There is a high possibility of bioaccumulation of fluoride from contaminated soil and water of the study area to cultivated crops. This will enhance the quantity of fluoride intake into human food chain in addition to drinking water pathway. PMID:25408071

  5. A study to investigate fluoride contamination and fluoride exposure dose assessment in lateritic zones of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Samal, Alok C; Bhattacharya, Piyal; Mallick, Anusaya; Ali, Md Motakabber; Pyne, Jagadish; Santra, Subhas C

    2015-04-01

    To assess the status of severity of fluoride contamination in lateritic Bankura and Purulia districts of West Bengal, concentrations of fluoride in different water sources and agricultural field soils were investigated. The fluoride content (mg/l) was observed to differ with aquifer depths: 0.19-0.47 in dug wells, 0.01-0.17 in shallow tube wells, and 0.07-1.6 in deep tube wells. Fluoride within the World Health Organization (WHO) prescribed range (1.0-1.5 mg/l) was estimated only in ~17% of the total collected water samples while ~67% showed <0.7 mg/l fluoride and thus may impede in the production and maintenance of healthy teeth and bones of the residents, especially children. Fluoride in water was found to be significantly correlated (r = 0.63) with pH. The exposure dose of fluoride (mg/kg/day) from drinking water in infants, children, and adults was estimated in the ranges 0.02-0.53, 0.01-0.24, and 0.01-0.14, respectively against the standard value of 0.05. A clear risk of dental fluorosis is apparent in infants and children of the study area. The fluoride in soil (55-399 mg/kg) was detected to be significantly correlated with the fluoride content in deep tube wells and soil pH (r = 0.56 and 0.71, respectively). The relationships of soil fluoride with total hardness and that with phosphate were not significant. There is a high possibility of bioaccumulation of fluoride from contaminated soil and water of the study area to cultivated crops. This will enhance the quantity of fluoride intake into human food chain in addition to drinking water pathway.

  6. Photochemistry of triarylsulfonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Dektar, J.L.; Hacker, N.P. )

    1990-08-01

    The photolysis of triphenylsulfonium, tris(4-methylphenyl)sulfonium, tris(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonium, several monosubstituted (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Me, 4-MeO, 4-PhS, and 4-PhCO), and disubstituted (4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2} and 4,4{prime}-(MeO){sub 2}) triphenylsulfonium salts was examined in solution. It was found that direct irradiation of triphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts, gave the new rearrangement products. The mechanism for direct photolysis is proposed to occur from the singlet excited states to give a predominant heterolytic cleavage along with some homolytic cleavage.

  7. Liquid fuel molten salt reactors for thorium utilization

    DOE PAGES

    Gehin, Jess C.; Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2016-04-08

    Molten salt reactors (MSRs) represent a class of reactors that use liquid salt, usually fluoride- or chloride-based, as either a coolant with a solid fuel (such as fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors) or as a combined coolant and fuel with fuel dissolved in a carrier salt. For liquid-fuelled MSRs, the salt can be processed online or in a batch mode to allow for removal of fission products as well as introduction of fissile fuel and fertile materials during reactor operation. The MSR is most commonly associated with the 233U/thorium fuel cycle, as the nuclear properties of 233U combined with themore » online removal of parasitic absorbers allow for the ability to design a thermal-spectrum breeder reactor; however, MSR concepts have been developed using all neutron energy spectra (thermal, intermediate, fast, and mixed-spectrum zoned concepts) and with a variety of fuels including uranium, thorium, plutonium, and minor actinides. Early MSR work was supported by a significant research and development (R&D) program that resulted in two experimental systems operating at ORNL in the 1960s, the Aircraft Reactor Experiment and the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment. Subsequent design studies in the 1970s focusing on thermal-spectrum thorium-fueled systems established reference concepts for two major design variants: (1) a molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR), with multiple configurations that could breed additional fissile material or maintain self-sustaining operation; and (2) a denatured molten salt reactor (DMSR) with enhanced proliferation-resistance. T MSRs has been selected as one of six most promising Generation IV systems and development activities have been seen in fast-spectrum MSRs, waste-burning MSRs, MSRs fueled with low-enriched uranium (LEU), as well as more traditional thorium fuel cycle-based MSRs. This study provides an historical background of MSR R&D efforts, surveys and summarizes many of the recent development, and provides analysis comparing

  8. A history of salt.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, M; Capasso, G; Di Leo, V A; De Santo, N G

    1994-01-01

    The medical history of salt begins in ancient times and is closely related to different aspects of human history. Salt may be extracted from sea water, mineral deposits, surface encrustations, saline lakes and brine springs. In many inland areas, wood was used as a fuel source for evaporation of brine and this practice led to major deafforestation in central Europe. Salt played a central role in the economies of many regions, and is often reflected in place names. Salt was also used as a basis for population censuses and taxation, and salt monopolies were practised in many states. Salt was sometimes implicated in the outbreak of conflict, e.g. the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt has also been invested with many cultural and religious meanings, from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle Ages. Man's innate appetite for salt may be related to his evolution from predominantly vegetarian anthropoids, and it is noteworthy that those people who live mainly on protein and milk or who drink salty water do not generally salt their food, whereas those who live mainly on vegetables, rice and cereals use much more salt. Medicinal use tended to emphasize the positive aspects of salt, e.g. prevention of putrefaction, reduction of tissue swelling, treatment of diarrhea. Evidence was also available to ancient peoples of its relationship to fertility, particularly in domestic animals. The history of salt thus represents a unique example for studying the impact of a widely used dietary substance on different important aspects of man's life, including medical philosophy.

  9. Iodised salt is safe.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, S

    1995-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders are prevalent in all the States and Union Territories in India. Under the National Iodine Deficiency Disorders control programme, the Government of India has adopted a strategy to iodisation of all edible salt in the country which is a long term and sustainable preventive solution to eliminate iodine deficiency disorders. The benefits to be derived from universal salt iodisation are more to the population. Iodised salt is safe and does not cause any side effect. PMID:8690505

  10. Determination of Fluoride in Toothpaste Using an Ion-Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Truman S.; Cappuccino, Carleton C.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the theory of chemical potentiometry, describes the experimental procedure for free fluoride determination, and presents sample data of fluoride concentration for various brands of toothpaste. (GS)

  11. Fluoride uptake and inhibition of intra-oral demineralization, following the application of varnishes with different concentrations of fluoride.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, H; Buskes, J A; Jongebloed, W; Arends, J

    1988-06-01

    The relationship between the amount of fluoride acquired by human enamel after varnish application and the resulting inhibition demineralization of is presented and discussed. Intact human enamel was pretreated with Fluor Protector varnishes with differing fluoride contents (0.7; 0.1; 0.05 and 0 wt% F-) for 24 hours. In a first experiment the amount of fluoride acquired after application was determined. In a second experiment the pretreated enamel was stored intra-orally under constant plaque coverage, in order to create a substantial demineralization challenge. The protection against demineralization, induced by the various varnishes was determined four months after varnish application using microradiography. Under the cariogenic conditions created in this study, the fluoride containing varnishes induced a protection of 53-75%. Although the amount of fluoride uptake was strongly related to the fluoride content in the varnishes, no statistically significant difference in demineralization inhibition between the varnishes was observed. SEM investigation of the enamel lesions revealed globular precipitates inside the fluoridated enamel, presumably consisting of calcium fluoride-like material. The present study indicates that the fluoride content in Fluor Protector varnishes can be decreased without reducing its ability to inhibit demineralization.

  12. Dosimetry using silver salts

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.

    2003-06-24

    The present invention provides a method for detecting ionizing radiation. Exposure of silver salt AgX to ionizing radiation results in the partial reduction of the salt to a mixture of silver salt and silver metal. The mixture is further reduced by a reducing agent, which causes the production of acid (HX) and the oxidized form of the reducing agent (R). Detection of HX indicates that the silver salt has been exposed to ionizing radiation. The oxidized form of the reducing agent (R) may also be detected. The invention also includes dosimeters employing the above method for detecting ionizing radiation.

  13. Unprecedented Directing Group Ability of Cyclophanes in Arene Fluorinations with Diaryliodonium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Graskemper, Joseph W.; Wang, Bijia; Qin, Linlin; Neumann, Kiel D.; DiMagno, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    For the first time it is shown that exceptionally electron-rich arene rings can be fluorinated exclusively during the reductive elimination reactions of diaryliodonium fluorides. The 5-methoxy[2.2]paracyclophan-4-yl directing group simultaneously reduces unproductive aryne chemistry and eliminates ligand exchange reactions by a combination of steric and electronic effects. Use of the cyclophane directing group permits an unprecedented degree of control in fluorination reactions of diaryliodonium salts. PMID:21591627

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of partially hydrophobic cationic polyelectrolytes with sodium halide salts in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bončina, Matjaž; Lukšič, Miha; Seručnik, Mojca; Vlachy, Vojko

    2014-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to determine the temperature and concentration dependence of the enthalpy of mixing of 3,3- and 6,6-ionene fluorides, bromides, and iodides with low molecular weight salts (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI) in water. The magnitudes of the enthalpies, measured in the temperature range from 273 to 318 K, depended on the number of methylene groups on the ionene polyion (hydrophobicity), and on the anion of the added salt (ion-specificity). All enthalpies of mixing of 3,3- and 6,6-ionene fluorides with low molecular weight salts (NaCl, NaBr, and NaI) were negative, which is in contrast to the predictions of standard theories of polyelectrolyte solutions. This fact was interpreted in the light of the ion-water short-range interactions that are not accounted for in those theories. In contrast, the enthalpies of mixing of 3,3- and 6,6-ionene bromides and iodides with NaF were positive, being in accord with theory. Using the calorimetric data, we performed a model thermodynamic analysis of the polyelectrolyte-salt mixing process to obtain changes in the apparent standard Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity relative to the pure ionene fluorides in water. The results prove that halide ions replace fluoride counterions with a strength increasing in the order chloride < bromide < iodide. The process is enthalpy governed, accompanied by a positive change in the heat capacity.

  15. Bioavailability of fluoride in drinking water: a human experimental study.

    PubMed

    Maguire, A; Zohouri, F V; Mathers, J C; Steen, I N; Hindmarch, P N; Moynihan, P J

    2005-11-01

    It has been suggested that systemic fluoride absorption from drinking water may be influenced by the type of fluoride compound in the water and by water hardness. Using a human double-blind cross-over trial, we conducted this study to measure c(max), T(max), and Area Under the Curve (AUC) for plasma F concentration against time, following the ingestion of naturally fluoridated hard and soft waters, artificially fluoridated hard and soft waters, and a reference water. Mean AUC over 0 to 8 hours was 1330, 1440, 1679, 1566, and 1328 ng F.min.mL(-1) for naturally fluoridated soft, naturally fluoridated hard, artificially fluoridated soft, artificially fluoridated hard, and reference waters, respectively, with no statistically significant differences among waters for AUC, c(max), or T(max). Any differences in fluoride bioavailability between drinking waters in which fluoride is present naturally or added artificially, or the waters are hard or soft, were small compared with large within- and between-subject variations in F absorption. Abbreviations used: F, fluoride; AUC, Area under the Curve for plasma F concentration against time; AUC(0-3), Area under the Curve for plasma F concentration against time for 0 to 3 hours following water ingestion; AUC(0-8), Area under the Curve for plasma F concentration against time for 0 to 8 hours following water ingestion; c(max), maximum plasma F concentration corrected for baseline plasma F and dose (i.e., F concentration of individual waters); T(max), time of c(max).

  16. Total Fluoride Intake by Children from a Tropical Brazilian City.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carolina V; Cury, Jaime A; Vale, Glauber C; Lima, Marina D M; Moura, Lúcia de Fátima A D; Moura, Marcoeli Silva de

    2015-01-01

    The main sources of fluoride intake by children are fluoridated water and toothpaste. Little has been studied regarding fluoride intake from these sources in regions with tropical climates and high temperatures throughout the year. This study aimed to determine the amount of fluoride ingested from diet and tooth brushing by children who live in a city with a tropical climate. Sixty-seven children from Teresina, Piauí, Brazil, took part in this study. The city's water supply was optimally fluoridated. The duplicate-diet method was used to determine the fluoride intake from diet. The intake of fluoride from dentifrice was determined by subtracting the amount of fluoride placed on the toothbrush and that recovered after brushing. The concentration of fluoride was measured using an ion-specific electrode and is expressed as milligrams/kilogram of body weight/day. The mean (±SD) total amount was 0.071 ± 0.036 mg F/kg body weight/day, and the relative contributions of diet and toothpaste were 0.025 ± 0.010 and 0.046 ± 0.035, respectively. The factors associated with fluoride intake from toothpaste were: use of children's toothpaste (p = 0.003), use of large amounts of toothpaste (p < 0.001), and a high frequency of tooth brushing (p = 0.003). Sixty-four percent of children had an intake of less than 0.07 mg F/kg body weight/day, which is considered the upper limit for an aesthetically tolerable fluorosis risk. The results suggest that the amount of fluoride ingested by most children who live in a Brazilian city with a tropical climate is considered safe in terms of the risk of dental fluorosis. PMID:26655142

  17. Cooling molten salt reactors using "gas-lift"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Valenta, Vaclav; Klimko, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This study briefly describes the selection of a type of two-phase flow, suitable for intensifying the natural flow of nuclear reactors with liquid fuel - cooling mixture molten salts and the description of a "Two-phase flow demonstrator" (TFD) used for experimental study of the "gas-lift" system and its influence on the support of natural convection. The measuring device and the application of the TDF device is described. The work serves as a model system for "gas-lift" (replacing the classic pump in the primary circuit) for high temperature MSR planned for hydrogen production. An experimental facility was proposed on the basis of which is currently being built an experimental loop containing the generator, separator bubbles and necessary accessories. This loop will model the removal of gaseous fission products and tritium. The cleaning of the fuel mixture of fluoride salts eliminates problems from Xenon poisoning in classical reactors.

  18. Cooling molten salt reactors using “gas-lift”

    SciTech Connect

    Zitek, Pavel E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz; Valenta, Vaclav E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz; Klimko, Marek E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz

    2014-08-06

    This study briefly describes the selection of a type of two-phase flow, suitable for intensifying the natural flow of nuclear reactors with liquid fuel - cooling mixture molten salts and the description of a “Two-phase flow demonstrator” (TFD) used for experimental study of the “gas-lift” system and its influence on the support of natural convection. The measuring device and the application of the TDF device is described. The work serves as a model system for “gas-lift” (replacing the classic pump in the primary circuit) for high temperature MSR planned for hydrogen production. An experimental facility was proposed on the basis of which is currently being built an experimental loop containing the generator, separator bubbles and necessary accessories. This loop will model the removal of gaseous fission products and tritium. The cleaning of the fuel mixture of fluoride salts eliminates problems from Xenon poisoning in classical reactors.

  19. Electrochemical Synthesis of Magnesium Hexaboride by Molten Salt Technique.

    PubMed

    Angappan, S; Kalaiselvi, N; Sudha, R; Visuvasam, A

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports electrochemical synthesis of MgB6 from molten salts using the precursor consists of LiF-B2O3-MgCl2. An attempt has been made to synthesize metastable phase MgB6 crystal by electrolysis method. DTA/TGA studies were made to determine the eutectic point of the melt and it was found to be around 900°C. The electrolysis was performed at 900°C under argon atmosphere, at current density of 1.5 A/cm(2). The electrodeposited crystals were examined using XRD, SEM, and XPS. From the above studies, the electrochemical synthesis method for hypothetical MgB6 from chloro-oxy-fluoride molten salt system is provided. Mechanism for the formation of magnesium hexaboride is discussed.

  20. Electrochemical Synthesis of Magnesium Hexaboride by Molten Salt Technique

    PubMed Central

    Angappan, S.; Kalaiselvi, N.; Sudha, R.; Visuvasam, A.

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports electrochemical synthesis of MgB6 from molten salts using the precursor consists of LiF–B2O3–MgCl2. An attempt has been made to synthesize metastable phase MgB6 crystal by electrolysis method. DTA/TGA studies were made to determine the eutectic point of the melt and it was found to be around 900°C. The electrolysis was performed at 900°C under argon atmosphere, at current density of 1.5 A/cm2. The electrodeposited crystals were examined using XRD, SEM, and XPS. From the above studies, the electrochemical synthesis method for hypothetical MgB6 from chloro-oxy-fluoride molten salt system is provided. Mechanism for the formation of magnesium hexaboride is discussed. PMID:27350961

  1. Electrochemical studies in molten fluorides and other halides: Progress report, April 1, 1966 through March 31, 1967

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.

    1987-01-01

    EMF and electrode kinetics measurements on the Ni/Ni(II) couple in molten LiF-NaF-KF (46.5-11.5-42 mole %) and LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ZrF/sub 4/ (65.6-29.4-5.0 mole %) have been performed. The results obtained have resulted in a practical reference electrode for molten fluoride compositions. Voltammetric studies of negative oxidation states of bismuth in molten halides will be resumed after the modification of the dry box. A multipurpose electroanalytical instrument for molten salt studies is under construction.

  2. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, N.F.; Williams, J.L.

    In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel contianing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  3. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT LEAD (II) IN POTABLE WATER? HEXAFLUOROSILICATE AND FLUORIDE EQUILIBRIA IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafluorosilicate hydrolysi...

  4. Obstacles to extending fluoridation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Neenan, M E

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is two-fold: (1) to describe the current extent of water fluoridation in the United States; (2) to address the major obstacles to attaining 75 per cent fluoridation by the year 2000. While 62.1 per cent of the US population has access to fluoridated public water systems, more than 32 million people need to be added to the fluoridation census, primarily from the cities. The legal framework for implementing fluoridation is considered at the state level; a review of fluoridation actions at the local level is presented. The impact of forces affecting the extension of fluoridation in the United States is described: (1) demographic trends--urbanisation, race, ethnicity, language, immigration, age, education levels, housing, income and poverty levels; (2) external environmental forces/political climate; (3) media influence on public opinion and public policy; (4) voter apathy/lack of awareness of the benefits of fluoridation; (5) perceptions of risks vs. benefits; (6) lack of political campaign skills; and (7) legal issues.

  5. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Wiesmann, Harold

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  6. Applications Of Graphite Fluoride Fibers In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheng; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1993-01-01

    Report characterizes graphite fluoride fibers made from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers and discusses some potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers in outer space. Applications include heat-sinking printed-circuit boards, solar concentrators, and absorption of radar waves. Other applications based on exploitation of increased resistance to degradation by atomic oxygen, present in low orbits around Earth.

  7. A health risk assessment for fluoride in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, F M; Vrana, K; Zhovinsky, E; Povoroznuk, V; Toth, G; Hope, B C; Iljinsky, U; Baker, J

    2007-04-01

    Like many elements, fluorine (which generally occurs in nature as fluoride) is beneficial to human health in trace amounts, but can be toxic in excess. The links between low intakes of fluoride and dental protection are well known; however, fluoride is a powerful calcium-seeking element and can interfere with the calcified structure of bones and teeth in the human body at higher concentrations causing dental or skeletal fluorosis. One of the main exposure routes is via drinking water and the World Health Organisation currently sets water quality guidelines for the element. In Central Europe, groundwater resources that exceed the guideline value of 1.5 mg l-1 are widespread and effects on health of high fluoride in water have been reported. The aim of the current project was to develop a geographic information system (GIS) to aid the identification of areas where high-fluoride waters and fluorosis may be a problem; hence, where water treatment technologies should be targeted. The development of the GIS was based upon the collation and digitisation of existing information relevant to fluoride risk in Ukraine, Moldova, Hungary and Slovakia assembled for the first time in a readily accessible form. In addition, geochemistry and health studies to examine in more detail the relationships between high-fluoride drinking waters and health effects in the population were carried out in Moldova and Ukraine demonstrating dental fluorosis prevalence rates of 60-90% in adolescents consuming water containing 2-7 mg l-1 fluoride.

  8. Carbide/fluoride/silver self-lubricating composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900.degree. C. in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  9. Preparation of thin film silver fluoride electrodes from constituent elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of preparing thin-film metal fluoride electrodes from the elemental constituents has been demonstrated. Silver fluoride cathodes were prepared by deposition of silver on a conducting graphite substrate followed by fluorination under controlled conditions using elemental fluorine. The resulting electrodes were of high purity, and the variables such as size, shape, and thickness were easily controlled.

  10. Carbide-fluoride-silver self-lubricating composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material is described for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900 C in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  11. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  12. Obstacles to extending fluoridation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Neenan, M E

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is two-fold: (1) to describe the current extent of water fluoridation in the United States; (2) to address the major obstacles to attaining 75 per cent fluoridation by the year 2000. While 62.1 per cent of the US population has access to fluoridated public water systems, more than 32 million people need to be added to the fluoridation census, primarily from the cities. The legal framework for implementing fluoridation is considered at the state level; a review of fluoridation actions at the local level is presented. The impact of forces affecting the extension of fluoridation in the United States is described: (1) demographic trends--urbanisation, race, ethnicity, language, immigration, age, education levels, housing, income and poverty levels; (2) external environmental forces/political climate; (3) media influence on public opinion and public policy; (4) voter apathy/lack of awareness of the benefits of fluoridation; (5) perceptions of risks vs. benefits; (6) lack of political campaign skills; and (7) legal issues. PMID:8897746

  13. 7 CFR 305.8 - Sulfuryl fluoride treatment schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sulfuryl fluoride treatment schedules. 305.8 Section 305.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... fluoride treatment schedules. Treatment schedule Pressure Temperature ( °F) Dosage rate(lb/1000 cubic...

  14. Fluoride Analysis. Training Module 5.200.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoride analysis procedures. Included are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts, and a list of reference material. This module considers the determination of fluoride in water supplies using the SPANDS and electrode…

  15. Separating Silicon and Sodium Fluoride by Melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanis, L.; Kapur, V. K.

    1983-01-01

    Silion is withdrawn from bottom of crucible, once two immiscible liquid stages form, in quasi-continuous method of separating silicon from other reaction products. Process is periodically halted to remove accumulated buildup of salts.

  16. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; LeBaron, N.; Bertin, P.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Roche, J.

    2009-03-10

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF{sub 2}) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF{sub 2} crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF{sub 2} samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from {sup 60}Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice - radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again - for each of these four PbF{sub 2} samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  17. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  18. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  19. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  20. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... backdrops for the 2002 Winter Olympics, to be held in Salt Lake City, Utah. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for ... western edge of the Rocky Mountains and eastern rim of the Great Basin. This early-winter image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle ...

  1. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-09

    The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

  2. Integrated Salt Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-04-01

    The growing importance of salt in the energy, subsurface storage, and chemical and food industries also increases the challenges with prediction of geometries, kinematics, stress and transport in salt. This requires an approach, which integrates a broader range of knowledge than is traditionally available in the different scientific and engineering disciplines. We aim to provide a starting point for a more integrated understanding of salt, by presenting an overview of the state of the art in a wide range of salt-related topics, from (i) the formation and metamorphism of evaporites, (ii) rheology and transport properties, (iii) salt tectonics and basin evolution, (iv) internal structure of evaporites, (v) fluid flow through salt, to (vi) salt engineering. With selected case studies we show how integration of these domains of knowledge can bring better predictions of (i) sediment architecture and reservoir distribution, (ii) internal structure of salt for optimized drilling and better cavern design, (iii) reliable long-term predictions of deformations and fluid flow in subsurface storage. A fully integrated workflow is based on geomechanical models, which include all laboratory and natural observations and links macro- and micro-scale studies. We present emerging concepts for (i) the initiation dynamics of halokinesis, (ii) the rheology and deformation of the evaporites by brittle and ductile processes, (iii) the coupling of processes in evaporites and the under- and overburden, and (iv) the impact of the layered evaporite rheology on the structural evolution.

  3. Aluminum fluoride affects the structure and functions of cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Norris, B; Villena, F; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, P; Zatta, P

    2004-06-01

    No useful biological function for aluminum has been found. To the contrary, it might play an important role in several pathologies, which could be related to its interactions with cell membranes. On the other hand, fluoride is a normal component of body fluids, soft tissues, bones and teeth. Its sodium salt is frequently added to drinking water to prevent dental caries. However, large doses cause severe pathological alterations. In view of the toxicity of Al(3+) and F(-) ions, it was thought of interest to explore the damaging effects that AlF(3) might induce in cell membranes. With this aim, it was incubated with human erythrocytes, which were examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy, and molecular models of biomembranes. The latter consisted of large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and bilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) which were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. In order to understand the effects of AlF(3) on ion transport (principally sodium and chloride) we used the isolated toad skin to which electrophysiological measurements were applied. It was found that AlF(3) altered the shape of erythrocytes inducing the formation of echinocytes. This effect was explained by X-ray diffraction which revealed that AlF(3) perturbed the structure of DMPC, class of lipids located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. This result was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV. The biphasic (stimulatory followed by inhibitory) effects on the isolated skin suggested changes in apical Cl(-) secretion and moderate ATPase inactivation. PMID:15110101

  4. The status of community water fluoridation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Easley, M W

    1990-01-01

    Community water fluoridation has served the American public extremely well as the cornerstone of dental caries prevention activities for 45 years. The dental and general health benefits associated with the ingestion of water-borne fluorides have been well known by researchers for an even longer period. Continued research has repeatedly confirmed the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries for Americans regardless of age, race, ethnicity, religion, educational status, or socioeconomic level. Despite the obvious benefits associated with this proven public health measure, slow progress has been made toward achieving the 1990 national fluoridation objectives as listed in "Promoting Health/Preventing Disease: Objectives for the Nation." This paper documents the lagging pace of community fluoridation by reviewing and analyzing data reported in "Fluoridation Census, 1985," a document published in late 1988 by the Public Health Service's Centers for Disease Control. Failure to attain the 1990 objectives is attributable to a combination of circumstances, including their low priority within many local, State, and Federal health agencies, inadequate funding at all levels of government, lack of a coordinated and focused national fluoridation effort, failure of most States to require fluoridation, lack of Federal legislation mandating fluoridation, general apathy of most health professional organizations toward fluoridation, misconceptions by the public about effectiveness and safety and, finally, unrelenting opposition by a highly vocal minority of the lay public. In addition, fluoridation successes have not been consistent among States, with wide variation in accomplishments documented in the reported data.While fluoridation still is one of the most cost effective public health measures available to local,State, and Federal public health agencies, it remains significantly underused nearly a half century after its

  5. Thermal-Hydraulic Design of a Fluoride High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Qualls, A L

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Fluoride High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) named the Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a novel reactor concept using molten salt coolant and TRIstructural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel that is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the FHR DR is to advance the technology readiness level of FHRs. The FHR DR will demonstrate technologies needed to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. The FHR DR has a thermal power of 100 MWt, very similar to the SmAHTR, another FHR ORNL concept (Refs. 1 and 2) with a power of 125 MWt. The FHR DR is also a small version of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), with a power of 3400 MWt, cooled by a molten salt and also being developed at ORNL (Ref. 3). The FHR DR combines three existing technologies: (1) high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant, (2) high-temperature coated-particle TRISO fuel, (3) and passive decay heat cooling systems by using Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS). This paper presents FHR DR thermal-hydraulic design calculations.

  6. Survey of fluoride levels in vended water stations.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Urvi G; Archarya, Bhavini S; Velasquez, Gisela M; Vance, Bradley J; Tate, Robert H; Quock, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to measure the fluoride concentration of water derived from vended water stations (VWS) and to identify its clinical implications, especially with regard to caries prevention and fluorosis. VWS and corresponding tap water samples were collected from 34 unique postal zip codes; samples were analyzed in duplicate for fluoride concentration. Average fluoride concentration in VWS water was significantly lower than that of tap water (P < 0.001). Fluoride concentration in the VWS water ranged from <0.01 ppm to 0.04 ppm, with a mean concentration of 0.02 ppm (±0.02 ppm). Patients utilizing VWS as their primary source of drinking water may not be receiving optimal caries preventive benefits; thus dietary fluoride supplementation may be indicated. Conversely, to minimize the risk of fluorosis in infants consuming reconstituted infant formula, water from a VWS may be used. PMID:25184716

  7. Fluoride content in caffeinated, decaffeinated and herbal teas.

    PubMed

    Chan, J T; Koh, S H

    1996-01-01

    The fluoride contents of infusions prepared from 44 different brands and types of teas were measured. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 3.71 ppm (mean = 1.50 ppm) in caffeinated tea infusions, 0.02-0.14 ppm (mean = 0.05 ppm) in herbal tea infusions, and 1.01-5.20 ppm (mean = 3.19) in decaffeinated tea infusions. This is the first report of the fluoride content of decaffeinated teas. The mean fluoride content of decaffeinated tea infusions is significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the corresponding caffeinated tea. The use of mineral water containing a naturally high fluoride level during the process of decaffeination is the most likely explanation of the above observation.

  8. Fluoride in Ceylon tea and its implications to dental health.

    PubMed

    Chandrajith, Rohana; Abeypala, Uthpala; Dissanayake, C B; Tobschall, H J

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the fluoride content of Ceylon Tea, which is a popular beverage throughout the world. The fluoride content of tea infusions prepared from different grades of tea leaves collected from different parts of the tea-growing regions (25 samples) of Sri Lanka was measured using a fluoride-selective electrode. Fluoride leaching was found to vary from 0.32 to 1.69 mg F/l, but there were no significant differences in terms of fluoride leaching between tea from different tea-growing regions or between tea of different grades. Dental fluorosis is widespread throughout the dry zone of Sri Lanka, and drinking water has traditionally been considered to be the main contributory factor to the development of fluorosis. However, diet, the consumption of tea in particular, may also contribute to the manifestation of dental diseases.

  9. Fluoride content in caffeinated, decaffeinated and herbal teas.

    PubMed

    Chan, J T; Koh, S H

    1996-01-01

    The fluoride contents of infusions prepared from 44 different brands and types of teas were measured. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 3.71 ppm (mean = 1.50 ppm) in caffeinated tea infusions, 0.02-0.14 ppm (mean = 0.05 ppm) in herbal tea infusions, and 1.01-5.20 ppm (mean = 3.19) in decaffeinated tea infusions. This is the first report of the fluoride content of decaffeinated teas. The mean fluoride content of decaffeinated tea infusions is significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the corresponding caffeinated tea. The use of mineral water containing a naturally high fluoride level during the process of decaffeination is the most likely explanation of the above observation. PMID:8850589

  10. Ion chromatography detection of fluoride in calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Jamie E; Ivey, Michelle M

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride in aquatic systems is increasing due to anthropogenic pollution, but little is known about how this fluoride affects organisms that live in and around aquatic habitats. Fluoride can bioaccumulate in structures comprised of calcium carbonate, such as shells and skeletons of both freshwater and saltwater species as diverse as snails, corals, and coccolithophorid algae. In this article, ion chromatography (IC) techniques are developed to detect and quantify fluoride in a matrix of calcium carbonate. Solid samples are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, pretreated to remove the majority of the chloride ions, and then analyzed using IC. With these methods, the 3σ limit of detection is 0.2 mg of fluoride/kg of calcium carbonate. PMID:21859530

  11. Assessment of fluoride contamination in groundwater as precursor for electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Sajil Kumar, P J

    2012-07-01

    The Present study was conducted in January 2010, in order to assess the fluoride contamination in the Thirupathur Taluk. The major objective of this study was to locate the vulnerable areas in terms of fluoride contamination. The range of fluoride concentration varied between .26 and 2.75 mg/L. 60 % of the samples were above the permissible limit. Good correlation was observed between pH, Na, HCO(3), CO(3) TDS and NO(3). A negative correlation showed by Ca and K. The results show that Geochemistry of these ions controls the Fluoride concentration in the study area. All the samples exceeded the permissible limit of F was characterized by Na-HCO(3) type of water. A fairly good correlation between F and NO(3) suggest an anthropogenic input of F, mainly from the agricultural fields. Spatial distribution map of Fluoride shows very high concentration in the SW part of the study area.

  12. Assessment of groundwater quality with respect to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Salve, P R; Maurya, A; Kumbhare, P S; Ramteke, D S; Wate, S R

    2008-09-01

    The study was conducted in the summer season (April-May 2007). The fluoride concentration along with physico-chemical parameters in ground water samples was determined in various villages of Kadi tehsil at Mehsana district of Gujarat state (India), since in most of the villages it is the only source of drinking water. The fluoride concentrations in these villages varied from 0.94 to 2.81 mg/L (1.37+/-0.56) with highest fluoride level at Visalpur (2.08 mg/L) and lowest at Adaraj (0.91 mg/L). There was found a positive correlation of pH with fluoride and a negative relationship of fluoride with bicarbonate which is generally observed in deep ground water.

  13. [Salt and cancer].

    PubMed

    Strnad, Marija

    2010-05-01

    Besides cardiovascular disease, a high salt intake causes other adverse health effects, i.e., gastric and some other cancers, obesity (risk factor for many cancer sites), Meniere's disease, worsening of renal disease, triggering an asthma attack, osteoporosis, exacerbation of fluid retention, renal calculi, etc. Diets containing high amounts of food preserved by salting and pickling are associated with an increased risk of cancers of the stomach, nose and throat. Because gastric cancer is still the most common cancer in some countries (especially in Japan), its prevention is one of the most important aspects of cancer control strategy. Observations among Japanese immigrants in the U.S.A. and Brazil based on the geographic differences, the trend in cancer incidence with time, and change in the incidence patterns indicate that gastric cancer is closely associated with dietary factors such as the intake of salt and salted food. The findings of many epidemiological studies suggest that high dietary salt intake is a significant risk factor for gastric cancer and this association was found to be strong in the presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection with atrophic gastritis. A high-salt intake strips the lining of the stomach and may make infection with H. pylori more likely or may exacerbate the infection. Salting, pickling and smoking are traditionally popular ways of preparing food in Japan and some parts of Asia. In addition to salt intake, cigarette smoking and low consumption of fruit and vegetables increase the risk of stomach cancer. However, it is not known whether it is specifically the salt in these foods or a combination of salt and other chemicals that can cause cancer. One study identified a mutagen in nitrite-treated Japanese salted fish, and chemical structure of this mutagen suggests that it is derived from methionine and that salt and nitrite are precursors for its formation. Working under conditions of heat stress greatly increased the workers

  14. Fluoride caused thyroid endocrine disruption in male zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Jianjie, Chen; Wenjuan, Xue; Jinling, Cao; Jie, Song; Ruhui, Jia; Meiyan, Li

    2016-02-01

    Excessive fluoride in natural water ecosystem has the potential to detrimentally affect thyroid endocrine system, but little is known of such effects or underlying mechanisms in fish. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of fluoride on growth performance, thyroid histopathology, thyroid hormone levels, and gene expressions in the HPT axis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to different determined concentrations of 0.1, 0.9, 2.0 and 4.1 M of fluoride to investigate the effects of fluoride on thyroid endocrine system and the potential toxic mechanisms caused by fluoride. The results indicated that the growth of the male zebrafish used in the experiments was significantly inhibited, the thyroid microtrastructure was changed, and the levels of T3 and T4 were disturbed in fluoride-exposed male fish. In addition, the expressional profiles of genes in HPT axis displayed alteration. The expressions of all studied genes were significantly increased in all fluoride-exposed male fish after exposure for 45 days. The transcriptional levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TG), sodium iodide symporter (NIS), iodothyronine I (DIO1), and thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα) were also elevated in all fluoride-exposed male fish after 90 days of exposure, while the inconsistent expressions were found in the mRNA of iodothyronineⅡ (DIO2), UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family a, b (UGT1ab), transthyretin (TTR), and thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ). These results demonstrated that fluoride could notably inhibit the growth of zebrafish, and significantly affect thyroid endocrine system by changing the microtrastructure of thyroid, altering thyroid hormone levels and endocrine-related gene expressions in male zebrafish. All above indicated that fluoride could pose a great threat to thyroid endocrine system, thus detrimentally affected the normal function of thyroid of male zebrafish. PMID:26748264

  15. Effect of a fluoride solution on dentinal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Thrash, W J; Jones, D L; Dodds, W J

    1992-12-01

    This two-phase experiment assessed the effects over time of a solution containing 1.09% sodium fluoride, .40% stannous fluoride, and .14% hydrogen fluoride (.717% fluoride solution, DentinBloc) on pain associated with dentinal hypersensitivity. During phase I, 30 subjects demonstrating dentinal hypersensitivity to a blast of cool air were divided into three double blind experimental groups. After baseline data were collected for all subjects, one group was instructed to apply the .717% fluoride solution twice a day. A second group was instructed to apply a gel containing .04% stannous fluoride (Gel-Kam) twice a day. A third group was instructed to apply distilled water. Each subject was assessed at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks utilizing the "method of limits" with a standardized, repeatable cold thermal stimulus. The results of a two factor repeated ANOVA indicated that those subjects who applied the .717% fluoride solution reported significantly less sensitivity at the 2-week period than the other groups (P < .05). In addition, those subjects whose solution contained the 0.4% stannous fluoride reported significantly less sensitivity at the 4- to 8-week periods (P < .05). Phase II of the study assessed the .717% fluoride solution on a more precise time course. These included: immediately, 15 minute, 1 day, 1 week and 2 weeks. A one factor repeated ANOVA revealed that this effect presented 15-minute post application (P < .05) and continued throughout the testing periods. It was concluded that the fully active 0.717% fluoride solution was an effective agent in the control of dentinal hypersensitivity after two 1-minute applications.

  16. Fluoride caused thyroid endocrine disruption in male zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Jianjie, Chen; Wenjuan, Xue; Jinling, Cao; Jie, Song; Ruhui, Jia; Meiyan, Li

    2016-02-01

    Excessive fluoride in natural water ecosystem has the potential to detrimentally affect thyroid endocrine system, but little is known of such effects or underlying mechanisms in fish. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of fluoride on growth performance, thyroid histopathology, thyroid hormone levels, and gene expressions in the HPT axis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to different determined concentrations of 0.1, 0.9, 2.0 and 4.1 M of fluoride to investigate the effects of fluoride on thyroid endocrine system and the potential toxic mechanisms caused by fluoride. The results indicated that the growth of the male zebrafish used in the experiments was significantly inhibited, the thyroid microtrastructure was changed, and the levels of T3 and T4 were disturbed in fluoride-exposed male fish. In addition, the expressional profiles of genes in HPT axis displayed alteration. The expressions of all studied genes were significantly increased in all fluoride-exposed male fish after exposure for 45 days. The transcriptional levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TG), sodium iodide symporter (NIS), iodothyronine I (DIO1), and thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα) were also elevated in all fluoride-exposed male fish after 90 days of exposure, while the inconsistent expressions were found in the mRNA of iodothyronineⅡ (DIO2), UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family a, b (UGT1ab), transthyretin (TTR), and thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ). These results demonstrated that fluoride could notably inhibit the growth of zebrafish, and significantly affect thyroid endocrine system by changing the microtrastructure of thyroid, altering thyroid hormone levels and endocrine-related gene expressions in male zebrafish. All above indicated that fluoride could pose a great threat to thyroid endocrine system, thus detrimentally affected the normal function of thyroid of male zebrafish.

  17. Fluctuation of fluoride concentrations in drinking waters: a collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Fejerskov, O; Bojen, O; Senderowitz, F; Lambrou, D; Manji, F; Hobdell, M

    1989-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the variations with time in the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water sources in Greenland, Kenya, Greece, Denmark and Ireland. Water samples were collected monthly and shipped to laboratories in Aarhus for electrometric analyses. In Narssaq, Greenland the fluoride concentration of a single piped water supply ranged from 0.3 to 2.8 ppm, the variations being related to climate, precipitation and temperature over the year. Water from the Athi River, Kenya had a fluoride content ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 ppm, the higher concentrations being associated with the dry seasons. The fluoride concentration in piped water from mountain rivers in Mourjes, Greece, ranged over the year between 1.3 to 2.0 ppm, the changes being apparently unrelated to rainfall. Marked variations in fluoride concentrations from 0.5 to over 3.5 ppm were observed in water from artesian wells in Assiros, Greece. In drinking waters from boreholes in Boennerup Strand, Denmark, fluoride concentrations ranged with time from 1.4 to 2.4 ppm, the variations being unrelated to climate or precipitation, while little variation in fluoride concentrations was found in water from boreholes in either Roedvig or Egens, Denmark. Water obtained from two sources of artificially fluoridated water supplies from Ireland showed considerable variations with time, although pooled samples indicated relatively constant levels over the year. The study indicates that the results of single fluoride ion measurement from any given source should not be taken as being a reliable indicator of fluoride exposure from drinking water.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Caries prevention through the fluoridation of milk. A review.

    PubMed

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 50 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization from the early 1980s onwards. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in milk, and increased concentrations of fluoride in saliva, dental plaque, dental enamel and dentine, and urine, after consumption of fluoridated milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s--some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programs. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. At present, milk fluoridation programs are running continuously in about ten countries of the world. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk program. The program should aim to provide fluoridated milk for at least 200 days per year and should commence before the children are 4 years of age. PMID:18078140

  19. 76 FR 37129 - Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F-18) Injection, 10 to 200 Millicuries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Product List'' section of the Orange Book. In previous instances (see, e.g., 72 FR 9763, March 5, 2007; 61 FR 25497, May 21, 1996), the Agency has determined that, for purposes of Sec. Sec. 314.161 and 314... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride...

  20. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  1. Role of Exchange and Correlation in Predicting Structures and Properties of Fluoride Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Nenian; Rondinelli, James

    The study of fluorine-based inorganic compounds has captured the attention of condensed matter physicists as a route to engineer novel states of matter. Here, we present a density functional theory (DFT) study on fluorides with structures ranging from simple to complex, including KF (rock salt), MnF2 and VF2 (rutile), KMnF3 (perovskite), and Na3MnF and Na6ScF6 (cryolite). The focus is on understanding the accuracy of various exchange-correlation functionals for the prediction of structural, electronic, and phonon properties at four different levels of theory, i.e., the local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA), meta-GGA, and hybrid functional level with exact exchange. Specifically, we draw attention to the meta-GGA functional MS2 [Sun et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 111, 106401 (2013)], demonstrating that although it shows improvements over the LDA and GGA functionals in predicting structural properties of fluorides, MS2 generally performs poorer for the electronic and phonon properties. Our study provides useful insights for predictive design of functional halide compounds using computational models based on DFT.

  2. Groundwater quality in some villages of Haryana, India: focus on fluoride and fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi; Garg, V K; Kavita; Renuka; Malik, Anju

    2004-01-01

    The fluoride concentration in underground water was determined in four villages of Jind district of Haryana state (India) where it is the only source of drinking water. Various other water quality parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved salts, total hardness, total alkalinity as well as sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride and sulfate concentrations were also measured. A systematic calculation of correlation coefficients among different physico-chemical parameters was performed. The analytical results indicated considerable variations among the analyzed samples with respect to their chemical composition. Majority of the samples do not comply with Indian as well as WHO standards for most of the water quality parameters measured. The fluoride concentration in the underground water of these villages varied from 0.3 to 6.9 mg/l, causing dental fluorosis among people especially children of these villages. Overall water quality was found unsatisfactory for drinking purposes without any prior treatment except at eight locations out of 60.

  3. Sources of dietary fluoride intake in 4-year-old children residing in low, medium and high fluoride areas in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zohouri, F V; Rugg-Gunn, A J

    2000-09-01

    Accurate estimation of fluoride dietary intake is desirable for optimising caries prevention. Little is known about the dietary fluoride intake of children aged 4 years, an age when many permanent teeth are forming. This study was undertaken in Fars Province, Iran, in 1995-1996, where there are big differences in temperature between winter and summer. The aims were to determine: (a) the relative contributions of different components of the diet to fluoride intake, (b) the effect of variation in fluoride concentration in drinking water, and (c) the effect of climate temperature. Temperature varied between +40 degrees C in summer to -5 degrees C in winter. The mean fluoride concentrations in drinking water in the three areas were 0.3, 0.6 and 4.0 mgF/L. Dietary information was obtained by two 3-day diet diaries with interview, validated with reference to international standards. The fluoride content of foods was measured using the silicon-facilitated diffusion method. One hundred and three 4-year-old children completed the study. The mean (and 95% confidence interval) dietary fluoride intakes in each of the three areas, respectively, were 413 (+/- 21), 698 (+/- 89) and 3472 (+/- 557) micrograms/day. Drinks provided 72 to 87% of dietary fluoride--this proportion increased with increasing water fluoride concentration and increasing climate temperature. Tea (infusion) was an important source of dietary fluoride, providing 31 to 38% of total dietary intake. Tap water was a more important source of fluoride than soft drinks. Cooked rice and bread were the most important food source of fluoride and the amount of fluoride they contributed increased as water fluoride concentration increased. The results of this first such survey in the Middle East showed (a) that water (as a drink) and tea were by far the most important contributors to dietary fluoride intake, (b) substantial increases in fluoride intake with increasing water fluoride concentrations, and (c) substantially

  4. Lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles for radiosensitization of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Bekah, Devesh; Cooper, Daniel; Shastry, Sathvik; Hill, Colin; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Dense inorganic nanoparticles have recently been identified as promising radiosensitizers. In addition to dose enhancement through increased attenuation of ionizing radiation relative to biological tissue, scintillating nanoparticles can transfer energy to coupled photosensitizers to amplify production of reactive oxygen species, as well as provide UVvisible emission for optical imaging. Lanthanum fluoride is a transparent material that is easily prepared as nanocrystals, and which can provide radioluminescence at a number of wavelengths through simple substitution of lanthanum ions with other luminescent lanthanides. We have prepared lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles doped with cerium, terbium, or both, that have good spectral overlap with chlorine6 or Rose Bengal photosensitizer molecules. We have also developed a strategy for stable conjugation of the photosensitizers to the nanoparticle surface, allowing for high energy transfer efficiencies on a per molecule basis. Additionally, we have succeeded in making our conjugates colloidally stable under physiological conditions. Here we present our latest results, using nanoparticles and nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates to demonstrate radiation dose enhancement in B16 melanoma cells. The effects of nanoparticle treatment prior to 250 kVp x-ray irradiation were investigated through clonogenic survival assays and cell cycle analysis. Using a custom apparatus, we have also observed scintillation of the nanoparticles and conjugates under the same conditions that the cell samples are irradiated.

  5. Industrial Applications of Graphite Fluoride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Kucera, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Based on fluorination technology developed during 1934 to 1959, and the fiber technology developed during the 1970s, a new process was developed to produce graphite fluoride fibers. In the process, pitch based graphitized carbon fibers are at first intercalated and deintercalated several times by bromine and iodine, followed by several cycles of nitrogen heating and fluorination at 350 to 370 C. Electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of this fiber depend on the fluorination process and the fluorine content of the graphite fluoride product. However, these properties are between those of graphite and those of PTFE (Teflon). Therefore, it is considered to be a semiplastic. The physical properties suggest that this new material may have many new and unexplored applications. For example, it can be a thermally conductive electrical insulator. Its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) can be adjusted to match that of silicon, and therefore, it can be a heat sinking printed circuit board which is CTE compatible with silicon. Using these fibers in printed circuit boards may provide improved electrical performance and reliability of the electronics on the board over existing designs. Also, since it releases fluorine at 300 C or higher, it can be used as a material to store fluorine and to conduct fluorination. This application may simplify the fluorination process and reduce the risk of handling fluorine.

  6. Electrowinning of neodymium from a molten oxide-fluoride electrolyte. Report of investigations/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dysinger, D.K.; Murphy, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Neodymium metal of 99.8 percent purity was prepared by electrolysis of Nd2O3 salts dissolved in a molten fluoride electrolyte. The metal was electrowon in a molten state at current efficiencies of 50 to 60 percent. Oxygen and carbon were the major impurities detected in the product. During operation of the small scale laboratory cell, a number of technical problems including anode effect, low oxide solubility in the electrolyte, high neodymium metal solubility, reactivity of the metal with the cell materials, and back reaction of the metal with the anode gases were encountered. Approaches to improve cell operation and prospects for commercial adoption of the electrolytic production of neodymium metal are discussed.

  7. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITS of 950 K and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITS ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo -generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  8. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants Using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITs of 950 and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITs ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo-generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  9. Rare earth/iron fluoride and methods for making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Wheelock, John T.; Peterson, David T.

    1991-12-17

    A particulate mixture of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, where RE is a rare earth element, is reacted with an excess of HF acid to form an insoluble fluoride compound (salt) comprising REF.sub.3 and FeF.sub.3 present in solid solution in the REF.sub.3 crystal lattice. The REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound is dried to render it usable as a reactant in the thermite reduction process as well as other processes which require an REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 mixture. The dried REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound comprises about 5 weight % to about 40 weight % of FeF.sub.3 and the balance REF.sub.3 to this end.

  10. Crushed Salt Constitutive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.

    1999-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt is presented in this report. Two mechanisms -- dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solution -- are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Upon complete consolidation, the crushed-salt model reproduces the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) model typically used for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) host geological formation salt. New shear consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on WIPP and southeastern New Mexico salt. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to the database produced two sets of material parameter values for the model -- one for the shear consolidation tests and one for a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests. Using the parameter values determined from the fitted database, the constitutive model is validated against constant strain-rate tests. Shaft seal problems are analyzed to demonstrate model-predicted consolidation of the shaft seal crushed-salt component. Based on the fitting statistics, the ability of the model to predict the test data, and the ability of the model to predict load paths and test data outside of the fitted database, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt reasonably well.

  11. Quantitative determination of lattice fluoride effects on the solubility and crystallinity of carbonated apatites with incorporated fluoride.

    PubMed

    Yan, G; Moribe, K; Otsuka, M; Papangkorn, K; Higuchi, W I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluoride on the solubility and crystallinity of carbonated apatites (CAPs) after its incorporation into the crystal lattice using the metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) distribution method. Fluoride-incorporated CAPs (F-CAPs) of two different carbonate levels (3 and 5%) and fluoride contents from 0 to 20,000 µg/g were synthesized. X-ray diffraction experiments and Rietveld analysis were conducted to obtain crystallite microstrain and unit cell parameters. Acetate buffer MES solution media were prepared at two solution fluoride concentrations (0.2 and 2.0 mg/l) and at two pHs (5.0 and 5.7). The unit cell a-axis values of the F-CAPs were found to decrease as the fluoride content increased, consistent with the fluoride being incorporated into the crystal lattice. The fluoride concentrations in the MES solution media were high enough to provide a 'swamping' effect such that the fluoride released from the F-CAPs during dissolution was minimal in changing the solution fluoride concentration. Employing the MES distribution superposition method, it was shown that the surface complex possessing the fluorapatite (FAP) stoichiometry [Ca10(PO4)6F2] accounted for the MES distribution behavior of all experiments. In addition, the mean pIFAP [the value of -log(aCa(10)aPO4(6)aF(2)) calculated from the ionic activity product based on FAP stoichiometry of the MES dissolution media in which 50% of the F-CAPs had dissolved] correlated well with the crystallite microstrain parameters of the F-CAPs. The incorporated fluoride in the F-CAPs showed only modest effects on F-CAP crystallinity and solubility.

  12. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material

  13. [Differential approach to spring water choice regarding fluoride content for caries prevention].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Protsenko, A S; Svistunova, E G

    2013-01-01

    The research includes an investigation of the tap water in different districts of Moscow. It was found out that Moscow tap water contains little fluoride, the difference between districts and okrugs is of no consequence. There is no centralized water fluoridization in Moscow therefore the authors suggest using bottled potable water with sufficient fluoride level. The fluoride concentration in one hundred of the most popular and wide-spread bottled potable water labels was examined. High in fluoride and low in fluoride labels were identified as well as the labels with the optimal fluoride content. Some practical guidelines for selection of bottled potable water depending on the quantity of liquid consummation were elaborated.

  14. Fluoride occurrence in publicly supplied drinking water in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karro, Enn; Indermitte, Ene; Saava, Astrid; Haamer, Kadri; Marandi, Andres

    2006-06-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the content and spatial distribution of fluoride in drinking water. Water samples (735) from public water systems covering all Estonian territory were analysed using SPADNS method. In order to specify the natural source of fluoride, the chemistry data from five aquifer systems utilised for water supply were included into the study. Fluoride concentrations in tap water, to a great extent, ranged from 0.01 to 6.95 mg/l. Drinking water in southern Estonia, where terrigenous Middle-Devonian aquifer system is exploited, has a fluoride concentration lower than recommended level (0.5 mg/l), thus promoting susceptibility to dental caries. The western part of the country is supplied by water with excess fluoride content (1.5-6.9 mg/l). Groundwater abstracted for drinking purposes originates from Ordovician and Silurian carbonate rocks. The content of fluoride in Silurian-Ordovician aquifer system is associated with the groundwater abstraction depth and the main controlling factors of dissolved fluoride are the pH value and the chemical type of water.

  15. Statistical modeling of global geogenic fluoride contamination in groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Amini, Manouchehr; Mueller, Kim; Abbaspour, Karim C; Rosenberg, Thomas; Afyuni, Majid; Møller, Klaus N; Sarr, Mamadou; Johnson, C Annette

    2008-05-15

    The use of groundwater with high fluoride concentrations poses a health threat to millions of people around the world. This study aims at providing a global overview of potentially fluoride-rich groundwaters by modeling fluoride concentration. A large database of worldwide fluoride concentrations as well as available information on related environmental factors such as soil properties, geological settings, and climatic and topographical information on a global scale have all been used in the model. The modeling approach combines geochemical knowledge with statistical methods to devise a rule-based statistical procedure, which divides the world into 8 different "process regions". For each region a separate predictive model was constructed. The end result is a global probability map of fluoride concentration in the groundwater. Comparisons of the modeled and measured data indicate that 60-70% of the fluoride variation could be explained by the models in six process regions, while in two process regions only 30% of the variation in the measured data was explained. Furthermore, the global probability map corresponded well with fluorotic areas described in the international literature. Although the probability map should not replace fluoride testing, it can give a first indication of possible contamination and thus may support the planning process of new drinking water projects.

  16. Brick tea fluoride as a main source of adult fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jin; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Jianwei; Xirao, Ruoden; Danzeng, Sangbu; Daji, Dawei; Yan, Yu

    2003-04-01

    An epidemiological survey was conducted in Naqu County, Tibet in September 2001 to investigate the manifestations of fluorosis in adults caused by the habitual consumption of brick tea. Profiles were obtained for the total daily fluoride intake, environmental fluoride levels and average urinary fluoride concentration, and a physical examination and a skeletal radiographic study were conducted. One hundred and eleven 30-78-year-old adults were enrolled. It was found that the fluoride level of water sources in Naqu County was 0.10+/-0.03 mg/l; no evidence of fluoride air pollution was found, but the brick tea water processed foods--zamba and buttered tea--had fluoride contents of 4.52+/-0.74 mg/kg and 3.21+/-0.65 mg/l, respectively. The adult daily fluoride intake reached 12 mg, of which 99% originated from the brick tea-containing foods. The positive rate of clinical symptoms by physical examination was 89%; furthermore, 42 of the 111 subjects were diagnosed by X-ray. The positive examination rate was 83%. Although the osteosclerosis-type skeletal fluorosis (overall increased bone matrix density) affected 74%, arthropathy and arthritis affected a significant number of the patients, resulting in functional disability. The results suggest that this brick tea-type fluorosis had even more severe adverse effects on human health compared with both the water-type and coal combustion-type fluorosis that occurred in other areas of China.

  17. [Fluoride content of soft drinks produced in Poland].

    PubMed

    Jedra, Małgorzata; Urbanek-Karłowska, Bogumiła; Gawarska, Halina; Sawilska-Rautenstrauch, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    Fluoride content of 81 commercial brands of soft drinks and bottled waters were determined using potentiometric method with ion selective electrode. In the beverages produced in the same factory fluoride level were similar. The connection between elevation of fluoride levels and ingredients of investigated products such as juice or cola extract was not found. However, in some samples of ice tea drinks containing the tea extract fluoride levels might have been raised up to 1.28 mg/l. Fluoride contents of beverages from 28 producers ranged from 0.01 to 0.30 mg/l and only from 4 producers up to 0.60 mg/l. The highest level of fluoride (1.39 mg/l) has been determined in one sample of mineral water. In conclusion, ice tea beverages and certain mineral water, made and sold in Poland, may constitute an important source of fluoride in diet. Their consumption, particularly in case of children, must be controlled.

  18. Dental enamel around fixed orthodontic appliances after fluoride varnish application.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, Leonardo; Cruz, Roberval de Almeida; Brandão, Paulo Roberto Gomes

    2007-01-01

    Poor oral hygiene has been considered one of the main problems routinely faced in the orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic appliance creates an environment that provides mineral loss from the dental enamel. Such condition is clinically seen as white spot lesions and cavitations in the most severe cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a fluoride varnish application as a caries prevention method for clinical orthodontics. The experiment analyzed dental enamel adjacent to orthodontics accessories after treatment. In addition, it was observed the calcium, phosphorus and fluoride contents on enamel treated with a fluoride varnish. The results showed that fluoride varnish application is a simple and fast technique that could be useful in preventing enamel demineralization associated to orthodontic treatment. Scanning electron microscopy revealed significant amount of calcium fluoride-like material deposited on enamel and energy dispersive x-ray analysis demonstrated a large incorporation of calcium and fluoride to the enamel of the treated specimens. It was concluded that fluoride varnish could indeed be considered an efficient preventive method to enhance enamel resistance against the cariogenic challenges during orthodontic therapy.

  19. Butane segregated by fluorides, olefins content at Texas terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-22

    Texas Eastern Products Pipeline Co., Houston (Teppco), this month has begun segregating butane streams at the company's Mont Belvieu and Baytown, Texas terminals according to fluoride and olefin contents. Streams containing fluoride or an olefin content greater than 1 ppm (or both) currently flow into Teppco's south Mont Belvieu terminal. Those fluoride-free streams with less than 1 ppm of olefins flow to its north Mont Belvieu terminal. Butane processed through an isomerization unit yields isobutane, a key component in MTBE. But high-fluoride butane from crude-oil refineries using hydrofluoric (HF) acid alkylation units cannot be used to produce MTBE because fluoride will damage isomerization units' process catalysts. Olefins also affect the efficiency of isomerization units, but less critically than fluorides. Their presence is higher in refinery product than in fractionated NGL. To extend the life of their process catalysts and to maximize yields, producers (including MTBE and isomerization unit operators) are specifying low-fluoride butanes developed from natural-gas fractionators or from refineries that do not use an HF process.

  20. Serum fluoride and sialic acid levels in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, R; Lal, H; Kundu, Z S; Kharb, S

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare malignant bone tumor most commonly occurring in children and young adults presenting with painful swelling. Various etiological factors for osteosarcoma are ionizing radiation, family history of bone disorders and cancer, chemicals (fluoride, beryllium, and vinyl chloride), and viruses. Status of fluoride levels in serum of osteosarcoma is still not clear. Recent reports have indicated that there is a link between fluoride exposure and osteosarcoma. Glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans are an integral part of bone and prolonged exposure to fluoride for long duration has been shown to cause degradation of collagen and ground substance in bones. The present study was planned to analyze serum fluoride, sialic acid, calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels in 25 patients of osteosarcoma and age- and sex-matched subjects with bone-forming tumours other than osteosarcoma and musculo-skeletal pain (controls, 25 each). Fluoride levels were analyzed by ISE and sialic acid was analyzed by Warren's method. Mean serum fluoride concentration was found to be significantly higher in patients with osteosarcoma as compared to the other two groups. The mean value of flouride in patients with other bone-forming tumors was approximately 50% of the group of osteosarcoma; however, it was significantly higher when compared with patients of group I. Serum sialic acid concentration was found to be significantly raised in patients with osteosarcoma as well as in the group with other bone-forming tumors as compared to the group of controls. There was, however, no significant difference in the group of patients of osteosarcoma when compared with group of patients with other bone-forming tumors. These results showing higher level of fluoride with osteosarcoma compared to others suggesting a role of fluoride in the disease.