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Sample records for fluoride volatility process

  1. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  2. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  3. Volatile fluoride process for separating plutonium from other materials

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F. H.; Newton, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or fission products by formation of the higher fluorides off uranium and/or plutonium is described. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first converted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treated with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sub 6/ leaving plutonium behind. Thc plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 5004DEC and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

  4. VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or tission products by formation of the higher fluorides of uranium and/or plutonium is discussed. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first convcrted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treatced with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sup 6/ leaving plutonium behind. The plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 500 deg C and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

  5. Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from spent uranium alloy fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghusen, J. J.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gunderson, G. E.; Holmes, J. T.; Jonke, A. A.; Kincinas, J. E.; Levitz, N. M.; Potts, G. L.; Ramaswami, D.; Stethers, H.; hide

    1967-01-01

    Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from uranium fuels containing either zirconium or aluminum. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. The process requires few operations in simple, compact equipment, and eliminates aqueous radioactive wastes.

  6. FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.J.; Hyman, H.H.; Sheft, I.

    1958-04-15

    The separation and recovery of uraniunn from contaminants introduced by neutron irradiation by a halogenation and volatilization method are described. The irradiated uranium is dissolved in bromine trifluoride in the liquid phase. The uranium is converted to the BrF/sub 3/ soluble urmium hexafluoride compound whereas the fluorides of certain contaminating elements are insoluble in liquid BrF/sub 3/, and the reaction rate of the BrF/sub 3/ with certain other solid uranium contamirnnts is sufficiently slower than the reaction rate with uranium that substantial portions of these contaminating elements will remain as solids. These solids are then separated from the solution by a distillation, filtration, or centrifugation step. The uranium hexafluoride is then separated from the balance of the impurities and solvent by one or more distillations.

  7. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J.

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  8. Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

    1984-12-21

    This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

  9. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    PubMed

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room.

  10. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  11. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  12. PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AMMONIUM URANIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, A.S.; Mooney, R.B.

    1953-08-25

    This patent relates to the preparation of ammonium uranium fluoride. The process comprises adding a water soluble fluoride to an aqueous solution of a uranous compound containing an ammonium salt, and isolating the resulting precipitate. This patent relates to the manufacture of uranium tetnafluoride from ammonium uranium fluoride, NH/sub 4/UF/sub 5/. Uranium tetrafluoride is prepared by heating the ammonium uranium fluoride to a temperature at which dissociation occurs with liberation of ammonium fluoride. Preferably the process is carried out under reduced pressure, or in a current of an inert gas.

  13. Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... by teeth and helps to strengthen teeth, resist acid, and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose homes have water that is not fluoridated (already has fluoride added). ...

  14. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  15. Effects of Gravity on Processing Heavy Metal Fluoride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the crystal nucleation of heavy metal fluoride fibers have been studied in preliminary experiments utilizing NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft and a microgravity sounding rocket flight. Commercially produced fibers were heated to the crystallization temperature in normal and reduced gravity. The fibers processed in normal gravity showed complete crystallization while the fibers processed in reduced gravity did not show signs of crystallization.

  16. Effects of Gravity on Processing Heavy Metal Fluoride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the crystal nucleation of heavy metal fluoride fibers have been studied in preliminary experiments utilizing NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft and a microgravity sounding rocket flight. Commercially produced fibers were heated to the crystallization temperature in normal and reduced gravity. The fibers processed in normal gravity showed complete crystallization while the fibers processed in reduced gravity did not show signs of crystallization.

  17. Asporin and the mineralization process in fluoride-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Houari, Sophia; Wurtz, Tilmann; Ferbus, Didier; Chateau, Danielle; Dessombz, Arnaud; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2014-06-01

    Microarray analysis of odontoblastic cells treated with sodium fluoride has identified the asporin gene as a fluoride target. Asporin is a member of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan/protein (SLRP) family that is believed to be important in the mineralization process. In this study, asporin expression and distribution were investigated by systematic analysis of dentin and enamel, with and without fluoride treatment. Specific attention was focused on a major difference between the two mineralized tissues: the presence of a collagenous scaffold in dentin, and its absence in enamel. Normal and fluorotic, continually growing incisors from Wistar rats treated with 2.5 to 7.5 mM sodium fluoride (NaF) were studied by immunochemistry, in situ hybridization, Western blotting, and RT-qPCR. Asporin was continuously expressed in odontoblasts throughout dentin formation as expected. Asporin was also found, for the first time, in dental epithelial cells, particularly in maturation-stage ameloblasts. NaF decreased asporin expression in odontoblasts and enhanced it in ameloblasts, both in vivo and in vitro. The inverse response in the two cell types suggests that the effector, fluoride, is a trigger that elicits a cell-type-specific reaction. Confocal and ultrastructural immunohistochemistry evidenced an association between asporin and type 1 collagen in the pericellular nonmineralized compartments of both bone and dentin. In addition, transmission electron microscopy revealed asporin in the microenvironment of all cells observed. Thus, asporin is produced by collagen-matrix-forming and non-collagen-matrix-forming cells but may have different effects on the mineralization process. A model is proposed that predicts impaired mineral formation associated with the deficiency and excess of asporin.

  18. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  19. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM FLUORIDE FROM BISMUTH PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATE CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating plutonium from fission products present on a bismuth phosphate carrier. The dried carrier is first treated with hydrogen fluoride at between 500 and 600 deg C whereby some fission product fluorides volatilize away from plutonium tetrafluoride, and nonvolatile fission product fluorides are formed then with anhydrous fluorine at between 400 and 500 deg C. Bismuth and plutonium distill in the form of volatile fluorides away from the nonvolatile fission product fluorides. The bismuth and plutonium fluorides are condensed at below 290 deg C.

  20. Structural and microscopic relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Angelini, R; Giura, P; Monaco, G; Ruocco, G; Sette, F; Verbeni, R

    2002-06-24

    The high frequency collective dynamics of liquid hydrogen fluoride is studied by inelastic x-ray scattering on the coexistence curve at T = 239 K. The comparison with existing molecular dynamics simulations shows the existence of two active relaxation processes with characteristic time scales in the subpicosecond range. The observed scenario is very similar to that found in liquid water. This suggests that hydrogen bonded liquids behave similarly to other very different systems as simple and glass forming liquids, thus indicating that these two relaxation processes are universal features of the liquid state.

  1. Pilot-scale fluoride-containing wastewater treatment by the ballasted flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin-Yuan; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Zhu, Jia; Shen, Ji-Min; Han, Ying

    2013-01-01

    A pilot-scale ballasted flocculation system was used to remove fluoride from one type of industrial wastewater. The system included the formation of calcium fluoride (CaF2) using calcium hydroxide followed by coagulation sedimentation. Calcium fluoride was recycled as nuclei for enhancing CaF2 precipitation and as a ballasting agent for improving fluoride removal and flocculation efficiency. Factors affecting fluoride and turbidity removal efficiencies, including pH in the CaF2-reacting tank and coagulation-mixing tank, sludge recycling ratio, and dosages of FeCl3 and polyacrylamide (PAM), were investigated in the pilot-scale system. The recycled CaF2 precipitates improved CaF2 formation kinetics, enhanced fluoride removal and flocculation performance. Under the optimized condition, the ballast flocculation process reduced fluoride concentration from 288.9 to 10.67 mg/L and the turbidity from 129.6 NTU to below 2.5 NTU.

  2. Volatility: A hidden Markov process in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, Zoltán; Perelló, Josep; Masoliver, Jaume

    2007-11-01

    Volatility characterizes the amplitude of price return fluctuations. It is a central magnitude in finance closely related to the risk of holding a certain asset. Despite its popularity on trading floors, volatility is unobservable and only the price is known. Diffusion theory has many common points with the research on volatility, the key of the analogy being that volatility is a time-dependent diffusion coefficient of the random walk for the price return. We present a formal procedure to extract volatility from price data by assuming that it is described by a hidden Markov process which together with the price forms a two-dimensional diffusion process. We derive a maximum-likelihood estimate of the volatility path valid for a wide class of two-dimensional diffusion processes. The choice of the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (expOU) stochastic volatility model performs remarkably well in inferring the hidden state of volatility. The formalism is applied to the Dow Jones index. The main results are that (i) the distribution of estimated volatility is lognormal, which is consistent with the expOU model, (ii) the estimated volatility is related to trading volume by a power law of the form σ∝V0.55 , and (iii) future returns are proportional to the current volatility, which suggests some degree of predictability for the size of future returns.

  3. A hybrid approach for treating fluorided water and biogeophysical monitoring of treatment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    A laboratory experiment has been conducted for investigating the possibility of development of novel techniques for treating fluoride contamination and monitoring of physico-chemical alterations caused by biogeochemical processes in the media. In the present study, high adsorption capacity and ion-exchange property of natural zeolites have been utilized in treating fluoride contamination. The preset goals are achieved by designing and constructing experimental setup consisting of three columns, first one is filled with 450 ppm fluorided water prepared by dissolving sodium fluoride in deionized water, the second is filled with zeolite and fluorided water, and the third is filled with zeolite, fluorided water, sodium lactate and the bacterial seed. The first and the second columns were poisoned with sodium azide for preventing the growth of microorganisms. The self-potential (SP) signals associated with physico-chemical alterations in natural zeolite induced by biogeochemical processes are measured by using Cu-CuSO4 gel electrodes. Liquid-phase analysis of samples from column two and three show the reduced concentrations of fluoride and aluminum and it indicates the possibility of precipitation of insoluble aluminum fluoride. This is further confirmed by the presence of fluoride and aluminum in the solid samples as detected by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The distinct SP of the order of -50 mV and 200 mV have been associated with biostimulated fluoride remediation and geochemical fluoride remediation processes respectively. Thus, there is a possibility of non-invasive monitoring of fluoride remediation processes driven by both microbes and chemical processes. It is found that after thirty-day nitrate and sulfate is introduced in column two due chemical interaction between water and natural zeolite. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that a hybrid approach, a combination of ion exchange and adsorption properties of natural zeolite and the bioremediation is more

  4. The mechanism for production of beryllium fluoride from the product of ammonium fluoride processing of beryllium- containing raw material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraydenko, R. I.; Dyachenko, A. N.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The technique of fluorite-phenacite-bertrandite ores from Russian Ermakovskoe deposit processing by ammonium bifluoride is described. To determine the temperature mode and the thermal dissociation mechanism of ammonium tetrafluoroberyllate (the product of ammonium-fluoride leaching of the ore) the TG/DTA have been carried out. By IR spectroscopy and XRD the semi-products of ammonium tetrafluoroberyllate thermal dissociation have been identified. The hygroscopic low-temperature beryllium fluoride forms higher than 380°C. The less hydroscopic form of BeF2 have been produced at 600°C.

  5. Diesel oil volatilization processes affected by selected porous media.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanfei; Zheng, Xilai; Anderson, S H; Lu, Jie; Feng, Xuedong

    2014-03-01

    Volatilization plays an important role in attenuating petroleum products in contaminated soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of wind speed, vessel diameter and mean grain size of porous media on diesel oil volatilization. Experiments were conducted to investigate the volatilization behavior of diesel oil from porous media by weighing contaminated samples pre- and post-volatilization. Three selected field porous media materials were evaluated: Silty Clay Loam, Fine Sand, and Coarse Sand along with six individual sand fractions of the Coarse Sand. Results indicate that increasing wind speed accelerates the diesel oil volatilization process, especially for wind speeds below 2.10ms(-1). The low-carbon components of diesel oil volatilize more rapidly, with the effects of wind speed more pronounced on C10 to C15 volatilization than on C16 and higher. The volatilization rate coefficient of diesel oil increases with decreasing mean grain size of porous media, and with increasing vessel diameter. A power function expressed the relationship with mean grain size. All processes (wind speed, vessel diameter, and mean grain size) were included in an equation which explained over 92% of the measured diesel oil volatilization rate coefficient variations for the experiments. Diesel oil volatilization appears to be boundary-layer regulated to some extent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [A fluoride-sensor for kink structure in DNA condensation process].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Ying-Bing; Li, Yu-Pu; Hu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Bloomfield has pointed out that the kink structure occurs for sharp bending during DNA condensation process, until now, which has not been proved by experiments. Using UV Spectrophotometer, the effects of fluoride and chlorine on the polyamine-DNA condensation system can be detected. Fluoride and chlorine both belong to the halogen family, but their effects on spermine-DNA condensation system are totally different. Fluoride ions make blue-shift and hyperchromicity appear in the spermine-DNA condensation system, but chlorine ions only make insignificant hyperchromicity happen in this system. Both fluoride ions and chlorine ions only make insignificant hyperchromicity happen in spermidine-DNA condensation system. Based on the distinguished character of fluoride, a fluoride-sensor for "kink" structure in DNA condensation was developed and the second kind of "kink" structure only appear in the spermine-DNA condensation system.

  7. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    DOEpatents

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav [Rocky Point, NY; Wiesmann, Harold [Stony Brook, NY

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  8. A Process for Making Bulk Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This invention relates to the preparation of glasses, and, in particular, relates to the preparation of heavy metal fluoride glasses with...reproducible high optical qualities. Considerable effort has been expended to develop heavy metal fluoride glasses ( HMFG ) as a viable family of infrared

  9. Baldovin-Stella stochastic volatility process and Wiener process mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirano, P. P.; Challet, D.

    2012-08-01

    Starting from inhomogeneous time scaling and linear decorrelation between successive price returns, Baldovin and Stella recently proposed a powerful and consistent way to build a model describing the time evolution of a financial index. We first make it fully explicit by using Student distributions instead of power law-truncated Lévy distributions and show that the analytic tractability of the model extends to the larger class of symmetric generalized hyperbolic distributions and provide a full computation of their multivariate characteristic functions; more generally, we show that the stochastic processes arising in this framework are representable as mixtures of Wiener processes. The basic Baldovin and Stella model, while mimicking well volatility relaxation phenomena such as the Omori law, fails to reproduce other stylized facts such as the leverage effect or some time reversal asymmetries. We discuss how to modify the dynamics of this process in order to reproduce real data more accurately.

  10. Volatile processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    A basic model for latitudinal transport of nitrogen is reviewed focusing on its limitations and some complications associated with surface and atmospheric physics. Data obtained by 1989 Voyager encounter with the Neptune system revealed the complexity in the pure nitrogen transport which is caused by the nonuniform albedo of the frosts. It is concluded that Triton is similar to Mars in terms of the complexity of volatile transport and to understand Triton's surface-atmosphere system, Mars may be a very good analog.

  11. Influence of the freezing process upon fluoride binding to hemeproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, A S; Brill, A S

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride association with ferric myoglobins and hemoglobins in aqueous buffers above freezing has been well studied. We chose this reaction to investigate the feasibility of observing titration intermediates and estimating dissociation constants at the freezing temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Dependence of apparent dissociation constant upon protein concentration was observed, a factor of four decrease in protein accompanied by about a fourfold increase in the apparent tightness of binding in the range of protein concentration studied. Binding was also found to depend upon cooling rate and concentration of additives (serum albumin, sucrose, glycerol). These effects appear to be associated with freezing-induced concentration of ligand, a process described in the literature. Bands of high concentration of electrolyte accompany solute rejection during ice growth, sweeping by slowing moving macromolecules. Thus, just before being trapped in the solid, the protein can experience a greater concentration of salt than in the original liquid. A mathematical model of this process, based upon simplifying assumptions about nucleation and ice-crystal growth rates in super-cooled solution, shows how the average concentration of mobile solute species can depend upon the concentration of all species present. Semiquantitative computer simulations of the actual, more complex, freezing are also presented and lead to estimates of ice particle size which are then compared with estimates from the former model. PMID:1651121

  12. Influence of the freezing process upon fluoride binding to hemeproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, A S; Brill, A S

    1991-05-01

    Fluoride association with ferric myoglobins and hemoglobins in aqueous buffers above freezing has been well studied. We chose this reaction to investigate the feasibility of observing titration intermediates and estimating dissociation constants at the freezing temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Dependence of apparent dissociation constant upon protein concentration was observed, a factor of four decrease in protein accompanied by about a fourfold increase in the apparent tightness of binding in the range of protein concentration studied. Binding was also found to depend upon cooling rate and concentration of additives (serum albumin, sucrose, glycerol). These effects appear to be associated with freezing-induced concentration of ligand, a process described in the literature. Bands of high concentration of electrolyte accompany solute rejection during ice growth, sweeping by slowing moving macromolecules. Thus, just before being trapped in the solid, the protein can experience a greater concentration of salt than in the original liquid. A mathematical model of this process, based upon simplifying assumptions about nucleation and ice-crystal growth rates in super-cooled solution, shows how the average concentration of mobile solute species can depend upon the concentration of all species present. Semiquantitative computer simulations of the actual, more complex, freezing are also presented and lead to estimates of ice particle size which are then compared with estimates from the former model.

  13. VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hanley, W.R.

    1959-01-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

  14. The evolution of standards for naturally occurring fluorides: an example of scientific due process.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, N; Corbin, S

    1983-01-01

    In three quarters of a century of observation and research, the effects of fluoride on dental caries and on general bodily health have been well documented. An expanding data base has allowed a firming up of the guidance and standards for appropriate and safe levels of naturally occurring fluorides for human consumption. Over time, through specific recommendations, the maximum fluoride concentrations deemed appropriate have been altered, but by a process of considered adjustment. Although the Public Health Service has been responsible for the formalization of many of the recommended standards, those recommendations have been based on research from many fronts. In the most recent reconsideration of the standards for natural fluoride, the most exhaustive and thoroughly documented review to date was done, incorporating review by representatives from State, Federal, and private programs. Although the specific example of the development of standards for natural fluoride is used, it should be illustrative of similar processes that are constantly underway in regard to substances and factors with a potential impact on the public's health. Expansion of the data base through research and scientific inquiry will lay the foundation for future reconsideration of the standards for naturally occurring fluorides. PMID:6828638

  15. PROCESS OF PREPARING A FLUORIDE OF TETRAVLENT URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Wheelwright, E.J.

    1959-02-17

    A method is described for producing a fluoride salt pf tetravalent uranium suitable for bomb reduction to metallic uranium. An aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate is treated with acetic acid and a nitrite-suppressor and then contacted with metallic lead whereby uranium is reduced from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state and soluble lead acetate is formed. Sulfate ions are then added to the solution to precipitate and remove the lead values. Hydrofluoric acid and alkali metal ions are then added causing the formation of an alkali metal uranium double-fluoride in which the uranium is in the tetravalent state. After recovery, this precipitate is suitable for using in the limited production of metallic uranium.

  16. Theoretical studies of volatile processes in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1991-01-01

    Four studies of volatile processes in the outer solar system are discussed. Researchers suggest that the convective and conductive regions of Triton's atmosphere join at the tropopause near 10 km. A model of volatile transport on Triton's surface was constructed that predicts that Triton's surface north of 15 degrees north latitude is experiencing deposition of nitrogen frosts, as are the bright portions of the south polar cap near the equator. Also discussed are numerical models of the evolution of Titan's surface and atmosphere. Results of a study of the rheology of ammonia-water liquids were applied to the icy satellites of the outer solar system. Finally, the researchers examined the frictional heating, sublimation, and re-condensation of grains free-falling into the solar nebula from a surrounding interstellar cloud. The sublimation model includes the effect of various volatile species and accounts for the poor radiating properties of small grains using Mie theory.

  17. Active non-volatile memory post-processing

    DOEpatents

    Kannan, Sudarsun; Milojicic, Dejan S.; Talwar, Vanish

    2017-04-11

    A computing node includes an active Non-Volatile Random Access Memory (NVRAM) component which includes memory and a sub-processor component. The memory is to store data chunks received from a processor core, the data chunks comprising metadata indicating a type of post-processing to be performed on data within the data chunks. The sub-processor component is to perform post-processing of said data chunks based on said metadata.

  18. Physics and Chemistry of the Hydrogen Fluoride Production Process from Fluorine Containing Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. N.; Kraydenko, R. I.; Lesnikova, M. S.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the aluminum industry wastes on the environment is established. The resource efficient method of aluminum industry fluorine-containing wastes processing, which includes wastes oxidizing roasting to remove carbon component and the interaction of fluorine- containing particles with sulfuric acid in order to produce hydrogen fluoride, is considered. The economic and environmental effect of the proposed processing method is substantiated.

  19. Lipid oxidation volatiles absent in milk after selected ultrasound processing.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Pablo; Torkamani, Amir Ehsan; Leong, Thomas; Kolb, Veronika; Watkins, Peter; Ajlouni, Said; Singh, Tanoj Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic processing can suit a number of potential applications in the dairy industry. However, the impact of ultrasound treatment on milk stability during storage has not been fully explored under wider ranges of frequencies, specific energies and temperature applications. The effect of ultrasonication on lipid oxidation was investigated in various types of milk. Four batches of raw milk (up to 2L) were sonicated at various frequencies (20, 400, 1000, 1600 and 2000kHz), using different temperatures (4, 20, 45 and 63°C), sonication times and ultrasound energy inputs up to 409kJ/kg. Pasteurized skim milk was also sonicated at low and high frequency for comparison. In selected experiments, non-sonicated and sonicated samples were stored at 4°C and were drawn periodically up to 14days for SPME-GCMS analysis. The cavitational yield, characterized in all systems in water, was highest between 400kHz and 1000kHz. Volatile compounds from milk lipid oxidation were detected and exceeded their odor threshold values at 400kHz and 1000kHz at specific energies greater than 271kJ/kg in raw milk. However, no oxidative volatile compounds were detected below 230kJ/kg in batch systems at the tested frequencies under refrigerated conditions. Skim milk showed a lower energy threshold for oxidative volatile formation. The same oxidative volatiles were detected after various passes of milk through a 0.3L flow cell enclosing a 20kHz horn and operating above 90kJ/kg. This study showed that lipid oxidation in milk can be controlled by decreasing the sonication time and the temperature in the system depending on the fat content in the sample among other factors.

  20. Modeling Regolith Temperatures and Volatile Ice Processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Surface and subsurface temperatures are an important tool for exploring the distribution and dynamics of volatile ices on and within planetary regoliths. I will review thermal-analysis approaches and recent applications in the studies of volatile ice processes. Numerical models of regolith temperatures allow us to examine the response of ices to periodic and secular changes in heat sources such as insolation. Used in conjunction with spatially and temporally distributed remotely-sensed temperatures, numerical models can: 1) constrain the stability and dynamics of volatile ices; 2) define the partitioning between phases of ice, gas, liquid, and adsorbate; and 3) in some instances be used to probe the distribution of ice hidden from view beneath the surface. The vapor pressure of volatile ices (such as water, carbon dioxide, and methane) depends exponentially on temperature. Small changes in temperature can result in transitions between stable phases. Cyclic temperatures and the propagation of thermal waves into the subsurface can produce a strong hysteresis in the population and partitioning of various phases (such as between ice, vapor, and adsorbate) and result in bulk transport. Condensation of ice will also have a pronounced effect on the thermal properties of otherwise loose particulate regolith. Cementing grains at their contacts through ice deposition will increase the thermal conductivity, and may enhance the stability of additional ice. Likewise sintering of grains within a predominantly icy regolith will increase the thermal conductivity. Subsurface layers that result from ice redistribution can be discriminated by remote sensing when combined with numerical modeling. Applications of these techniques include modeling of seasonal carbon dioxide frosts on Mars, predicting and interpreting the subsurface ice distribution on Mars and in Antarctica, and estimating the current depth of ice-rich permafrost on Mars. Additionally, understanding cold trapping ices

  1. Emission characteristics of volatile compounds during sludges drying process.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Yi; Yan, Jian-Hua; Li, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Xiao-Wan; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2009-02-15

    The emission characteristics of volatile compounds (VCs) during municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and paper mill sludge (PMS) drying process were investigated through experiments conducted on a lab-scale tubular drying furnace and a pilot-scale paddle dryer, respectively. The result indicated that five kinds of VCs, i.e. CO(2), NH(3), C(7)H(16) (n-heptane), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and CH(4) were emitted during the drying process. It was found that the NH(3) and CO(2) were the primary compound released from the MSS drying process. In the case of the PMS, the VFAs and CO(2) were the main compounds released. The temperature and water content of sludge had great effects on the emission rates of NH(3), C(7)H(16), CO(2) and VFAs. The pH and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of condensate from the paddle dryer were also studied. It showed that pH and COD of condensate from MSS were much higher than that from the PMS, and that the higher COD value of the MSS condensate interrelated to the higher ammonium and sulfur content of it.

  2. Highly packed and aligned fluoride substituted hydroxyapatite via a surfactant-free process.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecules and surfactants are believed to be the key factors for reconstruction of tooth enamel and preparation of fluoride hydroxyapatite coating with enamel-like structure on dental implants. We have developed an alternative surfactant-free biomimetic method to stimulate growth of fluoride substituted hydroxyapatite coatings with highly packed and aligned structure on metallic substrates. Oxidized titanium plates were chosen as the substrates. The biomimetic fluoride hydroxyapatite was prepared by immersing the pretreated Ti plates into the phosphate-buffered solution with Ca(2+), H(2)PO(4)(-), HPO(4)(2-), and F(-). The pH value was controlled at 7.4 at the beginning. Every titanium plate (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) was soaked into 20 mL of ion doped phosphate buffered solution in sealed plastic bottles, kept at 37°C or 60°C without stirring for time periods of 1 day to 2 weeks. After immersion, the samples were removed from the solution, rinsed with deionized water and allowed to dry in air. The fluoride substituted hydroxyapatite layer, composed of needle-like crystallites with the diameter of 10-20 nm, was well-organized and tightly packed. XRD results showed a sharper and stronger (002) peak, which could be used to explain that there was a preferable orientation along the c axis. The coating could be reconstructed on the former layer if the mineralization process was repeated, and the structure of the coating could be preserved. The method could be used to construct well organized fluoride substitute hydroxyapatite coating on metal implants.

  3. System of extraction of volatiles from soil using microwave processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C. (Inventor); Kaukler, William F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A device for the extraction and collection of volatiles from soil or planetary regolith. The device utilizes core drilled holes to gain access to underlying volatiles below the surface. Microwave energy beamed into the holes penetrates through the soil or regolith to heat it, and thereby produces vapor by sublimation. The device confines and transports volatiles to a cold trap for collection.

  4. Integrated biological and physiochemical treatment process for nitrate and fluoride removal.

    PubMed

    Mekonen, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, A

    2001-09-01

    The feasibility of an integrated biological and physiochemical water treatment process for nitrate and fluoride removal has been evaluated. It consisted of two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) in series. Performance of the process in the treatment of 24 synthetic water samples having nitrate concentrations of 40, 80, 120, 160, 200, and 250 mg/l (as N) and fluoride concentrations of 6, 10, 15, and 20 mg/l at different combinations was studied. Denitrification followed by defluoridation proved to be the best sequence of treatment. In all cases nitrate could be reduced to an acceptable level of less than 10 mg/l (as N) at 3, 5, and 7 h hydraulic retention times (HRTs) depending on its initial concentration. Fluoride concentrations up to 15 mg/l associated with nitrate concentrations up to 80 mg/l (as N) could be reduced acceptable 1.5 mg/l by alum-PAC slurry using alum doses up 850 mg/l [as Al2(SO4)3 x 16H2O] along with 100 mg/l of powdered activated carbon (PAC). Additional alkalinity produced during denitrification was used up during defluoridation for maintenance of pH avoiding the need for lime addition. On the other hand, residual organics, turbidity, and sulfide present in the denitrified water are removed by alum and PAC at the defluoridation stage along with fluoride, eliminating the need for an additional post-treatment step. At higher nitrate concentrations (> or = 120 mg/l as N), the alkalinity produced at the denitrification stage was in the range of 715-1175 mg/l as CaCO3. This excessive alkalinity inhibited reduction of fluoride to the level of 1.5 mg/l at the defluoridation stage, using alum doses up to 900 mg/l along with 100 mg/l of PAC. In all cases a fluoride concentration of 20 mg/l in water could not be reduced to the acceptable level of 1.5 mg/l.

  5. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  6. Migration Processes and Volatiles Inventory to the Inner Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marov, M. Y.; Ipatov, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    Comets and asteroids colliding with the terrestrial planets can deliver volatiles and organic or prebiotic compounds to the planets, thereby depositing on the planets the fundamental building-blocks for life. The inner planets contain heavier and cosmically less abundant elements in an iron-silicate matrix than the giant planets. This can be caused by the following three mechanisms: uneven fractionation and condensation in the accretionary disk; unequal degree of degassing of the composed matter; and heterogeneous accretion. Asteroid-size bodies consisting of the last low-temperature condensates (similar to most primitive chondritic meteorites, and enriched in hydrated silicates and trapped gases) are believed to have fallen onto the inner planets during the process of the giant planets formation. The relative contribution of either endogenous (i.e. outgassing) or exogenous (i.e. asteroid/comet collisions) sources is difficult to assess, although it is constrained by the pattern of noble gas abundances in the planetary atmospheres.

  7. Migration Processes and Volatiles Inventory to the Inner Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marov, M. Y.; Ipatov, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    Comets and asteroids colliding with the terrestrial planets can deliver volatiles and organic or prebiotic compounds to the planets, thereby depositing on the planets the fundamental building-blocks for life. The inner planets contain heavier and cosmically less abundant elements in an iron-silicate matrix than the giant planets. This can be caused by the following three mechanisms: uneven fractionation and condensation in the accretionary disk; unequal degree of degassing of the composed matter; and heterogeneous accretion. Asteroid-size bodies consisting of the last low-temperature condensates (similar to most primitive chondritic meteorites, and enriched in hydrated silicates and trapped gases) are believed to have fallen onto the inner planets during the process of the giant planets formation. The relative contribution of either endogenous (i.e. outgassing) or exogenous (i.e. asteroid/comet collisions) sources is difficult to assess, although it is constrained by the pattern of noble gas abundances in the planetary atmospheres.

  8. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  9. Simultaneous arsenic and fluoride removal from synthetic and real groundwater by electrocoagulation process: Parametric and cost evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Lokendra Singh; Mondal, Prasenjit

    2017-04-01

    Co-existence of arsenic and fluoride in groundwater has raised severe health issues to living being. Thus, the present research has been conducted for simultaneous removal of arsenic and fluoride from synthetic groundwater by using electrocoagulation process with aluminum electrode. Effects of initial pH, current density, run time, inter electrode distance and NaCl concentration over percentage removal of arsenic and fluoride as well as operating cost have been studied. The optimum experimental conditions are found to be initial pH: 7, current density: 10 A/m(2), run time: 95 min, inter electrode distance: 1 cm, NaCl concentration: 0.71 g/l for removal of 98.51% arsenic (initial concentration: 550 μg/l) and 88.33% fluoride (initial concentration: 12 mg/l). The concentration of arsenic and fluoride in treated water are found to be 8.19 μg/l and 1.4 mg/l, respectively, with an operating cost of 0.357 USD/m(3) treated water. Pseudo first and second order kinetic model of individual and simultaneous arsenic and fluoride removal in electrocoagulation have also been studied. Produced sludge characterization studies also confirm the presence of arsenic in As(III) form, and fluoride in sludge. The present electrocoagulation process is able to reduce the arsenic and fluoride concentration of synthetic as well as real groundwater to below 10 μg/l and 1.5 mg/l, respectively, which are maximum contaminant level of these elements in drinking water according to WHO guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Engineering subtilisin into a fluoride-triggered processing protease useful for one-step protein purification.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Biao; Fisher, Kathryn E; Alexander, Patrick A; Doroshko, Viktoriya; Bryan, Philip N

    2004-11-23

    Subtilisin was engineered into a highly specific, processing protease, and the subtilisin prodomain was coengineered into an optimized recognition sequence. This involved five steps. First, a robust subtilisin mutant was created, which could tolerate the subsequent mutations needed for high specificity. Second, the substrate binding pocket was mutated to increase its sequence selectivity. Third, the subtilisin prodomain was engineered to direct cleavage to the junction of any protein fused to it. Fourth, the active site of subtilisin was engineered to kinetically isolate binding and cleavage reactions. Finally, specific anions were identified to trigger the processing reaction, with fluoride ions being particularly useful. The ability to isolate the binding and processing steps with a triggering mechanism created a protease with a virtual on-off switch. This allowed column-immobilized processing subtilisin to be used as both the affinity ligand and processing protease for one-step purification of proteins. Fusion proteins tagged with the engineered prodomain can be bound to the column and washed free of contaminants. Cleavage can be triggered by the addition of fluoride to release the pure target protein. The column is then regenerated by stripping off the tightly bound prodomain at pH 2.1. Ten proteins have been purified to date by this method.

  11. A Heck-Matsuda Process for the Synthesis of β-Arylethenesulfonyl Fluorides: Selectively Addressable Bis-electrophiles for SuFEx Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua-Li; Zheng, Qinheng; Bare, Grant A L; Wu, Peng; Sharpless, K Barry

    2016-11-02

    A Heck-Matsuda process for the synthesis of the otherwise difficult to access compounds, β-arylethenesulfonyl fluorides, is described. Ethenesulfonyl fluoride (i.e., vinylsulfonyl fluoride, or ESF) undergoes β-arylation with stable and readily prepared arenediazonium tetrafluoroborates in the presence of the catalyst palladium(II) acetate to afford the E-isomer sulfonyl analogues of cinnamoyl fluoride in 43-97 % yield. The β-arylethenesulfonyl fluorides are found to be selectively addressable bis-electrophiles for sulfur(VI) fluoride exchange (SuFEx) click chemistry, in which either the alkenyl moiety or the sulfonyl fluoride group can be the exclusive site of nucleophilic attack under defined conditions, making these rather simple cores attractive for covalent drug discovery.

  12. [Effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes].

    PubMed

    Qiuxia, Yang; Ying, Yang; Han, Xu; Di, Wu; Ke, Guo

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes in a simulated oral environment. A total of 15 specimens were employed with selective laser melting (SLM) and another 15 for traditional casting (Cast) in cobalt-chromium alloy powders and blocks with the same material composition. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was studied by potentiodynamic polarization test under different oral environments with varying solubilities of fluorine (0, 0.05%, and 0.20% for each) in acid artificial saliva (pH = 5.0). The specimens were soaked in fluorine for 24 h, and the surface microstructure was observed under a field emission scanning electron microscope after immersing the specimens in the test solution at constant temperature. The corrosion potential (Ecorr) value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast decreased with increasing fluoride concentration in acidic artificial saliva. The Ecorr, Icorr, and Rp values of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes changed significantly when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P < 0.05). The Ecorr, Icorr, and Rp values of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes exhibited a statistically significant difference. The Icorr value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was higher than that in the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P < 0.05). The Ecorr, tRp alues of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast were lower htan those of the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P< 0 .05). Fluoride ions adversely affected the corrosion resistance of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes. The corrosion resistance of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was worse than that of the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20%.

  13. Determination of volatiles produced during radiation processing in Laurus cinnamomum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salum, D. C.; Araújo, M. M.; Fanaro, G. B.; Purgatto, E.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-07-01

    In order to protect food from pathogenic microorganisms as well as increase its shelf-life, while keeping sensorial properties (e.g., odor and taste), which are important properties required by spice buyers, it is necessary to analyze volatile formation from irradiation of medicinal and food herbs. Possible changes in the odor of these herbs are evaluated by characterizing different radiation doses and effects on sensorial properties, in order to allow better application of the irradiation technology. The aim of the present study was to analyze volatile formation on cinnamon ( Laurus cinnamomum) samples after gamma irradiation. These samples were irradiated into plastic packages using a 60Co facility. Radiation doses applied were 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 kGy. For the analysis of the samples, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was applied, while for the analysis of volatile compounds, CG/MS. Spice irradiation showed the highest decrease in volatile compounds. For L. cinnamomum, the irradiation decreased volatile compounds by nearly 56% and 89.5%, respectively, comparing to volatile from a sample which had not been previously irradiated.

  14. Evolution of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hierarchical morphology during slow gelation process and its superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Zhou, Chong; Du, Runhong; Li, Nana; Han, Xutong; Zhang, Yufeng; An, Shulin; Xiao, Changfa

    2013-06-26

    In the paper, we proposed an evolution process of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) macromolecular aggregation in a mixed solvent through the simple and slow gelation process at room temperature. The mixed solvent is prepared with a room-temperature solvent and a high-temperature solvent. The evolution process can be terminated by quenching and exchanging with nonsolvent in a nonsolvent coagulation bath properly, and then the vivid petal-like nanostructure and microspherulite is formed simultaneously. This hierarchical morphology endows PVDF with superhydrophobic and self-cleaning properties, which is useful to PVDF coating and membrane materials. The evolution processes are investigated through the measurements of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the rheological properties of solution, dry gel and wet gel, are explored.

  15. DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.

    2012-07-25

    Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

  16. TDDFT study on the sensing mechanism of a fluorescent sensor for fluoride anion: Inhibition of the ESPT process.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Yue; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Hang; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Feng; Liang, Ying-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The fluoride-sensing mechanism of a reported salicylaldehyde-based sensor (J. Photochem. Photobiol. B 2014, 138, 75) has been investigated by the TDDFT method. The present theoretical study indicates that there is an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process from the phenolic O-H moiety to the neighbor N atom in the sensor. The added fluoride anion could capture the proton in the O-H moiety and the corresponding phenolic anion is formed, which could inhibit the ESPT process. The experimental UV/Vis and fluorescence spectra are well reproduced by the calculated vertical excitation energies. Frontier molecular orbital analysis indicates that the local excited state of phenolic anion is responsible for its enhanced fluorescence. Due to this reason, the sensor can be used to sense fluoride anion by monitoring the fluorescent change.

  17. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling the high fluoride concentration in groundwater: a case study at the Boden block area, Orissa, India.

    PubMed

    Dey, R K; Swain, S K; Mishra, Sulagna; Sharma, Prachi; Patnaik, Tanushree; Singh, V K; Dehury, B N; Jha, Usha; Patel, R K

    2012-05-01

    The present investigation reports the assessment of hydrochemical/geochemical processes controlling the concentration of fluoride in groundwater of a village in India (Boden block, Orissa). Boden block is one of the severely affected fluoride-contaminated areas in the state of Orissa (India). The sampling and subsequent analysis of water samples of the study area was carried out following standard prescribed methods. The results of the analysis indicate that 36.60% groundwater F(-) concentration exceeds the limit prescribed by the World Health Organization for drinking water. The rock interaction with groundwater containing high concentration of HCO(3)(-) and Na(+) at a higher pH value of the medium could be one of the important reasons for the release of F(-) from the aquatic matrix into groundwater. Geochemical classification of groundwater based on Chadha rectangular diagram shows that most of the groundwater samples having fluoride concentration more than 1.5 mg L(-1) belongs to the Na-K-HCO(3) type. The saturation index values evaluated for the groundwater of the study area indicated that it is oversaturated with respect to calcite, whereas the same is undersaturated with respect to fluorite content. The deficiency of calcium ion concentration in the groundwater from calcite precipitation favors fluorite dissolution leading to excess of fluoride concentration. The risk index was calculated as a function of fluoride level in drinking water and morbidity of fluorosis categorizes high risk for villages of Amera and Karlakote panchayat of Boden block.

  18. Predicting biodegradable volatile solids degradation profiles in the composting process.

    PubMed

    Mason, I G

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a new method for the prediction of the pattern of biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation in the composting process. The procedure is based on a re-arrangement of the heat balance around a composting system to numerically solve for the rate of BVS carbon (BVS-C) disappearance. Input data for the model was obtained from composting experiments conducted in a laboratory-scale, constant temperature difference (CTD) reactor simulating a section of an aerated static pile, and using a simulated feedstock comprising ostrich feed, shredded paper, finished compost and woodchips. These experiments also provided validation data in the form of exit gas CO(2) carbon (CO(2)-C) profiles. The model successfully predicted the generic shape of experimental substrate degradation profiles obtained from CO(2) measurements, but under the conditions and assumptions of the experiment, the profiles were quantitatively different, giving an over-estimate of BVS-C. Both measured CO(2)-C and predicted BVS-C profiles were moderately to well fitted by a single exponential function, with replicated rate coefficient values of 0.08 and 0.09 d(-1), and 0.06 and 0.07 d(-1), respectively. In order to explore the underlying shape of the profiles, measured and predicted data at varying temperature were corrected to a constant temperature of 40 degrees C, using the temperature correction function of Rosso et al. [Rosso, L., Lobry, J.R., and Flandrois, J.P., 1993. An unexpected correlation between cardinal temperatures of microbial growth highlighted by a new model. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 162, 447-463], with cardinal temperatures of 5, 59 and 85 degrees C. Multi-phase profiles were generated for both the measured CO(2)-C and the predicted BVS-C data in this case. However, when alternative cardinal temperatures of 5, 55 and 80 degrees C, or 5, 50 and 80 degrees C, were used, the predicted profiles assumed an exponential shape, and excellent fits were obtained using a

  19. Optimal Fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John R.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal fluoridation has been defined as that fluoride exposure which confers maximal cariostasis with minimal toxicity and its values have been previously determined to be 0.5 to 1 mg per day for infants and 1 to 1.5 mg per day for an average child. Total fluoride ingestion and urine excretion were studied in Marin County, California, children in 1973 before municipal water fluoridation. Results showed fluoride exposure to be higher than anticipated and fulfilled previously accepted criteria for optimal fluoridation. Present and future water fluoridation plans need to be reevaluated in light of total environmental fluoride exposure. PMID:1130041

  20. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.J.; Sheft, I.

    1959-08-11

    A method is presented for preparing the halides of elements which are relatively non-reactive with halogenating agents. The method involves reacting a mixture of an oxygen containing salt of a difficulty halogenated metal with an oxygen containing salt of an easily halogenated metal with a halogenating agent. Accordingly plutonium tetrafluoride is produced by reacting a mixture of plutonium dioxide and uranium octaoxide with bromine trifluoride. The reaction proceeds smoothly at moderate temperatures and the resulting plutonium trifluoride may be readily separated from many impurities which form volatile fluorides by volatilizing these volatile fluorides from the reaction chamber.

  1. The role of volatiles and lithology in the impact cratering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Simonds, C. H.

    1980-02-01

    A survey of published descriptions of 32 of the largest, least eroded terrestrial impact structures shows that the amount of melt at craters in crystalline rocks is approximately two orders of magnitude greater than that at craters in sedimentary rocks. A model is proposed for the impact process, and it is examined whether the difference in melt abundance is due to differences in the amount of melt generated in various target materials or due to differences in the fate of the melt during late stages of the impact. The model accounts semiquantitatively for the effects of porosity and water and volatile content on the cratering process. Important features of the model are noted. Even if the recondensation of released volatiles is very efficient, the cumulative effect of repeated impacts on accreting planets would be to continually transfer volatiles toward the outer surface. By this process, volatiles might be enriched toward the outer layer of a growing planet.

  2. Inorganic analyses of volatilized and condensed species within prototypic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canistered waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-06-30

    The high-level radioactive waste currently stored in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The canistered waste will be sent to a geologic repository for final disposal. The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require the identification of any inorganic phases that may be present in the canister that may lead to internal corrosion of the canister or that could potentially adversely affect normal canister handling. During vitrification, volatilization of mixed (Na, K, Cs)Cl, (Na, K, Cs){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, (Na, K, Cs)BF{sub 4}, (Na, K){sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} and (Na,K)CrO{sub 4} species from glass melt condensed in the melter off-gas and in the cyclone separator in the canister pour spout vacuum line. A full-scale DWPF prototypic canister filled during Campaign 10 of the SRS Scale Glass Melter was sectioned and examined. Mixed (NaK)CI, (NaK){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, (NaK) borates, and a (Na,K) fluoride phase (either NaF or Na{sub 2}BF{sub 4}) were identified on the interior canister walls, neck, and shoulder above the melt pour surface. Similar deposits were found on the glass melt surface and on glass fracture surfaces. Chromates were not found. Spinel crystals were found associated with the glass pour surface. Reference amounts of the halides and sulfates were found retained in the glass and the glass chemistry, including the distribution of the halides and sulfates, was homogeneous. In all cases where rust was observed, heavy metals (Zn, Ti, Sn) from the cutting blade/fluid were present indicating that the rust was a reaction product of the cutting fluid with glass and heat sensitized canister or with carbon-steel contamination on canister interior. Only minimal water vapor is present so that internal corrosion of the canister, will not occur.

  3. Climate, atmosphere, and volatile inventory evolution: Polar processes, climate records, volatile inventories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Climate change on Mars was driven by long term changes in the solar luminosity, variations in the partitioning of volatiles between the atmosphere and near-surface reservoirs, and astronomical variations in axial and orbital properties. There are important parallels between these drives for Mars and comparable ones for Earth. In the early history of the solar system, the Sun's luminosity was 25 to 30 percent lower than its current value. It is suggested that an early benign climate on Earth was due to the presence of much more carbon dioxide in its atmosphere at these early times than currently resides there. Such a partitioning of carbon dioxide, at the expense of the carbonate rock reservoir, may have resulted from a more vigorous tectonic and volcanic style at early times. Such a line of reasoning may imply that much more carbon dioxide was present in the Martian atmosphere during the planet's early history than resides there today. It is now widely recognized that astronomical variations of the Earth's axial and orbital characteristics have played a dominant role in causing the succession of glacial and interglacial periods characterizing the last several million years. The magnitude of the axial and eccentricity variations are much larger for Mars than for Earth. Such changes on Mars could result in sizeable variations in atmospheric pressure, dust storm activity, and the stability of perennial carbon dioxide and water ice polar caps. These quasi-periodic climate changes occur on periods of 100,000 to 1,000,000 years and may be recorded in the sedimentary layers of the polar layered terrain.

  4. Climate, atmosphere, and volatile inventory evolution: Polar processes, climate records, volatile inventories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Climate change on Mars was driven by long term changes in the solar luminosity, variations in the partitioning of volatiles between the atmosphere and near-surface reservoirs, and astronomical variations in axial and orbital properties. There are important parallels between these drives for Mars and comparable ones for Earth. In the early history of the solar system, the Sun's luminosity was 25 to 30 percent lower than its current value. It is suggested that an early benign climate on Earth was due to the presence of much more carbon dioxide in its atmosphere at these early times than currently resides there. Such a partitioning of carbon dioxide, at the expense of the carbonate rock reservoir, may have resulted from a more vigorous tectonic and volcanic style at early times. Such a line of reasoning may imply that much more carbon dioxide was present in the Martian atmosphere during the planet's early history than resides there today. It is now widely recognized that astronomical variations of the Earth's axial and orbital characteristics have played a dominant role in causing the succession of glacial and interglacial periods characterizing the last several million years. The magnitude of the axial and eccentricity variations are much larger for Mars than for Earth. Such changes on Mars could result in sizeable variations in atmospheric pressure, dust storm activity, and the stability of perennial carbon dioxide and water ice polar caps. These quasi-periodic climate changes occur on periods of 100,000 to 1,000,000 years and may be recorded in the sedimentary layers of the polar layered terrain.

  5. Relation between volatility correlations in financial markets and Omori processes occurring on all scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Philipp; Wang, Fengzhong; Vodenska-Chitkushev, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the memory in volatility by studying volatility return intervals, defined as the time between two consecutive fluctuations larger than a given threshold, in time periods following stock market crashes. Such an aftercrash period is characterized by the Omori law, which describes the decay in the rate of aftershocks of a given size with time t by a power law with exponent close to 1. A shock followed by such a power law decay in the rate is here called Omori process. We find self-similar features in the volatility. Specifically, within the aftercrash period there are smaller shocks that themselves constitute Omori processes on smaller scales, similar to the Omori process after the large crash. We call these smaller shocks subcrashes, which are followed by their own aftershocks. We also show that the Omori law holds not only after significant market crashes as shown by Lillo and Mantegna [Phys. Rev. E 68, 016119 (2003)], but also after “intermediate shocks.” By appropriate detrending we remove the influence of the crashes and subcrashes from the data, and find that this procedure significantly reduces the memory in the records. Moreover, when studying long-term correlated fractional Brownian motion and autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average artificial models for volatilities, we find Omori-type behavior after high volatilities. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that the memory in the volatility is related to the Omori processes present on different time scales.

  6. Relation between volatility correlations in financial markets and Omori processes occurring on all scales.

    PubMed

    Weber, Philipp; Wang, Fengzhong; Vodenska-Chitkushev, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the memory in volatility by studying volatility return intervals, defined as the time between two consecutive fluctuations larger than a given threshold, in time periods following stock market crashes. Such an aftercrash period is characterized by the Omori law, which describes the decay in the rate of aftershocks of a given size with time t by a power law with exponent close to 1. A shock followed by such a power law decay in the rate is here called Omori process. We find self-similar features in the volatility. Specifically, within the aftercrash period there are smaller shocks that themselves constitute Omori processes on smaller scales, similar to the Omori process after the large crash. We call these smaller shocks subcrashes, which are followed by their own aftershocks. We also show that the Omori law holds not only after significant market crashes as shown by Lillo and Mantegna [Phys. Rev. E 68, 016119 (2003)], but also after "intermediate shocks." By appropriate detrending we remove the influence of the crashes and subcrashes from the data, and find that this procedure significantly reduces the memory in the records. Moreover, when studying long-term correlated fractional Brownian motion and autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average artificial models for volatilities, we find Omori-type behavior after high volatilities. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that the memory in the volatility is related to the Omori processes present on different time scales.

  7. Does Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Glycosidically Bound Volatile Compounds Really Contribute to the Formation of Volatile Compounds During the Oolong Tea Manufacturing Process?

    PubMed

    Gui, Jiadong; Fu, Xiumin; Zhou, Ying; Katsuno, Tsuyoshi; Mei, Xin; Deng, Rufang; Xu, Xinlan; Zhang, Linyun; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2015-08-12

    It was generally thought that aroma of oolong tea resulted from hydrolysis of glycosidically bound volatiles (GBVs). In this study, most GBVs showed no reduction during the oolong tea manufacturing process. β-Glycosidases either at protein or gene level were not activated during the manufacturing process. Subcellular localization of β-primeverosidase provided evidence that β-primeverosidase was located in the leaf cell wall. The cell wall remained intact during the enzyme-active manufacturing process. After the leaf cell disruption, GBV content was reduced. These findings reveal that, during the enzyme-active process of oolong tea, nondisruption of the leaf cell walls resulted in impossibility of interaction of GBVs and β-glycosidases. Indole, jasmine lactone, and trans-nerolidol were characteristic volatiles produced from the manufacturing process. Interestingly, the contents of the three volatiles was reduced after the leaf cell disruption, suggesting that mechanical damage with the cell disruption, which is similar to black tea manufacturing, did not induce accumulation of the three volatiles. In addition, 11 volatiles with flavor dilution factor ≥4(4) were identified as relatively potent odorants in the oolong tea. These results suggest that enzymatic hydrolysis of GBVs was not involved in the formation of volatiles of oolong tea, and some characteristic volatiles with potent odorants were produced from the manufacturing process.

  8. Lead enhances fluoride influence on apoptotic processes in the HepG2 liver cell line.

    PubMed

    Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Siwiec, Ewa; Szczuko, Małgorzata; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Kondarewicz, Anna; Rybicka, Marta; Dunaj-Stańczyk, Małgorzata; Wiernicki, Ireneusz; Chlubek, Dariusz; Stachowska, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    Chronic long-term exposure to high levels of fluoride leads to fluorosis, manifested by skeletal fluorosis and damage to internal organs, including kidneys, liver, parathyroid glands, and brain. Excess fluoride can also cause DNA damage, trigger apoptosis, and change cell cycle. The effect of fluoride may be exacerbated by lead (Pb), a potent inhibitor of many enzymes and a factor causing apoptosis, still present in the environment in excessive amounts. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of sodium fluoride (NaF) and/or lead acetate (PbAc) on development of apoptosis, cell vitality, and proliferation in the liver cell line HepG2. We examined hepatocytes from the liver cell line HepG2, incubated for 48 h with NaF, PbAc, and their mixture (NaF + PbAc), and used for measuring apoptosis, index of proliferation, and vitality of cells. Incubation of the hepatocytes with NaF or PbAc increased apoptosis, more when fluoride and Pb were used simultaneously. Vitality of the cells depended on the compound used and its concentration. Proliferation slightly increased and then decreased in a high fluoride environment; it decreased significantly after addition of Pb in a dose-dependent manner. When used together, fluoride inhibited the decreasing effect of Pb on cell proliferation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Detection of volatile sulfide-producing bacteria isolated from poultry-processing plants.

    PubMed Central

    McMeekin, T A; Gibbs, P A; Patterson, J T

    1978-01-01

    A technique using filter paper strips impregnated with 5-5'-dithiobis-nitrobenzoic acid was developed to allow the detection of bacteria (isolated from poultry-processing environs) which produced volatile sulfides (H2S, CH3SH, [CH3]2S). The technique is preferred to conventional methods in that it allows the detection of volatile organic sulfides in addition to hydrogen sulfide. PMID:567037

  10. Systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Levy, Steven Marc

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that fluoride, through different applications and formulas, works to control caries development. The first observations of fluoride's effects on dental caries were linked to fluoride naturally present in the drinking water, and then from controlled water fluoridation programs. Other systemic methods to deliver fluoride were later suggested, including dietary fluoride supplements such as salt and milk. These systemic methods are now being questioned due to the fact that many studies have indicated that fluoride's action relies mainly on its post-eruptive effect from topical contact with the tooth structure. It is known that even the methods of delivering fluoride known as 'systemic' act mainly through a topical effect when they are in contact with the teeth. The effectiveness of water fluoridation in many geographic areas is lower than in previous eras due to the widespread use of other fluoride modalities. Nevertheless, this evidence should not be interpreted as an indication that systemic methods are no longer relevant ways to deliver fluoride on an individual basis or for collective health programs. Caution must be taken to avoid excess ingestion of fluoride when prescribing dietary fluoride supplements for children in order to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis, particularly if there are other relevant sources of fluoride intake - such as drinking water, salt or milk and/or dentifrice. Safe and effective doses of fluoride can be achieved when combining topical and systemic methods.

  11. [Evaluation of the repair process in mechanically injured rat bone stimulated by sodium fluoride with non-toxic doses].

    PubMed

    Białecki, P

    1999-01-01

    The influence of sodium fluoride on the course of repair process in the mechanically injured rat bone was studied. Thirty six male Wistar rats aged 5 months, weighing 460-540 g were investigated. The animals lived under standard conditions and were fed ad libidum with the standard LSM food including 0.7 mg/kg of fluorine on the average. The animals randomly divided into 3 groups that comprised study and control groups, 6 rats each. The rats in the first group were given water with 20 mg (1.05 mmol) of sodium fluoride per kg of body weight for 24 h over a period of 2 weeks--group Ia. In the second group--IIa--animals were given water with sodium fluoride at a dose of 1.5 mmol/kg b.w./24 h for a period of 4 weeks. In the third group--IIIa--the animals were given sodium fluoride in a dose of 1.5 mmol/kg b.w./24 h for a period of 6 weeks. The rats from the control groups I, II and III were given water without sodium fluoride for the period of 2, 4 and 6 weeks, respectively. At the beginning of the experiment a hole was drilled in both femoral bones in rat under barbiturate anaesthesia. According to the protocol the rats underwent ether euthanasia after 2, 4 and 6 weeks after surgery and the following samples were collected: blood from the heart for biochemical studies and both femoral bones for biochemical and histological studies. The following parameters were evaluated in blood serum: fluorine, calcium, magnesium contents, serum concentrations of urea, creatinine, bilirubin and activity levels of enzymes: aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, cholinesterase, base phosphatase. Fluorine, calcium magnesium and zinc contents were estimated in bone samples. The concentration of fluorine ions in animal serum after 2, 4 and 6 weeks of experiment increased significantly as compared with the corresponding controls. The highest fluorine concentrations were observed in serum of rats supplemented with NaF for 6 weeks. The fluorine concentrations in the bone

  12. Catalytic oxidation process cleans volatile organics from exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J.

    1994-06-27

    Unsteady-state catalytic oxidation is the basis of a technology now becoming available in the US for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial exhaust streams. The technology originated in Russia and is being developed for the US market by Monsanto Enviro-Chem Systems, St. Louis. At least 149 of the 189 pollutants identified by EPA are VOCs. EPA estimates that the initial cost to industry for equipment to remove the hazardous materials will be about $350 million. The expected annual maintenance bill to treat the major pollution sources is about $182 million. Catalytic oxidizers are applicable to most, but not all, VOC removal applications. The advantages in most cases are VOC removal efficiencies of at least 99%, half the energy requirement of other systems, low operating temperatures, stable operation with variable flow rates and VOC concentrations, and low capital and operating costs.

  13. Volatile inventory of Mars-2: Primordial sources and fractionating processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O.

    1987-01-01

    The total volatile inventory of Mars has been modeled using meteoritic and presumed primordial abundances in the early solar system. Evidence is presented which indicates that the elemental abundances of the noble gases on Earth and Mars are similar, and their ratios are comparable to those in average carbonaceous chondrites with the exception of xenon and krypton. In order to account for presently observed variations in gas abundances, two primordial sources were used. One was the solar composition similar to the solar wind, and the other of carbonaceous grains that were the source for trace exotic components. For Mars, a model in which the early, high solar EUV flux with continued hydrogen production by differentiation results in mass fractionation of the primordial atmosphere, early depletion of xenon, and later depletion of gases lighter than krypton. The result is that the primordial Mars water inventory may have been on the order of 20 to 30 km if spread over the planet.

  14. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  15. Effect of annealing process on the phase formation in poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Ibtisam Yahya; Yahaya, Muhammad; Jumali, Mohd Hafizuddin Haji; Shanshool, Haider Mohammed

    2014-09-03

    This work reports the initial study on the effect of annealing process on the crystalline phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) thin film. PVDF powder was dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide before spin-coated onto a glass substrate to form a film. The films were annealed at 30°C, 90°C and 110°C for 5 hrs. The crystalline phase of the powder PVDF as received was investigated by using XRD and FTIR techniques. Moreover, the crystalline phases of thin films after annealing were investigated by using the same techniques. XRD analysis showed that in powder form PVDF exists in α-phase. Each annealed PVDF thin films exhibited identical formation of three-phases material namely γ (as major phase) while α and β phases as the minor phases. The FTIR analysis showed that the powder form of PVDF exists in α and β phases. FTIR measurement further confirmed the XRD results implying that the annealing process has no significant effect on the phase formation in PVDF films.

  16. Calcium fluoride window mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, D. Douglas

    1982-10-01

    A technique has been developed for joining a large calcium fluoride crystal to a stainless-steel flange by means of a silver transition ring. The process involves both vacuum brazing using a copper-silver alloy and air brazing using silver chloride. This paper describes the procedure used in fabricating a high-vacuum leak-tight calcium fluoride window assembly.

  17. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  18. Microwave Processing of Planetary Surfaces for Volatile Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William

    2011-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization will be necessary for sustained exploration of space. Volatiles are present in planetary soils, but water by far has the strongest potential for effective utilization. The presence of water at the lunar poles, Mars, and possibly on Phobos opens the possibility of producing LOX for propellant. Water is also a useful radiation shielding material and water (and oxygen) are expendables that are also required for habitation in space. Because of the strong function of water vapor pressure with temperature, heating soil effectively liberates water vapor by sublimation. Microwave energy will penetrate soil and heat from within much more efficiently than heating from the surface with radiant heat. This is especially true under vacuum conditions since the heat transfer rate is very low. The depth of microwave penetration is a strong function of the microwave frequency and to a lesser extent on soil dielectric properties. Methods for measuring the complex electric permittivity and magnetic permeability are being developed and have been measured for some lunar soil simulants at 0.5, 2.45, and 10 GHz from room temperature down to liquid nitrogen temperature. A new method for delivery of microwaves deep into a planetary surface is being prototyped with laboratory experiments and modeled with COMSOL MultiPhysics. We have plans to set up a planetary testbed in a large vacuum chamber in the coming year. Recent results will be presented.

  19. Microwave Processing of Planetary Surfaces for the Extraction of Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William

    2011-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization will be necessary for sustained exploration of space. Volatiles are present in planetary soils, but water by far has the most potential for effective utilization. The presence of water at the lunar poles, Mars, and possibly on Phobos opens the possibility of producing LOX for propellant. Water is also a useful radiation shielding material , and valuable to replenish expendables (water and oxygen) required for habitation in space. Because of the strong function of water vapor pressure with temperature, heating soil effectively liberates water vapor by sublimation. Microwave energy will penetrate soil and heat from within much more efficiently than heating from the surface with radiant heat. This is especially true under vacuum conditions since the heat transfer rate is very low. The depth of microwave penetration is a strong function of the microwave frequency and to a lesser extent on soil dielectric properties. Methods for complex electric permittivity and magnetic permeability measurement are being developed and used for measurements of lunar soil simulants. A new method for delivery of microwaves deep into a planetary surface is being prototyped with laboratory experiments and modeled with COMSOL MultiPhysics. We are planning to set up a planetary testbed in a large vacuum chamber in the coming year. Recent results are discussed.

  20. Rare-earth-doped bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals via a facile microwave-assisted process.

    PubMed

    Pang, Min; Liu, Dapeng; Lei, Yongqian; Song, Shuyan; Feng, Jing; Fan, Weiqiang; Zhang, Hongjie

    2011-06-20

    Rare-earth-doped magnetic-optic bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized via a facile microwave-assisted process. The as-prepared nanocrystals were monodisperse and could form stable colloidal solutions in polar solvents, such as water and ethanol. They show bright-green fluorescence emisson. Furthermore, Gd(3+)-doped ones exhibit paramagnetic behavior at room temperature and superparamagnetic behavior at 2 K.

  1. Volatile profile of breast milk subjected to high-pressure processing or thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Contador, R; Delgado, F J; García-Parra, J; Garrido, M; Ramírez, R

    2015-08-01

    The effect of Holder pasteurisation (HoP) (62.5°C for 30 min) or high-pressure treatments (400 or 600 MPa for 3 or 6 min) on the volatile compound profile of human breast milk was evaluated, in order to compare both preservation technologies. A total of 46 different volatile compounds was found in milk samples. The most abundant compounds detected were aliphatic hydrocarbons. In general, the effect of some high-pressure treatments on the volatile profile of human milk was less intense than that caused by HoP. The treatments at 400 and 600 MPa for 3 min maintained the volatile compounds at similar levels to those found in control milk samples. However, the application of 600 MPa for 6 min changed the original volatile compounds of human milk, even more than HoP. Since, HPP at 400 or 600 MPa for 3 min preserved the original volatile compounds of human milk, this novel process may be an alternative to thermal pasteurisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient volatile metal removal from low rank coal in gasification, combustion, and processing systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Alan E.; Sellakumar, Kumar Muthusami; Newcomer, Jesse D.

    2017-03-21

    Efficient coal pre-processing systems (69) integrated with gasification, oxy-combustion, and power plant systems include a drying chamber (28), a volatile metal removal chamber (30), recirculated gases, including recycled carbon dioxide (21), nitrogen (6), and gaseous exhaust (60) for increasing the efficiencies and lowering emissions in various coal processing systems.

  3. Pricing foreign equity option under stochastic volatility tempered stable Lévy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoli; Zhuang, Xintian

    2017-10-01

    Considering that financial assets returns exhibit leptokurtosis, asymmetry properties as well as clustering and heteroskedasticity effect, this paper substitutes the logarithm normal jumps in Heston stochastic volatility model by the classical tempered stable (CTS) distribution and normal tempered stable (NTS) distribution to construct stochastic volatility tempered stable Lévy processes (TSSV) model. The TSSV model framework permits infinite activity jump behaviors of return dynamics and time varying volatility consistently observed in financial markets through subordinating tempered stable process to stochastic volatility process, capturing leptokurtosis, fat tailedness and asymmetry features of returns. By employing the analytical characteristic function and fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique, the formula for probability density function (PDF) of TSSV returns is derived, making the analytical formula for foreign equity option (FEO) pricing available. High frequency financial returns data are employed to verify the effectiveness of proposed models in reflecting the stylized facts of financial markets. Numerical analysis is performed to investigate the relationship between the corresponding parameters and the implied volatility of foreign equity option.

  4. Influence of thermal processing on the volatile constituents of muskmelon puree.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, D; Sindhoora, S; Vijayanand, P; Kulkarni, S G; Nagarajan, S

    2015-05-01

    Muskmelon (Cucumis melo L) is an important tropical fruit cultivated widely in different parts of India. Fresh muskmelon has a delicate but characteristic flavor rendering the fruit with highly acceptable flavor. Processing and preservation of muskmelon puree requires thermal processing, which affects the volatile constituents. It is imperative to understand the flavor changes during thermal processing which would affect the quality of the processed and packed muskmelon puree. Muskmelon puree was subjected to different methods of thermal processing viz., heating, canning and packing in retort pouches and the volatile constituents were analyzed. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated the presence of more than 49 volatile components in the muskmelon puree samples. Major volatile components identified using GC-MS analysis showed the presence of esters (27.29 %), aldehydes (18.57 %), Heterocyclic compounds (16.63 %), aliphatic alcohols (11.72 %), phenolic compounds (6.03 %) and sesquiterpenes (0.25 %) in the fresh samples. Aldehydes decreased and ester content increased in thermally processed muskmelon puree packed in cans and retort pouches. Aliphatic alcohols, Heterocyclic compounds and phenolic compounds decreased in puree processed in tin containers and retort pouches.

  5. [Chlorination transformation and volatilization of heavy metals in fly ash from the incineration during the disposal process with higher temperature].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Yong; Sun, Shui-Yu

    2012-09-01

    The volatilization of heavy metals Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn were studied at 900 degrees C and 1 000 degrees C with different residence time, meanwhile the influence of chlorination agents CaCl2, MgCl2, NaCl, FeCl3 and AlCl3 on heavy metals volatilization was studied. The results showed that the volatilization of heavy metals had great differences with the volatilization rate followed the order Pb > Cd > Zn > Cu, in which the volatilization rate of Pb was more than 80% and that of Cu was less than 30%. In the thermal disposal process, the volatilization rate influenced by temperature was greater than that by the residence time, and the volatile elements Pb and Cd were particularly evident in the volatilization. After adding chlorides in fly ash, the volatilization of heavy metals changed significantly, and the volatilization rate of the low volatile elements Cu and Zn increased significantly compared with Pb and Cd. With the content of chloride increasing, the volatilization rate of heavy metals increased, but different types of chloride compounds on heavy metal transformation were quite different, in which the promotion effect of NaCl on heavy metals Cd, Zn and Cu was less than that of other chlorinating agents. The results can provide strategies for the harmless disposal and maximize resource utilization and recycling of fly ash.

  6. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W.; Ma, H.A.; Jia, X.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  7. Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

    2002-06-01

    Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

  8. Spillage of lunar polar crater volatiles onto adjacent terrains: The case for dynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Hurley, D. M.; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2015-05-01

    We present an investigation of the release and transport of lunar polar crater volatiles onto topside regions surrounding the cold traps. The volatiles are liberated via surface energization processes associated with the harsh space environment, including solar wind plasma sputtering and impact vaporization. We find that some fraction of these volatiles can migrate from crater floors onto topside regions (those regions directly adjacent to and above the polar crater floors), and that these surrounding terrains should contain a sampling of the material originating within the crater itself. It is concluded that the nature of the volatile content on crater floors can be obtained by sampling the surface volatiles that have migrated or "spilled out" onto the adjacent terrain. This "spillage" effect could make human or robotic prospecting for crater resources significantly easier, since an assessment may not require direct entry into the very harsh polar crater environment. We also suggest that there are dynamic processes actively operating on the crater floors, and we estimate their source rates assuming dynamic equilibrium of the observed water frost and our modeled loss rates.

  9. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  10. [Study on the difference between components in volatile oil of Citrus reticulata before and after being processed].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Xu, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Kang; Wang, Jin-Yu; Huang, Pei-Xuan

    2012-07-01

    To analyze the change of components in volatile oil of Citrus reticulata before and after being processed. The volatile oil of Citrus reticulata was extracted by steam distillation and comparatively studied by GC-MS. The content of volatile of Citrus reticulata after being steamed decreased from 1.13% to 1.06%. 34 components was detected in Citrus reticulata, 30 components was detected in the processed Citrus reticulata, 24 components in volatile oil of Citrus reticulata were identified. 15 components in volatile oil of Citrus reticulata before and after being processed were the same, 9 components were not detected after steamed, but there were 9 new kinds being detected. The relative contents of 4 components increased, 10 components decreased. There are many differences between the components in the volatile oil of Citrus reticulata before and after being processed and also the content of the components may offer some theoretical evidence for drug property transform and different clinical application.

  11. Fluoride mouthrinses and fluoride varnishes.

    PubMed

    Petersson, L G

    1993-01-01

    The cariostatic efficacy of rinsing with a 0.05-0.2% neutral sodium fluoride solution has been clearly demonstrated, especially in supervised school-based programmes in moderate and high caries risk children. The cost-benefit effect, however, is questionable in populations with low caries prevalence, and fluoride rinsing programmes are gradually being replaced by more individual fluoride therapy comprising combinations of fluoride toothpastes, tablets, or varnishes. Fluoride varnishes were developed as individual alternatives to conventional topical fluoride application and are today gaining acceptance for clinical application. Two varnishes, Duraphat containing 5% wt NaF and Fluor Protector with 0.9% wt fluor silane, are available commercially. The clinical effects seem to depend mainly on application frequency, especially in high caries risk groups. The cost-benefit effect is high, but can be increased by delegating application to auxiliary personnel in conjunction with regular dental visits. Toxicologically both fluoride mouthrinses and fluoride varnishes are safe if used as directed.

  12. Method for removing volatile components from a ceramic article, and related processes

    DOEpatents

    Klug, Frederic Joseph; DeCarr, Sylvia Marie

    2002-01-01

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  13. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  14. A process-based emission model for volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources suc...

  15. Changes in flavor volatile composition of oolong tea after panning during tea processing.

    PubMed

    Sheibani, Ershad; Duncan, Susan E; Kuhn, David D; Dietrich, Andrea M; Newkirk, Jordan J; O'Keefe, Sean F

    2016-05-01

    Panning is a processing step used in manufacturing of some varieties of oolong tea. There is limited information available on effects of panning on oolong tea flavors. The goal of this study was to determine effects of panning on flavor volatile compositions of oolong using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry (GC-O). SDE and SPME techniques were applied for extraction of volatiles in panned and unpanned teas. A total of 190 volatiles were identified from SDE and SPME extractions using GC-MS and GC-O. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in aldehyde or terpene contents of unpanned and panned tea. However, alcohols, ketones, acids and esters contents were significantly reduced by panning. Among 12 major volatiles previously used for identification and quality assessment of oolong tea, trans nerolidol, 2- hexenal, benzaldehyde, indole, gernaiol, and benzenacetaldehyde contents were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) by panning. Panning increased (P < 0.05) contents of linalool oxide, cis jasmone, and methyl salicylate. The GC-O study also showed an increase of aroma active compounds with sweet descriptions and decrease of aroma active compounds with fruity and smoky descriptions after panning. Panning significantly changes the volatile compositions of the tea and created new aroma active compounds. Results from this study can be used in quality assessment of panned oolong tea.

  16. Resource Prospector Instrumentation for Lunar Volatiles Prospecting, Sample Acquisition and Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R.; Paz, A.; Smith, J.; Captain, J.; Zacny, K.

    2016-01-01

    Data gathered from lunar missions within the last two decades have significantly enhanced our understanding of the volatile resources available on the lunar surface, specifically focusing on the polar regions. Several orbiting missions such as Clementine and Lunar Prospector have suggested the presence of volatile ices and enhanced hydrogen concentrations in the permanently shadowed regions of the moon. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was the first to provide direct measurement of water ice in a permanently shadowed region. These missions with other orbiting assets have laid the groundwork for the next step in the exploration of the lunar surface; providing ground truth data of the volatiles by mapping the distribution and processing lunar regolith for resource extraction. This next step is the robotic mission Resource Prospector (RP).Resource Prospector is a lunar mission to investigate strategic knowledge gaps (SKGs) for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The mission is proposed to land in the lunar south pole near a permanently shadowed crater. The landing site will be determined by the science team with input from broader international community as being near traversable landscape that has a high potential of containing elevated concentrations of volatiles such as water while maximizing mission duration. A rover will host the Regolith Environment Science and Oxygen Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload for resource mapping and processing. The science instruments on the payload include a 1-meter drill, neutron spectrometer, a near infrared spectrometer, an operations camera, and a reactor with a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer for volatile analysis.

  17. REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

    1960-08-30

    A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

  18. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  19. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride.

  20. Changes in Volatile Compounds of Chinese Luzhou-Flavor Liquor during the Fermentation and Distillation Process.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaofei; Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic of volatile compounds in the Zaopei during the fermentation and distillation process by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GCMS). Physicochemical properties analysis of Zaopei (fermented grains [FG], fermented grains mixed with sorghum [FGS], streamed grains [SG], and streamed grains mixed with Daqu [SGD]) showed distinct changes. A total number of 66 volatile compounds in the Zaopei were identified, in which butanoic acid, hexanoic acid, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl octanoate, hexyl hexanoate, ethyl hydrocinnamate, ethyl oleate, ethyl hexadecanoate, and ethyl linoleate were considered to be the dominant compounds due to their high concentrations. FG had the highest volatile compounds (112.43 mg/kg), which significantly decreased by 17.05% in the FGS, 67.12% in the SG, and 73.75% in the SGD. Furthermore, about 61.49% of volatile compounds of FGS were evaporated into raw liquor, whereas head, heart, and tail liquor accounted for 29.84%, 39.49%, and 30.67%, respectively. Each volatile class generally presented a decreasing trend, except for furans. Especially, the percentage of esters was 55.51% to 67.41% in the Zaopei, and reached 92.60% to 97.67% in the raw liquor. Principal component analysis based ordination of volatile compounds data segregated FGS and SGD samples. In addition, radar diagrams of the odor activity values suggested that intense flavor of fruit was weakened most from FG to SGD. The dynamic of volatile compounds in the Zaopei during the fermentation and distillation process was tested by SPME-GCMS. The result of this study demonstrated that both volatile compounds of Zaopei and thermal reaction during distillation simply determined the unique feature of raw liquor. This study was conducted based on the real products from liquor manufactory, so it is practicable that the method can be used in an industry setting. © 2015 Institute of Food

  1. Dentifrice Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  2. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Bottled Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Consumers drink ... questions about bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, ...

  3. Virtual volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. Christian; Prange, Richard E.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation strategy.

  4. Water fluoridation.

    PubMed

    Parnell, C; Whelton, H; O'Mullane, D

    2009-09-01

    This was to present a summary of the evidence from systematic reviews of the effectiveness and safety of water fluoridation. A search for relevant systematic reviews was conducted using the terms Fluoridation [Mesh] OR "water fluoridation" OR fluoridation OR (water AND fluoride) and was run from 01/01/2000 to 17/10/2008 in Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects in the Cochrane Library. The quality of the systematic reviews was assessed using Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) methodology checklists for systematic reviews. Websites of guideline organisations were also searched for relevant evidence-based guidelines, which were appraised using the AGREE instrument. Of the 59 publications identified, 3 systematic reviews and 3 guidelines were included in this review. While the reviews themselves were of good methodological quality, the studies included in the reviews were generally of moderate to low quality. The results of the three reviews showed that water fluoridation is effective at reducing caries in children and adults. With the exception of dental fluorosis, no association between adverse effects and water fluoridation has been established. Water fluoridation reduces caries for all social classes, and there is some evidence that it may reduce the oral health gap between social classes. Water fluoridation, where technically feasible and culturally acceptable, remains a relevant and valid choice as a population measure for the prevention of dental caries.

  5. Lipid oxidation in baked products: impact of formula and process on the generation of volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Maire, Murielle; Rega, Barbara; Cuvelier, Marie-Elisabeth; Soto, Paola; Giampaoli, Pierre

    2013-12-15

    This paper investigates the effect of ingredients on the reactions occurring during the making of sponge cake and leading to the generation of volatile compounds related to flavour quality. To obtain systems sensitive to lipid oxidation (LO), a formulation design was applied varying the composition of fatty matter and eggs. Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and formation of related volatile compounds were followed at the different steps of cake-making. Optimised dynamic Solid Phase Micro Extraction was applied to selectively extract either volatile or semi-volatile compounds directly from the baking vapours. We show for the first time that in the case of alveolar baked products, lipid oxidation occurs very early during the step of dough preparation and to a minor extent during the baking process. The generation of lipid oxidation compounds depends on PUFA content and on the presence of endogenous antioxidants in the raw matter. Egg yolk seemed to play a double role on reactivity: protecting unsaturated lipids from oxidation and being necessary to generate a broad class of compounds of the Maillard reaction during baking and linked to the typical flavour of sponge cake. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Portland Water Fluoridation: A Newspaper Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Allison; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Lewis, Patricia Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Portland, Oregon is the largest city in the United States without community water fluoridation (CWF). A newspaper analysis was conducted of the failed 2013 CWF campaign to evaluate anti-fluoridation and pro-fluoridation messaging provided by newspapers during the campaign. News content was categorized by type and slant (pro-fluoridation, anti-fluoridation, or neutral) and 34 variables were tabulated (23 anti-fluoridation, 11 pro-fluoridation). Results showed overall messaging was slightly pro-fluoridation, as compared to anti-fluoridation or neutral content (35%, 32%, and 33% respectively). Editorial content was 85% pro-fluoridation and 15% anti-fluoridation. The most frequent anti-fluoridation variables were alternatives to water fluoridation, mass/forced medication and concerns about the political process. Conversely, tooth decay and social justice were the most commonly cited pro-fluoridation variables. Newspapers can be influential in shaping public policy opinions in the fight for community water fluoridation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Improved laser damage threshold performance of calcium fluoride optical surfaces via Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Svrluga, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optics are not keeping up with the pace of laser advancements. The laser industry is rapidly increasing its power capabilities and reducing wavelengths which have exposed the optics as a weak link in lifetime failures for these advanced systems. Nanometer sized surface defects (scratches, pits, bumps and residual particles) on the surface of optics are a significant limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, magnesium fluoride, zinc sulfide, LBO and others presents a unique challenge for traditional polishing techniques. Exogenesis Corporation, using its new and proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and particle contamination leaving many material surfaces with roughness typically around one Angstrom. This surface defect mitigation via ANAB processing can be shown to increase performance properties of high intensity optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for calcium fluoride laser windows. It further correlates laser damage threshold improvements with the smoothing produced by ANAB surface treatment. All ANAB processing was performed at Exogenesis Corporation using an nAccel100TM Accelerated Particle Beam processing tool. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis on a Park Model XE70 AFM, and all laser damage testing was performed at Spica Technologies, Inc. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply mechanical forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface

  8. [Effects of processing methods on the amounts of volatile oil of nutmeg and on isolation and characterization of the volatile oil constituents].

    PubMed

    Li, T; Zhou, J; Xu, Z; Pan, J; Mao, S

    1990-07-01

    In this paper, the authors investigated the effects of various processing methods, i.e., scalding in hot purified talc, simmering wrapped in flour in hot purified talc and stir-frying in smoking wheat bran, on nutmeg (Semen Myristicae) in terms of the quantities of the volatile oil. The experimental results revealed that the amounts of volatile oil contained in nutmeg vary remarkably with the lengths of cooking time and the fluctuation of temperature. Detected by GC-MS-computer, 32 compounds of nutmeg were characterized, and their contents were determined by GC respectively.

  9. Automated Signal Processing Applied to Volatile-Based Inspection of Greenhouse Crops

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Roel; Hofstee, Jan Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro; van Henten, Eldert

    2010-01-01

    Gas chromatograph–mass spectrometers (GC-MS) have been used and shown utility for volatile-based inspection of greenhouse crops. However, a widely recognized difficulty associated with GC-MS application is the large and complex data generated by this instrument. As a consequence, experienced analysts are often required to process this data in order to determine the concentrations of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of interest. Manual processing is time-consuming, labour intensive and may be subject to errors due to fatigue. The objective of this study was to assess whether or not GC-MS data can also be automatically processed in order to determine the concentrations of crop health associated VOCs in a greenhouse. An experimental dataset that consisted of twelve data files was processed both manually and automatically to address this question. Manual processing was based on simple peak integration while the automatic processing relied on the algorithms implemented in the MetAlign™ software package. The results of automatic processing of the experimental dataset resulted in concentrations similar to that after manual processing. These results demonstrate that GC-MS data can be automatically processed in order to accurately determine the concentrations of crop health associated VOCs in a greenhouse. When processing GC-MS data automatically, noise reduction, alignment, baseline correction and normalisation are required. PMID:22163594

  10. Automated signal processing applied to volatile-based inspection of greenhouse crops.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Roel; Hofstee, Jan Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro; van Henten, Eldert

    2010-01-01

    Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometers (GC-MS) have been used and shown utility for volatile-based inspection of greenhouse crops. However, a widely recognized difficulty associated with GC-MS application is the large and complex data generated by this instrument. As a consequence, experienced analysts are often required to process this data in order to determine the concentrations of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of interest. Manual processing is time-consuming, labour intensive and may be subject to errors due to fatigue. The objective of this study was to assess whether or not GC-MS data can also be automatically processed in order to determine the concentrations of crop health associated VOCs in a greenhouse. An experimental dataset that consisted of twelve data files was processed both manually and automatically to address this question. Manual processing was based on simple peak integration while the automatic processing relied on the algorithms implemented in the MetAlign™ software package. The results of automatic processing of the experimental dataset resulted in concentrations similar to that after manual processing. These results demonstrate that GC-MS data can be automatically processed in order to accurately determine the concentrations of crop health associated VOCs in a greenhouse. When processing GC-MS data automatically, noise reduction, alignment, baseline correction and normalisation are required.

  11. Fluoride transport due to injection of reject water from RO process into the ground water through downstream bore well.

    PubMed

    Babu, C Anand; Agarwal, Sourabh; Sujish, D; Rajan, K K

    2011-10-01

    Fluoride removal using Reverse Osmosis has appreciable amount of fluorine in the reject stream. Disposal of reject water to surface water further contaminates the water body. It is required to dispose of this reject into the environment with minimal pollution. So a study on disposal of fluoride contaminated reject inside the ground water through bore well is done through theoretical modelling using COMSOL multiphysics software. It has been established that the rise in fluoride concentration in ground water due to injection of fluoride contaminated reject through bore well depends on the injection rate of reject inside the bore well and not on the initial background concentration of fluoride in the ground water. It has been found that for reject injection rate of 30 m3/day the rise in fluoride concentration in ground water with respect to initial background concentration of fluoride is less than 10% at a distance above 600m from the injection source after 100 years.

  12. The role of volatiles and lithology in the impact cratering process.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Kieffer S.; Simonds, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of published descriptions of 32 of the largest, least eroded terrestrial impact structures reveals that the amount of melt at craters in crystalline rocks is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than at craters in sedimentary rocks. In this paper we present a model for the impact process; calculations show that the volume of material shocked to pressures sufficient for melting should not be significantly different in sedimentary and crystalline rocks. We conclude that shock melt is formed in the early stages of the cratering process by impacts into rocks rich in volatiles but is destroyed by the cratering process. -from Authors

  13. METAL RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Werner, L.B.; Hill, O.F.

    1957-12-01

    A process is presented for the separation of plutonium from the niobium oxide which is frequently used as a carrier precipitate to separate the plutonium from solutions of dissolved fuel elements. The niobium oxide, plutonium bearing precipitate is treated with hydrogen fluoride converting the niobium to the volatile pentafluoride, while the plutonium is changed into the substantially non- volatile plutonium tetrafluoride. After the niobium has been removed, the plutonium tetrafluoride is reacted with elemental fluorine, converting it to a higher plutonium fluoride and this may in turn be volitilized away from any residual impurities.

  14. Resource Prospector Instrumentation for Lunar Volatiles Prospecting, Sample Acquisition and Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Elphic, R.; Colaprete, A.; Zacny, Kris; Paz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Data gathered from lunar missions within the last two decades have significantly enhanced our understanding of the volatile resources available on the lunar surface, specifically focusing on the polar regions. Several orbiting missions such as Clementine and Lunar Prospector have suggested the presence of volatile ices and enhanced hydrogen concentrations in the permanently shadowed regions of the moon. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was the first to provide direct measurement of water ice in a permanently shadowed region. These missions with other orbiting assets have laid the groundwork for the next step in the exploration of the lunar surface; providing ground truth data of the volatiles by mapping the distribution and processing lunar regolith for resource extraction. This next step is the robotic mission Resource Prospector (RP). Resource Prospector is a lunar mission to investigate 'strategic knowledge gaps' (SKGs) for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The mission is proposed to land in the lunar south pole near a permanently shadowed crater. The landing site will be determined by the science team with input from broader international community as being near traversable landscape that has a high potential of containing elevated concentrations of volatiles such as water while maximizing mission duration. A rover will host the Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload for resource mapping and processing. The science instruments on the payload include a 1-meter drill, neutron spectrometer, a near infrared spectrometer, an operations camera, and a reactor with a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer for volatile analysis. After the RP lander safely delivers the rover to the lunar surface, the science team will guide the rover team on the first traverse plan. The neutron spectrometer (NS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrometer instruments will be used as prospecting tools to guide

  15. Design and development of sustainable remediation process for mitigation of fluoride contamination in ground water and field application for domestic use.

    PubMed

    Gwala, Poonam; Andey, Subhash; Nagarnaik, Pranav; Ghosh, Sarika Pimpalkar; Pal, Prashant; Deshmukh, Prashant; Labhasetwar, Pawan

    2014-08-01

    Decentralised household chemo defluoridation unit (CDU) was developed and designed based on a combination of coagulation and sorption processes. Chemo-defluoridation process was optimised to reduce use of chemicals and increase acceptability among beneficiaries without affecting palatability of water. Chemical dose optimization undertaken in the laboratory using jar test revealed the optimum calcium salt to initial fluoride ratio of 60 for fluoride removal. Performance of CDU was evaluated in the laboratory for removal efficiency, water quality parameters, filter bed cleaning cycle and desorption of fluoride. CDU evaluation in the laboratory with spiked water (5 mg/L) and field water (~4.2 mg/L) revealed treated water fluoride concentration of less than 1mg/L. Seventy five CDUs were installed in households at Sakhara Village, Yavatmal District in Maharashtra State of India. Monthly monitoring of CDUs for one year indicated reduction of the raw water fluoride concentration from around 4 mg/L to less than 1mg/L. Post implementation survey after regular consumption of treated drinking water by the users for one year indicated user satisfaction and technological sustainability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  17. Impact of Anaerobic Digestion of Liquid Dairy Manure on Ammonia Volatilization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, K.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of anaerobic digestion (AD) on the mechanism of ammonia volatilization from liquid dairy manure, in storage or treatment lagoon, prior to land application. Physical-chemical properties of liquid dairy manure, which may affect ammonia volatilization process, were determined before and after AD. The properties of interest included: particle size distribution (PSD), total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), viscosity, pH, total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), and ionic strength (IS). The overall mass transfer coefficient of ammonia (KoL) and the NH3 fraction of TAN (β) for the undigested (UD) and AD manures were then experimentally determined in a laboratory convective emission chamber (CEC) at a constant wind speed of 1.5 m s-1 and fixed air temperature of 25 °C at liquid manure temperatures of 15, 25, and 35 °C. The PSD indicated non-normal left skewed distribution for both AD and UD manures particles, suggestive of heavier concentrations of particles towards the lower particle size range. The volume median diameters (VMD) for solids from UD and AD were not significantly different (p= 0.65), but the geometric standard deviations (GSD) were significantly different (p = 0.001), indicating slightly larger particles but more widely distributed solids in UD than AD manure. Results also indicated significantly higher pH, TAN, ionic strength (IS) and viscosity in AD manure. The KoL and β for AD manure determined under identical conditions (air temperature, liquid temperature, and airflow) were significantly higher (p > 0.05) than for UD manure. Overall, these findings suggest that AD of dairy manure significantly increased initial ammonia volatilization potential from liquid dairy manure; with the largest increase (~62%) emanating from increased ammonium dissociation. The initial flux of ammonia, during the experiment period, was ~84% more from AD than in UD dairy manure. Keywords. Process based models, mass transfer

  18. Understanding the determinants of volatility clustering in terms of stationary Markovian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccichè, S.

    2016-11-01

    Volatility is a key variable in the modeling of financial markets. The most striking feature of volatility is that it is a long-range correlated stochastic variable, i.e. its autocorrelation function decays like a power-law τ-β for large time lags. In the present work we investigate the determinants of such feature, starting from the empirical observation that the exponent β of a certain stock's volatility is a linear function of the average correlation of such stock's volatility with all other volatilities. We propose a simple approach consisting in diagonalizing the cross-correlation matrix of volatilities and investigating whether or not the diagonalized volatilities still keep some of the original volatility stylized facts. As a result, the diagonalized volatilities result to share with the original volatilities either the power-law decay of the probability density function and the power-law decay of the autocorrelation function. This would indicate that volatility clustering is already present in the diagonalized un-correlated volatilities. We therefore present a parsimonious univariate model based on a non-linear Langevin equation that well reproduces these two stylized facts of volatility. The model helps us in understanding that the main source of volatility clustering, once volatilities have been diagonalized, is that the economic forces driving volatility can be modeled in terms of a Smoluchowski potential with logarithmic tails.

  19. Volatile, anthocyanidin, quality and sensory changes in rabbiteye blueberry from whole fruit through pilot plant juice processing.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: High antioxidant content and keen marketing have increased blueberry demand and increased local production which in turn mandates new uses for abundant harvests. Pilot scale processes were employed to investigate the anthocyanidin profiles, qualitative volatile compositions, and sensori...

  20. To melt is not enough: Retention of volatile species through internal processing in icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, G.; Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-07-01

    The outer Solar System hosts a vast population of small icy bodies, considered to be primitive remnants from the planet-formation epoch. Early thermal and collisional processes affected such planetesimals to varying degrees depending on the time scale and dynamics of early planet growth. Recent observations have revealed that many large (>˜1000 km in diameter) transneptunian objects (TNOs) exhibit features of crystalline water ice in their surface spectra [1], as well as spectral features of more volatile ices, such as methane or hydrated ammonia [2]. These telltale observations should be accounted for when considering the alteration history and bulk processing of dwarf planets and their icy progeny. We will discuss preliminary calculations of early evolution scenarios for small icy-rocky bodies formed beyond the water-ice snow line. Such objects should also contain non-negligible fractions of pre-organic volatile compounds. The volatile composition and interior structure of these objects may change considerably due to internal heating and/or collisional modification prior to settling in their current (relatively quiescent) dynamical niches. Our initial model for the objects in question is that of a porous aggregate of various volatile compounds (as ices or trapped gases) and refractory silicate-metal solid grains, comprising the bulk matrix [3]. Chemical compositions for these objects are taken from existing simulations of chemical and dynamical evolution of disk material [4]. The key volatile species (e.g., H_2O, CO, CO_2, NH_3, CH_4, and CH_3OH) are also the most commonly observed in comets [5], which are remnants of such an early planetesimal population. Thermal and chemical internal evolution is examined self-consistently, as the abundances and locations of all species evolve, and we record mass ratios, temperatures, pressures, and porosity variations. The presence of volatile species in the interior can affect the overall heat balance and accompanied phase

  1. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  2. Major role of process conditions in tuning the percolation behavior of polyvinylidene fluoride based polymer/metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Maheswar

    2017-08-01

    The percolation behaviour of a polymer/metal composite (PMC), comprising polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/nanocrystalline nickel (n-Ni) prepared by cold press and hot press methods, has been compared. Higher effective dielectric constants (ɛeff) with lower loss tangent (Tan δ) were observed for the cold pressed samples as compared to the hot pressed samples, which is attributed to better homogeneity and uniform distribution of n-Ni in the PVDF matrix. The percolation parameters [percolation threshold (fc) and critical exponents (s and s')] are largely tuned due to the difference in process conditions. The non-universal fc, s, and s' have been explained with the help of the percolation theory. PMC prepared though cold pressing would be a better candidate for static and low frequency dielectric applications.

  3. Shrinkage void formation and its effect on freeze and thaw processes of lithium and lithium-fluoride for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jae Y.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of shrinkage void forming during freezing of lithium and lithium fluoride on subsequent thaw processes are investigated using a numerical scheme that is based on a single (solid/liquid) cell approach. Results show that a void forming at the wall appreciably reduces the solid-liquid interface velocity, during both freeze and thaw, and causes a substantial rise in the wall temperature during thaw. However, in the case of Li, the maximum wall temperature was much lower than the melting temperature of PWC-11, which is used as the structure material in the SP-100 system. Hence, it is concluded that a formation of hot spots is unlikely during the startup or restart of the SP-100 system.

  4. Other Fluoride Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... August 17, 2001;50(RR-14):1–42. Fluoride Products Fluoride Toothpaste Form Concentrations of fluoride in ...

  5. Effect of suspended particles upon drying process of volatile droplet sitting on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, I.; Kochiya, K.

    Particle motion in volatile droplet on the solid surface especially the behavior of particles depositing in the vicinity of solid-liquid-gas boundary line contact line is focused This phenomenon is called as coffee stain problem Particle motion in the droplet is analyzed by reconstruction of spatio-temporal particle motion by applying three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry 3-D PTV We discuss the effect of the suspended particles upon the drying process of the droplet Morphological discussion on the particles stuck on the solid surface after the dryout the droplet is also conducted

  6. Environmental guideline for the reduction of volatile organic compound emissions from the plastics processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to environmental regulatory agencies, manufacturers, and operators of plastics processing plants regarding the means of reducing emissions containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are released to the environment in the course of production. Sectors covered by the guideline are expanded polystyrene, cellular polyethylene foams, polyvinyl chloride, and reinforced plastics and composites made from thermoset polyester resins. The guideline focuses on the reduction of VOC emissions from processing and clean-up operations, the handling and storage of VOC-containing materials, and the handling and disposal of wastes. The guideline contains material, equipment, process, and operating standards for plastics processing facilities, record keeping and training standards, recommended operating practices, and testing protocols.

  7. Influence of the drying processes of yeasts on their volatile phenol sorption capacity in model wine.

    PubMed

    Pradelles, R; Vichi, S; Alexandre, H; Chassagne, D

    2009-10-31

    Volatile phenols, such as 4-ethylphenol, are responsible for a "horsey" smell in wine. Thus, the study of volatile phenol sorption in yeasts, and their subsequent elimination from wine, helps to optimize eco-friendly wine curative processes. Here, we compared the influences of spray drying, lyophilization and evaporative drying at low water activity on yeast, for improving the 4-ethylphenol sorption capacity in a synthetic model wine. The changes that occur in the physico-chemical characteristics of the yeast surface (surface hydrophobicity, electron-donor character and zeta potential) during these drying processes were determined to assess if any correlation exists between these factors and the 4-ethylphenol sorption capacities of the cells. Evaporative drying at low water activity, spray drying and lyophilization induced, respectively, 61.5%, 169% and 192% greater 4-ethylphenol sorption than biomass without drying treatment. Surface hydrophobicity of yeasts was also significantly greater, but the zeta potential of yeast cells was significantly lower after the drying processes. This is the first report investigating changes to the physico-chemical variables affected during yeast drying. These cell surface modifications were correlated with the 4-ethyphenol sorption value measured.

  8. On the connection between financial processes with stochastic volatility and nonextensive statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, S. M. D.; Tsallis, C.

    2005-11-01

    The GARCH algorithm is the most renowned generalisation of Engle's original proposal for modelising returns, the ARCH process. Both cases are characterised by presenting a time dependent and correlated variance or volatility. Besides a memory parameter, b, (present in ARCH) and an independent and identically distributed noise, ω, GARCH involves another parameter, c, such that, for c=0, the standard ARCH process is reproduced. In this manuscript we use a generalised noise following a distribution characterised by an index qn, such that qn=1 recovers the Gaussian distribution. Matching low statistical moments of GARCH distribution for returns with a q-Gaussian distribution obtained through maximising the entropy Sq=1-sumipiq/q-1, basis of nonextensive statistical mechanics, we obtain a sole analytical connection between q and left( b,c,qnright) which turns out to be remarkably good when compared with computational simulations. With this result we also derive an analytical approximation for the stationary distribution for the (squared) volatility. Using a generalised Kullback-Leibler relative entropy form based on Sq, we also analyse the degree of dependence between successive returns, zt and zt+1, of GARCH(1,1) processes. This degree of dependence is quantified by an entropic index, qop. Our analysis points the existence of a unique relation between the three entropic indexes qop, q and qn of the problem, independent of the value of (b,c).

  9. Ion-chromatographic determination of chloride and fluoride in electrolyte from the halogen tin-plating process.

    PubMed

    Korth, W; Ellis, J

    1984-06-01

    A simple and rapid procedure is proposed for the determination of chloride and free fluoride in tin electroplating fluid. Suppressor-column ion-chromatography is used after oxidation of hexafluorostannate(II) to hexafluorostannate(IV) with hydrogen peroxide. Concurrent determination of tin(II) and total tin then allows calculation of the concentrations of fluoride, hexafluorostannate(II) and hexafluorostannate(IV).

  10. Optimization of process parameters for production of volatile fatty acid, biohydrogen and methane from anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I; Deng, L J; Wang, J; Wu, Y

    2016-11-01

    The anaerobic digestion process has been primarily utilized for methane containing biogas production over the past few years. However, the digestion process could also be optimized for producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and biohydrogen. This is the first review article that combines the optimization approaches for all three possible products from the anaerobic digestion. In this review study, the types and configurations of the bioreactor are discussed for each type of product. This is followed by a review on optimization of common process parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, retention time and organic loading rate) separately for the production of VFA, biohydrogen and methane. This review also includes additional parameters, treatment methods or special additives that wield a significant and positive effect on production rate and these products' yield.

  11. Influence of processing on the volatile profile of strawberry spreads made with isomaltulose.

    PubMed

    Peinado, I; Rosa, E; Heredia, A; Escriche, I; Andrés, A

    2013-05-01

    A new strawberry spread formulated with fructose and isomaltulose (replacing sucrose partially or totally) and a high percentage of fruit was developed in line with the new trend of healthier products. This work studies the influence of some process variables (percentage of sugar, pectin and citric acid, and time of thermal treatment) on the volatile profile of these spreads with different formulations. The ripeness of the raw strawberries influences the concentrations of some of the compounds in the spreads, such as isobutyl acetate, butyl butyrate, 3-hexen-1-yl acetate or propan-2-ol. The process conditions have an important effect on the volatile profiles. Most of the esters and alcohols decreased whereas 13 new compounds appear, mostly furans (furfural, 2-acetylfurane, 5-methyl furfural, mesifurane) and aldehydes (octanal, nonanal, decanal and benzaldeyhde). In general, the spreads formulated with sucrose-isomaltulose that contained higher levels of pectin and citric acid gave better results in the preservation of the original aromatic compounds in raw strawberries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Space-weathering processes and products on volatile-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D.; Schelling, P.; Consolmagno, G.; Bradley, T.

    2014-07-01

    Space weathering is a generic term for the effects on atmosphereless solid bodies in the solar system from a range of processes associated with direct exposure to the space environment. These include impact processes (shock, vaporization, fragmentation, heating, melting, and ejecta formation), radiation damage (from galactic and solar cosmic rays), solar-wind effects (irradiation, ion implantation, and sputtering), and the chemical reactions driven by these processes. The classic example of space weathering is the formation of the lunar spectral red slope associated with the production of nanophase Fe (npFe0) in the dusty lunar regolith (C.R. Chapman, 2004, Annual Review of Earth & Planet. Sci. 32, C.M. Pieters, 2000, MAPS 35). Similar npFe0 has been recovered from asteroid (25143) Itokawa and some asteroid classes do exhibit modest spectral red slopes (T. Noguchi, 2011, Science 333). Space weathering can be thought of as driven by a combination of the chemical environment of space (hard vacuum, low oxygen fugacity, solar-wind implantation of hydrogen) along with thermal energy supplied by micrometeorite impacts. The forward modeling of space weathering as thermodynamically-driven decomposition of common rock-forming minerals suggests the production of a range of daughter products: (1) The silicate products typically lose oxygen, other volatile elements (i.e., sulfur and sodium), and metallic cations, producing minerals that are typically more disordered and less optically active than the original parent materials. (2) The decomposed metallic cations form in nano-sized blebs including npFe0, on the surfaces or in condensing rims of mineral grains. This creates a powerful optical component as seen in the lunar red slope. Surfaces with exposed npFe0 are an ideal environment for catalyzing further reactions. (3) The liberated volatile elements and gases (O, S, Na) may form an observable exosphere (e.g., Moon and Mercury) and can either escape from the body or

  13. Removal of fluoride from drinking water using modified ultrafine tea powder processed using a ball-mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huimei; Xu, Lingyun; Chen, Guijie; Peng, Chuanyi; Ke, Fei; Liu, Zhengquan; Li, Daxiang; Zhang, Zhengzhu; Wan, Xiaochun

    2016-07-01

    A low-cost and highly efficient biosorbent was prepared by loading zirconium(IV) onto ball-milled, ultrafine tea powder (UTP-Zr) for removal of fluoride from drinking water. To evaluate the fluoride adsorption capacity of UTP-Zr over a wide range of conditions, the biosorbent dosage, contact time, initial pH, initial fluoride concentration and presence of other ions were varied. UTP-Zr performed well over the considerably wide pH range of 3-10. The residual concentration of Zr in the treated water was below the limit of detection (0.01 mg/L). Fluoride adsorption by the UTP-Zr biosorbent followed the Langmuir model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 12.43 mgF/g at room temperature. The fluoride adsorption kinetics fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The synthesized biosorbent was characterized by BET, SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS to reveal how UTP-Zr interacts with fluoride. Results from this study demonstrated that UTP-based biosorbents will be useful and safe for the removal of fluoride from drinking water.

  14. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part I. The role and kinetics of volatile reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2005-10-06

    With iron ore reduction processes using coal-ore pellets or mixtures, it is possible that volatiles can contribute to reduction. By simulating the constituents of the individual reducing species in the volatiles, the rates for H{sub 2} and CO were investigated in the temperature and reduction range of interest; hydrogen is the major reductant and was studied in detail. The kinetics of the reduction by H{sub 2} has been found to be a complex mechanism with, initially, nucleation and growth controlling the rate. There is a catalytic effect by the existing iron nuclei, followed by a mixed control of chemical kinetics and pore diffusion. This results in a topochemical reduction of these iron oxide particles. Up to 1173 K, reduction by H{sub 2} is considerably faster than by carbon in the pellet/mixture or by CO. It was also found that H{sub 2}S, which is involved with the volatiles, does not affect the rate at the reduction range of interest.

  15. Observed glacier and volatile distribution on Pluto from atmosphere-topography processes.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François

    2016-12-01

    Pluto has a variety of surface frosts and landforms as well as a complex atmosphere. There is ongoing geological activity related to the massive Sputnik Planitia glacier, mostly made of nitrogen (N2) ice mixed with solid carbon monoxide and methane, covering the 4-kilometre-deep, 1,000-kilometre-wide basin of Sputnik Planitia near the anti-Charon point. The glacier has been suggested to arise from a source region connected to the deep interior, or from a sink collecting the volatiles released planetwide. Thin deposits of N2 frost, however, were also detected at mid-northern latitudes and methane ice was observed to cover most of Pluto except for the darker, frost-free equatorial regions. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution of N2, methane and carbon monoxide on Pluto over thousands of years. The model predicts N2 ice accumulation in the deepest low-latitude basin and the threefold increase in atmospheric pressure that has been observed to occur since 1988. This points to atmospheric-topographic processes as the origin of Sputnik Planitia's N2 glacier. The same simulations also reproduce the observed quantities of volatiles in the atmosphere and show frosts of methane, and sometimes N2, that seasonally cover the mid- and high latitudes, explaining the bright northern polar cap reported in the 1990s and the observed ice distribution in 2015. The model also predicts that most of these seasonal frosts should disappear in the next decade.

  16. Observed glacier and volatile distribution on Pluto from atmosphere-topography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François

    2016-12-01

    Pluto has a variety of surface frosts and landforms as well as a complex atmosphere. There is ongoing geological activity related to the massive Sputnik Planitia glacier, mostly made of nitrogen (N2) ice mixed with solid carbon monoxide and methane, covering the 4-kilometre-deep, 1,000-kilometre-wide basin of Sputnik Planitia near the anti-Charon point. The glacier has been suggested to arise from a source region connected to the deep interior, or from a sink collecting the volatiles released planetwide. Thin deposits of N2 frost, however, were also detected at mid-northern latitudes and methane ice was observed to cover most of Pluto except for the darker, frost-free equatorial regions. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution of N2, methane and carbon monoxide on Pluto over thousands of years. The model predicts N2 ice accumulation in the deepest low-latitude basin and the threefold increase in atmospheric pressure that has been observed to occur since 1988. This points to atmospheric-topographic processes as the origin of Sputnik Planitia’s N2 glacier. The same simulations also reproduce the observed quantities of volatiles in the atmosphere and show frosts of methane, and sometimes N2, that seasonally cover the mid- and high latitudes, explaining the bright northern polar cap reported in the 1990s and the observed ice distribution in 2015. The model also predicts that most of these seasonal frosts should disappear in the next decade.

  17. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  18. Water fluoridation as a public health measure.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Michael G; Ellwood, Roger P; Pretty, Iain A

    2010-12-01

    Water fluoridation schemes have been used as dental public health measures for over 50 years. This second paper in a series of three aims to provide a background to the history of water fluoridation schemes and the evidence base that led to their implementation. The article will also discuss the processes and chemicals involved in fluoridation during water treatment. This article aims to provide a summary for general practitioners of the history and evidence base for water fluoridation, to enable them to understand the role of water fluoridation in caries prevention and to be able to answer non-clinical questions raised by patients.

  19. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  20. Purex Processing of Dissolved Sand, Slag, and Crucible Containing High Levels of Boric Acid and Calcium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.A.

    1998-05-01

    The plutonium solution obtained from the dissolution of SSC in F- Canyon will be high in fluoride. Flowsheet adjustments must be made to increase the plutonium extraction in the solvent extraction cycle to keep Pu losses from being excessive.

  1. Formation of Volatile Tea Constituent Indole During the Oolong Tea Manufacturing Process.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lanting; Zhou, Ying; Gui, Jiadong; Fu, Xiumin; Mei, Xin; Zhen, Yunpeng; Ye, Tingxiang; Du, Bing; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-06-22

    Indole is a characteristic volatile constituent in oolong tea. Our previous study indicated that indole was mostly accumulated at the turn over stage of oolong tea manufacturing process. However, formation of indole in tea leaves remains unknown. In this study, one tryptophan synthase α-subunit (TSA) and three tryptophan synthase β-subunits (TSBs) from tea leaves were isolated, cloned, sequenced, and functionally characterized. Combination of CsTSA and CsTSB2 recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli exhibited the ability of transformation from indole-3-glycerol phosphate to indole. CsTSB2 was highly expressed during the turn over process of oolong tea. Continuous mechanical damage, simulating the turn over process, significantly enhanced the expression level of CsTSB2 and amount of indole. These suggested that accumulation of indole in oolong tea was due to the activation of CsTSB2 by continuous wounding stress from the turn over process. Black teas contain much less indole, although wounding stress is also involved in the manufacturing process. Stable isotope labeling indicated that tea leaf cell disruption from the rolling process of black tea did not lead to the conversion of indole, but terminated the synthesis of indole. Our study provided evidence concerning formation of indole in tea leaves for the first time.

  2. Design Manual: Removal of Fluoride from Drinking Water ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is an updated version of the Design Manual: Removal of Fluoride from Drinking Water Supplies by Activated Alumina (Rubel, 1984). The manual is an in-depth presentation of the steps required to design and operate a fluoride removal plant using activated alumina (AA), which is a reliable and cost-effective process for treating excess fluoride from drinking water supplies. Design Manual on removing fluoride from drinking water to support the fluoride MCL - manual

  3. Fluoridated Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... based on a review of more than 50 human epidemiological (population) studies produced over the past 40 years, concluded that optimal fluoridation of drinking water “does not pose a detectable cancer risk to humans” as evidenced by extensive human epidemiological data reported ...

  4. Effect of high pressure high temperature processing on the volatile fraction of differently coloured carrots.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Palmers, Stijn; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Carle, Reinhold; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2014-06-15

    To get deeper insight into the effect of high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing on the volatile fraction of carrots, differently coloured cultivars exhibiting orange, purple, red and yellow hues were investigated. The impact of HPHT sterilisation was compared with thermal sterilisation based on equivalent microbiological inactivation. The results of this study demonstrated HPHT sterilisation to exert a distinct effect on important chemical reactions in comparison to thermal sterilisation. A comprehensive integration of MS-based metabolomic fingerprinting (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and chemometric tools has been implemented as an untargeted multivariate screening tool to identify differences. In all carrot cultivars, two dominant discriminative quality-related reactions were found: oxidative degradation and the Maillard reaction. Regarding the first reaction, oxidative terpenes, free fatty acids and carotenoids degradation products were detected at higher levels after HPHT sterilisation. Regarding the latter reaction, HPHT sterilisation appeared to suppress the formation of Maillard and Strecker degradation products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Topical fluoride for caries prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weyant, Robert J.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Anselmo, Theresa (Tracy); Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D.; Donly, Kevin J.; Frese, William A.; Hujoel, Philippe P.; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M.; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J. Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. Types of Studies Reviewed The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents—including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes—with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. Results The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. Practical Implications The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.5 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from “in favor” to “expert opinion for.” As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. PMID:24177407

  6. Power consumption and byproducts in electron beam and electrical discharge processing of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.

    1996-02-20

    Among the new methods being investigated for the post-process reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in atmospheric-pressure air streams are based on non-thermal plasmas. Electron beam, pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge methods are among the more extensively investigated techniques for producing non-thermal plasmas. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. In this paper the authors present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor, a pulsed corona and a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. They have used these reactors to study the removal of a wide variety of VOCs. The effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry have been studied. They present a description of the reactions that control the efficiency of the plasma process. They have found that pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge reactors are most suitable only for processes requiring O radicals. For VOCs requiring copious amounts of electrons, ions, N atoms or OH radicals, the use of electron beam reactors is generally the best way of minimizing the electrical power consumption. Electron beam processing is remarkably more effective for all of the VOCs tested. For control of VOC emissions from dilute, large volume sources such as paint spray booths, cost analysis shows that the electron beam method is cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

  7. Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title: Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Background Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Methods Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Conclusions The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. PMID:24929594

  8. Focus on fluorides: update on the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Liu, Y.; Barnes, J. J.; Boyce, J. W.; Day, J. M. D.; Elardo, S. M.; Hui, H.; Magna, T.; Ni, P.; Tartese, R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The chapter will begin with an introduction that defines magmatic volatiles (e.g., H, F, Cl, S) versus geochemical volatiles (e.g., K, Rb, Zn). We will discuss our approach of understanding both types of volatiles in lunar samples and lay the ground work for how we will determine the overall volatile budget of the Moon. We will then discuss the importance of endogenous volatiles in shaping the "Newer Views of the Moon", specifically how endogenous volatiles feed forward into processes such as the origin of the Moon, magmatic differentiation, volcanism, and secondary processes during surface and crustal interactions. After the introduction, we will include a re-view/synthesis on the current state of 1) apatite compositions (volatile abundances and isotopic compositions); 2) nominally anhydrous mineral phases (moderately to highly volatile); 3) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar pyroclastic glass beads; 4) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar basalts; 5) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of melt inclusions; and finally 6) experimental constraints on mineral-melt partitioning of moderately to highly volatile elements under lunar conditions. We anticipate that each section will summarize results since 2007 and focus on new results published since the 2015 Am Min review paper on lunar volatiles [9]. The next section will discuss how to use sample abundances of volatiles to understand the source region and potential caveats in estimating source abundances of volatiles. The following section will include our best estimates of volatile abundances and isotopic compositions (where permitted by available data) for each volatile element of interest in a number of important lunar reservoirs, including the crust, mantle, KREEP, and bulk Moon. The final section of the chapter will focus upon future work, outstanding questions

  10. Effect of post harvest radiation processing and storage on the volatile oil composition and glucosinolate profile of cabbage.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Variyar, Prasad S; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Sharma, Arun

    2014-05-15

    Effect of radiation processing (0.5-2 kGy) and storage on the volatile oil constituents and glucosinolate profile of cabbage was investigated. Among the volatile oil constituents, an enhancement in trans-hex-2-enal was noted on irradiation that was attributed to the increased liberation of precursor linolenic acid mainly from monogalactosyl diacyl glycerol (MGDG). Irradiation also enhanced sinigrin, the major glucosinolate of cabbage that accounted for the enhanced allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) in the volatile oils of the irradiated vegetable. During storage the content of trans-hex-2-enal increased immediately after irradiation and then returned to the basal value within 24h while the content of sinigrin and AITC increased post irradiation and thereafter remained constant during storage. Our findings on the enhancement in potentially important health promoting compounds such as sinigrin and AITC demonstrates that besides extending shelf life and safety, radiation processing can have an additional advantage in improving the nutritional quality of cabbage.

  11. The changes in the volatile aldehydes formed during the deep-fat frying process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Qin, Wen; Lin, Derong; Shen, Qun; Saleh, Ahmed S M

    2015-12-01

    Volatile aldehydes (VAs) formed during soybean oil (SBO) heating, wheat dough (WD) frying, and chicken breast meat (CBM) frying processes were comparatively investigated by solid-phase micro-extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). The results showed that relative amounts (RAs) of the most detected VAs were firstly increased to maximum values in oil samples collected at the second hour of the seventh day and the values were then decreased with the increase in the time of oil heating process (control). However, for food frying processes, the time needed for reaching maximum RAs of VAs was shorter and the values were decreased with the increase in frying time. Significant change in contents of the VAs was observed for oil samples fried with CBM due to the high contents of water, protein, and lipid content compared to oil samples fried with WD. Based on the obtained results, free radical reaction, particularly positional isomerization and cis-trans isomerization, was deduced to occur when WD or CBM was fried in SBO. The relatively high RAs of VAs formed during the deep-fat frying process presented certain invaluable measures for evaluating of frying oil and fried food quality and safety.

  12. An investigation of voids formation mechanisms and their effects on freeze and thaw processes of lithium and lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Yang, Jae-Young

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of void formation during the cooldown and freezing of lithium coolant within the primary loop of SP-100 type systems are investigated. These mechanisms are: (1) homogeneous nucleation; (2) heterogeneous nucleation; (3) normal segregation of helium gas dissolved in liquid lithium; and (4) shrinkage of lithium during freezing. To evaluate the void formation potential due to segregation, a numerical scheme that couples the freezing and mass diffusion processes in both the solid and liquid regions is developed. The results indicated that the formation of He bubbles is unlikely by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation during the cooldown process. However, homogeneous nucleation of He bubbles following the segregation of dissolved He in liquid lithium ahead of the solid-liquid interface is likely to occur. Results also show that total volume of He void is insignificant when compared to that of shrinkage voids. In viewing this, the subsequent research focuses on the effects of shrinkage void forming during freezing of lithium on subsequent thaw processes are investigated using a numerical scheme that is based on a single (solid/liquid) cell approach. The cases of lithium-fluoride are also investigated to show the effect of larger volume shrinkage upon freezing on the freeze and thaw processes. Results show that a void forming at the wall appreciably reduces the solid-liquid interface velocity, during both freeze and thaw, and causes a substantial rise in the wall temperature during thaw. However, in the case of Li, the maximum wall temperature was much lower than the melting temperature of PWC-11, which is used as the structure material in the SP-100 system. Hence, it is included that a formation of hot spots is unlikely during the startup or restart of the SP-100 system.

  13. Effect of chemical composition and high pressure processing on the volatile fraction of Serrano dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Onandi, Nerea; Rivas-Cañedo, Ana; Nuñez, Manuel; Picon, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    The volatile fraction of 30 Serrano dry-cured hams with different salt and intramuscular fat contents was investigated. In addition, the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) at 600 MPa for 6 min at 21°C on the volatile compounds of those hams was studied. One hundred volatile compounds were identified and their levels subjected to analysis of variance with ham chemical composition (aw, salt content, intramuscular fat content and salt in lean ratio) and HPP treatment as main effects. Chemical composition mainly affected the relative abundance of acids, alcohols, branched-chain aldehydes, ketones, benzene compounds, sulfur compounds and some miscellaneous compounds. Salt content and fat content influenced a greater number of volatile compounds than aw. High pressure processing had a significant effect on only 8 volatile compounds, with higher levels of methanethiol and sulfur dioxide in HPP-treated samples and higher levels of ethyl acetate, ethyl butanoate, ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, ethyl 3-methylbutanoate, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide in control untreated samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystal form and phase structure of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/polyamide 11/clay nanocomposites by high-shear processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjin; Iwakura, Yuko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Polyamide 11 (PA11)/clay, Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/clay and PVDF/PA11/clay nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing using a high shear extruder. Two types of organoclay with different modified alkyl tails and different polarities were used for PA11 and PVDF nanocomposites. PA11 nanocomposites derived from an organoclay having one alkyl tail show a well-exfoliated morphology but no crystal form transformation, whereas those derived from an organoclay having two alkyl tails give a little worse clay dispersion with the clear alpha to gamma crystal form transition with the addition of the clay. In contrast, the PVDF composites derived from the two organoclays result in a poor dispersion. In addition, PVDF/PA11 blend nanocomposites with a novel morphology have been fabricated using the high-shear extruder. It was found that the clay platelets were selectively dispersed in the PA11 phase with the size of larger than 200 nm, while no clay platelets were located in the PVDF phase and in the PA11 nanodomains with the size of smaller than 200 nm. Moreover, the addition of organoclay shows significant effects on the phase structure of PVDF/PA11 blends.

  15. {sup 252}Cf-source-correlated transmission measurements for uranyl fluoride deposit in a 24-in.-OD process pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; Mullens, J.A.; Wyatt, M.S.; Hannon, T.F.

    1998-06-01

    Characterization of a hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O) deposit in a 17-ft-long, 24-in.-OD process pipe at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant was successfully performed by using {sup 252}Cf-source-correlated time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. These measurements of neutrons and gamma rays through the pipe from an external {sup 2521}Cf fission source were used to measure the deposit profile and its distribution along the pipe, the hydration (or H/U), and the total uranium mass. The measurements were performed with a source in an ionization chamber on one side of the pipe and detectors on the other. Scanning the pipe vertically and horizontally produced a spatial and time-dependent radiograph of the deposit in which transmitted gamma rays and neutrons were separated in time. The cross-correlation function between the source and the detector was measured with the Nuclear Weapons Identification System. After correcting for pipe effects, the deposit thickness was determined from the transmitted neutrons and H/U from the gamma rays. Results were consistent with a later intrusive observation of the shape and the color of the deposit; i.e., the deposit was annular and was on the top of the pipe at some locations, demonstrating the usefulness of this method for deposit characterization.

  16. Differential Volatile Signatures from Skin, Naevi and Melanoma: A Novel Approach to Detect a Pathological Process

    PubMed Central

    Abaffy, Tatjana; Duncan, Robert; Riemer, Daniel D.; Tietje, Olaf; Elgart, George; Milikowski, Clara; DeFazio, R. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Background Early detection of melanoma is of great importance to reduce mortality. Discovering new melanoma biomarkers would improve early detection and diagnosis. Here, we present a novel approach to detect volatile compounds from skin. Methods and Findings We used Head Space Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to identify volatile signatures from melanoma, naevi and skin samples. We hypothesized that the metabolic state of tissue alters the profile of volatile compounds. Volatiles released from fresh biopsy tissue of melanoma and benign naevus were compared based on their difference in frequency distribution and their expression level. We also analyzed volatile profiles from frozen tissue, including skin and melanoma. Conclusions Three volatiles, 4-methyl decane, dodecane and undecane were preferentially expressed in both fresh and frozen melanoma, indicating that they are candidate biomarkers. Twelve candidate biomarkers evaluated by fuzzy logic analysis of frozen samples distinguished melanoma from skin with 89% sensitivity and 90% specificity. Our results demonstrate proof-of-principle that there is differential expression of volatiles in melanoma. Our volatile metabolomic approach will lead to a better understanding of melanoma and can enable development of new diagnostic and treatment strategies based on altered metabolism. PMID:21079799

  17. Evaluation of lead recovery efficiency from waste CRT funnel glass by chlorinating volatilization process.

    PubMed

    Erzat, Aris; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2014-01-01

    The current study was carried out to develop a novel process, namely chloride volatilization procedure for lead recovery from waste cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass. In the recovery system, the glass powder was first compressed into cylindrical pellet homogeneously with chlorinating agents, and then subjected to thermal treatment for solid-phase reaction. In this case, lead could be easily released from the silicon oxide network of the glass and it was recovered in the form of PbCl₂. It was found that CaCl2 was the most effective chlorinating agent, and the optimum operation temperature, holding time and system pressure were 1000 °C, 2 h, 600 ± 50 Pa, respectively. The evaporated PbCl₂could be easily recovered by a cooling device. The evaporation ratio of lead from waste CRT was 99.1% and the purity of the recovered PbCl₂product was 97.0%. The reaction routes and lead recovery mechanisms of the process were identified. This study provides an efficient and practical process for waste CRT funnel glass detoxification and recycling.

  18. [Occurrence and distribution of volatile organic compounds in conventional and advanced drinking water treatment processes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-Chao; Luo, Qian; Chen, Hu; Wei, Zi; Wang, Zi-Jian; Xu, Ke-Wen

    2013-12-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to study the occurrence and distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in conventional and advanced drinking water treatment processes of 3 water treatment plants in Lianyungang City. Results showed that 30 compounds of 3 classes were detected from 67 kinds of VOCs in all the samples collected. The concentrations of carbonyl compounds, halogenated hydrocarbons and benzenes detected were in the ranges of 0.04-61.27, 0.02-35.61 and 0.07-2.33 microg x L(-1) respectively. Comparing the changes of different VOCs in three drinking water treatment plants, conventional chlorination process could effectively remove benzenes but meanwhile produced trihalomethanes (THMs). Additional advanced treatment ozonation-biological activated carbon process could decrease the formation of THMs during pre-chlorination but produced new risky contaminants like carbonyl compounds. The changes of VOCs in tap water were also investigated. It was found that carbonyl compounds produced by ozonation could be further transformed to THMs with residual chlorine. However, the health risks of all detected compounds in tap water were at a low level, except that the carcinogenic risk of crotonaldehydes (9.3 x 10(-5)-2.2 x 10(-4)) was slightly higher than the US EPA threshold (10(-6)-10(-4)).

  19. Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds and Possibility of Exposure to By-product Volatile Organic Compounds in Photolithography Processes in Semiconductor Manufacturing Factories.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Hyun; Shin, Jung-Ah; Park, Hyun-Hee; Yi, Gwang Yong; Chung, Kwang-Jae; Park, Hae-Dong; Kim, Kab-Bae; Lee, In-Seop

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the concentration of volatile organic compound (VOC)s originated from the chemicals used and/or derived from the original parental chemicals in the photolithography processes of semiconductor manufacturing factories. A total of four photolithography processes in 4 Fabs at three different semiconductor manufacturing factories in Korea were selected for this study. This study investigated the types of chemicals used and generated during the photolithography process of each Fab, and the concentration levels of VOCs for each Fab. A variety of organic compounds such as ketone, alcohol, and acetate compounds as well as aromatic compounds were used as solvents and developing agents in the processes. Also, the generation of by-products, such as toluene and phenol, was identified through a thermal decomposition experiment performed on a photoresist. The VOC concentration levels in the processes were lower than 5% of the threshold limit value (TLV)s. However, the air contaminated with chemical substances generated during the processes was re-circulated through the ventilation system, thereby affecting the airborne VOC concentrations in the photolithography processes. Tens of organic compounds were being used in the photolithography processes, though the types of chemical used varied with the factory. Also, by-products, such as aromatic compounds, could be generated during photoresist patterning by exposure to light. Although the airborne VOC concentrations resulting from the processes were lower than 5% of the TLVs, employees still could be exposed directly or indirectly to various types of VOCs.

  20. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  1. Changes in volatile flavor components of guava juice with high-pressure treatment and heat processing and during storage.

    PubMed

    Yen, G C; Lin, H T

    1999-05-01

    The changes in volatile flavor components of guava juice during pressure processing (25 degrees C, 600 MPa, 15 min), heat processing (95 degrees C, 5 min), and storage at 4 and 25 degrees C were evaluated by purge and trap/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Esters were the major volatile fraction in guava juice, and alcohols were the second. Pressure processing could maintain the original flavor distribution of the juice. Heat processing (95 degrees C, 5 min) caused decreases in the majority of flavor components in the juice when compared with freshly extracted juice. High-pressure treatment at 600 MPa for 15 min can effectively sterilize microbes but partially inactivate enzymes of guava juice; therefore, volatile components in pressure-treated juice gradually changed during storage periods. Pressure-treated guava juice showed increases in methanol, ethanol, and 2-ethylfuran with decreases in the other components during storage period. Nevertheless, the volatile distribution of 600 MPa treated guava juice was similar to that of freshly extracted juice when stored at 4 degrees C for 30 days.

  2. Improved process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons under varying wind speeds and gas bubbling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the lagoon water total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model using a...

  3. Influence of physicochemical characteristics and high pressure processing on the volatile fraction of Iberian dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Onandi, Nerea; Rivas-Cañedo, Ana; Ávila, Marta; Garde, Sonia; Nuñez, Manuel; Picon, Antonia

    2017-09-01

    The volatile fraction of 30 Iberian dry-cured hams of different physicochemical characteristics and the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) at 600MPa on volatile compounds were investigated. According to the analysis of variance carried out on the levels of 122 volatile compounds, intramuscular fat content influenced the levels of 8 benzene compounds, 5 carboxylic acids, 2 ketones, 2 furanones, 1 alcohol, 1 aldehyde and 1 sulfur compound, salt concentration influenced the levels of 1 aldehyde and 1 ketone, salt-in-lean ratio had no effect on volatile compounds, and water activity influenced the levels of 3 sulfur compounds, 1 alcohol and 1 aldehyde. HPP-treated samples of Iberian ham had higher levels of 4 compounds and lower levels of 31 compounds than untreated samples. A higher influence of HPP treatment on volatile compounds than physicochemical characteristics was observed for Iberian ham. Therefore, HPP treatment conditions should be optimized in order to diminish its possible effect on Iberian ham odor and aroma characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and thermal processing on bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and volatile profile of mulberry juice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Du, Bao-Lei; Cui, Zheng-Wei; Xu, Li-Ping; Li, Chun-Yang

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure and thermal processing on microbiological quality, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and volatile profile of mulberry juice. High hydrostatic pressure processing at 500 MPa for 10 min reduced the total viable count from 4.38 log cfu/ml to nondetectable level and completely inactivated yeasts and molds in raw mulberry juice, ensuring the microbiological safety as thermal processing at 85 ℃ for 15 min. High hydrostatic pressure processing maintained significantly (p < 0.05) higher contents of total phenolic, total flavonoid and resveratrol, and antioxidant activity of mulberry juice than thermal processing. The main volatile compounds of mulberry juice were aldehydes, alcohols, and ketones. High hydrostatic pressure processing enhanced the volatile compound concentrations of mulberry juice while thermal processing reduced them in comparison with the control. These results suggested that high hydrostatic pressure processing could be an alternative to conventional thermal processing for production of high-quality mulberry juice.

  5. [Emission characteristics and safety evaluation of volatile organic compounds in manufacturing processes of automotive coatings].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Pei-Yuan; Li, Jian-Jun; Liao, Dong-Qi; Tu, Xiang; Xu, Mei-Ying; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2013-12-01

    Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated in an automotive coating manufacturing enterprise. Air samples were taken from eight different manufacturing areas in three workshops, and the species of VOCs and their concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Safety evaluation was also conducted by comparing the concentration of VOCs with the permissible concentration-short term exposure limit (PC-STEL) regulated by the Ministry of Health. The results showed that fifteen VOCs were detected in the indoor air of the automotive coatings workshop, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, methyl isobutyl ketone, propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, trimethylbenzene and ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, Their concentrations widely ranged from 0.51 to 593.14 mg x m(-3). The concentrations of TVOCs were significantly different among different manufacturing processes. Even in the same manufacturing process, the concentrations of each component measured at different times were also greatly different. The predominant VOCs of indoor air in the workshop were identified to be ethylbenzene and butyl acetate. The concentrations of most VOCs exceeded the occupational exposure limits, so the corresponding control measures should be taken to protect the health of the workers.

  6. Anaerobic rotating disc batch reactor nutrient removal process enhanced by volatile fatty acid addition.

    PubMed

    Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Mielcarek, Artur; Filipkowska, Urszula; Kłodowska, Izabella; Ostrowska, Kamila; Duchniewicz, Sylwia

    2015-01-01

    RBC effluent needs further treatment because of water-quality standards requiring low nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. It may be achieved by using reactors with biomass immobilized on the filling's surface as post-denitrification biofilm reactors. Due to the lack of organic matter in treated wastewater, the introduction of external carbon sources becomes necessary. The new attached growth bioreactor--anaerobic rotating disc batch reactor (ARDBR)--was examined as a post-denitrification reactor. The impact of selected volatile fatty acids on nutrient removal efficiency in an ARDBR was studied. The biofilm was developing on totally submerged discs mounted coaxially on a vertical shaft. Acetic, propionic, butyric and caproic acids were applied. Wastewaters were removed from the reactors after 24-h treatment, together with the excess solids. In the ARDBR tank, there was no biomass in the suspended form at the beginning of the treatment process. Acids with a higher number of carbon atoms (butyric and caproic) were the most efficient in denitrification process. The highest phosphorus removal efficiency was noted in the ARDBR with butyric and propionic acids. The lowest unitary consumption of the external source of carbon in denitrification was recorded for acetic acid, whereas the highest one for caproic acid.

  7. Fluoride absorption: independence from plasma fluoride levels

    SciTech Connect

    Whitford, G.M.; Williams, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    The concept that there are physiologic mechanisms to homeostatically regulate plasma fluoride concentrations has been supported by results in the literature suggesting an inverse relationship between plasma fluoride levels and the absorption of the ion from the gastrointestinal tract of the rat. The validity of the relationship was questioned because of possible problems in the experimental design. The present work used four different methods to evaluate the effect of plasma fluoride levels on the absorption of the ion in rats: (i) the percentage of the daily fluoride intake that was excreted in the urine; (ii) the concentration of fluoride in femur epiphyses; (iii) the net areas under the time-plasma fluoride concentration curves after intragastric fluoride doses; and (iv) the residual amounts or fluoride in the gastrointestinal tracts after the intragastric fluoride doses. None of these methods indicated that plasma fluoride levels influence the rate or the degree or fluoride absorption. It was concluded that, unless extremely high plasma fluoride levels are involved (pharmacologic or toxic doses), the absorption of the ion is independent of plasma levels. The results provide further evidence that plasma fluoride concentrations are not homeostatically regulated.

  8. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling changes in fluoride ion concentration within alluvial and hard rock aquifers in a part of a semi-arid region of Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Priyadarshini; Ashthana, Harshita; Rena, Vikas; Kumar, Pardeep; Mukherjee, Saumitra

    2017-04-01

    Geochemical signatures from alluvial and hard rock aquifers in a part of Northern India elucidate the chemical processes controlling fluctuations in fluoride ion concentration linked to changes in major ion groundwater chemistry. Majority of samples from the hard rock and the alluvial aquifers for pre-monsoon show both carbonate and silicate weathering, ion exchange, evaporation and rock water interaction as the processes controlling major ion chemistry whereas for post monsoon samples, contribution of silicate weathering and ion exchange process were observed. Evaporative processes causing the increase in Na+ ion concentration in premonsoon enhance the reverse ion exchange processes causing increase in Ca2+ ions which impedes fluorite mineral dissolution in the premonsoon groundwater samples within the study area. Alternately, it is observed that the removal of Ca2+ ion from solution plays a key role in increase in fluorite mineral dissolution despite its saturation in groundwater in the postmonsoon samples. Also, ion exchange process on clay surfaces is more pronounced in the postmonsoon samples leading to the uptake of Ca2+ ion upon release of Na+ and K+ ion in solution. Ca2+ ion concentration is inversely correlated with F- ion concentration in both the aquifers in the postmonsoon season validating the role of calcite precipitation as a major reason for the fluoride ion increase. Moreover, increase in silicate weathering in the postmonsoon samples leads to increase in clay particles acting as suitable sites for ion exchange enhancing Ca2+ removal from groundwater. Cationic dominance of Na+ ion in the post monsoon samples also validates the occurrence of this process. Collectively, these processes set the ideal conditions for increase in the fluoride ion concentration particularly in the alluvium aquifer waters in the postmonsoon season Keywords: geochemistry, ion-exchange, rock-water interaction, mineral dissolution, weathering.

  9. Influence of the fabrication process and fluoride content on the tribocorrosion behaviour of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy in artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Licausi, M P; Igual Muñoz, A; Amigó Borrás, V

    2013-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used as dental implants due to their low density, excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, during their lifetime Ti6Al4V biomedical alloys are subjected to different mechanical actions (i.e., sliding or fretting), thus resulting in a tribocorrosion system, which is an irreversible material degradation process due to the combined effect of corrosion and wear. In this study, the tribo-electrochemical behavior of cast and sintered (by powder metallurgy) Ti6Al4V alloy in artificial human saliva solution without and with fluoride additions of 100ppm and 1000ppm and in an average industrial mouth wash solution with a 112ppm fluoride content have been investigated by different electrochemical techniques. The same tribocorrosion mechanisms were found in the cast and sintered titanium alloys, although slightly different wear debris behavior was observed. At low applied passive potentials, wear rates are similar to those obtained under equilibrium conditions (Open Circuit Potential). There exists a critical fluoride concentration above which corrosion and tribocorrosion rates increase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermodynamic constants for actinide oxides and oxyhydroxides relevant to actinide volatility calculations for thermal oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1993-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to provide input of thermodynamic data on actinide volatilities to EERC for use in their computer code for modeling of metal volatilities in incinerators. It is also anticipated that the data may be documented later in an EPA sponsored ``Metals Bible.`` It should be noted that only upper limits for the volatility of PuO{sub 2}(s) due to PuO{sub 3}(g) and PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) and the volatility of AmO{sub 2} in PuO{sub 2}(s) due to AmO{sub 3}(g) and AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) could be set. The data on the americium vapor species are intended for calculations where AmO{sub 2} is present as a solid solution in PuO{sub 2}(s).

  11. Implications of internal processes in the interpretation of Titan's volatile inventory measured by Cassini-Huygens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Gautier, D.; Hersant, F.; Lunine, J. I.

    2010-04-01

    Based on a series of data collected by Cassini-Huygens, we constrain the composition of the primordial bricks that formed Titan and quantify the chemical exchanges that occurred on Titan between the interior and the atmosphere since its accretion. Assuming that the bricks that formed Titan had a composition close to that of Enceladus and that of the planetesimals in the feeding zone of Saturn, we show that accretional melting generate an CH4-CO2-H2S - dominated atmosphere of more than 10 bars in equilibrium with a water ocean. The partial atmospheric pressure of ammonia remains low (< 0.01 bar for T< 300 K) owing to its high solubility in liquid water. Photochemical conversion of atmospheric ammonia into nitrogen is possible just after accretion but requires the water ocean remains in contact with the atmosphere during at least 10-50 millions of years. We show that most of the gas species, except N2 and 36Ar, released during accretion are likely to be re-incorporated in the interior during the post-accretional cooling phase, owing to efficient clathration at the water/ocean interface. During this process, xenon is predicted to be almost entirely removed from the primitive atmosphere and to be stored in the form of clathrate hydrate in the interior. The composition of gases released during the rest of the evolution is determined by the stability of each gas species relative to the clathrate phase and is expected to be dominated by CH4 and CO2, and to contain small amounts of argon and CO. It can be anticipated from our analysis that flows and deposits of CO2-rich materials would be associated to cryovolcanic events. Although the detection of 40Ar clearly support that interaction with the silicate phase has occurred during Titan's history, it is still unclear if significant chemical exchanges has occurred with the rocky core. Only detection of 38Ar and of the other noble gas isotopes by a future mission will permit to determine how the silicate phase has contributed

  12. Occupational exposure to volatile nitrosamines in foundries using the Ashland core-making process

    SciTech Connect

    Ducos, P.; Gaudin, R.; Maire, C.; Mavelle, T.; Bouchikhi, B.; Derby, G.

    1988-10-01

    Eight foundries using the Ashland process for the production of cores were surveyed to assess the occupational exposure to carcinogenic volatile nitrosamines. Personal and area samples were collected by means of artifact-free cartridges during the core-making and the molding/casting/shake-out operations. Analyses were carried out with gas chromatography/Hall detector and gas chromatography/TEA (thermal energy analyzer) for validation. The core-making workshops had the highest concentration for at least two nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosoethylmethylamine (NEMA), but the levels of NDMA never exceeded 0.35 microgram/m3 with an arithmetic mean between 0.23 and 0.02 microgram/m3. In a number of samplings, two other peaks, both on TEA and Hall detector, could not be identified. The foundries per se (molding/casting/shake-out) had lower nitrosamine levels (CNDMAmax = 0.15 microgram/m3, CNDMA less than 0.03 microgram/m3). For the first time NEMA was identified as an industrial contaminant in foundries but its concentration was always lower than that of NDMA. The nitrosamines found were presumably produced from dimethylethylamine (DMEA). Industries producing or using tertiary or secondary amines should be controlled for their possible nitrosamine contamination.

  13. Regolith layering processes based on studies of low-temperature volatile elements in Apollo core samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The concentrations of Hg released at at the most 130 C increase with depth in near-surface samples from cores. This is in response to a daytime thermal gradient with temperatures of approximately 400 K at the surface decreasing to approximately 250 K at greater than 10 cm depth (Keihm and Langseth, 1973). The steepness of the slopes and the depths to which the concentration gradients extend appear to be determined by the color, density and possibly the grain size of the soils. Earlier surface layers can be identified and, in general, are in agreement with other indicators of such layers. Low temperature volatilized Br exhibits trends that parallel those of Hg in a number of cases. This is also true of Br and Hg fractions released in stepwise heating experiments at higher temperatures. The coherence, especially in higher temperature fractions, between these chemically dissimilar elements implies a common physical process of entrapment; possibly one related to the presence of vapor deposits on surfaces and to opening and closing of microcracks and pores.

  14. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  15. Fluoride release from aged resin composites containing fluoridated glass filler.

    PubMed

    Itota, Toshiyuki; Al-Naimi, Omar T; Carrick, Thomas E; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; McCabe, John F

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release from aged resin composites containing different types of fluoridated glass filler into both deionized distilled water and lactic acid solution. Three resin composites, UniFil S (containing fluoro-alumino-silicate glass filler), Reactmer (containing pre-reacted glass-ionomer filler) and Beautifil (containing both types of fillers) were used. A conventional glass-ionomer cement, Ketac-Fil, was used as a control. Five disk specimens of each material were prepared and aged in water for 10 weeks. After aging, specimens were immersed in deionized distilled water for a further 6 days and then in aqueous lactic acid (pH 4.0) for 2 days. This process was repeated twice more and the specimens were subsequently immersed in water for a further 12 days. Fluoride release was measured every 2 days throughout the post-aging period. The amount of fluoride release for aged UniFil S and Beautifil markedly increased in acid solution compared with water storage. The difference was not so great for aged Reactmer and Ketac-Fil. UniFil S and Beautifil gave significantly greater fluoride release in water following immersion in acid solution (p<0.05, two-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test), but Reactmer and Ketac-Fil showed no such increase in fluoride release after acid immersion. These results suggested that the nature of the fluoridated glass filler within a resin composite and the way in which the material interacts with an acidic environment affected the amount of fluoride released.

  16. Bio-electrolytic sensor for rapid monitoring of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangdan; Li, Xiaohu; Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-03-15

    This study presents an innovative biosensor that was developed on the basis of a microbial electrolysis cell for fast and reliable measurement of volatile fatty acids (VFA) during anaerobic digestion (AD) process. The bio-electrolytic sensor was first tested with synthetic wastewater containing varying concentrations of VFA. A linear correlation (R(2) = 0.99) between current densities (0.03 ± 0.01 to 2.43 ± 0.12 A/m(2)) and VFA concentrations (5-100 mM) was found. The sensor performance was then investigated under different affecting parameters such as the external voltage, VFA composition ratio, and ionic strength. Linear relationship between the current density and VFA concentrations was always observed. Furthermore, the bio-electrolytic sensor proved ability to handle interruptions such as the presence of complex organic matter, anode exposure to oxygen and low pH. Finally, the sensor was applied to monitor VFA concentrations in a lab-scale AD reactor for a month. The VFA measurements from the sensor correlated well with those from GC analysis which proved the accuracy of the system. Since hydrogen was produced in the cathode as byproduct during monitoring, the system could be energy self-sufficient. Considering the high accuracy, short response time, long-term stability and additional benefit of H2 production, this bio-electrolytic sensor could be a simple and cost-effective method for VFA monitoring during AD and other anaerobic processes.

  17. Process window improvement on 45nm technology non volatile memory by CD uniformity improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Birkner, Robert; Graitzer, Erez; Cohen, Avi; Triulzi, Benedetta; Romeo, Carmelo

    2010-09-01

    For the next years optical lithography stays at 193nm with a numerical aperture of 1.35. Mask design becomes more complex, mask and lithography specification tighten and process control becomes more important than ever. Accurate process control is a key factor to success to maintain a high yield in chip production. One of the key parameters necessary to assure a good and reliable functionality of any integrated circuit is the Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU). There are different contributors which impact the total wafer CDU: mask CD uniformity, scanner repeatability, resist process, lens fingerprint, wafer topography etc. In this work we focus on improvement of intra-field CDU at wafer level by improving the mask CD signature using a CDC200TM tool from Carl Zeiss SMS. The mask layout used is a line and space dark level of a 45nm node Non Volatile Memory (NVM). A prerequisite to improve intra-field CDU at wafer level is to characterize the mask CD signature precisely. For CD measurement on mask the newly developed wafer level CD metrology tool WLCD32 of Carl Zeiss SMS was used. The WLCD32 measures CD based on proven aerial imaging technology. The WLCD32 measurement data show an excellent correlation to wafer CD data. For CDU correction the CDC200TM tool is used which utilizes an ultrafast femto-second laser to write intra-volume shading elements (Shade-In ElementsTM) inside the bulk material of the mask. By adjusting the density of the shading elements, the light transmission through the mask is locally changed in a manner that improves wafer CDU when the corrected mask is printed. In the present work we will demonstrate a closed loop process of WLCD32 and CDC200TM to improve mask CD signature as one of the main contributors to intra-field wafer CDU. Furthermore we will show that the process window will be significantly enlarged by improvement of intra-field CDU. An increase of 20% in exposure latitude was observed.

  18. Volatile, anthocyanidin, quality and sensory changes in rabbiteye blueberry from whole fruit through pilot plant juice processing.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, John C; Stein-Chisholm, Rebecca E; Lloyd, Steven W; Bett-Garber, Karen L; Grimm, Casey C; Watson, Michael A; Lea, Jeanne M

    2017-01-01

    High antioxidant content and keen marketing have increased blueberry demand and increased local production which in turn mandates new uses for abundant harvests. Pilot scale processes were employed to investigate the anthocyanidin profiles, qualitative volatile compositions, and sensorial attributes in not-from-concentrate (NFC) 'Tifblue' rabbiteye blueberry juices. Processing prior to pasteurization generally resulted in increased L(*) and hue angle color, while a(*) , b(*) , and C(*) decreased. After 4 months pasteurized storage, non-clarified juice (NCP) lost 73.8% of total volatiles compared with 70.9% in clarified juice (CJP). There was a total anthocyanidin decrease of 84.5% and 85.5% after 4 months storage in NCP and CJP, respectively. Storage itself resulted in only 14.2% and 7.2% anthocyanidin loss after pasteurization in NCP and CJP. Storage significantly affected nine flavor properties in juices; however, there were no significant differences in the blueberry, strawberry, purple grape, floral, sweet aroma, or sweet tastes between processed and stored juices. NFC pasteurized blueberry juices maintained desirable flavors even though highly significant volatile and anthocyanidin losses occurred through processing. Maintenance of color and flavor indicate that NFC juices could have an advantage over more abusive methods often used in commercial juice operations. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Influence of partial replacement of NaCl with KCl on profiles of volatile compounds in dry-cured bacon during processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated the influence of partial substitution of NaCl with KCl on the formation of volatile compounds in bacons during processing using a purge and trap dynamic headspace GC/MS system. Three substitutions were 0% KCl (I), 40% KCl (II), and 70% KCl (III). The profiles of the volatile ...

  20. Salt fluoridation: a review.

    PubMed

    Pollick, Howard F

    2013-06-01

    Salt fluoridation is sometimes suggested as a prospect for communities that have a low water fluoride concentration and have no possibility of implementing community water fluoridation. School-based milk fluoridation programs also are practiced in some countries as an alternative. This paper reviews the evidence of effectiveness in dental caries prevention and risks of dental fluorosis in countries where salt or milk fluoridation is practiced.

  1. Fluoride content of infant formulae in Australia.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Reynolds, E C

    1996-02-01

    The prevalence of dental fluorosis in Australia and the United States of America has increased in both optimally fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas. This has been attributed to an increase in the fluoride level of food and beverages through processing with fluoridated water, inadvertent ingestion of fluoride toothpaste, and the inappropriate use of dietary supplements. A major source of fluoride in infancy is considered to be infant formula which has been implicated as a risk factor for fluorosis in a number of studies. In this study the fluoride content of the infant formulae commonly used in Australia was determined. The acid diffusible fluoride of each powdered formula was isolated by microdiffusion and measured using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. The fluoride content of milk-based formulae ranged from 0.23 to 3.71 micrograms F/g and for soy-based formulae from 1.08 to 2.86 micrograms F/g. When reconstituted, according to the manufacturer's directions, with water not containing fluoride, the formulae ranged in fluoride content from 0.031 to 0.532 ppm, with the average fluoride content 0.240 ppm. Using average infant body masses and suggested volumes of formula consumption for infants 1-12 months of age, possible fluoride ingestion per kg body mass was estimated. None of the formulae, if reconstituted using water containing up to 0.1 ppm F, should provide a daily fluoride intake above the suggested threshold for fluorosis of 0.1 mg F/kg body mass. However, if reconstituted with water containing 1.0 ppm F they should all provide a daily fluoride intake of above the suggested threshold for fluorosis with intakes up to 2-3 times the recommended upper 'optimal' limit of 0.07 mg/kg body mass. Under these conditions the water used to reconstitute the formulae would provide 65-97 percent of the fluoride ingested. These figures are likely to be overestimates due to the intake of nutrients from other sources reducing formulae consumption and also due to the lower

  2. Nitrogen compounds in must and volatile profile of white wine: Influence of clarification process before alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Burin, Vívian Maria; Caliari, Vinícius; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding a fining agent to the must in relation to the fermentation kinetics and the volatile composition of the wine produced. Three fining agents, bentonite, pectinolytic enzyme and silica were applied, separately, to samples of Chardonnay must. It was observed that the addition of a fining agent had a significant influence on the must and wine composition. The must clarified with bentonite showed the lowest nitrogen content and the enzyme addition led to the highest nitrogen content. During the fermentation process, a difference in the consumption rate was observed for each amino acid in relation to the fining agent used in the process. In relation to the volatile composition, the wine produced had different characteristics according to the fining agent added to the must, which was confirmed by separation of the samples using principal component analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The application of the fluoride reactivation process to the detection of sarin and soman nerve agent exposures in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Adams, T K; Capacio, B R; Smith, J R; Whalley, C E; Korte, W D

    2004-02-01

    The fluoride reactivation process was evaluated for measuring the level of sarin or soman nerve agents reactivated from substrates in plasma and tissue from in vivo exposed guinea pigs (Cava porcellus), in blood from in vivo exposed rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), and in spiked human plasma and purified human albumin. Guinea pig exposures ranged from 0.05 to 44 LD50, and reactivated nerve agent levels ranged from 1.0 ng/mL in plasma obtained from 0.05 LD50 sarin-exposed guinea pigs to an average of 147 ng/g in kidney tissue obtained from two 2.0 LD50 soman-exposed guinea pigs. Positive dose-response relationships were observed in all low-level, 0.05 to 0.4 LD50, exposure studies. An average value of 2.4 ng/mL for reactivated soman was determined in plasma obtained from two rhesus monkeys three days after a 2 LD50 exposure. Of the five types of guinea pig tissue studied, plasma, heart, liver, kidney and lung, the lung and kidney tissue yielded the highest amounts of reactivated agent. In similar tissue and with similar exposure procedures, reactivated soman levels were greater than reactivated sarin levels. Levels of reactivated agents decreased rapidly with time while the guinea pig was alive, but decreased much more slowly after death. This latter chemical stability should facilitate forensic retrospective identification. The high level of reactivated agents in guinea pig samples led to the hypothesis that the principal source of reactivated agent came from the agent-carboxylesterase adduct. However, there could be contributions from adducts of the cholinesterases, albumin and fibrous tissue, as well. Quantitative analysis was performed with a GC-MS system using selected ion monitoring of the 99 and 125 ions for sarin and the 99 and 126 ions for soman. Detection levels were as low as 0.5 ng/mL. The assay was precise and easy to perform, and has potential for exposure analysis from organophosphate nerve agents and pesticides in other animal species.

  4. Improvement of a three-step process for the treatment of aluminium hazardous wastes containing PAHs (benzo[b,j,k]fluoranthene and chrysene) and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François; Dhenain, Aurélie; Chartier, Myriam

    2011-12-01

    Hazardous wastes from a primary aluminium production plant could be decontaminated by a three-step process. First, the PAHs contained in these wastes were extracted with an amphoteric surfactant (0.25% or 0.50% w/w of cocamidopropylhydroxysultaine [CAS]) by cell or column flotation, depending on the particle size fraction (under or above 500 microm). Then, the fluorides were stabilized with lime (8% w/w) or a mixture of lime (4% w/w) and phosphoric acid (0.95% w/w). The decontaminated wastes satisfied the Quebec PAH norm, fixed at 1000 mg kg(-1), with values of 900 +/- 352 mg kg(-1) and 624 +/- 179 mg kg(-1) for benzo(b,j,k)fluoranthene (BJK) at laboratory and pilot scales, respectively. The fluoride stabilization in the treated wastes was characterized by TCLP values of 138 +/- 67 mg F- L(-1) and 29.5 +/- 7.6 mg F- L(-1) for laboratory and pilot experiments, which were under the Quebec norm (< 150 mg F- L(-1)). Finally, the metals in the process effluent were recovered by precipitation with sulphuric acid (10% v/v), and the final effluent and metallic residue obtained were recirculated without liquid fraction enrichment impact. The whole process was successfully tested at pilot scale. The preliminary economic study showed the potential of the process for the treatment of aluminium hazardous wastes.

  5. Adsorption process of fluoride from drinking water with magnetic core-shell Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 and Ce-Ti oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abo Markeb, Ahmad; Alonso, Amanda; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier

    2017-11-15

    Synthesized magnetic core-shell Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 nanoparticles were tested, as an adsorbent, for fluoride removal and the adsorption studies were optimized. Adsorption capacity was compared with the synthesized Ce-Ti oxide nanoparticles. The adsorption equilibrium for the Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 adsorbent was found to occur in <15min and it was demonstrated to be stable and efficient in a wide pH range of 5-11 with high fluoride removal efficiency over 80% of all cases. Furthermore, isotherm data were fitted using Langmuir and Freundlich models, and the adsorption capacities resulted in 44.37 and 91.04mg/g, at pH7, for Ce-Ti oxides and Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 nanoparticles, respectively. The physical sorption mechanism was estimated using the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. An anionic exchange process between the OH(-) group on the surface of the Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 nanomaterial and the F(-) was involved in the adsorption. Moreover, thermodynamic parameters proved the spontaneous process for the adsorption of fluoride on Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The reusability of the material through magnetic recovery was demonstrated for five cycles of adsorption-desorption. Although the nanoparticles suffer slight structure modifications after their reusability, they keep their adsorption capacity. Likewise, the efficiency of the Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 was demonstrated when applied to real water to obtain a residual concentration of F(-) below the maximum contaminated level, 1.5mg/L (WHO, 2006). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fates of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in aerobic biological treatment processes: the effects of aeration and sludge addition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yang, Wen-Ben; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Yang, Jun-Chen; Zhao, Qing-Liang

    2014-05-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an environmental issue of increasing concern. As biological treatment has been considered as one important approach for VOC removal, lab-scale batch experiments were conducted in this study to investigate the fates of four chlorinated hydrocarbons, including chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC), in the biological treatment processes with respect to the effects of aeration and sludge addition. The VOC concentrations in the phases of air, water, and sludge under four simulated treatment stages (the first sedimentation, the forepart and rear part of aerobic biological treatment, and the second sedimentation) were analyzed. The results were used to understand the three-phase partitioning of these compounds and to estimate their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption and degradation in these technologies with the concept of fugacity. It was observed that the VOCs were mainly present in the water phase through the experiments. The effects of aeration or sludge addition on the fates of these VOCs occurred but appeared to be relatively limited. The concentration distributions of the VOCs were well below the reported partitioning coefficients. It was suggested that these compounds were unsaturated in the air and sludge phases, enhancing their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption/degradation through the processes. However, the properties of these chlorinated VOCs such as the volatility, polarity, or even biodegradability caused by their structural characteristics (e.g., the number of chlorine, saturated or unsaturated) may represent more significant factors for their fates in the aerobic biological treatment processes. These findings prove the complication behind the current knowledge of VOC pollutions in WWTPs and are of help to manage the adverse impacts on the environment and public

  7. Profiling analysis of volatile compounds from fruits using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Schmarr, Hans-Georg; Bernhardt, Jörg

    2010-01-22

    An image processing approach originating from the proteomics field has been transferred successfully to the processing of data obtained with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations data. The approach described here has proven to be a useful analytical tool for unbiased pattern comparison or profiling analyses, as demonstrated with the differentiation of volatile patterns ("aroma") from fruits such as apples, pears, and quince fruit. These volatile patterns were generated by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (HS-SPME-GC x GC). The data obtained from GC x GC chromatograms were used as contour plots which were then converted to gray-scale images and analyzed utilizing a workflow derived from 2D gel-based proteomics. Run-to-run variations between GC x GC chromatograms, respectively their contour plots, have been compensated by image warping. The GC x GC images were then merged into a fusion image yielding a defined and project-wide spot (peak) consensus pattern. Within detected spot boundaries of this consensus pattern, relative quantities of the volatiles from each GC x GC image have been calculated, resulting in more than 700 gap free volatile profiles over all samples. These profiles have been used for multivariate statistical analysis and allowed clustering of comparable sample origins and prediction of unknown samples. At present state of development, the advantage of using mass spectrometric detection can only be realized by data processing off-line from the identified software packages. However, such information provides a substantial basis for identification of statistically relevant compounds or for a targeted analysis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluoride assay methodology for carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    Heilman, Judith R; Levy, Steven M; Wefel, James S; Patterson, Kristine Y; Cutrufelli, Rena; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Holden, Joanne M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review different methodological techniques used for the assessment of fluoride in carbonated beverages, and compare results using a fluoride ion electrode direct read method with and without a prior decarbonation treatment. The carbonated beverages in this study were either purchased locally at grocery stores in Iowa City, Iowa, or purchased as part of a national representative sampling approach included in the National Fluoride Database and Intake Assessment Study (NFDIAS). The samples were compared with and without a decarbonating process. Soda pop and beer samples were analyzed by removing a 1-ml sample and adding a 1-ml buffer solution. The fluoride concentration of the sample and buffer combination was then determined using a fluoride ion specific electrode. There was no significant difference in the fluoride concentration of the samples with or without prior decarbonation. The mean absolute difference between the soda pop group with and without decarbonation was 0.01 ppm F, while results from the beer samples showed variation of 0.00 to 0.02 parts per million fluoride (ppm F). These differences were not statistically significant for the soda pop or beer groups (P=.50 and P=.74, respectively). Whether or not decarbonation was conducted prior to analysis, the fluoride assay results were the same. Therefore, decarbonation of soda pop and beer was deemed unnecessary prior to fluoride analysis.

  9. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Reiner, Robert H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1990-01-01

    A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  10. A process-based emission model of volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, H. F.; Rotz, C. A.; Hafner, S. D.; Montes, F.; Cohen, M.; Mitloehner, F. M.

    2017-03-01

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources such as those from dairy farms. A process-based model for predicting VOC emissions from silage was developed and incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM, v. 4.3), a whole-farm simulation of crop, dairy, and beef production systems. The performance of the IFSM silage VOC emission model was evaluated using ethanol and methanol emissions measured from conventional silage piles (CSP), silage bags (SB), total mixed rations (TMR), and loose corn silage (LCS) at a commercial dairy farm in central California. With transport coefficients for ethanol refined using experimental data from our previous studies, the model performed well in simulating ethanol emission from CSP, TMR, and LCS; its lower performance for SB could be attributed to possible changes in face conditions of SB after silage removal that are not represented in the current model. For methanol emission, lack of experimental data for refinement likely caused the underprediction for CSP and SB whereas the overprediction observed for TMR can be explained as uncertainty in measurements. Despite these limitations, the model is a valuable tool for comparing silage management options and evaluating their relative effects on the overall performance, economics, and environmental impacts of farm production. As a component of IFSM, the silage VOC emission model was used to simulate a representative dairy farm in central California. The simulation showed most silage VOC emissions were from feed lying in feed lanes and not from the exposed face of silage storages. This suggests that mitigation efforts, particularly in areas prone to ozone non-attainment status, should focus on reducing emissions during feeding. For

  11. Thermogenic respiratory processes drive the exponential increase of volatile organic compound emissions in Macrozamia cycad cones.

    PubMed

    Terry, L Irene; Roemer, Robert B; Booth, David T; Moore, Chris J; Walter, Gimme H

    2016-07-01

    An important outcome of plant thermogenesis is increased emissions of volatiles that mediate pollinator behaviour. We investigated whether the large increase in emissions, mainly the monoterpene ß-myrcene (>90%), during daily thermogenic events of Macrozamia macleayi and lucida cycad cones are due solely to the influence of high cone temperatures or are, instead, a result of increased respiratory rates during thermogenesis. We concurrently measured temperature, oxygen consumption and ß-myrcene emission profiles during thermogenesis of pollen cones under typical environmental temperatures and during experimental manipulations of cone temperatures and aerobic conditions, all in the dark. The exponential rise in ß-myrcene emissions never occurred without a prior, large increase in respiration, whereas an increase in cone temperature alone did not increase emissions. When respiration during thermogenesis was interrupted by anoxic conditions, ß-myrcene emissions decreased. The increased emission rates are not a result of increased cone temperature per se (through increased enzyme activity or volatilization of stored volatiles) but are dependent on biosynthetic pathways associated with increased respiration during thermogenesis that provide the carbon, energy (ATP) and reducing compounds (NADPH) required for ß-myrcene production through the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. These findings establish the significant contribution of respiration to volatile production during thermogenesis.

  12. SCREENING PROCESSED MILK FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING VACUUM DISTILLATION/GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adaptation of Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response' Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste Physical/Chemical Methods (SW-846) method 8261 to analyze milk for an expanded list of volatile organic compounds is presented. The milk matriz exhibits a strong affinity for o...

  13. SCREENING PROCESSED MILK FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING VACUUM DISTILLATION/GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adaptation of Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response' Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste Physical/Chemical Methods (SW-846) method 8261 to analyze milk for an expanded list of volatile organic compounds is presented. The milk matriz exhibits a strong affinity for o...

  14. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.; Willard, J.E.

    1961-08-01

    A method is described for dissolving lanthanum fluoride precipitates which is applicable to lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation processes for recovery of plutonium values from aqueous solutions. The lanthanum fluoride precipitate is contacted with an aqueous acidic solution containing dissolved zirconium in the tetravalent oxidation state. The presence of the zirconium increases the lanthanum fluoride dissolved and makes any tetravalent plutonium present more readily oxidizable to the hexavalent state. (AEC)

  15. When should fig fruit produce volatiles? Pattern in a ripening process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Renee M.; Ranganathan, Yuvaraj; Krishnan, Anusha; Ghara, Mahua; Pramanik, Gautam

    2011-11-01

    Ripe fruit need to signal their presence to attract dispersal agents. Plants may employ visual and/or olfactory sensory channels to signal the presence of ripe fruit. Visual signals of ripe fruit have been extensively investigated. However, the volatile signatures of ripe fruit that use olfactorily-oriented dispersers have been scarcely investigated. Moreover, as in flowers, where floral scents are produced at times when pollinators are active (diurnal versus nocturnal), whether plants can modulate the olfactory signal to produce fruit odours when dispersers are active in the diel cycle is completely unknown. We investigated day-night differences in fruit odours in two species of figs, Ficus racemosa and Ficus benghalensis. The volatile bouquet of fruit of F. racemosa that are largely dispersed by bats and other mammals was dominated by fatty acid derivatives such as esters. In this species in which the ripe fig phase is very short, and where the figs drop off soon after ripening, there were no differences between day and night in fruit volatile signature. The volatile bouquet of fruit of F. benghalensis that has a long ripening period, however, and that remain attached to the tree for extended periods when ripe, showed an increase in fatty acid derivatives such as esters and of benzenoids such as benzaldehyde at night when they are dispersed by bats, and an elevation of sesquiterpenes during the day when they are dispersed by birds. For the first time we provide data that suggest that the volatile signal produced by fruit can show diel differences based on the activity period of the dispersal agent.

  16. Whey-grape juice drink processed by supercritical carbon dioxide technology: Physicochemical characteristics, bioactive compounds and volatile profile.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Gabriela V; Silva, Eric Keven; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo N; Martins, Carolina P C; Andrade, Luiz Guilherme Z S; Moraes, Jeremias; Alvarenga, Verônica O; Guimarães, Jonas T; Esmerino, Erick A; Freitas, Mônica Q; Silva, Márcia C; Raices, Renata S L; Sant' Ana, Anderson S; Meireles, M Angela A; Cruz, Adriano G

    2018-01-15

    The effect of supercritical carbon dioxide technology (SCCD, 14, 16, and 18MPa at 35±2°C for 10min) on whey-grape juice drink characteristics was investigated. Physicochemical characterization (pH, titratable acidity, total soluble solids), bioactive compounds (phenolic compounds, anthocyanin, DPPH and ACE activity) and the volatile compounds were performed. Absence of differences were found among treatments for pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, total anthocyanin and DPPH activity (p-value>0.05). A direct relationship between SCCD pressure and ACE inhibitory activity was observed, with 34.63, 38.75, and 44.31% (14, 16, and 18MPa, respectively). Regards the volatile compounds, it was noted few differences except by the presence of ketones. The findings confirm the SCCD processing as a potential promising technology to the conventional thermal treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Changes in physico-chemical properties and volatile compounds throughout the manufacturing process of dry-cured foal loin.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, José M; Carballo, J

    2015-01-01

    Physico-chemical, textural, lipolytic and volatile compound changes that occur during the manufacture of dry-cured foal loin were studied. Hardness and chewiness increased significantly (P<0.001) from 1.67 kg and 0.48 kg ∗ mm to 18.33 kg and 5.01 kg∗mm, respectively during ripening process. The total average content of free fatty acid increased significantly (P<0.001), from 768.8 mg/100g of fat in the loins immediately after the seasoning period to 1271.1mg/100g of fat at the end of the drying-ripening period. In the final product, aldehydes became the dominant volatile compounds.

  18. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water A A ... to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  19. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. What do I need to know about fluoride and groundwater from a well? Fluoride is present ... well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended fluoride level ...

  20. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water Print A ... to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  1. Practitioner's guide to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, Erik; Studen-Pavlovich, Deborah; Markovic, Nina

    2002-10-01

    The current health care trend is to provide evidence-based recommendations and treatment. Many literature reviews have shown fluoride's effectiveness against caries. The current use of fluoride in the prevention of dental caries is based on community, professional, and individual strategies. Personalized fluoride regimens should include a risk analysis and a review of the patient's current fluoride exposure. The future of fluoride may be found in its slow release and retention in the oral cavity through various modalities. Because of the many uncertainties still associated with fluoride, further research is needed.

  2. Measurement of plutonium and americium volatilities under thermal process conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, O.H.; Condit, R.H.; Fontes, A.S. Jr.; Fleming, D.L.; Magana, J.W.; Morris, W.F.; Adamson, M.G.

    1993-04-28

    We have used the transpiration method to measure volatilities of Pu and Am from PuO{sub 2}(s) and PuO{sub 2}/2% AmO{sub 2}(s) in the presence of steam and oxygen at temperatures of 1230--1430 K. We find the volatile species to be PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) and AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) at vapor pressures on the order of 10{sup {minus}10} atm and 10 {sup {minus}12} atm respectively under measurement conditions. For the Pu volatilization reaction, PuO{sub 2}(s) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain a free energy of reaction of {Delta}G{sup O}{sub T} = 231.3--0.0109 T in kj/mol, and for the Am volatilization reaction, AmO{sub 2}(s.s. in PuO{sub 2}) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain AG{sup O}{sub T} = 223.9--0.0109 T in kj/mol. We apply these results to the Rocky Flats Plant Fluidized Bed Incinerator to assess the amount of volatile Pu and Am produced in the secondary combustor chamber. Taking operating conditions of 550C combustor temperature, 40 kmols/h of total gas flow at 1 atm pressure, 0.1 atm 0{sub 2}(9), 0.05 atm H{sub 2}0(g), PuO{sub 2} (s) containing 200 ppm AmO{sub 2} in the bed, and 6000 h of operating time per year, gives volatilization rates of 7 {times} 10 {sup {minus}6}g Pu and 4 {times} 10 {sup {minus}9}g Am/y.

  3. From quantum mechanics to finance: Microfoundations for jumps, spikes and high volatility phases in diffusion price processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Christof

    2017-03-01

    We present an agent behavior based microscopic model that induces jumps, spikes and high volatility phases in the price process of a traded asset. We transfer dynamics of thermally activated jumps of an unexcited/excited two state system discussed in the context of quantum mechanics to agent socio-economic behavior and provide microfoundations. After we link the endogenous agent behavior to price dynamics we establish the circumstances under which the dynamics converge to an Itô-diffusion price processes in the large market limit.

  4. High-pressure processing decelerates lipolysis and formation of volatile compounds in ovine milk blue-veined cheese.

    PubMed

    Calzada, J; Del Olmo, A; Picon, A; Gaya, P; Nuñez, M

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme-rich cheeses are prone to over-ripening during refrigerated storage. Blue-veined cheeses fall within this category because of the profuse growth of Penicillium roqueforti in their interior, which results in the production of highly active proteinases, lipases, and other enzymes responsible for the formation of a great number of flavor compounds. To control the excessive formation of free fatty acids (FFA) and volatile compounds, blue-veined cheeses were submitted to high-pressure processing (HPP) at 400 or 600 MPa on d 21, 42, or 63 after manufacture. Cheeses were ripened for 30d at 10°C and 93% relative humidity, followed by 60 d at 5°C, and then held at 3°C until d 360. High-pressure processing influenced the concentrations of acetic acid and short-chain, medium-chain, and long-chain FFA. The effect was dependent on treatment conditions (pressure level and cheese age at the time of treatment). The lowest concentrations of acetic acid and FFA were recorded for cheeses treated at 600 MPa on d 21; these cheeses showed the lowest esterase activity values. Acetic acid and all FFA groups increased during ripening and refrigerated storage. The 102 volatile compounds detected in cheese belonged to 10 chemical groups (5 aldehydes, 12 ketones, 17 alcohols, 12 acids, 35 esters, 9 hydrocarbons, 5 aromatic compounds, 3 nitrogen compounds, 3 terpenes, and 1 sulfur compound). High-pressure processing influenced the levels of 97 individual compounds, whereas 68 individual compounds varied during refrigerated storage. Total concentrations of all groups of volatile compounds were influenced by HPP, but only ketones, acids, esters, and sulfur compounds varied during refrigerated storage. The lowest total concentrations for most groups of volatile compounds were recorded for the cheese pressurized at 600 MPa on d 21. A principal component analysis combining total concentrations of groups of FFA and volatile compounds discriminated cheeses by age and by the pressure level

  5. Acidification of In-Storage-Psychrophilic-Anaerobic-Digestion (ISPAD) process to reduce ammonia volatilization: Model development and validation.

    PubMed

    Madani-Hosseini, Mahsa; Mulligan, Catherine N; Barrington, Suzelle

    2016-06-01

    In-Storage-Psychrophilic-Anaerobic-Digestion (ISPAD) is an ambient temperature treatment system for wastewaters stored for over 100days under temperate climates, which produces a nitrogen rich digestate susceptible to ammonia (NH3) volatilization. Present acidification techniques reducing NH3 volatilization are not only expensive and with secondary environmental effects, but do not apply to ISPAD relying on batch-to-batch inoculation. The objectives of this study were to identify and validate sequential organic loading (OL) strategies producing imbalances in acidogen and methanogen growth, acidifying ISPAD content one week before emptying to a pH of 6, while also preserving the inoculation potential. This acidification process is challenging as wastewaters often offer a high buffering capacity and ISPAD operational practices foster low microbial populations. A model simulating the ISPAD pH regime was used to optimize 3 different sequential OLs to decrease the ISPAD pH to 6.0. All 3 strategies were compared in terms of biogas production, volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, microbial activity, glucose consumption, and pH decrease. Laboratory validation of the model outputs confirmed that a sequential OL of 13kg glucose/m(3) of ISPAD content over 4days could indeed reduce the pH to 6.0. Such OL competes feasibly with present acidification techniques. Nevertheless, more research is required to explain the 3-day lag between the model results and the experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

    2011-08-10

    Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current

  7. How Does Fluoride Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work? A A A There's fluoride in your toothpaste and even in your water. But how does ... enamel from plaque and sugars. By using fluoride toothpaste, for instance, everyone can enjoy some cavity protection. ...

  8. Fluoridation update 2014.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Myron; Wong, Chloe

    2014-01-01

    This year more than 4 million people living in 140 communities in Massachusetts will have the health and economic benefits of community water fluoridation. However Massachusetts is ranked only 37th in the country for fluoridation, with just 62 percent of the population on a public water supply living in fluoridated communities. Nationally, more than 210 million Americans, about 74.6 percent of the U.S. population on a community water supply live in fluoridated communities.

  9. Fluoride Glass Fibres For Telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maze, Gwenael; Cardin, Vincent; Poulain, Marcel

    1983-09-01

    Zirconium fluoride glasses are the best known and the most stable beryllium-free glasses. They offer numerous potential uses for I.R.-transmitting fibres and ultra-long repeaterless optical wave-guides. Various problems arise in the manufacturing of fluoride glass fibres, essentially because of the steep viscosity profile and the devitrification phenomena. This paper discusses the processes for manufacturing step-index preforms and for drawing fibres. Optical quality preforms have been obtained and fibres have been drawn over more than 1 km. A spectral loss measurement system has been constructed using fluoride glass optical components. Several curves showing the optical attenuation versus wavelength are presented and discussed. These fibres are now available for optical transmission in infra-red systems.

  10. FLUORIDE: A REVIEW OF USE AND EFFECTS ON HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Kanduti, Domen; Sterbenk, Petra; Artnik, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual’s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Aim: The aim of our research was to review the literature about fluoride toxicity and to inform physicians, dentists and public health specialists whether fluoride use is expedient and safe. Methods: Data we used in our review were systematically searched and collected from web pages and documents published from different international institutions. Results: Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment but we consume it in small amounts. Exposure can occur through dietary intake, respiration and fluoride supplements. The most important factor for fluoride presence in alimentation is fluoridated water. Methods, which led to greater fluoride exposure and lowered caries prevalence, are considered to be one of the greatest accomplishments in the 20th century`s public dental health. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Fluoride can be transmitted through the plasma into the mother’s milk; however, the concentration is low. The most important action of fluoride is topical, when it is present in the saliva in the appropriate concentration. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel. Acute toxicity can occur after ingesting one or more doses of fluoride over a short time period which then leads to poisoning. Today, poisoning is mainly due to unsupervised ingestion of products for dental and oral hygiene and over-fluoridated water. Conclusion: Even though fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations, it`s topical use is safe. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their

  11. Illumination Conditions at Phobos: Implications for Surface Processes, Volatiles and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Wang, Y.; Glenar, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Illumination conditions at airless bodies, such as Phobos, control or significantly influence many aspects of their environment, including temperature of the surface and subsurface, volatile sequestration and transport. In this study we simulate the average present-day illumination conditions at Phobos and assess whether locations exist where water ice could be either thermally stable in the near subsurface on billion year timescales, or accumulated by the "thermal ice pump" effect. Previous investigations of Phobos temperature and volatile sequestration have assumed a sphere or triaxial ellipsoid shape for Phobos. Here we use more realistic shape models in order to capture the shadowing caused by both its global-scale irregular shape and smaller scale structures, such as craters, that can have a crucial role in determining illumination conditions. Phobos is frequently eclipsed by Mars, especially around equinoxes, and this important effect is accounted for in the shadowing simulations. Preliminary predictions for the average incident solar flux using the Thomas [1993] shape model reveal many interesting features, such as high fluxes around crater rims (e.g., Stickney), doubly-shadowed craters (e.g., Limtoc) and strong asymmetries between poleward- and equatorward-facing crater walls (e.g., Drunlo). Perhaps most significantly, there are regions (most likely small craters) that are predicted to receive very low average solar flux ( 40-50 Wm-2). These will likely be, on average, the coldest places on Phobos. Should water ice, or other volatiles, be present at relatively shallow depths at certain locations on Phobos, then this could serve as a witness plate to the history of the Mars system, as well as provide valuable resources to future explorers.

  12. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    process. It was observed in the laboratory simulated production of fluoride cement, that the clinkering temperature is much lower (around 1 170 °C) compared to that for the production of ordinary Portland cement. The other observed differences were attributed to the different mineralogical composition as a result of fluoride incorporation into the cement. While fluorine content is very minimal in fluoride cement, not more than 2 %, the resulting cementitious products are altered significantly as was observed from the study. Part of the experimental results has been used as reference material in the preparation of a draft Malawi Standard on fluoride cement. This draft standard will be submitted to the Malawi Bureau of Standards for further processing before it can be officially endorsed as a Malawi Standard.

  13. Electron Collisions with Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with hydrogen fluoride. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature, recommended values of the cross sections are determined, as far as possible.

  14. Effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA hairpin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Zhai, Weili; Gong, Hongling; Liu, Yanhui; Chen, Hu

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride prevents tooth decay as an additive in oral hygiene products, while high dose intake of fluoride from contaminated drinking water leads to fluorosis. Here we studied the effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA double helix using magnetic tweezers. The equilibrium critical force decreases with increasing concentration of fluoride in the range from 1 mM to 100 mM. Our results give the first quantitative measurement of DNA stability in the presence of fluoride ion, which might disturb DNA-related biological processes to cause fluorosis.

  15. Impact of thermal and nonthermal processing technologies on unfermented apple cider aroma volatiles.

    PubMed

    Azhu Valappil, Zareena; Fan, Xuetong; Zhang, Howard Q; Rouseff, Russell L

    2009-02-11

    Aroma composition and microbial quality of identical lots of apple cider treated by pulsed electric field (PEF), ultraviolet irradiation (UV), or thermal pasteurization stored at 4 degrees C were compared at 0 and 4 weeks. Conditions were optimized to achieve identical 5 log reductions in Escherichia coli K12 for each treatment. PEF and thermal pasteurization maintained acceptable microbial quality for 4 weeks, but UV samples fermented after 2 weeks. Twenty-eight volatiles were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and odor activity values (OAV) determined. OAVs of 69:hexyl acetate, 41:hexanal, 25:2-methylbutyl acetate, 23:2-methyl ethyl butyrate, and 14:2-(E)-hexenal were observed for the control cider. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in the levels of these odorants were observed between treated apple ciders only after 4 weeks of storage. Thermal samples lost 30% of the major ester and aldehyde volatiles during storage with significant decreases (p < 0.05) in butyl acetate, 2-methylbutyl acetate, hexanal, and 2-(E)-hexenal. In UV cider, hexanal and 2-(E)-hexenal were completely lost after 4 weeks of storage. Microbial spoilage in UV cider after 4 weeks of storage was chemically confirmed by the detection of the microbial metabolite 1,3-pentadiene. PEF cider lost <2% of its total ester and aldehydes after 4 weeks of storage and was preferred by 91% of the sensory panel over thermally treated cider.

  16. ALH85085: a unique volatile-poor carbonaceous chondrite with possible implications for nebular fractionation processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, J.N.; Rubin, A.E.; MacPherson, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Allan Hills 85085 is a unique chondrite with affinities to the Al Rais-Renazzo clan of carbonaceous chondrites. Its constituents are less than 50 ??m in mean size. Chondrules and microchondrules of all textures are present; nonporphyritic chondrules are unusually abundant. The mean compositions of porphyritic, nonporphyritic and barred olivine chondrules resemble those in ordinary chondrites except that they are depleted in volatile elements. Ca-, Al-rich inclusions are abundant and largely free of nebular alteration; they comprise types similar to those in CM and CO chondrites, as well as unique types. Calcium dialuminate occurs in several inclusions. Metal, silicate and sulfide compositions are close to those in CM-CO chondrites and Al Rais and Renazzo. C1-chondrite clasts and metal-rich "reduced" clasts are present, but opaque matrix is absent. Siderophile abundances in ALH85085 are extremely high (e.g., Fe Si = 1.7 ?? solar), and volatiles are depleted (e.g., Na Si = 0.25 ?? solar, S Si = 0.03 ?? solar). Nonvolatile lithophile abundances are similar to those in Al Rais, Renazzo, and CM and CO chondrites. ALH85085 agglomerated when temperatures in the nebula were near 1000 K, in the same region where Renazzo, Al Rais and the CI chondrites formed. Agglomeration of high-temperature material may thus be a mechanism by which the fractionation of refractory lithophiles occurred in the nebula. Chondrule formation must have occurred at high temperatures when clumps of precursors were small. After agglomeration, ALH85085 was annealed and lightly shocked. C1 and other clasts were subsequently incorporated during late-stage brecciation. ?? 1988.

  17. Geochemical processes controlling the fluoride concentrations in the groundwater of the Lake Acıgöl Basin (Denizli, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Muhittin; Budakoǧlu, Murat; Taşdelen, Suat

    2017-04-01

    The lacustrine Acıgöl basin formed as an extensional half-graben host to various bodies of water, such as cold-hot springs, lakes, streams, and wells. This study examines the fluoride evolution of the groundwater in the semi-arid, closed Acıgöl Basin (using 165 samples). The economically important saline/hyper-saline lake that borders the NE-trending Acıgöl fault zone is located in the southern part of the basin. The brackish springs and deep waters that discharge along the NE-trending Acıgöl fault zone feed the hyper-saline lake. The groundwater chemistry of springs that discharge near or around the lake is affected by carbonate- and sulphate-rich lacustrine sediments. The fluoride concentrations varied from 0 to 2.9 mg/L (mean value 0.8 mg/L, n=165) in groundwater samples of the Lake Acıgöl Basin . The mean fluoride concentration values were 0.5 mg/L (n=42) in dry seasons and 0.9 mg/L (n=123) in wet seasons. According to the water type, the mean value of fluoride concentrations in deep wells, shallow wells, springs, and streams were 0.8 mg/L, 0.3 mg/L, 0.9 mg/L, and 0.2 mg/L, respectively. Over 12.7 % of the groundwater in basin had fluoride concentrations above 1.5 mg/L (the WHO drinking guideline), and 38% of the groundwater in the basin had fluoride concentrations above 1.0 mg/L (Turkish Standards-TS266). The highest fluoride concentrations were measured in brackish deep groundwater (2.9 mg/L) that bordered the hyper-saline lake and Beylerli Thermal springs (2.7 mg/L) located south west of the hyper-saline lake. The Hayriye Başpınar Spring had the lowest fluoride concentration. The high-fluoride groundwater zones were mainly located along the NE-trending Acıgöl fault zone at the south part of the basin. The mean fluoride concentration value was 1 mg/L at these zones. The fluoride enrichment in springs discharged from the Acıgöl fault zone is higher than in springs discharged from lithological units. According to the spatial variation map of

  18. Flavor characteristics of the juices from fresh market tomatoes differentiated from those from processing tomatoes by combined analysis of volatile profiles with sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Yoko; Iwasaki, Yumi; Otagiri, Yuji; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Tsuneo; Otomo, Hiroe; Sekine, Yukio; Obata, Akio

    2016-12-01

    Various commercial tomato juices with different flavors are available at markets worldwide. To clarify the marker compounds related to the flavor characteristics of tomato juice, we analyzed 15 pure commercial tomato juices by a combination of volatile profiling and sensory evaluation. The correlations among volatiles and the relationship between volatiles and sensory descriptors were elucidated by multivariate analyses. Consequently, the tomato juices made from fresh market tomatoes (including the popular Japanese tomato variety "Momotaro") were clearly separated from other juices made from processing tomatoes, by both the volatile composition and sensory profiles. cis-3-Hexenol, hexanal, and apocarotenoids negatively contributed to the juices from fresh market tomatoes, whereas Strecker aldehydes and furfural showed positive contributions to the juices. Accordingly, the sensory characteristics of juices from fresh market tomatoes were related to cooked and fruity flavors but not to green or fresh notes.

  19. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  20. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  1. [The impact of tap water fluoridation on human health].

    PubMed

    Romero, Verena; Norris, Frances J; Ríos, Juvenal A; Cortés, Isel; González, Andrea; Gaete, Leonardo; Tchernitchin, Andrei N

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the osteological, neurological, endocrine and dermatological effects of fluoride ingestion. Additional aims are to evaluate whether the Chilean tap water fluoridation program has had any impact on dental health, and analyze the basis for the Chilean elementary school milk fluoridation program, which is targeted at children living in places where tap water has a fluoride concentration less than 0.3 mg/L, without any artificial fluoridation process. We discuss the finding that both public measures have no direct or remarkable effect on dental health, since topical dental hygiene products are the main and most effective contributors to the prevention of dental decay. We also suggest that the permanent and systematic ingestion of fluorides imposes health risks on the population. Therefore, we recommend reevaluating the national fluoridation program for public tap water and the elementary school milk program.

  2. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  3. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

    2011-11-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

  4. Charge-trap non-volatile memories fabricated by laser-enabled low-thermal budget processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hsien; Shieh, Jia-Min; Pan, Fu-Ming; Yang, Chih-Chao; Shen, Chang-Hong; Wang, Hsing-Hsiang; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Wu, Ssu-Yu; Wu, Meng-Chyi

    2015-11-01

    We fabricated charge-trap non-volatile memories (NVMs) using low thermal budget processes, including laser-crystallization of poly-Si thin film, chemical vapor deposition deposition of a stacked memory layer, and far-infrared-laser dopant activation. The thin poly-Si channel has a low defect-density at the interface with the bulk, resulting in a steep subthreshold swing for the NVM transistors. The introduction of the stacked SiO2/AlOxNy tunnel layer and the SiNx charge-trap layer with a gradient bandgap leads to reliable retention and endurance at low voltage for the NVMs. The low thermal budget processes are desirable for the integration of the nano-scaled NVMs into system on panels.

  5. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  6. Problem Solving for Volatilizing Situation in Nursing: Developing Thinking Process Supporting System using NursingNAVI® Contents.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Satoko; Wako, Fumiko; Omori, Miho; Sudo, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    We have identified three foci of the nursing observation and nursing action respectively. Using these frameworks, we have developed the structured knowledge model for a number of diseases and medical interventions. We developed this structure based NursingNAVI® contents collaborated with some quality centered hospitals. Authors analysed the nursing care documentations of post-gastrectomy patients in light of the standardized nursing care plan in the "NursingNAVI®" developed by ourselves and revealed the "failure to observe" and "failure to document", which leaded to the volatility of the patients' data, conditions and some situation. This phenomenon should have been avoided if nurses had employed a standardized nursing care plan. So, we developed thinking process support system for planning, delivering, recording and evaluating in daily nursing using NursingNAVI® contents. A hospital decided to use NursingNAVI® contents in HIS. It was suggested that the system has availability for nursing OJT and time reduction of planning and recording without volatilizing situation.

  7. Characteristics of yttrium fluoride and yttrium oxide coatings for plasma process equipment prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ken; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Huang, Shih-Yung; Wang, Wei-Kai

    2016-12-01

    In this study, yttrium fluoride (YF3) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) coatings were prepared by an atmospheric plasma spraying technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). YF3 powders were sprayed at various plasma spraying powers of 9, 15, and 21 kW. The XRD result indicates that the YF3 coating shows preferred orientations and was well crystallized. The XPS results revealed a strong Y-F bond on the YF3 coating surface. A porosity value analysis showed that the porosity of the YF3 coating was lower than that of the Y2O3 coating. Moreover, the dielectric strength of the YF3 coating (22.65 kV/mm) was higher than that of the Y2O3 coating (14.42 kV/mm). This confirms that the YF3 coating exhibits a breakdown voltage of 4.97 kV, which is more than 1.5 times higher than that observed for the Y2O3 coating (3.29 kV). These results indicate that the YF3 coating has better mechanical and dielectric properties than the Y2O3 coating, indicating that the YF3 coating is a very attractive novel antiplasma and corrosion-resistant material.

  8. The water fluoridation debate.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Michael G; Ellwood, Roger P; Pretty, Iain A

    2011-01-01

    Water fluoridation schemes have been employed for over 50 years. Water fluoridation has been a source of continuous debate between those who advocate its use as a public health measure and those who oppose it. There have been no new fluoridation schemes in the U.K. for nearly 30 years owing to principally legislative, but also geographic, financial, and political reasons. However, in early 2008, the U.K. Secretary of State for Health promoted the use of water fluoridation schemes for areas in England with the highest rates of decay. This article, the third and final article of three, aims to discuss the arguments surrounding water fluoridation and its continued relevance as a public health measure. This article aims to provide an update for general practitioners for the background and the current status of the water fluoridation debate and to enable them to answer non-clinical questions raised by patients.

  9. The Search for a Volatile Human Specific Marker in the Decomposition Process.

    PubMed

    Rosier, E; Loix, S; Develter, W; Van de Voorde, W; Tytgat, J; Cuypers, E

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a validated method using a thermal desorber combined with a gas chromatograph coupled to mass spectrometry was used to identify the volatile organic compounds released during decomposition of 6 human and 26 animal remains in a laboratory environment during a period of 6 months. 452 compounds were identified. Among them a human specific marker was sought using principle component analysis. We found a combination of 8 compounds (ethyl propionate, propyl propionate, propyl butyrate, ethyl pentanoate, pyridine, diethyl disulfide, methyl(methylthio)ethyl disulfide and 3-methylthio-1-propanol) that led to the distinction of human and pig remains from other animal remains. Furthermore, it was possible to separate the pig remains from human remains based on 5 esters (3-methylbutyl pentanoate, 3-methylbutyl 3-methylbutyrate, 3-methylbutyl 2-methylbutyrate, butyl pentanoate and propyl hexanoate). Further research in the field with full bodies has to corroborate these results and search for one or more human specific markers. These markers would allow a more efficiently training of cadaver dogs or portable detection devices could be developed.

  10. Volatile organic compounds in Arctic snow: concentrations and implications for atmospheric processes.

    PubMed

    Kos, Gregor; Kanthasami, Visahini; Adechina, Nafissa; Ariya, Parisa A

    2014-11-01

    The role of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the snowpack for atmospheric oxidation, gas-particle transfer and aerosol formation remains poorly understood, partly due to a lack of methodology and unavailable data. We deployed solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) gas chromatography with flame ionization detection for measurement of halogenated, aromatic and oxygenated VOC in the snow pack in Alert, NU, Canada, a High Arctic site. Maximum concentrations in snow were 39 ± 6 μg L(-1) (styrene), indicating a potential VOC contribution to atmospheric oxidation and aerosol formation. Concurrently sampled air had concentrations of up to 1.0 ± 0.3 ng L(-1) (trichloroethene). Back trajectory data showed a change of air mass source region during a depletion event of several VOC in snow (e.g., trichloroethene and benzene). Snow profiles showed an enrichment of most compounds close to the surface. During a second study in Barrow, AK, USA VOC were quantified in snow and frost flowers in the Montreal lab. In Barrow work was carried out as part of the extensive OASIS (Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack) field campaign. Maximum VOC concentrations were up to 1.3 ± 0.1 μg L(-1) (acetophenone). Bromoform in frost flowers averaged 0.19 ± 0.04 μg L(-1), indicating the potential to contribute to bromine generation through photolysis.

  11. The Search for a Volatile Human Specific Marker in the Decomposition Process

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, E.; Loix, S.; Develter, W.; Van de Voorde, W.; Tytgat, J.; Cuypers, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a validated method using a thermal desorber combined with a gas chromatograph coupled to mass spectrometry was used to identify the volatile organic compounds released during decomposition of 6 human and 26 animal remains in a laboratory environment during a period of 6 months. 452 compounds were identified. Among them a human specific marker was sought using principle component analysis. We found a combination of 8 compounds (ethyl propionate, propyl propionate, propyl butyrate, ethyl pentanoate, pyridine, diethyl disulfide, methyl(methylthio)ethyl disulfide and 3-methylthio-1-propanol) that led to the distinction of human and pig remains from other animal remains. Furthermore, it was possible to separate the pig remains from human remains based on 5 esters (3-methylbutyl pentanoate, 3-methylbutyl 3-methylbutyrate, 3-methylbutyl 2-methylbutyrate, butyl pentanoate and propyl hexanoate). Further research in the field with full bodies has to corroborate these results and search for one or more human specific markers. These markers would allow a more efficiently training of cadaver dogs or portable detection devices could be developed. PMID:26375029

  12. Influence of physicochemical parameters and high pressure processing on the volatile compounds of Serrano dry-cured ham after prolonged refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Onandi, N; Rivas-Cañedo, A; Picon, A; Nuñez, M

    2016-12-01

    One hundred and three volatile compounds were detected by solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in 30 ripened Serrano dry-cured hams, submitted or not to high pressure processing (HPP) and afterwards held for 5months at 4°C. The effect of ham physicochemical parameters and HPP (600MPa for 6min) on volatile compounds was assessed. Physicochemical parameters primarily affected the levels of acids, alcohols, alkanes, esters, benzene compounds, sulfur compounds and some miscellaneous compounds. Intramuscular fat content was the physicochemical parameter with the most pronounced effect on the volatile fraction of untreated Serrano ham after refrigerated storage, influencing the levels of 38 volatile compounds while aw, salt content and salt-in-lean ratio respectively influenced the levels of 4, 4 and 5 volatile compounds. HPP treatment affected 21 volatile compounds, resulting in higher levels of alkanes and ketones and lower levels of esters and secondary alcohols, what might affect Serrano ham odor and aroma after 5months of refrigerated storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of hydrogen fluoride production relevant to actinide residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    This report addresses issues specific to generation of hydrogen fluoride via reaction of calcium fluoride with sulfuric acid. This process has been established on a commercial scale and is under consideration for treatment of calcium fluoride residues from uranium processing. Magnesium fluoride slags are also available as a product of uranium processing. The technique of using sulfuric acid for the production of hydrogen fluoride from magnesium fluoride is also under consideration as a residue processing scheme. In the current study, thermodynamic modeling was used to investigate these chemical processing systems. Results presented herein reveal information relevant to selection of processing temperatures and conditions. Details include predicted effects in system composition based on operating temperatures for both the calcium fluoride and the magnesium fluoride systems.

  14. Vehicular volatile organic compounds losses due to refueling and diurnal process in China: 2010-2050.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofan; Liu, Huan; Cui, Hongyang; Man, Hanyang; Fu, Mingliang; Hao, Jiming; He, Kebin

    2015-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are crucial to control air pollution in major Chinese cities since VOCs are the dominant factor influencing ambient ozone level, and also an important precursor of secondary organic aerosols. Vehicular evaporative emissions have become a major and growing source of VOC emissions in China. This study consists of lab tests, technology evaluation, emissions modeling, policy projections and cost-benefit analysis to draw a roadmap for China for controlling vehicular evaporative emissions. The analysis suggests that evaporative VOC emissions from China's light-duty gasoline vehicles were approximately 185,000 ton in 2010 and would peak at 1,200,000 ton in 2040 without control. The current control strategy implemented in China, as shown in business as usual (BAU) scenario, will barely reduce the long-term growth in emissions. Even if Stage II gasoline station vapor control policies were extended national wide (BAU+extended Stage II), there would still be over 400,000 ton fuel loss in 2050. In contrast, the implementation of on-board refueling vapor recovery (ORVR) on new cars could reduce 97.5% of evaporative VOCs by 2050 (BAU+ORVR/BAU+delayed ORVR). According to the results, a combined Stage II and ORVR program is a comprehensive solution that provides both short-term and long-term benefits. The net cost to achieve the optimal total evaporative VOC control is approximately 62 billion CNY in 2025 and 149 billion CNY in 2050. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Emission of volatile organic compounds from domestic coal stove with the actual alternation of flaming and smoldering combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengtang; Zhang, Chenglong; Mu, Yujing; Liu, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2017-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the chimney of a prevailing domestic stove fuelled with raw bituminous coal were measured under flaming and smoldering combustion processes in a farmer's house. The results indicated that the concentrations of VOCs quickly increased after the coal loading and achieved their peak values in a few minutes. The peak concentrations of the VOCs under the smoldering combustion process were significantly higher than those under the flaming combustion process. Alkanes accounted for the largest proportion (43.05%) under the smoldering combustion, followed by aromatics (28.86%), alkenes (21.91%), carbonyls (5.81%) and acetylene (0.37%). The emission factors of the total VOCs under the smoldering combustion processes (5402.9 ± 2031.8 mg kg(-1)) were nearly one order of magnitude greater than those under the flaming combustion processes (559.2 ± 385.9 mg kg(-1)). Based on the VOCs emission factors obtained in this study and the regional domestic coal consumption, the total VOCs emissions from domestic coal stoves was roughly estimated to be 1.25 × 10(8) kg a(-1) in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region.

  16. Fluoride in dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette; Rios, Daniela; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Dental erosion develops through chronic exposure to extrinsic/intrinsic acids with a low pH. Enamel erosion is characterized by a centripetal dissolution leaving a small demineralized zone behind. In contrast, erosive demineralization in dentin is more complex as the acid-induced mineral dissolution leads to the exposure of collagenous organic matrix, which hampers ion diffusion and, thus, reduces further progression of the lesion. Topical fluoridation inducing the formation of a protective layer on dental hard tissue, which is composed of CaF(2) (in case of conventional fluorides like amine fluoride or sodium fluoride) or of metal-rich surface precipitates (in case of titanium tetrafluoride or tin-containing fluoride products), appears to be most effective on enamel. In dentin, the preventive effect of fluorides is highly dependent on the presence of the organic matrix. In situ studies have shown a higher protective potential of fluoride in enamel compared to dentin, probably as the organic matrix is affected by enzymatical and chemical degradation as well as by abrasive influences in the clinical situation. There is convincing evidence that fluoride, in general, can strengthen teeth against erosive acid damage, and high-concentration fluoride agents and/or frequent applications are considered potentially effective approaches in preventing dental erosion. The use of tin-containing fluoride products might provide the best approach for effective prevention of dental erosion. Further properly designed in situ or clinical studies are recommended in order to better understand the relative differences in performance of the various fluoride agents and formulations. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Off-flavor related volatiles in soymilk as affected by soybean variety, grinding, and heat-processing methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Shuntang; Liu, Zhisheng; Chang, Sam K C

    2012-08-01

    Off-flavor of soymilk is a barrier to the acceptance of consumers. The objectionable soy odor can be reduced through inhibition of their formation or through removal after being formed. In this study, soymilk was prepared by three grinding methods (ambient, cold, and hot grinding) from two varieties (yellow Prosoy and a black soybean) before undergoing three heating processes: stove cooking, one-phase UHT (ultrahigh temperature), and two-phase UHT process using a Microthermics direct injection processor, which was equipped with a vacuuming step to remove injected water and volatiles. Eight typical soy odor compounds, generated from lipid oxidation, were extracted by a solid-phase microextraction method and analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that hot grinding and cold grinding significantly reduced off-flavor as compared with ambient grinding, and hot grinding achieved the best result. The UHT methods, especially the two-phase UHT method, were effective to reduce soy odor. Different odor compounds showed distinct concentration patterns because of different formation mechanisms. The two varieties behaved differently in odor formation during the soymilk-making process. Most odor compounds could be reduced to below the detection limit through a combination of hot grinding and two-phase UHT processing. However, hot grinding gave lower solid and protein recoveries in soymilk.

  18. Development of a headspace-solid phase micro extraction method to monitor changes in volatile profile of rose (Rosa hybrida, cv David Austin) petals during processing.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Giulia; Nuzzi, Monica; Avitabile Leva, Alexa; Rizzolo, Anna

    2007-05-25

    In the present study, headspace solid phase microextraction combined to capillary gas chromatography (HS-SPME-GC) has been applied for the determination of changes in the volatile profile of rose petals (Rosa hybrida, cvs David Austin) following processing (heat treatment and addition as an ingredient to a food product--for example yoghurt). Four SPME fibres at two sampling temperatures (40 and 60 degrees C) with a sampling time of 30 min were examined. Volatile profiles were detected either by FID or/and by olfactometry (ODP-II, Gerstel). Fibre testing was performed using raw rose petals for sampling temperature selection and an 18 characteristic rose volatile standard mixture in water was used to compare fibre performances at the sampling temperature of 60 degrees C. Polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fibre at the sampling temperature of 60 degrees C was the most suitable to sample the rose alcohols phenyl ethanol, citronellol, nerol, geraniol and eugenol, as assessed by GC-olfactometry, not only from raw petals, but also from processed rose petals and the food product. PDMS-DVB fibre also showed a desired low affinity to volatiles from yoghurt, which reduces the influence of food matrix on the volatile profile. The method was linear over two orders of magnitude and had satisfactory repeatability, with limits of detection for the rose alcohols ranging from <1 to 10 ng/ml concentration levels.

  19. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    PubMed

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua; Qu, Hang; Zhou, Mengyi; Sun, Jin; Gou, Bin

    2015-11-15

    Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities were investigated in the Yangtze River Delta, China. Source samples were collected from various process units in the petrochemical, basic chemical, and chlorinated chemical plants, and were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. The results showed that propane (19.9%), propene (11.7%), ethane (9.5%) and i-butane (9.2%) were the most abundant species in the petrochemical plant, with propene at much higher levels than in petrochemical profiles measured in other regions. Styrene (15.3%), toluene (10.3%) and 1,3-butadiene (7.5%) were the major species in the basic chemical industry, while halocarbons, especially dichloromethane (15.2%) and chloromethane (7.5%), were substantial in the chlorinated chemical plant. Composite profiles were calculated using a weight-average approach based on the VOC emission strength of various process units. Emission profiles for an entire petrochemical-related industry were found to be process-oriented and should be established considering the differences in VOC emissions from various manufacturing facilities. The VOC source reactivity and carcinogenic risk potential of each process unit were also calculated in this study, suggesting that process operations mainly producing alkenes should be targeted for possible controls with respect to reducing the ozone formation potential, while process units emitting 1,3-butadiene should be under priority control in terms of toxicity. This provides a basis for further measurements of process-specific VOC emissions from the entire petrochemical industry. Meanwhile, more representative samples should be collected to reduce the large uncertainties.

  1. Slab-derived halogens and noble gases illuminate closed system processes controlling volatile element transport into the mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Ishimaru, Satoko; Arai, Shoji; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-01-01

    Halogen and noble gas systematics are powerful tracers of volatile recycling in subduction zones. We present halogen and noble gas compositions of mantle peridotites containing H2O-rich fluid inclusions collected at volcanic fronts from two contrasting subduction zones (the Avacha volcano of Kamchatka arc and the Pinatubo volcano of Luzon arcs) and orogenic peridotites from a peridotite massif (the Horoman massif, Hokkaido, Japan) which represents an exhumed portion of the mantle wedge. The aims are to determine how volatiles are carried into the mantle wedge and how the subducted fluids modify halogen and noble gas compositions in the mantle. The halogen and noble gas signatures in the H2O-rich fluids are similar to those of marine sedimentary pore fluids and forearc and seafloor serpentinites. This suggests that marine pore fluids in deep-sea sediments are carried by serpentine and supplied to the mantle wedge, preserving their original halogen and noble gas compositions. We suggest that the sedimentary pore fluid-derived water is incorporated into serpentine through hydration in a closed system along faults at the outer rise of the oceanic, preserving Cl/H2O and 36Ar/H2O values of sedimentary pore fluids. Dehydration-hydration process within the oceanic lithospheric mantle maintains the closed system until the final stage of serpentine dehydration. The sedimentary pore fluid-like halogen and noble gas signatures in fluids released at the final stage of serpentine dehydration are preserved due to highly channelized flow, whereas the original Cl/H2O and 36Ar/H2O ratios are fractionated by the higher incompatibility of halogens and noble gases in hydrous minerals.

  2. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated.

  3. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  4. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  5. Natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the leachate plume of a municipal landfill: Using alkylbenzenes as process probes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eganhouse, R.P.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Scholl, M.A.; Matthews, L.L.

    2001-01-01

    More than 70 individual VOCs were identified in the leachate plume of a closed municipal landfill. Concentrations were low when compared with data published for other landfills, and total VOCs accounted for less than 0.1% of the total dissolved organic carbon. The VOC concentrations in the core of the anoxic leachate plume are variable, but in all cases they were found to be near or below detection limits within 200 m of the landfall. In contrast to the VOCs, the distributions of chloride ion, a conservative tracer, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon, indicate little dilution over the same distance. Thus, natural attentuation processes are effectively limiting migration of the VOC plume. The distribution of C2-3-benzenes, paired on the basis of their octanol-water partition coefficients and Henry's law constants, were systematically evaluated to assess the relative importance of volatilization, sorption, and biodegradation as attenuation mechanisms. Based on our data, biodegradation appears to be the process primarily responsible for the observed attenuation of VOCs at this site. We believe that the alkylbenzenes are powerful process probes that can and should be exploited in studies of natural attenuation in contaminated ground water systems.

  6. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part III. The simulation of volatile reduction in a multi-layer rotary hearth furnace process

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2006-04-15

    For reduction of iron oxides by volatiles from coal, the major reductant was found to be H{sub 2, and it can affect the overall reduction of iron oxides. In this study, the reduction by actual volatiles of composite pellets at 1000{sup o}C was studied. The volatile reduction of the hand-packed Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Coal composite pellet as it is devolatilizing out of the pellet was found to be negligible. However, the reduction of iron oxide pellets at the top layer by volatiles from the bottom layers of a three-layer pellet geometry was observed to be about 15 pct. From the morphological observations of partially reduced pellets and the computed rates of bulk mass transfer, volatile reduction appears to be controlled by a mixed-controlled mechanism of bulk gas mass transfer and the limited-mixed control reduction kinetics. Using the reduction rate obtained from the single pellet experiments with pure hydrogen and extrapolating this rate to an H{sub 2 partial pressure corresponding to the H{sub 2 from the volatiles, an empirical relationship was obtained to approximately predict the amount of volatile reduction up to 20 pct.

  7. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part III. The simulation of volatile reduction in a multi-layer rotary hearth furnace process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    For reduction of iron oxides by volatiles from coal, the major reductant was found to be H2, and it can affect the overall reduction of iron oxides. In this study, the reduction by actual volatiles of composite pellets at 1000 °C was studied. The volatile reduction of the hand-packed Fe2O3/coal composite pellet as it is devolatilizing out of the pellet was found to be negligible. However, the reduction of iron oxide pellets at the top layer by volatiles from the bottom layers of a three-layer pellet geometry was observed to be about 15 pct. From the morphological observations of partially reduced pellets and the computed rates of bulk mass transfer, volatile reduction appears to be controlled by a mixed-controlled mechanism of bulk gas mass transfer and the limited-mixed control reduction kinetics. Using the reduction rate obtained from the single pellet experiments with pure hydrogen and extrapolating this rate to an H2 partial pressure corresponding to the H2 from the volatiles, an empirical relationship was obtained to approximately predict the amount of volatile reduction up to 20 pct.

  8. The abundance and relative volatility of refractory trace elements in Allende Ca,Al-rich inclusions - Implications for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornacki, Alan S.; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The relative volatilities of lithophile refractory trace elements (LRTE) were determined using calculated 50-percent condensation temperatures. Then, the refractory trace-element abundances were measured in about 100 Allende inclusions. The abundance patterns found in Allende Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and ultrarefractory inclusions were used to empirically modify the calculated LRTE volatility sequence. In addition, the importance of crystal-chemical effects, diffusion constraints, and grain transport for the origin of the trace-element chemistry of Allende CAIs (which have important implications for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula) is discussed.

  9. The abundance and relative volatility of refractory trace elements in Allende Ca,Al-rich inclusions - Implications for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornacki, Alan S.; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The relative volatilities of lithophile refractory trace elements (LRTE) were determined using calculated 50-percent condensation temperatures. Then, the refractory trace-element abundances were measured in about 100 Allende inclusions. The abundance patterns found in Allende Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and ultrarefractory inclusions were used to empirically modify the calculated LRTE volatility sequence. In addition, the importance of crystal-chemical effects, diffusion constraints, and grain transport for the origin of the trace-element chemistry of Allende CAIs (which have important implications for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula) is discussed.

  10. Scalable processes for fabricating non-volatile memory devices using self-assembled 2D arrays of gold nanoparticles as charge storage nodes.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Girish; Bhat, Navakanta; Santhanam, Venugopal

    2011-11-01

    We propose robust and scalable processes for the fabrication of floating gate devices using ordered arrays of 7 nm size gold nanoparticles as charge storage nodes. The proposed strategy can be readily adapted for fabricating next generation (sub-20 nm node) non-volatile memory devices.

  11. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  12. Comparative study of water and ammonia rinsing processes of potassium fluoride-treated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Ishwor; Shudo, Kosuke; Matsuura, Junpei; Sugiyama, Mutsumi; Nakada, Tokio

    2017-08-01

    In this work, potassium fluoride (KF)-treated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films were rinsed in ammonia and water solutions before buffer layer (CdS) deposition and the effects of rinsing on photovoltaic properties were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements revealed that sodium atoms out-diffused at the surface region during KF deposition. Water and ammonia rinsing processes of KF-treated CIGS thin films reduced alkali metals from the surface. However, sodium at the Cu-depleted surface layer remained at a high concentration, suggesting the occupation of Cu vacancies with sodium atoms. On the other hand, ammonia rinsing removed the Cu-poor region from the surfaces of KF-treated CIGS thin films affecting the growth (or nucleation) of the CdS layer. The surface coverage of the CdS layer deposited on the ammonia-rinsed KF-treated CIGS thin film was inferior to than that of water-rinsed samples, resulting in the poor cell performance due to an increased interface recombination.

  13. Effects of air injection during sap processing on maple syrup color, chemical composition and flavor volatiles.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Air injection (AI) is a maple sap processing technology reported to increase the efficiency of maple syrup production by increasing production of more economically valuable light-colored maple syrup, and reducing development of loose scale mineral precipitates in syrup, and scale deposits on evapora...

  14. The Investment in Scent: Time-Resolved Metabolic Processes in Developing Volatile-Producing Nigella sativa L. Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, David; Botnick, Ilan; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Nikoloski, Zoran; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Fait, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of processes in central and specialized metabolisms during seed development of Nigella sativa L. was studied by using a high-throughput metabolomics technology and network-based analysis. Two major metabolic shifts were identified during seed development: the first was characterized by the accumulation of storage lipids (estimated as total fatty acids) and N-compounds, and the second by the biosynthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and a 30% average decrease in total fatty acids. Network-based analysis identified coordinated metabolic processes during development and demonstrated the presence of five network communities. Enrichment analysis indicated that different compound classes, such as sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids, are largely separated and over-represented in certain communities. One community displayed several terpenoids and the central metabolites, shikimate derived amino acids, raffinose, xylitol and glycerol–3-phosphate. The latter are related to precursors of the mevalonate-independent pathway for VOC production in the plastid; also plastidial fatty acid 18∶3n-3 abundant in “green” seeds grouped with several major terpenes. The findings highlight the interplay between the components of central metabolism and the VOCs. The developmental regulation of Nigella seed metabolism during seed maturation suggests a substantial re-allocation of carbon from the breakdown of fatty acids and from N-compounds, probably towards the biosynthesis of VOCs. PMID:24019893

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratio and its use in determination of photochemical processing of ambient volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, A.; Saccon, M. S.; Rudolph, J.; Huang, L.

    2012-12-01

    Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition measurement technique can provide valuable information about trace gas processing in the atmosphere. It can not only be used to distinguish physical processes such as dilution and mixing from photochemical ageing, but also can be an important tool in identification of sources, calculating the photochemical age and qualitatively and quantitatively connecting precursors with their atmospheric products. Even though isotopic composition analysis is a valuable technique, its use is hindered by the low concentrations of compounds in the atmosphere, complexity of the samples and complex measuring instrumentation. We have developed and validated sampling and instrumental analysis techniques that can be used to perform isotopic composition measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and to apply these methods to analysis of ambient samples. In this poster application of this newly developed sampling and analysis techniques will be presented and discussed using concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient VOC collected during 2009-2010 at urban and remote locations of southern Ontario. Photochemical ages determined using conventional hydrocarbon clock will be compared to ones determined with photochemical ages derived from isotope hydrocarbon clock. Advantages of the use of stable carbon isotope ratios over other conventional methods will be outlined and applications of isotope hydrocarbon clock in air quality monitoring will be discussed.

  16. Human intracranial high-frequency activity during memory processing: neural oscillations or stochastic volatility?

    PubMed

    Burke, John F; Ramayya, Ashwin G; Kahana, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Intracranial high-frequency activity (HFA), which refers to fast fluctuations in electrophysiological recordings, increases during memory processing. Two views have emerged to explain this effect: (1) HFA reflects a synchronous signal, related to underlying gamma oscillations, that plays a mechanistic role in human memory and (2) HFA reflects an asynchronous signal that is a non-specific marker of brain activation. We review recent data supporting each of these views and conclude that HFA during memory processing is more consistent with an asynchronous signal. Memory-related HFA is therefore best conceptualized as a biomarker of neural activation that can functionally map memory with high spatial and temporal precision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Uncoupled hydrogen and volatile fatty acids generation in a two-step biotechnological anaerobic process fed with actual site wastewater.

    PubMed

    Monti, Matilde; Scoma, Alberto; Martinez, Gonzalo; Bertin, Lorenzo; Fava, Fabio

    2015-05-25

    Among agro-wastes, olive mill wastewater (OMW) truly qualifies as a high impact organic residue due to its biochemical-rich composition and high annual production. In the present investigation, dephenolized OMW (OMWdeph) was employed as the feedstock for a biotechnological two-stage anaerobic process dedicated to the production of biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs), respectively. To this end, two identically configured packed-bed biofilm reactors were operated sequentially. In the first, the hydraulic retention time was set to 1 day, whereas in the second it was equal to 5 days. The rationale was to decouple the hydrolysis of the organic macronutrients held by the OMWdeph, so as to quantitatively generate a biogas enriched in H2 (first stage aim), for the acidogenesis of the residual components left after hydrolysis, to then produce a highly concentrated mixture of VFAs (second stage aim). Results showed that the generation of H2 and VFAs was effectively split, with carbohydrates and lipids, respectively, being the main substrates of the two processes. About 250 ml H2 L(-1) day(-1) was produced, corresponding to a yield of 0.36 mol mol(-1) of consumed carbohydrates (expressed as glucose equivalents). The overall concentration of VFAs in the acidogenic process was 13.80 g COD L(-1), so that 2.76 g COD L(-1) day(-1) was obtained. Second generation biorefineries use a selected fraction of an organic waste to conduct a microbiologically-driven pathway towards the generation of one target molecule. With the proposed approach, a greater value of the waste was attained, since the multi-purpose two-stage process did not entail competition for substrates between the first and the second steps.

  18. Sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities.

    PubMed

    Sriranjini, Venkata-rao; Rajendran, Somiahnadar

    2008-08-01

    The use of sulfuryl fluoride, a structural fumigant for termite and woodborer control, has recently been expanded to treating stored food commodities and food facilities. There is, however, a lack of data on the sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities. Knowledge about sorption is important in the context of effective treatment and residues. When sulfuryl fluoride was applied at a dose of 50 g m(-3) to various food commodities (total 68) with 300 g per replicate in 0.75 L gas wash bottles (fumigation chambers) at 25 +/- 1 degrees C, in most cases (81%) the gas concentrations in the free space of the commodities exceeded 50 g m(-3) (range 51-80 g m(-3)) at the end of 24 h exposure. In chambers without the substrate, an average concentration of 49.7 g m(-3) was recorded. About 54% of the commodities showed low-level ( < or = 25%) sorption of sulfuryl fluoride, 34% showed medium-level (26-50%) sorption and only 12% were highly sorptive (>50%). The latter include white oats (terminal gas concentration 17.8 g m(-3)), some of the decorticated split pulses (24.0-29.3 g m(-3)), chickpea flour (26.3 g m(-3)), dried ginger (29.0 g m(-3)), refined wheat flour (30.3 g m(-3)) and coriander powder (40.5 g m(-3)). In unfumigated control commodities, owing to interfering volatiles, Fumiscope readings in the range 0-13 were noted. Sulfuryl fluoride has the advantage of a low or moderate level of sorption with the majority of the food commodities.

  19. NEAR-REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF TRACE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM COMBUSTION PROCESSES USING AN ON-LINE GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's current regulatory approach for combustion and incineration sources emphasizes the use of real-time continuous emission monitors (CEMs) for particulate, Metals, and volatile, semivolatile, and of nonvolatile organic compounds to monitor source emissions. Currently...

  20. NEAR-REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF TRACE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM COMBUSTION PROCESSES USING AN ON-LINE GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's current regulatory approach for combustion and incineration sources emphasizes the use of real-time continuous emission monitors (CEMs) for particulate, Metals, and volatile, semivolatile, and of nonvolatile organic compounds to monitor source emissions. Currently...

  1. Volatile N-nitrosamines in Meat Products: Potential Precursors, Influence of Processing and Mitigation Strategies.

    PubMed

    De Mey, Eveline; De Maere, Hannelore; Paelinck, Hubert; Fraeye, Ilse

    2015-11-03

    Meat products can be contaminated with carcinogenic N-nitrosamines, which is ascribed to the reaction between a nitrosating agent, originating from nitrite or smoke, and a secondary amine, derived from protein and lipid degradation. Although in model systems it is demonstrated that many amine containing compounds can be converted to N-nitrosamines, the yield is dependent of reaction conditions (e.g. low pH and high temperature). In this paper the influence of the composition of the meat products (e.g. pH, aw, spices) and processing (e.g. ageing, ripening, fermentation, smoking, heat treatment and storage) on the presence and availability of the amine precursors and the N-nitrosamine formation mechanism is discussed. In addition, this paper explores the current N-nitrosamine mitigation strategies in order to obtain healthier and more natural meat products.

  2. H2S and volatile fatty acids elimination by biofiltration: clean-up process for biogas potential use.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sáenz, D; Zarate-Segura, P B; Guerrero-Barajas, C; García-Peña, E I

    2009-04-30

    In the present work, the main objective was to evaluate a biofiltration system for removing hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) contained in a gaseous stream from an anaerobic digestor (AD). The elimination of these compounds allowed the potential use of biogas while maintaining the methane (CH(4)) content throughout the process. The biodegradation of H(2)S was determined in the lava rock biofilter under two different empty bed residence times (EBRT). Inlet loadings lower than 200 g/m(3)h at an EBRT of 81 s yielded a complete removal, attaining an elimination capacity (EC) of 142 g/m(3)h, whereas at an EBRT of 31 s, a critical EC of 200 g/m(3)h was reached and the EC obtained exhibited a maximum value of 232 g/m(3)h. For 1500 ppmv of H(2)S, 99% removal was maintained during 90 days and complete biodegradation of VFAs was observed. A recovery of 60% as sulfate was obtained due to the constant excess of O(2) concentration in the system. Acetic and propionic acids as a sole source of carbon were also evaluated in the bioreactor at different inlet loadings (0-120 g/m(3)h) obtaining a complete removal (99%) for both. Microcosms biodegradation experiments conducted with VFAs demonstrated that acetic acid provided the highest biodegradation rate.

  3. Fluoride in drinking water and its removal.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi; Maheshwari, R C

    2006-09-01

    Excessive fluoride concentrations have been reported in groundwaters of more than 20 developed and developing countries including India where 19 states are facing acute fluorosis problems. Various technologies are being used to remove fluoride from water but still the problem has not been rooted out. In this paper, a broad overview of the available technologies for fluoride removal and advantages and limitations of each one have been presented based on literature survey and the experiments conducted in the laboratory with several processes. It has been concluded that the selection of treatment process should be site specific as per local needs and prevailing conditions as each technology has some limitations and no one process can serve the purpose in diverse conditions.

  4. How Does Fluoride Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluoride is a natural element found in the earth's crust as well as in water and air. ... Activity: Teeth What Are Dentures? Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines About KidsHealth ...

  5. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    PubMed Central

    Isman, R

    1981-01-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media. PMID:7246838

  6. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken through the gums have changes in the enamel that covers the teeth. Faint white lines or ... regarding fluoride intake from reconstituted infant formula and enamel fluorosis: a report of the American Dental Association ...

  7. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media.

  8. Fluoride technology of obtaining REM magnetic alloys and master alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophronov, V. L.; Zhiganov, A. N.; Makaseev, Yu N.; Rusakov, I. Yu; Verkhoturova, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Rare earth permanent magnets (REPM) based on neodymium-Fe-boron system are the most promising, since they have the highest magnetic and satisfactory mechanical characteristics. The paper covers physical-chemical principles and shows the results of experimental studies of the process of obtaining REM alloys and master alloys using fundamentally new fluoride technology based on ladle calciothermal REM fluorides and Fe reduction.

  9. Pesticide Volatilization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We consider the risks posed when pesticides volatilize during or after application. The movement of vapors through the air is not the same as pesticide movement by spray drift, erosion, or windblown soil particles.

  10. In-cloud processes of methacrolein under simulated conditions - Part 3: Hygroscopic and volatility properties of the formed secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, V.; El Haddad, I.; Liu, Yao; Sellegri, K.; Laj, P.; Villani, P.; Picard, D.; Marchand, N.; Monod, A.

    2009-07-01

    The hygroscopic and volatility properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced from the nebulization of solutions after aqueous phase photooxidation of methacrolein was experimentally studied in a laboratory, using a Volatility-Hygroscopicity Tandem DMA (VHTDMA). The obtained SOA were 80% 100°C-volatile after 5 h of reaction and only 20% 100°C-volatile after 22 h of reaction. The Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) of the SOA produced from the nebulization of solutions after aqueous-phase photooxidation of methacrolein is 1.34-1.43, which is significantly higher than the HGF of SOA formed by gas-phase photooxidation of terpenes, usually found almost hydrophobic. These hygroscopic properties were confirmed for SOA formed by the nebulization of the same solutions where NaCl was added. The hygroscopic properties of the cloud droplet residuals decrease with the reaction time, in parallel with the formation of more refractory compounds. This decrease was mainly attributed to the 250°C-refractive fraction (presumably representative of the highest molecular weight compounds), which evolved from moderately hygroscopic (HGF of 1.52) to less hygroscopic (HGF of 1.36). Oligomerization is suggested as a process responsible for the decrease of both volatility and hygroscopicity with time. The NaCl seeded experiments enabled us to show that 19±4 mg L-1 of SOA was produced after 9.5 h of reaction and 41±9 mg L-1 after 22 h of in-cloud reaction. Because more and more SOA is formed as the reaction time increases, our results show that the reaction products formed during the aqueous-phase OH-oxidation of methacrolein may play a major role in the properties of residual particles upon the droplet's evaporation. Therefore, the specific physical properties of SOA produced during cloud processes should be taken into account for a global estimation of SOA and their atmospheric impacts.

  11. In-cloud processes of methacrolein under simulated conditions - Part 3: Hygroscopic and volatility properties of the formed Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, V.; El Haddad, I.; Liu, Y.; Sellegri, K.; Laj, P.; Villani, P.; Picard, D.; Marchand, N.; Monod, A.

    2009-03-01

    The hygroscopic and volatility properties of SOA produced from the nebulization of solutions after aqueous phase photooxidation of methacrolein was experimentally studied in laboratory, using a Volatility-Hygroscopicity Tandem DMA (VHTDMA). The obtained SOA were 80% 100°C-volatile after 5 h of reaction and only 20% 100°C-volatile after 22 h of reaction. The Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) of the SOA produced from the nebulization of solutions after aqueous-phase photooxidation of methacrolein is 1.34-1.43, which is significantly higher than the HGF of SOA formed by gas-phase phtooxidation of terpenes, usually found nearly hydrophobic. These hygroscopic properties were confirmed for SOA formed by the nebulization of the same solutions where NaCl was added. The hygroscopic properties of the cloud droplet residuals decrease with the reaction time, in parallel with the formation of more refractory compounds. This decrease was mainly attributed to the 250°C-refractive fraction (presumably representative of the highest molecular weigh compounds), evolved from moderately hygroscopic (HGF of 1.52) to less hygroscopic (HGF of 1.36). Oligomerization is suggested as a process responsible for the decrease of both volatility and hygroscopicity with time. The NaCl seeded experiments enabled us to show that 19±4 mg L-1 of SOA was produced after 9.5 h of reaction and 41±9 mg L-1 after 22 h of in-cloud reaction. Because more and more SOA is formed as the reaction time increases, our results show that the reaction products formed during the aqueous-phase OH-oxidation of methacrolein may play a major role in the properties of residual particles upon droplet's evaporation. Therefore, the specific physical properties of SOA produced during cloud processes should be taken into account for a global estimation of SOA and their atmospheric impacts.

  12. Fluoride-contaminated groundwater of Birbhum district, West Bengal, India: Interpretation of drinking and irrigation suitability and major geochemical processes using principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Batabyal, Asit Kumar; Gupta, Srimanta

    2017-08-01

    The present research work is confined to a rural tract located in the north-western part of Birbhum district, West Bengal, India. Chemical analysis of the groundwater shows the cations is in the order of Na(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) while for anions it is HCO3(─) > Cl(─) > SO4(2─) > NO3(─). The F(─) concentration was found to vary from 0.01 to 18 mg/L in the pre-monsoon and 0.023 to 19 mg/L in post-monsoon period. 86% of samples show low F(─) content (<0.60 mg/L) whereas, 8% exhibit elevated concentration of F(─) (>1.2 mg/L) mainly in the central and north-central parts of the study area at a depth of 46 to 98 m. The prime water type is CaHCO3 succeeded by F(─)-rich NaHCO3 and NaCl waters. The suitability analysis reveals that the water at about 81% of the sampling sites is unsuitable for drinking and at 16% of sites unsuitable for irrigation. The alkaline nature of the water and/or elevated concentration of Fe, Mn and F(─) make the water unsuitable for potable purposes while the high F(─) and Na(+) contents delimit the groundwater for irrigation uses. Multivariate statistical analysis suggests that chemical weathering along with ion exchange is the key process, responsible for mobilization of fluoride in groundwater of the study area.

  13. Energy Transfer Collisional Process Involving Heteromolecular Collisions Between Methyl Fluoride and N_2, Ar, He, CO_2, and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Dane J.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2013-06-01

    Time resolved IR/THz double resonance (DR) spectroscopy has been performed with a Q-switched CO_2 laser and heterodyne THz detection. The rate constants associated with allowed rotational- and vibrational-state changing collisions of CH_3F with N_2, Ar, He, CO_2, and air are measured by monitoring the temporal evolution of the absorption strength for numerous rotational transitions as a function of pressure. Collision partner dependent energy transfer processes are studied and compared with homomolecular collisions. Energy transfer maps and associated collisional cross sections will be presented for each collision partner.

  14. On the volatility of volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.; Murray, Brian M.

    2007-07-01

    The Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) Volatility Index, VIX, is calculated based on prices of out-of-the-money put and call options on the S&P 500 index (SPX). Sometimes called the “investor fear gauge”, the VIX is a measure of the implied volatility of the SPX, and is observed to be correlated with the 30-day realized volatility of the SPX. Changes in the VIX are observed to be negatively correlated with changes in the SPX. However, no significant correlation between changes in the VIX and changes in the 30-day realized volatility of the SPX are observed. We investigate whether this indicates a mispricing of options following large VIX moves, and examine the relation to excess returns from variance swaps. The sense in which the term “mispricing” is used is discussed in the paper.

  15. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    DOEpatents

    FitzPatrick, J.R.; Dunn, J.G.; Avens, L.R.

    1987-02-13

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF/sub 4/ is not further oxidized to AmF/sub 6/ by the application of O/sub 2/F at room temperature thereto, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF/sub 6/, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride thereof.

  16. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    DOEpatents

    FitzPatrick, John R.; Dunn, Jerry G.; Avens, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF.sub.4 is not further oxidized to AmF.sub.6 by the application of O.sub.2 F at room temperature, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF.sub.6, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride.

  17. Fluoride content of infant foods.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jaime L; Martinez-Mier, E Angeles; Sanders, Brian J; Jones, James E; Jackson, Richard D; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Tomlin, Angela M; Eckert, George J

    2014-01-01

    Excessive fluoride consumption during the first 2 years of life is associated with an increased risk of dental fluorosis. Estimates of fluoride intake from various sources may aid in determining a child's risk for developing fluorosis. This study sought to assess the fluoride content of commercially available foods for infants, and to guide dentists who are advising parents of young children about fluoride intake. Three samples each of 20 different foods (including fruits and vegetables, as well as chicken, turkey, beef/ham, and vegetarian dinners) from 3 manufacturers were analyzed (in duplicate) for their fluoride content. Among the 360 samples tested, fluoride concentration ranged from 0.007-4.13 μg fluoride/g food. All foods tested had detectable amounts of fluoride. Chicken products had the highest mean levels of fluoride, followed by turkey products. Consuming >1 serving per day of the high fluoride concentration products in this study would place children over the recommended daily fluoride intake. Fluoride from infant foods should be taken into account when determining total daily fluoride intake.

  18. Permeability and fluoride release of lining materials containing amine fluorides.

    PubMed

    Nordbö, H; Eriksen, H M

    1976-11-01

    The addition of amine fluorides to a copal recin (Copalite) and a chlorine caoutchouc varnish (Pergut S-40) has been studied. The permeability of Copalite films was only slightly increased whereas the excellent film-forming qualities of Pergut S-40 were destroyed by the addition of fluorides. A high fluoride release was found initially from test films of the materials but within 2-3 weeks a decrease to very low fluoride levels was observed.

  19. Effect of fluoride content on ion release from cast and selective laser melting-processed Co-Cr-Mo alloys.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) alloy is gaining popularity in prosthetic dentistry. However, its biocompatibility has been of some concern because of long-term exposure to fluoride in the oral environment. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride concentration on ion release from Co-Cr-Mo alloy specimens fabricated using either SLM or lost-wax casting when immersed in an artificial saliva solution containing fluoride. Specimens were prepared with either a SLM system for the SLM alloy or conventional lost-wax techniques for the cast alloy. The specimen surfaces were wet ground with silicon carbide paper (400, 800, and 1200 grit) and immersed in modified artificial saliva solutions, the pH of which had been adjusted to 5.0 with lactic acid and which contained NaF at concentrations of 0.00%, 0.05%, 0.1%, or 0.2%. The metal ion content of the solution was determined with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and regression analysis (α=.05). Fluoride concentration significantly influenced the elemental ion release from both the SLM and cast alloys. The quantity of ions released increased significantly with increasing fluoride concentration. The ion release from the cast specimens was significantly greater than that from the SLM specimens. The performance of the SLM alloy in immersion tests demonstrates that this new technique is a superior choice because of its good biocompatibility. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel approach for the determination of volatile compounds in processed onion by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Colina-Coca, Clara; González-Peña, Diana; Vega, Estela; de Ancos, Begoña; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción

    2013-01-15

    A novel headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS GC-MS) method was developed for analysis of volatile compounds in onion (Allium cepa L. var. cepa, 'Recas'). MS was operated using full scan mode and selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode in order to quantify some specific compounds with increased sensitivity relative to full scan mode. The limits of detection and quantitation ranged from 0.01 to 0.10 μg/g and from 0.02 to 3.83 μg/g fresh weight, respectively, for studied compounds. The procedure allowed the identification of eighteen compounds and quantitation of nine compounds in the volatile fraction of onion, belonging mainly to di-, and trisulfides and aldehydes. These methods were applied to evaluate how high-pressure (HP) as a processing technology affects onion volatile compounds, responsible in part of the onion biological activity. Onion samples were treated at T1: 200 MPa/25°C/5 min, T2: 400 MPa/25°C/5 min and T3: 600 MPa/25°C/5 min (treatments). In addition, the difference among diced, freeze-dried and pulverized onions (groups) was studied, in order to select the process more adequate for better preserving volatile compounds. The results obtained in full scan mode showed that both main factors (group and treatment) had a significant effect (P<0.001). There were also significant differences between groups and treatments for all compounds, being the main effect of group more marked by HS GC-MS using selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. For 2-methyl 2-pentenal, dimethyl trisulfide, and methyl propyl trisulfide it has been observed an increase in freeze-dried and pulverized onion samples compared with diced samples regardless the HP treatment. However, freeze-drying and pulverization processes affected the stability of propionaldehyde, 1-propanethiol, hexanal, dipropyl disulfide, and dipropyl trisulfide, diminishing their content regardless the HP treatment. HP at 200 and 400 MPa/25°C/5 min were the least detrimental treatments to the total

  1. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of volatile oils from processed products of Angelica sinensis radix by GC-MS-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li-Jia; Hua, Yong-Li; Ji, Peng; Yao, Wan-Ling; Zhang, Wen-Quan; Li, Jian; Wei, Yan-Ming

    2016-09-15

    Roots of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (AS) a commonly used herbal, always act as an anti-inflammatory drug in Chinese traditional therapy. In clinical use, AS is always processed before being used for the reason that processing can increase its therapeutic effect. Recent studies have shown that volatile oil of AS (VOAS), an important component in AS, has evident anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, our aim is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of volatile oils from processed products of AS. In this paper, volatile oils from stir-fried AS (C-VOAS), parched AS with alcohol (J-VOAS), parched AS with soil (T-VOAS), and parched AS with sesame oil (Y-VOAS) were applied to intervene the carrageenan-induced acute inflammation model rats. GC-MS based metabolomics was utilized to determine different metabolites in the inflammatory exudate and plasma samples. The results showed that VOASs could significantly inhibit the release of PGE2, HIS, 5-HT and TNF-α, among which C-VOAS and J-VOAS expressed better effect. Otherwise, 14 potential biomarkers were identified respectively in inflammatory exudate and plasma, which changed highly significantly (P<0.01) in C-VOAS and J-VOAS groups. We inferred that the anti-inflammatory effect of C-VOAS and J-VOAS were superior to other VOASs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Northland fluoridation advocacy programme: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Sunitha; Thomas, David R

    2008-12-01

    On 20 July 2006, the Far North District Council resolved to fluoridate Kaitaia and Kaikohe. This was the first such initiative by any Territorial Local Authority (TLA) in New Zealand for 23 years, and resulted from a fluoridation advocacy programme. This paper describes the programme implementation, assesses its consistency with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and critically examines the collaboration between the fluoride advocate and the key stakeholders. Process evaluation identified three main categories of programme implementation: policy advocacy, community action projects, and media advocacy. The collaboration of iwi, Maori health providers and the community suggests that the programme was consistent with the principles (partnership, participation and protection) ofthe Treaty ofWaitangi. Media advocacy played an important role in reflecting and engaging community views on fluoridation, and it influenced decision-making by the Far North District Council. The simultaneous, combined 'top-down and bottom-up' approach was an effective and successful strategy for fluoridation advocacy in the community. Less integrated approaches implemented on their own (such as the 'top down' approach in Whangarei and the 'bottom-up' approach in Dargaville) were not effective.

  3. Fluorination process using catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  4. Fluorination process using catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

    1983-08-25

    A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  5. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children.

    PubMed

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-20

    The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste. After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P < 0.01). When fluoridated toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste in connection with the varnish applications would decrease fluoride exposure. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  7. Volatilization of Mercury By Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Magos, L.; Tuffery, A. A.; Clarkson, T. W.

    1964-01-01

    Volatilization of mercury has been observed from various biological media (tissue homogenates, infusion broth, plasma, urine) containing mercuric chloride. That micro-organisms were responsible was indicated by the finding that the rates of volatilization were highly variable, that a latent period often preceded volatilization, that toluene inhibited the process, and that the capacity to volatilize mercury could be transferred from one biological medium to another. Two species of bacteria when isolated and cultured from these homogenates were able to volatilize mercury. Two other bacteria, one of which was isolated from the local water supply, were also highly active. The volatile mercury was identified as mercury vapour. The importance of these findings in relation to the storage of urine samples prior to mercury analysis is discussed. PMID:14249899

  8. Fluoride-containing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Burke, F M; Ray, N J; McConnell, R J

    2006-02-01

    Dental practitioners are exposed to an increasing number of dental materials, which claim the benefits of fluoride release. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the literature of these materials. Glass ionomers, resin modified glass ionomers, compomers, resin composites, fissure sealants and amalgam are discussed. It is clear that a long-term measurable release of fluoride can be observed from certain restorative materials, in vitro, particularly glass ionomer cement, resin modified glass ionomer cement, fluoridated cements, fluoridated dental amalgam and certain fissure sealants. In general, the rate of fluoride release is not constant but exhibits a relatively rapid initial rate, which decreases with time. However, the fluoride release profiles may be dependent on specific formulation and on experimental design and sampling methods. These materials may feature greater longevity, a reduced incidence of marginal failure, an elevated concentration of fluoride in contingent plaque, together with an antibacterial action when compared with non-fluoride releasing materials. In addition, fluoride-releasing materials may perform better in caries inhibition in artificial caries model studies than non-fluoridated materials. While any, or all, of these anti-cariogenic effects may be associated with fluoride release, a direct relationship between fluoride release profiles and such effects has not been determined in vivo.

  9. Fluoride content in caffeinated, decaffeinated and herbal teas.

    PubMed

    Chan, J T; Koh, S H

    1996-01-01

    The fluoride contents of infusions prepared from 44 different brands and types of teas were measured. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 3.71 ppm (mean = 1.50 ppm) in caffeinated tea infusions, 0.02-0.14 ppm (mean = 0.05 ppm) in herbal tea infusions, and 1.01-5.20 ppm (mean = 3.19) in decaffeinated tea infusions. This is the first report of the fluoride content of decaffeinated teas. The mean fluoride content of decaffeinated tea infusions is significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the corresponding caffeinated tea. The use of mineral water containing a naturally high fluoride level during the process of decaffeination is the most likely explanation of the above observation.

  10. Flash Thermal Conditioning of Olive Pastes during the Oil Mechanical Extraction Process: Cultivar Impact on the Phenolic and Volatile Composition of Virgin Olive Oil.

    PubMed

    Veneziani, Gianluca; Esposto, Sonia; Taticchi, Agnese; Selvaggini, Roberto; Urbani, Stefania; Di Maio, Ilona; Sordini, Beatrice; Servili, Maurizio

    2015-07-08

    The concentration of phenolic and volatile compounds in virgin olive oil (VOO) is closely related to the different operative conditions applied to the mechanical extraction process of the olive oil. However, the great qualitative and quantitative variability of these compounds indicates an important role played by genetic and agronomic aspects. A heat exchanger was placed in front of a traditional, covered malaxer to study the impact of flash thermal conditioning (FTC) of olive paste on the quality of VOO, which is highly influenced by phenolic release and aroma generation. The VOO flash thermal conditioning of five major Italian cultivars showed a higher concentration of phenols (range of increase percentage, 9.9-37.3%) compared to the control trials, whereas the FTC treatment featured a differentiated impact on the volatile fractions, associated with the genetic origins of the olives.

  11. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  12. Intake and metabolism of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Whitford, G M

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the major factors that determine the body burden of inorganic fluoride. Fluoride intake 25 or more years ago was determined mainly by measurement of the concentration of the ion in the drinking water supply. This is not necessarily true today because of ingestion from fluoride-containing dental products, the "halo effect", the consumption of bottled water, and the use of water purification systems in the home. Therefore, the concentration of fluoride in drinking water may not be a reliable indicator of previous intake. Under most conditions, fluoride is rapidly and extensively absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The rate of gastric absorption is inversely related to the pH of the gastric contents. Overall absorption is reduced by calcium and certain other cations and by elevated plasma fluoride levels. Fluoride removal from plasma occurs by calcified tissue uptake and urinary excretion. About 99% of the body burden of fluoride is associated with calcified tissues, and most of it is not exchangeable. In general, the clearance of fluoride from plasma by the skeleton is inversely related to the stage of skeletal development. Skeletal uptake, however, can be positive or negative, depending on the level of fluoride intake, hormonal status, and other factors. Dentin fluoride concentrations tend to increase throughout life and appear to be similar to those in bone. Research to determine whether dentin is a reliable biomarker for the body burden of fluoride is recommended. The renal clearance of fluoride is high compared with other halogens. It is directly related to urinary pH. Factors that acidify the urine increase the retention of fluoride and vice versa. The renal clearance of fluoride decreases and tissue levels increase when the glomerular filtration rate is depressed on a chronic basis.

  13. Geochemical modeling of high fluoride concentration in groundwater of Pokhran area of Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chander Kumar; Rina, Kumari; Singh, R P; Shashtri, S; Kamal, V; Mukherjee, S

    2011-02-01

    The groundwater is the only major source of drinking water in western part of Rajasthan, India. The study was carried out to locate and decipher hydrogeochemical reactions responsible for elevated concentration of fluoride. The concentration of fluoride ranged from 0.6 to 4.74 ppm in groundwater of study area. Since the area is a desertic terrain and no industries are present thus possibility of anthropogenic input of fluoride is all most negligible thus the enrichment of fluoride in groundwater is only possible due to rock-water interaction. The highly alkaline conditions indicated fluorite dissolution as major process responsible for high concentration of fluoride in Pokhran.

  14. Influence of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) and sodium fluoride on the healing process in delayed tooth replantation: histologic and histometric analysis in rats.

    PubMed

    Poi, Wilson Roberto; Carvalho, Roberta Martinelli; Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Manfrin, Thais Mara; Rodrigues, Thais da Silveira

    2007-02-01

    Although it has already been shown that enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) promotes periodontal regeneration in the treatment of intrabony periodontal defects, there is little information concerning its regenerative capacity in cases of delayed tooth replantation. To evaluate the alterations in the periodontal healing of replanted teeth after use of Emdogain, the central incisors of 24 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were extracted and left on the bench for 6 h. Thereafter, the dental papilla and the enamel organ of each tooth were sectioned for pulp removal by a retrograde way and the canal was irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite. The teeth were assigned to two groups: in group I, root surface was treated with 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10 min (changing the solution every 5 min), rinsed with saline for 10 min and immersed in 2% acidulated-phosphate sodium fluoride for 10 min; in group II, root surfaces were treated in the same way as described above, except for the application of Emdogain instead of sodium fluoride. The teeth were filled with calcium hydroxide (in group II right before Emdogain was applied) and replanted. All animals received antibiotic therapy. The rats were killed by anesthetic overdose 10 and 60 days after replantation. The pieces containing the replanted teeth were removed, fixated, decalcified and paraffin-embedded. Semi-serial 6-microm-thick sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic and histometric analyses. The use of 2% acidulated-phosphate sodium fluoride provided more areas of replacement resorption. The use of Emdogain resulted in more areas of ankylosis and was therefore not able to avoid dentoalveolar ankylosis. It may be concluded that neither 2% acidulated-phosphate sodium fluoride nor Emdogain were able to prevent root resorption in delayed tooth replantation in rats.

  15. Changes in headspace volatile concentrations of coffee brews caused by the roasting process and the brewing procedure.

    PubMed

    López-Galilea, Isabel; Fournier, Nicole; Cid, Concepción; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2006-11-01

    Headspace-solid-phase microextraction technique (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) were used to characterize the aroma compounds of coffee brews from commercial conventional and torrefacto roasted coffee prepared by filter coffeemaker and espresso machine. A total of 47 volatile compounds were identified and quantified. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to differentiate coffee brew samples by volatile compounds. Conventional and torrefacto roasted coffee brews were separated successfully by principal component 1 (68.5% of variance), and filter and espresso ones were separated by principal component 2 (19.5% of variance). By GC olfactometry, a total of 34 aroma compounds have been perceived at least in half of the coffee extracts and among them 28 were identified, among which octanal was identified for the first time as a contributor to coffee brew aroma.

  16. Phase A design study of microgravity fluoride fiber puller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Improved transmission properties for fluoride fibers due to space processing has great potential for commercial benefits. Phase A design study will determine conceptual feasibility and provide initial definition of the technical requirements and design issues for space.

  17. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  18. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  19. Ferrimyoglobin-Fluoride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an experiment which is designed to investigate the reaction of the protein ferrimyoglobin with fluoride. The activity uses readily available apparatus and the technique of optical absorbance for measurement of concentrations. Experimental design, procedures, and treatment of the equilibrium data are detailed. (CW)

  20. Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    relatively low refractive Indices in the visible range of about 1.5-1.9 and fairly good chemical resistance towards water and weak acids. Their...particularly interesting to compare with crystalline fluorides (Refs. 25, 37) such as 7800 spinel-type Li2NiF4 ; 7700 rutile-type NiF2 ; 7500 perovskite-type

  1. Ferrimyoglobin-Fluoride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an experiment which is designed to investigate the reaction of the protein ferrimyoglobin with fluoride. The activity uses readily available apparatus and the technique of optical absorbance for measurement of concentrations. Experimental design, procedures, and treatment of the equilibrium data are detailed. (CW)

  2. Other Fluoride Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... About CDC.gov . Oral Health home Oral Health Basics Children's Oral Health Protecting Your Child's Teeth Brush Up on Healthy Teeth Adult Oral Health ... concentration of fluoride in a small amount of material in close contact with the teeth for many hours. Varnishes must be reapplied at ...

  3. Salt fluoridation and oral health.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the caries-protective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%). In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67%) and Switzerland (85%). In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  4. Moderately volatile elements. [in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palme, H.; Larimer, J. W.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    That the fractionation of moderately volatile and highly volatile elements was a major process in the early solar system is reflected in the variable concentrations of Rb and associated variations in initial Sr-isotopic ratios in chondritic meteorites. Greater knowledge of processes leading to volatile depletion would place stronger constraints on the formation conditions of solid material in the solar system. It will especially become possible to ascertain whether evaporation or incomplete condensation was the major process in establishing the elemental abundance patterns observed in primitive meteorites and planets.

  5. Mapping of fluoride endemic areas and assessment of fluoride exposure.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopalan; Jaswanth, A; Gopalakrishnan, S; Siva ilango, S

    2009-02-15

    The prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the consumption of more fluoride through drinking water. It is necessary to find out the fluoride endemic areas to adopt remedial measures to the people on the risk of fluorosis. The objectives of this study are to estimate the fluoride exposure through drinking water from people of different age group and to elucidate the fluoride endemic areas through mapping. Assessment of fluoride exposure was achieved through the estimation fluoride level in drinking water using fluoride ion selective electrode method. Google earth and isopleth technique were used for mapping of fluoride endemic areas. From the study it was observed that Nilakottai block of Dindigul district in Tamil Nadu is highly fluoride endemic. About 88% of the villages in this block have fluoride level more than the prescribed permissible limit in drinking water. Exposure of fluoride among different age groups was calculated in this block, which comprises 32 villages. The maximum estimated exposure doses were 0.19 mg/kg/day for infants, 0.17 mg/kg/day for children and 0.10 mg/kg/day for adults. When compared with adequate intake of minimal safe level exposure dose of 0.01 mg/kg/day for infants and 0.05 mg/kg/day for other age groups, a health risk due to fluorosis to the people in Nilakottai block has become evident. From the results, the people in Nilakottai block are advised to consume drinking water with fluoride level less than 1 mg/l. It has been recommended to the government authorities to take serious steps to supply drinking water with low fluoride concern for the fluorosis affected villages.

  6. Evolution of Triton's volatile budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1993-01-01

    Triton's volatile budget provides important links to planetary formation processes in the cold outer solar nebula. However, the budget has been modified by processes subsequent to the accretion of this body. It is of interest to assess whether certain formation environments can be ruled out for Triton on the basis of its current volatile abundances, and also to quantify some of the post-accretional processes by which the abundances have been modified.

  7. Estimating the importance of multi-phase processing on secondary organic aerosol based on a functional-group resolving volatility basis set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C. J.; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Madronich, S.

    2014-12-01

    Traditional understanding views secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere as continuous gas-phase oxidation of precursors such as isoprene, aromatics or alkanes. Recent research found that these oxidation products are also highly water soluble. It is further understood that the liquid-phase of cloud droplets as well as deliquesced particles could mediate SOA formation through chemistry in the aqueous-phase. While the effect of multi-phase processing has been studied in detailed for specific compounds like glyoxal or methylglyoxal, an integrated approach that considers the large number of individual compounds has been missing due to the complexity involved. In our work we explore the effects of multi-phase processing on secondary organic aerosol from an explicit modeling perspective.Volatility and solubility determine in which phase a given molecule will be found under given atmospheric conditions. Volatility has already been used to simplify the description of SOA formation in the gas-phase in what became known as the Volatility Basis Set approach (VBS). Compounds contributing to SOA formation are grouped by volatility and then treated as a whole. A number of studies extended the VBS by adding a second dimension like oxygen to carbon ratio or the mean oxidation state. In our work we use functional groups as second dimension.Using explicit oxidation chemistry modeling (GECKO-A) we derive SOA yields as well as their composition in terms of functional groups for commonly used precursors. We then investigate the effect of simply partitioning functional-group specific organic mass into cloud droplets and deliquesced aerosol based on their estimated solubility. Finally we apply simple chemistry in the aqueous-phase and relate changes in functional groups to changes in volatility and subsequent changes in partitioning between gas- and aerosol-phase.In our presentation we will explore the sensitivites of the multi-phase system in a box model setting with

  8. Assessment of water contribution on total fluoride intake of various age groups of people in fluoride endemic and non-endemic areas of Dindigul District, Tamil Nadu, South India.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopalan; Gopalakrishnan, S; Siva Ilango, S

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the intake of large quantities of fluoride through water. It is necessary to determine the contribution of water used for drinking and food processing and other diet sources on daily fluoride intake for finding the ways to reduce the excess fluoride intake than the minimum safe level intake of 0.05 mg/kg/day. The main objectives of this study are to determine the quantitative impact of water through drinking and cooking of food and beverages on total fluoride intake as well as to estimate the contribution of commonly consumed diet sources on total fluoride intake. Contribution of water on daily fluoride intake and estimation of total fluoride intake through the diet sources were accomplished through analysis of fluoride in drinking water, solid and liquid food items, Infant formulae, tea and coffee infusions using fluoride ion selective electrode. Determination of incidence of fluorosis in different fluoride endemic areas in Dindigul District of Tamil Nadu, South India is achieved through clinical survey. The percentage of daily fluoride intake through water is significantly higher for infants than children, adults and old age groups of people. The percentile scores of fluoride intake through water from drinking and cooking increases with increase of water fluoride level. The rate of prevalence of fluorosis is higher in adolescent girls and females than adolescent boys and males residing in high fluoride endemic areas. More than 60% of the total fluoride intake per day derived from water used for drinking and food processing. Hence the people residing in the fluoride endemic areas in Dindigul District of Tamil Nadu, South India are advised to take serious concern about the fluoride level of water used for drinking and cooking to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  9. Relationship of fluoride in drinking water to other drinking water parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    Fluoride in drinking water and 32 other drinking water variables were evaluated in an epidemiologic study of 158 municipalities in the State of Iowa. The study included three study groups: two for controlled fluoridation and one for natural fluoride. Previous epidemiologic studies of fluoride in drinking water have rarely addressed other drinking water parameters. The results indicated that controlled fluoridation municipalities were more likely to have initiated other treatment practices such as chlorination. Natural fluoride drinking water concentrations were positively correlated with water source depth, and thereby related to other depth-associated variables such as radium 226, strontium, and nitrogen. Future epidemiologic studies evaluating the safety of fluoride in drinking water should address the potential for confounding by other water variables and treatment processes.

  10. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  11. Use of fluorides in dental caries management.

    PubMed

    Chu, C H; Mei, May L; Lo, Edward C M

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is commonly and widely used to prevent and even arrest caries. The clinical effects of fluorides depend on the chemical compounds utilized and the methods used to apply the fluoride ion to the surface of the tooth. Fluorosis has been reported in conjunction with increased doses of fluoride. A coordinated approach to fluoride delivery is essential to avoid the risk of fluorosis.

  12. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  13. Water fluoridation and oral health.

    PubMed

    Harding, Máiréad Antoinette; O'Mullane, Denis Martin

    2013-11-01

    Water fluoridation, is the controlled addition of fluoride to the water supply, with the aim of reducing the prevalence of dental caries. Current estimates suggest that approximately 370 million people in 27 countries consume fluoridated water, with an additional 50 million consuming water in which fluoride is naturally occurring. A pre-eruptive effect of fluoride exists in reducing caries levels in pit and fissure surfaces of permanent teeth and fluoride concentrated in plaque and saliva inhibits the demineralisation of sound enamel and enhances the remineralisation of demineralised enamel. A large number of studies conducted worldwide demonstrate the effectiveness of water fluoridation. Objections to water fluoridation have been raised since its inception and centre mainly on safety and autonomy. Systematic reviews of the safety and efficacy of water fluoridation attest to its safety and efficacy; dental fluorosis identified as the only adverse outcome. Water fluoridation is an effective safe means of preventing dental caries, reaching all populations, irrespective of the presence of other dental services. Regular monitoring of dental caries and fluorosis is essential particularly with the lifelong challenge which dental caries presents. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  14. Mass Wasting and Ground Collapse in Terrains of Volatile-Rich Deposits as a Solar System-Wide Geological Process: The Pre-Galileo View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Mellon, Michael T.; Zent, Aaron P.

    1996-01-01

    The polar terrains of Mars are covered in many places with irregular pits and retreating scarps, as are some of the surfaces of the outer-planet satellites. These features are interpreted by us as diagnostic of exogenic degradation due to the loss of a volatile rock-forming matrix or cement. In this study we propose that sublimation degradation is a plausible Solar Systemwide geological process. Candidate examples have been identified on Mars, Io, and Triton, and possibly Europa and Ganymede. We envision this process as having two end-member expressions (pits and scarps), for which we hypothesize two end-member mechanisms (massive localized lenses and areally extensive basal layers). In this study we focus on the role this process may play on the surfaces of the galilean satellites. Our principle modeling results are that for these satellites, H2S, CO2, and NH3 are the only viable candidate volatiles for sublimation degradation of landforms, in light of galilean satellite cosmochemistry. For Io's polar regions only H2S, and then only from slopes that face the Sun and have thin lags, is volatile enough to cause the observed sublimation-induced erosion at those latitudes. SO2 is not a viable candidate as an agent of erosion, especially for these polar landforms. In the case of Europa, only CO2 and H2S are viable candidates (given surface age constraints). Both species could be efficient eroders in nonpolar regions. H2S could generate erosion within the polar regions if the deposition and erosion conditions were essentially identical as those we invoked for Io's polar regions. For Ganymede (and Callisto) NH3 might be an agent of erosion in equatorial terrains of great age. The sublimation of CO2 and H2S is much more robust than NH3. The much slower rate of sublimation degradation from NH3 might be detectable by Galileo and used as a compositional indicator.

  15. PROCESS FOR CONTINUOUSLY SEPARATING IRRADIATION PRODUCTS OF THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, L.P.; Miles, F.T.; Sheehan, T.V.; Wiswall, R.H.; Heus, R.J.

    1959-07-01

    A method is presented for separating uranium-233 and protactinium from thorium-232 containing compositions which comprises irradiating finely divided particles of said thorium with a neutron flux to form uranium-233 and protactinium, heating the neutron-irradiated composition in a fluorine and hydrogen atmosphere to form volatile fluorides of uranium and protactinium and thereafter separating said volatile fluorides from the thorium.

  16. The history of public health use of fluorides in caries prevention

    PubMed Central

    Šket, Tea; Kukec, Andreja; Kosem, Rok

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of our study was to chronologically analyse various public health measures of fluoride use in caries prevention. Methods We systematically searched the PubMed database on the preventive role of fluorides in public health, published from 1984 to 2014. The search process was divided into four steps, where inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined. Qualitative methodology was used for the article analysis. In the research process, the described forms of F use, diversity of the described F agents, and the observed population group were analysed. Results In our systematic review, 40 relevant reviews were revealed. Fluorides have been used in many different forms, but only a few studies showed their significant role in public health. Water fluoridation was the most important public health measure. In the recent decades, the number of studies on topical fluorides is constantly rising. The most extensively described topical forms of fluorides are professionally applied fluoride agents and fluoride toothpaste for home-use. The use of fluoride containing toothpaste in caries prevention is a safe and successful public health measure (PHM) if their use is widespread, and it is recommended for all. The results on other topical forms of fluorides are insufficient to be suggested as an important PHM. Conclusions The role of fluorides in public health prevention has changed in accordance with the knowledge about the fluoride cariostatic mechanism. Previously the most important pre-eruptive effect of fluorides was supplemented by the post eruptive effect. Abundant evidence exists to show the effectiveness of systemic and topical fluorides. PMID:28289474

  17. Fluoride ion release and solubility of fluoride enriched interim cements.

    PubMed

    Lewinstein, Israel; Block, Jonathan; Melamed, Guy; Dolev, Eran; Matalon, Shlomo; Ormianer, Zeev

    2014-08-01

    Interim and definitive restorations cemented with interim cements for a prolonged interval are susceptible to bacterial infiltration and caries formation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term fluoride release and solubility of aged ZnO-based interim cements enriched separately with 0.4% NaF and SnF2. Four different brands of cements (Tempbond, Tempbond NE, Procem, and Freegenol) were tested for fluoride release and solubility. For every test, 6 disk specimens of each cement with NaF and SnF2, and 6 with no fluoride enrichment (control) were fabricated, for a total of 72 specimens. The disks were incubated in deionized water. Fluoride ion release was recorded at 1, 7, 14, 21, 63, 91, and 182 days. Solubility was calculated as weight percent after 90 days of incubation. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance with repeated measures and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (P<.05). Cements mixed with fluorides released fluoride ions for at least 182 days. Cements mixed with NaF released more fluoride ions than those mixed with SnF2 (P<.001). The cumulative release rates from all the tested cements mixed with either NaF or SnF2 were linear with respect to t(½) (r>.97), indicating a diffusion-controlled fluoride release. Cement and fluoride types were the main affecting factors in fluoride ion release. The addition of fluorides slightly increased the solubility of the cements. Given their long-term sustained and diffusive controlled release, these fluorides, particularly NaF when mixed with ZnO-based interim cements, may be useful for caries prevention under provisionally cemented restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A review on fluoride varnishes: an alternative topical fluoride treatment.

    PubMed

    Clark, D C

    1982-06-01

    The in vitro, in vivo and clinical research on topical fluoride varnishes in surveyed. The probable mechanisms of action for fluoride varnishes is discussed and this effect demonstrated from the results of in vitro and in vivo research. Findings from clinical studies are summarized and selected results are used to estimate expected preventive effects from the treatment. The practical advantages and limitations of fluoride varnishes are also reviewed and indications for the future used of these preventive agents are considered.

  19. The evolution of immiscible silicate and fluoride melts: Implications for REE ore-genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukova, O.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mid-Proterozoic peralkaline Strange Lake pluton (Québec-Labrador, Canada) exhibits extreme enrichment in high field strength elements (HFSE), including the rare earth elements (REE), particularly in pegmatites. On the basis of a study of melt inclusions, we proposed recently that fluoride-silicate melt immiscibility played an important and perhaps dominant role in concentrating the REE within the pluton. Here we present further evidence for silicate-fluoride immiscibility at Strange Lake from a sample of the hypersolvus granite, which contains an inclusion composed largely of REE and HFSE minerals. The inclusion (∼5 cm in diameter) comprises a narrow rim containing chevkinite-(Ce) and zircon in a fluorite matrix, a core of fluorbritholite-(Ce) and bastnäsite-(Ce) and a transition zone between the rim and the core consisting of a fine-grained intergrowth of bastnäsite-(Ce), gagarinite-(Y) and fluorite. We propose that the inclusion formed as a result of silicate-fluoride immiscibility, which occurred early in the emplacement history of the Strange Lake pluton, and that it represents the fluoride melt. After separation of the two melts, the boundary between them acted as a locus of crystallisation, where crystals formed repeatedly due to heterogeneous (surface catalysed) nucleation. Zircon crystallised shortly after melt phase separation, and was followed by the growth of perthite together with arfvedsonite and quartz. As a result, the silicate melt surrounding the fluoride inclusion became enriched in volatiles that facilitated crystallisation of progressively larger crystals in the inclusion; large crystals of arfvedsonite and perthite were succeeded by even larger crystals of quartz. Massive crystallisation of chevkinite-(Ce) followed, forming the rim of the inclusion. The fluoride melt, which constituted the matrix to the silicate minerals and chevkinite-(Ce), crystallised after chevkinite-(Ce), forming fluorbritholite-(Ce) and fluorite. Aqueous fluid

  20. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, Norman F.; Williams, Joe L.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  1. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  2. VOLATILIZATION OF ALKYLBENZENES FROM WATER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Volatilization is a physical process of importance in determining the fate of many organic compounds in streams and rivers. This process is frequently described by the conceptual-two-film model. The model assumes uniformly mixed water and air phases separated by thin films of water and air in which mass transfer is by molecular diffusion. Mass-transfer coefficients for the water and air films are related to an overall mass-transfer coefficient for volatilization through the Henry's law constant.

  3. Recovery of agricultural odors and odorous compounds from polyvinyl fluoride film bags

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate sampling methods are necessary when quantifying odor and volatile organic compound emissions at agricultural facilities. The commonly accepted methodology in the U.S. has been to collect odor samples in polyvinyl fluoride bags (PVF, brand name Tedlar®) and, subsequently, analyze with human ...

  4. Comparison of storage stability of odorous VOCs in polyester aluminum and polyvinyl fluoride tedlar bags

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whole air sampling using containers such as flexible bags or rigid canisters is commonly used to collect samples of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in air. The objective of this study was to compare the stability of polyester aluminum (PEA) and polyvinyl fluoride (PVF, brand name Tedlar®) bags for ...

  5. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.L.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1989-10-17

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag formed in the production of metallic uranium by the reduction of depleted uranium tetrafluoride with metallic magnesium in a retort wherein the slag contains the free metals magnesium and uranium and also oxides and fluorides of the metals. The slag having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 rhoCi/gm. The method comprises the steps of: grinding the slag to a median particle size of about 200 microns; contacting the ground slag in a reaction zone with an acid having a strength of from about 0.5 to 1.5 N for a time of from about 4 to about 20 hours in the presence of a catalytic amount of iron; removing the liquid product; treating the particulate solid product; repeating the last two steps at least one more time to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 rhoCi/gm.

  6. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.L.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1989-10-17

    This patent describes a method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag formed in the production of metallic uranium by the reduction of depleted uranium tetrafluoride with metallic magnesium in a retort wherein the slag contains the free metals magnesium and uranium and also oxides and fluorides of the metals, the slag having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 pCi/gm. The method comprises: grinding the slag to a median particle size of about 200 microns; contacting the ground slag in a reaction zone with an acid having a strength of from about 0.5 to 1.5 N for a time of from about 4 to about 20 hours in the presence of a catalytic amount of iron, the reaction zone being maintained at a temperature within the range of from about 60{degrees} to 90{degrees} C. and the weight of ratio of slag to acid being within the range of from about 1:2 to 1:6 to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product; removing the liquid product; treating the particulate solid product; and repeating steps at least one more time to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm.

  7. Young children and fluoride toothpaste.

    PubMed

    Rock, W P

    1994-07-09

    Studies have shown a higher prevalence of enamel mottling in children who live in fluoridated areas than in those from low fluoride areas. It is possible that the additive effect of fluoride ingestion from water and toothpaste may be responsible since it is known that young children may swallow up to half of the toothpaste on the brush. Parents must supervise toothbrushing for young children, low fluoride paste should be used, and the brush merely smeared with paste. The commonly recommended pea-sized quantity may be too much.

  8. [Water fluoridation and public health].

    PubMed

    Barak, Shlomo

    2003-11-01

    Fluoridation in Israel was first mooted in 1973 and finally incorporated into law in November 2002 obligating the Ministry of Health to add fluoride to the nation's water supply. Epidemiology studies in the USA have shown that the addition of one part per million of fluoride to the drinking water reduced the caries rate of children's teeth by 50% to 60% with no side effects. Both the WHO in 1994 and the American Surgeon General's report of 2000 declared that fluoridation of drinking water was the safest and most efficient way of preventing dental caries in all age groups and populations. Opposition to fluoridation has arisen from "antifluoridation" groups who object to the "pollution" of drinking water by the addition of chemicals and mass medication in violation of the "Patient's Rights" law and the Basic Law of Human Dignity and Liberty. A higher prevalence of hip fractures in elderly osteoporotic women and osteosarcoma in teenagers has been reported in areas where excess fluoride exists in the drinking water. However, none of the many independent professional committees reviewing the negative aspects of fluoridation have found any scientific evidence associating fluoridation with any ill-effects or health problems. In Israel, where dental treatment is not included in the basket of Health Services, fluoridation is the most efficient and cheapest way of reducing dental disease, especially for the poorer members of the population.

  9. Current concepts on the theories of the mechanism of action of fluoride.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, J M

    1999-12-01

    The caries-preventive effect of fluoride is mainly attributed to the effects on demineralization/remineralization at the tooth oral fluids interface. Sub ppm levels of fluoride in saliva are effective in shifting the balance from demineralization, leading to caries, to remineralization. This is attributed to the fluoride-enhanced precipitation of calcium phosphates, and the formation of fluorhydroxyapatite in the dental tissues. Low fluoride levels are found in saliva after toothbrushing with fluoride containing dentifrices. Similar concentrations are ineffective in interfering with processes of growth and metabolism of bacteria, and also do not result in a significantly reduced dissolution of tooth mineral as a result of (firmly bound) fluoride incorporation. Comparative studies of fluoride efficacy have shown that higher concentrations in solution are needed in pH-cycling studies of dentine than in enamel to maintain the mineral balance or to induce remineralization. This is attributed to the greater solubility of the dentine and the smaller size of the dentine crystallites compared to enamel. Fluoride slow-release devices, in the form of fluoride-releasing restorative materials, may serve to increase the fluoride levels in saliva and plaque to levels at which caries can be prevented, also in high-risk patients. Research questions for the next millennium and future perspectives for fluoride applications should be found in the retention and slow release of fluoride after various combinations of fluoride treatment, the combination of fluoride and anti-microbial treatment, the individualization of caries prevention, and the combination of preventive schemes with new developments in caries diagnosis.

  10. Performance of novel hydroxyapatite nanowires in treatment of fluoride contaminated water.

    PubMed

    He, Junyong; Zhang, Kaisheng; Wu, Shibiao; Cai, Xingguo; Chen, Kai; Li, Yulian; Sun, Bai; Jia, Yong; Meng, Fanli; Jin, Zhen; Kong, Lingtao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2016-02-13

    Novel ultralong hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires were successfully prepared for fluoride removal for the first time. The fluoride adsorption on the HAP nanowires was studied on a batch mode. The results revealed that the adsorption data could be well described by the Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetic followed the pseudo-second-order model. The maximum of adsorption capacity was 40.65 mg/g at pH 7.0 when the fluoride concentration is 200mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of fluoride was a spontaneous endothermic process. The FT-IR, XPS and Zeta potential analysis revealed that both anion exchange and electrostatic interactions were involved in the adsorption of fluoride. Furthermore, the HAP nanowires were made into HAP membrane through a simple process of suction filtration. Membrane filtration experiments revealed that the fluoride removal capabilities depended on the membrane thickness, flow rate and initial concentration of fluoride. The as-prepared membrane could remove fluoride efficiently through continues filtration. The filtered water amount could reach 350, 192, and 64 L/m(2) when the fluoride concentrations were 4, 5 and 8 ppm, respectively, using the HAP membrane with only 150 μm thickness. The as-synthesized ultralong HAP nanowires were thus demonstrated to be very effective and biocompatible adsorbents for fluoride removal from contaminated water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Capture and identification of the volatile components in crude and processed herbal medicines through on-line purge and trap technique coupled with GC × GC-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Xu, Zhiwei; Wu, Xin; Li, Qingli; Chen, Xiaocheng

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to investigate the volatile components in crude and processed herbal medicines (HMs). Using Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma (AMR) as a model HM, the volatile components were captured through on-line purge and trap technique and identified by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOF MS) system. A total of 224 and 171 volatile compounds were identified in crude and processed AMR samples, respectively. After frying with honey-bran, 52 compounds which were found in crude AMR samples disappeared in processed AMR samples, and 15 compounds were newly generated in processed AMR. The established method can be applied in different research areas such as HM and food processing.

  12. Water fluoridation and osteoporotic fracture.

    PubMed

    Hillier, S; Inskip, H; Coggon, D; Cooper, C

    1996-09-01

    Osteoporotic fractures constitute a major public health problem. These fractures typically occur at the hip, spine and distal forearm. Their pathogenesis is heterogeneous, with contributions from both bone strength and trauma. Water fluoridation has been widely proposed for its dental health benefits, but concerns have been raised about the balance of skeletal risks and benefits of this measure. Fluoride has potent effects on bone cell function, bone structure and bone strength. These effects are mediated by the incorporation of fluoride ions in bone crystals to form fluoroapatite, and through an increase in osteoblast activity. It is believed that a minimum serum fluoride level of 100 ng/ml must be achieved before osteoblasts will be stimulated. Serum levels associated with drinking water fluoridated to 1 ppm are usually several times lower than this value, but may reach this threshold at concentrations of 4 ppm in the drinking water. Animal studies suggest no effect of low-level (0-3 ppm) fluoride intake on bone strength, but a possible decrease at higher levels. Sodium fluoride has been used to treat established osteoporosis for nearly 30 years. Recent trials of this agent, prescribed at high doses, have suggested that despite a marked increase in bone mineral density, there is no concomitant reduction in vertebral fracture incidence. Furthermore, the increase in bone density at the lumbar spine may be achieved at the expense of bone mineral in the peripheral cortical skeleton. As a consequence, high dose sodium fluoride (80 mg daily) is not currently used to treat osteoporosis. At lower doses, recent trials have suggested a beneficial effect on both bone density and fracture. The majority of epidemiological evidence regarding the effect of fluoridated drinking water on hip fracture incidence is based on ecological comparisons. Although one Finnish study suggested that hip fracture rates in a town with fluoridated water were lower than those in a matching town

  13. Drinking water fluoridation and bone.

    PubMed

    Allolio, B; Lehmann, R

    1999-01-01

    Drinking water fluoridation has an established role in the prevention of dental caries, but may also positively or negatively affect bone. In bone fluoride is incorporated into hydroxylapatite to form the less soluble fluoroapatite. In higher concentrations fluoride stimulates osteoblast activity leading to an increase in cancellous bone mass. As optimal drinking water fluoridation (1 mg/l) is widely used, it is of great interest, whether long-term exposition to artificial water fluoridation has any impact on bone strength, bone mass, and -- most importantly -- fracture rate. Animal studies suggest a biphasic pattern of the effect of drinking water fluoridation on bone strength with a peak strength at a bone fluoride content of 1200 ppm followed by a decline at higher concentrations eventually leading to impaired bone quality. These changes are not paralleled by changes in bone mass suggesting that fluoride concentrations remain below the threshold level required for activation of osteoblast activity. Accordingly, in most epidemiological studies in humans bone mass was not altered by optimal drinking water fluoridation. In contrast, studies on the effect on hip fracture rate gave conflicting results ranging from an increased fracture incidence to no effect, and to a decreased fracture rate. As only ecological studies have been performed, they may be biased by unknown confounding factors -- the so-called ecological fallacy. However, the combined results of these studies indicate that any increase or decrease in fracture rate is likely to be small. It has been calculated that appropriately designed cohort studies to solve the problem require a sample size of >400,000 subjects. Such studies will not be performed in the foreseeable future. Future investigations in humans should, therefore, concentrate on the effect of long-term drinking water fluoridation on bone fluoride content and bone strength.

  14. Critical factors determining fluoride concentration in tea leaves produced from Anhui province, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huimei; Zhu, Xiaohui; Peng, Chuanyi; Xu, Wei; Li, Daxiang; Wang, Yijun; Fang, Shihui; Li, Yeyun; Hu, Shaode; Wan, Xiaochun

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the fluoride present in tea plants (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) and its relationship to soils, varieties, seasons and tea leaf maturity. The study also explored how different manufacturing processes affect the leaching of fluoride into tea beverages. The fluoride concentration in the tea leaves was significantly correlate to the concentration of water-soluble fluoride in the soil. Different tea varieties accumulated different levels of fluoride, with varieties, Anji baicha having the highest and Nongkang zao having the lowest fluoride concentration. In eight different varieties of tea plant harvested over three tea seasons, fluoride concentration were highest in the summer and lowest in the spring in china. The fluoride concentration in tea leaves was directly related to the maturity of the tea leaves at harvest. Importantly, the tea manufacturing process did not introduced fluoride contamination. The leaching of fluoride was 6.8% and 14.1% higher in black and white tea, respectively, than in fresh tea leaves. The manufacturing step most affecting the leaching of fluoride into tea beverage was withering used in white, black and oolong tea rather than rolling or fermentation. The exposure and associated health risks for fluoride concentration in infusions of 115 commercially available teas from Chinese tea markets was determined. The fluoride concentration ranged from 5.0 to 306.0mgkg(-1), with an average of 81.7mgkg(-1). The hazard quotient (HQ) of these teas indicated that there was no risk of fluorosis from drinking tea, based on statistical analysis by Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Some Unusual Rheological Responses of Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-Co-Hexafluoropropylene) Solutions in Dimethyl Acetamide and Their Effects on the Electrospinning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jae Sik; Lee, Ki Hyun; Kim, Byoung Chul

    2008-07-01

    The rheological properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) in dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) were investigated to obtain preliminary data for electrospinning. Intrinsic viscosity data suggested that solubility of PVDF-HFP was reduced with increasing temperature. Over the temperature range of 30 to 70 °C, the dynamic viscosity of the concentrated solutions was increased with increasing temperature and Bingham behavior became more noticed. In addition, increase of temperature and concentration of the solutions increased yield stress and relaxation time. Although the dynamic viscosity was increased with increasing temperature, electrospinning temperature had little effects on the resultant fiber morphology on the condition that other spinning conditions were identical.

  16. [Fluoride effect on bone formation--an overview].

    PubMed

    Mohr, H

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate our present knowledge of fluoride effect on bone formation on basis of the literature. It is likely that fluoride affects the remodelling processes of the skeleton as well as growth related bone formation. During bone remodelling the amount of bone and osteoid tissue is increased by alteration of the balance between resorption and formation. This finding may be accompagnied by impaired mineralization. In studies of fluoride effect on growth related bone formation a number of quantitative histologic alterations have been observed. These include reduction in epiphyseal plate thickness and changes in cellular morphology as well as a retardation of mineralization. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind the observed effects and the variation in tissue response are still unexplained. Fluoride may have a direct cellular effect causing disturbances in cell morphology and metabolism, but the effects may also involve local supracellular mechanisms as well as the general homeostasis of the individual.

  17. Microwave-assisted chemical pre-treatment of waste sorghum leaves: Process optimization and development of an intelligent model for determination of volatile compound fractions.

    PubMed

    Rorke, Daneal C S; Suinyuy, Terence N; Gueguim Kana, E B

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the profiling of volatile compounds generated during microwave-assisted chemical pre-treatment of sorghum leaves. Compounds including acetic acid (0-186.26ng/g SL), furfural (0-240.80ng/g SL), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) (0-19.20ng/g SL) and phenol (0-7.76ng/g SL) were detected. The reducing sugar production was optimized. An intelligent model based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) was developed and validated to predict a profile of 21 volatile compounds under novel pre-treatment conditions. This model gave R(2)-values of up to 0.93. Knowledge extraction revealed furfural and phenol exhibited high sensitivity to acid- and alkali concentration and S:L ratio, while phenol showed high sensitivity to microwave duration and intensity. Furthermore, furfural production was majorly dependent on acid concentration and fit a dosage-response relationship model with a 2.5% HCl threshold. Significant non-linearities were observed between pre-treatment conditions and the profile of various compounds. This tool reduces analytical costs through virtual analytical instrumentation, improving process economics.

  18. A hybrid magnetic/complementary metal oxide semiconductor process design kit for the design of low-power non-volatile logic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pendina, G.; Prenat, G.; Dieny, B.; Torki, K.

    2012-04-01

    Since the advent of the MOS transistor, the performance of microelectronic circuits has followed Moore's law, stating that their speed and density would double every 18 months. Today, this trend tends to get out of breath: the continuously decreasing size of devices and increasing operation frequency result in power consumption and heating issues. Among the solutions investigated to circumvent these limitations, the use of non-volatile devices appears particularly promising. It allows easing, for example, the power gating technique, which consists in cutting-off the power supply of inactive blocks without losing information, drastically reducing the standby power consumption. In this approach, the advantages of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) compared with other non-volatile devices allow one to design hybrid CMOS/magnetic circuits with high performance and new functionalities. Designing such circuits requires integrating MTJs in standard microelectronics design suites. This is performed by means of a process design kit (PDK) for the hybrid CMOS/magnetic technology. We present here a full magnetic PDK, which contains a compact model of the MTJ for electrical simulation, technology files for layout and physical verifications, and standard cells for the design of complex logic circuits and which is compatible with standard design suites. This PDK allows designers to accurately and comfortably design high-performance hybrid CMOS/magnetic logic circuits in the same way as standard CMOS circuits.

  19. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    PubMed

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body.

  20. Investing in professional advocacy: a case study of a successful fluoridation campaign in rural New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Sivaneswaran, S; Chong, G T F

    2011-09-01

    In New South Wales (NSW), Australia, the responsibility to implement water fluoridation rests with local government Councils, partly accounting for the hindrance in its statewide implementation. Since 2003, the NSW Health Department has been actively promoting water fluoridation to the remaining unfluoridated rural communities. To describe the community education and consultation strategies which led to the implementation of fluoridation in two rural NSW towns. In February 2005, the Mid-Western Regional Council and the NSW Health Department undertook a comprehensive community education process followed by a consultation process. The education process included the organization of public forums; distribution of fluoridation information packs; building rapport with the local media; and the use of local disease and treatment data to demonstrate oral health disparities with neighbouring fluoridated towns. The consultation process to determine support for fluoridation included seeking written submissions from the community and conducting interviews on a random sample of households by an independent research organization. A total of 502 (N = 1,012) interviews to determine support for fluoridation were completed, achieving a response rate of 49.6%. 54% of respondents wanted their water supplies fluoridated, 25% did not and the remaining 21% were unsure. In June 2005, the Mid-Western Regional Council resolved to implement water fluoridation and fluoride was added to the towns' water supplies in November 2007. This case study demonstrates that it is possible to garner community support for water fluoridation with the use of a multifaceted approach in educating and consulting communities and stakeholders.

  1. Exposure of lima bean leaves to volatiles from herbivore-induced conspecific plants results in emission of carnivore attractants: active or passive process?

    PubMed

    Choh, Yasuyuki; Shimoda, Takeshi; Ozawa, Rika; Dicke, Marcel; Takabayashi, Junji

    2004-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatiles emitted by herbivore-damaged plants can cause responses in downwind undamaged neighboring plants, such as the attraction of carnivorous enemies of herbivores. One of the open questions is whether this involves an active (production of volatiles) or passive (adsorption of volatiles) response of the uninfested downwind plant. This issue is addressed in the present study. Uninfested lima bean leaves that were exposed to volatiles from conspecific leaves infested with the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, emitted very similar blends of volatiles to those emitted from infested leaves themselves. Treating leaves with a protein-synthesis inhibitor prior to infesting them with spider mites completely suppressed the production of herbivore-induced volatiles in the infested leaves. Conversely, inhibitor treatment to uninfested leaves prior to exposure to volatiles from infested leaves did not affect the emission of volatiles from the exposed, uninfested leaves. This evidence supports the hypothesis that response of the exposed downwind plant is passive. T. urticae-infested leaves that had been previously exposed to volatiles from infested leaves emitted more herbivore-induced volatiles than T. urticae-infested leaves previously exposed to volatiles from uninfested leaves. The former leaves were also more attractive to the predatory mite, Phytoseiulus persimilis, than the latter. This shows that previous exposure of plants to volatiles from herbivore-infested neighbors results in a stronger response of plants in terms of predator attraction when herbivores damage the plant. This supports the hypothesis that the downwind uninfested plant is actively involved. Both adsorption and production of volatiles can mediate the attraction of carnivorous mites to plants that have been exposed to volatiles from infested neighbors.

  2. Sustainable approach for recycling waste lamb and chicken bones for fluoride removal from water followed by reusing fluoride-bearing waste in concrete.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; AbdelKareem, Hala N

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable management of waste materials is an attractive approach for modern societies. In this study, recycling of raw waste lamb and chicken bones for defluoridation of water has been estimated. The effects of several experimental parameters including contact time, pH, bone dose, fluoride initial concentration, bone grains size, agitation rate, and the effect of co-existing anions in actual samples of wastewater were studied for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Results indicated excellent fluoride removal efficiency up to 99.4% and 99.8% using lamb and chicken bones, respectively at fluoride initial concentration of 10 mg F/L and 120 min contact time. Maximum fluoride uptake was obtained at neutral pH range 6-7. Fluoride removal kinetic was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models could fit the experimental data well with correlation coefficient values >0.99 suggesting favorable conditions of the process. Furthermore, for complete sustainable management of waste bones, the resulted fluoride-bearing sludge was reused in concrete mixes to partially replace sand. Tests of the mechanical properties of fluoride sludge-modified concrete mixes indicated a potential environmentally friendly approach to dispose fluoride sludge in concrete and simultaneously enhance concrete properties.

  3. Caries management with fluoride agents.

    PubMed

    Lam, Anty; Chu, C H

    2012-11-01

    Dental caries is the single most common, chronic oral disease of childhood. It is progressive and cumulative, and becomes more complex over time. The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health revealed that more than 51 million school hours are lost each year as a result of dental problems. Contemporary caries management philosophy has changed from the traditional surgical approach to a medical model that emphasizes prevention. Among various strategies for caries prevention or reduction, fluoride therapy has been highly promoted. Various in-office and over-the-counter fluoride products are available for caries prevention. Dental professionals should identify and assess the caries risk level of patients and optimize the use of fluorides in caries management. Since multiple sources of fluoride exposure exist, a coordinated approach to fluoride delivery is essential.

  4. Volatile phytochemicals as mosquito semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Nyasembe, Vincent O.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-01-01

    Plant biochemical processes result in the release of an array of volatile chemical substances into the environment, some of which are known to play important plant fitness enhancing functions, such as attracting pollinators, thermal tolerance of photosynthesis, and defense against herbivores. Cunningly, phytophagous insects have evolved mechanisms to utilize these volatiles to their own advantage, either to colonize a suitable host for feeding, reproduction and oviposition or avoid an unsuitable one. The volatile compounds involved in plant–insect chemical interactions have been widely exploited in the management of agricultural pests. On the other hand, use of plant volatiles in the management of medically important insects is limited, mainly due to paucity of information on their role in disease vector–plant interactions. To date, a total of 29 plant volatile compounds from various chemical classes, including phenols, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones and terpenes, have been identified as mosquito semiochemicals. In this review, we present highlights of mosquito–plant interactions, the available evidence of nectar feeding, with particular emphasis on sources of plant attractants, methods of plant volatile collection and the candidate plant volatile compounds that attract mosquitoes to nectar sources. We also highlight the potential application of these phytochemical attractants in integrated mosquito management. PMID:25383131

  5. Tealeaves may release or absorb fluoride, depending on the fluoride content of water.

    PubMed

    Malde, Marian Kjellevold; Greiner-Simonsen, Rita; Julshamn, Kåre; Bjorvatn, Kjell

    2006-08-01

    As the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) is known to accumulate fluoride from the soil, the tealeaves may contain high concentrations of fluoride, which is easily released during infusion. In this study, we have tested the possible effect of original fluoride concentration in the water on the fluoride release from tea. Moreover, we wanted to test the possible capacity of tealeaves (commercially available tea) to absorb fluoride from high-fluoride water. In low-fluoride water, fluoride is easily released from tealeaves. Depending upon the fluoride content of the water, dried tealeaves are able also to absorb fluoride. Thus, if a cup of tea is made from high-fluoride water, the fluoride concentration of the infusion may actually be lower than the original fluoride concentration of the water.

  6. WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-11-25

    The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

  7. Compound specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses of volatile organic compounds in various emissions of combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Christiane D; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Kelly, David; Gibberd, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study presents carbon (δ(13)C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope values of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in various emission sources using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC-irMS). The investigated VOCs ranged from C6 to C10. Samples were taken from (i) car exhaust emissions as well as from plant combustion experiments of (ii) various C3 and (iii) various C4 plants. We found significant differences in δ values of analysed VOCs between these sources, e.g. δ(13)C of benzene ranged between (i) -21.7 ± 0.2 ‰, (ii) -27.6 ± 1.6 ‰ and (iii) -16.3 ± 2.2 ‰, respectively and δD of benzene ranged between (i) -73 ± 13 ‰, (ii) -111 ± 10 ‰ and (iii) -70 ± 24 ‰, respectively. Results of VOCs present in investigated emission sources were compared to values from the literature (aluminium refinery emission). All source groups could be clearly distinguished using the dual approach of δ(13)C and δD analysis. The results of this study indicate that the correlation of compound specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis provides the potential for future research to trace the fate and to determine the origin of VOCs in the atmosphere using thermal desorption compound specific isotope analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oenological characteristics, amino acids and volatile profiles of Hongqu rice wines during pottery storage: Effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuting; Huang, Jiamei; Xie, Tingting; Huang, Luqiang; Zhuang, Weijin; Zheng, Yafeng; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-07-15

    Hongqu rice wines were subjected to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments of 200 MPa and 550 MPa at 25 °C for 30 min and effects on wine quality during pottery storage were examined. HHP treatment can significantly (p<0.05) decrease the content of fusel-like alcohols and maintain the concentration of lactones in these wines. After 18 months of storage, the HHP-treated wines exhibited a more rapid decrease in total sugars (9.3-15.3%), lower free amino acid content (e.g. lysine content decreased by 45.0-84.5%), and higher ketone content (e.g. 6- and 14-fold increase for 2-nonanone). These changes could be attributed to the occurrence of Maillard and oxidation reactions. The wines treated at 550 MPa for 30 min developed about twice as rapidly during pottery storage than untreated wines based on principal component analysis. After only 6 months, treated wines had a volatile composition and an organoleptic quality similar to that of untreated wines stored in pottery for 18 months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Design of the extraction process for terpenes and other volatiles from allspice by solid-phase microextraction and hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Bajer, Tomáš; Ligor, Magdalena; Ligor, Tomasz; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-02-01

    Methods for the separation and determination of terpenes (mono- and sesqui-) and phenylpropanoids such as eugenol and methyleugenol from samples of allspice berries have been developed. Chromatographic analyses of isolated groups of compounds were carried out by means of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. A comparison of various types of solid-phase microextraction fibers was performed. The highest yields of terpenes were extracted by polydimethylsiloxane and divinylbenzene/Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fibers (almost the same for these two fibers), approximately twice as much as by Carbowax/divinylbenzene fiber. The highest amounts of monoterpenes were extracted by divinylbenzene/Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber, and the highest amounts of sesquiterpenes were extracted by polydimethylsiloxane fiber. Moreover, the effect of water addition on extraction yields as well as time and temperature of extraction were tested. Aroma profiles of extracts obtained by solid-phase microextraction and essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of allspice berries were compared. The aroma profile of the divinylbenzene/Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber extract was similar to the aroma profile of essential oil. Particular characteristics of volatile allspice matters were presented. The linear retention indices for each compound were calculated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of water fluoridation on the development of medial vascular calcification in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Martín-Pardillos, Ana; Sosa, Cecilia; Millán, Ángel; Sorribas, Víctor

    2014-04-06

    Public water fluoridation is a common policy for improving dental health. Fluoride replaces the hydroxyls of hydroxyapatite, thereby improving the strength of tooth enamel, but this process can also occur in other active calcifications. This paper studies the effects of water fluoridation during the course of vascular calcification in renal disease. The effect of fluoride was studied in vitro and in vivo. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells were calcified with 2mM Pi for 5 days. Fluoride concentrations of 5-10 μM--similar to those found in people who drink fluoridated water--partially prevented calcification, death, and osteogene expression in vitro. The anticalcifying mechanism was independent of cell activity, matrix Gla protein, and fetuin A expressions, and it exhibited an IC50 of 8.7 μM fluoride. In vivo, however, fluoridation of drinking water at 1.5mg/L (concentration recommended by the WHO) and 15 mg/L dramatically increased the incipient aortic calcification observed in rats with experimental chronic kidney disease (CKD, 5/6-nephrectomy), fed a Pi-rich fodder (1.2% Pi). Fluoride further declined the remaining renal function of the CKD animals, an effect that most likely overwhelmed the positive effect of fluoride on calcification in vitro. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that fluoride did not modify the Ca/P atomic ratio, but it was incorporated into the lattice of in vivo deposits. Fluoride also converted the crystallization pattern from plate to rode-like structures. In conclusion, while fluoride prevents calcification in vitro, the WHO's recommended concentrations in drinking water become nephrotoxic to CKD rats, thereby aggravating renal disease and making media vascular calcification significant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Change in Color and Volatile Composition of Skim Milk Processed with Pulsed Electric Field and Microfiltration Treatments or Heat Pasteurization †

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Anupam; Khanal, Dipendra; Walkling-Ribeiro, Markus; Corredig, Milena; Duizer, Lisa; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal processing methods, such as pulsed electric field (PEF) and tangential-flow microfiltration (TFMF), are emerging processing technologies that can minimize the deleterious effects of high temperature short time (HTST) pasteurization on quality attributes of skim milk. The present study investigates the impact of PEF and TFMF, alone or in combination, on color and volatile compounds in skim milk. PEF was applied at 28 or 40 kV/cm for 1122 to 2805 µs, while microfiltration (MF) was conducted using membranes with three pore sizes (lab-scale 0.65 and 1.2 µm TFMF, and pilot-scale 1.4 µm MF). HTST control treatments were applied at 75 or 95 °C for 20 and 45 s, respectively. Noticeable color changes were observed with the 0.65 µm TFMF treatment. No significant color changes were observed in PEF-treated, 1.2 µm TFMF-treated, HTST-treated, and 1.4 µm MF-treated skim milk (p ≥ 0.05) but the total color difference indicated better color retention with non-thermal preservation. The latter did not affect raw skim milk volatiles significantly after single or combined processing (p ≥ 0.05), but HTST caused considerable changes in their composition, including ketones, free fatty acids, hydrocarbons, and sulfur compounds (p < 0.05). The findings indicate that for the particular thermal and non-thermal treatments selected for this study, better retention of skim milk color and flavor components were obtained for the non-thermal treatments. PMID:28234317

  12. Determination of Stability Constants of Hydrogen and Aluminum Fluorides with a Fluoride-Selective Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    2003-01-06

    The ability to directly determine free fluoride ion concentration (or mean activity) simplifies gathering and interpretation of experimental data for studies of metal complexes. In this work, the new lanthanum fluoride electrode was used to measure free fluoride ion in an investigation of the hydrogen-fluoride and aluminum-fluoride systems in NH4NO3.

  13. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  14. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  15. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  16. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  17. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  18. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  19. [Operational control of water fluoridation in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Maia, Lucianne Cople; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Soares, Eduardo Lúcio; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the operational control of water fluoridation at the city water supply plant in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from January to December 2000. The water treatment supervisor filled out a questionnaire on the control of water fluoridation. In addition, water samples were collected every two weeks for fluoride analysis before and after treatment. Samples were analyzed by an independent laboratory using an ion-specific electrode. According to the water treatment supervisor, the entire process for controlling fluoride concentration in the water was rigorous and complied with Brazilian guidelines, but according to testing, 96% of samples were inadequate in terms of risks/benefits of fluoride use from water. The information obtained from the plant supervisor and the test data were thus mutually inconsistent. Based on these data, an independent water fluoride concentration control program is needed to ensure the benefits of dental caries prevention for the population.

  20. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  1. Economic process to produce biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids by a mixed culture using vinasse from sugarcane ethanol industry as nutrient source.

    PubMed

    Sydney, Eduardo Bittencourt; Larroche, Christian; Novak, Alessandra Cristine; Nouaille, Regis; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Letti, Luiz Alberto; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    This work evaluates the potential of vinasse (a waste obtained at the bottom of sugarcane ethanol distillation columns) as nutrient source for biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids production by means of anaerobic consortia. Two different media were proposed, using sugarcane juice or molasses as carbon source. The consortium LPBAH1 was selected for fermentation of vinasse supplemented with sugarcane juice, resulting in a higher H2 yield of 7.14 molH2 molsucrose(-1) and hydrogen content in biogas of approx. 31%, while consortium LPBAH2 resulted in 3.66 molH2/molsucrose and 32.7% hydrogen content in biogas. The proposed process showed a rational and economical use for vinasse, a mandatory byproduct of the renewable Brazilian energy matrix.

  2. Zonation of volatile and major elements in basaltic melt inclusions: a snapshot of syn-eruptive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, M.; Fabbrizio, A.; Zhang, Y.; Le Voyer, M.; Guan, Y.; Ma, C.; Eiler, J. M.; Saal, A. E.; Stolper, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Significant zonation in volatile and major elements has been discovered in olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) from glassy pillow margins from the Siqueiros Fracture Zone [samples previously studied in 1]. For the most part, components that are compatible in olivine (e.g. MgO) are depleted at the edges of the zoned MIs relative to their centers, whereas components that are incompatible in olivine (e.g. Al2O3, SiO2, Na2O, and S) are enriched near the MI edges. H2O and F are exceptions in that they are incompatible, yet in several MIs they are depleted near the olivine-melt boundary. FeO and CaO are also exceptions in that they show complex features attributable to uphill diffusion. Another complexity is the similarity between the shapes of the SiO2 and Na2O profiles (despite significant differences in measured self and tracer diffusivities of these components [2, 3]), suggesting that the diffusion of these components is strongly coupled. All MIs from this sample suite exhibit zoning profiles, as do a suite of MIs from the Galapagos Islands and the inclusions studied in [4], so this feature may be common in rapidly quenched, glassy inclusions. Preservation of strong zonation in the Siqueiros MIs suggests that it formed in response to crystallization of olivine on the walls of the MIs during or just prior to eruption because, based on known diffusion coefficients, such profiles would be erased by diffusion on time scales on the order of 1 hr. The MgO concentration profiles in several Siqueiros MIs have been used to constrain the cooling history of the inclusions using the results of [5]. The profiles are consistent with an initial slow cooling rate followed by a period of more rapid cooling over a total timescale of ~10 min. Given that they are incompatible in olivine, the observed decreases in the concentrations of H2O and F toward the edges of some Siqueiros inclusions could suggest either uphill diffusion of H2O and F (as observed for H2O in [6] in a granitic

  3. Multifractal diffusion entropy analysis on stock volatility in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingjing; Shang, Pengjian; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2012-11-01

    This paper introduces a generalized diffusion entropy analysis method to analyze long-range correlation then applies this method to stock volatility series. The method uses the techniques of the diffusion process and Rényi entropy to focus on the scaling behaviors of regular volatility and extreme volatility respectively in developed and emerging markets. It successfully distinguishes their differences where regular volatility exhibits long-range persistence while extreme volatility reveals anti-persistence.

  4. Effect of xylitol and fluoride on enamel erosion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chunmuang, Siriwan; Jitpukdeebodintra, Suwanna; Chuenarrom, Chanya; Benjakul, Pojjanut

    2007-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the anti-erosive effects of xylitol, fluoride and a xylitol/fluoride combination used as an additive in an acidic drink or as mouthrinse after enamel was exposed to an acidic drink, in vitro. Human third molars were divided into 7 groups (A-G). Samples from groups A to D were immersed for 5 min in orange juice only (A), orange juice plus either 25% xylitol (B), F(-) 1 ppm (C) or a 25% xylitol/F(-) 1 ppm combination (D), respectively. Samples from groups E to G were immersed in orange juice for 5 min and then in either 40% xylitol (E), F(-) 227 ppm (F) or a 40% xylitol/F(-) 227 ppm combination (G), for 1 min respectively. This process was performed four times daily for 14 days. Mineral loss was determined from the lesion depth and surface hardness. Erosion depth progressively increased in all groups, except E, where erosion depth was significantly lower than group A. Surface microhardness progressively decreased in all groups, except E, where hardness was significantly higher than group A. This study demonstrated that addition of xylitol, fluoride or a xylitol/fluoride combination to an acidic drink or post-treatment with fluoride or a xylitol/fluoride combination could reduce, but not prevent, enamel erosion.

  5. Grout formulation for disposal of low-level and hazardous waste streams containing fluoride

    DOEpatents

    McDaniel, E.W.; Sams, T.L.; Tallent, O.K.

    1987-06-02

    A composition and related process for disposal of hazardous waste streams containing fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. the presence of fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. The presence of fluoride in waste materials acts as a set retarder and as a result, prevents cement-based grouts from setting. This problem is overcome by the present invention wherein calcium hydroxide is incorporated into the dry-solid portion of the grout mix. The calcium hydroxide renders the fluoride insoluble, allowing the grout to set up and immobilize all hazardous constituents of concern. 4 tabs.

  6. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON AND HEAVY-METAL- CONTAMINATED SOIL - INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The batch steam distillation and metal extraction treatment process is a two-stage system that treats soils contaminated with organics and inorganics. This system uses conventional, readily available process equipment, and does not produce hazardous combustion products. Hazar...

  7. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON AND HEAVY-METAL- CONTAMINATED SOIL - INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The batch steam distillation and metal extraction treatment process is a two-stage system that treats soils contaminated with organics and inorganics. This system uses conventional, readily available process equipment, and does not produce hazardous combustion products. Hazar...

  8. Fluoride: A naturally-occurring health hazard in drinking-water resources of Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chuah, C Joon; Lye, Han Rui; Ziegler, Alan D; Wood, Spencer H; Kongpun, Chatpat; Rajchagool, Sunsanee

    2016-03-01

    In Northern Thailand, incidences of fluorosis resulting from the consumption of high-fluoride drinking-water have been documented. In this study, we mapped the high-fluoride endemic areas and described the relevant transport processes of fluoride in enriched waters in the provinces of Chiang Mai and Lamphun. Over one thousand surface and sub-surface water samples including a total of 995 collected from shallow (depth: ≤ 30 m) and deep (> 30 m) wells were analysed from two unconnected high-fluoride endemic areas. At the Chiang Mai site, 31% of the shallow wells contained hazardous levels (≥ 1.5 mg/L) of fluoride, compared with the 18% observed in the deep wells. However, at the Lamphun site, more deep wells (35%) contained water with at least 1.5mg/L fluoride compared with the shallow wells (7%). At the Chiang Mai site, the high-fluoride waters originate from a nearby geothermal field. Fluoride-rich geothermal waters are distributed across the area following natural hydrological pathways of surface and sub-surface water flow. At the Lamphun site, a well-defined, curvilinear high-fluoride anomalous zone, resembling that of the nearby conspicuous Mae Tha Fault, was identified. This similarity provides evidence of the existence of an unmapped, blind fault as well as its likely association to a geogenic source (biotite-granite) of fluoride related to the faulted zone. Excessive abstraction of ground water resources may also have affected the distribution and concentration of fluoride at both sites. The distribution of these high-fluoride waters is influenced by a myriad of complex natural and anthropogenic processes which thus created a challenge for the management of water resources for safe consumption in affected areas. The notion of clean and safe drinking water can be found in deeper aquifers is not necessarily true. Groundwater at any depth should always be tested before the construction of wells.

  9. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  10. Spectral Diversity Crystalline Fluoride Lasers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    2 4.-. i1.34 I R TUNABLE Table IX XeF Pumoe TM3 +: YLF :1 .Tm:YLF exhibits nearly ideal parameters for high energy operation aa3x10-20cm 2 ESAT 0cm e...host crystal, lithium yttrium fluoride, LiYF*4 ( YLF )" 1..0 Introductin Within the realm of crystalline laser materials,. the class of fluorides...on the host crystal, lithium yttrium fluoride, LiYF4 - often shortened as YLF . Tables I and 12 show the mechanical, thermal, and optical properties

  11. Volatile organic compound flux from manure of cattle fed diets differing in grain processing method and co-product inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Kristin; Parker, David B.; Cole, N. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Odor emissions from livestock production have become increasingly important in the past decade. Odors derived from animal feeding operations are caused by odorous VOC emitted from the mixture of feces and urine, as well as feed and silage which may be experiencing microbial fermentation. Distillers grains are a by-product of corn grain fermentation used to produce fuel ethanol, and this industry has grown rapidly throughout the U.S. in past years. Therefore, the use of wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in feedlot cattle diets has also increased. The objective of this research was to determine specific VOC emissions from feces and urine or a mixture of both, from cattle fed steam flaked or dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets containing either 0% or 30% WDGS. Flux of dimethyl trisulfide was greater from feces of cattle fed DRC than steam-flaked corn (SFC) diets. No other differences in flux from feces were detected across dietary treatments for phenol, 4-methylphenol, indole, skatole, dimethyl disulfide, and flux of volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids (P > 0.15). Flux of skatole, acetic acid, and valeric acid from urine was greater for cattle fed SFC than DRC diets (P < 0.05). Moreover, dimethyl disulfide flux was greater for cattle fed DRC vs. SFC diets (P = 0.05). When evaluating WDGS inclusion in the diet, flux of acetic acid and heptanoic acid from urine was greater when cattle were fed diets containing 0% WDGS than 30% WDGS (P < 0.05). When combining urine and feces in the ratio in which they were excreted from the animal, flux of propionic acid was greater when cattle were fed DRC vs. SFC diets (P = 0.05). Based on these results, the majority of the VOC, VFA, and odor flux from cattle feeding operations is from the urine. Therefore, dietary strategies to reduce odor from cattle feeding facilities should primarily focus on reducing excretion of odorous compounds in the urine.

  12. The Oxidation State of Global Subduction Zone Basalts and its Relationship to Volatiles, Magmatic Processes, and Source Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.

    2008-12-01

    Oxidation state is a central variable in magmatic systems. In subduction zones, the mantle wedge is exposed to hydrous fluids from an oxidized subducting plate, potentially driving a fundamental shift in the oxidation states of arc and back-arc basin magmas and their sources. Despite its importance, however, magmatic oxidation state and its relationship to conditions in the mantle source can be difficult to constrain. Here, we present new, in-situ μ-XANES analyses of Fe+3/ΣFe ratios, as an indicator of melt oxidation state, in natural, primitive pillow glasses from the Mariana, Lau, and Manus back-arc basins (MgO>6 wt.%; n=31) and a global suite of olivine-hosted arc melt inclusions (MI; MgO>4 wt.%; n=16). These new data show that back-arc basin basalts preserve Fe+3/ΣFe ratios of 0.14-0.21, more oxidized than MORB (Fe+3/ΣFe=0.11-0.17), and arc basalts range to even higher ratios of 0.17-0.36. Analysis of MI equilibrium with host olivine compositions indicates that either post-entrapment crystallization or outward Fe+2 diffusion may have occurred in the MI's studied, but the magnitude of these effects is small (9±5% change in FeO; see also Cottrell & Kelley, this mtg.). Coupled with new and existing major element, volatile (H2O±CO2, S, Cl, F), and trace element data, we also test the variation of melt oxidation state with indicators of extent of crystal fractionation and of mantle source composition. The arc and back-arc glasses capture a full range of natural, undegassed magmatic H2O concentrations (0.1-5.3 wt.%), and show a general, global increase in Fe+3/ΣFe with increasing H2O content, although the Mariana trough defines a trend distinct from the Manus and Lau basins. The Fe+3/ΣFe ratio does not correlate with Mg#, suggesting that the melt oxidation states are not controlled by the extent of crystal fractionation. In the Mariana trough, Fe+3/ΣFe does increase with increasing Ba and Sr concentrations, suggesting a direct link between melt oxidation

  13. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Neil; Whalen, J. Marc; Chacon, Lisa

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  14. Insights into the fluoride-resistant regulation mechanism of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 based on whole genome microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyuan; Li, Qian; Shen, Li; Feng, Xue; Xiao, Yunhua; Tao, Jiemeng; Liang, Yili; Yin, Huaqun; Liu, Xueduan

    2016-10-01

    Acidophilic microorganisms involved in uranium bioleaching are usually suppressed by dissolved fluoride ions, eventually leading to reduced leaching efficiency. However, little is known about the regulation mechanisms of microbial resistance to fluoride. In this study, the resistance of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 to fluoride was investigated by detecting bacterial growth fluctuations and ferrous or sulfur oxidation. To explore the regulation mechanism, a whole genome microarray was used to profile the genome-wide expression. The fluoride tolerance of A. ferrooxidans cultured in the presence of FeSO4 was better than that cultured with the S(0) substrate. The differentially expressed gene categories closely related to fluoride tolerance included those involved in energy metabolism, cellular processes, protein synthesis, transport, the cell envelope, and binding proteins. This study highlights that the cellular ferrous oxidation ability was enhanced at the lower fluoride concentrations. An overview of the cellular regulation mechanisms of extremophiles to fluoride resistance is discussed.

  15. Chemical differentiation of volatile compounds in crude and processed Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Cai, Hao; Jiang, Jianping; Yao, Linjiang; Tu, Sicong; Wang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoqing; Cai, Baochang

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, comprehensive 2D GC-TOF-MS combined with multivariate data analysis was applied to analyze the differences of the volatile components in crude and processed Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma (AMR) samples. As a result, 26 compounds that were found in crude AMR samples disappeared in processed AMR samples, and 19 compounds were newly generated and identified in AMR after processing with wheat bran. Meanwhile, principal component analysis demonstrated that there were significant chemical differences between crude and processed AMR samples, and processing procedure caused obvious quantitative and qualitative changes of volatile components in AMR. The established method could be used to explain the chemical differentiation between crude and processed AMR, and to further understand the processing mechanism of herbal medicines.

  16. Fluoride in weathered rock aquifers of southern India: Managed Aquifer Recharge for mitigation.

    PubMed

    Brindha, K; Jagadeshan, G; Kalpana, L; Elango, L

    2016-05-01

    Climatic condition, geology, and geochemical processes in an area play a major role on groundwater quality. Impact of these on the fluoride content of groundwater was studied in three regions-part of Nalgonda district in Telangana, Pambar River basin, and Vaniyar River basin in Tamil Nadu, southern India, which experience semi-arid climate and are predominantly made of Precambrian rocks. High concentration of fluoride in groundwater above 4 mg/l was recorded. Human exposure dose for fluoride through groundwater was higher in Nalgonda than the other areas. With evaporation and rainfall being one of the major contributors for high fluoride apart from the weathering of fluoride rich minerals from rocks, the effect of increase in groundwater level on fluoride concentration was studied. This study reveals that groundwater in shallow environment of all three regions shows dilution effect due to rainfall recharge. Suitable managed aquifer recharge (MAR) methods can be adopted to dilute the fluoride rich groundwater in such regions which is explained with two case studies. However, in deep groundwater, increase in fluoride concentration with increase in groundwater level due to leaching of fluoride rich salts from the unsaturated zone was observed. Occurrence of fluoride above 1.5 mg/l was more in areas with deeper groundwater environment. Hence, practicing MAR in these regions will increase the fluoride content in groundwater and so physical or chemical treatment has to be adopted. This study brought out the fact that MAR cannot be practiced in all regions for dilution of ions in groundwater and that it is essential to analyze the fluctuation in groundwater level and the fluoride content before suggesting it as a suitable solution. Also, this study emphasizes that long-term monitoring of these factors is an important criterion for choosing the recharge areas.

  17. Do Fluoride Ions Protect Teeth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Begins with the procedure and results from an investigation on the effect of fluoride on the reaction between eggshell (substitute teeth) and dilute ethanoic acid. Describes an elegantly modified and improvised apparatus. (DDR)

  18. Do Fluoride Ions Protect Teeth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Begins with the procedure and results from an investigation on the effect of fluoride on the reaction between eggshell (substitute teeth) and dilute ethanoic acid. Describes an elegantly modified and improvised apparatus. (DDR)

  19. The interaction of zinc oxide-based dental cements with aqueous solutions of potassium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, K; Booth, S E; Coleman, N J; Nicholson, J W

    2008-09-01

    The ability of zinc oxide-based dental cements (zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate) to take up fluoride from aqueous solution has been studied. Only zinc phosphate cement was found to take up any measurable fluoride after 5 h exposure to the solutions. The zinc oxide filler of the zinc phosphate also failed to take up fluoride from solution. The key interaction for this uptake was thus shown to involve the phosphate groups of the set cement. However, whether this took the form of phosphate/fluoride exchange, or the formation of oxyfluoro-phosphate groups was not clear. Fluoride uptake followed radicaltime kinetics for about 2 h in some cases, but was generally better modelled by the Elovich equation, dq(t)/dt = alpha exp(-betaq(t)). Values for alpha varied from 3.80 to 2.48 x 10(4), and for beta from 7.19 x 10(-3) to 0.1946, though only beta showed any sort of trend, becoming smaller with increasing fluoride concentration. Fluoride was released from the zinc phosphate cements in processes that were diffusion based up to M(t)/M(infinity) of about 0.4. No further release occurred when specimens were placed in fresh volumes of deionised water. Only a fraction of the fluoride taken up was re-released, demonstrating that most of the fluoride taken up becomes irreversibly bound within the cement.

  20. Fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wangwang; Kovalsky, Peter; He, Di; Waite, T David

    2015-11-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an emerging water desalination technology in which pairs of porous electrodes are electrically charged to remove ionic species from water. In this work, the feasibility of fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode CDI was investigated. Initially, the effects of flow rate, initial fluoride concentration, and initial coexisting NaCl concentration on fluoride removal were studied. The steady-state fluoride concentration declined as the initial fluoride concentration decreased while initial NaCl concentration remained constant. Due to the competitive electrosorption between fluoride and chloride for limited pore surface sites, a higher initial chloride concentration resulted in a higher equilibrium dissolved fluoride concentration. A simplified one-dimensional transport model for dual anions was developed and found to reliably describe the dynamic process of removal of both fluoride and chloride ions in CDI cells over a range of well-defined operating conditions. Based on the ability of the model to describe fluoride removal, it was extended to description of nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters and also found to perform well. Thus, the approach to description of ion removal, at least in batch studies, appears robust and should assist in optimization of design and operating conditions such that optimal removal of trace ionic species is achieved even when high background concentrations of salt are present.

  1. Identification and characterization of volatile components causing the characteristic flavor in miso (Japanese fermented soybean paste) and heat-processed miso products.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Kenji; Kaneko, Shu; Nishimura, Osamu

    2013-12-11

    The aroma concentrates of two types of raw miso (traditional Japanese fermented soybean paste) were prepared by combining solid phase extraction (SPE) and solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) techniques. The aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) applied to the volatile fraction revealed 39 odor-active peaks with FD factors between 4(1) and 4(8). Among the perceived odorants, 32 odorants were identified or tentatively identified from the 39 odor-active peaks, and the newly identified odorants for the miso were half of them. Furthermore, by comparison of the FD factors between the raw miso and heat-processed miso, it was found that one increasing odorant (methional) and three decreasing odorants (1-octen-3-one, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, and trans-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal) contributed to the flavor change during the heat processing. This finding suggested that the flavor change in the raw miso during heat processing is attributed to relatively few odorant changes. In addition, it was assumed that the amino acids included in the miso have a significant influence on the remarkable disappearance of the three decreasing odorants.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mitigation in the pyrolysis process of waste tires using CO₂ as a reaction medium.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Our work reported the CO2-assisted mitigation of PAHs and VOCs in the thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis). To investigate the pyrolysis of used tires to recover energy and chemical products, the experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale batch-type reactor. In particular, to examine the influence of the CO2 in pyrolysis of a tire, the pyrolytic products including C1-5-hydrocarbons (HCs), volatile organic carbons (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated qualitatively by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectroscopy (MS) as well as with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The mass balance of the pyrolytic products under various pyrolytic conditions was established on the basis of their weight fractions of the pyrolytic products. Our experimental work experimentally validated that the amount of gaseous pyrolytic products increased when using CO2 as a pyrolysis medium, while substantially altering the production of pyrolytic oil in absolute content (7.3-17.2%) and in relative composition (including PAHs and VOCs). Thus, the co-feeding of CO2 in the pyrolysis process can be considered an environmentally benign and energy efficient process.

  3. Advanced treatment of residual nitrogen from biologically treated coke effluent by a microalga-mediated process using volatile fatty acids (VFAs) under stepwise mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Byung-Gon; Kim, Woong; Heo, Sung-Woon; Kim, Donghyun; Choi, Gang-Guk; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-09-01

    This work describes the development of a microalga-mediated process for simultaneous removal of residual ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and production of lipids from biologically treated coke effluent. Four species of green algae were tested using a sequential mixotrophic process. In the first phase-CO2-supplied mixotrophic condition-all microalgae assimilated NH4(+)-N with no evident inhibition. In second phase-volatile fatty acids (VFAs)-supplied mixotrophic condition-removal rates of NH4(+)-N and biomass significantly increased. Among the microalgae used, Arctic Chlorella sp. ArM0029B had the highest rate of NH4(+)-N removal (0.97 mg/L/h) and fatty acid production (24.9 mg/L/d) which were 3.6- and 2.1-fold higher than those observed under the CO2-supplied mixotrophic condition. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that acetate and butyrate were decisive factors for increasing NH4(+)-N removal and fatty acid production. These results demonstrate that microalgae can be used in a sequential process for treatment of residual nitrogen after initial treatment of activated sludge.

  4. The variation of volatile fatty acid compositions in sewer length, and its effect on the process design of biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Yun, Z; Yun, G H; Lee, H S; Yoo, T U

    2013-01-01

    The potential of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems critically depends on the availability and types of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in sewage. Although the characteristics of VFAs in sewage are strongly related with the biochemical transformations in the sewer system, they have not been studied thoroughly in terms of BNR process design. We have investigated the characteristics of VFAs in influent of nine sewage treatment plants which represent typical small to very large sewer systems in Korea. We found that influent total VFACOD (VFA as chemical oxygen demand) concentrations ranged from 20.4 to 65.2 mg/L. Acetic acid was a predominant VFA in sewage, and the propionic acid (HPr) portion averaged 38.7% of total VFACOD. However the sewage from longer sewer systems showed more HPr content, indicating that type of VFA varied with the total sewer length. The finding is a particularly important consideration for BNR process design since availability of HPr positively behaved to suppress the unfavorable growth of glycogen-accumulating organisms. The implication of these findings for BNR process design is discussed in this paper.

  5. THE EFFECT OF FLUORIDE ON CONVENTIONAL WATER TREATMENT USING ALUMINUM SULFATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on the Information Collection Rule survey results of 600 large utilities, approximately 50% of them fluoridate their water and of those, 15-20% do so at the location of coagulant addition. In this case, the effect of fluoride on the coagulation process, floc properties, coa...

  6. Analytical Determination of Fluoride Ion Using Gran's Semi-Antilog Plot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhard, Ralph J.

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative determination for fluoride ion using a commercially available fluoride electrode is described. The procedure referred to as known-addition is employed with the data processed on Gran's Plot Paper. Background information, experimental procedures, and advantages/disadvantages of the method are discussed. (JN)

  7. THE EFFECT OF FLUORIDE ON CONVENTIONAL WATER TREATMENT USING ALUMINUM SULFATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on the Information Collection Rule survey results of 600 large utilities, approximately 50% of them fluoridate their water and of those, 15-20% do so at the location of coagulant addition. In this case, the effect of fluoride on the coagulation process, floc properties, coa...

  8. Analytical Determination of Fluoride Ion Using Gran's Semi-Antilog Plot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhard, Ralph J.

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative determination for fluoride ion using a commercially available fluoride electrode is described. The procedure referred to as known-addition is employed with the data processed on Gran's Plot Paper. Background information, experimental procedures, and advantages/disadvantages of the method are discussed. (JN)

  9. Discrimination of fluoride and phosphate contamination in central Florida for analyses of environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, A. E.; Marshall, R.; Thomson, F.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the spatial registration of fluoride and phosphate pollution parameters in central Florida by utilizing remote sensing techniques. Multispectral remote sensing data were collected over the area and processed to produce multispectral recognition maps. These processed data were used to map land areas and waters containing concentrations of fluoride and phosphate. Maps showing distribution of affected and unaffected vegetation were produced. In addition, the multispectral data were processed by single band radiometric slicing to produce radiometric maps used to delineate areas of high ultraviolet radiance, which indicates high fluoride concentrations. The multispectral parameter maps and radiometric maps in combination showed distinctive patterns, which are correlated with areas known to be affected by fluoride and phosphate contamination. These remote sensing techniques have the potential for regional use to assess the environmental impact of fluoride and phosphate wastes in central Florida.

  10. Heterogeneous processing of biomass burning aerosol proxies by OH radicals for a wide range of OH concentrations and detection of volatilization products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H.; Knopf, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning aerosol (BBA) constitutes the majority of primary organic aerosol found in the atmosphere, with emission rates comparable to fossil-fuel burning. BBA affects earth's radiative budget directly through absorption and scattering of radiation or indirectly by modifying cloud radiative properties, and impacts air quality. Quantifying BBA source strength and thus its effects on air quality, human health, and climate can be difficult since these organic particles can chemically transform during atmospheric transport, a process also termed aging, due to heterogeneous reactions with oxidants and radicals such as OH. In this work we investigate the reactive uptake of OH radicals by typical BBA compounds that also serve as molecular markers for source apportionment studies. Organic substrates of cellulose pyrolysis products such as levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-glucopyranose, C6H10O5), resin acids such as abietic acid (1-phenanthrenecarboxylic acid, C20H30O2), and lignin decomposition products such as 5-nitroguaiacol (2-methoxy-5-nitrophenol, C7H7NO4) have been exposed to a wide range of OH concentrations (~107-1011 cm-3), in presence of O2 in a rotating wall flow reactor operated at 2-6 mbar coupled to a custom built chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). OH radicals were generated through H2 dissociation in an Evenson microwave resonant cavity operated at 2.45 GHz followed by reaction with O2 or NO2. In addition, potential volatilization of organic material due to heterogeneous oxidation by OH has been determined in-situ by monitoring the volatile organic compounds using a high resolution-proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (HR-PTR-ToF-MS). The volatilization studies are conducted at 1 atm and OH is generated by O3 photolysis in the presence of H2O vapor and quantified using a photochemical box model as well as through reaction with a known concentration of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, C5H8). Reactive uptake validation

  11. 75 FR 60013 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of Volatile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions From Industrial Solvent Cleaning Operations AGENCY: Environmental... consists of an addition to Maryland's Volatile Organic Compounds from Specific Processes Regulation... available control techniques (RACT) requirements for sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) covered...

  12. A Review on Adsorption of Fluoride from Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Habuda-Stanić, Mirna; Ergović Ravančić, Maja; Flanagan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is one of the anionic contaminants which is found in excess in surface or groundwater because of geochemical reactions or anthropogenic activities such as the disposal of industrial wastewaters. Among various methods used for defluoridation of water such as coagulation, precipitation, membrane processes, electrolytic treatment, ion-exchange, the adsorption process is widely used. It offers satisfactory results and seems to be a more attractive method for the removal of fluoride in terms of cost, simplicity of design and operation. Various conventional and non-conventional adsorbents have been assessed for the removal of fluoride from water. In this review, a list of various adsorbents (oxides and hydroxides, biosorbents, geomaterials, carbonaceous materials and industrial products and by-products) and its modifications from literature are surveyed and their adsorption capacities under various conditions are compared. The effect of other impurities on fluoride removal has also been discussed. This survey showed that various adsorbents, especially binary and trimetal oxides and hydroxides, have good potential for the fluoride removal from aquatic environments. PMID:28788194

  13. Effects of free ammonia on volatile fatty acid accumulation and process performance in the anaerobic digestion of two typical bio-wastes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuchuan; Lin, Jia; Zuo, Jiane; Li, Peng; Li, Xiaoxia; Guo, Xianglin

    2017-05-01

    The effect of free ammonia on volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation and process instability was studied using a lab-scale anaerobic digester fed by two typical bio-wastes: fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) and food waste (FW) at 35°C with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.0kg VS/(m(3)·day). The inhibitory effects of free ammonia on methanogenesis were observed due to the low C/N ratio of each substrate (15.6 and 17.2, respectively). A high concentration of free ammonia inhibited methanogenesis resulting in the accumulation of VFAs and a low methane yield. In the inhibited state, acetate accumulated more quickly than propionate and was the main type of accumulated VFA. The co-accumulation of ammonia and VFAs led to an "inhibited steady state" and the ammonia was the main inhibitory substance that triggered the process perturbation. By statistical significance test and VFA fluctuation ratio analysis, the free ammonia inhibition threshold was identified as 45mg/L. Moreover, propionate, iso-butyrate and valerate were determined to be the three most sensitive VFA parameters that were subject to ammonia inhibition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Method for sampling and analysis of volatile biomarkers in process gas from aerobic digestion of poultry carcasses using time-weighted average SPME and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Koziel, Jacek A; Nguyen, Lam T; Glanville, Thomas D; Ahn, Heekwon; Frana, Timothy S; Hans van Leeuwen, J

    2017-10-01

    A passive sampling method, using retracted solid-phase microextraction (SPME) - gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and time-weighted averaging, was developed and validated for tracking marker volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during aerobic digestion of biohazardous animal tissue. The retracted SPME configuration protects the fragile fiber from buffeting by the process gas stream, and it requires less equipment and is potentially more biosecure than conventional active sampling methods. VOC concentrations predicted via a model based on Fick's first law of diffusion were within 6.6-12.3% of experimentally controlled values after accounting for VOC adsorption to the SPME fiber housing. Method detection limits for five marker VOCs ranged from 0.70 to 8.44ppbv and were statistically equivalent (p>0.05) to those for active sorbent-tube-based sampling. The sampling time of 30min and fiber retraction of 5mm were found to be optimal for the tissue digestion process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiation effects in fluoride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, K.; Sibley, W. A.; Suscavage, M.; Drexhage, M.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation-induced defects in Zr-based fluoride glasses have been characterized using optical absorption and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques. The optical absorption bands due to interstitial fluorine atoms, the F2(-), FC1(-), C12(-) centers, and Zr(3+) centers have been identified by correlating optical absorption and ESR measurements. Polarized bleaching experiments indicate that the hole-type centers, and the Zr(3+) centers have anisotropic defect configurations. X-ray excitation at 14 K generates a broad, asymmetric emission band at 337 nm (3.68 eV), which is assigned to a localized-excited state similar to that for self-trapped excitons in halide crystals. The intensity of the X-ray induced emission provides further evidence that radiolysis defect production occurs in this material. The optical tail of the radiation-induced Zr(3+) absorption affects infrared transmission. Evidence is presented that the CC14 reactive-atmosphere process introduces a significant amount of Cl(-) (about 5 percent) in the glass.

  16. Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boboila, Simona; Kim, Youngjae; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Desnoyers, Peter; Shipman, Galen M

    2012-01-01

    In this abstract, we study the performance and energy tradeoffs involved in migrating data analysis into the flash device, a process we refer to as Active Flash. The Active Flash paradigm is similar to 'active disks', which has received considerable attention. Active Flash allows us to move processing closer to data, thereby minimizing data movement costs and reducing power consumption. It enables true out-of-core computation. The conventional definition of out-of-core solvers refers to an approach to process data that is too large to fit in the main memory and, consequently, requires access to disk. However, in Active Flash, processing outside the host CPU literally frees the core and achieves real 'out-of-core' analysis. Moving analysis to data has long been desirable, not just at this level, but at all levels of the system hierarchy. However, this requires a detailed study on the tradeoffs involved in achieving analysis turnaround under an acceptable energy envelope. To this end, we first need to evaluate if there is enough computing power on the flash device to warrant such an exploration. Flash processors require decent computing power to run the internal logic pertaining to the Flash Translation Layer (FTL), which is responsible for operations such as address translation, garbage collection (GC) and wear-leveling. Modern SSDs are composed of multiple packages and several flash chips within a package. The packages are connected using multiple I/O channels to offer high I/O bandwidth. SSD computing power is also expected to be high enough to exploit such inherent internal parallelism within the drive to increase the bandwidth and to handle fast I/O requests. More recently, SSD devices are being equipped with powerful processing units and are even embedded with multicore CPUs (e.g. ARM Cortex-A9 embedded processor is advertised to reach 2GHz frequency and deliver 5000 DMIPS; OCZ RevoDrive X2 SSD has 4 SandForce controllers, each with 780MHz max frequency

  17. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  18. Studies of fluoride varnishes in Finland.

    PubMed

    Seppä, L

    1991-01-01

    Despite the artificial fluoridation of drinking water in Kuopio, part of the children have high caries incidence. We therefore started our studies on fluoride varnishes in 1977 in an attempt to find a feasible means of applying fluoride topically in children at high risk of caries. In our first trial, the sodium fluoride varnish Duraphat was found to be effective in preventing caries, but the effectiveness of the silane fluoride varnish Fluor Protector could not be unequivocally established, despite the fact that Fluor Protector deposited markedly more fluoride in enamel than Duraphat. In a second study in children in a low-fluoride area, use of Duraphat was found to be more effective than fortnightly fluoride rinses or Fluor Protector. Increasing the frequency of application from two to four times a year did not increase the effectiveness of Duraphat even in highly caries-prone children in a 2-year trial. On the basis of peak values of fluoride in parotid saliva after application, use of either fluoride varnishes was considered safe. Although the fluoride content of the enamel remained elevated for at least two years after discontinuation of treatment with both varnishes, the caries preventive effect did not continue after the applications were stopped. This shows that increasing the fluoride content of enamel is not the main mechanism by which fluoride varnishes prevent caries, and that the applications need to be continued as long as caries is a problem.

  19. Health effects of groundwater fluoride contamination.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Bishwajit; Roy, Madan Mohan; Das, Bhaskar; Pal, Arup; Sengupta, Mrinal Kumar; De, Shankar Prasad; Chakraborti, Dipankar

    2009-04-01

    The people in Berhait block, Sahibganj district, Jharkhand state, India, have been exposed chronically to fluoridecontaminated groundwater. Hereby, we report the clinical effects of chronic exposure to fluoride. The study population was a convenience sample of 342 adults and 258 children living in the affected area. All volunteers filled out questionnaires and were examined. Well water from the six affected villages and urine samples were analyzed for fluoride using an ion-sensitive electrode. Twenty nine percent of 89 well water samples had fluoride concentrations above the Indian permissible limit of fluoride in drinking water. Eighty-five children and 72 adults had clinical fluorosis. Urine fluoride concentrations in children were 0.758-2.88 mg/L whereas in adults they were 0.331-10.36 mg/L. Clinical effects of fluoride included abnormal tooth enamel in children; adults had joint pain and deformity of the limbs and spine, along with ligamentous calcifications and exostosis formations in seven patients. Elevated urine fluoride concentrations supported the clinical diagnosis of fluorosis. Owing to insufficient fluoride-safe wells and lack of awareness of the danger of fluoride toxicity, villagers often drink fluoride-contaminated water. Villagers of Berhait block, including children, are at risk from chronic fluoride toxicity. To combat the situation, villagers need fluoride-safe water, education, and awareness of the danger about fluoride toxicity.

  20. Fluoride content of tank water in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, N J; Hopcraft, M S; Tong, A C; Thean, H l; Thum, Y S; Tong, D E; Wen, J; Zhao, S C; Stanton, D P; Yuan, Y; Shen, P; Reynolds, E C

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) analyse the fluoride content of tank water; (2) determine whether the method of water collection or storage influenced fluoride content; and (3) survey participant attitudes towards water fluoridation. Plastic tubes and a questionnaire were distributed through dentists to households with water tanks in Victoria. A midstream tank water sample was collected and fluoride analysed in triplicate using ion chromatography All samples (n = 123) contained negligible amounts of fluoride, with a mean fluoride concentration of <0.01 ppm (range: <0.01-0.18 ppm). No statistically significant association was found between fluoride content and variables investigated such as tank material, tank age, roof material and gutter material. Most people did not know whether their tank water contained fluoride and 40.8% preferred to have access to fluoridated water. The majority thought fluoride was safe and more than half of the respondents supported fluoridation. Fluoride content of tank water was well below the optimal levels for caries prevention. People who rely solely on tank water for drinking may require additional exposure to fluoride for optimal caries prevention. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  1. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  2. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface; with more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix/mineral interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the doserelated decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffleended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As

  3. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Abnormally high fluoride levels in commercial preparations of 40 per cent silver fluoride solution: contraindications for use in children.

    PubMed

    Gotjamanos, T; Orton, V

    1998-12-01

    Although a 40 per cent solution of silver fluoride would be expected to contain 6 per cent fluoride (60,000 ppm), F-levels of 100,000 ppm and 120,000 ppm were found in 14 commercial samples analysed at The University of Western Australia in 1993 and 1994. To determine whether F-levels in 40 per cent AgF preparations have remained high, the present investigation was aimed at analysing different batches of commercial preparations obtained more recently. Fluoride ion analysis was carried out on 24 AgF samples using the Ion-Selective Electrode technique. Independent analyses of the same samples were carried out by a private chemical testing laboratory (Genalysis). Ten samples supplied by Agson Chemical Export were found to contain between 75,000 and 100,000 ppm F-: Genalysis reported 80,000 to 120,000 ppm. Fourteen samples supplied by Southern Dental Industries were found to contain between 70,000 and 120,000 ppm F-; Genalysis reported 88,000 to 108,000 ppm F-. These results confirm significantly higher than expected F-levels (ANOVA p < 0.05) in commercial preparations of 40 per cent AgF. The solutions tested were found to contain a mixture of ammonium fluoride, sodium or potassium fluoride, and silver fluoride. The additional presence of silver difluoride and hydrofluoric acid resulting from the manufacturing process has been suggested as an explanation for the much higher than expected levels of fluoride ion. In view of possible toxicity of 40 per cent AgF in young children, it is concluded that such a highly concentrated solution should not be used clinically; instead, lower strength AgF solutions should be investigated for their efficacy in caries treatment.

  5. Pronounced reduction of fluoride exposure in free-ranging deer in North Bohemia (Czech Republic) as indicated by the biomarkers skeletal fluoride content and dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Bahelková, Petra; Sedláček, František; Kierdorf, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Wild deer have been recommended as bioindicators of fluoride pollution. We compared bone fluoride concentrations and prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in free-ranging European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) from five counties in the northwestern part of the Czech Republic that had been collected by hunters and whose mandibles were presented at trophy exhibitions in the years 1996/1997 ("early period") and 2009 ("late period"). Data on atmospheric fluoride deposition suggested that the deer from the early period had been exposed to markedly higher fluoride levels than those from the late period. We therefore predicted a decline in skeletal fluoride levels and prevalence of dental fluorosis for both species from the early to the late period. Fluoride concentrations were determined in the coronoid process of the mandible, and assessment of dental fluorosis was performed on the permanent cheek teeth. A pronounced drop in fluoride concentrations from the early period (roe deer (n = 157), median: 3147 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone; red deer (n = 127), median: 1263 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone) to the late period (roe deer (n = 117), median: 350 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone; red deer (n = 72), median: 288 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone) was recorded. Prevalence of dental fluorosis also markedly declined from the early to the late period (roe deer: from 93% to 12%, red deer: from 87% to 28%). The reduction of fluoride deposition in the study area and, in consequence, fluoride exposure of the resident deer populations, is attributed largely to the implementation of emission control devices in the brown coal-fired power plants located in North Bohemia from the mid 1990s onwards. The findings of the present study demonstrate that wild deer are well suited for monitoring temporal changes in fluoride pollution of their habitats.

  6. Chemical diversity of organic volatiles among comets: An emerging taxonomy and implications for processes in the proto-planetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.

    2008-10-01

    As messengers from the early Solar System, comets contain key information from the time of planet formation and even earlier some may contain material formed in our natal interstellar cloud. Along with water, the cometary nucleus contains ices of natural gases (CH4, C2H6), alcohols (CH3OH), acids (HCOOH), embalming fluid (H2CO), and even anti-freeze (ethylene glycol). Comets today contain some ices that vaporize at temperatures near absolute zero (CO, CH4), demonstrating that their compositions remain largely unchanged after 4.5 billion years. By comparing their chemical diversity, several distinct cometary classes have been identified but their specific relation to chemical gradients in the proto-planetary disk remains murky. How does the compositional diversity of comets relate to nebular processes such as chemical processing, radial migration, and dynamical scattering? No current reservoir holds a unique class, but their fractional abundance can test emerging dynamical models for origins of the scattered Kuiper disk, the Oort cloud, and the (proposed) main-belt comets. I will provide a simplified overview emphasizing what we are learning, current issues, and their relevance to the subject of this Symposium.

  7. Effects of processing methods on composition and functionality of volatile components isolated from immature fruits of atemoya.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tai-Ti; Chao, Louis Kuo-Ping; Peng, Chi-Wei; Yang, Tsung-Shi

    2016-07-01

    Atemoya is one of the most important commercial fruits of the family Annonaceae. The immature fruits of atemoya amply produced from a fruit-thinning process is normally regarded as waste and discarded. This research aimed at studying antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil (EO) isolated from the immature fruits to explore its potential application. The fruits were subjected to different drying methods: solar drying (SD), oven drying at 30°C (OD-30), and at 50°C (OD-50). The oven drying method gave a higher EO yield than the solar drying method. Spathulenol was the largest compound in the EO after the drying process. Antimicrobial effect was not affected by the different drying methods. Antioxidant activity of the EO was measured by DPPH, nitric oxide, and reducing power methods. The EOOD-50 exhibited a stronger antioxidant activity than EOSD and EOOD-30. The EO also showed an anti-inflammatory activity in a cell model.

  8. Benefits of a silica-based fluoride toothpaste containing o-cymen-5-ol, zinc chloride and sodium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Newby, Craig S; Rowland, Joanna L; Lynch, Richard J M; Bradshaw, David J; Whitworth, Darren; Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Fluoride toothpastes in conjunction with tooth brushing are used to clean teeth, control plaque build-up and for anti-caries benefits. Toothpastes are designed with attractive flavours and appearances to encourage regular prolonged use to maximise these benefits. The incorporation of additional ingredients into toothpaste is a convenient way to provide supplementary protection that fits into people's everyday oral care routine. Such ingredients should not compromise the primary health benefits of toothpaste nor discourage its use. o-Cymen-5-ol and zinc chloride have been incorporated into a sodium fluoride (NaF)/silica toothpaste at 0.1%w/w and 0.6%w/w respectively to provide additional benefits. These include improved gingival health maintenance, in terms of the reduction of plaque, gingival index and bleeding, and an immediate and long lasting reduction in volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) measured on breath. These benefits can be attributed to the antimicrobial and neutralisation actions of the toothpaste. The use of established fluoride models demonstrated no compromise in NaF bioavailability. The toothpaste was formulated without compromising product aesthetics. The combination of o-cymen-5-ol and zinc chloride in toothpaste gave superior maintenance of gingival health and reduction in malodour related VSCs without compromising the primary health benefits of the toothpaste or diminishing attributes preferred for the product's use.

  9. Aqueous geochemistry of fluoride enriched groundwater in arid part of Western India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chander Kumar; Mukherjee, Saumitra

    2015-02-01

    Fluoride-enriched water has become a major public health issue in India. The present study tries to evaluate the geochemical mechanism of fluoride enrichment in groundwater of western India. Total 100 groundwater samples were collected for the study spreading across the entire study area. The results of the analyzed parameters formed the attribute database for geographical information system (GIS) analysis and final output maps. A preliminary field survey was conducted and fluoride testing was done using Hach make field kits. The fluoride concentration ranges from 0.08 to 6.6 mg/L (mean 2.4 mg/L), with 63 % of the samples containing fluoride concentrations that exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water guideline value of 1.5 mg/L and 85 % samples exceeding the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) guidelines of 1 mg/L. The study also reveals high concentration of nitrate that is found to be above WHO standrads. The dominant geochemical facies present in water are Na-Cl-HCO3 (26 samples), Na-Ca-Cl-HCO3 (20 samples), Na-Cl (14 samples), and Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-HCO3 (11 samples); however, sodium and bicarbonate being the major component in all the water types of 100 samples, which in fact has a tendency to increase fluoride concentration in water by dissolving fluoride from fluorite. The thermodynamic considerations between the activities of calcium, fluoride, and bicarbonate suggest that fluoride concentration is being governed by activity of calcium ion. X-ray diffraction analysis of sediments reveals calcite and fluorite are the main solubility-control minerals controlling the aqueous geochemistry of high fluoride groundwater. The results indicate that the fluoride concentration in groundwater is mainly governed by geochemical composition of rocks, such as metamorphic granites and sedimentary rocks, alkaline hydrogeological environment, climatic conditions, high temperature and lesser rainfall, and geochemical processes such as weathering, evaporation

  10. Potential exposure and risk of fluoride intakes from tea drinks produced in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Fu, Chi Betsy

    2008-03-01

    Tea is the second most commonly consumed drink in the world. Excess fluoride intakes from tea drinks may cause health effects. This work assesses infusible fluoride levels in popular tea sold in Taiwan and evaluates potential exposure factors. Lungjing, pouchong, tienguanyin, oolong, pureh, and black tea specimens were purchased from different counties in Taiwan. Fluoride levels were evaluated in one complete cycle of tea making as well as at different calcium carbonate contents in water, with glass or porcelain teapots, and with/without adding sugar. Oolong tea leaves in each manufacturing step were also analyzed for infusible fluoride. Potential fluoride intakes and risks are estimated based on a national survey. Among six kinds of tea, black tea had the highest fluoride concentrations (8.64+/-2.96 mg/l), whereas pureh (1.97+/-2.70 mg/l) had the lowest levels. Higher percentages of infusible fluoride can be rinsed away from tea leaves curved lengthways compared to those curved end-to-end in the first 2.5 min. The use of glass or porcelain teapots and calcium carbonate content (up to 400 mg/l) in water would not affect infusible fluoride levels, whereas adding sugar increased the infusible fluoride in the first few minutes. In addition, it was found that the critical step during the manufacturing process affecting the percentage of infusible fluoride was ball rolling rather than fermentation. Furthermore, intakes of high amounts (> or =5 l/week) of certain tea may result in excess risks of dental or skeletal fluorosis. Tea lovers could be exposed to excess fluoride and may be at risk of fluorosis.

  11. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... the cylinder's water weight capacity. In place of the periodic volumetric expansion test, cylinders...

  12. Fluoride removal by a continuous flow electrocoagulation reactor.

    PubMed

    Emamjomeh, Mohammad M; Sivakumar, Muttucumaru

    2009-02-01

    Long-term consumption of water containing excessive fluoride can lead to fluorosis of the teeth and bones. Electrocoagulation (EC) is an electrochemical technique, in which a variety of unwanted dissolved particles and suspended matter can be effectively removed from an aqueous solution by electrolysis. Continuous flow experiments with monopolar aluminium electrodes for fluoride removal were undertaken to investigate the effects of the different parameters such as: current density (12.5-50A/m(2)), flow rate (150-400 mL/min), initial pH (4-8), and initial fluoride concentration (5-25mg/L). The highest treatment efficiency was obtained for the largest current and the removal efficiency was found to be dependent on the current density, the flow rate and the initial fluoride concentration when the final pH ranged between 6 and 8. The composition of the sludge produced was analysed using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum. The strong presence of the aluminium hydroxide [Al(OH)(3)] in the above pH range, which maximizes the formation of aluminium fluoride hydroxide complex [Al(n)F(m)(OH)(3n-m)], is the main reason for defluoridation by electrocoagulation. The results obtained showed that the continuous flow electrocoagulation technology is an effective process for defluoridation of potable water supplies and could also be utilized for the defluoridation of industrial wastewater.

  13. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution by waste mud.

    PubMed

    Kemer, Baris; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan N; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-15

    The present study was carried out to assess the ability of original waste mud (o-WM) and different types of activated waste mud which are acid-activated (a-WM) and precipitated waste mud (p-WM), in order to remove excess of fluoride from aqueous solution by using batch technique. The p-WM exhibited greater performance than the others. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, adsorbent concentration, temperature, etc. Studies were also performed to understand the effect of some co-existing ions present in aqueous solutions. Adsorption process was found to be almost independent of pH for all types of waste mud. Among the kinetic models tested for p-WM, pseudo-second-order model fitted the kinetic data well with a perfect correlation coefficient value of 1.00. It was found that the adequate time for the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was only 1h. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ), and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) revealed that adsorption of fluoride ions on the p-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Experimental data showed a good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Results of this study demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of WM for removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution.

  14. [Natural fluorides. The distinction between technically produced and naturally occurring fluorides in caries prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Newesely, H

    1977-06-01

    In the controversial discussion of the bio-availability of fluoride in caries prophylaxis by fluoridation, fluorides coming from the geochemical circulation to the biochemical circulation are sometimes differentiated from synthetic fluorides introduced into fluoride medication. The question as to whether such a differentiation is essential can be answered from the physical-chemical point of view. This requires a wide field of scientific research starting with geochemistry and the knowledge of fluoride deposits, sedimentology, hydrology, technology of inorganic and organic fluorine compounds, thermodynamics of dissolved fluorides, up to biocrystallography and biochemistry of fluorine.

  15. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years, and

  16. How to improve bayberry (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.) juice flavour quality: effect of juice processing and storage on volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi Xiu; Zhang, Min; Fang, Zhong Xiang; Sun, Jin Cai; Wang, Ying Qiang

    2014-05-15

    To improve the flavour quality of bayberry juice, effects of different raw materials, heat treatment and storage time on the flavour variations were investigated. Changes of total sugar and titratable acids were also monitored. Identification and quantitation of volatile flavour compounds were performed by headspace solid-phase microextraction couped with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS). The contents of esters, alcohols, total sugar and titratable acidity of the rancid flavour raw juice were 6.03%, 8.24%, 5.56 g/L, 0.18 g/L less than those of pleasing flavour raw juice (PF), while the content of aldehydes was 4.19% higher than that of PF. After 9 months storage, the bayberry juice produced fermentation-like flavours with alcohols increases (11.45%) while esters (14.91%) and total sugar (3.27 g/L) decreases. The results suggested that proper juice processing and storage techniques are critical to the flavour quality of bayberry juice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mapping and profile of emission sources for airborne volatile organic compounds from process regions at a petrochemical plant in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Liang; Fang, Hung-Yuan; Shu, Chi-Min

    2006-06-01

    This work surveyed five process regions inside a petrochemical plant in Taiwan to characterize the profiles of airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and locate emission sources. Samples, taken with canisters, were analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry according to the TO-14 method. Each region was deployed with 24 sampling sites, sampled twice, and 240 samples in total were measured during the survey period. All of the data were consolidated into a database on Excel to facilitate retrieval, statistical analysis, and presentation in the form of a table or graph, and, subsequently, the profile of VOCs was elucidated. Emission sources were located by mapping the concentration distribution of either an individual or a type of species in terms of contour maps on Surfer. Through the cross-analysis of data, the abundant VOCs included alkenes, dienes, alkanes, and aromatics. A total of 19 emission sources were located from these five regions. The sources for alkanes stood inside first, third aromatic, and fourth naphtha cracking regions, whereas the ones for alkenes were inside two naphtha cracking regions. The sources for dienes were found inside the third naphtha cracking region alone; in contrast, the sources for aromatics were universally traced except inside the third naphtha cracking region. The measured intensity for sources mostly ranged from 1000 to 7000 ppb.

  19. Volatile organic compounds concentrations during the construction process in newly-built timber-frame houses: source identification and emission kinetics.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, H; Vignau-Laulhere, J; Mocho, P; Sauvat, N; Raulin, K; Desauziers, V

    2017-05-24

    Building and furniture materials are known to be major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) indoors. During the construction process, an introduced material can have a more or less long-term impact on the indoor air quality according to the building characteristics. In this study, field measurements were carried out at six construction stages in three energy-efficient timber-frame houses. Data analysis focused on the ten most abundant compounds found among an initial list of fifteen target VOCs, namely formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, hexanal, toluene, m/p-xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene, α-pinene, 3-carene and d-limonene. The chemical compositions and concentration variation patterns were recorded. The results showed a high pollution count, with m/p-xylenes and ethylbenzene concentrations ranging from 1900 to 5100 μg m(-3) occurring at the time of the structural work (representing more than 88% of the sum of the target VOCs). Emission tests done on a large number of materials used in the construction revealed that this pollution is due to the emissions from the polyurethane adhesive mastic used as a sealing material. The emission kinetics of polyurethane adhesive mastic was assessed alone and also within a material assembly reconstituting a room wall. The results showed that the superposition of materials led to a slowing down of the VOC emission process from polyurethane adhesive mastic, which explains the concentration decays recorded in houses during the construction process. At the final construction stage, the concentration levels were low for all compounds (the sums of the target VOCs were between 18 and 32 μg m(-3)), with the aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexanal) now becoming the major fraction in the chemical composition in the last stages of construction (representing 50-70% of the sum of the target VOCs). This is in agreement with the fact that the sources of aldehydes are the most numerous among the materials and have rather slow

  20. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrametz, K.; Kofler, L.

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution were addressed.

  1. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Oconnell, R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution are addressed.

  2. Industrial Applications of Graphite Fluoride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Kucera, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Based on fluorination technology developed during 1934 to 1959, and the fiber technology developed during the 1970s, a new process was developed to produce graphite fluoride fibers. In the process, pitch based graphitized carbon fibers are at first intercalated and deintercalated several times by bromine and iodine, followed by several cycles of nitrogen heating and fluorination at 350 to 370 C. Electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of this fiber depend on the fluorination process and the fluorine content of the graphite fluoride product. However, these properties are between those of graphite and those of PTFE (Teflon). Therefore, it is considered to be a semiplastic. The physical properties suggest that this new material may have many new and unexplored applications. For example, it can be a thermally conductive electrical insulator. Its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) can be adjusted to match that of silicon, and therefore, it can be a heat sinking printed circuit board which is CTE compatible with silicon. Using these fibers in printed circuit boards may provide improved electrical performance and reliability of the electronics on the board over existing designs. Also, since it releases fluorine at 300 C or higher, it can be used as a material to store fluorine and to conduct fluorination. This application may simplify the fluorination process and reduce the risk of handling fluorine.

  3. A Retrospective: Active Volatile-Driven Geologic Processes Across the Solar System—Lessons for Planetary Explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    When Voyagers 1 and 2 left Earth in 1977, we had little clue as to the rich variety of activity we'd find on the outer Solar System moons. The moons of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune would likely exhibit little geologic evolution¾much less even than our Moon. We expected battered, cratered, dead worlds. Like the Moon, Mars had showed volcanic activity in the geologic past, but ancient, heavily crater highlands dominated both surfaces. It seemed unlikely that we'd find even extinct volcanism in the cold, dead reaches of the outer Solar System. Voyager 1 shocked us by revealing Io's prolific ongoing volcanism. (Not all were surprised: just days earlier, Peale, Cassen, and Reynolds published a prediction that Io could be volcanically active). Europa, too, was a Voyager surprise; only a small handful of impact craters pocked its surface. It too had to be a geologically young body—likely still actively evolving. We have even found very recent geological activity on tiny cometary nuclei, where young flows have oozed forth across their surfaces. At Neptune, incredibly, Voyager 2 found eruptions on Triton's 37K polar cap—plumes driven by solar-heated nitrogen gas blasting dark dust and bright ice in 8-km-high columns. On Mars, "dark spiders" near the pole signaled similar active eruptions, in this case driven by pressurized carbon dioxide. Cassini witnessed a myriad of jets near tiny Enceladus' south pole, arising from an internal ocean evidently driven by active chemical processes and modulated by Saturn's proximity. Cassini revealed Titan to be Earth's alien twin, with a host of processes borrowed from textbooks on terrestrial geomorphology and meteorology. Akin to Earth's global hydrological cycle, Titan's runs on methane—methane rivers, seas, and rain abound. What lessons can we take from these active places into the next phase of exploration? When the Voyagers were launched, our naiveté allowed that only planet Earth was dynamically active. But exploring

  4. Regional biogenic emissions of reactive volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from forests: First results on process studies, modelling and validation experiments (BEWA2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, B.; Bewa2000 Team

    2003-04-01

    The overall objective of the research consortia is to develop for a forest canopy a prognostic, validated emission model for primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOC) to be used for estimating regional biogenic emissions with a higher spatial and temporal resolution than present. To achieve this objective requires a better description of biosynthetic processes as well as chemical degradation mechanisms for reactive biogenic VOC in combination with a process-based model and latest vegetation specific land use information. Up to now several highlights were achieved within the different key activities. In the section model development a process-based isoprenoid emission model was supplemented with new differential equations especially taking into account the influence of transport-resistances for leaf gas-exchange. In biochemical process-studies related to the formation of isoprene in leaves it turned out that during daytime about 20-70% of the total carbon delivered to poplar leaves (photosynthesis + other sources) was derived from xylem-transported sugars. This finding indicates that xylem-delivered carbon may indeed act as a significant alternative carbon source for isoprenoid biosynthesis. First chemical process studies on the reaction of limonene with NO3 radicals (observed in the night and under low light conditions) in the EUPHORE (European Photoreactor) demonstrated a secondary particle formation. At the field site Waldstein (Fichtelgebirge) this reaction may result in maximum pinonealdhyde concentrations in the air and on particles observed in night periods. A first analysis of particle size distributions over the Norway spruce canopy showed the appearance of small particles (< 10nm) during early daytime. The first results demonstrate that the proposed approach of combining interdisciplinary field, laboratory and modelling exercises to address the complexity of the biosphere/atmosphere exchange of reactive trace gases will contribute

  5. Influence of the process, season, and origin on volatile composition and antioxidant activity of Juniperus phoenicea L. leaves essential oils.

    PubMed

    Ennajar, Monia; Afloulous, Samia; Romdhane, Mehrez; Ibrahim, Hany; Cazaux, Sylvie; Abderraba, Manef; Raies, Aly; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2011-03-01

    Essential oils of Juniperus phoenicea L. leaves cultivated in 3 regions, Korbos, Matmata, and Tabarka of Tunisia were obtained by hydrodistillation (HD), steam distillation (SD), and Soxhlet (SH) extraction methods. The essential oils were analyzed and quantified by capillary gas chromatography using flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The highest yield was observed in HD process (1.12%). Tabarka essential oil provided the best yield 0.79% compared to other regions. December month SD essential oil was the highest in oxygenated monoterpenes (52.7%). Nevertheless, SH essential oil showed a higher content in sesquitepenes hydrocarbons (64.5%). α-Terpinol (25.5%) was the main oxygenated component in Matmata juniper essential oil, extracted by SD. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of essential oils was evaluated using ABTS assays. The strongest antioxidant activity (IC(50) = 22.6 ± 0.7 mg/L) was obtained by the Matmata (October 2007) SD essential oil.

  6. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF/sub 6/ and UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF/sub 6/, UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Promoting social welfare through oral health: New Jersey's fluoridation experience.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the contentious public health policy of treating community water with fluoride in the United States. The question for scholarly investigation is why water fluoridation has been unsuccessful in several parts of the United States relative to the rest. It addresses this question by looking into the processes of scientific discovery and information dissemination, benefits and risks of science-based health policy, related issues of provision and production, and spatial dimensions of policy development. The case method based on New Jersey's experience in public water fluoridation, was opted for this study. We find that policy debates, which are confined to single key issues, tend to breed binary choices and bipolar debates and result in policy stalemates. Consumer accessibility and desirability of merit goods thus become sharply conflicting social welfare values. They undermine the intent of science-based policies and often make alternative and second-best policies more practical to adopt.

  8. [Mechanism study of fluoride adsorption by hydrous metal oxides].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-Chao; Li, Wen-Jun; Chang, Zhi-Dong; Wang, Huan-Ying; Zhou, Yue

    2011-08-01

    Hydrous oxides of cerium, aluminum, nickel and copper were prepared by alkaline precipitation method. Langmuir adsorption isotherm was studied and specific surface area was measured by BET method through N2 adsorption-desorption process. IR characterization of hydrous metal oxides before and after fluoride adsorption was also studied. Results show that different hydrous metal oxides have different specific surface areas and their pore size distributions also are not all the same. Adsorption capacity is not directly dependent on the specific surface area. Isotherm study indicates that the adsorption follows Langmuir model and shows the feature of monolayer adsorption. IR study before and after fluoride adsorption shows that different hydrous metal oxides have similar adsorption sites in the same IR region as well as adsorption sites in the different IR region. The comprehensive interaction of these adsorption sites with fluoride ions results in the different adsorption capacity of different hydrous metal oxides.

  9. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  10. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  11. A Manual for Rural School Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprouse, Larman W.; Brooks, John

    The product of a 1972 Dental Health Branch contract with the U.S. Public Health Service, this manual is designed to aid in the development of school fluoridation programs and presents: background information on general concepts relating to the action of fluoride on teeth; discussions dealing with community and school fluoridation studies; and the…

  12. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  13. PILOT-SCALE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS USING VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.; Pak, D. J.

    2012-09-11

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. In 2011, SRNL adapted the technology for the removal of fluoride from fluoride-bearing salts. The method involved an in situ reaction between potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the fluoride salt to yield potassium fluoride (KF) and the corresponding oxide. The KF and excess KOH can be distilled below 1000{deg}C using vacuum salt distillation (VSD). The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated by a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attaned, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile material in the feed boat. Studies discussed in this report were performed involving the use of non-radioactive simulants in small-scale and pilot-scale systems as well as radioactive testing of a small-scale system with plutonium-bearing materials. Aspects of interest include removable liner design considerations, boat materials, in-line moisture absorption, and salt deposition.

  14. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOEpatents

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  15. Long-term release of fluoride from fissure sealants-In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kosior, Piotr; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Korczyński, Mariusz; Herman, Katarzyna; Czajczyńska-Waszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk-Zając, Małgorzata; Piesiak-Pańczyszyn, Dagmara; Fita, Katarzyna; Janeczek, Maciej

    2017-05-01

    The intensity of the cariostatic activity of fluoride ions can be attributed to their multidirectional influence on the caries process. They are an irreplaceable factor that helps sustain mineral balance of dental tissues, simultaneously demonstrating antibacterial properties. As a consequence, many manufacturers of fissure sealants include fluoride ions in their products. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine long-term fluoride release from four fissure sealants (Conseal F, Fissurit FX, Delton Fs+, Admira Seal). During a 14-week-long observation, all the materials showed a relatively constant level of F- release; however, it is crucial to mention that within the first 48h, the most significant increase in fluoride release was found for Fissurit and Delton sealants. Based on the overall assessment, the highest total amount of the released fluoride ions was observed for Delton, and the lowest level was reported for Admira Seal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of bioavailable fluoride from sepiolite by "in vivo" digestibility assays.

    PubMed

    Suárez, P; Quintana, M C; Hernández, L

    2008-02-01

    This work presents a study of the bioavailability and distribution of fluoride in tissues of animals (Wistar rats) which were fed with a poultry feeding that contains sepiolite as an additive. The determination of fluoride concentration was carried out by potentiometric measurements using a fluoride selective electrode. The quantification was done using the standard addition method with enough accuracy and precision in all the assays. The results demonstrate that fluoride present in sepiolite is not bioavailable. The digestion process does not extract all the fluoride from sepiolite, so sepiolite can be use in poultry feedings without any risk. These studies have contributed to the discussions at EU level about extraction procedures and F(-) determination in feed material of mineral origin.

  17. [Public water supply fluoridation in Brazil according to health sector leaders].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Regina Glaucia Lucena Aguiar; Bógus, Cláudia Maria; Marques, Regina Auxiliadora de Amorim; Menezes, Léa Maria Bezerra de; Narvai, Paulo Capel

    2014-09-01

    Various groups have opposed water supply fluoridation in Brazil, while others have supported the measure based on scientific evidence. This article describes the perceptions of delegates to the 13th National Health Conference on mandatory fluoridation of the country's public water supply. Interviews were processed using collective subject discourse analysis. A certain degree of misinformation persists regarding basic characteristics of water fluoridation, which is frequently confused with chlorination. The delegates' discourses showed a continuing need for public awareness-raising regarding fluoridation and the delegates' desire that the National Congress not take measures impacting public health without consulting society's stakeholders. However, most of the interviewees agreed that to repeal mandatory water fluoridation or loosen the control of its implementation could increase the incidence of tooth decay in the population.

  18. Removal of fluoride from drinking water by cellulose@hydroxyapatite nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolin; Tong, Shengrui; Ge, Maofa; Zuo, Junchao

    2013-01-30

    Cellulose@hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocomposites were prepared in NaOH/thiourea/urea/H(2)O solution via situ hybridization. The composite materials combine the advantage of cellulose and HA with the high specific surface area and the strong affinity toward fluoride. The composite materials were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD, TG and XPS, and the adsorption of fluoride was investigated. Adsorption kinetics indicated the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was within 360 min and the adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models could fit the experimental data well. At the initial fluoride concentration of 10mg/L, the residual concentration using above 3g/L adsorbent dose could meet the drinking water standard of WHO norms. Furthermore, the coexisting anions had no significant effect on fluoride adsorption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microcratering in Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Anthony John

    Dust is defined as macroparticles as small as a few molecules up to several micrometers in diameter. In the context of space exploration, it was originally seen only as a technical obstacle to applications; dust can damage instrument surfaces, coat mating surfaces preventing proper seals, and impair or obstruct measurements. Because of the ubiquity of dust in the solar system and its role in the origin of planets and other bodies, the study of dust and related phenomena has evolved to a scientific subdiscipline which can provide us insight into the origins and evolution of our solar system. In order to facilitate this, a hypervelocity dust accelerator has been built at the University of Colorado at Boulder and is being used to probe impact phenomena, dust mitigation techniques, dust detection techniques, and more. One such dust detector is a Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) dust detector. The PVDF dust detector is very lightweight and consumes little power. Due to these properties, PVDF detectors can potentially be used on any spacecraft to gain information on the local dust environment. It is not fully understood how this PVDF dust detector signal is generated, so at present can only be used as a dust counter. In this thesis I discuss the importance of the study of dust phenomena, describe the accelerator experiment, and describe a study conducted to determine the underlying physical principles of PVDF dust detectors. This included measuring crater size scaling laws, measuring the detailed shape of craters, and applying this data to simulations of the signals being generated by PVDF detectors.

  20. High-fluoride groundwater.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  1. Assessment of fluoride contaminations in groundwater of hard rock aquifers in Madurai district, Tamil Nadu (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivya, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Rao, M. S.; Thilagavathi, R.; Prasanna, M. V.; Manikandan, S.

    2015-07-01

    The fluoride contamination in drinking water is already gone to the alarming level and it needs the immediate involvement and attention of all people to solve this problem. Fluoride problem is higher in hard rock terrains in worldwide and Madurai is such type of hard rock region. Totally 54 samples were collected from the Madurai district of Tamilnadu with respect to lithology. The samples collected were analysed for major cations and anions using standard procedures. The higher concentration of fluoride is noted in the Charnockite rock types of northern part of the study area. 20 % of samples are below 0.5 ppm and 6 % of samples are above 1.5 ppm exceeding the permissible limit. The affinity between the pH and fluoride ions in groundwater suggests that dissolution of fluoride bearing minerals in groundwater. The higher concentration of fluoride ions are observed in the lower EC concentration. The isotopic study suggests that fluoride is geogenic in nature. In factor scores, fluoride is noted in association with pH which indicates the dissolution process.

  2. Assessment of fluoride contaminations in groundwater of hard rock aquifers in Madurai district, Tamil Nadu (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivya, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Rao, M. S.; Thilagavathi, R.; Prasanna, M. V.; Manikandan, S.

    2017-05-01

    The fluoride contamination in drinking water is already gone to the alarming level and it needs the immediate involvement and attention of all people to solve this problem. Fluoride problem is higher in hard rock terrains in worldwide and Madurai is such type of hard rock region. Totally 54 samples were collected from the Madurai district of Tamilnadu with respect to lithology. The samples collected were analysed for major cations and anions using standard procedures. The higher concentration of fluoride is noted in the Charnockite rock types of northern part of the study area. 20 % of samples are below 0.5 ppm and 6 % of samples are above 1.5 ppm exceeding the permissible limit. The affinity between the pH and fluoride ions in groundwater suggests that dissolution of fluoride bearing minerals in groundwater. The higher concentration of fluoride ions are observed in the lower EC concentration. The isotopic study suggests that fluoride is geogenic in nature. In factor scores, fluoride is noted in association with pH which indicates the dissolution process.

  3. Production and Transport of Gaseous (18)F-Synthons: (18)F-Acyl Fluorides.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huailei; DiMagno, Stephen G; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Fluorine-18 ((18)F, T 1/2=109.7 min) is a positron-emitting isotope that has found extensive application as a radiolabel for positron emission tomography (PET). Although gaseous (11)C-CO2 and (11)C-CH4 are practically transported from cyclotron to radiochemistry processes, (18)F-fluoride is routinely transported in aqueous solution because it is commonly produced by proton irradiation of (18)O-enriched water. In most cases, subsequent dry-down steps are necessary to prepare reactive (18)F-fluoride for radiofluorination. In this work, a simple module was designed to generate gaseous (18)F-acyl fluorides from aqueous (18)F-fluoride solution by solid phase (18)F-radiofluorination of acyl anhydride. The gaseous (18)F-acyl fluorides were purified through a column containing Porapak Q/Na2SO4, resulting in high yields (>86%), purities (>99%) and specific activities (>1200 GBq/μmol). Prototypic (18)F-acetyl fluoride ((18)F-AcF) was readily transported through 15 m of 0.8 mm ID polypropylene tubing with low (0.64 ± 0.12 %) adsorption to the tubing. Following dissolution of (18)F-AcF in solvent containing base, highly reactive (18)F-flouride was generated immediately and used directly for (18)F-labeling reactions. These data indicate that (18)F-acyl fluorides represent a new paradigm for preparation and transport of anhydrous, reactive (18)F-fluoride for radiofluorinations.

  4. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brett D; Binning, Philip J; Sloan, Scott W

    2008-01-28

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process. The paper focuses on two issues in the implementation of calcite permeable reactive barriers for remediating fluoride contaminated water: the impact of the groundwater chemical matrix and CO2 addition on fluoride removal. Column tests comparing pure NaF solutions, synthetic SPL solutions, and actual SPL leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal diminishes. Column tests also show that pH control is important for optimizing fluoride removal with the mass removed increasing with decreasing pH. Barrier pH can be regulated by CO2 addition with the point of injection being critical for optimising the remediation performance. Experimental and model results show that approximately 99% of 2300 mg/L fluoride can be removed when CO2 is injected directly into the barrier. This can be compared to approximately 30-50% removal when the influent solution is equilibrated with atmospheric CO2 before contact with calcite.

  5. Ammonium polyuranate precipitation from fluoride solutions : an experimental study of the UO{sub 3}-HF-NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O system as applied in UF{sub 6} processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, A.; Graczyk, D.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-09-01

    In the ammonium diuranate (ADU) process, UF{sub 6} is reacted with water, and the acidic solution of uranyl fluoride is treated with aqueous ammonia to precipitate ammonium polyuranate for subsequent reduction to UO{sub 2} and production of fuel pellets for commercial nuclear reactors. Our experiments simulated adding aqueous ammonia to the reaction products of UF{sub 6} and water in typical ADU processes. Chemical and X-ray diffraction analysis of products from the experiments are consistent with postulated chemical equilibria in which solids with structures close to that of ammonium polyuranate are formed from co-precipitation of the NH{sub 4}{sup +}(aq) cation with (previously unreported) anions of the form UO{sub 2}F{sub 3-x}(OH){sub x}{sup -}(aq). More efficient separations of solid products were obtained at NH{sub 4}OH:UF{sub 6} ratios of 19 or greater, with x closer to the value of 3 for the hypothetical formation of pure ammonium polyuranate. Supplementary experiments in the current study and a previous study in our laboratory indicated that nominal uranium concentrations of 90 mg/l in the filtrate resulting from such separations could be reduced to microgram per liter levels by batch mixing a 1-to-2.5 aqueous diluate of the filtrate with the Diphonix{reg_sign} ion exchange resin. Our study further demonstrated that reaction of the purified NH{sub 4}OH-NH{sub 4}F diluate with aqueous Ca(OH){sub 2} at 80 to 90 C could produce essentially uranium-free CaF{sub 2} and an ammonia distillate, as useful waste-conversion end products from a modified ADU process.

  6. Multi-year measurements of field-scale metolachlor volatilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatilization is a critical pathway for herbicide loss from agricultural fields, and subsequent deposition downwind from the edge of the field. To better understand the volatilization process, field-scale turbulent volatilization fluxes of metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-metho...

  7. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-03-01

    The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching.

  8. Atomic layer deposition of magnesium fluoride via bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, John Jewell, April D.; Greer, Frank; Lee, Michael C.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2015-01-15

    A new process has been developed to deposit magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) thin films via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as optical coatings in the ultraviolet. MgF{sub 2} was deposited in a showerhead style ALD reactor using bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) as precursors at substrate temperatures from 100 to 250 °C. The use of HF was observed to result in improved morphology and reduced impurity content compared to other reported MgF{sub 2} ALD approaches that use metal fluoride precursors as the fluorine-containing chemistry. Characterization of these films has been performed using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for material deposited on silicon substrates. Films at all substrate temperatures were transparent at wavelengths down to 190 nm and the low deposition temperature combined with low surface roughness makes these coatings good candidates for a variety of optical applications in the far ultraviolet.

  9. Total fluoride intake and excretion in children up to 4 years of age living in fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas.

    PubMed

    Zohoori, F V; Buzalaf, M A R; Cardoso, C A B; Olympio, K P K; Levy, F M; Grizzo, L T; Mangueira, D F B; Sampaio, F C; Maguire, A

    2013-10-01

    Fractional fluoride retention is important during the early years of life when considering the risk of development of dental fluorosis. This study aimed to measure fractional fluoride retention in young children. The objectives were to investigate the relationships between fractional fluoride retention and total daily fluoride intake, age, and body mass index (BMI). Twenty-nine healthy children, up to 4 yr of age, participated; 14 lived in a fluoridated area (0.64 μg ml(-1) of fluoride in drinking water) and 15 lived in a non-fluoridated area (0.04 μg ml(-1) of fluoride in drinking water). The total daily fluoride intake of each child was calculated from the daily dietary fluoride intake and toothpaste ingestion (if fluoride toothpaste was used). Total daily fluoride excretion was measured by collecting voided urine and faeces over a 24-h period, and fractional fluoride retention was calculated by dividing the amount of fluoride retained in the body (total daily fluoride intake minus total daily fluoride excretion) by the total daily fluoride intake. Nine children were excluded from data analysis because of suspected invalid samples. Mean (range) fractional fluoride retention for the remaining 20 children was 0.61 (0.06-0.98). There were no statistically significant correlations between fractional fluoride retention and either age or BMI. However, fractional fluoride retention was correlated with total daily fluoride intake: fractional fluoride retention = 1 - exp (-C × total daily fluoride intake), where C = 28.75 (95% CI = 19.75-37.75). The wide variation in fluoride retention in young children could have important implications when recommendations for fluoride use are being considered. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Facile fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) nanodot arrays for organic ferroelectric memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Huajing; Yan, Qingfeng; Geng, Chong; Chan, Ngai Yui; Au, Kit; Yao, Jianjun; Ng, Sheung Mei; Leung, Chi Wah; Li, Qiang; Guo, Dong; Wa Chan, Helen Lai; Dai, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    Nano-patterned ferroelectric materials have attracted significant attention as the presence of two or more thermodynamically equivalent switchable polarization states can be employed in many applications such as non-volatile memory. In this work, a simple and effective approach for fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays is demonstrated. By using a soft polydimethylsiloxane mold, we successfully transferred the 2D array pattern from the initial monolayer of colloidal polystyrene nanospheres to the imprinted P(VDF-TrFE) films via nanoimprinting. The existence of a preferred orientation of the copolymer chain after nanoimprinting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Local polarization switching behavior was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy, and each nanodot showed well-formed hysteresis curve and butterfly loop with a coercive field of ˜62.5 MV/m. To illustrate the potential application of these ordered P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays, the writing and reading process as non-volatile memory was demonstrated at a relatively low voltage. As such, our results offer a facile and promising route to produce arrays of ferroelectric polymer nanodots with improved piezoelectric functionality.

  11. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Bertin, P.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; Roche, J.; Camacho, C. Muñoz; LeBaron, N.

    2009-03-01

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF2) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF2 crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF2 samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from 60Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice—radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again—for each of these four PbF2 samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  12. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; LeBaron, N.; Bertin, P.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Roche, J.

    2009-03-10

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF{sub 2}) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF{sub 2} crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF{sub 2} samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from {sup 60}Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice - radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again - for each of these four PbF{sub 2} samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  13. Assessment of processes controlling the regional distribution of fluoride and arsenic in groundwater of the Pampeano Aquifer in the Del Azul Creek basin (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabala, M. E.; Manzano, M.; Vives, L.

    2016-10-01

    Groundwater in the upper 50 m of the Pampeano Aquifer in the Del Azul Creek basin (Argentina) has F and As contents above the WHO safe drinking levels. This basin is situated to the SE of the Chaco-Pampean plain, in Buenos Aires Province. The Pampeano Aquifer is a major water source for all uses. The aim of the study is to assess the primary processes controlling the regional distribution of F and As in the most exploited part of the aquifer. The study involved sampling for chemical and isotopic analyses, interpretation of data with different methods (diagrams, bivariate analyses, mineral saturation states, Principal Component Analysis) and deduction of leading processes. Information about aquifer mineralogy and hydrogeochemical processes involved in F and As solubilization in the aquifer has been taken from previous works of the same and other authors. Groundwater salinity increases to the NE, in the direction of the regional groundwater flow. Chemical types evolve from Ca/Mg-HCO3 in the upper part of the basin, to Na-HCO3 in the middle part and to Na-ClSO4 and Na-Cl in the lower part. The regional distribution of F is controlled by hydrogeochemical processes. The distribution of As is controlled by two types of processes dominating in different areas: hydrogeochemical controls prevail in the low to moderately mineralized groundwater of the middle and lower parts of the basin; hydrogeological controls lead to the NE of the lower basin and beyond it. In the last zone there are abundant lagoons and seasonal flooding is frequent, making evapoconcentration an important process for groundwater mineralization. The main hydrogeochemical processes involved in both F and As distribution are cation exchange, with Na release and Ca uptake, carbonate dissolution and pH increase. Arsenic release induced by redox processes may play to the NE, but its results would be masked by the effect of evaporation.

  14. Water fluoridation, osteoporosis, fractures--recent developments.

    PubMed

    Demos, L L; Kazda, H; Cicuttini, F M; Sinclair, M I; Fairley, C K

    2001-06-01

    Optimal (1ppm) water fluoridation is seen as the most socially equitable way to prevent dental caries, however concerns about the safety of fluoridation are periodically raised. Research on effects on bone published since the 1991 National Health and Medical Research Council report on water fluoridation was reviewed. Thirty-three studies were identified. Adverse effects in animal feeding studies were only seen at doses much greater than those currently used in artificial water fluoridation. The majority of animal studies showed no effect or a beneficial effect of low fluoride doses. The results of ecological studies were conflicting. One of the two cohort studies showed an increase in fracture incidence at fluoride levels four times greater than optimal water fluoridation and the other showed no effect after 20 years' optimal fluoridation. The cross-sectional studies showed a favourable effect on bone mineral density. The clinical trials predominantly showed increased bone density in several sites associated with fluoride treatment of 9-22.6mg fluoride per day for one-four years. These studies provide a substantial body of evidence that fluoride at up to 1ppm does not have an adverse effect on bone strength, bone mineral density or fracture incidence.

  15. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    PubMed

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Water fluoridation in Canada: past and present.

    PubMed

    Rabb-Waytowich, Danielle

    2009-07-01

    Water fluoridation remains a contentious issue in Canada and many communities choose not to fluoridate their water supply. As of 2007, 45.1% of the Canadian population had access to fluoridated water supplies. The main arguments for and against fluoridation have changed very little over the years, with supporters (including the World Health Organization and Health Canada) citing evidence that shows fluoridation as a safe and effective method of caries prevention, while detractors cite high costs and potential health risks. This article provides an historical overview and a current snapshot of water fluoridation in Canada. It concludes that the ultimate advantage of fluoridation is that it helps everyone in a community, regardless of socioeconomic status.

  17. Chlorine and fluorine partition coefficients and abundances in sub-arc mantle xenoliths (Kamchatka, Russia): Implications for melt generation and volatile recycling processes in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénard, A.; Koga, K. T.; Shimizu, N.; Kendrick, M. A.; Ionov, D. A.; Nebel, O.; Arculus, R. J.

    2017-02-01

    We report chlorine (Cl) and fluorine (F) abundances in minerals, interstitial glasses, and melt inclusions in 12 andesite-hosted, spinel harzburgite xenoliths and crosscutting pyroxenite veins exhumed from the sub-arc lithospheric mantle beneath Avacha volcano in the Kamchatka Arc (NE Russia). The data are used to calculate equilibrium mineral-melt partition coefficients (D mineral / melt) for Cl and F relevant to subduction-zone processes and unravel the history of volatile depletion and enrichment mechanisms in an arc setting. Chlorine is ∼100 times more incompatible in pyroxenes (DClmineral/melt = 0.005-0.008 [±0.002-0.003]) than F (DFmineral/melt = 0.50-0.57 [±0.21-0.24]), which indicates that partial melting of mantle sources leads to strong depletions in Cl relative to F in the residues. The data set in this study suggests a strong control of melt composition on DCl,Fpyroxene/melt, in particular H2O contents and Al/(Al + Si), which is in line with recent experiments. Fluorine is compatible in Ca-amphibole in the 'wet' sub-arc mantle (DFamphibole/melt = 3.5-3.7 [±1.5]) but not Cl (DClamphibole/melt = 0.03-0.05 [±0.01-0.03]), indicating that amphibole may fractionate F from Cl in the mantle wedge. The inter-mineral partition coefficients for Cl and F in this study are consistent amongst different harzburgite samples, whether they contain glass or not. In particular, disseminated amphibole hosts much of the Cl and F bulk rock budgets of spinel harzburgites (DClamphibole/pyroxene up to 14 and DFamphibole/pyroxene up to 40). Chlorine and fluorine are variably enriched (up to 1500 ppm Cl and 750 ppm F) in the parental arc picrite and boninite melts of primitive pyroxenite veins (and related melt inclusions) crosscutting spinel harzburgites.

  18. Contents of fluorides in vegetables from areas contaminated by industrial emissions: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Machoy, Z.; Samujlo, D.

    1981-01-01

    In vegetables grown in 1978 and 1979 near a chemical plant where phosphorites and apatites are processed, according to preliminary data, fluoride was significantly elevated in roots of carrots and parsley and in the leaves of parsley.

  19. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  20. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  1. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (<0.5 mg/L) is beneficial in promoting dental health by reducing dental caries, whereas higher concentrations (>1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects.

  2. Determining the optimal fluoride concentration in drinking water for fluoride endemic regions in South India.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopalan; Jaswanth, A; Gopalakrishnan, S; Siva Ilango, S; Aditya, G

    2009-10-01

    Fluoride ion in drinking water is known for both beneficial and detrimental effects on health. The prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the intake of large quantities of fluoride through drinking water owing to more than 90% bioavailability. The objective of this study is to predict optimal fluoride level in drinking water for fluoride endemic regions by comprising the levels of fluoride and other water quality parameters in drinking water, prevalence of fluorosis, fluoride intake through water, food and beverages such as tea and coffee and also considering the progressive accumulation of fluoride in animal bones, by comparing with non fluoride endemic areas comprise of the same geological features with the aid of regression analysis. Result of this study shows that increase of fluoride level above 1.33 mg/l in drinking water increases the community fluorosis index (CFI) value more than 0.6, an optimum index value above which fluorosis is considered to be a public health problem. Regression plot between water fluoride and bone fluoride levels indicates that, every increase of 0.5mg/l unit of water fluoride level increases the bone fluoride level of 52 mg/kg unit within 2 to 3 years. Furthermore, the consumption of drinking water containing more than 0.65 mg/l of fluoride can raise the total fluoride intake per day more than 4 mg, which is the optimum fluoride dose level recommended for adults by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. From the result, the people in fluoride endemic areas in South India are advised to consume drinking water with fluoride level within the limit of 0.5 to 0.65 mg/l to avoid further fluorosis risk.

  3. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  4. Topical fluoride for caries prevention: executive summary of the updated clinical recommendations and supporting systematic review.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Robert J; Tracy, Sharon L; Anselmo, Theresa Tracy; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D; Donly, Kevin J; Frese, William A; Hujoel, Philippe P; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M

    2013-11-01

    A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents--including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes--with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.05 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from "in favor" to "expert opinion for." As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences.

  5. Fissure seal or fluoride varnish?

    PubMed

    Deery, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry PlatformStudy selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least 12 months follow-up, in which fissure sealants, or fissure sealants together with fluoride varnishes, were compared with fluoride varnishes alone for preventing caries in occlusal surfaces of permanent teeth of children and adolescents.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. Studies were grouped and analysed on the basis of sealant material type (resin-based sealant and glass ionomer-based sealant, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer) and different follow-up periods. Odds ratio were calculated for caries or no caries on occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth. Mean differences were calculated for continuous outcomes and data. Evidence quality was assessed using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methods.ResultsEight RCTs involving a total of 1747 children aged five to ten years of age were included. Three trials compared resin-based fissure sealant versus fluoride varnish. Results from two studies (358 children) after two years were combined. Sealants prevented more caries, pooled odds ratio (OR) = 0.69 (95%CI; 0.50 to 0.94). One trial with follow-up at four and nine years found that the caries-preventive benefit for sealants was maintained, with 26% of sealed teeth and 55.8% of varnished teeth having developed caries at nine years. Evidence for glass-ionomer sealants was of low quality. One split-mouth trial analysing 92 children at two-year follow-up found a significant difference in favour of resin-based fissure sealant together with fluoride varnish compared with fluoride varnish only (OR

  6. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Ella A; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H

    2016-01-05

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity.

  7. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, Ella A.; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity. PMID:26727989

  8. Global affordability of fluoride toothpaste

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ann S; Yee, Robert; Holmgren, Christopher J; Benzian, Habib

    2008-01-01

    Objective Dental caries remains the most common disease worldwide and the use of fluoride toothpaste is a most effective preventive public health measure to prevent it. Changes in diets following globalization contribute to the development of dental caries in emerging economies. The aim of this paper is to compare the cost and relative affordability of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries. The hypothesis is that fluoride toothpaste is not equally affordable in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Methods Data on consumer prices of fluoride toothpastes were obtained from a self-completion questionnaire from 48 countries. The cost of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries was compared and related to annual household expenditure as well as to days of work needed to purchase the average annual usage of toothpaste per head. Results The general trend seems to be that the proportion of household expenditure required to purchase the annual dosage of toothpaste increases as the country's per capita household expenditure decreases. While in the UK for the poorest 30% of the population only 0.037 days of household expenditure is needed to purchase the annual average dosage (182.5 g) of the lowest cost toothpaste, 10.75 days are needed in Kenya. The proportion of annual household expenditure ranged from 0.02% in the UK to 4% in Zambia to buy the annual average amount of lowest cost toothpaste per head. Conclusion Significant inequalities in the affordability of this essential preventive care product indicate the necessity for action to make it more affordable. Various measures to improve affordability based on experiences from essential pharmaceuticals are proposed. PMID:18554382

  9. Fluoride and bacterial content of bottled water vs tap water.

    PubMed

    Lalumandier, J A; Ayers, L W

    2000-03-01

    Bottled water has become a status symbol and is frequently used in place of tap water. While both waters are considered safe to drink, is either more beneficial in preventing tooth decay and is there a difference in purity? To determine the fluoride level and bacterial content of commercially bottled waters municipal tap water and to compare the results. Comparative study. Cleveland, Ohio. Fifty-seven samples of 5 categories of bottled waters were purchased from local stores. Samples of tap water were collected in sterile containers from the 4 local water processing plants. Fluoride levels were determined by an ion-selective electrode method. Water was cultured quantitatively and levels of bacteria were calculated as colony-forming units (CFUs) per milliliter. Fluoride levels and bacterial counts. Fluoride levels within the range recommended for drinking water by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, 0.80 to 1.30 mg/L, were found in only 3 samples of bottled water tested. The fluoride levels of tap water samples were within 0.04 mg/L of the optimal fluoride level of 1.00 mg/L. The bacterial counts in the bottled water samples ranged from less than 0.01 CFU/mL to 4900 CFUs/mL, including 6 samples with levels substantially above 1000 CFUs/mL. In contrast, bacterial counts in samples of tap water ranged from 0.2 to 2.7 CFUs/mL. Five percent of the bottled water purchased in Cleveland fell within the required fluoride range recommended by the state, compared with 100% of the tap water samples, all of which were also within 0.04 mg/L of the optimal fluoride level of 1.00 mg/L. Use of bottled water based on the assumption of purity can be misguided. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, published a final ruling that requires community water systems to regularly report to the public on the quality of local tap water; there are no similar proposals to determine the quality of bottled water through labeling.

  10. Treatment of fluoride containing drinking water by electrocoagulation using monopolar and bipolar electrode connections.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, D; Medhi, C R; Purkait, M K

    2008-11-01

    Electrocoagulation was investigated for the effective removal of fluoride from drinking water. Different initial concentrations (2-10 mg L(-1)) of fluoride were considered for the experiment. Two different electrode connections (monopolar and bipolar) were examined for choosing the better alternative in order to intensify the performance of the process. It was observed that the removal of fluoride was better for bipolar connection than for monopolar connection. The final recommendable limit of fluoride (1 mg L(-1)) was obtained in 30 min at 625 Am(-2) using bipolar connection. The corrosion of electrodes as well as the sludge formed during the process was estimated for the bipolar connection. Thickness of film generated on the electrode surfaces in bipolar connection was also estimated at different current densities as well as for different initial fluoride concentrations. By-products obtained from the electrocoagulation bath were analyzed using SEM, EDAX, FTIR and XRD and explained. Comparative cost estimation for both electrode connections was adopted and presented as well. Total operating costs for monopolar and bipolar connections were 0.38 and 0.62 US$ m(-3), respectively, for the initial fluoride concentration of 10 mg L(-1). These findings might be useful in order to treat the fluoride contaminated water for drinking.

  11. Food price volatility

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C. L.; Morgan, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The high food prices experienced over recent years have led to the widespread view that food price volatility has increased. However, volatility has generally been lower over the two most recent decades than previously. Variability over the most recent period has been high but, with the important exception of rice, not out of line with historical experience. There is weak evidence that grains price volatility more generally may be increasing but it is too early to say. PMID:20713400

  12. Volatilization of ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Volatilization fluxes of seven ketones were measured over a range of temperatures. Gas-film coefficients were calculated from these volatilization fluxes and related to the gas-film coefficient for the evaporation of water. These relations, when combined with an equation for estimating the gas-film coefficient for evaporation of water from a canal, permit estimating gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of ketones from streams and rivers.

  13. Sol gel-fluorination synthesis of amorphous magnesium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Groß, Udo; Rüdiger, Stephan; Kemnitz, Erhard; Winfield, John M.

    2006-03-01

    The sol-gel fluorination process is discussed for the reaction of magnesium alkoxides with HF in non-aqueous solvents to give X-ray amorphous nano-sized magnesium fluoride with high surface areas in the range of 150-350 m 2/g (HS-MgF 2). The H2 type hysteresis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption BET-isotherms is indicative for mesoporous solids. A highly distorted structure causes quite high Lewis acidity, shown by NH 3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH 3-TPD) and catalytic test reactions. XPS data of amorphous and conventionally crystalline MgF 2 are compared, both show octahedral coordination at the metal site. Thermal analysis, F-MAS NMR- and IR-spectroscopy give information on composition and structure of the precursor intermediate as well as of the final metal fluoride. The preparation of complex fluorides, M +MgF 3-, by the sol-gel route is reported. From the magnesium fluoride gel of the above process thin films for optical application are obtained by, e.g., spin coating.

  14. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used... fluoride resins consist of basic resins produced by the polymerization of vinylidene fluoride. (b)...

  15. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2006-04-15

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900{sup o}C to 1000{sup o}C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 degrees C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H{sub 2O generated from the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by H-2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50% reduction of the iron oxide.

  16. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  17. Iodine volatility. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this program is to couple experimental aqueous iodine volatilities to a fission product release model. Iodine partition coefficients, for inorganic iodine, have been measured during hydrolysis and radiolysis. The hydrolysis experiments have illustrated the importance of reaction time on iodine volatility. However, radiolysis effects can override hydrolysis in determining iodine volatility. In addition, silver metal in radiolysis samples can react to form silver iodide accompanied by a decrease in iodine volatility. Experimental data are now being coupled to an iodine transport and release model that was developed in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  18. Fluoride Does Not Inhibit Enamel Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tye, C.E.; Antone, J.V.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorosed enamel can be porous, mottled, discolored, hypomineralized, and protein-rich if the enamel matrix is not completely removed. Proteolytic processing by matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) and kallikrein-4 (KLK4) is critical for enamel formation, and homozygous mutation of either protease results in hypomineralized, protein-rich enamel. Herein, we demonstrate that the lysosomal proteinase cathepsin K is expressed in the enamel organ in a developmentally defined manner that suggests a role for cathepsin K in degrading re-absorbed enamel matrix proteins. We therefore asked if fluoride directly inhibits the activity of MMP20, KLK4, dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) (an in vitro activator of KLK4), or cathepsin K. Enzyme kinetics were studied with quenched fluorescent peptides with purified enzyme in the presence of 0–10 mM NaF, and data were fit to Michaelis-Menten curves. Increasing concentrations of known inhibitors showed decreases in enzyme activity. However, concentrations of up to 10 mM NaF had no effect on KLK4, MMP20, DPPI, or cathepsin K activity. Our results show that fluoride does not directly inhibit enamel proteolytic activity. PMID:21118795

  19. Fluoride Varnishes--Is There a Correlation Between Fluoride Release and Deposition on Enamel?

    PubMed

    Bolis, Carlo; Härtli, Gian Peider; Lendenmann, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride uptake of enamel after application of fluoride varnishes was compared with fluoride release into artificial saliva. The hypothesis was that fluoride uptake is higher for products exhibiting faster fluoride release. Fluoride varnishes, i.e. Fluor Protector S, Duraphat, MI Varnish, Clinpro White Varnish, Profluorid Varnish and Enamel Pro Varnish were applied on bovine enamel specimens. Subsequently, specimens were incubated in artificial saliva. After removal of the varnishes, surface bound fluoride was extracted with potassium hydroxide and measured with an ion-selective electrode. Structurally bound fluoride was etched from the same specimens with perchloric acid. Fluoride release of varnish films into artificial saliva was measured for comparison. After 4 h in artificial saliva, the highest total enamel fluoride uptake of 47.9 μg F·cm-² was found with Fluor Protector S, followed by Enamel Pro Varnish with 22.1 μg F·cm-². The other products ranged between 12-16 μg F·cm-². This was several times higher than the negative control. Fluoride uptake did not correlate with release into artificial saliva. During the first 4 h, Duraphat released the lowest and MI Varnish the highest amount of fluoride with 7.7 and 249 μg F·cm-², respectively. The fluoride uptake of these two products was not statistically different. Enamel fluoride uptake cannot be predicted from the fluoride release rate of a product. Hence, based on the results of this study, fluoride release into artificial saliva is no measure for the efficacy of a fluoride varnish.

  20. Deposition of fluoride on enamel surfaces released from varnishes is limited to vicinity of fluoridation site.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Lennon, A M; Yakin, M; Becker, K; Buchalla, W; Attin, R; Wiegand, A

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the in-situ study was to determine fluoride uptake in non-fluoridated, demineralized enamel after application of fluoride varnishes on enamel samples located at various distances from the non-fluoridated samples. All enamel samples used were demineralized with acidic hydroxyethylcellulose before the experiment. Intra-oral appliances were worn by ten volunteers in three series: (1, Mirafluorid, 0.15% F; 2, Duraphat, 2.3% F and 3, unfluoridated controls) of 6 days each. Each two enamel samples were prepared from 30 bovine incisors. One sample was used for the determination of baseline fluoride content (BFC); the other was treated according to the respective series and fixed in the intra-oral appliance for 6 days. Additionally, from 120 incisors, each four enamel samples were prepared (one for BFC). Three samples (a-c) were placed into each appliance at different sites: (a) directly neighboured to the fluoridated specimen (=next), (b) at 1-cm distance (=1 cm) and (c) in the opposite buccal aspect of the appliance (=opposite). At these sites, new unfluoridated samples were placed at days 1, 3 and 5, which were left in place for 1 day. The volunteers brushed their teeth and the samples with fluoridated toothpaste twice per day. Both the KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride were determined in all samples to determine fluoride uptake and were statistically analyzed. One day, after fluoridation with Duraphat, KOH-soluble fluoride uptake in specimen a (=next) was significantly higher compared to the corresponding samples of both the control and Mirafluorid series, which in turn were not significantly different from each other. At all other sites and time points, fluoride uptake in the enamel samples were not different from controls for both fluoride varnishes. Within the first day after application, intra-oral-fluoride release from the tested fluoride varnish Duraphat leads to KOH-soluble fluoride uptake only in enamel samples located in close vicinity to

  1. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  2. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions.

  3. Fluoride concentration of bottled water, tap water, and fluoridated salt from two communities in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mier, E Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Buckley, Christine M; Zero, Domenick T; Margineda, Jorge

    2005-04-01

    To determine fluoride levels in bottled water, tap water, and fluoridated salt from two communities in Mexico. Stratified random collection of water and salt samples from Mexico City and Veracruz, Mexico for fluoride analysis. Samples were analysed using a combination fluoride ion-specific electrode. Results were compared using Student's t-test and mixed-model ANOVA. Water fluoride values were compared by type, community and collection area; salt fluoride values were compared by community and collection area. 197 tap water samples, 133 bottled water samples and 20 fluoridated salt samples were collected. The mean (+/- SD) fluoride content for all tap water was 0.20 +/- 0.17 microg F/g (ranging from 0.01 to 0.88 microg F/g) and 0.24 +/- 0.24 microg F/g for all bottled water (ranging from 0.01 to 2.80 microg F/g). This difference was not statistically significant. When results were analysed by city, the difference between tap water samples was statistically significant. Ten bottled water samples contained more than negligible fluoride (ranging from 0.7-2.8 microg F/g). Mean salt fluoride content was 230.0 +/- 49.8 microg F/g, which was within governmental regulation levels. Some water samples had amounts of fluoride exceeding the maximum recommended levels. Salt fluoride levels were within regulation limits. Monitoring of fluoride content of both bottled and tap water is strongly advised.

  4. The effects of fluoride on cell migration, cell proliferation, and cell metabolism in GH4C1 pituitary tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Schulz, A; Solano-Agama, C; Arreola-Mendoza, L; Reyes-Márquez, B; Barbier, O; Del Razo, L M; Mendoza-Garrido, M E

    2009-10-28

    The consumption of drinking water rich in fluoride has toxic effects on the central nervous system. In cell biology research, fluoride is currently used as a phosphatase inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride on different physiological processes in GH4C1 pituitary tumour cells. We used a range of different fluoride concentrations, from levels below normal human serum concentrations (0.23 and 1.2 micromol/L) to those observed in chronically exposed persons (10.7 micromol/L) and above (107 and 1072 micromol/L). Treatment of 10.7 micromol/L fluoride resulted in a discrete induction of DNA synthesis, without a change in cell number. Cell migration, a behaviour stimulated by growth factors, was increased in cells treated with 2.4 micromol/L. At this fluoride concentration, changes in phosphorylation status of both cytoskeletal and cytosolic protein fractions, as well as in actin cytoskeletal arrangements were observed. The GH4C1 fluoride treated cells had significantly less cellular protein than control cells, suggesting an effect of fluoride on hormone secretion and protein synthesis in this endocrine cell. The bioreduction of MTT was significantly increased with a wide range of fluoride concentrations. With the highest fluoride concentration, 1072 micromol/L, all of the analysed parameters were significantly reduced, suggesting that this dose is highly toxic in GH4C1 cells. Our results show that biologically relevant concentrations of fluoride are capable of increasing cell migration in tumour cells, suggesting that exposure to fluoride could stimulate tumour invasion.

  5. Surface and interfacial effect of filler particle on electrical properties of polyvinyledene fluoride/nickel composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Maheswar; Srinivas, V.; Thakur, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    The effect of processing conditions and filler particle size/surface area on the dielectric behavior of polyvinyledene fluoride/nickel composites is reported. Large enhancement of low frequency dielectric constant with reduction in metal particle size in a metal-polymer composite is observed. Enhancement in the dielectric constant has been attributed to increase in interfacial area and consequent interfacial polarization with reduction in metal particle size. The increased interparticle contacts from the nearest neighbors result in enhanced tunneling probability leading to lowering of percolation threshold for nanosized nickel/polyvinyledene fluoride composites as compared to micron nickel/polyvinyledene fluoride composites.

  6. [Geographical distribution of fluoride in the public water supply in the province of Tucumán, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Durán, Raúl Alberto; Durán, Estela Liliana; Ojeda, Graciela de Jesús; Castellanos, Walter Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    This work studied the geographical distribution of fluoride content in the public water supply in the province of Tucumán, Argentina. A total of 1,210 samples were collected in 190 localities of the 17 departments of the province during the 2008-2012 period. The analytical determination was performed using the SPADNS method and QGis 2.16 was used for processing the information. The fluoride content requirements in the studied localities were determined according to the Argentine Food Code. The results showed that 94% of population studied consumed water with fluoride concentrations below the recommended limits, 5% were exposed to fluoride concentrations above the required maximum limit and 1% consumed water at optimal fluoride concentrations. The maps showed a heterogeneous geographical distribution of fluorides, in which areas with deficit, excess and recommended values of fluorides can be differentiated; in some departments an inverse relationship between the density of the hydrological network and fluoride concentration can be observed. In the capital of the province, the average value found was 0.32 mg/l, presenting a homogeneous geographical distribution. The information obtained is indispensable for the proper management of fluoride, so as to improve public health through policy.

  7. Optimizing School-Based Health-Promotion Programmes: Lessons from a Qualitative Study of Fluoridated Milk Schemes in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Geraldine R. K.; Tickle, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective: Some districts in the United Kingdom (UK), where the level of child dental caries is high and water fluoridation has not been possible, implement school-based fluoridated milk (FM) schemes. However, process variables, such as consent to drink FM and loss of children as they mature, impede the effectiveness of these…

  8. Optimizing School-Based Health-Promotion Programmes: Lessons from a Qualitative Study of Fluoridated Milk Schemes in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Geraldine R. K.; Tickle, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective: Some districts in the United Kingdom (UK), where the level of child dental caries is high and water fluoridation has not been possible, implement school-based fluoridated milk (FM) schemes. However, process variables, such as consent to drink FM and loss of children as they mature, impede the effectiveness of these…

  9. 76 FR 37129 - Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F-18) Injection, 10 to 200 Millicuries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F... Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (sodium fluoride F-18) injection, 10... FLUORIDE F 18 injection, 10 to 200 mCi/mL, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR...

  10. Salivary Fluoride Levels after Use of High-Fluoride Dentifrice

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min−1) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P < 0.01). Even after 120 min, salivary F concentration was still higher than the baseline values for both dentifrices (P < 0.001). High-F dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk. PMID:25821849

  11. Salivary fluoride levels after use of high-fluoride dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min(-1)) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P < 0.01). Even after 120 min, salivary F concentration was still higher than the baseline values for both dentifrices (P < 0.001). High-F dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk.

  12. The age of lunar south circumpolar craters Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini, and Shackleton: Implications for regional geology, surface processes, and volatile sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tye, A. R.; Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Mazarico, E.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-07-01

    The interiors of the lunar south circumpolar craters Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini, and Shackleton contain permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) and have been interpreted to contain sequestered volatiles including water ice. Altimetry data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a new means of examining the permanently shadowed interiors of these craters in unprecedented detail. In this study, we used extremely high-resolution gridded LOLA data of Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini, and Shackleton to determine the size-frequency distributions and the spatial density of craters superposing their rims, inner slopes, and floors. Based on their population of superposed D ⩾ 2 km craters, Haworth, Shoemaker, and Faustini have pre-Nectarian formation ages. Shackleton is interpreted as having a Late Imbrian age on the basis of craters with diameter D ⩾ 0.5 km superposed on its rim. The local density of craters with sub-km diameters across our study area is strongly dependent on slope; because of its steep interior slopes, the lifetime of craters on the interior of Shackleton is limited. The slope-dependence of the small crater population implies that the population in this size range is controlled primarily by the rate at which craters are destroyed. This is consistent with the hypothesis that crater removal and resurfacing is a result of slope-dependent processes such as diffusive mass wasting and seismic shaking, linked to micrometeorite and meteorite bombardment. Epithermal neutron flux data and UV albedo data show that these circumpolar PSRs, particularly Shoemaker, may have ∼1-2% water ice by mass in their highly porous surface regolith, and that Shoemaker may have ∼5% or more water ice by mass in the near subsurface. The ancient formation ages of Shoemaker, Faustini and Haworth, and the Late Imbrian (∼3.5 Ga) crater retention ages of their floors suggests that any water ice that might have been deposited in

  13. The Age of Lunar South Circumpolar Craters Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini, and Shackleton: Implications for Regional Geology, Surface Processes, and Volatile Sequestration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tye, A. R.; Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Mazarico, E.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    The interiors of the lunar south circumpolar craters Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini, and Shackleton contain permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) and have been interpreted to contain sequestered volatiles including water ice. Altimetry data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a new means of examining the permanently shadowed interiors of these craters in unprecedented detail. In this study, we used extremely high-resolution gridded LOLA data of Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini, and Shackleton to determine the size-frequency distributions and the spatial density of craters superposing their rims, inner slopes, and floors. Based on their population of superposed D greater than or equal to 2 km craters, Haworth, Shoemaker, and Faustini have pre-Nectarian formation ages. Shackleton is interpreted as having a Late Imbrian age on the basis of craters with diameter D greater than or equal to 0.5 km superposed on its rim. The local density of craters with sub-km diameters across our study area is strongly dependent on slope; because of its steep interior slopes, the lifetime of craters on the interior of Shackleton is limited. The slope-dependence of the small crater population implies that the population in this size range is controlled primarily by the rate at which craters are destroyed. This is consistent with the hypothesis that crater removal and resurfacing is a result of slopedependent processes such as diffusive mass wasting and seismic shaking, linked to micrometeorite and meteorite bombardment. Epithermal neutron flux data and UV albedo data show that these circumpolar PSRs, particularly Shoemaker, may have approximately 1-2% water ice by mass in their highly porous surface regolith, and that Shoemaker may have approximately 5% or more water ice by mass in the near subsurface. The ancient formation ages of Shoemaker, Faustini and Haworth, and the Late Imbrian (approximately 3.5 Ga) crater retention ages of their

  14. Fluoride intake from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by young children in Kuwait: a non-fluoridated community.

    PubMed

    Akpata, Enosakhare S; Behbehani, Jawad; Akbar, Jaber; Thalib, Lukman; Mojiminiyi, Olusegun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the pattern of fluid consumption, fluoride intake from the fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by children aged 1-9 years in Kuwait, a nonfluoridated community. Using the cluster sampling technique, children aged 1-9 years were chosen from 2000 randomly selected households in Kuwait. Questionnaires were then administered to their mothers to determine the children's daily fluid intake. Fluoride concentrations in tap water as well as all brands of bottled water and beverages consumed by the children were measured, using the fluoride ion-specific electrode. Fluoride excretion was determined in 400 randomly selected children, based on fluoride/creatinine ratio. The mean daily fluid consumption by the children was high, being 1115-1545 ml. About 40% of the fluid intake was plain (tap and bottled) water and approximately 10% of the children drank bottled water exclusively. Fluoride concentration in tap water was low (0.04±SD 0.02 ppm), but was higher in bottled water (0.28±SD 0.40 ppm). Mean daily fluoride ingestion from fluids was 0.013-0.018 mg/kg body weight (bw). Even after allowing for fluoride ingestion from other sources, mean daily fluoride ingestion was still below 0.1 mg/kg bw set by the United States of America Institute of Medicine as the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level for moderate enamel fluorosis in children aged up to 8 years. Furthermore, the mean daily urinary fluoride excretion of 128-220 μg was below the provisional standard of 360-480 μg for optimal fluoride usage by children aged 3-5 years. Fluoride ingestion from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by the children were below the recommendations for optimal fluoride usage. Thus, there is room for an upward adjustment of fluoride level in public drinking water supplies in Kuwait, as a caries preventive measure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Lithological Influences on Occurrence of High-Fluoride Waters in The Central Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaka, L. A.; Musolff, A.; Mulch, A.; Olago, D.; Odada, E. O.

    2013-12-01

    Within the East African rift, groundwater recharge results from the complex interplay of geology, land cover, geomorphology, climate and on going volcano-tectonic processes across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The interrelationships between these factors create complex patterns of water availability, reliability and quality. The hydrochemical evolution of the waters is further complex due to the different climatic regimes and geothermal processes going on in this area. High fluoridic waters within the rift have been reported by few studies, while dental fluorosis is high among the inhabitants of the rift. The natural sources of fluoride in waters can be from weathering of fluorine bearing minerals in rocks, volcanic or fumarolic activities. Fluoride concentration in water depends on a number of factors including pH, temperature, time of water-rock formation contact and geochemical processes. Knowledge of the sources and dispersion of fluoride in both surface and groundwaters within the central Kenya rift and seasonal variations between wet and dry seasons is still poor. The Central Kenya rift is marked by active tectonics, volcanic activity and fumarolic activity, the rocks are majorly volcanics: rhyolites, tuffs, basalts, phonolites, ashes and agglomerates some are highly fractured. Major NW-SE faults bound the rift escarpment while the rift floor is marked by N-S striking faults We combine petrographic, hydrochemistry and structural information to determine the sources and enrichment pathways of high fluoridic waters within the Naivasha catchment. A total of 120 water samples for both the dry season (January-February2012) and after wet season (June-July 2013) from springs, rivers, lakes, hand dug wells, fumaroles and boreholes within the Naivasha catchment are collected and analysed for fluoride, physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes (δ2 H, δ18 O) in order to determine the origin and evolution of the waters. Additionally, 30 soil and

  16. An isotope hydrochemical approach to understand fluoride release into groundwaters of the Datong Basin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunli; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun; Zhu, Yapeng

    2015-04-01

    The hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations of high fluoride (up to 8.26 mg L(-1)) groundwater in the Datong Basin, Northern China were carried out in order to evaluate the geochemical controls on fluoride enrichment. The groundwater fluoride concentration tends to increase along with the regional groundwater flow path away from the basin margins, towards the central parts of the basin. Groundwater with high F concentrations has a distinctive major ion chemistry, being generally HCO3(-)-rich, Na-rich, Ca-poor, and having weak alkaline pH values (7.2 to 8.2) and Na-HCO3 waters. These data indicate that variations in the groundwater major ion chemistry and possibly pH, which are controlled by water-rock interaction processes in the aquifer, are important in mobilizing F. Positive correlations between fluoride with lithogenic sodium (LNa) and HCO3(-) in groundwater show that the high fluoride content and alkaline sodic characteristics of groundwater result from dissolution of fluorine-bearing minerals. The occurrence and behavior of fluorine in groundwater are mainly controlled by fluorite precipitation as a function of Ca(2+) concentration. A positive correlation between fluoride and δ(18)O, low F(-)/Cl(-) ratios, and the low tritium level in the fluoride-rich groundwater indicate the effects of long-term water-rock interactions and intensive evapotranspiration.

  17. Debating Water Fluoridation Before Dr. Strangelove.

    PubMed

    Carstairs, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    In the 1930s, scientists learned that small amounts of fluoride naturally occurring in water could protect teeth from decay, and the idea of artificially adding fluoride to public water supplies to achieve the same effect arose. In the 1940s and early 1950s, a number of studies were completed to determine whether fluoride could have harmful effects. The research suggested that the possibility of harm was small. In the early 1950s, Canadian and US medical, dental, and public health bodies all endorsed water fluoridation. I argue in this article that some early concerns about the toxicity of fluoride were put aside as evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of water fluoridation mounted and as the opposition was taken over by people with little standing in the scientific, medical, and dental communities. The sense of optimism that infused postwar science and the desire of dentists to have a magic bullet that could wipe out tooth decay also affected the scientific debate.

  18. Fluoride laser crystals: old and new

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenssen, Hans P.; Cassanho, Arlete

    2006-02-01

    The development of oxide and fluoride materials as gain materials of choice for solid state lasers ranges from early materials such as Calcium Fluoride and Calcium Tungstate crystals to the now ubiquitous Nd hosts YLF, YAG and Vanadate. Among Tunable laser materials, MgF II - an early favorite, gave way to superior oxides such as Alexandrite and Ti:Sapphire only to be followed by development of still newer tunable fluoride media, notably, fluoride colquiriites such as Cr-doped LiSAF and LiCaF. Newer fluoride crystals, such as Barium Yttrium Fluoride BaY II F 8 (BYF), KY 3F 10 (KYF) and the tunable Cr doped LiCaGaF 6 are attractive laser materials, but their growth has not been optimized. Key advantages of two of these new crystals are discussed. Crystal growth results for BYF and Cr:LiCaGaF 6 as well as some material characterization are presented.

  19. Aluminum fluoride interactions with troponin C.

    PubMed Central

    Phan, B C; Reisler, E

    1993-01-01

    The increasing interest in the metal ion aluminum fluoride and beryllium fluoride complexes as phosphate analogs in the myosin ATPase reaction and in muscle fiber studies prompted the examination of their interactions with the regulatory system of troponin and tropomyosin. In this work, the effects of these metal ion analogs on the spectral properties of the Ca(2+)-binding subunit of troponin, troponin C (TnC), were examined. In contrast to beryllium fluoride which did not change the spectral properties of TnC, aluminum fluoride binding induced an increase in both the alpha-helicity and the tyrosine fluorescence of TnC and exposed a hydrophobic region on this protein for fluorescent probe binding. Aluminum fluoride also reduced the Ca2+ and/or Mg(2+)-induced changes on TnC. These results indicate a direct interaction of aluminum fluoride with TnC and merit consideration in designing muscle fiber experiments with this phosphate analog. PMID:8312488

  20. Reversible Intercalation of Fluoride-Anion Receptor Complexes in Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Leifer, Nicole; Greenbaum, Steve; Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Blanco, Mario; Narayanan, S. R.

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated a route to reversibly intercalate fluoride-anion receptor complexes in graphite via a nonaqueous electrochemical process. This approach may find application for a rechargeable lithium-fluoride dual-ion intercalating battery with high specific energy. The cell chemistry presented here uses graphite cathodes with LiF dissolved in a nonaqueous solvent through the aid of anion receptors. Cells have been demonstrated with reversible cathode specific capacity of approximately 80 mAh/g at discharge plateaus of upward of 4.8 V, with graphite staging of the intercalant observed via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction during charging. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and B-11 nuclear magnetic resonance studies suggest that cointercalation of the anion receptor with the fluoride occurs during charging, which likely limits the cathode specific capacity. The anion receptor type dictates the extent of graphite fluorination, and must be further optimized to realize high theoretical fluorination levels. To find these optimal anion receptors, we have designed an ab initio calculations-based scheme aimed at identifying receptors with favorable fluoride binding and release properties.