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Sample records for fluorocarbon films deposited

  1. Selective Plasma Deposition of Fluorocarbon Films on SAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Mark M., III; Walsh, Kevin M.; Cohn, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    A dry plasma process has been demonstrated to be useful for the selective modification of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates. These SAMs are used, during the fabrication of semiconductor electronic devices, as etch masks on gold layers that are destined to be patterned and incorporated into the devices. The selective modification involves the formation of fluorocarbon films that render the SAMs more effective in protecting the masked areas of the gold against etching by a potassium iodide (KI) solution. This modification can be utilized, not only in the fabrication of single electronic devices but also in the fabrication of integrated circuits, microelectromechanical systems, and circuit boards. In the steps that precede the dry plasma process, a silicon mold in the desired pattern is fabricated by standard photolithographic techniques. A stamp is then made by casting polydimethylsiloxane (commonly known as silicone rubber) in the mold. The stamp is coated with an alkanethiol solution, then the stamp is pressed on the gold layer of a device to be fabricated in order to deposit the alkanethiol to form an alkanethiolate SAM in the desired pattern (see figure). Next, the workpiece is exposed to a radio-frequency plasma generated from a mixture of CF4 and H2 gases. After this plasma treatment, the SAM is found to be modified, while the exposed areas of gold remain unchanged. This dry plasma process offers the potential for forming masks superior to those formed in a prior wet etching process. Among the advantages over the wet etching process are greater selectivity, fewer pin holes in the masks, and less nonuniformity of the masks. The fluorocarbon films formed in this way may also be useful as intermediate layers for subsequent fabrication steps and as dielectric layers to be incorporated into finished products.

  2. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  3. Surface-Morphology-Induced Hydrophobicity of Fluorocarbon Films Grown by a Simultaneous Etching and Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J. S.; Lin, C. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Chin, T. S.

    2015-08-01

    Development of facile methods to prepare hydrophobic films is of great important. We report fluorocarbon films deposited by a simple plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method using C3F8 and C2H2 with extra Ar and/or O2 gases. The surface characteristics of the films were examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The hydrophobic and oleophobic properties of the films were evaluated by measurements of static contact angle. The results showed that the film deposited with C3F8, C2H2, Ar, and O2 exhibited a water contact angle of 114°, hexadecane contact angle of 45°, and transmittance of 94.5%. Photoelectron spectra further revealed that the films contained mainly CF and CF2 bonds and thus a high F/C ratio. Introduction of O2 increased the F/C ratio, which combined with the stripe-like surface of the films achieved better hydrophobicity.

  4. Fluorocarbon thin-film deposition on polymer surfaces from low-energy polyatomic ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesundara, Muthu Bandage Jayathilaka

    Low energy polyatomic ion deposition is attractive for selective surface modification of advanced materials. Surface modification by fluorocarbon (FC) thin film deposition is widely used for many technological applications. Thus, polymer surface modification by FC thin film deposition was carried out using mass-separated low energy FC ion beams. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and air/water contact angles were employed to examine how the FC film chemistry, morphology, and long term stability depend on incident ion structure, kinetic energy, and fluence. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to support experimental data. 25--100 eV CF3+ and C3F 5+ ion deposition on polystyrene (PS) surface was examined. CF3+ and C3F5+ each formed a distribution of different FC functional groups on PS in amounts dependent upon the incident ion energy, structure, and fluence. Both ions deposited mostly intact upon the surface at 25 eV. The total fluorine and fluorinated carbon content were increased with ion energy. The fluorination efficiency was higher for the larger ion. The simulations revealed that the fragmentation behavior depends on the incident ion structure and its energy. The simulations also confirmed that FC ions only penetrated a few angstroms into the surface. The compositional changes of 25--100 eV CF3+ and C3F5+ ion-modified PS surfaces were examined after being exposed to atmosphere for four and eight weeks. The FC films oxidized in atmospheric conditions. Oxygen incorporation into the ion-modified surfaces increased with ion energy due to higher surface bond breakage and active site formation at high collision energy. Overall, the aging process of these ion-deposited films appeared similar to that of plasma-deposited films. Mass-selected 50 eV C3F5+ ion deposition was employed to create chemical gradient thin films on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by variation of the ion fluence across the substrate surface. The surface chemistry

  5. The effects of changing deposition conditions on the similarity of sputter-deposited fluorocarbon thin films to bulk PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandona, Philip

    Solid lubrication of space-borne mechanical components is essential to their survival and the continued human exploration of space. Recent discoveries have shown that PTFE when blended with alumina nanofillers exhibits greatly improved physical performance properties, with wear rates being reduced by several orders of magnitude. The bulk processes used to produce the PTFE-alumina blends are limiting. Co-sputter deposition of PTFE and a filler material overcomes several of these limitations by enabling the reduction of particle size to the atomic level and also by allowing for the even coating of the solid lubricant on relatively large areas and components. The goal of this study was to establish a baseline performance of the sputtered PTFE films as compared to the bulk material, and to establish deposition conditions that would result in the most bulk-like film possible. In order to coax change in the structure of the sputtered films, sputtering power and deposition temperature were increased independently. Further, post-deposition annealing was applied to half of the deposited film in an attempt to affect change in the film structure. Complications in the characterization process due to increasing film thickness were also examined. Bulk-like metrics for characterization processes the included Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray spectroscopy (XPS), nanoindentation via atomic force microscopy, and contact angle of water on surface measurements were established. The results of the study revealed that increasing sputtering power and deposition temperature resulted in an increase in the similarity between the fluorocarbon films and the bulk PTFE, at a cost of affecting the potential of the film thicknesses, either by affecting the deposition process directly, or by decreasing the longevity of the sputtering targets.

  6. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon polymer films on titanium for preventing cell adhesion: a surface finishing for temporarily used orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, B.; Testrich, H.; Rebl, H.; Walschus, U.; Schlosser, M.; Zietz, C.; Staehlke, S.; Nebe, J. B.; Weltmann, K. D.; Meichsner, J.; Polak, M.

    2016-06-01

    The design of a titanium implant surface should ideally support its later application in clinical use. Temporarily used implants have to fulfil requirements different from permanent implants: they should ensure the mechanical stabilization of the bone stock but in trauma surgery they should not be integrated into the bone because they will be removed after fracture healing. Finishing of the implant surface by a plasma-fluorocarbon-polymer (PFP) coating is a possible approach for preventing cell adhesion of osteoblasts. Two different low pressure gas-discharge plasma processes, microwave (MW 2.45 GHz) and capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF 13.56 MHz) plasma, were applied for the deposition of the PFP film using a mixture of the precursor octafluoropropane (C3F8) and hydrogen (H2). The thin films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. Cell culture experiments show that cell adhesion and spreading of MG-63 osteoblasts were clearly reduced or nonexistent on these surfaces, also after 24 h of storage in the cell culture medium. In vivo data demonstrated that the local inflammatory tissue response for the PFP films deposited in MW and RF plasma were comparable to uncoated controls.

  7. Robust Ultralow-k Dielectric (Fluorocarbon) Deposition by Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yoshiyuki; Miyatani, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Kawamura, Kohei; Nemoto, Takenao; Nakamura, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Ito, Azumi; Shirotori, Akihide; Nozawa, Toshihisa; Matsuoka, Takaaki

    2012-05-01

    A robust fluorocarbon film was successfully deposited on a substrate at a temperature above 400 °C by the new microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MWPE-CVD) method using the linear C5F8 precursor instead of a conventional cyclic C5F8 one. The fluorocarbon performed keeping the dielectric constant low as a value of 2.25 by controlling the molecular structure forming cross-linked poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) chains with configurational carbon atoms. The novel fluorocarbon demonstrates less fluorine degassing at an elevated temperature, with high mechanical strength and without degradation of adhesion of the fluorocarbon film to SiCN and SiOx stacked films after thermal stress at 400 °C and 1 atm N2 for 1 h. Consequently, this robust fluorocarbon film is considered a promising candidate for general porous silicon materials with applications to practical integration processes as an interlayer dielectric.

  8. Adhesion of metals to spin-coated fluorocarbon polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Kil; Chang, Chin-An; Schrott, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion between metals and fluorocarbon polymer films has been studied for Cu, Cr, Ti, Al, and Au on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) films. Polymer films were applied on the Cr/SiO2 /Si substrate by spinning the aqueous dispersions of the polymer resin particles, followed by thermal curing. Strips of different metals were deposited on the polymers, and adhesion was measured at 90° peel test. The peel strengths were invariably higher for the metals on FEP than those of the corresponding metals on PTFE. Among the metals, Ti showed the highest peel strength for both polymers, followed by Cr and Al, with Cu and Au being the lowest. The peel strengths of Ti, Cr, and Cu on FEP are 85, 45, and 12 g/mm, respectively, and the corresponding ones on PTFE are 23, 5, and 2 g/mm, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis shows that the metal-polymer bonding involves the metal-carbon interactions. The strongest interaction is observed for Ti with the polymers, forming Ti carbidelike bonds. Cr also shows strong interaction with the two polymers, but to a lesser degree compared with Ti. Only a weak bonding is shown for Cu. The difference in peel strengths among the metals shows a correlation with the difference in electronegativities between the metals and carbon. Little contribution to the observed peel strengths is seen from the surface morphological analysis of the untreated polymers.

  9. Plasma polymerization and deposition of linear, cyclic and aromatic fluorocarbons on (100)-oriented single crystal silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G. H.; Oh, S. W.; Kang, E. T.; Neoh, K. G.

    2002-11-01

    Fluoropolymer films were deposited on the Ar plasma-pretreated Si(100) surfaces by plasma polymerization of perfluorohexane (PFH, a linear fluorocarbon), perfluoro(methylcyclohexane) (MCH, a cyclic fluorocarbon), and hexafluorobenzene (HFB, an aromatic fluorocarbon) under different glow discharge conditions. The effects of the radio-frequency plasma power on the chemical composition and structure of the plasma-polymerized fluoropolymer films were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and water contact angle measurements. The changes in structure and composition of the three types of the plasma-deposited films from those of the respective fluorocarbons were compared. Under similar glow discharge conditions: (i) the extent of defluorination was highest for the PFH polymer, (ii) the deposition rate was highest for the HFB polymer, (iii) the cyclic structure of MCH was less well preserved than the aromatic structure of HFB, (iv) aliphatic structures appeared in the plasma-deposited MCH polymer, and (v) the plasma-polymerized HFB has the highest thermal stability due to the preservation of the aromatic rings. The adhesive tape peel test results revealed that the plasma-polymerized and deposited fluoropolymer layers were strongly bonded to the Ar plasma-pretreated Si(100) surfaces.

  10. Chemical modification of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) copolymer surface through fluorocarbon ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, W.-D.; Jang, Inkook; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2007-07-15

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the effects of continuous fluorocarbon ion beam deposition on a poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-trFE)] surface, a polymer with electromechanical properties. Fluorocarbon plasma processing is widely used to chemically modify surfaces and deposit thin films. It is well accepted that polyatomic ions and neutrals within low-energy plasmas have a significant effect on the surface chemistry induced by the plasma. The deposition of mass selected fluorocarbon ions is useful to isolate the effects specific to polyatomic ions. Here, the differences in the chemical interactions of C{sub 3}F{sub 5}{sup +} and CF{sub 3}{sup +} ions with the P(VDF-trFE) surface are examined. The incident energy of the ions in both beams is 50 eV. The CF{sub 3}{sup +} ions are predicted to be more effective at fluorinating the P(VDF-trFE) surface than C{sub 3}F{sub 5}{sup +} ions. At the same time, the C{sub 3}F{sub 5}{sup +} ions are predicted to be more effective at growing fluorocarbon thin films. The simulations also reveal how the deposition process might ultimately modify the electromechanical properties of this polymer surface.

  11. Comparison of pulsed and downstream deposition of fluorocarbon materials from C3F8 and c-C4F8 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ina T.; Malkov, Galiya Sh.; Butoi, Carmen I.; Fisher, Ellen R.

    2004-03-01

    Materials deposited in continuous wave (cw) and pulsed low-pressure octafluoropropane (C3F8) and octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8) plasmas were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, static contact angle measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fluorocarbon (FC) materials deposited in pulsed plasmas were less crosslinked than those deposited in cw plasmas with equivalent input powers. Within each system, higher F/C ratio materials were deposited by lowering the plasma input power/duty cycle. Using downstream depositions had a similar effect on film composition, but also resulted in decreased deposition rates. SEM analysis showed that decreases in the flexibility of the fluorocarbon films were correlated with increases in the percent of crosslinking. Additionally, the smoothness of the film surfaces suggests that polymerization processes occur on the substrate surface. Overall, films deposited in C4F8 plasmas were more crosslinked and less flexible than those deposited in C3F8 plasmas under the same conditions. The composition of the deposited FC films is correlated to the nature and relative concentrations of nascent ions previously measured in these plasma systems using plasma ion mass spectrometry. .

  12. Properties of solid polymer electrolyte fluorocarbon film. [used in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic fluorocarbon film used as the solid polymer electrolyte in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells was found to exhibit delamination failures. Polarized light microscopy of as-received film showed a lined region at the center of the film thickness. It is shown that these lines were not caused by incomplete saponification but probably resulted from the film extrusion process. The film lines could be removed by an annealing process. Chemical, physical, and tensile tests showed that annealing improved or sustained the water contents, spectral properties, thermo-oxidative stability, and tensile properties of the film. The resistivity of the film was significantly decreased by the annealing process.

  13. 157 nm Pellicles (Thin Films) for Photolithography: Mechanistic Investigation of the VUV and UV-C Photolysis of Fluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kwangjoo; Jockusch, Steffen; Turro, Nicholas J.; French, Roger H.; Wheland, Robert C.; Lemon, M F.; Braun, Andre M.; Widerschpan, Tatjana; Dixon, David A.; Li, Jun; Ivan, Marius; Zimmerman, Paul

    2005-06-15

    The use of 157 nm as the next lower wavelength for photolithography for the production of semiconductors has created a need for transparent and radiation-durable polymers for use in soft pellicles, the polymer films which protect the chip from particle deposition. The most promising materials for pellicles are fluorinated polymers, but currently available fluorinated polymers undergo photodegradation and/or photodarkening upon long term exposure to 157 nm irradiation. To understand the mechanism of the photodegradation and photodarkening of fluorinated polymers, mechanistic studies on the photolysis of liquid model fluorocarbons, including perfluorobutylethyl ether and perfluoro-2 H-3-oxa-heptane, were performed employing UV, NMR, FTIR, GC, and GC/MS analyses. All hydrogen-containing compounds showed decreased photostability compared to the fully perfluorinated compounds. Irradiation in the presence of atmospheric oxygen showed reduced photostability compared to deoxygenated samples. Photolysis of the samples was performed at 157, 172, 185, and 254 nm and showed only minor wavelength dependence. Mechanisms for photodegradation of the fluorocarbons are proposed, which involve Rydberg excited states. Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to predict the excitation spectra of model compounds.

  14. Nanoscale mechanical and tribological properties of fluorocarbon films grafted onto plasma-treated low-density polyethylene surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2012-03-01

    Fluorocarbon (FC) films were grafted onto Ar plasma-treated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) surfaces by plasma polymerization and deposition. The evolution of the surface morphology of the grafted FC films was investigated at different scales with an atomic force microscope. Nanoscale sliding experiments performed with a surface force microscope provided insight into the nanotribological properties of Ar plasma-treated LDPE, with and without grafted FC films, in terms of applied normal load and number of sliding cycles. The observed trends are explained in the context of microstructure models accounting for morphological and structure changes at the LDPE surface due to the effects of plasma treatment (e.g., selective etching of amorphous phase, chain crosslinking and FC film grafting) and surface sliding (e.g., crystalline lamellae alignment along the sliding direction). Nanoindentation experiments elucidated the effect of plasma treatment on surface viscoelasticity and global contact stiffness. The results of this study demonstrate that plasma-assisted grafting of FC films is an effective surface modification method for tuning the nanomechanical/tribological properties of polymers.

  15. Disappearance of fuel hydrazine vapors in fluorocarbon-film environmental chambers. Experimental observations and kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.A.; Wiseman, F.L.; Kilduff, J.E.; Koontz, S.L.; Davis, D.D.

    1989-03-01

    Fluorocarbon-film environmental chambers, of the type often employed in air pollution studies, have been used to investigate the stability of the fuel hydrazines (hydrazine, methylhydrazine, and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine) with respect to atmospheric oxidation. These studies have shown that the observed disappearance of fuel hydrazine vapors in these chambers is caused by physical loss processes rather than oxidation. Vapor-phase decay is affected by chamber size, water content of the matrix gas, and previous chamber experiments. A kinetic model has been developed that incorporates adsorption, permeation, and surface site concentration to fit the observed decay data.

  16. Miscibility of Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Surfactants in Adsorbed Film and Micelle.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Masumi; Nomura, Teruko; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneshina, Shoji; Aratono, Makoto

    2001-02-01

    We investigated the miscibility of nonionic hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants in the adsorbed film and the micelle by surface tension measurements of the aqueous solution. The combination of tetraethyleneglycol monodecyl ether (C10E4) and tetraethyleneglycol mono-1,1,7-trihydrododecafluoroheptyl ether (FC7E4) was chosen because they have the same hydrophilic groups and about the same surface activity. The extent of nonideal mixing was estimated quantitatively in terms of the excess Gibbs energy in the adsorbed film g(H,E) and that in the micelle g(M,E). The excess area per adsorbed molecule, A(H,E), was also evaluated and discussed. The ionic hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon mixed surfactant systems, lithium dodecyl sulfate (LiDS)/lithium perfluorooctane sulfonate (LiFOS) and lithium tetradecyl sulfate (LiTS)/LiFOS systems are also investigated from the standpoint of excess Gibbs energy and excess area. It is also clearly shown that the regular solution approach does not fit in the systems that contain ionic species. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Assembly and Structure of alpha-helical Peptide Films on Hydrophobic Fluorocarbon Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, T.; Samual, N; McCrea, K; Gamble, L; Ward, R; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure, orientation, and formation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix model peptide films on fluorocarbon surfaces has been monitored with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with a hydrophobic periodicity of 3.5. This periodicity yields a rigid amphiphilic peptide with leucine and lysine side chains located on opposite sides. XPS composition analysis confirms the formation of a peptide film that covers about 75% of the surface. NEXAFS data are consistent with chemically intact adsorption of the peptides. A weak linear dichroism of the amide {pi}* is likely due to the broad distribution of amide bond orientations inherent to the {alpha}-helical secondary structure. SFG spectra exhibit strong peaks near 2865 and 2935 cm{sup -1} related to aligned leucine side chains interacting with the hydrophobic surface. Water modes near 3200 and 3400 cm{sup -1} indicate ordering of water molecules in the adsorbed-peptide fluorocarbon surface interfacial region. Amide I peaks observed near 1655 cm{sup -1} confirm that the secondary structure is preserved in the adsorbed peptide. A kinetic study of the film formation process using XPS and SFG showed rapid adsorption of the peptides followed by a longer assembly process. Peptide SFG spectra taken at the air-buffer interface showed features related to well-ordered peptide films. Moving samples through the buffer surface led to the transfer of ordered peptide films onto the substrates.

  18. Correlation of elastohydrodynamic film thickness measurements for fluorocarbon type 2 ester, and polyphenyl ether lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    A minimum films thickness correlation applicable to heavily loaded elastohydrodynamic (EHD) contacts was formulated from experimental data obtained by an X-ray transmission technique. The correlation, based on data generated with fluorocarbon, type II ester, and polyphenyl ether lubricants, extends a previous analysis developed from data for a synthetic paraffinic oil. The resulting correlation represents the data of the four lubricants reasonably well over a large range of operating conditions. Contained within the derived relation is a factor to account for the high-load dependence displayed by the measurements beyond that which is provided for by the theory. Thermal corrections applied to a commonly used film thickness formula showed little improvement to the general disagreement that exists between theory and test. Choice of contact geometry and material are judged to have a relatively mild influence on the form of the semiempirical model.

  19. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  20. Ion beam deposited protective films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Single or dual ion beam sources were used to deposit thin films for different applications. Metal and metal oxide films were evaluated as protective coatings for the materials. Film adherence was measured and the most promising films were then tested under environments similar to operating conditions. It was shown that some materials do protect die material (H-13 steel) and do reduce thermal fatigue. Diamondlike films have many useful applications. A series of experiments were conducted to define and optimize new approaches to the manufacture of such films. A dual beam system using argon and methane gases was developed to generate these films.

  1. Metals plated on fluorocarbon polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, H.; Krasinsky, J. B.; Vango, S. P.

    1964-01-01

    Electroplating lead on fluorocarbon polymer parts is accomplished by etching the parts to be plated with sodium, followed by successive depositions of silver and lead from ultrasonically agitated plating solutions. Metals other than lead may be electroplated on the silvered parts.

  2. VACUUM DEPOSITION OF THIN FILMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book deals with methods of obtaining and processing thin films , methods of measuring the deposition rate and thickness of thin-film layers, and...the main fields of application of thin films . Vacuum requirements and the requirements for the composition of the residual medium in thermal...evaporation and cathode sputtering are given, and modern methods of producing and measuring vacuums and the equipment used in obtaining thin films are described. (Author)

  3. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  4. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  5. PRODUCTION OF FLUOROCARBONS

    DOEpatents

    Sarsfield, N.F.

    1949-06-21

    This patent pertains to a process for recovering fluorocarbons from a liquid mixture of hydrocarbons with partially and completely fluorinated products thereof. It consists of contacting the mxture in the cold with a liquid which is a solvent for the hydrocarbons and which is a nonsolvent for the fluorocarbons, extracting the hydrocarbons, separating the fluorocarbon-containing layer from the solvent-containing layer, and submitting the fluorocarbon layer to fractlonal distillation, to isolate the desired fluorocarbon fraction. Suitable solvents wnich may be used in the process include the lower aliphatic alcohols, and the lower aliphatic ketones.

  6. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, David C.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  7. Deposited films with improved microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.; Moss, Ronald W.; McClanahan, Edwin D.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for improving microstructures of line-of-sight deposited films are described. Columnar growth defects ordinarily produced by geometrical shadowing during deposition of such films are eliminated without resorting to post-deposition thermal or mechanical treatments. The native, as-deposited coating qualities, including homogeneity, fine grain size, and high coating-to-substrate adherence, can thus be retained. The preferred method includes the steps of emitting material from a source toward a substrate to deposit a coating non-uniformly on the substrate surface, removing a portion of the coating uniformly over the surface, again depositing material onto the surface, but from a different direction, and repeating the foregoing steps. The quality of line-of-sight deposited films such as those produced by sputtering, progressively deteriorates as the angle of incidence between the flux and the surface becomes increasingly acute. Depositing non-uniformly, so that the coating becomes progressively thinner as quality deteriorates, followed by uniformly removing some of the coating, such as by resputtering, eliminates the poor quality portions, leaving only high quality portions of the coating. Subsequently sputtering from a different direction applies a high quality coating to other regions of the surface. Such steps can be performed either simultaneously or sequentially to apply coatings of a uniformly high quality, closed microstructure to three-dimensional or large planar surfaces.

  8. Deposition of plasma polymerized perfluoromethylene-dominated films showing oil-repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, J. E.; Boerio, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma polymerized fluorocarbon films were deposited onto polyethylene (PE) substrates to increase oil-repellency of PE. Depositions were performed using the monomer, 1H,1H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecene in a parallel-plate, radio frequency (rf) reactor, with variable continuous-wave power ranging from 2 to 160 W. The film deposition rate and morphology were strongly dependent on the applied rf power. Most importantly, the chemical structure of the deposited films was also altered, resulting in changes in contact angles of various liquids and the surface energy. Films deposited at low power were composed mainly of perfluoromethylene (CF2) species (up to 67.2%), as shown by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). With an increase in rf power, CF2 content in the film decreased as further fragmentation of the monomer occurred. For each deposition at varying rf powers, even at powers as low as 2 W, the C=C and C-H bonds in the monomer were dissociated by the plasma and not incorporated into the films, as shown by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Oil-repellency, as shown by increased contact angles of hydrocarbon liquids, was found to increase as the amount of CF2 species increased in the film structure. A low critical surface energy (2.7 mJ/m2) was calculated for the film deposited with only 2 W of rf power. Adhesion of the plasma-polymerized films to the PE was also evaluated and found to be poor for films with a high concentration of CF2 species, where cohesive failure within the film occurred. However, adhesion increased as a function of rf power, where the film structure showed more cross-linking. There was a compromise between producing a film with high oleophobicity (oil-repellency) while maintaining adhesion of the film to PE, as some disruption of the CF2 chains in the films was necessary for cohesion through cross-linking.

  9. Deposition of diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A diamondlike carbon film is deposited in the surface of a substrate by exposing the surface to an argon ion beam containing a hydrocarbon. The current density in the ion beam is low during initial deposition of the film. Subsequent to this initial low current condition, the ion beam is increased to full power. At the same time, a second argon ion beam is directed toward the surface of the substrate. The second ion beam has an energy level much greater than that of the ion beam containing the hydrocarbon. This addition of energy to the system increases mobility of the condensing atoms and serves to remove lesser bound atoms.

  10. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  11. Deposition of thin films of multicomponent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Composite films of multicomponent materials, such as oxides and nitrides, e.g., lead zirconate titanate, are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, employing a rotating substrate holder, which rotates relative to a plurality of targets, one target for each metal element of the multicomponent material. The sputtering is carried out in a reactive atmosphere. The substrates on which the layers are deposited are at ambient temperature. Following deposition of the composite film, the film is heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate a solid state reaction and form the final product, which is substantially single phase and substantially homogeneous.

  12. Plasma deposition of organic thin films: Control of film chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, B.D.

    1993-12-31

    Plasma deposition of thin, polymeric films represent a versatile surface modification technology. Although these thin films are exploited for many applications, complaints heard about plasma deposited films are that their structures are uncharacterizable, that organic functionality is lost in their production and that reproducibility is difficult. Recently, new methods for film production, reactor control and surface characterization have led to well characterized plasma deposited thin polymeric films (PDTPF) with defined structure and organic functionality. Such PDTPF often closely resemble conventionally prepared homopolymers. Methods that can be used to control the chemistry of PDTPF are the minimization of the plasma power, pulsing the RF field to reduce the {open_quotes}plasma on{close_quotes} time, use of a Faraday cage to reduce electron bombardment, positioning the sample downfield from the glow zone, the use of monomers containing polymerizable double bonds and the use of a cold substrate to condense vapor simultaneously with plasma deposition.

  13. A study of reactive plasma deposited thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, J.; Williams, E.

    1986-01-01

    A state-of-the-art research laboratory was established to grow and characterize amorphous thin films that are useful in semi-conductor devices. Two film systems, nitride films and silicon dioxide films were studied. Over seventy deposition runs for nitride films were made. The films were deposited on silicon substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. It was found that the uniformity of the films were affected by the location of the film on the platen.

  14. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  15. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  16. Elastohydrodynamic film thickness measurements with advanced ester, fluorocarbon, and polyphenyl ether lubricants to 589 K (600 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Kannel, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thicknesses have been measured, by means of an X-ray technique, under conditions that closely simulate the ball-race contact in advanced turbine engine thrust bearings. The experiments were conducted with a rolling-disk machine using disks which yield a contact zone similar to that in the actual bearing. Both the rolling and spinning motions of the ball relative to the race were simulated by the apparatus. Four lubricants were evaluated at temperatures to 600 F and maximum Hertz stresses to 350,000 psi. The X-ray film thickness data correlated well with observations of surface distress (or lack thereof) in full-scale bearing tests with the same lubricants under similar conditions of temperature and load. The predicted variation of film thickness with speed and viscosity as verified, although the magnitude of measured film thickness was generally one-half to one-third of predicted values. An effect of stress greater than predicted was consistently observed in the higher stress range.

  17. Ion plating technique improves thin film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Ion plating technique keeps the substrate surface clean until the film is deposited, allows extensive diffusion and chemical reaction, and joins insoluble or incompatible materials. The technique involves the deposition of ions on the substrate surface while it is being bombarded with inert gas ions.

  18. Characteristics Of Vacuum Deposited Sucrose Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, F.; Predoi, D.; Ghita, R. V.; Vatasescu-Balcan, R. A.; Costache, M.

    Thin films of sucrose (C12H22O11) were deposited on thin cut glass substrates by thermal evaporation technique (p ~ 10-5 torr). The surface morphology was putted into evidence by FT-IR and SEM analysis. The experimental results confirm a uniform deposition of an adherent sucrose layer. The biological tests (e.g., cell morphology and cell viability evaluated by measuring mitochondrial dehydrogenise activity with MTT assay) confirm the properties of sucrose thin films as bioactive material. The human fetal osteoblast system grown on thin sucrose film was used for the determination of cell proliferation, cell viability and cell morphology studies.

  19. Hard Carbon Films Deposited under Various Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.-K.; Chen, S.-C.; Wu, T. C.; Lee, Sanboh

    1998-03-01

    Using a carbon target ablated with an XeCl-excimer laser under various gas atmospheres at different pressures, hard carbon was deposited on silicon, iron and tungsten carbide substrates. The hardness, friction coefficient, and wear rate of the film against steel are better than pure substrate material, respectively, so that it has potential to be used as a protective coating for micromechanical elements. The influences of gas pressure, gas atmosphere, and power density of laser irradiation on the thermal stability of film were analyzed by means of Raman-spectroscope, time-of-flight method, and optical emission spectrum. It was found that the film deposited under higher pressure has less diamond-like character. The film deposited under rest gas or argon atmosphere was very unstable and looked like a little graphite-like character. The film deposited at high vacuum (10-5 mbar rest gas) was the most stable and looked like the most diamond-like character. The film deposited at higher power density was more diamond-like than that at lower power density.

  20. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter deposition are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq cm resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x 10 to the -6th/ohm cm for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm cm for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  1. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  2. Post-Flight Analysis of Selected Fluorocarbon and Other Thin Film Polymer Specimens Flown on MISSE-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeGroh, Kim; Finckenor, Miria; Minton, Tim; Brunsvold, Amy; Pippin, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Twenty thin film specimens were flown on M1SSE-5 as a cooperative effort between several organizations. This presentation will report results of initial inspections and post-flight measurements of the optical properties and recession of these materials due to the approx.13 month exposure period on the exterior of the International Space Station. These specimens were located on the "anti-solar" side of the MISSE-5 container and received a low number of Equivalent Sun Hours of solar UV exposure. Profilometry and/or ATF measurements will be conducted to determine thickness changes and atomic oxygen-induced recession rates Six of the specimens were covered with thin Kapton films, 0.1 and 0.3 mil in thickness. The 0.1 mil Kapton was almost completely eroded, suggesting that the atomic oxygen fluence is <8 x 10(exp 19) atoms/sq cm, similar to levels experienced during Space Shuttle materials experiments in the 1980's and 1990's. A comparison of results from MISSE-5 and Space Shuttle experiments will be included for those materials common to both the short and long-term exposures.

  3. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter depoairion are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq. cm. resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x to to the -6/ohm. cm. for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm. cm. for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  4. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  5. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Banks, Paul S.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2002-01-01

    Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Metalloorganic solution deposition of ferroelectric PZT films.

    PubMed

    Lipeles, R A; Coleman, D J; Leung, M S

    1991-01-01

    The metallo-organic solution deposition (MOSD or sol-gel) technique can be used for preparing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics with a wide range of compositions and crystal structures for electrooptical applications. Film morphology is affected by the stoichiometry of the film, hydrolysis and polymerization of the sol-gel solution, and thermal treatment of the deposited material. The lattice parameter decreases with the amount of titanium in the PZT, in agreement with ceramic data. A slight initial excess of lead in the coating solution is found to improve film morphology. Unlike traditional powder ceramic processing techniques, MOSD permits the growth of small uniform grains that are conducive to achieving consistent electronic and optical properties. Results show that the properties of films prepared by the MOSD process can be tailored to meet the needs of device applications.

  7. Laser deposition of bimetallic island films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Istratov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the colloidal system by nanosecond laser radiation are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. We report the results of formation bimetallic islands films with various electrical and optical properties. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology.

  8. Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A unified treatment of the theories, data, and technologies underlying physical vapor deposition methods With electronic, optical, and magnetic coating technologies increasingly dominating manufacturing in the high-tech industries, there is a growing need for expertise in physical vapor deposition of thin films. This important new work provides researchers and engineers in this field with the information they need to tackle thin film processes in the real world. Presenting a cohesive, thoroughly developed treatment of both fundamental and applied topics, Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films incorporates many critical results from across the literature as it imparts a working knowledge of a variety of present-day techniques. Numerous worked examples, extensive references, and more than 100 illustrations and photographs accompany coverage of: * Thermal evaporation, sputtering, and pulsed laser deposition techniques * Key theories and phenomena, including the kinetic theory of gases, adsorption and condensation, high-vacuum pumping dynamics, and sputtering discharges * Trends in sputter yield data and a new simplified collisional model of sputter yield for pure element targets * Quantitative models for film deposition rate, thickness profiles, and thermalization of the sputtered beam

  9. Ultrasound-Assisted Deposition Of Dielectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwangbo, C. K.; Jacobson, M. R.; Macleod, H. A.; Potoff, R. H.

    1986-12-01

    The effects of ultrasound-assisted deposition (UAD) of ZrOx , Ta0x , and MgFx films on their optical properties have been investigated. The direction of vibration is transverse to the direction of growing films on substrates that are glued to tubular piezoelectric transducers driven by a power amplifier. Results indicate that ultrasonic powers above 20 W/cm2 are required to induce detectable changes in UV absorption and vacuum-to-air shifts of spectral profiles. UAD is likely to induce oxygen and fluoride deficiencies in oxide and fluoride films and increase the packing density of films. No significant changes between UAD and conventional films were observed in x-ray diffraction analysis, humidity testing, and Nomarski microscopy.

  10. Photobiomolecular deposition of metallic particles and films

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2005-02-08

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  11. Effect of fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer films on sidewall adhesion and friction of surface micromachines with impacting and sliding contact interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-06-14

    A self-assembled monolayer film consisting of fluoro-octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) was vapor-phase deposited on Si(100) substrates and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) surface micromachines. The hydrophobic behavior and structural composition of the FOTS film deposited on Si(100) were investigated by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of contact pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and impact/sliding cycles on the adhesive and friction behavior of uncoated and FOTS-coated polysilicon micromachines (referred to as the Si and FOTS/Si micromachines, respectively) were investigated under controlled loading and environmental conditions. FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated much lower and stable adhesion than Si micromachines due to the highly hydrophobic and conformal FOTS film. Contrary to Si micromachines, sidewall adhesion of FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated a weak dependence on relative humidity, temperature, and impact cycles. In addition, FOTS/Si micromachines showed low and stable adhesion and low static friction for significantly more sliding cycles than Si micromachines. The adhesive and static friction characteristics of Si and FOTS/Si micromachines are interpreted in the context of physicochemical surface changes, resulting in the increase of the real area of contact and a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition of the surface chemical characteristics caused by nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of the organic residue (Si micromachines) or the FOTS film (FOTS/Si micromachines) during repetitive impact and oscillatory sliding of the sidewall surfaces.

  12. (Chemically vapor deposited diamond films)

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L. Jr.

    1990-09-22

    The NATO-ASI on Diamond and Diamond-Like Films and Coatings'' was an opportunity for us to learn the latest research results from ongoing programs in the leading laboratories of the world and relate them to our work. Specific examples are given in the comprehensive report which follows. The meeting format provided an ideal environment to meet and interact with our international counterparts. It is clear that our studies are well regarded, and that we have established an excellent reputation in a short time. New opportunities for collaboration were identified. A panel discussion at the end of the meeting addressed the needs and opportunities in the synthesis of CVD diamond. The key scientific needs are those related to modeling the nucleation and growth processes and to elucidation of the critical roles of atomic hydrogen and the mechanisms of carbon addition to the growing surfaces. The development and more extensive use of in situ diagnostics for both surface and gas phases are important to solving these issues. The more immediate practical questions concern the identification of the growth-rate-limiting steps, the relation of growth parameters to the resulting film structure, and the dependence of properties on structure.

  13. Studies of Niobium Thin Film Produced by Energetic Vacuum Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Genfa Wu; Anne-Marie Valente; H. Phillips; Haipeng Wang; Andy Wu; T. J. Renk; P Provencio

    2004-05-01

    An energetic vacuum deposition system has been used to study deposition energy effects on the properties of niobium thin films on copper and sapphire substrates. The absence of working gas avoids the gaseous inclusions commonly seen with sputtering deposition. A biased substrate holder controls the deposition energy. Transition temperature and residual resistivity ratio of the niobium thin films at several deposition energies are obtained together with surface morphology and crystal orientation measurements by AFM inspection, XRD and TEM analysis. The results show that niobium thin films on sapphire substrate exhibit the best cryogenic properties at deposition energy around 123 eV. The TEM analysis revealed that epitaxial growth of film was evident when deposition energy reaches 163 eV for sapphire substrate. Similarly, niobium thin film on copper substrate shows that film grows more oriented with higher deposition energy and grain size reaches the scale of the film thickness at the deposition energy around 153 eV.

  14. Ultra-Smooth As-Deposited Optical Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    thin films with state-of-the-art properties , specifically ultrasmooth surfaces, high packing density, refractive index close... properties of thin films ; in particular, the surface roughness of the thin films . And secondarily, the lifetime of the Cs source is important. In other... Film Deposition Initially, the deposition system was utilized to deposit single layer thin films of titanium oxide ( TiO2 ) and silicon oxide

  15. water-soluble fluorocarbon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanelli, P.

    1979-01-01

    Water-soluble fluorocarbon proves durable nonpolluting coating for variety of substrates. Coatings can be used on metals, masonry, textiles, paper, and glass, and have superior hardness and flexibility, strong resistance to chemicals fire, and weather.

  16. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J. K.; Tang, C. C.; Hess, D. W.

    1982-07-01

    High-purity films of tungsten are deposited from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen using plasma-enhanced deposition (PED). At 400 °C deposition temperature, resistivities of ˜40 μΩ cm are attained. After annealing at 1100 °C, the resistivity falls to ˜7 μΩ cm. Below 400 °C, the as-deposited film stress is <6×109 dynes/cm2. Tensile, unlike tungsten, molybdenum films deposited by PED displayed high resistivities.

  17. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  18. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Somnath; McKnight, Steven H.; Sengupta, Louise C.

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that in bulk ceramic form, the barium to strontium ratio in barium strontium titanium oxide (Ba1- xSrxTiO3, BSTO) affects the voltage tunability and electronic dissipation factor in an inverse fashion; increasing the strontium content reduces the dissipation factor at the expense of lower voltage tunability. However, the oxide composites of BSTO developed at the Army Research Laboratory still maintain low electronic loss factors for all compositions examined. The intent of this study is to determine whether such effects can be observed in the thin film form of the oxide composites. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method has been used to deposit the thin films. The different compositions of the compound (with 1 wt% of the oxide additive) chosen were: Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3, Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3, and Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3. The electronic properties investigated in this study were the dielectric constant and the voltage tunability. The morphology of the thin films were examined using the atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was also utilized for optical characterization of the thin films. The electronic and optical properties of the thin films and the bulk ceramics were compared. The results of these investigations are discussed.

  20. Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; McLean, II, William

    1996-01-01

    A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskeméti, G.; Kresz, N.; Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Nógrádi, A.

    2005-07-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ( λ = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm 2. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 × 10 -3 Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm 2. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified "protein cube" method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  2. Deposition and characterization of CuInS2 thin films deposited over copper thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Titu; Kumar, K. Rajeev; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2015-06-01

    Simple, cost effective and versatile spray pyrolysis method is effectively combined with vacuum evaporation for the deposition of CuIns2 thin films for photovoltaic applications. In the present study In2s3 was spray deposited over vacuum evaporated Cu thin films and Cu was allowed to diffuse in to the In2S3 layer to form CuInS2. To analyse the dependence of precursor volume on the formation of CuInS2 films structural, electrical and morphological analzes are carried out. Successful deposition of CuInS2thin films with good crystallinity and morphology with considerably low resistivity is reported in this paper.

  3. Substrate heater for thin film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Steve R.

    1996-01-01

    A substrate heater for thin film deposition of metallic oxides upon a target substrate configured as a disk including means for supporting in a predetermined location a target substrate configured as a disk, means for rotating the target substrate within the support means, means for heating the target substrate within the support means, the heating means about the support means and including a pair of heating elements with one heater element situated on each side of the predetermined location for the target substrate, with one heater element defining an opening through which desired coating material can enter for thin film deposition and with the heating means including an opening slot through which the target substrate can be entered into the support means, and, optionally a means for thermal shielding of the heating means from surrounding environment is disclosed.

  4. Fluoropolymer Films Deposited by Argon Ion-Beam Sputtering of Polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Banks, Bruce A.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The FT-IR, XPS and UV spectra of fluoropolymer films (SPTFE-I) deposited by argon ion-beam sputtering of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were obtained and compared with prior corresponding spectra of fluoropolymer films (SPTFE-P) deposited by argon rf plasma sputtering of PTFE. Although the F/C ratios for SPTFE-I and -P (1.63 and 1.51) were similar, their structures were quite different in that there was a much higher concentration of CF2 groups in SPTFE-I than in SPTFE-P, ca. 61 and 33% of the total carbon contents, respectively. The FT-IR spectra reflect that difference, that for SPTFE-I showing a distinct doublet at 1210 and 1150 per centimeter while that for SPTFE-P presents a broad, featureless band at ca. 1250 per centimeter. The absorbance of the 1210-per centimeter band in SPTFE-I was proportional to the thickness of the film, in the range of 50-400 nanometers. The SPTFE-I was more transparent in the UV than SPTFE-P at comparable thickness. The mechanism for SPTFE-I formation likely involves "chopping off" of oligomeric segments of PTFE as an accompaniment to "plasma" polymerization of TFE monomer or other fluorocarbon fragments generated in situ from PTFE on impact with energetic Ar ions. Data are presented for SPTFE-I deposits and the associated Ar(+) bombarded PTFE targets where a fresh target was used for each run or a single target was used for a sequence of runs.

  5. Boron carbon nitride films deposited by sequential pulses laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinescu, M.; Perrone, A.; Caricato, A. P.; Mirenghi, L.; Gerardi, C.; Ghica, C.; Frunza, L.

    1998-05-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of c-BCN thin films by reactive pulsed laser ablation (RPLA) of a rotating target (3 Hz) formed of two semidisks: one of h-BN and the other one of graphite, with the substrate at room temperature. The irradiations were performed in vacuum (10 -5 Pa) and in N 2 ambient gas (1-100 Pa) using a XeCl excimer laser ( λ=308 nm, τFWHM=30 ns) with a fluence of 5 J/cm 2. Series of 10,000 pulses at a repetition rate of 10 Hz were directed to target. Different analysis techniques pointed out the synthesis of h-BCN and c-BCN. Microhardness measurements at the deposited films evidence high values up to 2.9 GPa. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles showed the presence of layers of 600-700 nm thickness, with uniform concentrations of B, C and N in the films. Uniform signals of BN and CN, which are related to the BCN bond, are also present. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies pointed out the BCN compound formation. The deconvolution of B 1s recorded spectra evidenced a strong peak (centered at 188 eV) assigned to B bonded in BC 2N; the N 1s and C 1s spectra also confirm the BCN formation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis evidenced the presence of c-BCN phase (with crystallites of 30-80 nm) and h-BCN phase as well. The N 2 pressure strongly influenced the BCN formation and, consequently, the properties of the deposited films.

  6. Deposition of superhard amorphous carbon films by pulsed arc sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, H.J.; Schultrich, B.; Ziegele, H.; Siemroth, P.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films with hardness comparable to crystalline superhard materials have been deposited by special Pulsed arc techniques. By the combination of very high hardness, low adhesion and high smoothness, these films show superior behaviour in wear and glide applications. The influence of plasma and deposition conditions on these film properties and the choice of optimum conditions are discussed.

  7. Pulsed-laser deposition of crystalline Teflon (PTFE) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. T.; Arenholz, E.; Heitz, J.; Bäuerle, D.

    1998-01-01

    Thin films of crystalline polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were prepared by pulsed-laser deposition using 248 nm UV-excimer-laser radiation. Pressed powder pellets and bulk PTFE have been employed as target material. The films were analyzed by means of optical polarization microscopy, stylus profilometry, capacity measurements, XRD, and IR spectroscopy. The effect of substrate temperature Ts on the morphology and crystallinity of the films was studied. Films deposited from pressed powder targets at sufficiently high Ts consist mainly of spherulite-like microcrystallites. These films are continuous, pinhole-free, well adherent to the substrate, and have a composition which is similar to that of the target material. It is suggested that film formation is based on laser-assisted material transfer with subsequent melting and crystallization. They are superior to films deposited from PTFE bulk targets, cut from a solid rod, with respect to film morphology, deposition rate, film cohesion, and optical and electrical properties.

  8. Electro-deposition of superconductor oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2001-01-01

    Methods for preparing high quality superconducting oxide precursors which are well suited for further oxidation and annealing to form superconducting oxide films. The method comprises forming a multilayered superconducting precursor on a substrate by providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a substrate electrode, and providing to the bath a plurality of precursor metal salts which are capable of exhibiting superconducting properties upon subsequent treatment. The superconducting precursor is then formed by electrodepositing a first electrodeposited (ED) layer onto the substrate electrode, followed by depositing a layer of silver onto the first electrodeposited (ED) layer, and then electrodepositing a second electrodeposited (ED) layer onto the Ag layer. The multilayered superconducting precursor is suitable for oxidation at a sufficient annealing temperature in air or an oxygen-containing atmosphere to form a crystalline superconducting oxide film.

  9. Electrophoretically-deposited solid film lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.; Panitz, J.K.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1995-04-01

    An aqueous-based process that uses electrophoresis to attract powdered lubricant in suspension to a charged target was developed. The deposition process yields coatings with low friction, complies with environmental safety regulations, requires minimal equipment, and has several advantages over processes involving organic binders or vacuum techniques. This work focuses on development of the deposition process, includes an analysis of the friction coefficient of the material in sliding contact with stainless steel under a range of conditions, and a functional evaluation of coating performance in a precision mechanical device application. Results show that solid lubricant films with friction coefficients as low as 0.03 can be produced. A 0.03 friction coefficient is superior to solid lubricants with binder systems and is comparable to friction coefficients generated with more costly vacuum techniques.

  10. Preparation of Thick Magnet Films by the Aerosol Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Satoshi

    The aerosol deposition method (ADM) is effective for the preparation of thick films with high deposition rate. We applied this method to fabricate NiZn ferrite or Sm-Fe-N films, which are used for microwave absorbers or permanent magnets, respectively. In this article, the magnetic properties of Sm-Fe-N thick films fabricated by the ADM are introduced and the possibility of the ADM for the fabrication process with high deposition rate is discussed.

  11. Recent progress of obliquely deposited thin films for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Itoh, Tadayoshi; Taga, Yasunori

    1999-06-01

    More than 10 years ago, birefringent films of metal oxides were formed by oblique vapor deposition and investigated with a view of their application to optical retardation plates. The retardation function of the films was explained in terms of the birefringence caused by the characteristic anisotropic nanostructure inside the films. These films are now classified in the genre of the so-called sculptured thin films. However, the birefringent films thus prepared are not yet industrialized even now due to the crucial lack of the durability and the yield of products. In this review paper, we describe the present status of application process of the retardation films to the information systems such as compact disc and digital versatile disc devices with a special emphasis on the uniformity of retardation properties in a large area and the stability of the optical properties of the obliquely deposited thin films. Finally, further challenges for wide application of the obliquely deposited thin films are also discussed.

  12. Fabrication of Piezoelectric Polyurea Films by Alternating Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanase, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate that polyurea films can be prepared by alternating deposition with automated deposition control involving quartz crystal microbalance monitoring and optical source heating. The thickness of the films was linearly controlled by changing the repetition time of deposition, and the stoichiometry obtained was much higher than ±5%. The surface roughness of a 600-nm-thick film was 0.5 nm, which ensures the nm thickness control of the deposited polymers. The piezoelectricity of the films was confirmed by directly measuring the current transient induced by mechanical stress and by measuring the capacitance change induced by electric field.

  13. Real-Time Deposition Monitor for Ultrathin Conductive Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    A device has been developed that can be used for the real-time monitoring of ultrathin (2 or more) conductive films. The device responds in less than two microseconds, and can be used to monitor film depositions up to about 60 thick. Actual thickness monitoring capability will vary based on properties of the film being deposited. This is a single-use device, which, due to the very low device cost, can be disposable. Conventional quartz/crystal microbalance devices have proven inadequate to monitor the thickness of Pd films during deposition of ultrathin films for hydrogen sensor devices. When the deposited film is less than 100 , the QCM measurements are inadequate to allow monitoring of the ultrathin films being developed. Thus, an improved, high-sensitivity, real-time deposition monitor was needed to continue Pd film deposition development. The new deposition monitor utilizes a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device in a differential delay-line configuration to produce both a reference response and a response for the portion of the device on which the film is being deposited. Both responses are monitored simultaneously during deposition. The reference response remains unchanged, while the attenuation of the sensing path (where the film is being deposited) varies as the film thickness increases. This device utilizes the fact that on high-coupling piezoelectric substrates, the attenuation of an SAW undergoes a transition from low to very high, and back to low as the conductivity of a film on the device surface goes from nonconductive to highly conductive. Thus, the sensing path response starts with a low insertion loss, and as a conductive film is deposited, the film conductivity increases, causing the device insertion loss to increase dramatically (by up to 80 dB or more), and then with continued film thickness increases (and the corresponding conductivity increases), the device insertion loss goes back down to the low level at which it started. This provides a

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgharkar, Narendra Shamkant

    We have studied the kinetics of copper chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for interconnect metallization using hydrogen (Hsb2) reduction of the Cu(hfac)sb2 (copper(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate) precursor. Steady-state deposition rates were measured using a hot-wall microbalance reactor. For base case conditions of 2 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C, a growth rate of 0.5 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 10 nm minsp{-1}) is observed. Reaction order experiments suggest that the deposition rate passes through a maximum at partial pressure of 2 Torr of Cu(hfac)sb2. The deposition rate has an overall half-order dependence on Hsb2 partial pressure. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expression is used to describe the observed kinetic dependencies on Cu(hfac)sb2, Hsb2, and H(hfac). Based on the rate expression a mechanism is proposed in which the overall rate is determined by the surface reaction of adsorbed Cu(hfac)sb2 and H species. Additionally, the role of alcohols in enhancing the deposition rate has been investigated. Addition of isopropanol results in a six fold enhancement to yield a deposition rate of 3.3 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}) at 5 Torr of isopropanol, 0.4 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C. Ethanol and methanol give lower enhancements of 1.75 and 1.1 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1}, respectively. A mechanism based on the ordering of the aqueous pKsba values of the alcohols is proposed to explain the observed results. Lastly, we have built a warm-wall Pedestal reactor apparatus to demonstrate copper CVD on TiN/Si substrates. The apparatus includes a liquid injection system for transport of isopropanol-diluted precursor solutions. At optimized conditions of precursor and substrate pre-treatments, we have deposited uniform films of copper on TiN/Si substrates at an average deposition rate of 3.0 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}).

  15. Molecular origins of fluorocarbon hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    Dalvi, Vishwanath H.; Rossky, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    We have undertaken atomistic molecular simulations to systematically determine the structural contributions to the hydrophobicity of fluorinated solutes and surfaces compared to the corresponding hydrocarbon, yielding a unified explanation for these phenomena. We have transformed a short chain alkane, n-octane, to n-perfluorooctane in stages. The free-energy changes and the entropic components calculated for each transformation stage yield considerable insight into the relevant physics. To evaluate the effect of a surface, we have also conducted contact-angle simulations of water on self-assembled monolayers of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon thiols. Our results, which are consistent with experimental observations, indicate that the hydrophobicity of the fluorocarbon, whether the interaction with water is as solute or as surface, is due to its “fatness.” In solution, the extra work of cavity formation to accommodate a fluorocarbon, compared to a hydrocarbon, is not offset by enhanced energetic interactions with water. The enhanced hydrophobicity of fluorinated surfaces arises because fluorocarbons pack less densely on surfaces leading to poorer van der Waals interactions with water. We find that interaction of water with a hydrophobic solute/surface is primarily a function of van der Waals interactions and is substantially independent of electrostatic interactions. This independence is primarily due to the strong tendency of water at room temperature to maintain its hydrogen bonding network structure at an interface lacking hydrophilic sites. PMID:20643968

  16. Organic thin film deposition in atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, S.; Kogoma, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Kodama, M.; Nomiyama, H.; Ichinohe, K.

    1996-01-01

    The stabilization of a homogeneous glow discharge at atmospheric pressure has been studied since 1987. On flat surfaces, various plasma surface treatments and film depositions at atmospheric pressure have been examined. A practical application of the atmospheric pressure glow plasma on inner surfaces of flexible polyvinyl chloride tubes was tested for thin film deposition of polytetrafluoroethylene. Deposited film surfaces were characterized by ESCA and FT-IR/ATR measurements. Also SEM observation was done for platelet adhesion on the plasma treated polyvinyl chloride surface. These results showed remarkable enhancement in the inhibition to platelet adhesion on the inner surface of PVC tube, and homogeneous organic film deposition was confirmed. The deposition mechanism of polytetrafluoroethylene film in atmospheric pressure glow plasma is the same as the mechanism of film formation in the low pressure glow plasma, except for radical formation source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Pulsed Laser Deposition of the Ni-Base Superalloy Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joonghan; Mazumder, Jyotirmoy

    2016-03-01

    Ni-base superalloy films were deposited on single-crystal (SC) Ni-base superalloy substrates from a target with the same alloy composition by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructure and growth behavior of the films deposited were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. The homoepitaxial growth of the SC Ni-base superalloy film occurred at the 1123 K (850 °C) substrate temperature and 2 J/cm2 pulse energy. Films generally exhibited a strong polycrystalline characteristic as the substrate temperature and pulse energy increased. The SC film had a smooth surface. The measured root mean square roughness of the SC film surface was ~6 nm. Based on the Taguchi analysis, the substrate temperature and pulse energy were the most significant process parameters influencing the structural characteristics of the films. Also, the influence of the pulse repletion rate and deposition time was not found to be significant.

  18. SnS2 Thin Film Deposition by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, Abdallah Yahia; Alamri, Saleh Noaiman; Aida, Mohammed Salah

    2012-06-01

    Tin disulfide (SnS2) thin films have been synthesized using a simplified spray pyrolysis technique using a perfume atomizer. The films were deposited using two different solutions prepared by the dilution of SnCl2 and thiourea in distilled water and in methanol. The obtained films have a microcrystalline structure. The film deposited using methanol as the solvent is nearly stochiometric SnS2 with a spinel phase having a (001) preferential orientation. The film prepared with an aqueous solution is Sn-rich. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images reveal that the film deposited with the aqueous solution is rough and is formed with large wires. However, the film deposited with methanol is dense and smooth. Conductivity measurements indicate that the aqueous solution leads to an n-type semiconductor, while methanol leads to a p-type semiconductor.

  19. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J.

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  20. Characterization of copper selenide thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    2004-11-01

    A low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films onto glass substrates and deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Good quality thin films of smooth surface of copper selenide thin films were deposited using sodium selenosulfate as a source of selenide ions. The structural and optical behaviour of the films are discussed in the light of the observed data.

  1. Formation of diamond nanoparticle thin films by electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yosuke; Ohishi, Fujio; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Usui, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Thin films of diamond nanoparticles were prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) using 0.5 wt % dispersions in water, ethanol, and 2-propanol. The film growth rate increased with increasing voltage applied to the electrodes. However, an excessive increase in voltage caused the degradation of film morphology. The optimum voltage was 4 V with an electrode separation of 5 mm. The film growth rate was higher in organic solvents than in water. The deposited film had a smooth surface with an average surface roughness comparable to the size of primary particles of the source material. It is notable that the EPD films had a considerably higher physical stability than spin-coated and cast films. The stability was further improved by thermally annealing the films. IR analysis revealed that the diamond nanoparticles have carboxy and amino groups on their surfaces. It is considered that the stability of the EPD films originate from a chemical reaction between these functional groups.

  2. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naes, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    The liquid transparent film-forming, fluorocarbon, Spraylon, a protective coating for terrestrial solar cell modules was evaluated. Two modules were completed and field tested. Problems developed early in the field testing which led to the shortened test period, specifically, lifting of the antireflection coating, followed in some areas by complete film delamination. It is believed that although these problems were certainly induced by the presence of the SPRAYLON film, they were not failures of the material per se. Instead, assembly procedures, module design, and cell coating quality should be evaluated to determine cause of failure.

  3. Bismuth thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Teresa; Arronte, Miguel; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Ponce, Luis; Alonso, J. C.; Garcia, C.; Fernandez, M.; Haro, E.

    1999-07-01

    In the present work Bi thin films were obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition, using Nd:YAG lasers. The films were characterized by optical microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction. It was accomplished the real time spectral emission characterization of the plasma generated during the laser evaporation process. Highly oriented thin films were obtained.

  4. Thin film deposition using rarefied gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2016-11-01

    The rarefied gas jet of aluminium is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uj /√{ kbTj / m }) in the range .01 deposition mechanisms in a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process for the development of the highly oriented pure metallic aluminum thin film with uniform thickness and strong adhesion on the surface of the substrate in the form of ionic plasma, so that the substrate can be protected from corrosion and oxidation and thereby enhance the lifetime and safety, and to introduce the desired surface properties for a given application. Here, His the characteristic dimension, Uj and Tj are the jet velocity and temperature, nd is the number density of the jet, m and d are the molecular mass and diameter, and kb is the Boltzmann constant. An important finding is that the capture width (cross-section of the gas jet deposited on the substrate) is symmetric around the centerline of the substrate, and decreases with increased Mach number due to an increase in the momentum of the gas molecules. DSMC simulation results reveals that at low Knudsen number ((Kn = 0 . 01) ; shorter mean free paths), the atoms experience more collisions, which direct them toward the substrate. However, the atoms also move with lower momentum at low Mach number, which allows scattering collisions to rapidly direct the atoms to the substrate.

  5. Thin film deposition using rarefied gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev

    2016-10-01

    The rarefied gas jet of aluminium is studied at Mach number Ma =(U_j ∖√{ kbTj / m }) in the range .01 deposition mechanisms in a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process for the development of the highly oriented pure metallic aluminum thin film with uniform thickness and strong adhesion on the surface of the substrate in the form of ionic plasma, so that the substrate can be protected from corrosion and oxidation and thereby enhance the lifetime and safety, and to introduce the desired surface properties for a given application. Here, H is the characteristic dimension, U_j and T_j are the jet velocity and temperature, n_d is the number density of the jet, m and d are the molecular mass and diameter, and kb is the Boltzmann constant. An important finding is that the capture width (cross-section of the gas jet deposited on the substrate) is symmetric around the centerline of the substrate, and decreases with increased Mach number due to an increase in the momentum of the gas molecules. DSMC simulation results reveals that at low Knudsen number ((Kn = 0.01); shorter mean free paths), the atoms experience more collisions, which direct them toward the substrate. However, the atoms also move with lower momentum at low Mach number ,which allows scattering collisions to rapidly direct the atoms to the substrate.

  6. Thin film deposition using rarefied gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The rarefied gas jet of aluminium is studied at Mach number Ma =(U_j /√{ kbTj / m }) in the range .01 deposition mechanisms in a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process for the development of the highly oriented pure metallic aluminum thin film with uniform thickness and strong adhesion on the surface of the substrate in the form of ionic plasma, so that the substrate can be protected from corrosion and oxidation and thereby enhance the lifetime and safety, and to introduce the desired surface properties for a given application. Here, H is the characteristic dimension, U_j and T_j are the jet velocity and temperature, n_d is the number density of the jet, m and d are the molecular mass and diameter, and kb is the Boltzmann constant. An important finding is that the capture width (cross-section of the gas jet deposited on the substrate) is symmetric around the centerline of the substrate, and decreases with increased Mach number due to an increase in the momentum of the gas molecules. DSMC simulation results reveals that at low Knudsen number ((Kn =0.01); shorter mean free paths), the atoms experience more collisions, which direct them toward the substrate. However, the atoms also move with lower momentum at low Mach number ,which allows scattering collisions to rapidly direct the atoms to the substrate.

  7. Investigation of new stilbazolium dye thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirov, S.; Todorova, M.; Draganov, M.; Penchev, P.; Bakalska, R.; Serbezov, V.

    2013-03-01

    In present work we report the analysis of thin films and targets from new stilbazolium dye E-4-(2-(4- hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)vinyl)-1-octylquinolinium iodide (D1) deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique using high power UV TEA N2 laser. The thin films are deposited onto substrates - KBr, 316L SS alloy, optical glass and aluminum foil. The films were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, bright field microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. FTIR spectroscopic analysis of thin films and target material shows small differences between deposited films and native substance. The films are found to be homogeneous by AFM results and without any cracks and droplets on the surfaces. The present study demonstrates the ability of PLD technique to provide thin films from new stilbazolium dyes with good quality when they are applied as non-linear optical (NLO) organic materials on different type of substrates.

  8. Deposition of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yunxiang; Afzaal, Mohammad; Malik, Mohammad A.; O'Brien, Paul

    2006-12-01

    A new method is reported for the growth of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles using copper acetylacetonate and trioctylphosphine selenide. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition experiments lead to successful deposition of tetragonal Cu 2Se films. In contrast, hexadecylamine capped nanoparticles are composed of cubic Cu 2-xSe. The deposited materials are optically and structurally characterized. The results of this comprehensive study are described and discussed.

  9. Polyimide films from vapor deposition: toward high strength, NIF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C; Hsieh, E J; Letts, S A; Roberts, C C; Saculla, M

    1998-10-16

    The focus of recent efforts at LLNL has been to demonstrate that vapor deposition processing is a suitable technique to form polyimide fnms with sufficient strength for current national ignition facility target specifications. Production of polyimide films with controlled stoichiometry was acccomplished by: 1) depositing a novel co-functional monomer and 2) matching the vapor pressure of each monomer in PMDA/ODA co-depositions. The sublimation and deposition rate for the monomers was determined over a range of temperatures. Polyimide films with thicknesses up to 30 p.m were fabricated. Composition, structure and strength were assessed using FTIR, SEM and biaxial burst testing. The best films had a tensile strength of approximately 100 MPa. A qualitative relationship between the stoichiometry and tensile strength of the film was demonstrated. Thin films ({approximately}3.5 {micro}m) were typically smooth with an rms of 1.5 nm.

  10. Large Crystal Grain Niobium Thin Films Deposited by Energetic Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.; Valente-Feliciano, A-M.; Xu, C.; Geng, R.L.; Phillips, H.; Reece, Charles; Wright, J.; Seo, K.; Crooks, R.; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Gerhan, A.; Bures, B.; Wilson, K.

    2008-01-01

    This letter presents evidence for unprecedented Nb thin films that were grown on sapphire and copper (Cu) substrates using a vacuum arc process called coaxial energetic deposition CED^TM. Most other deposition techniques with low adatom energy produce amorphous or small crystal-grain films, and typically high substrate temperatures and anneal steps is required to form the large, highly connected grains. The CED^TM technique deposits from plasma consisting of a non-equilibrium, high energy (50-150eV) ion population produced from the ionized source material. At the substrate these fast ions break up columnar structures, intermix with the first few atomic layers of the substrate to improve adhesion, and form dense films at lower substrate temperatures than are typical for low adatom energy techniques, such as physical vapor deposition (PVD). Nano-scale features of the thin films were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The films cryogenic state electrical properties w

  11. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  12. Crystalline Indium Sulphide thin film by photo accelerated deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, A. C.; Preetha, K. C.; Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T. L.

    2015-02-01

    Indium sulfide thin films deserve special attention because of its potential application as buffer layers in CIGS based solar cells. Highly transparent indium sulfide (InS) thin films were prepared using a novel method called photo accelerated chemical deposition (PCD). Ultraviolet source of 150 W was used to irradiate the solution. Compared to all other chemical methods, PCD scores its advantage for its low cost, flexible substrate and capable of large area of deposition. Reports on deposition of high quality InS thin films at room temperature are very rare in literature. The precursor solution was initially heated to 90°C for ten minutes and then deposition was carried out at room temperature for two hours. The appearance of the film changed from lemon yellow to bright yellow as the deposition time increased. The sample was characterized for its structural and optical properties. XRD profile showed the polycrystalline behavior of the film with mixed phases having crystallite size of 17 nm. The surface morphology of the films exhibited uniformly distributed honey comb like structures. The film appeared to be smooth and the value of extinction coefficient was negligible. Optical measurements showed that the film has more than 80% transmission in the visible region. The direct band gap energy was 2.47eV. This method is highly suitable for the synthesis of crystalline and transparent indium sulfide thin films and can be used for various photo voltaic applications.

  13. Thin film growth rate effects for primary ion beam deposited diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, D.; Mirtich, M.

    1986-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were grown by primary ion beam deposition and the growth rates were measured for various beam energies, types of hydrocarbon gases and their ratio to Ar, and substrate materials. The growth rate had a linear dependence upon hydrocarbon content in the discharge chamber, and only small dependence on other parameters. For given deposition conditions a threshold in the atomic ratio of carbon to argon gas was identified below which films did not grow on fused silica substrate, but grew on Si substrate and on existing DLC films. Ion source deposition parameters and substrate material were found to affect the deposition threshold and film growth rates.

  14. Sputtering deposition and characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation focuses on experimental investigations of ultrathin, ultrasmooth amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited on Si(100) substrates by radio frequency (RF) sputtering and characterization of the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties and thermal stability of the films. Ultrathin a-C films of thickness 5--100 nm and typical root-mean-square roughness of 0.15--1 nm were deposited on ultrasmooth Si(100) substrates using pure argon as the sputtering gas. A low-pressure RF argon discharge model was used to analyze the plasma parameters in the film growth environment. These plasma parameters correlate the deposition conditions with the film growth processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface force microscopy (SFM) were used to characterize the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of the a-C films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the compositions and microstructures of the films. Sputter-etching measurements of the a-C films by energetic argon ion bombardment were used to study the surface binding energy of carbon atoms in a-C films deposited under different conditions. The dependence of film properties on deposition conditions was studied, and relations between nanomechanical and nanotribological properties were discussed in terms of a modified deformation index. The deformation and nanotribology mechanisms of the a-C films were compared with those of other films, such as TiC and Cr films (both 100 nm thick), and bulk Si(100). Reactive RF sputtering of nitrogenated amorphous carbon (a-CNx) films was investigated by introducing nitrogen into the a-C films during film growth by using an argon-nitrogen gas mixture as the sputtering gas. The alloying effect of nitrogen on the film growth and properties, such as hardness and surface energy, was studied and interpreted in terms of the changes in the plasma environment induced due to differences in the composition of the sputtering gas mixture. The thermal

  15. Depositing highly adhesive optical thin films on acrylic substrates.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomoaki; Harada, Toshinori; Murotani, Hiroshi; Matumoto, Shigeharu

    2014-02-01

    Optical thin films are used to control the reflectance and transmittance of optical components. However, conventional deposition technologies applicable to organic (plastic) substrates typically result in weak adhesion. We overcame this problem by using vacuum deposition in combination with sputtering to directly deposit a SiO2 optical thin film onto an acrylic resin substrate. We observed neither yellowing nor deformation. The hardness of the film is 2H as measured by the pencil hardness test, indicating successful modulation of optical properties without sacrificing substrate hardness.

  16. Sputter deposition of metallic thin film and directpatterning

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, L.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, X.; Ji, Q.; Leung, K.-N.

    2005-09-09

    A compact apparatus is developed for deposition of metal thin film. The system employs an RF discharge plasma source with a straight RF antenna, which is made of or covered with deposition material, serving as sputtering target at the same time. The average deposition rate of copper thin film is as high as 450nm/min. By properly allocating the metal materials on the sputtering antenna, mixture deposition of multiple metal species is achieved. Using an ion beam imprinting scheme also taking advantage of ion beam focusing technique, two different schemes of direct patterning deposition process are developed: direct depositing patterned metallic thin film and resistless ion beam sputter patterning. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated direct pattern transfer from a template with feature size of micro scale; patterns with more than 10x reduction are achieved by sputtering patterning method.

  17. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  18. Process and film characterization of chemical-bath-deposited ZnS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical-bath deposition of ZnS thin films from NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}/ZnSO{sub 4} solutions has been studied. The effect of various process parameters on the growth and the film quality is presented. A first approach to a mechanistic interpretation of the chemical process is reported. The structural, optical, chemical, and electrical properties of the ZNS thin films deposited by this method have been studied. The electron diffraction (EDS) analysis shows that the films are microcrystalline with a cubic structure. EDS analysis has demonstrated that the films are highly stoichiometric. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the ZnS thin films deposited by this method show that the films are continuous and homogeneous. Electrical conductivity measurements have shown the highly resistivity nature of these films ({sigma} = 10{sup {minus}9} S/cm).

  19. Dual Ion Beam Deposition Of Diamond Films On Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutchman, Arnold H.; Partyka, Robert J.; Lewis, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Diamond film deposition processes are of great interest because of their potential use for the formation of both protective as well as anti-reflective coatings on the surfaces of optical elements. Conventional plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond coating processes are not ideal for use on optical components because of the high processing temperatures required, and difficulties faced in nucleating films on most optical substrate materials. A unique dual ion beam deposition technique has been developed which now makes possible deposition of diamond films on a wide variety of optical elements. The new DIOND process operates at temperatures below 150 aegrees Farenheit, and has been used to nucleate and grow both diamondlike carbon and diamond films on a wide variety of optical :taterials including borosilicate glass, quartz glass, plastic, ZnS, ZnSe, Si, and Ge.

  20. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  1. Anodization of Ti thin film deposited on ITO.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Abu Z; Zheng, Haidong; Latham, Kay; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2009-01-06

    We have investigated several key aspects for the self-organization of nanotubes in RF sputtered titanium (Ti) thin films formed by the anodization process in fluoride-ion-containing neutral electrolytes. Ti films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates at room temperature and 300 degrees C, and then anodized. The films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-vis spectrometry before and after anodization. It was observed that anodization of high temperature deposited films resulted in nanotube type structures with diameters in the range of 10-45 nm for an applied voltage of 5-20 V. In addition, the anatase form of TiO(2) is formed during the anodization process which is also confirmed using photocurrent measurements. However, the anodization of room temperature deposited Ti films resulted in irregular pores or holes.

  2. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Nanoporous Cobalt Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunming; Nori, Sudhakar; Wei, Wei; Aggarwal, Ravi; Kumar, Dhananjay; Narayan, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoporous cobalt thin films were deposited on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes at room temperature using pulsed laser deposition. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the nanoporous cobalt thin films retained the monodisperse pore size and high porosity of the anodized aluminum oxide substrates. Temperature- and field-dependent magnetic data obtained between 10 K and 350 K showed large hysteresis behavior in these materials. The increase of coercivity values was larger for nanoporous cobalt thin films than for multilayered cobalt/alumina thin films. The average diameter of the cobalt nanograins in the nanoporous cobalt thin films was estimated to be ~5 nm for blocking temperatures near room temperature. These results suggest that pulsed laser deposition may be used to fabricate nanoporous magnetic materials with unusual properties for biosensing, drug delivery, data storage, and other technological applications. PMID:19198344

  3. Optimization of chemical bath deposited cadmium sulfide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Oladeji, I.O.; Chow, L.

    1997-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is known to be an excellent heterojunction partner of p-type cadmium telluride (CdTe) or p-type copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) due essentially to its high electron affinity. It is widely used as a window material in high efficiency thin-film solar cells based on CdTe or CuInSe{sub 2} owing to its transparency and photoconductivity among other properties. The authors report the optimization of CdS thin film grown by chemical bath deposition where homogeneous reactions are minimized. The optimum parameters have enabled them to maximize the thickness of the deposited film in a single dip and to grow thicker films by periodically replenishing the concentration of reactants while the substrate remains continuously dipped in the reaction bath. Characterization results reveal the deposited CdS films exhibit improved optical and electrical properties.

  4. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Temperature Protonic Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred W.; Berger, M. H.; Sayir, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to fabricate nanostructured BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3- sigma) films. Protonic conduction of fabricated BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films was compared to sintered BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma). Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 1 to 8 micron thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on porous Al2O3 substrates. Thin films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 700 to 950 C at O2 pressures up to 200 mTorr using laser pulse energies of 0.45 - 0.95 J. Fabricated films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Single phase BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films with a columnar growth morphology are observed with preferred crystal growth along the [100] or [001] direction. Results indicate [100] growth dependence upon laser pulse energy. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C to 900 C. Electrical conduction behavior was dependent upon film deposition temperature. Maximum conductivity occurs at deposition temperature of 900 oC; the electrical conductivity exceeds the sintered specimen. All other deposited films exhibit a lower electrical conductivity than the sintered specimen. Activation energy for electrical conduction showed dependence upon deposition temperature, it varied

  5. Nitrogen incorporation in sputter deposited molybdenum nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Stöber, Laura Patocka, Florian Schneider, Michael Schmid, Ulrich; Konrath, Jens Peter Haberl, Verena

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, the authors report on the high temperature performance of sputter deposited molybdenum (Mo) and molybdenum nitride (Mo{sub 2}N) thin films. Various argon and nitrogen gas compositions are applied for thin film synthetization, and the amount of nitrogen incorporation is determined by Auger measurements. Furthermore, effusion measurements identifying the binding conditions of the nitrogen in the thin film are performed up to 1000 °C. These results are in excellent agreement with film stress and scanning electron microscope analyses, both indicating stable film properties up to annealing temperatures of 500 °C.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of tungsten boron alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Fleming, J.G.; Lujan, R.D.; Roherty-Osmun, E.; Reid, J.S.; Hochberg, A.K.; Roberts, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    A low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) process for depositing W{sub X}B{sub (1-X)} films from WF{sub 6} and B{sub 2}H{sub 6} is described. The depositions were performed in a cold wall reactor on 6 in. Si wafers at 400C. During deposition, pressure was maintained at a fixed level in the range of 200 to 260 mTorr. Ratio of WF{sub 6}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6} was varied from 0.05 to 1.07. Carrier gas was either 100 sccm of Ar with a gas flow of 308 to 591 sccm, or 2000 sccm of Ar and 2000 sccm of H{sub 2} with the overall gas flow from 4213 to 4452 sccm. Two stable deposition regions were found separated by an unstable region that produced non-uniform films. The B-rich films produced in one of the stable deposition regions had W concentrations of 30 at.% and resistivities between 200 and 300 {mu}ohm{center_dot}cm. The W-rich films produced in the other stable deposition region had W concentrations of 80 at.% and resistivities of 100 {mu}ohm{center_dot}cm. As-deposited films had densities similar to bulk material of similar stoichiometry. Barrier properties of the films against diffusion of Cu to 700C in vacuum were measured by 4-point probe. Also, annealing was carried out to 900C in order to determine phases formed as the films crystallize. These studies indicate that W{sub X}B{sub (1-X)} films may be useful barriers in ULSI metallization applications.

  7. Fundamentals of sol-gel film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C.J.; Anderson, M.T.; Bohuszewicz, T.; Ganguli, R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, M.

    1996-12-31

    Results appear to confirm the concept of surfactant-templating of thin film mesostructures. Final film pore structure depends on starting surfactant and water concentrations and process time scale (governed by evaporation rate). Surfactant ordering at substrate-film and film-vapor interfaces orients the porosity of adjoining films, leading to graded structures. SAW experiments show that depending on processing conditions, the porosity may be open or closed (restricted). Open porosity is monosized. Upon pyrolysis, lamellar structures collapse, while the hexagonal structures persist; when both hexagonal and lamellar structures are present, the hexagonal may serve to pillar the lamellar, avoiding its complete collapse. Thick lamellar films can be prepared because the surfactant mechanically decouples stress development in adjoining layers. Upon drying and heating, each individual layer can shrink due to continuing condensation reactions without accumulating stress. During surfactant pyrolysis, the layers coalesce to form a thick crack-free layer. Formation of closed porosity films is discussed.

  8. Thin film zinc oxide deposited by CVD and PVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelmann, Frank U.

    2016-10-01

    Zinc oxide is known as a mineral since 1810, but it came to scientific interest after its optoelectronic properties found to be tuneable by p-type doping. Since the late 1980’s the number of publications increased exponentially. All thin film deposition technologies, including sol-gel and spray pyrolysis, are able to produce ZnO films. However, for outstanding properties and specific doping, only chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition have shown so far satisfying results in terms of high conductivity and high transparency. In this paper the different possibilities for doping will be discussed, some important applications of doped ZnO thin films will be presented. The deposition technologies used for industrial applications are shown in this paper. Especially sputtering of aluminium doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:Al or AZO) and LPCVD of boron doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:B or BZO) are used for the commercial production of transparent conductive oxide films on glass used for thin film photovoltaic cells. For this special application the typical process development for large area deposition is presented, with the important trade-off between optical properties (transparency and ability for light scattering) and electrical properties (conductivity). Also, the long term stability of doped ZnO films is important for applications, humidity in the ambient is often the reason for degradation of the films. The differences between the mentioned materials are presented.

  9. Stress development during deposition of CNx thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broitman, E.; Zheng, W. T.; Sjöström, H.; Ivanov, I.; Greene, J. E.; Sundgren, J.-E.

    1998-05-01

    We have investigated the influence of deposition parameters on stress generation in CNx (0.3films deposited onto Si(001) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering of C in pure N2 discharges. Film stress, σ, which in all cases is compressive, decreases with an increase in the N2 pressure, PN2, due to structural changes induced by the pressure-dependent variation in the average energy of particles bombarding the film during deposition. The film stress σ is also a function of the film growth temperature, Ts, and exhibits a maximum value of ˜5 GPa at 350 °C. Under these conditions, the films have a distorted microstructure consisting of a three-dimensional, primarily sp2 bonded, network. In contrast, films deposited at Ts<200 °C with a low stress are amorphous. At 350 °Cfilms grown at 350 °C exhibit the highest hardness and elasticity.

  10. Diamond film deposition using microwave plasmas under low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave plasma depositions of diamond films have been investigated under low pressures of 10 mTorr to 10 Torr, at low substrate temperatures of 400 to 750 C, using high methane concentrations of 5 to 15 percent and oxygen concentrations of 5 to 10 percent in hydrogen plasmas. The deposition system consists of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and a RF induction-heated sample stage. The deposition system can be operated in either high-pressure microwave or electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) modes by varying the sample stage position. Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies on diamond films deposited at 10 Torr pressure show that CL emissions at 430, 480, 510, 530, 560, 570 and 740 nm can be employed to characterize the quality of diamond films. High-quality, well-faceted diamond films have been deposited at 10 Torr and 600 C using 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas; CL measurements on these films show very low N impurities and no detectable Si impurities. Diamond nucleation on SiC has been demonstrated by depositing well-faceted diamond crystallites on SiC-coated Si substrates.

  11. Reactive ion beam deposition of aluminum nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, S.; Ashok, S.; Fonash, S. J.; Tongson}, L.

    1985-07-01

    Aluminum nitride thin films have been prepared at room temperature by reactive ion beam sputtering for potential use as a passivant and diffusion/anneal cap in compound semiconductor technology. The electrical and optical pro-perties of these films have been studied along with the in-fluence of thermal annealing on the material characteristics. The quality of the films has also been found to improve in the presence of atomic hydrogen during the deposition.

  12. Characterization of CdTe Films Deposited at Various Bath Temperatures and Concentrations Using Electrophoretic Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Mohd Norizam Md; Zakaria, Azmi; Jafari, Atefeh; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Abdullah, Wan Rafizah Wan; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established. PMID:22754325

  13. Characterization of CdTe films deposited at various bath temperatures and concentrations using electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Daud, Mohd Norizam Md; Zakaria, Azmi; Jafari, Atefeh; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Abdullah, Wan Rafizah Wan; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established.

  14. Vacuum deposition of stoichiometric crystalline PbS films: The effect of sulfurizing environment during deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Tyagi, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Thin film of lead sulfide (PbS) was deposited onto highly cleaned glass and quartz substrates using a vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The effect of the sulfurizing environment on the growth and properties of vacuum-deposited PbS thin film was studied. The ambient sulfurizing environment was created by thermal decomposition of thiourea inside the vacuum chamber during deposition to maintain the stoichiometry and quality of the PbS film. The sulfurizing gas H2S, produced in the thermal decomposition of the solid sulfur containing thiourea readily combines with the cations (Pb2+) without leaving any anions (S2-) at the substrates and also has not produced any excess of sulfur at the substrates. The deposited film was characterized by optical spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron micrographs with energy dispersive analysis of x-rays, and atomic force micrographs. The physical characterization of the deposited PbS film revealed that the surface of film grown in the sulfurizing environment improved and contained more stoichiometric sulfur in comparison to film deposited without the sulfurizing environment.

  15. Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Auciello, O.

    1990-05-08

    Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams. 10 figs.

  16. Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Auciello, Orlando

    1990-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams.

  17. Process Tuning of Silica Thin-Film Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Keck,J.; Oliver,J.B.; Gruschow,V.; Spaulding,J.; Howe,J.

    2004-12-17

    Use of high-resolution deposition-rate monitoring and programmatic control of electron-beam position results in improvements in rate consistency and uniformity of source depletion during SiO2 thin-film deposition by electron-beam evaporation.

  18. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  19. Self-terminating growth of platinum films by electrochemical deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihua; Gokcen, Dincer; Bertocci, Ugo; Moffat, Thomas P

    2012-12-07

    A self-terminating rapid electrodeposition process for controlled growth of platinum (Pt) monolayer films from a K(2)PtCl(4)-NaCl electrolyte has been developed that is tantamount to wet atomic layer deposition. Despite the deposition overpotential being in excess of 1 volt, Pt deposition was quenched at potentials just negative of proton reduction by an alteration of the double-layer structure induced by a saturated surface coverage of underpotential deposited H (H(upd)). The surface was reactivated for further Pt deposition by stepping the potential to more positive values, where H(upd) is oxidized and fresh sites for the adsorption of PtCl(4)(2-) become available. Periodic pulsing of the potential enables sequential deposition of two-dimensional Pt layers to fabricate films of desired thickness, relevant to a range of advanced technologies.

  20. Aluminosilicate glass thin films elaborated by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, Thibault; Saitzek, Sébastien; Méar, François O.; Blach, Jean-François; Ferri, Anthony; Huvé, Marielle; Montagne, Lionel

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, we report the elaboration of aluminosilicate glass thin films by Pulsed Laser Deposition at various temperatures deposition. The amorphous nature of glass thin films was highlighted by Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and no nanocristallites were observed in the glassy matrix. Chemical analysis, obtained with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy, showed a good transfer and homogeneous elementary distribution with of chemical species from the target to the film a. Structural studies performed by Infrared Spectroscopy showed that the substrate temperature plays an important role on the bonding configuration of the layers. A slight shift of Si-O modes to larger wavenumber was observed with the synthesis temperature, assigned to a more strained sub-oxide network. Finally, optical properties of thins film measured by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry are similar to those of the bulk aluminosilicate glass, which indicate a good deposition of aluminosilicate bulk glass.

  1. Plasma deposition of polymer composite films incorporating nanocellulose whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, P.; Airoudj, A.; Laborie, M.-P.; Mathew, A. P.; Roucoules, V.

    2011-11-01

    In a trend for sustainable engineering and functionalization of surfaces, we explore the possibilities of gas phase processes to deposit nanocomposite films. From an analysis of pulsed plasma polymerization of maleic anhydride in the presence of nanocellulose whiskers, it seems that thin nanocomposite films can be deposited with various patterns. By specifically modifying plasma parameters such as total power, duty cycle, and monomer gas pressure, the nanocellulose whiskers are either incorporated into a buckled polymer film or single nanocellulose whiskers are deposited on top of a polymeric film. The density of the latter can be controlled by modifying the exact positioning of the substrate in the reactor. The resulting morphologies are evaluated by optical microscopy, AFM, contact angle measurements and ellipsometry.

  2. thin films by an hybrid deposition configuration: pulsed laser deposition and thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Solís-Casados, D. A.; Perez-Alvarez, J.; Romero, S.; Morales-Mendez, J. G.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to report the application of an hybrid deposition configuration to deposit Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films modified with different amounts of bismuth (Bi:TiO2). The samples were synthesized combining a TiO2 laser ablation plasma with a flux of vapor of bismuth produced by thermal evaporation. By varying the deposition rate of Bi it was possible to control the amount of Bi incorporated in the film and consequently the film properties. A detailed compositional, structural, and optical characterization by XPS, RBS, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectrometry techniques is discussed. Photocatalytic response of the deposited thin films was studied through the degradation of a malachite green solution.

  3. UV laser deposition of metal films by photogenerated free radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. K.; Mantei, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel photochemical method for liquid-phase deposition of metal films is described. In the liquid phase deposition scheme, a metal containing compound and a metal-metal bonded carbonyl complex are dissolved together in a polar solvent and the mixture is irradiated using a UV laser. The optical arrangement consists of a HeCd laser which provides 7 mW of power at a wavelength of 325 nm in the TEM(OO) mode. The beam is attenuated and may be expanded to a diameter of 5-20 mm. Experiments with photochemical deposition of silver films onto glass and quartz substrates are described in detail. Mass spectrometric analysis of deposited silver films indicated a deposition rate of about 1 A/s at incident power levels of 0.01 W/sq cm. UV laser-induced copper and palladium films have also been obtained. A black and white photograph showing the silver Van Der Pauw pattern of a solution-deposited film is provided.

  4. SEM Analysis of Electrophoretically-Deposited Nanoparticle Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Neil

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (20 nm) were synthesized and electrophoretically deposited onto aluminum foil, graphite paper, and carbon felt in order to study its potential as a cost-effective electrocatalyst for the oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in a proposed sulfur ammonia thermochemical cycle. Scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry were used to characterize the deposited films and investigate their electrochemical activity. Furthermore, the effects of electrophoretic deposition conditions on deposit morphology and subsequently the effects of deposit morphology on electrochemical activity in 2 M ammonium sulfite were studied to better understand how to improve electrocatalysts. It was found that there is a critical deposit thickness for each substrate, where additional deposited particles reduce overall electrocatalytic activity of the deposits. For graphite paper, this thickness was estimated to be 3 particle layers for the EPD conditions studied. The 3 particle layer film on graphite paper resulted in a 5.5 fold increase in current density from a blank graphite paper substrate. For carbon felt, the deposit thickness threshold was calculated to be 0.13 of a particle layer for the EPD conditions studied. Moreover, this film was found to have a 4.3 fold increase in current density from a blank carbon felt substrate.

  5. Modified chemical route for deposition of molybdenum disulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Akshay N. Sartale, S. D.

    2014-04-24

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using a modified chemical route. Sodium molybdate and sodium sulphide were used as precursors for molybdenum and sulphur respectively. The route involves formation of tetrathiomolybdate ions (MoS{sub 4}{sup 2−}) and further reduction by sodium borohydride to form MoS{sub 2}. The deposition was performed at room temperature. The deposited films were annealed in argon atmosphere at 1073 K for 1 hour to improve its crystallinity. The deposited films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy for optical studies and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for structure determination.

  6. Sputter deposited Terfenol-D thin films for multiferroic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanchandra, K. P.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Wetzlar, K. P.; Sun, W. Y.; Nordeen, P.; Carman, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the sputter deposition and crystallization process to produce high quality Terfenol-D thin film (100 nm) with surface roughness below 1.5 nm. The Terfenol-D thin film was produced using DC magnetron sputtering technique with various sputtering parameters and two different crystallization methods, i.e. substrate heating and post-annealing. Several characterization techniques including WDS, XRD, TEM, AFM, SQUID and MOKE were used to determine the physical and magnetic properties of the Terfenol-D films. TEM studies reveal that the film deposited on the heated substrate has large grains grown along the film thickness producing undesirable surface roughness while the film crystallized by post-annealing method shows uniformly distributed small grains producing a smooth surface. The Terfenol-D film was also deposited onto (011) cut PMN-PT single crystal substrate. With the application of an electric field the film exhibited a 1553 Oe change in coercivity with an estimated saturation magnetostriction of λs = 910 x 10-6.

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of tannic acid-polypyrrolidone films and composites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zhang, Tianshi; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Thin films of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-tannic acid (TA) complexes were prepared by a conceptually new strategy, based on electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Proof of concept investigations involved the analysis of the deposition yield, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy of the deposited material, and electron microscopy studies. The analysis of the deposition mechanism indicated that the limitations of the EPD in the deposition of small phenolic molecules, such as TA, and electrically neutral polymers, similar to PVP, containing hydrogen-accepting carbonyl groups, can be avoided. The remarkable adsorption properties of TA and film forming properties of the PVP-TA complexes allowed for the EPD of materials of different types, such as huntite mineral platelets and hydrotalcite clay particles, TiO2 and MnO2 oxide nanoparticles, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, TiN and Pd nanoparticles. Moreover, PVP-TA complexes were used for the co-deposition of different materials and formation of composite films. In another approach, TA was used as a capping agent for the hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorods, which were then deposited by EPD using PVP-TA complexes. The fundamental adsorption and interaction mechanisms of TA involved chelation of metal atoms on particle surfaces with galloyl groups, π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. The films prepared by EPD can be used for various applications, utilizing functional properties of TA, PVP, inorganic and organic materials of different types and their composites.

  8. Large-Scale Graphene Film Deposition for Monolithic Device Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-shurman, Khaled

    Since 1958, the concept of integrated circuit (IC) has achieved great technological developments and helped in shrinking electronic devices. Nowadays, an IC consists of more than a million of compacted transistors. The majority of current ICs use silicon as a semiconductor material. According to Moore's law, the number of transistors built-in on a microchip can be double every two years. However, silicon device manufacturing reaches its physical limits. To explain, there is a new trend to shrinking circuitry to seven nanometers where a lot of unknown quantum effects such as tunneling effect can not be controlled. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new platform material to replace Si. Graphene is considered a promising material with enormous potential applications in many electronic and optoelectronics devices due to its superior properties. There are several techniques to produce graphene films. Among these techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a very convenient method to fabricate films for large-scale graphene films. Though CVD method is suitable for large area growth of graphene, the need for transferring a graphene film to silicon-based substrates is required. Furthermore, the graphene films thus achieved are, in fact, not single crystalline. Also, graphene fabrication utilizing Cu and Ni at high growth temperature contaminates the substrate that holds Si CMOS circuitry and CVD chamber as well. So, lowering the deposition temperature is another technological milestone for the successful adoption of graphene in integrated circuits fabrication. In this research, direct large-scale graphene film fabrication on silicon based platform (i.e. SiO2 and Si3N4) at low temperature was achieved. With a focus on low-temperature graphene growth, hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was utilized to synthesize graphene film using 200 nm thick nickel film. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to examine graphene formation on the bottom side of the Ni film

  9. Calculating The Resistivity Of A Deposited Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberle, Lawrence G.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    1990-01-01

    Iterative procedure computes resistivity from measurements by four-probe method. Computer program and technique developed to aid in solution of class of problems in which measurements of electrical resistivity needed for substance deposited on substrate of higher resistivity than deposited layer.

  10. Methods for making deposited films with improved microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.; Moss, Ronald W.; McClanahan, Edwin D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for improving microstructures of line-of-sight deposited films are described. Columnar growth defects ordinarily produced by geometrical shadowing during deposition of such films are eliminated without resorting to post-deposition thermal or mechanical treatments. The native, as-deposited coating qualities, including homogeneity, fine grain size, and high coating-to-substrate adherence, can thus be retained. The preferred method includes the steps of emitting material from a source toward a substrate to deposit a coating non-uniformly on the substrate surface, removing a portion of the coating uniformly over the surface, again depositing material onto the surface, but from a different direction, and repeating the foregoing steps. The quality of line-of-sight deposited films such as those produced by sputtering, progressively deteriorates as the angle of incidence between the flux and the surface becomes increasingly acute. Depositing non-uniformly, so that the coating becomes progressively thinner as quality deteriorates, followed by uniformly removing some of the coating, such as by resputtering, eliminates the poor quality portions, leaving only high quality portions of the coating. Subsequently sputtering from a different direction applies a high quality coating to other regions of the surface. Such steps can be performed either simultaneously or sequentially to apply coatings of a uniformly high quality, closed microstructure to three-dimensional or larger planar surfaces.

  11. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2015-12-01

    Niobium nitride (NbNx) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbNx films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ˜40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbNx films from mixed β-Nb2N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb2N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbNx deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbNx films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbNx film morphology and phase.

  14. Vapor-deposited porous films for energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Hayes, Jeffrey P.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2005-07-05

    Metallic films are grown with a "spongelike" morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous and open porosity on the submicron scale. The stabilization of the spongelike morphology is found over a limited range of the sputter deposition parameters, that is, of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This spongelike morphology is an extension of the features as generally represented in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings were deposited with working gas pressures up 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1000 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross section views with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) under which the spongelike metal deposits are produced appear universal for other metals including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, David Christopher

    1998-12-01

    The continued drive to decrease the size and increase the speed of micro-electronic Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) devices is hampered by some of the properties of the SiOsb2 gate dielectric. This research has focused on the CVD of TiOsb2 thin films to replace SiOsb2 as the gate dielectric in MOS capacitors and transistors. The relationship of CVD parameters and post-deposition anneal treatments to the physical and electrical properties of thin films of TiOsb2 has been studied. Structural and electrical characterization of TiOsb2 films grown from the CVD precursors tetraisopropoxotitanium (IV) (TTIP) and TTIP plus Hsb2O is described in Chapter 3. Both types of deposition produced stoichiometric TiOsb2 films comprised of polycrystalline anatase, but the interface properties were dramatically degraded when water vapor was added. Films grown with TTIP in the presence of Hsb2O contained greater than 50% more hydrogen than films grown using only TTIP and the hydrogen content of films deposited in both wet and dry TTIP environments decreased sharply with a post deposition Osb2 anneal. A significant thickness variation of the dielectric constant was observed which could be explained by an interfacial oxide and the finite accumulation thickness. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 38, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 4 discusses the low temperature CVD of crystalline TiOsb2 thin films deposited using the precursor tetranitratotitanium (IV), TNT, which produces crystalline TiOsb2 films of the anatase phase in UHV-CVD at temperatures as low as 184sp°C. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 17, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 5 describes the results of a comparison of physical and electrical properties between TiOsb2 films grown via LPCVD using

  16. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  17. Film synthesis on powders by cathodic arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Brown, I.G.; Ivanov, I.C.

    1995-04-01

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition was used to coat Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder (mesh size 60) with platinum. The power particles were moved during deposition using a mechanical system operating at a resonance frequency of 20 Hz. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron microscopy show that all particles are completely coated with a platinum film having a thickness of about 100 nm. The actual deposition time was only 20 s, thus the deposition rate was very high (5 nm/s).

  18. Characterization of electrophoretic suspension for thin polymer film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenova, D.; Weiter, M.; Stepanek, P.; Ouzzane, I.; Vala, M.; Sinigersky, V.; Zhivkov, I.

    2012-03-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of poly [2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] toluene solutions and 50:50% toluene/acetonitrile suspensions show clearly distinguishable differences (e.g., peak broadening and shifting), which could be used for characterization of suspensions with different acetonitrile content. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement of the suspensions prepared showed a particle size of 90 nm. Thin films with thicknesses of about 400 nm were prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and spin coating. As the films are very soft, a contactless optical profilometry techique based on chromatic aberration was used to measure their thickness. AFM imaging of spin coated and EPD films revealed film roughness of 20÷40 nm and 40÷80 nm, respectively. The EPD film roughness seems to be less than the suspension particle size obtained by DLS, probably due to the partial film dissolving by the toluene present in the suspension.

  19. Aspects of thin film deposition on granulates by physical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Andreas; Schmid, Gerwin H. S.; Mahr, Harald; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Thin film and coating technology has entered fields which may show significant deviations from classical coating applications where films are deposited on plane, sometimes large substrates. Often surfaces of small and irregularly shaped bodies have to be improved in respect to electrical, thermal or mechanical properties. Film deposition and characterization on such small substrates is not a trivial task. This specially holds for methods based on Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) processes such as sputter deposition and its ion- and plasma assisted varieties. Due to their line of sight nature a key issue for homogenous films is efficient intermixing. If this problem is mastered, another task is the prediction and determination of the film thickness on single particles as well as on large scale ensembles thereof. In this work a mechanism capable of uniformly coating up to 1000 cm3 of granulate with particle sizes ranging from approx. 10 μm to 150 μm by magnetron sputtering is thoroughly described. A method for predicting the average film thickness on the particles is presented and tested for several differently shaped objects like microspheres, irregular grains of sinter powder or micro diamonds. For assessing the film thickness on single particles as well as on particle ensembles several complementary methods based on optics, X-ray analysis and gravimetry are employed. Their respective merits and limitations are discussed. Finally an outlook on adapting the described technology for surface modification by plasma based reactive and non-reactive processes is given.

  20. Electron Bombardment of Certain Thin Films during Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Stephen Douglas

    The performance of multilayer thin film optical filters depends largely on the microstructure of the component layers. This microstructure varies with the deposition parameters inside the coating chamber. By controlling these parameters, optical filters can be produced to exacting specifications. In 1947, R. M. Rice established the technique of bombarding the substrate with electrons of several kilovolts as the fils were being deposited. This process improved the durability of zinc sulfide films dramatically. This study was performed to quantitatively analyze the effects of bombardment on film microstructure and subsequent effects on optical and mechanical properties. I installed an electron source filament inside the coating chamber and electrically isolated the substrate holder, which was connected to a positive high voltage supply. An accelerating loop placed just above the filament enhanced its efficiency. The source was calibrated by measuring the current through the substrate holder. Single layer films of five different materials were deposited, each at its own set of electron bombardment parameters. The microstructure was analyzed with an X -ray diffractometer and a transmission electron microscope. Optical properties were measured with guided waves, induced absorption, and spectrophotometric analysis. Film durability was analyzed with scotch tape, eraser, and controlled humidity tests. Antimony trioxide films showed a shift in lattice orientation, but this did not affect columnar structure or macroscopic quantities. Potassium hexafluorozirconate films showed elimination of both crystal structure and columnar growth, resulting in slightly reduced durability and some absorption. Silicon monoxide films suffered no change in structure or properties. Zinc sulfide films demonstrated the change in crystal structure, which was quantified and shown to improve moisture resistance. Optical properties were unaffected. Magnesium fluoride films showed a slight increase

  1. Fractal structure of films deposited in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Budaev, V. P.; Khimchenko, L. N.

    2007-04-15

    The surface of amorphous films deposited in the T-10 tokamak was studied in a scanning tunnel microscope. The surface relief on a scale from 10 nm to 100 {mu}m showed a stochastic surface topography and revealed a hierarchy of grains. The observed variety of irregular structures of the films was studied within the framework of the concept of scale invariance using the methods of fractal geometry and statistical physics. The experimental probability density distribution functions of the surface height variations are close in shape to the Cauchy distribution. The stochastic surface topography of the films is characterized by a Hurst parameter of H = 0.68-0.85, which is evidence of a nontrivial self-similarity of the film structure. The fractal character and porous structure of deposited irregular films must be considered as an important issue related to the accumulation of tritium in the ITER project. The process of film growth on the surface of tokamak components exposed to plasma has been treated within the framework of the general concept of inhomogeneous surface growth. A strong turbulence of the edge plasma in tokamaks can give rise to fluctuations in the incident flux of particles, which leads to the growth of fractal films with grain dimensions ranging from nano-to micrometer scale. The shape of the surface of some films found in the T-10 tokamak has been interpreted using a model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The growth of films according to the discrete DLA model was simulated using statistics of fluctuations observed in a turbulent edge plasma of the T-10 tokamak. The modified DLA model reproduces well the main features of the surface of some films deposited in tokamaks.

  2. Matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition of melanin thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloisi, F.; Pezzella, A.; Barra, M.; Chiarella, F.; Cassinese, A.; Vicari, L.

    2011-07-01

    Melanins constitute a very important class of organic pigments, recently emerging as a potential material for a new generation of bioinspired biocompatible electrically active devices. In this paper, we report about the deposition of synthetic melanin films starting from aqueous suspensions by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In particular, we demonstrate that it is possible to deposit melanin films by MAPLE even if melanin (a) is not soluble in water and (b) absorbs light from UV to IR. AFM images reveal that the film surface features are highly depending on the deposition parameters. UV-VIS and FTIR spectra show both the optical properties and the molecular structure typical of melanins are preserved.

  3. Deposition of superconducting thin films by laser ablation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.F.; Bohandy, J.; Moorjani, K.; Adrian, F.J.

    1988-02-25

    Superconducting thin films, approximately 1 ..mu..m thick and 1 cm/sup 2/ in area, have been deposited on fused silica by ablation of the bulk material, YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/, using a pulsed excimer laser. The presence of superconductivity in as-deposited films was established by a novel variation of the technique of microwave absorption, in which the superconducting transition appears as a peak in the temperature dependence of the microwave response. The method is sensitive enough to allow detection of superconductivity in small (approx.0.1 mg) samples and is capable of resolving multiple superconducting phases with slight differences in T/sub c/. As-deposited films have essentially the same value of T/sub c/ (94K) as the bulk material.

  4. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  5. Final report of ''Fundamental Surface Reaction Mechanisms in Fluorocarbon Plasma-Based Processing''

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb S. Oehrlein; H. Anderson; J. Cecchi; D. Graves

    2004-09-21

    This report provides a summary of results obtained in research supported by contract ''Fundamental Surface Reaction Mechanisms in Fluorocarbon Plasma-Based Processing'' (Contract No. DE-FG0200ER54608). In this program we advanced significantly the scientific knowledge base on low pressure fluorocarbon plasmas used for patterning of dielectric films and for producing fluorocarbon coatings on substrates. We characterized important neutral and ionic gas phase species that are incident at the substrate, and the processes that occur at relevant surfaces in contact with the plasma. The work was performed through collaboration of research groups at three universities where significantly different, complementary tools for plasma and surface characterization, computer simulation of plasma and surface processes exist. Exchange of diagnostic tools and experimental verification of key results at collaborating institutions, both experimentally and by computer simulations, was an important component of the approach taken in this work.

  6. A new approach to the deposition of nanostructured biocatalytic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitsky, V. I.; Berzina, T. S.; Pastorino, L.; Bernasconi, E.; Nicolini, C.

    2003-06-01

    In the present work, monolayer engineering was used to fabricate biocatalytic nanostructured thin films based on the enzyme penicillin G acylase. The biocatalytic films with enhanced characteristics were produced by the deposition of alternate-layer assemblies with a predetermined structure using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett and adsorption techniques. The value of enzyme activity and the level of protein detachment were measured in dependence on the variation of film composition and on the sequence of layer alternation. As a result, highly active and stable structures were found, which could be promising candidates for practical applications. The method of modification of the deposition method to provide continuous film formation on large-area supports is discussed.

  7. A preliminary petrogenetic grid for REE fluorocarbonates and associated minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Wood, Scott A.

    1992-02-01

    - activity alone, but can result from variations in either Ca 2+ or CO 32- activities, and (2) that fluocerite can coexist with any of the fluorocarbonate minerals at high F - or low CO 32- activity depending on the activity of Ca 2+, pressure and temperature. Fuller understanding of the genesis of REE fluorocarbonate deposits will require extensive fluid inclusion and related studies and systematic determinations of phase relations through well-constrained, reversed experiments.

  8. Substrates suitable for deposition of superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Feenstra, Roeland; Boatner, Lynn A.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

  9. Nanostructuring and texturing of pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunbin; Catledge, Shane; Vohra, Yogesh; Camata, Renato; Lacefield, William

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca_10(PO_4)_6(OH)_2] is commonly deposited onto orthopedic and dental metallic implants to speed up bone formation around devices, allowing earlier stabilization in a patient. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a suitable means of placing thin HA films on these implants because of its control over stoichiometry, crystallinity, and nanostructure. These characteristics determine the mechanical properties of the films that must be optimized to improve the performance of load-bearing implants and other devices that undergo bone insertion. We have used PLD to produce nanostructured and preferentially oriented HA films and evaluated their mechanical properties. Pure, highly crystalline HA films on Ti-6Al-4V substrates were obtained using a KrF excimer laser (248nm) with energy density of 4-8 J/cm^2 and deposition temperature of 500-700^rcC. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopies reveal that our careful manipulation of energy density and substrate temperature has led to films made up of HA grains in the nanometer scale. Broadening of x-ray diffraction peaks as a function of deposition temperature suggests it may be possible to control the film nanostructure to a great extent. X-ray diffraction also shows that as the laser energy density is increased in the 4-8 J/cm^2 range, the hexagonal HA films become preferentially oriented along the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. Texture, nanostructure, and phase make-up all significantly influence the mechanical properties. We will discuss how each of these factors affects hardness and Young's modulus of the HA films as measured by nanoindentation.

  10. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  11. Studies on atomic layer deposition of IRMOF-8 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Salmi, Leo D. Heikkilä, Mikko J.; Vehkamäki, Marko; Puukilainen, Esa; Ritala, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2015-01-15

    Deposition of IRMOF-8 thin films by atomic layer deposition was studied at 260–320 °C. Zinc acetate and 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid were used as the precursors. The as-deposited amorphous films were crystallized in 70% relative humidity at room temperature resulting in an unknown phase with a large unit cell. An autoclave with dimethylformamide as the solvent was used to recrystallize the films into IRMOF-8 as confirmed by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. The films were further characterized by high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA), nanoindentation, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. HTXRD measurements revealed similar behavior to bulk IRMOF-8. According to TOF-ERDA and FTIR, composition of the films was similar to IRMOF-8. Through-porosity was confirmed by loading the films with palladium using Pd(thd){sub 2} (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) as the precursor.

  12. Deposition of magnetoelectric hexaferrite thin films on substrates of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Saba; Izadkhah, Hessam; Vittoria, Carmine

    2016-12-01

    Magnetoelectric M-type hexaferrite thin films (SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19) were deposited using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique on Silicon substrate. A conductive oxide layer of Indium-Tin Oxide (ITO) was deposited as a buffer layer with the dual purposes of 1) to reduce lattice mismatch between the film and silicon and 2) to lower applied voltages to observe magnetoelectric effects at room temperature on Silicon based devices. The film exhibited magnetoelectric effects as confirmed by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) techniques in voltages as low as 0.5 V. Without the oxide conductive layer the required voltages to observe magnetoelectric effects was typically about 1000 times larger. The magnetoelectric thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and ferromagnetic resonance techniques. We measured saturation magnetization of 650 G, and coercive field of about 150 Oe for these thin films. The change in remanence magnetization was measured in the presence of DC voltages and the changes in remanence were in the order of 15% with the application of only 0.5 V (DC voltage). We deduced a magnetoelectric coupling, α, of 1.36×10-9 s m-1 in SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19 thin films.

  13. Fabrication of ionic liquid ultrathin film by sequential deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Yusuke; Kanai, Yuta; Imanishi, Akihito; Yokota, Yasuyuki; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    A simple, mild, reproducible, and controllable nanodeposition method for ionic liquids (ILs) by ejection of IL solution through a high-speed electromagnetic valve (pulse valve) to a substrate under vacuum is proposed (pulse-valve method). Sequential deposition of an IL [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (BMIM-TFSI)] on Au(111) substrates from its methanol solution was examined by adopting the pulse-valve method and the deposited IL films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The amount of IL deposited per a pulse was successfully reduced to less than an equivalent thickness of 0.2 nm. The deposited IL was homogeneously distributed over a substrate area of 1 × 1 cm2 substrate area and the deposited amount was reproducible for independent depositions.

  14. Thin NiTi Films Deposited on Graphene Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, S.; Schulze, A.; Böhme, M.; Hahn, T.; Wagner, M. F.-X.

    2017-03-01

    We present experimental results on the deposition of Nickel Titanium (NiTi) films on graphene substrates using a PVD magnetron sputter process. Characterization of the 2-4 micron thick NiTi films by electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy shows that grain size and orientation of the thin NiTi films strongly depend on the type of combination of graphene and copper layers below. Our experimental findings are supported by density functional theory calculations: a theoretical estimation of the binding energies of different NiTi-graphene interfaces is in line with the experimentally determined microstructural features of the functional NiTi top layer.

  15. Thin NiTi Films Deposited on Graphene Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, S.; Schulze, A.; Böhme, M.; Hahn, T.; Wagner, M. F.-X.

    2016-12-01

    We present experimental results on the deposition of Nickel Titanium (NiTi) films on graphene substrates using a PVD magnetron sputter process. Characterization of the 2-4 micron thick NiTi films by electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy shows that grain size and orientation of the thin NiTi films strongly depend on the type of combination of graphene and copper layers below. Our experimental findings are supported by density functional theory calculations: a theoretical estimation of the binding energies of different NiTi-graphene interfaces is in line with the experimentally determined microstructural features of the functional NiTi top layer.

  16. Deposition of silver on titania films by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xue-Nan; Ye, Mao; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wei, Lin; Hu, Yan; Hou, Xing-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, An-Dong

    2006-06-01

    The deposition of silver on titania films prepared with sol-gel method was performed by electron beam irradiation of silver nitrate solutions. The high efficient Ag/TiO2 films were formed and exhibited enhanced photo-catalytic functions in degradation of methyl orange in aqueous solutions under UV illumination. Metallic Ag nano-clusters were confirmed by XPS, XRD and TEM. The relationship between the silver nitrate concentrations and the photo-catalytic efficiencies of the films was investigated. The optimum concentration of silver nitrate solution was found to be 5 × 10-4 M.

  17. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  18. Polyelectrolyte Coacervates Deposited as High Gas Barrier Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Haile, Merid; Sarwar, Owais; Henderson, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer coatings consisting of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes have proven to be extraordinarily effective oxygen barriers but require many processing steps to fabricate. In an effort to prepare high oxygen barrier thin films more quickly, a polyelectrolyte complex coacervate composed of polyethylenimine and polyacrylic acid is prepared. The coacervate fluid is applied as a thin film using a rod coating process. With humidity and thermal post-treatment, a 2 µm thin film reduces the oxygen transmission rate of 0.127 mm poly(ethylene terephthalate) by two orders of magnitude, rivalling conventional oxygen barrier technologies. These films are fabricated in ambient conditions using low-cost, water-based solutions, providing a tremendous opportunity for single-step deposition of polymeric high barrier thin films.

  19. Formation of ultrasmooth thin silver films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Garaeva, M. Ya.; Mamichev, D. A. Grishchenko, Yu. V.; Zanaveskin, M. L.

    2013-09-15

    Ultrasmooth thin silver films have been formed on a quartz substrate with a buffer yttrium oxide layer by pulsed laser deposition. The dependence of the surface morphology of the film on the gas (N{sub 2}) pressure in the working chamber and laser pulse energy is investigated. It is found that the conditions of film growth are optimal at a gas pressure of 10{sup -2} Torr and lowest pulse energy. The silver films formed under these conditions on a quartz substrate with an initial surface roughness of 0.3 nm had a surface roughness of 0.36 nm. These films can be used as a basis for various optoelectronics and nanoplasmonics elements.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of compact high adhesion polytetrafluoroethylene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smausz, Tomi; Hopp, Béla; Kresz, Norbert

    2002-08-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films were prepared from pressed powder pellets via pulsed laser deposition by using ArF (193 nm) excimer laser. The applied laser fluences were in the 1.6-10 J cm-2 range, the substrate temperature was varied between 27°C and 250°C and post-annealing of the films was carried out in air at temperatures between 320°C and 500°C. Films deposited at 250°C substrate temperature were found to be stoichiometric while those prepared at lower temperatures were fluorine deficient. Morphological analyses proved that the film thickness did not significantly depend on the substrate temperature and the post annealing at 500°C resulted in a thickness reduction of approximately 50%. It was demonstrated that the films prepared at 8.2 J cm-2 fluence and annealed at 500°C followed by cooling at 1°C min-1 rate were compact, pinhole-free layers. The adherence of films to the substrates was determined by tensile strength measurements. Tensile strength values up to 2.4 MPa were obtained. These properties are of great significance when PTFE films are fabricated for the purpose of protecting coatings.

  1. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  2. Deposition And Characterization Of Ultra Thin Diamond Like Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomcik, B.

    2010-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated and/or nitrogenated carbon films, a-C:H/a-C:N, in overall thickness up to 2 nm are materials of choice as a mechanical and corrosion protection layer of the magnetic media in modern hard disk drive disks. In order to obtain high density and void-free films the sputtering technology has been replaced by different plasma and ion beam deposition techniques. Hydrocarbon gas precursors, like C2H2 or CH4 with H2 and N2 as reactive gases are commonly used in Kaufman DC ion and RF plasma beam sources. Optimum incident energy of carbon ions, C+, is up to 100 eV while the typical ion current densities during the film formation are in the mA/cm2 range. Other carbon deposition techniques, like filtered cathodic arc, still suffer from co-deposition of fine nanosized carbon clusters (nano dust) and their improvements are moving toward arc excitation in the kHz and MHz frequency range. Non-destructive film analysis like μ-Raman optical spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR and optical surface analysis are mainly used in the carbon film characterization. Due to extreme low film thicknesses the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pre-deposited layer of Au can reduce the signal collection time and minimize photon-induced damage during the spectra acquisition. Standard approach in the μ-Raman film evaluation is the measurement of the position (shift) and area of D and G-peaks under the deconvoluted overall carbon spectrum. Also, a slope of the carbon spectrum in the 1000-2000 cm-1 wavenumber range is used as a measure of the hydrogen intake within a film. Diamond like carbon (DLC) film should possess elasticity and self-healing properties during the occasional crash of the read-write head flying only couple of nanometers above the spinning film. Film corrosion protection capabilities are mostly evaluated by electrochemical tests, potentio-dynamic and linear polarization method and by business environmental method. Corrosion mechanism

  3. Sub-picosecond laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, F; Stuart, B; McLean, W; Chase, L

    2000-11-03

    The 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry recognized the importance and growing maturity of the femtosecond time-scale in science and engineering. Understanding the interaction between materials and high energy density light to manufacture and process materials has become a key issue in both programmatic and fundamental research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We have emphasized in this research the aspects related to producing thin films by ablation of material with intense ultra-short laser pulses. Our effort during FY2000 has been focused on building the foundation of this research using high purity graphite as the initial ablation material. We have deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) in vacuum, measured ablation rates, and characterized the physical and chemical properties of the films. We successfully completed our first objective to compare the microstructure and materials properties of the films deposited using lasers operated in the femtosecond and nanosecond pulse length regime. The mechanical characterization of the deposits showed improved film-substrate adhesion properties that allowed us to build 200-{micro}m thick layers using 150 fs pulses. Films produced with ns-pulses delaminated as soon as the thickness reached only a couple of microns. The stresses in the films were greatly influenced by the fluence and the duration of the laser pulses. The microstructure and surface morphology of the films did not vary significantly with the processing parameters studied (pulse length and fluence). Finally, we demonstrated that it is possible to significantly increase the deposition rate with shorter pulses at a given fluence. In particular, carbon could be deposited at a rate of 25 {micro}m/hour with this technology. Our goal in FY2001 is to study and model the relationship between the ablation plume characteristics (energy, charge, mass, and momentum) and the film growth behavior in order to influence and optimize the deposition process. We also want to

  4. Germanium films by polymer-assisted deposition

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Burrell, Anthony K.; Bauer, Eve; Ronning, Filip; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Zou, Guifu

    2013-01-15

    Highly ordered Ge films are prepared directly on single crystal Si substrates by applying an aqueous coating solution having Ge-bound polymer onto the substrate and then heating in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere. A coating solution was prepared by mixing water, a germanium compound, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and polyethyleneimine to form a first aqueous solution and then subjecting the first aqueous solution to ultrafiltration.

  5. Deposition of zinc films by laser method

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V K; Gusakov, G A; Puzyrev, M V

    2015-04-30

    Conditions of laser irradiation of a zinc target under which large droplets of a laser target material are not formed in the erosion plume are found, and zinc nanofilms with a minimum number of large particles on the surface are produced. The surface structure, thickness and optical characteristics of zinc films are determined as functions of the power density of laser radiation falling on a zinc target. The evaporation threshold for a zinc target irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses is found. (laser technologies)

  6. Effect of Deposition Temperature on the Properties of TIO2 Thin Films Deposited by Mocvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Zaki S.

    2016-02-01

    Crystal structure, microstructure, and optical properties of TiO2 thin films deposited on quartz substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in the temperature range from 250∘C to 450∘C have been studied. The crystal structure, thickness, microstructure, and optical properties have been carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and UV-visible transmittance spectroscopy, respectively. XRD patterns show that the obtained films are pure anatase. Simultaneously, the crystal size calculated using XRD peaks, and the grain size measured by AFM decrease with the increase in deposition temperature. Moreover, the texture of the films change and roughness decrease with the increase in deposition temperature. The spectrophotometric transmittance spectra have been used to calculate the refractive index, extinction coefficient, dielectric constant, optical energy gap, and porosity of the deposited films. While the refractive index and dielectric constant decrease with the increase of deposition temperature, the porosity shows the opposite.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of metal oxide and nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jeffrey Thomas

    Processes for depositing thin films with various electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties are indispensable in many industries today. Of the many deposition methods available, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proved over time to be one of the most flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a newer process that is gaining favor as a method for depositing films with excellent properties and unparalleled precision. This work describes the development of novel CVD and ALD processes to deposit a variety of materials. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide show promise as replacements for SiO 2 as gate dielectrics in future-generation transistors. These high-k materials would provide sufficient capacitance with layers thick enough to avoid leakage from tunneling. An ALD method is presented here for depositing conformal hafnium oxide from tetrakis-(diethylamido)hafnium and oxygen gas. A CVD method for depositing zirconium oxide from tetrakis-(dialkylamido)zirconium and either oxygen gas or water vapor is also described. The use of copper for interconnects in integrated circuits requires improved diffusion barrier materials, given its high diffusivity compared to the previously-used aluminum and tungsten. Tungsten nitride has a low resistivity among barrier materials, and can be deposited in amorphous films that are effective diffusion barriers in layers as thin as a few nanometers. Here we demonstrate CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD methods to deposit tungsten nitride films from bis-(dialkylamido)bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten precursors and ammonia gas. Recent findings had shown uniform copper growth on tantalum silicate films, without the dewetting that usually occurs on oxide surfaces. Tantalum and tungsten silicates were deposited by a CVD reaction from the reaction of either tris-(diethylamido)ethylimido tantalum or bis-(ethylmethylamido)-bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten with tris-(tert-butoxy)silanol. The ability of evaporated

  8. Fundamental Mechanisms of Roughening and Smoothing During Thin Film Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Headrick, Randall

    2016-03-18

    In this research program, we have explored the fundamental limits for thin film deposition in both crystalline and amorphous (i.e. non-crystalline) materials systems. For vacuum-based physical deposition processes such as sputter deposition, the background gas pressure of the inert gas (usually argon) used as the process gas has been found to be a key variable. Both a roughness transition and stress transition as a function of pressure have been linked to a common mechanism involving collisions of energetic particles from the deposition source with the process inert gas. As energetic particles collide with gas molecules in the deposition process they lose their energy rapidly if the pressure (and background gas density) is above a critical value. Both roughness and stress limit important properties of thin films for applications. In the area of epitaxial growth we have also discovered a related effect; there is a critical pressure below which highly crystalline layers grow in a layer-by-layer mode. This effect is also though to be due to energetic particle thermalization and scattering. Several other important effects such as the observation of coalescence dominated growth has been observed. This mode can be likened to the behavior of two-dimensional water droplets on the hood of a car during a rain storm; as the droplets grow and touch each other they tend to coalesce rapidly into new larger circular puddles, and this process proceeds exponentially as larger puddles overtake smaller ones and also merge with other large puddles. This discovery will enable more accurate simulations and modeling of epitaxial growth processes. We have also observed that epitaxial films undergo a roughening transition as a function of thickness, which is attributed to strain induced by the crystalline lattice mismatch with the substrate crystal. In addition, we have studied another physical deposition process called pulsed laser deposition. It differs from sputter deposition due to the

  9. Biomimetic lithography and deposition kinetics of iron oxyhydroxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, P.C.; Wood, L.L.; Marsh, B.M.; Fryxell, G.E.; Engelhard, M.H.; Baer, D.R.; Tarasevich, B.J. |; John, C.M.

    1993-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation and crystal growth on functionalized organic substrates is a critical step in biological hard tissue formation. Self assembled monolayers can be derivatized with various organic functional groups to mimic the ``nucleation proteins`` for induction of mineral growth. Studies of nucleation and growth on SAMs can provide a better understanding of biomineralization and can also form the basis of a superior thin film deposition process. We demonstrate that micron-scale, electron and ion beam, lithographic techniques can be used to pattern SAMs with functional organic groups that either inhibit or promote mineral deposition. Patterned films of iron oxyhydroxide were deposited on the areas patterned with nucleation sites. Studies of the deposition kinetic of these films show that indeed the surface induces heterogeneous nucleation and that film formation does not occur via absorption of polymers or colloidal material formed homogeneously in solution. The nucleus interfacial free energy was calculated to be 24 mJ/m2 on a SAM surface composed entirely of sulfonate groups.

  10. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  11. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of diamond-like films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma CVD has been developed at low pressures (0.0001 - 0.01 torr) and at ambient and high substrate temperatures (up to 750 C), to achieve large-area (greater than 4 in. diameter) depositions of diamondlike amorphous carbon (a - C:H) films. The application of a RF bias to the substrate stage, which induces a negative self-bias voltage, is found to play a critical role in determining carbon bonding configurations and in modifying the film morphology. There are two distinct types of ECR-deposited diamondlike films. One type of diamondlike film exhibits a Raman spectrum consisting of broad and overlapping, graphitic D (1360/cm, line width = 280/cm) and G (1590/cm, line width 140/cm) lines, and the other type has a broad Raman peak centered at appoximately 1500/cm. Examination of plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy shows no correlation between the CH-asterisk emission intensity and the deposition rate of diamondklike films.

  12. Vacuum deposited polymer/metal films for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affinito, J. D.; Martin, P. M.; Gross, M. E.; Coronado, C.; Greenwell, E.

    1995-04-01

    Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Tantalum/Polymer/Aluminum Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuun web coating operation on polyester substrates with a new, high speed deposition process. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from 0.3 to 0.8(mu)m. This new vacuum processing technique has been shown to be capable of deposition line speeds in excess of 500 linear meters/minute. Central to this technique is a new position process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process -- for Polymer Multi-Layer. Also, vacuum deposited, index matched, polymer/CaF(sub 2) composites were fabricated from monomer slurries that were subsequently cured with LTV light. This second technique is called the Liquid Multi-Layer (or LML) process. Each of these polymer processes is compatible with each other and with conventional vacuum deposition processes such as sputtering or evaporation.

  13. Control of Thin Liquid Film Morphology During Solvent-Assisted Film Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Evmenenko, G.; Stripe, B; Dutta, P

    2010-01-01

    Liquid films of different silicate esters were deposited from volatile solvents on hydroxylated and hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces. We show that adsorption of silicate ester molecules and the resulting structural morphology of the liquid films not only are determined by attractive van der Waals forces with contributions from electrostatic interactions between the silicone ester moieties and oxide surface sites but also can be tuned by modifying the substrate surface or by changing the liquid-solvent interactions. Our results also show the importance of the conformational properties of liquid molecules and their rearrangements at the liquid/solid interface for controlled solvent-assisted film deposition.

  14. YBCO thin film evaporation on as-deposited silver film on MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, J.

    1999-11-01

    YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) thin film was evaporated on as-deposited Ag buffer layer on MgO substrate. A simple, inexpensive vacuum system equipped with one resistively heated source was used. The subsequent heat treatment was carried out under low oxygen partial pressure at a relatively low temperature and short dwelling time. The films thus obtained were characterized for electrical properties using DC four-probe electrical measurements and inspected for structural properties and chemical composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is shown that YBCO thin film can grow on as-deposited thin silver layer on MgO substrate.

  15. Thermodynamics of deposition flux-dependent intrinsic film stress

    PubMed Central

    Saedi, Amirmehdi; Rost, Marcel J.

    2016-01-01

    Vapour deposition on polycrystalline films can lead to extremely high levels of compressive stress, exceeding even the yield strength of the films. A significant part of this stress has a reversible nature: it disappears when the deposition is stopped and re-emerges on resumption. Although the debate on the underlying mechanism still continues, insertion of atoms into grain boundaries seems to be the most likely one. However, the required driving force has not been identified. To address the problem we analyse, here, the entire film system using thermodynamic arguments. We find that the observed, tremendous stress levels can be explained by the flux-induced entropic effects in the extremely dilute adatom gas on the surface. Our analysis justifies any adatom incorporation model, as it delivers the underlying thermodynamic driving force. Counterintuitively, we also show that the stress levels decrease, if the barrier(s) for adatoms to reach the grain boundaries are decreased. PMID:26888311

  16. Chemically Deposited Thin-Film Solar Cell Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R.; Junek, W.; Gorse, J.; Thompson, T.; Harris, J.; Hehemann, D.; Hepp, A.; Rybicki, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have been working on the development of thin film photovoltaic solar cell materials that can be produced entirely by wet chemical methods on low-cost flexible substrates. P-type copper indium diselenide (CIS) absorber layers have been deposited via electrochemical deposition. Similar techniques have also allowed us to incorporate both Ga and S into the CIS structure, in order to increase its optical bandgap. The ability to deposit similar absorber layers with a variety of bandgaps is essential to our efforts to develop a multi-junction thin-film solar cell. Chemical bath deposition methods were used to deposit a cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers on our CIS-based absorber layers. Window contacts were made to these CdS/CIS junctions by the electrodeposition of zinc oxide (ZnO). Structural and elemental determinations of the individual ZnO, CdS and CIS-based films via transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will be presented. The electrical characterization of the resulting devices will be discussed.

  17. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  18. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-05-01

    Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing Tg. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring therefore enable the optimal preparation of conductive nanocomposite films.

  19. Area selective molecular layer deposition of polyurea films.

    PubMed

    Prasittichai, Chaiya; Zhou, Han; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-12-26

    Patterned organic thin films with submicrometer features are of great importance in applications such as nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. We present here a new approach for creating patterned organic films using area selective molecular layer deposition (MLD). MLD is a technique that allows for conformal deposition of nanoscale organic thin films with exceptional control over vertical thickness and composition. By expanding the technique to allow for area selective MLD, lateral patterning of the film can be achieved. In this work, polyurea thin films were deposited by alternating pulses of 1,4-phenylenediisocyanate (PDIC) and ethylenediamine (ED) in a layer-by-layer fashion with a linear growth rate of 5.3 Å/cycle. Studies were carried out to determine whether self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed from octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) could block MLD on silicon substrates. Results show that the MLD process is impeded by the SAM. To test lateral patterning in MLD, SAMs were patterned onto silicon substrates using two different approaches. In one approach, SiO2-coated Si(100) substrates were patterned with an ODTS SAM by soft lithography in a well-controlled environment. In the second approach, patterned ODTS SAM was formed on H-Si/SiO2 patterned wafers by employing the chemically selective adsorption of ODTS on SiO2 over H-Si. Auger electron spectroscopy results revealed that the polyurea film is deposited predominantly on the ODTS-free regions of both patterned substrates, indicating sufficient blocking of MLD by the ODTS SAM layer to replicate the pattern. The method we describe here offers a novel approach for fabricating high quality, three-dimensional organic structures.

  20. Luminescent sulfides and solution-deposited oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeremy T.

    Solid state luminescent sulfides are prepared as powders in order to elucidate the relationship between structure and light emission. While the sulfides studied in this dissertation are known phosphors, materials are investigated in a variety of new ways. Elementary properties and structures of MgS are reviewed, and preparation of MgS is described with sufficient detail that it may be reproduced in laboratories worldwide. Luminescence of MgS:Eu is evaluated, primarily by interpretation of published work. Solid pellets of MgS:Eu are created for the purpose of depositing thin-film layers by physical vapor deposition, and incorporating the phosphor layer within ACTFEL structures. Fabricated devices are found to exhibit bright ACTFEL luminescence--the brightest known for MgS. Similarly, MgS films are doped with a variety of lanthanide atoms to investigate the hot-electron distribution in MgS layers during device operation. The system BaGa2S4--SrGa 2S4 is evaluated for mutual solid phase solubility. Addition of Eu2+ causes each of these phases to photoluminescence. The emission energies (and therefore colors) are adjusted according to composition. Thin-film oxides are deposited from solution sources. Solution-deposited ZnO serves as the semiconductor layer in transparent thin-film transistor devices. A new class of dielectric material is also developed by solution methods. HafSOx and ZircSOx films, and derivative compositions, are evaluated in simple capacitor structures and demonstrated in functioning transistor devices. High-resolution nanolaminate structures are also constructed from this class of materials. From the knowledge and experience of developing oxide thin-films, more general chemical strategies are expressed.

  1. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, Archie H.; Carapella, Jeffrey C.; Gallagher, Alan C.

    1995-01-01

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH.sub.4) over a high temperature, 2000.degree. C., tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400.degree. C., substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20-30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content.

  2. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M. ); Chason, E. )

    1992-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of [approximately] 1--50 [Angstrom], has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 [Angstrom] X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 [Angstrom] (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  3. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M.; Chason, E.

    1992-12-31

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of {approximately} 1--50 {Angstrom}, has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 {Angstrom} X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 {Angstrom} (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  4. Thin Film Nanomorphology Tailored by Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi

    Shadowing growth by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) has been providing self-assembled nanostructures over much larger area for much lower costs since much earlier than the recent advanced top down processes do. In these two decades, significant progress has been made in the development of the well-controlled 3D nanomorphologies such as zigzag and helix. Much effort for theoretical and numerical understanding of the growth mechanism has been also paid in order to improve the morphology. Many researches in academia have been investigating useful properties of nanocolumnar thin films in their laboratory. On the other hand, most companies seem hesitate to introduce GLAD technique into the factory due to the prejudice that the obliquely deposited thin films are not durable and reproducible. In this article, we discuss the progress in glancing angle deposition technology for the practical applications.

  5. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

    1995-03-14

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

  6. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  7. Zinc Oxide Thin Films Fabricated with Direct Current Magnetron Sputtering Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon, Jian-Wei; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Krishnasamy, Jegenathan; Tou, Teck-Yong

    2011-03-30

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a very promising material for emerging large area electronic applications including thin-film sensors, transistors and solar cells. We fabricated ZnO thin films by employing direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering deposition technique. ZnO films with different thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 1020 nm were deposited on silicon (Si) substrate. The deposition pressure was varied from 12 mTorr to 25 mTorr. The influences of the film thickness and the deposition pressure on structural properties of the ZnO films were investigated using Mahr surface profilometer and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental results reveal that the film thickness and the deposition pressure play significant role in the structural formation of the deposited ZnO thin films. ZnO films deposited on Si substrates are promising for variety of thin-film sensor applications.

  8. Effects of deposition rate and thickness on the properties of YBCO films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, D. Q.; Ko, R. K.; Song, K. J.; Chung, J. K.; Choi, S. J.; Park, Y. M.; Shin, K. C.; Yoo, S. I.; Park, C.

    2004-02-01

    YBCO films with various thicknesses from 100 nm to 1.6 µm were deposited on single crystal SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The effects of thickness and deposition rate—by means of controlling the pulsed laser frequency—on the critical current density (Jc) were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to examine the orientation, crystallization and surface quality. The amount of a-axis YBCO component evaluated from the ratio of XRD chi-scan intensities of the a-axis and c-axis for the YBCO (102) plane increased as the YBCO film became thicker. SEM was used to analyse the surface of YBCO film, and it was shown that the surface of YBCO film became rougher with increasing thickness. There were many large singular outgrowths and networks of outgrowths on the surface of the YBCO films with thickness greater than 0.4 µm. The increased amount of a-axis YBCO component and the coarse microstructure of the thick YBCO film caused degradation of Jc with increasing thickness.

  9. Annealing dependence of residual stress and optical properties of TiO2 thin film deposited by different deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Lee, Kuan-Shiang; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2008-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO(2)) thin films were prepared by different deposition methods. The methods were E-gun evaporation with ion-assisted deposition (IAD), radio-frequency (RF) ion-beam sputtering, and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering. Residual stress was released after annealing the films deposited by RF ion-beam or DC magnetron sputtering but not evaporation, and the extinction coefficient varied significantly. The surface roughness of the evaporated films exceeded that of both sputtered films. At the annealing temperature of 300 degrees C, anatase crystallization occurred in evaporated film but not in the RF ion-beam or DC magnetron-sputtered films. TiO(2) films deposited by sputtering were generally more stable during annealing than those deposited by evaporation.

  10. Smoothing of mirror substrates by thin-film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S; Parra, E; Spiller, E; Tarrio, C

    1999-08-03

    Superpolished optical flats with high spatial frequency roughness below 0.1 nm have been commercially available for years. However, it is much more difficult to obtain figured optics of similar quality. We have obtained and tested the finish of figured optics from different vendors by atomic force microscopy and optical profilometry and have investigated how the substrate quality can be improved by the deposition of thin films. We have determined the growth parameters of several thin-film structures. From these parameters we can determine how the surface topography of a coated mirror differs from that of the substrate, select the best thin-film structure, and predict the possible improvement. Keywords: Smoothing films, multilayer coatings, finish of mirror substrates

  11. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid.

    PubMed

    Hecht, David S; Heintz, Amy M; Lee, Roland; Hu, Liangbing; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 Ω/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12,825 S cm(-1) and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  12. Gain and loss mechanisms in fluorocarbon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Caleb Timothy

    Understanding dominant reaction channels for important gas-phase species in fluorocarbon plasmas is crucial to the ability to control surface evolution and morphology. In order to accomplish this goal a modified GEC reference ICP reactor is used in tandem with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to measure the densities of stable species. Integrated absorption cross-sections are presented for all fundamental bands in the 650 cm-1 to 2000 cm-1 region for C3F6, C4F 8, C3F8, C2F6, C2F 4, and CF4. The results show that although the absorption profile changes significantly, the integrated absorption cross-sections, with the exception of CF4, do not change significantly as gas temperature increases from 25°C to 200°C. However, the internal temperature of the absorbing species can be estimated from the rotational band maximum in most cases. Species densities obtained with the aforementioned cross-sections are used with a novel analysis technique to quantify gain and loss rates as functions of residence time, pressure, and deposited power. CF4, C2F6, C3F8, and C4F 10, share related production channels, which increase in magnitude as the plasma pressure, deposited power, or surface temperature are raised. CF 2 is primarily produced through a combination of surface production (the magnitude also increases with temperature) and electron impact dissociation of C2F4, while it is predominantly lost in the large reactor to gas-phase addition to form C2F4. Time-resolved FTIR results are used to measure a cross-section of 1.8x10-14 cm3/s for the reaction between CF2 radicals creating C2F4. Finally, C2F4 originates through the electron impact dissociation of c- C4F8. The loss process for C2F4 is undetermined, but the results indicate that it could occur on reactor surfaces. Neither the density of fluorine nor the ion flux to the chuck surface changes substantially with wall temperature. We show that increases in the deposition rate in a heated chamber are due to an

  13. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, III, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures.

  14. Study on platinum thermal sensitive films deposited using magnetic sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changlong; Liu, Weiguo; Zhou, Shun; Zhai, Yujia

    2012-10-01

    The infrared imaging detecting technology has broad application prospects in military and civilian fields. The bolometer is one of mainstream uncooled infrared detectors, because it has many advantages, for example, light weight, wide dynamic range, excellent response linearity, and without refrigeration and chopper which leads to low manufacturing cost. In many infrared detecting sensitive materials, Pt films have wider linear range, lower noise, and compatibility with silicon integrated process excellently. In this paper, Pt sensitive films were deposited by means of magnetron sputtering, the preparation process of Pt films for the infrared imaging detecting unit was studied, the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of Pt films can be improved by vacuum annealing to achieve 1.737 ‰/K. The micro-structure and micro-fabrication process of infrared imaging detecting unit based on Pt films were designed, and the heating character of infrared imaging detecting unit based on Pt films was measured using I-V character testing system. Testing results shown that, the properties of fabricated infrared thermal imaging detecting unit based on Pt films were better, Its TCR is about 1.64 ‰/K, and its thermal response is better.

  15. Molecular layer deposition of alucone films using trimethylaluminum and hydroquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Devika; Sarkar, Shaibal K.; Mahuli, Neha

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid organic–inorganic polymer film grown by molecular layer deposition (MLD) is demonstrated here. Sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] and hydroquinone [C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}] are used to deposit the polymeric films, which is a representative of a class of aluminum oxide polymers known as “alucones.” In-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies are employed to determine the growth characteristics. An average growth rate of 4.1 Å per cycle at 150 °C is obtained by QCM and subsequently verified with x-ray reflectivity measurements. Surface chemistry during each MLD-half cycle is studied in depth by in-situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) vibration spectroscopy. Self limiting nature of the reaction is confirmed from both QCM and FTIR measurements. The conformal nature of the deposit, typical for atomic layer deposition and MLD, is verified with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements confirm the uniform elemental distribution along the depth of the films.

  16. Polymer-assisted deposition of metal-oxide films.

    PubMed

    Jia, Q X; McCleskey, T M; Burrell, A K; Lin, Y; Collis, G E; Wang, H; Li, A D Q; Foltyn, S R

    2004-08-01

    Metal oxides are emerging as important materials for their versatile properties such as high-temperature superconductivity, ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, piezoelectricity and semiconductivity. Metal-oxide films are conventionally grown by physical and chemical vapour deposition. However, the high cost of necessary equipment and restriction of coatings on a relatively small area have limited their potential applications. Chemical-solution depositions such as sol-gel are more cost-effective, but many metal oxides cannot be deposited and the control of stoichiometry is not always possible owing to differences in chemical reactivity among the metals. Here we report a novel process to grow metal-oxide films in large areas at low cost using polymer-assisted deposition (PAD), where the polymer controls the viscosity and binds metal ions, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of metal precursors in the solution and the formation of uniform metal-organic films. The latter feature makes it possible to grow simple and complex crack-free epitaxial metal-oxides.

  17. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  18. Ultraviolet optical properties of aluminum fluoride thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, John Jewell, April D.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2016-01-15

    Aluminum fluoride (AlF{sub 3}) is a low refractive index material with promising optical applications for ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. An atomic layer deposition process using trimethylaluminum and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride has been developed for the deposition of AlF{sub 3} at substrate temperatures between 100 and 200 °C. This low temperature process has resulted in thin films with UV-optical properties that have been characterized by ellipsometric and reflection/transmission measurements at wavelengths down to 200 nm. The optical loss for 93 nm thick films deposited at 100 °C was measured to be less than 0.2% from visible wavelengths down to 200 nm, and additional microstructural characterization demonstrates that the films are amorphous with moderate tensile stress of 42–105 MPa as deposited on silicon substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows no signature of residual aluminum oxide components making these films good candidates for a variety of applications at even shorter UV wavelengths.

  19. Synthesis, deposition and characterization of ferroelectric films for electrooptic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunaboylu, Bahadir

    The use of integrable ferroelectric electro-optic thin films is a revolutionary approach in the development of high-speed, low-voltage and high-contrast ratio integrated electro-optic spatial light modulators (SLM) for free-space optoelectronic interconnects. Thin films offer improved performance over bulk ferroelectric (FE) materials because of their lower modulator capacitance and operation at high speeds with low switching energies. Integration of ferroelectric thin films with silicon technology will also impact both the uncooled infrared sensor and dynamic and nonvolatile memory technologies. Ferroelectrics such as lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) and patassium tantalate niobate (KTN) present great potential for SLMs due to their large electro-optic (EO) effect in the bulk form. The development of thin-film SLMs require electro-optic films of high optical quality with good dielectric and EO properties. High quality thin films of PLZT and KTN were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering on r-plane sapphire substrates which offer integration capability with semiconductor devices. PLZT films with extremely large peak dielectric constant, 2800 at the Curie temperature of 180sp°C, were achieved with remarkably low dissipation loss factor <0.04. The dielectric frequency dispersion was determined to be very small up to 1 Mhz. Also, the absorption of the light in the films was very low. A giant effective quadratic electrooptic effect was demonstrated in PLZT films. These results represent a huge leap forward for the FE-SLM technology with respect to the goal of fully integrated thin film electrooptic light modulators. Microstructural development and phase transformation kinetics in PLZT films were also analyzed for the first time and are presented here. Energy required for the formation of desirable perovskite phase was determined to be 322 kJ/mol. Single-phase PLZT films with larger average grain size showed higher dielectric constants and better EO

  20. Poly-para-xylylene thin films: A study of the deposition chemistry, kinetics, film properties, and film stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jeffrey Bernard

    Poly-para-xylylene, or parylene, thin films are chemically vapor deposited (CVD), conformal, pin-hole free polymeric thin films. They have found many industrial uses since there invention in 1947 and continue to find new applications in micro-electronics, biotechnology, and micro-electro-mechanical systems. In this study the deposition chemistry, deposition kinetics, film properties, and film stability were investigated. A differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to analyze the vapor species present during the CVD process. The identity of dimer contamination and its impact on the CVD process and film properties was studied. The quantitative conversion of dimer to monomer was investigated and it was found that conversion begins at around 385°C and by 565°C 100% conversion is obtained. The kinetics of the CVD process was analyzed for a range of substrate temperatures and chamber pressures. A new kinetic model based on a two-step adsorption was developed and fit the kinetic data well. This model should be appropriate for use with all parylene family polymers. Many of the properties of the films deposited in this study were analyzed. This includes a detailed study of surface morphology using atomic force microscopy which shows the interface width increases as a power law of film thickness. Other properties analyzed were the thermal stability, electrical properties, index of refraction, birefringence, hardness, and elastic modulus. The effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation of lambda ≥ 250 nm on the thermal stability, electrical, and optical properties of thin parylene films was studied. The thermal stability and electrical properties of UV treated films were seen to deteriorate as the radiation dose increased. The stability of parylene thin films receiving plasma etching was analyzed. The dielectric constant, dissipation factor, and leakage current of plasma etched thin parylene films were investigated and found to be stable for the range of

  1. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Surface vertical deposition for gold nanoparticle film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, J. J.; Qiu, F. S.; Chen, G. D.; Reeves, M. E.

    2003-02-01

    In this rapid communication, we present the surface vertical deposition (SVD) method to synthesize the gold nanoparticle films. Under conditions where the surface of the gold nanoparticle suspension descends slowly by evaporation, the gold nanoparticles in the solid-liquid-gas junction of the suspension aggregate together on the substrate by the force of solid and liquid interface. When the surface properties of the substrate and colloidal nanoparticle suspension define for the SVD, the density of gold nanoparticles in the thin film made by SVD only depends on the descending velocity of the suspension surface and on the concentration of the gold nanoparticle suspension.

  2. RESISTIVITY OF A THIN FILM DEPOSITED ON A CONDUCTIVE SUBSTRATE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberle, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    Resistivity of a Thin Film Deposited on a Conductive Substrate is a computer program developed to aid in the solution of the class of problems where resistivity measurements are needed for a substance deposited on a substrate of higher resistivity than the deposited layer. One of the ways in which a semiconductor material is characterized is by measurement of its resistivity. In the development of silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a semiconductor material for high temperature applications, it became necessary to measure the resistivity of the thin SiC film while it was still attached to the silicon upon which it had been grown epitaxially. The problem is that the presence of the silicon substrate will introduce error in the measured resistivity of the SiC. This program assumes that the resistivity of a thin film of conducting material deposited on another layer of conducting material is measured using the four-point probe. Using the four-point probe measurements, this program calculates the "true" resistivity of the deposited layer on a substrate of finite and different resistivity. Starting from basic principles, an expression for the ratio of measured voltage difference to injected current is developed. This expression involves the probe spacing, relative thicknesses of the layers, and the substrate resistivity as parameters, as well as the unknown resistivity of the deposited layer. The unknown resistivity can be found by iteratively evaluating the theoretical expression. This must be done numerically. The program is written in FORTRAN 77 and targeted for use on an IBM PC or compatible. It can be modified for use on any machine with a FORTRAN 77 compiler. It requires 46K of memory and has been implemented under MS-DOS 3.2.1. The program was developed in 1986.

  3. thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navasery, M.; Halim, S. A.; Dehzangi, A.; Soltani, N.; Bahmanrokh, G.; Erfani H, M.; Kamalianfar, A.; Pan, K. Y.; Chang, S. C.; Chen, S. K.; Lim, K. P.; Awang Kechik, M. M.

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite manganite La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 thin films were directly grown on MgO(100), Si(100) and glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition. From the XRD patterns, the films are found to be polycrystalline, single-phase orthorhombic. The metal-insulator transition temperature is 209 K for LCMO/MgO, 266 K for LCMO/Si and 231 K for film deposited on the glass substrate. The conduction mechanism in these films is investigated in different temperature regimes. Low-temperature resistivity data below the phase transition temperature ( T P) have been fitted with the relation , indicating that the electron-electron scattering affects the conduction of these materials. The high-temperature resistivity data ( T > T P) were explained using variable-range hopping (VRH) and small-polaron hopping (SPH) models. Debye temperature values are 548 K for LCMO/Cg, 568 K for LCMO/Si and 508 K for LCMO/MgO thin films. In all thin films, the best fitting in the range of VRH is found for 3D dimension. The density of states near the Fermi level N ( E F) for LCMO/MgO is lower due to the prominent role of the grain boundary in LCMO/MgO and increase in bending of Mn-O-Mn bond angle, which decreases the double exchange coupling of Mn3+-O2-Mn4+ and in turn makes the LCMO/MgO sample less conducting as compared to the other films.

  4. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to films deposited from hydroxyethylmethacrylate plasma.

    PubMed

    Morra, M; Cassinelli, C

    1996-06-01

    The adhesion of S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 strain on polystyrene (PS) disks coated by films deposited from hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) plasma was evaluated and compared to adhesion on untreated PS and oxygen-plasma-treated PS. Films were deposited keeping constant the monomer flow rate while the discharge power ranged from 40-100 W in order to obtain coating with different surface properties. Surface chemistry, energetics, and morphology were evaluated by Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA), contact angle measurement, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. Bacteria adhered more to the plasma-deposited or plasma-treated surfaces than to untreated PS, but no significant difference was recorded among the samples obtained using different deposition conditions. According to the surface energetic analysis, plasma-deposited and plasma-treated surfaces bear a strong Lewis-base character, so it is possible to hypothesize a marked contribution of electron donor-electron acceptor interactions to the mechanism(s) controlling adhesion between synthetic and bacterial surfaces.

  5. Apparatus and process for deposition of hard carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, Ali R.; Garwin, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for depositing thin, amorphous carbon films having extreme hardness on a substrate is described. An enclosed chamber maintained at less than atmospheric pressure houses the substrate and plasma producing elements. A first electrode is comprised of a cavity enclosed within an RF coil which excites the plasma. A substrate located on a second electrode is excited by radio frequency power applied to the substrate. A magnetic field confines the plasma produced by the first electrode to the area away from the walls of the chamber and focuses the plasma onto the substrate thereby yielding film deposits having higher purity and having more rapid buildup than other methods of the prior art.

  6. Nanoparticle formation and thin film deposition in aniline containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattyn, Cedric; Dias, Ana; Hussain, Shahzad; Strunskus, Thomas; Stefanovic, Ilija; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Lecas, Thomas; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    This contribution deals with plasma based polymerization processes in mixtures of argon and aniline. The investigations are performed in a capacitively coupled RF discharge (in pulsed and continuous mode) and concern both the observed formation of nanoparticles in the plasma volume and the deposition of films. The latter process was used for the deposition of ultra-thin layers on different kind of nanocarbon materials (nanotubes and free standing graphene). The analysis of the plasma and the plasma chemistry (by means of mass spectroscopy and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy) is accompanied by several ex-situ diagnostics of the obtained materials which include NEXAFS and XPS measurements as well as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The decisive point of the investigations concern the preservation of the original monomer structure during the plasma polymerization processes and the stability of the thin films on the different substrates.

  7. Apparatus and process for deposition of hard carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, Ali R.; Garwin, Edward L.

    1989-01-03

    A process and an apparatus for depositing thin, amorphous carbon films having extreme hardness on a substrate is described. An enclosed chamber maintained at less than atmospheric pressure houses the substrate and plasma producing elements. A first electrode is comprised of a cavity enclosed within an RF coil which excites the plasma. A substrate located on a second electrode is excited by radio frequency power applied to the substrate. A magnetic field confines the plasma produced by the first electrode to the area away from the walls of the chamber and focuses the plasma onto the substrate thereby yielding film deposits having higher purity and having more rapid buildup than other methods of the prior art.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of cellulase thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicco, N.; Morone, A.; Verrastro, M.; Viggiano, V.

    2013-08-01

    Thin films of cellulase were obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on an appropriate substrate. Glycoside hydrolase cellulase has received our attention because it emerges among the antifouling enzymes (enzymes being able to remove and prevent the formation of micro-organism biofilms) used in industry and medicine field. Pressed cellulase pellets, used as target material, were ablated with pulses of a Nd-YAG laser working at wavelength of 532 nm. In this work, we evaluated the impact of PLD technique both on molecular structure and hydrolytic activity of cellulase. Characteristic chemical bonds and morphology of deposited layers were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and SEM respectively. The hydrolytic activity of cellulase thin films was detected by a colorimetric assay.

  9. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Fernàndez, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.; Romano, F.; Tunno, T.; Valerini, D.; Verdyan, A.; Soifer, Y. M.; Azoulay, J.; Meda, L.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N 2 or NH 3). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 °C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) × 10 -8 Ω m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 × 10 -8 Ω m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N 2 phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  10. Raman spectra of amorphous carbon films deposited by SWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junqi; Liu, Weiguo; Hang, Lingxia; Su, Junhong; Fan, Huiqing

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous carbon film is one of the most important anti-reflection protective films coated on infrared optical components. In this paper, hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films were deposited by new type surface-wave-sustained plasma (SWP) source with a graphite target at various experiment parameters. The laser Raman spectroscopy at wavelength of 514 nm was used to investigate the structure and bonding of these carbon films. The results showed consanguineous correlations between the intensity ratio ID/IG and the experiment parameters such as microwave power, target voltage and gas pressure applied to the SWP source. Raman spectra proved the structure of these carbon films prepared by SWP technique is typical diamond-like carbon (DLC). The analysis on G peak position and intensity ratio ID/IG indicated that Raman shifts moves to low wavenumber and ID/IG decreases with the increasing of microwave power from 150 W to 330 W. These results means the formation of sp3 bond prefers higher microwave power. DLC films prepared at target voltage of -200 V have higher sp3 content than that of -350 V, moreover, an increase of gas pressure during experiments yields higher sp3 content at the microwave power below 270 W, whereas the change of sp3 content is slight with the various conditions when microwave power exceeds 270 W.

  11. Effect of two hydrocarbon and one fluorocarbon surfactant mixtures on the surface tension and wettability of polymers.

    PubMed

    Szymczyk, Katarzyna; González-Martín, Maria Luisa; Bruque, Jose Morales; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2014-03-01

    The advancing contact angle of water, formamide and diiodomethane on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) surfaces covered with the film of ternary mixtures of surfactants including p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl) phenoxypoly(ethyleneglycols), Triton X-100 (TX100) and Triton X-165 (TX165) and the fluorocarbon surfactants, Zonyl FSN-100 (FSN100) or Zonyl FSO-100 (FSO100) was measured. The obtained results were used for the surface tension of PTFE and PMMA covered with this film determination from the Young equation on the basis of van Oss et al. and Neumann et al. approaches to the interfacial tension. The surface tension of PTFE and PMMA was also determined using the Neumann et al. equation and the contact angle values for the aqueous solutions of the above mentioned ternary surfactants mixtures which were taken from the literature. As follows from our calculations mainly the presence of the fluorocarbon surfactant in the mixture considerably changes the surface properties of PTFE and PMMA causing that in contrast to hydrocarbon surfactants and their mixtures there is no linear dependence between adhesion and surface tension in the whole range of concentration of the ternary mixtures of surfactants including the fluorocarbon one. The behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the polymer-air and polymer-water interfaces is quite different from those of hydrocarbons. In the case of fluorocarbon surfactants not only adsorption but also sorption can occur on the polymer surface.

  12. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  13. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  14. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K; Park, Hyun S; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-27

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  15. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries. PMID:27459901

  16. Properties of zirconia thin films deposited by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Cancea, V. N.; Filipescu, M.; Colceag, D.; Dinescu, M.; Mustaciosu, C.

    2013-11-13

    Zirconia thin films have been deposited by laser ablation of a ceramic ZrO{sub 2} target in vacuum or in oxygen background at 0.01 mbar. The laser beam generated by an ArF laser (λ=193 nm, ν=40 Hz) has been focalized on the target through a spherical lens at an incident angle of 45°. The laser fluence has been established to a value from 2.0 to 3.4 Jcm{sup −2}. A silicon (100) substrate has been placed parallel to the target, at a distance of 4 cm, and subsequently has been heated to temperatures ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. Thin films morphology has been characterized by atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Biocompatibility of these thin films has been assessed by studying the cell attachment of L929 mouse fibroblasts.

  17. Magnetic Phases of Sputter Deposited Thin-Film Erbium

    PubMed Central

    Witt, J. D. S.; Cooper, J. F. K.; Satchell, N.; Kinane, C. J.; Curran, P. J.; Bending, S. J.; Langridge, S.; Heyderman, L. J.; Burnell, G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed structural and magnetic characterization of sputter deposited thin film erbium, determined by x-ray diffraction, transport measurements, magnetometry and neutron diffraction. This provides information on the onset and change of the magnetic state as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. Many of the features of bulk material are reproduced. Also of interest is the identification of a conical magnetic state which repeats with a wavevector parallel to the c axis τc = 4/17 in units of the reciprocal lattice parameter c*, which is a state not observed in any other thin film or bulk measurements. The data from the various techniques are combined to construct magnetic field, temperature (H, T)–phase diagrams for the 200 nm-thick Er sample that serves as a foundation for future exploitation of this complex magnetic thin film system. PMID:27966662

  18. Magnetic Phases of Sputter Deposited Thin-Film Erbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, J. D. S.; Cooper, J. F. K.; Satchell, N.; Kinane, C. J.; Curran, P. J.; Bending, S. J.; Langridge, S.; Heyderman, L. J.; Burnell, G.

    2016-12-01

    We present a detailed structural and magnetic characterization of sputter deposited thin film erbium, determined by x-ray diffraction, transport measurements, magnetometry and neutron diffraction. This provides information on the onset and change of the magnetic state as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. Many of the features of bulk material are reproduced. Also of interest is the identification of a conical magnetic state which repeats with a wavevector parallel to the c axis τc = 4/17 in units of the reciprocal lattice parameter c*, which is a state not observed in any other thin film or bulk measurements. The data from the various techniques are combined to construct magnetic field, temperature (H, T)–phase diagrams for the 200 nm-thick Er sample that serves as a foundation for future exploitation of this complex magnetic thin film system.

  19. Supercritical fluid molecular spray film deposition and powder formation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.

    1986-01-01

    Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. Upon expansion and supersonic interaction with background gases in the low pressure region, any clusters of solvent are broken up and the solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solute concentration in the solution is varied primarily by varying solution pressure to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solvent clustering and solute nucleation are controlled by manipulating the rate of expansion of the solution and the pressure of the lower pressure region. Solution and low pressure region temperatures are also controlled.

  20. Microplasma deposition of challenging thin films at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey; Thejaswini, H. C.; Plasma Engineering Laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium microplasmas produce fluxes of ions and excited species to a surface while maintaining the surface near room temperature. At atmospheric pressure, however, it is very difficult to accelerate the highly collisional ions. While many applications do not benefit from energetic interactions between plasma and surface, conventional plasma deposition of thin films often requires either ion bombardment or substrate heating. For example, diamondlike carbon (DLC) is known to require ~ 100 eV ion bombardment and transparent conducting oxides (TCO) typically require substrate temperatures on the order of 400-500 K. A microwave-induced microplasma is used to dissociate dilute precursor molecules within flowing helium. The precursor and plasma species result in rapid deposition of thin films (>1 μm/min). This plasma produces a steady-state ion flux of 6×1017 cm-2s-1, which is more than two orders of magnitude greater than a low pressure capacitively coupled plasma. Likewise, the metastable density is roughly two orders greater. These and other microplasma diagnostics are correlated with the measured film properties of microplasma-deposited DLC and TCO. This study shows that high ion flux, even at low energy (~ 1 eV), can provide the needed surface interactions to produce these materials at room temperature.

  1. Structural and electrical properties of electric field assisted spray deposited pea structured ZnO film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Neha; Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Dutta, Viresh

    2016-05-01

    Spray deposition of ZnO film was carried out. The uneven growth of ZnO nanostructures is resulted for spray deposited ZnO film. Application of DC voltage (1000V) during spray deposition provides formation of pea like structures with uniform coverage over the substrate. Electric field assisted spray deposition provides increased crystallinity with reduced resistivity and improved mobility of the ZnO film as compared to spray deposited ZnO film without electric field. This with large area deposition makes the process more efficient than other techniques.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic magnetite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Ren, Wei E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yuepeng; Chen, Xing; Ye, Zuo-Guang E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-05-07

    One of the key challenges in realizing superparamagnetism in magnetic thin films lies in finding a low-energy growth way to create sufficiently small grains and magnetic domains which allow the magnetization to randomly and rapidly reverse. In this work, well-defined superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films are successfully prepared using atomic layer deposition technique by finely controlling the growth condition and post-annealing process. As-grown Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films exhibit a conformal surface and poly-crystalline nature with an average grain size of 7 nm, resulting in a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 210 K. After post-annealing in H{sub 2}/Ar at 400 °C, the as-grown α−Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample is reduced to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, exhibiting a ferrimagnetic ordering and distinct magnetic shape anisotropy. Atomic layer deposition of magnetite thin films with well-controlled morphology and magnetic properties provides great opportunities for integrating with other order parameters to realize magnetic nano-devices with potential applications in spintronics, electronics, and bio-applications.

  3. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  4. On the evolution of film roughness during magnetron sputtering deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2010-11-15

    The effect of long-range screening on the surface morphology of thin films grown with pulsed-dc (p-dc) magnetron sputtering is studied. The surface evolution is described by a stochastic diffusion equation that includes the nonlocal shadowing effects in three spatial dimensions. The diffusional relaxation and the angular distribution of the incident particle flux strongly influence the transition to the shadowing growth regime. In the magnetron sputtering deposition the shadowing effect is essential because of the configuration of the magnetron system (finite size of sputtered targets, rotating sample holder, etc.). A realistic angular distribution of depositing particles is constructed by taking into account the cylindrical magnetron geometry. Simulation results are compared with the experimental data of surface roughness evolution during 100 and 350 kHz p-dc deposition, respectively.

  5. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  6. Deposition of adherent Ag-Ti duplex films on ceramics in a multiple-cathode sputter deposition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion of Ag films deposited on oxide ceramics can be increased by first depositing intermediate films of active metals such as Ti. Such duplex coatings can be fabricated in a widely used three target sputter deposition system. It is shown here that the beneficial effect of the intermediate Ti film can be defeated by commonly used in situ target and substrate sputter cleaning procedures which result in Ag under the Ti. Auger electron spectroscopy and wear testing of the coatings are used to develop a cleaning strategy resulting in an adherent film system.

  7. Short review on chemical bath deposition of thin film and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugle, Dhananjay; Jadhav, Ghanshyam

    2016-05-01

    This reviews the theory of early growth of the thin film using chemical deposition methods. In particular, it critically reviews the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method for preparation of thin films. The different techniques used for characterizations of the chemically films such as X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Electrical conductivity and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) are discussed. Survey shows the physical and chemical properties solely depend upon the time of deposition, temperature of deposition.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite film on laser gas nitriding NiTi substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Xing, W.; Man, H. C.

    2009-09-01

    A hydroxyapatite (HA) film was deposited on laser gas nitriding (LGN) NiTi alloy substrate using pulsed laser deposition technique. TiN dendrite prepared by LGN provided a higher number of nucleation sites for HA film deposition, which resulted in that a lot number of HA particles were deposited on TiN dendrites. Moreover, the rough LGN surface could make the interface adhesive strength between HA film and substrate increase as compared with that on bare NiTi substrate.

  9. Properties of pulsed laser deposited fluorinated hydroxyapatite films on titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, J.V.; Smirnov, V.V.; Laureti, S.; Generosi, A.; Varvaro, G.; Fosca, M.; Ferro, D.; Cesaro, S. Nunziante; Albertini, V. Rossi; Barinov, S.M.

    2010-09-15

    Fluorinated hydroxyapatite coated titanium was investigated for application as implant coating for bone substitute materials in orthopaedics and dentistry. Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for films preparation. Fluorinated hydroxyapatite target composition, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 1.37}(OH){sub 0.63}, was maintained at 2 J/cm{sup 2} of laser fluence and 500-600 {sup o}C of the substrate temperature. Prepared films had a compact microstructure, composed of spherical micrometric-size aggregates. The average surface roughness resulted to be of 3 nm for the film grown at 500 {sup o}C and of 10 nm for that grown at 600 {sup o}C, showing that the temperature increase did not favour the growth of a more fine granulated surface. The films were polycrystalline with no preferential growth orientation. The films grown at 500-600 {sup o}C were about 8 {mu}m thick and possessed a hardness of 12-13 GPa. Lower or higher substrate temperature provides the possibility to obtain coatings with different fine texture and roughness, thus tayloring them for various applications.

  10. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supekar, O. D.; Brown, J. J.; Eigenfeld, N. T.; Gertsch, J. C.; Bright, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga+) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (<40 nm thin) of heterogeneous composition (metal, insulator, semiconductor, etc) with large lateral dimension structures (aspect ratio >1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga+ ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  11. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams.

    PubMed

    Supekar, O D; Brown, J J; Eigenfeld, N T; Gertsch, J C; Bright, V M

    2016-12-09

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga(+)) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (<40 nm thin) of heterogeneous composition (metal, insulator, semiconductor, etc) with large lateral dimension structures (aspect ratio >1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga(+) ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition and characterizations of pyrochlore iridate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Matthew; Aviles-Acosta, Jaime; Xie, Yuantao; Zhu, Wenka; Li, Zhen; Chen, Aiping; Li, Nan; Tao, Chenggang; Jia, Quanxi; Heremans, J. J.; Zhang, S. X.

    Pyrochlore iridates have attracted growing interest in recent years because of their potential to realize novel topological phases. While most of the previous studies have focused on polycrystalline and single crystalline bulk samples, epitaxial thin films offer a unique platform for controllable tuning of material parameters such as oxygen stoichiometry and elastic strain to achieve new electronic states. In this talk, we will present the growth and characterizations of epitaxial thin films of pyrochlore Y2Ir2O7 and Bi2Ir2O7 that are predicted to host topologically non-trivial states. The iridate thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition at different conditions, and a narrow window for epitaxial growth was determined. Characterizations of crystalline structures were performed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to establish a growth parameter-structure phase diagram. The compositions of thin films were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the surface morphologies were characterized using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Magneto-transport studies indicate a strong dependence of transport properties on the oxygen stoichiometry and the film thickness.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of thin superconducting films and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proslier, Thomas; Klug, Jeffrey; Groll, Nikolas; Altin, Serdar; Becker, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    We report the use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize thin superconducting films and multilayer superconductor-insulator (S-I) heterostructures including: nitrides, carbides, and silicides, nitrides of molybdenum and titanium, and Nb1-xTixN/AlN-based S-I heterostructures. The atomic-scale thickness control afforded by ALD enables the study of superconductivity and associated phenomena in homogeneous layers in the ultra-thin film limit. Two-dimensional superconductivity in such films is of interest from a fundamental point of view, as a new effect has recently been discovered at ultra-low temperature in thin superconducting films made by ALD: the super-insulating transition. Furthermore, the ALD technique applied to superconducting films opens the way for a variety of applications, including improving the performance and decreasing the cost of high energy particle accelerators, superconducting wires for energy storage, and bolometers for radiation detection. In this respect, we will present results on the ALD growth processes, the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings.

  14. Development of Thick-Film Thermoelectric Microcoolers Using Electrochemical Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Borshchevsky, A.; Ryan, M. A.; Phillips, W. M.; Snyder, J. G.; Caillat, T.; Kolawa, E. A.; Herman, J. A.; Mueller, P.; Nicolet, M.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced thermoelectric microdevices integrated into thermal management packages and low power, electrical source systems are of interest for a variety of space and terrestrial applications. By shrinking the size of the thermoelements, or legs, of these devices, it becomes possible to handle much higher heat fluxes, as well as operate at much lower currents and higher voltages that are more compatible with electronic components. The miniaturization of state-of-the-art thermoelectric module technology based on Bi2Te3 alloys is limited due to mechanical and manufacturing constraints for both leg dimensions (100-200 gm thick minimum) and the number of legs (100-200 legs maximum). We are investigating the development of novel microdevices combining high thermal conductivity substrate materials such as diamond, thin film metallization and patterning technology, and electrochemical deposition of thick thermoelectric films. It is anticipated that thermoelectric microcoolers with thousands of thermocouples and capable of pumping more than 200 W/sq cm over a 30 to 60 K temperature difference can be fabricated. In this paper, we report on our progress in developing an electrochemical deposition process for obtaining 10-50 microns thick films of Bi2Te3 and its solid solutions. Results presented here indicate that good quality n-type Bi2Te3, n-type Bi2Te(2.95)Se(0.05) and p-type Bi(0.5)Sb(1.5)Te3 thick films can be deposited by this technique. Some details about the fabrication of the miniature thermoelements are also described.

  15. Fluorocarbon nanodrops as acoustic temperature probes.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Paul A; Smith, William S; Borden, Mark A

    2015-10-06

    This work investigated the use of superheated fluorocarbon nanodrops for ultrasound thermal imaging and the use of mixed fluorocarbons for tuning thermal and acoustic thresholds for vaporization. Droplets were fabricated by condensing phospholipid-coated microbubbles containing C3F8 and C4F10 mixed at various molar ratios. Vaporization temperatures first were measured in a closed system by optical transmission following either isothermal pressure release or isobaric heating. The vaporization temperature was found to depend linearly on the percentage of C4F10 in the droplet core, indicating excellent tunability under these fluorocarbon-saturated conditions. Vaporization temperatures were then measured in an open system using contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging, where it was found that the mixed droplets behaved like pure C4F10 drops. Additionally, the critical mechanical index for vaporization was measured at the limits of therapeutic hyperthermia (37 and 60 °C), and again the mixed droplets were found to behave like pure C4F10 drops. These results suggested that C3F8 preferentially dissolves out of the droplet core in open systems, as shown by a simple mass transfer model of multicomponent droplet dissolution. Finally, proof-of-concept was shown that pure C4F10 nanodrops can be used as an acoustic temperature probe. Overall, these results not only demonstrate the potential of superheated fluorocarbon emulsions for sonothermetry but also point to the limits of tunability for fluorocarbon mixtures owing to preferential release of the more soluble species to the atmosphere.

  16. Y-Ba-Cu-O film deposition by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on buffered metal substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Selvamanickam, V.; Galinski, G.; DeFrank, J.; Trautwein, C.; Haldar, P.; Balachandran, U.; Lanagan, M.; Chudzik, M.

    1999-10-12

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 2} (YBCO) films have been deposited on buffered metal substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). Cube-textured nickel substrates were fabricated by a thermomechanical process. Epitaxial CeO{sub 2}films were deposited on these substrates by thermal evaporation. Nickel alloy substrates with biaxially-textured Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers deposited by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition were also prepared. Highly biaxially-textured YBCO films were deposited by MOCVD on both types of metal substrates. A critical current density greater than 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K has been achieved in YBCO films on metal substrates.

  17. Resonant Infrared Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Deposition of Polymers: Improving the Morphology of As-Deposited Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Daniel; Papantonakis, Michael; Collins, Brian; Brookes, Elijah; Wood, Joshua; Gurudas, Ullas

    2008-03-01

    Resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition has been used to deposit thin films of PMMA, a widely used industrial polymer. This technique is similar to conventional pulsed laser deposition, except that the polymer to be deposited is dissolved in a solvent and the solution is frozen before ablation in a vacuum chamber. The laser wavelength is absorbed by a vibrational band in the frozen matrix. The polymer lands on the substrate to form a film, while the solvent is pumped away. Our preliminary results show that the surface roughness of the as-deposited films depends strongly on the differential solubility radius, as defined by Hansen solubility parameters of the solvent and the solubility radius of the polymer. Our results will be compared with computational and experimental studies of the same polymer using a KrF (248 nm) laser. The ejection mechanism will be discussed as well as the implications of these results for the deposition of smooth high quality films.

  18. (abstract) Optical Scattering and Surface Microroughness of Ion Beam Deposited Au and Pt Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Jumaily, Ghanim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Edlou, Samad M.; Simons, John C.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of gold and platinum have been deposited onto superpolished fused silica substrates using thermal evaporation, ion assisted deposition (IAD), and ion assisted sputtering. The influence of ion beam flux, thin film material, and deposition rate on the films microroughness have been investigated. Short range surface microroughness of the films has been examined using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Long range surface microroughness has been characterized using an angle resolved optical scatterometer. Results indicate that ion beam deposited coatings have improved microstructure over thermally evaporated films.

  19. Controlled Mechanical Cracking of Metal Films Deposited on Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    PubMed Central

    Polywka, Andreas; Stegers, Luca; Krauledat, Oliver; Riedl, Thomas; Jakob, Timo; Görrn, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable large area electronics conform to arbitrarily-shaped 3D surfaces and enables comfortable contact to the human skin and other biological tissue. There are approaches allowing for large area thin films to be stretched by tens of percent without cracking. The approach presented here does not prevent cracking, rather it aims to precisely control the crack positions and their orientation. For this purpose, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is hardened by exposure to ultraviolet radiation (172 nm) through an exposure mask. Only well-defined patterns are kept untreated. With these soft islands cracks at the hardened surface can be controlled in terms of starting position, direction and end position. This approach is first investigated at the hardened PDMS surface itself. It is then applied to conductive silver films deposited from the liquid phase. It is found that statistical (uncontrolled) cracking of the silver films can be avoided at strain below 35%. This enables metal interconnects to be integrated into stretchable networks. The combination of controlled cracks with wrinkling enables interconnects that are stretchable in arbitrary and changing directions. The deposition and patterning does not involve vacuum processing, photolithography, or solvents.

  20. Texture evolution in nanocrystalline iron films deposited using biased magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Vetterick, G.; Taheri, M. L.; Baldwin, J. K.; Misra, A.

    2014-12-21

    Fe thin films were deposited on sodium chloride (NaCl) substrates using magnetron sputtering to investigate means of texture control in free standing metal films. The Fe thin films were studied using transmission electron microscopy equipped with automated crystallographic orientation microscopy. Using this technique, the microstructure of each film was characterized in order to elucidate the effects of altering deposition parameters. The natural tendency for Fe films grown on (100) NaCl is to form a randomly oriented nanocrystalline microstructure. By careful selection of substrate and deposition conditions, it is possible to drive the texture of the film toward a single (100) orientation while retaining the nanocrystalline microstructure.

  1. Pressure Effect in ZnO Films Using Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Peters, P.; George, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    ZnO films are deposited on (0001) sapphire, (001) Si and quartz substrates using the off-axis reactive magnetron sputtering deposition. Based on film thickness measurements, three transport regions of sputtered particles are observed when films are deposited in the pressure regions of 5 mtorr - 150 mtorr. X-ray diffraction, scanning probes microscopy, and electrical measurements are also used to characterize these films. The full width at half maximum of theta rocking curves for epitaxial films is less than 0.5 deg. In textured films, it rises to several degrees. The epitaxial films deposited at high pressure reveal a flat surface with some hexagonal facets. The density of hexagonal facets decreases when the growth pressure is reduced. The resistivity of these epitaxial films also depends on the growth pressures. A relationship between the pressure effects and film properties are discussed.

  2. Harnessing Compositional Marangoni Flows in Depositing Nanoparticle Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Mainak; Pasquali, Matteo; Monash University/Rice University Team

    2012-11-01

    Attempts at depositing uniform films of nanoparticles by drop-drying have been frustrated by the ``coffee-stain'' effect, arising from the convective macroscopic flow into the solid-liquid-vapor contact line of a droplet. We have recently demonstrated that uniform deposition of nanoparticles from aqueous suspensions can be obtained by drying the droplet in an ethanol vapor atmosphere.(.).............(Majumder et al., 2012). This technique allows the particle-laden water droplets to spread on a variety of surfaces such as glass, silicon, mica, PDMS, and even Teflon® due to absorption of ethanol from the vapor. Visualization of droplet shape and internal flow shows initial droplet spreading and strong re-circulating flow during spreading and shrinkage. During the drying phase, the vapor is saturated in ethanol, leading to preferential evaporation of water at the contact line; thereby generating a surface tension gradient (or Marangoni forces) that drive a strong recirculating flow. We show that this method can be used for depositing catalyst nanoparticles for the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes as well as to manufacture plasmonic films of well-spaced, unaggregated gold nanoparticles. MAJUMDER, M., RENDALL, C. S., PASQUALI, M. et al. 2012. Overcoming the ``Coffee-Stain'' Effect by Compositional Marangoni-Flow-Assisted Drop-Drying. J.Phys.Chem.B, 116, 6536-6542.

  3. Vacuum deposited polymer films: Past, present, and future applications

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

    1994-11-01

    Two extremely high rate processes have been developed for the vacuum deposition of polymer thin films. Dubbed the PML (for Polymer Multi-Layer) and LML (for Liquid Multi-Layer) processes, the PML technique was originally developed for the manufacture of polymer/aluminum surface mount capacitors while the LML method arose from a need to fabricate lithium polymer batteries. These processes have since been found to be compatible with most other vacuum deposition techniques in, integrated, in-line coating processes. Battelle has developed an extensive program, and a great deal of hardware, to pursue a wide variety of PML and LML applications which integrate these two process technologies with other, conventional, vacuum deposition methods. The historical development of the technologies is reviewed and the Battelle PML/LML facilities are described. Current Battelle work involving solar thermal control films, PML QWOTs, and polymer/metal high reflectors are also discussed. Battelle PML work that is just starting, involving non-linear optical materials/devices, lithium polymer battery fabrication, electrochromic devices, and polymer/oxide multilayers, is discussed as well.

  4. Enhanced Bactericidal Activity of Silver Thin Films Deposited via Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Ponja, Sapna D; Sehmi, Sandeep K; Allan, Elaine; MacRobert, Alexander J; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2015-12-30

    Silver thin films were deposited on SiO2-barrier-coated float glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass, Activ glass, and TiO2-coated float glass via AACVD using silver nitrate at 350 °C. The films were annealed at 600 °C and analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. All the films were crystalline, and the silver was present in its elemental form and of nanometer dimension. The antibacterial activity of these samples was tested against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in the dark and under UV light (365 nm). All Ag-deposited films reduced the numbers of E. coli by 99.9% within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus by 99.9% within only 2 h. FTO/Ag reduced bacterial numbers of E. coli to below the detection limit after 60 min and caused a 99.9% reduction of S. aureus within only 15 min of UV irradiation. Activ/Ag reduced the numbers of S. aureus by 66.6% after 60 min and TiO2/Ag killed 99.9% of S. aureus within 60 min of UV exposure. More remarkably, we observed a 99.9% reduction in the numbers of E. coli within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus within 4 h in the dark using our novel TiO2/Ag system.

  5. Physical properties of chemically deposited Bi2S3 thin films using two post-deposition treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-García, H.; Messina, S.; Calixto-Rodriguez, M.; Martínez, H.

    2014-08-01

    As-deposited bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3) thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition technique were treated with thermal annealed in air atmosphere and argon AC plasma. The as-deposited, thermally annealing and plasma treatment Bi2S3 thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM), transmission, specular reflectance and electrical measurements. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the films are compared. The XRD analysis showed that both post-deposition treatments, transform the thin films from amorphous to a crystalline phase. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement showed a reduction of roughness for the films treated in plasma. The energy band gap value of the as-prepared film was Eg = 1.61 eV, while for the film thermally annealed was Eg = 1.60 eV and Eg = 1.56 eV for film treated with Plasma. The electrical conductivity under illumination of the as-prepared films was 3.6 × 10-5 (Ω cm)-1, whereas the conductivity value for the thermally annealed films was 2.0 × 10-3 (Ω cm)-1 and for the plasma treated films the electrical conductivity increases up to 7.7 × 10-2 (Ω cm)-1.

  6. CuInS2 Films Deposited by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Ternary Single-Source Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael H.-C.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry D.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2004-01-01

    Polycrystalline CuInS2 films were deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using both solid and liquid ternary single-source precursors (SSPs) prepared in-house. Films with either (112) or (204/220) preferred orientation were obtained, and compositional analysis showed that (112)-oriented films contained more copper than (204/220)-oriented films. Using X-ray diffraction, the signature of chalcopyrite structure was often confirmed for (112)-oriented films. The preferred orientation of the film is likely related to the decomposition and reaction kinetics associated with the molecular structure of the precursors at the substrate. Interestingly, the (204/220)-oriented films were always accompanied by a secondary phase, which was identified as an unknown In-rich compound from the results of post-growth annealing, etching experiments, and Raman spectroscopic data. By increasing Cu to In ratio in the film, (112)-oriented films were obtained with a maximum grain size of about 0.5 micrometers, and their X-ray diffractions did not show any observable signature of the In secondary phase. Electrical and optical properties of all the films grown were characterized. They all showed p-type conduction with an electrical resistivity between 0.1 omega cm and 30 omega cm, and an optical band gap of 1.46eV +/- 0.02, as deposited. The material properties of deposited films revealed this methodology of using SSPs for fabricating chalcopyrite-based solar cells to be highly promising.

  7. Phase change properties of Ti-Sb-Te thin films deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sannian; Shen, Lanlan; Song, Zhitang; Yao, Dongning; Guo, Tianqi; Li, Le; Liu, Bo; Wu, Liangcai; Cheng, Yan; Ding, Yuqiang; Feng, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCM) appears to be the strongest candidate for next-generation high density nonvolatile memory. The fabrication of ultrahigh density PCM depends heavily on the thin film growth technique for the phase changing chalcogenide material. In this study, TiSb2Te4 (TST) thin films were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using TiCl4, SbCl3, (Et3Si)2Te as precursors. The threshold voltage for the cell based on thermal ALD-deposited TST is about 2.0 V, which is much lower than that (3.5 V) of the device based on PVD-deposited Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) with the identical cell architecture. Tests of TST-based PCM cells have demonstrated a fast switching rate of 100 ns. Furthermore, because of the lower melting point and thermal conductivities of TST materials, TST-based PCM cells exhibit 19% reduction of pulse voltages for Reset operation compared with GST-based PCM cells. These results show that thermal ALD is an attractive method for the preparation of phase change materials.

  8. Structure and thermoelectric properties of obliquely deposited bismuth films

    SciTech Connect

    Ukhlinov, G.A.; Kosakovskaya, Z. Ya.; Vigdorovich, V.N.

    1986-11-01

    Bismuth films were deposited in a vacuum evaporation equipment at a vacuum of 10/sup -2/ Pa. The microstructure of the films was investigaged by optical and scanning-electron microscopy. The orientation of the crystals was studied with a UEMV-100K electron microscope and a DRON-2 x-ray diffractometer using Fe K..cap alpha.. radiation. We carried out a survey both of the diffractograms of the films to reveal the type of planes parallel to the substrate surface and of the texture patterns from the 0009 reflection by tilting the samples relative to the horizontal axis on a GP-2 tilting attachment. The electrical resistance of the films was measured by the four-probe method and the longitudinal thermo-emf using two probes on a gradient thermoblock. The transverse thermo-emf was determined by irradiating the samples by a heat flux with an intensity of 1 W/cm/sup 2/ from an infrared heating lamp.

  9. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  10. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  11. Effects of the growth conditions on the roughness of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, G.; Prioli, R.; Freire, F. L. Jr.

    2006-11-15

    The surface roughness and scaling behavior of a-C:H films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from CH{sub 4}-Ar mixtures were studied using atomic force microscopy. Raman spectroscopy gives some insights about the film microstructure. The film surface roughness is shown to decrease with the increase of deposition negative self-bias, while the presence of Ar ions enhances this effect. An analysis of the film surface and scaling behavior suggests that there is a transition of the mechanism of the film growth from a random deposition with surface diffusion process to a thermal spike based process that occurs upon the increase of the negative self-bias voltage and the argon bombardment.

  12. Dependence of electro-optical properties on the deposition conditions of chemical bath deposited CdS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J.

    1997-11-01

    Lately, there has been a sharp increase in the publication of papers on chemical bath deposition of CdS thin films and related materials due to successful results obtained using this method to fabricate CdS thin-film buffer layers for CuInSe{sub 2}- and CdTe-based polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. Generally, these papers focus on previously proposed methods of studying film characteristics without a systematic study of the influence of deposition conditions on film characteristics. In this paper the authors present an exhaustive study of the chemical bath-deposited CdS thin films electro-optical properties dependence on deposition variables. The authors propose not only a set of conditions for obtaining CdS thin films by this method but additionally, suitable deposition process conditions for certain application requirements, such as buffer layers for thin-film solar cells. The observed electro-optical characteristics dependence on the deposition variables corroborates the chemical mechanism that they proposed previously for this process.

  13. Optical and scratch resistant properties of diamondlike carbon films deposited with single and dual ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance and frictional and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  14. Optical and Scratch Resistant Properties of Diamondlike Carbon Films Deposited with Single and Dual Ion Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance, frictional, and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  15. Improvement in mechanical and barrier properties of polyethylene blown films using atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyeong Beom; Hak Song, Seung; Wook Moon, Sung; Woo Kim, Jun; Hyung Shim, Joon; Choi, Byoung-Ho; Moo Heo, Young

    2014-01-15

    Recently, thin films deposited on polymer substrates have been widely utilized as encapsulation barriers in electronic applications such as flexible displays, packaging films, and organic light-emitting diodes. The barrier and mechanical properties of these films are critical aspects when using them for protecting the inner modules of electronic devices from environmental factors such as moisture, oxygen, and sunlight. In particular, polymers can be degraded or decomposed more easily than other materials under such environmental conditions. Therefore, polymer films can be deposited using thin functional materials; however, suitable deposition methods for polymers are scarce owing to many limitations such as low melting/glass transition temperature, thermal degradation, and oxidation. In this study, a thin alumina oxide film was deposited on a high-density polyethylene blown film by using atomic layer deposition. The mechanical and barrier properties of the alumina oxide film deposited on the polyethylene film were characterized by a microtensile test and water vapor transmission rate test. Process conditions such as process temperature, plasma surface treatment, and number of cycles were varied to ascertain the reliability of the thin alumina oxide film deposited on the high-density polyethylene blown film. The results showed that the barrier property of the deposited film improved upon the application of plasma surface treatment, and that its mechanical properties varied under different process conditions.

  16. Nano-oxide thin films deposited via atomic layer deposition on microchannel plates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun

    2015-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) as a key part is a kind of electron multiplied device applied in many scientific fields. Oxide thin films such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (ZnO:Al2O3) as conductive layer and pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as secondary electron emission (SEE) layer were prepared in the pores of MCP via atomic layer deposition (ALD) which is a method that can precisely control thin film thickness on a substrate with a high aspect ratio structure. In this paper, nano-oxide thin films ZnO:Al2O3 and Al2O3 were prepared onto varied kinds of substrates by ALD technique, and the morphology, element distribution, structure, and surface chemical states of samples were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Finally, electrical properties of an MCP device as a function of nano-oxide thin film thickness were firstly studied, and the electrical measurement results showed that the average gain of MCP was greater than 2,000 at DC 800 V with nano-oxide thin film thickness approximately 122 nm. During electrical measurement, current jitter was observed, and possible reasons were preliminarily proposed to explain the observed experimental phenomenon.

  17. Properties of electrochromic nickel-vanadium oxide films sputter-deposited from nonmagnetic alloy target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendano, Esteban; Azens, Andris; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2001-11-01

    In this study we investigate the structure, composition, diffusion coefficient, and electrochromic properties of nickel-vanadium oxide films as a function of deposition conditions. Polycrystalline films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering from a nonmagnetic target of Ni0.93V0.07 in an atmosphere of O2/Ar and Ar/O2/H2, with the gas flow ratios varied systematically to cover the range from nearly-metallic to overoxidized films. The results contradict the usual view that films deposited in O2/Ar are dark brown in their as-deposited state. While such films can easily be deposited, the optimum electrochromic properties have been observed at O2/Ar ratios giving nearly transparent films. Addition of hydrogen to the sputtering atmosphere improved cycling stability of the films. The diffusion coefficient has been determined by the Galvanostatic Intermittent Titration Technique (GITT).

  18. Effect of post-deposition implantation and annealing on the properties of PECVD deposited silicon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Shams, Q.A.

    1988-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that memory-quality silicon nitride can be deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Nitrogen implantation and post-deposition annealing resulted in improved memory properties of MNOS devices. The primary objective of the work described here is the continuation of the above work. Silicon nitride films were deposited using argon as the carrier gas and evaluated in terms of memory performance as the charge-trapping layer in the metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) capacitor structure. The bonding structure of PECVD silicon nitride was modified by annealing in different ambients at temperatures higher than the deposition temperature. Post-deposition ion implantation was used to introduce argon into the films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the MNOS devices. Results show that the memory performance of PECVD silicon nitride is sensitive to the deposition parameters and post-deposition processing.

  19. Morphology and structural studies of WO3 films deposited on SrTiO3 by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalhori, Hossein; Porter, Stephen B.; Esmaeily, Amir Sajjad; Coey, Michael; Ranjbar, Mehdi; Salamati, Hadi

    2016-12-01

    WO3 films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 (001) substrates. The effects of substrate temperature, oxygen partial pressure and energy fluence of the laser beam on the physical properties of the films were studied. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns during and after growth were used to determine the surface structure and morphology. The chemical composition and crystalline phases were obtained by XPS and XRD respectively. AFM results showed that the roughness and skewness of the films depend on the substrate temperature during deposition. Optimal conditions were determined for the growth of the highly oriented films.

  20. Pulse laser deposited nanostructured ZnO thin films: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Girish; Umar, Ahmad

    2014-02-01

    This review summarizes the work principles of pulse laser deposition (PLD) apparatus, physical processes like ablation, and plasma plume formation accompanying the deposition of un-doped ZnO from target to substrate material. Various modes of deposition and factors influencing the properties of thin films such as substrate temperature, background gas pressure, laser energy density (laser fluence), target to substrate distance, repetition rate, oxygen partial pressure in deposition chamber, deposition time and post growth annealing which control deposition parameters such as adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, nucleation, and crystallization/re-crystallization are also discussed in this review. Moreover, various film properties such as morphology, roughness of the film surface, film thickness, grain size, optical transmittance, sensitivity, electrical conductivity, uniformity and electrical resistivity of the deposited ZnO thin films have also been enumerated in the present review.

  1. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, J.J. III; Halpern, B.L.

    1993-10-26

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures. 5 figures.

  2. Study of anisotropy of spin cast and vapor deposited polyimide films using internal reflection techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, V.

    1996-11-01

    We have compared anisotropy of spin cast and vapor deposited polyimide (VDP) films, using internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. The films were deposited directly on the internal reflection element. We find that spin cast films are more anisotropic than their VDP counterparts, with the polyimide chains tending to align parallel to the substrate. Both films are found to contain more and less ordered regions. Within the ordered regions, the plane of the phenyl ring tends to align parallel to the substrate.

  3. Properties of ITO thin films deposited on amorphous and crystalline substrates with e-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. X.; Beling, C. D.; Djurisic, A. B.; Li, S.; Fung, S.

    2004-06-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited using the e-beam evaporation method on amorphous and crystalline substrates under identical conditions. The properties of the films were investigated using optical transmittance, XRD and XPS techniques. It was found that the properties of the films depend strongly on the nature of the substrate surface. Analysis suggests that changes in chemical composition and microstructure of the ITO films deposited on crystalline and amorphous substrates are responsible for the differences in optical properties.

  4. XPS analysis and luminescence properties of thin films deposited by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolo, J. J.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.; Terblans, J. J.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Dejene, B. F.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of substrate temperature and oxygen partial pressure on the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the Gd2O2S:Tb3 + thin films that were grown by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The PL intensity increased with an increase in the oxygen partial pressure and substrate temperature. The thin film deposited at an oxygen pressure of 900 mTorr and substrate temperature of 900°C was found to be the best in terms of the PL intensity of the Gd2O2S:Tb3 + emission. The main emission peak due to the 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb was measured at a wavelength of 545 nm. The stability of these thin films under prolonged electron bombardment was tested with a combination of techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. It was shown that the main reason for the degradation in luminescence intensity under electron bombardment is the formation of a non-luminescent Gd2O3 layer, with small amounts of Gd2S3, on the surface.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of nickel-cobalt spinel thin films.

    PubMed

    Hagen, D J; Tripathi, T S; Karppinen, M

    2017-04-05

    We report the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-quality crystalline thin films of the spinel-oxide system (Co1-xNix)3O4. These spinel oxides are ferrimagnetic p-type semiconductors, and promising material candidates for several applications ranging from photovoltaics and spintronics to thermoelectrics. The spinel phase is obtained for Ni contents exceeding the x = 0.33 limit for bulk samples. It is observed that the electrical resistivity decreases continuously with x while the magnetic moment increases up to x = 0.5. This is in contrast to bulk samples where a decrease of resistivity is not observed for x > 0.33 due to the formation of a rock-salt phase. From UV-VIS-NIR absorption measurements, a change from distinct absorption edges for the parent oxide Co3O4 to a continuous absorption band ranging deep into the near infrared for 0 < x ≤ 0.5 was observed. The conformal deposition of dense films on high-aspect-ratio patterns is demonstrated.

  6. Electrochemical deposition of conducting ruthenium oxide films from solution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Warren, L.F.

    1984-02-01

    In the last decade, ruthenium oxide, RuO /sub x/ (x less than or equal to 2), has been used extensively as the active anode electrocatalyst constituent for Cl/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ evolution reactions, in chlorate production, and in metal electrowinning from mixed chloride-sulfate solutions. More recently, this material has been incorporated in several light-induced water electrolysis schemes and apparently possesses the ability to inhibit CdS photocorrosion by acting as a hole scavenger. The numerous applications for this catalyst material certainly warrant further studies of its electrochemical properties on a variety of substrates, e.g., semiconductors. The lack of a simple technique for controlled deposition of ruthenium oxide onto conducting substrates prompted us to investigate an electrochemical approach to this problem. We describe here a new way to electrochemically deposit conducting films of hydrated ruthenium oxide from an aqueous solution of the benzeneruthenium (II)aqua complex. The films slowly dissolve in aqueous electrolytes upon potential cycling, yet appear to be catalytic with regards to water oxidation.

  7. Deposition of Nanostructured Thin Film from Size-Classified Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camata, Renato P.; Cunningham, Nicholas C.; Seol, Kwang Soo; Okada, Yoshiki; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    Materials comprising nanometer-sized grains (approximately 1_50 nm) exhibit properties dramatically different from those of their homogeneous and uniform counterparts. These properties vary with size, shape, and composition of nanoscale grains. Thus, nanoparticles may be used as building blocks to engineer tailor-made artificial materials with desired properties, such as non-linear optical absorption, tunable light emission, charge-storage behavior, selective catalytic activity, and countless other characteristics. This bottom-up engineering approach requires exquisite control over nanoparticle size, shape, and composition. We describe the design and characterization of an aerosol system conceived for the deposition of size classified nanoparticles whose performance is consistent with these strict demands. A nanoparticle aerosol is generated by laser ablation and sorted according to size using a differential mobility analyzer. Nanoparticles within a chosen window of sizes (e.g., (8.0 plus or minus 0.6) nm) are deposited electrostatically on a surface forming a film of the desired material. The system allows the assembly and engineering of thin films using size-classified nanoparticles as building blocks.

  8. Low temperature deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films on a flexible polymer substrate by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-hoon; Jung, Jae-soo; Lee, Sung-soo; Lee, Sung-bo; Hwang, Nong-moon

    2016-11-01

    For the applications such as flexible displays and solar cells, the direct deposition of crystalline silicon films on a flexible polymer substrate has been a great issue. Here, we investigated the direct deposition of polycrystalline silicon films on a polyimide film at the substrate temperature of 200 °C. The low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on a flexible substrate has been successfully made based on two ideas. One is that the Si-Cl-H system has a retrograde solubility of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate temperature. The other is the new concept of non-classical crystallization, where films grow by the building block of nanoparticles formed in the gas phase during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total amount of precipitation of silicon nanoparticles decreased with increasing HCl concentration. By adding HCl, the amount and the size of silicon nanoparticles were reduced remarkably, which is related with the low temperature deposition of silicon films of highly crystalline fraction with a very thin amorphous incubation layer. The dark conductivity of the intrinsic film prepared at the flow rate ratio of RHCl=[HCl]/[SiH4]=3.61 was 1.84×10-6 Scm-1 at room temperature. The Hall mobility of the n-type silicon film prepared at RHCl=3.61 was 5.72 cm2 V-1s-1. These electrical properties of silicon films are high enough and could be used in flexible electric devices.

  9. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, RK; Annapureddy, HVR; Vijaykumar, M; Schaef, HT; Martin, PF; McGrail, BP; Dang, LX; Krishna, R; Thallapally, PK

    2014-07-09

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g(-1) at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/P-o) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g(-1) at P/P-o of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  10. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motkuri, Radha Kishan; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Vijaykumar, M.; Schaef, H. Todd; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-01

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g-1 at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g-1 at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  11. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition: A viable route for the growth of aluminum antimonide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Ghosh, B.; Hussain, S.; Bhar, R.; Pal, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Aluminum antimonide films (AlSb) were successfully deposited on glass substrates by ablating an aluminum antimonide target using pulsed Nd-YAG laser. Films deposited at substrate temperatures 773 K and above showed zinc blende structure. Increase in substrate temperature culminated in grain growth in the films. Photoluminescence studies indicated a strong peak 725 nm ( 1.71 eV) and 803 nm ( 1.55 eV). Films deposited at higher deposition temperatures indicated lower residual strain. Characteristic Raman peaks for AlSb at 151 cm-1 followed by two peaks located at 71 cm-1 and 116 cm-1 were also observed.

  13. Thin-film preparation by back-surface irradiation pulsed laser deposition using metal powder targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Ihara, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Makiko; Suda, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Several kinds of functional thin films were deposited using a new thin-film preparation method named the back-surface irradiation pulsed laser deposition (BIPLD) method. In this BIPLD method, powder targets were used as the film source placed on a transparent target holder, and then a visible-wavelength pulsed laser was irradiated from the holder side to the substrate. Using this new method, titanium oxide and boron nitride thin films were deposited on the silicon substrate. Surface scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images suggest that all of the thin films were deposited on the substrate with some large droplets irrespective of the kind of target used. The deposition rate of the films prepared by using this method was calculated from film thickness and deposition time to be much lower than that of the films prepared by conventional PLD. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement results suggest that rutile and anatase TiO2 crystal peaks were formed for the films prepared using the TiO2 rutile powder target. Crystal peaks of hexagonal boron nitride were observed for the films prepared using the boron nitride powder target. The crystallinity of the prepared films was changed by annealing after deposition.

  14. Development of vapor deposited thin films for bio-microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popat, Ketul Chandrakant

    Increasing demands for more biocompatible and sophisticated bio-microsystems in recent years has led to the development of a new technology called BioMEMS (biological micro-electro-mechanical systems). The foundation of this technology is the same as that of the traditional field of IC (integrated circuits), but an emphasis on developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Micro- and nano-fabrication techniques are currently being used to develop implants that can record, sense, stimulate and deliver to biological systems. Micromachined substrates can provide unique advantages over traditional implantable devices in terms of their ability to control surface micro-architecture, topography and feature size in micron and nano sizes. However, as BioMEMS technology is rapidly being developed, the practical use of these bio-microsystems is limited due to the inability to effectively interface with the biological system in non-immunogenic and stable manner. This is one of the most important considerations, and hence it is useful to focus on the fundamental scientific issues relating to material science, surface chemistry and immunology of silicon based bio-microsystems. This results in development of biomolecular interfaces that are compatible with both microfabrication processing and biological systems. The overall thrust of this research is to develop, characterize and integrate vapor deposited thin films with bio-microsystems in a manner that it is both reproducible and fully integrated with existing technologies. The main strategy is to use silane coatings precursor coatings on which poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) will be coated in vapor phase. Silane has been coated user vapor phase, but its chemical and biological characterization and stability of the films under physiological conditions has not been investigated for biological applications. PEG has been coated in solution phase on silicon surface. However, it has not been coated under vapor phase. Here we are

  15. Properties of RF sputtered cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films: Influence of deposition pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Pawbake, A. S.; Waykar, R. G.; Rondiya, S. R.; Jadhavar, A. A.; Pandharkar, S. M.; Karpe, S. D.; Diwate, K. D.; Jadkar, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of deposition pressure on structural, morphology, electrical and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited at low substrate temperature (100°C) by RF magnetron sputtering was investigated. The formation of CdTe was confirmed by low angle XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The low angle XRD analysis revealed that the CdTe films have zinc blende (cubic) structure with crystallites having preferred orientation in (111) direction. Raman spectra show the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode peak ˜ 165.4 cm-1 suggesting high quality CdTe film were obtained over the entire range of deposition pressure studied. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that films are smooth, homogenous, and crack-free with no evidence of voids. The EDAX data revealed that CdTe films deposited at low deposition pressure are high-quality stoichiometric. However, for all deposition pressures, films are rich in Cd relative to Te. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis show the blue shift in absorption edge with increasing the deposition pressure while the band gap show decreasing trend. The highest electrical conductivity was obtained for the film deposited at deposition pressure 1 Pa which indicates that the optimized deposition pressure for our sputtering unit is 1 Pa. Based on the experimental results, these CdTe films can be useful for the application in the flexible solar cells and other opto-electronic devices.

  16. CuInS2 Films Deposited by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Ternary Single-Source Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael; Banger, Kal; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2003-01-01

    Polycrystalline CuInS2 films were deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using both solid and liquid ternary single-source precursors (SSPs) which were prepared in-house. Films with either (112) or (204/220) preferred orientation, had a chalcopyrite structure, and (112)-oriented films contained more copper than (204/220)-oriented films. The preferred orientation of the film is likely related to the decomposition and reaction kinetics associated with the molecular structure of the precursors at the substrate. Interestingly, the (204/220)-oriented films were always In-rich and were accompanied by a secondary phase. From the results of post-growth annealing, etching experiments, and Raman spectroscopic data, the secondary phase was identified as an In-rich compound. On the contrary, (112)-oriented films were always obtained with a minimal amount of the secondary phase, and had a maximum grain size of about 0.5 micron. Electrical and optical properties of all the films grown were characterized. They all showed p-type conduction with an electrical resistivity between 0.1 and 30 Omega-cm, and an optical band gap of approximately 1.46 eV +/- 0.02, as deposited. The material properties of deposited films revealed this methodology of using SSPs for fabricating chalcopyrite-based solar cells to be highly promising.

  17. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  18. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  19. Understanding the deposition mechanism of pulsed laser deposited B-C films using dual-targets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; He, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chuanbin; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Lu, Wenzhong

    2014-04-21

    Boron carbide thin films with stoichiometry (boron-carbon atomic ratio) range of 0.1 ∼ 8.9 were fabricated via pulsed laser deposition by using boron-carbon dual-targets. However, this experimental data on stoichiometry were smaller than the computer simulation values. The discrepancy was investigated by studies on composition and microstructure of the thin films and targets by scanning electron microscopy, excitation laser Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the boron liquid droplets were formed by phase explosion after laser irradiation on boron sector. Part of the boron droplets would be lost via ejection in the direction of laser beam, which is tilted 45° to the surface of substrate.

  20. Comparison of the properties of Pb thin films deposited on Nb substrate using thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, A.; Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Di Giulio, M.; Broitman, E.; Ferrario, M.

    2013-11-01

    Pb thin films were prepared at room temperature and in high vacuum by thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques. Films deposited by both the techniques were investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine their surface topology. The structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction in θ-2θ geometry. The photoelectron performances in terms of quantum efficiency were deduced by a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. Relatively high quantum efficiency (>10-5) was obtained for all the deposited films, comparable to that of corresponding bulk. Finally, film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Weak and strong points of these two competitive techniques are illustrated and discussed.

  1. Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-03

    Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public...Society H2.4 Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate- based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic...investigated and report the microstructural and electrical characterization of selected barium strontium titanate-based solid solution thin films

  2. Electrophoretic deposition onto an insulator for thin film preparation toward electronic device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Shougo; Nagamatsu, Shuichi; Pandey, Shyam S.; Hayase, Shuzi; Kaneto, Keiichi; Takashima, Wataru

    2012-11-01

    An electrostatic film fabrication method utilizing the dielectric layer, entitled dielectric barrier electrophoretic deposition (DBEPD) has been proposed. We demonstrated the fabrication of uniform organic semiconductor thin film onto any kind of substrate by DBEPD. Optical absorption spectra of colloidal poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) film prepared by DBEPD exhibited the clear vibrational structure attributed to highly ordered domains. It was in contrast to the relatively disordered structure as shown in the case of P3HT film prepared by conventional electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Organic field effect transistors fabricated by each method showed similar organic field effect transistor characteristics, however, the uniformity of DBEPD film was superior to EPD film.

  3. Simultaneous deposition of diamondlike carbon films on both surfaces of aluminum substrate by electrochemical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. S.; Zhou, M.; Pan, X. J.; Zhang, Z. X.; Lu, B. A.; Wang, T.; Xie, E. Q.

    2009-03-01

    By electrolysis of the N ,N-dimethylformamide solution, an attempt was made to simultaneously deposit diamondlike carbon (DLC) films on both surfaces of an aluminum (Al) substrate. Raman spectra showed that the structures of the DLC film were uniform. The thickness distribution of the film was 260-300 nm. A simple model of the sustaining mechanism was proposed for simultaneous electrodeposition of the DLC film on both surfaces of conductive substrates. The simultaneous formation of the DLC film on both surfaces of the Al substrate showed a possibility in the three-dimensional deposition of DLC films on complex conductive substrates.

  4. Stress anisotropy and stress gradient in magnetron sputtered films with different deposition geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.B.; Yalisove, S.M.; Bilello, J.C.

    2006-03-15

    Mo films were deposited via magnetron sputtering with two different deposition geometries: dynamic deposition (moving substrate) and static deposition (fixed substrate). The residual stress and structural morphologies of these films were investigated, with particular focus on in-plane anisotropy of the biaxial stress and stress gradient across the film thickness. The results revealed that the Mo films developed distinct states of residual stress, which depended on both deposition geometry and film thickness. With the dynamic geometry, the Mo films generally exhibited anisotropic stress. Both the degree of anisotropy and the magnitude of stress varied as functions of film thickness. The variation of stress was linked to the evolution of anisotropic microstructures in the films. The Mo films from the static geometry developed isotropic residual stress, which was more compressive and noticeably larger in magnitude than that of the Mo films from the dynamic geometry. Aside from these disparities, the two types of Mo films (i.e., anisotropic and isotropic) exhibited notably similar trends of stress variation with film thickness. Depth profiling indicated the presence of large stress gradients for the Mo films, irrespective of the deposition geometries. This observation seems to be consistent with the premise that Mo films develop a zone T structure, which is inherently inhomogeneous along the film thickness. Moreover, the largest stress gradient for both types of deposition geometries arises at roughly the same film depth ({approx}240 nm from substrate), where the stresses sharply transits from highly compressive to less compressive or even tensile. This appears to correspond to the boundary region that separates two distinct stages of microstructural evolution, a feature unique to zone T-type structure.

  5. Characterization of polydopamine thin films deposited at short times by autoxidation of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Zangmeister, Rebecca A; Morris, Todd A; Tarlov, Michael J

    2013-07-09

    Current interest in melanin films derived from the autoxidation of dopamine stems from their use as a universal adhesion layer. Here we report chemical and physical characterization of polydopamine films deposited on gold surfaces from stirred basic solutions at times ranging from 2 to 60 min, with a focus on times ≤10 min. Data from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical methods suggest the presence of starting (dopamine) and intermediate (C=N-containing tautomers of quinone and indole) species in the polydopamine films at all deposition times. A uniform overlayer analysis of the XPS data indicates that film thickness increased linearly at short deposition times of ≤10 min. At deposition times ≥10 min, the films appeared largely continuous with surface roughness ≈ ≤ 2 nm, as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Pinhole-free films, as determined by anionic redox probe measurements, required deposition times of 60 min or greater.

  6. Chemical Vapor-Deposited (CVD) Diamond Films for Electronic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Diamond films have a variety of useful applications as electron emitters in devices such as magnetrons, electron multipliers, displays, and sensors. Secondary electron emission is the effect in which electrons are emitted from the near surface of a material because of energetic incident electrons. The total secondary yield coefficient, which is the ratio of the number of secondary electrons to the number of incident electrons, generally ranges from 2 to 4 for most materials used in such applications. It was discovered recently at the NASA Lewis Research Center that chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films have very high secondary electron yields, particularly when they are coated with thin layers of CsI. For CsI-coated diamond films, the total secondary yield coefficient can exceed 60. In addition, diamond films exhibit field emission at fields orders of magnitude lower than for existing state-of-the-art emitters. Present state-of-the-art microfabricated field emitters generally require applied fields above 5x10^7 V/cm. Research on field emission from CVD diamond and high-pressure, high-temperature diamond has shown that field emission can be obtained at fields as low as 2x10^4 V/cm. It has also been shown that thin layers of metals, such as gold, and of alkali halides, such as CsI, can significantly increase field emission and stability. Emitters with nanometer-scale lithography will be able to obtain high-current densities with voltages on the order of only 10 to 15 V.

  7. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  8. Photocatalytic activity of nanostructured TiO2 films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Foglia, Flavio; Losco, Tonia; Piseri, Paolo; Milani, Paolo; Selli, Elena

    2009-08-01

    The photocatalytic activity of thin, nanostructured films of titanium dioxide, synthesized by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from the gas phase, has been investigated employing the photodegradation of salicylic acid as test reaction. Because of the low deposition energy, the so-deposited highly porous TiO2 films are composed of nanoparticles maintaining their original properties in the film, which can be fully controlled by tuning the deposition and post-deposition treatment conditions. A systematic investigation on the evolution of light absorption properties and photoactivity of the films in relation to their morphology, determined by AFM analysis, and phase composition, determined by Raman spectroscopy, has been performed. The absorption and photocatalytic activity of the nanostructured films in the visible region could be enhanced either through post-deposition annealing treatment in ammonia containing atmosphere or employing mild oxidation conditions, followed by annealing in N2 at 600 °C.

  9. Influence of process parameters on the preparation of pharmaceutical films by electrostatic powder deposition.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; LaFountaine, Justin S; Keen, Justin M; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2016-12-30

    Electrostatic powder deposition (ESPD) has been developed as a solvent-free method to prepare pharmaceutical films. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of process parameters during (1) electrostatic powder deposition, (2) curing, and (3) removal of the film from the substrate on the properties of the film. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) was used as the model polymer and stainless steel 316 as the substrate. Deposition efficiency (i.e. deposited weight) was measured with varying charging voltage, gun tip to substrate distance, and environmental humidity. Scanning electron microscopy was utilized to assess film formation, and adhesive and mechanical strength of films were measured with varying cure temperature and time. Adhesive strength was measured for films prepared on substrates of varying surface roughness. When deposition was performed at low humidity conditions, 25%RH, process parameters did not significantly affect deposition behavior. At 40%RH, increasing deposition efficiency with decreasing gun tip to substrate distance and increasing voltage (up to 60kV) was observed. Complete film formation was seen by 30min at 80°C, compared to lower curing temperatures and times. All films were readily removed from the substrates. The results show the ESPD process can be modified to produce films with good mechanical properties (e.g. tensile strength>0.06MPa), suggesting it is a promising dry powder process for preparing pharmaceutical films.

  10. Thermochromic properties of Sn, W co-doped VO2 nanostructured thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Hur, M G; Masaki, T; Yoon, D H

    2014-12-01

    Tin (Sn) and tungsten (W) co-doped vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructured thin films with 50-nm thickness were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to reduce the transition temperature and improve the IR transmittance. The crystal structure of the nanostructured thin films and the presence of elements were evaluated by XRD and XPS analysis. The transition temperature (T(c)) of 1 at% Sn-1 at% W co-doped VO2 nanostructured thin film was decreased to about 22 degrees C (from 70.3 to 48.5 degrees C) compared with the undoped VO2 nanostructured thin film. The transmittance width in the IR range of the co-doped nanostructured thin film decreased from 37.5% to 27% compared with the undoped VO2 nanostructured thin film. Also, the width of hysteresis was narrowed by Sn doping.

  11. Deposition of vanadium carbide thin films using compound target sputtering and their field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, M.Y.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Ishikawa, J.

    2005-09-15

    Vanadium carbide (VC) thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by direct sputtering of a VC target in an argon atmosphere. The structure, composition, and electrical properties of the films were investigated as functions of deposition conditions. The crystallographic structure of the film was strongly related to the argon pressure. VC films with (111) preferred orientation were formed at 2.0 Pa regardless of the substrate temperature examined, while amorphous films were obtained at the lowest pressure of 0.5 Pa. It was shown that carbon segregation within the film was difficult to avoid, but could be suppressed to some degree. To make a full understanding of the compositional variation in compound target sputtering process, deposition of chromium carbide thin films was also performed. Some common mechanisms involved in compound target sputtering process were discussed. Field emission measurements revealed that the VC film is a good electron emitter.

  12. Deposition of vanadium carbide thin films using compound target sputtering and their field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M. Y.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Ishikawa, J.

    2005-09-01

    Vanadium carbide (VC) thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by direct sputtering of a VC target in an argon atmosphere. The structure, composition, and electrical properties of the films were investigated as functions of deposition conditions. The crystallographic structure of the film was strongly related to the argon pressure. VC films with (111) preferred orientation were formed at 2.0 Pa regardless of the substrate temperature examined, while amorphous films were obtained at the lowest pressure of 0.5 Pa. It was shown that carbon segregation within the film was difficult to avoid, but could be suppressed to some degree. To make a full understanding of the compositional variation in compound target sputtering process, deposition of chromium carbide thin films was also performed. Some common mechanisms involved in compound target sputtering process were discussed. Field emission measurements revealed that the VC film is a good electron emitter.

  13. Soap-film coating: High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renyun; Andersson, Henrik A.; Andersson, Mattias; Andres, Britta; Edlund, Håkan; Edström, Per; Edvardsson, Sverker; Forsberg, Sven; Hummelgård, Magnus; Johansson, Niklas; Karlsson, Kristoffer; Nilsson, Hans-Erik; Norgren, Magnus; Olsen, Martin; Uesaka, Tetsu; Öhlund, Thomas; Olin, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    The coating of thin films is applied in numerous fields and many methods are employed for the deposition of these films. Some coating techniques may deposit films at high speed; for example, ordinary printing paper is coated with micrometre-thick layers of clay at a speed of tens of meters per second. However, to coat nanometre thin films at high speed, vacuum techniques are typically required, which increases the complexity of the process. Here, we report a simple wet chemical method for the high-speed coating of films with thicknesses at the nanometre level. This soap-film coating technique is based on forcing a substrate through a soap film that contains nanomaterials. Molecules and nanomaterials can be deposited at a thickness ranging from less than a monolayer to several layers at speeds up to meters per second. We believe that the soap-film coating method is potentially important for industrial-scale nanotechnology. PMID:23503102

  14. Structural and Optical Study of Chemical Bath Deposited Nano-Structured CdS Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Vineet; Barman, P. B.; Katyal, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    CdS is commonly used as window layer in polycrystalline solar cells. The paper presents a structural and optical study of CdS nano-structured thin films. High quality CdS thin films are grown on commercial glass by means of chemical bath deposition. It involves an alkaline solution of cadmium salt, a complexant, a chalcogen source and a non-ionic surfactant. The films have been prepared under various process parameters. The chemically deposited films are annealed to estimate its effect on the structural and optical properties of films. These films (as -deposited and annealed) have been characterized by means of XRD, SEM and UV-Visible spectrophotometer. XRD of films show the nano-crystalline nature. The energy gap of films is found to be of direct in nature.

  15. Ion-beam and dual-ion-beam sputter deposition of tantalum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevro, Mirza; Carter, George

    1995-02-01

    Ion-beam sputter deposition (IBS) and dual-ion-beam sputter deposition (DIBS) of tantalum oxide films was investigated at room temperature and compared with similar films prepared by e-gun deposition. The optical properties, i.e., refractive index and extinction coefficient, of IBS films were determined in the 250- to 1100-nm range by transmission spectrophotometry and at (lambda) equals 632.8 nm by ellipsometry. They were found to be mainly sensitive to the partial pressure of oxygen used as a reactive gas in the deposition process. The maximum value of the refractive index of IBS deposited tantalum oxide films was n equals 2.15 at (lambda) equals 550 nm and the extinction coefficient of order k equals 2 X 10-4. Films deposited by e-gun deposition had refractive index n 2.06 at (lambda) equals 550 nm. Films deposited using DIBS, i.e., deposition assisted by low energy Ar and O2 ions (Ea equals 0 to 300 eV) and low current density (Ji equals 0 to 40 (mu) A/cm2), showed no improvement in the optical properties of the films. Preferential sputtering occurred at Ea(Ar) equals 300 eV and Ji equals 20 (mu) A/cm2 and slightly oxygen deficient films were formed. Different bonding states in the tantalum-oxide films were determined by x-ray spectroscopy, whereas composition of the film and contaminants were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Tantalum oxide films formed by IBS contained relatively high Ar content (approximately equals 2.5%) originating from the reflected argon neutrals from the sputtering target whereas assisted deposition slightly increased the Ar content. Stress in the IBS-deposited films was measured by the bending technique. IBS-deposited films showed compressive stress with a typical value of s equals 3.2 X 109 dyn/cm2. Films deposited by concurrent ion bombardment showed an increase in the stress as a function of applied current density. The maximum was s approximately equals 5.6 X 109 dyn/cm2 for Ea equals 300 eV and Ji equals

  16. Ion beam and dual ion beam sputter deposition of tantalum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevro, Mirza; Carter, George

    1994-11-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBS) and dual ion beam sputter deposition (DIBS) of tantalum oxide films was investigated at room temperature and compared with similar films prepared by e-gun deposition. Optical properties ie refractive index and extinction coefficient of IBS films were determined in the 250 - 1100 nm range by transmission spectrophotometry and at (lambda) equals 632.8 nm by ellipsometry. They were found to be mainly sensitive to the partial pressure of oxygen used as a reactive gas in the deposition process. The maximum value of the refractive index of IBS deposited tantalum oxide films was n equals 2.15 at (lambda) equals 550 nm and the extinction coefficient of order k equals 2 X 10-4. Films deposited by e-gun deposition had refractive index n equals 2.06 at (lambda) equals 550 nm. Films deposited using DIBS ie deposition assisted by low energy Ar and O2 ions (Ea equals 0 - 300 eV) and low current density (Ji equals 0 - 40 (mu) A/cm2) showed no improvement in the optical properties of the films. Preferential sputtering occurred at Ea(Ar) equals 300 eV and Ji equals 20 (mu) A/cm2 and slightly oxygen deficient films were formed. Different bonding states in the tantalum-oxide films were determined by x-ray spectroscopy while composition of the film and contaminants were determined by Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Tantalum oxide films formed by IBS contained relatively high Ar content (approximately equals 2.5%) originating from the reflected argon neutrals from the sputtering target while assisted deposition slightly increased the Ar content. Stress in the IBS deposited films was measured by the bending technique. IBS deposited films showed compressive stress with a typical value of s equals 3.2 X 109 dyn/cm2. Films deposited by concurrent ion bombardment showed an increase in the stress as a function of applied current density. The maximum was s approximately equals 5.6 X 109 dyn/cm2 for Ea equals 300 eV and Ji equals 35 (mu) A/cm2. All

  17. Uses of ion bombardment in thin-film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erdemir, A.

    1990-10-01

    Use of plasma- and ion-beam-modified surfaces and surface coatings in continually expanding in engineering disciplines. The purpose of these modifications and treatments is to impart favorable properties, such as wear resistance and lubricity, to the surfaces, while at the same time retaining the strength or toughness of the bulk materials. Energetic-ion bombardment can be used to modify the structural and chemical properties of surfaces or applied coatings. Ion-implantation has been used for many years, and recently, other surface-modification techniques, among them ion-beam mixing and ion-beam-assisted deposition, have attracted attention because they permit application of highly adherent lubricious and wear-resistant films. In this paper, ion-beam techniques are described from the viewpoint of ion-surface interactions, and some avenues for the engineering of tribological surfaces are presented. 100 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Thin-film deposition and characterization for neutron detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiano, C.; Trucchi, D. M.; Renzelli, M.; Bemporad, E.; Santoni, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Vannozzi, A.; Celentano, G.

    2015-10-01

    Solid state physics experimental techniques and characterization tools can provide a valuable contribution to the research and development activity on He-free neutron detection systems, for both detector assessment and performance improvement. Presently, a He replacement strategy relies on the use of 6Li - and/or 10B -based neutron-to-charged particle converters coupled to radiation detectors (solid state, gaseous and scintillators). These topics have been discussed during a devoted session within the HeRe (He- Replacement) in Italy Workshop held in Frascati at the ENEA Research Centre, and this paper aims at presenting a brief overview on possible deposition and characterization techniques of thin films that have been subject of discussion.

  19. Nanomechanical properties of platinum thin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, M.A.; Gu, D.; Baumgart, H.; Elmustafa, A.A.

    2015-03-01

    The nanomechanical properties of Pt thin films grown on Si (100) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated using nanoindentation. Recently, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has successfully demonstrated the capability to deposit ultra-thin films of platinum (Pt). Using (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe3) as chemical platinum precursor and oxygen (O2) as the oxidizing agent, the ALD synthesis of Pt can be achieved with high conformity and excellent film uniformity. The ALD process window for Pt films was experimentally established in the temperature range between 270 °C and 320 °C, where the sheet conductance was constant over that temperature range, indicating stable ALD Pt film growth rate. ALD growth of Pt films exhibits very poor nucleation and adhesion characteristics on bare Si surfaces when the native oxide was removed by 2% HF etch. Pt adhesion improves for thermally oxidized Si wafers and for Si wafers covered with native oxide. Three ALD Pt films deposited at 800, 900, and 1000 ALD deposition cycles were tested for the structural and mechanical properties. Additionally, the sample with 900 ALD deposition cycles was further annealed in forming gas (95% N2 and 5% H2) at 450 °C for 30 min in order to passivate dangling bonds in the grain boundaries of the polycrystalline Pt film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were employed to characterize the films' surface structure and morphology. Nanoindentation technique was used to evaluate the hardness and modulus of the ALD Pt films of various film thicknesses. The results indicate that the films depict comparable hardness and modulus results; however, the 800 and 1000 ALD deposition cycles films without forming gas annealing experienced significant amount of pileup, whereas the 900 ALD deposition cycles sample annealed in forming gas resulted in a smaller pileup.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of a-Si:H and a-C:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Yang, C. L.; Allevato, C. E.; Pool, F. S.

    1989-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma enhanced CVD. A high deposition rate of 25 A/sec and a light-to-dark conductivity ratio of 500,000 for a-Si:H films have been achieved by the ECR process using a pure silane plasma. ECR microwave plasmas have been analyzed by in situ optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and have shown a strong H-asterisk emission at 434 nm indicating higher chemical reactivity than RF plasmas. The linear correlation between the film deposition rate and the SiH-asterisk emission intensity of ECR silane plasma suggests that SiH-asterisk species are related to the neutral radicals which are responsible for the a-Si:H film deposition. Hard and soft a-C:H films have been deposited by ECR with and without RF bias power, respectively. The RF bias to the substrate is found to play a critical role in determining the film structure and the carbon bonding configuration of ECR deposited a-C:H films. Raman spectra of these films indicate that ECR deposition conditions can be optimized to produce diamond films.

  1. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  2. Low-temperature crystallization of TiO2 films by sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taga, Yasunori; Yamada, Naoomi

    2010-04-01

    Crystalline TiO2 film was formed on PET(polyethlene terephthalate) film by radio frequency sputter deposition method using a sintered TiO2 target by adding H2O gas to Ar gas for sputtering. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal structure of the film of 100 nm thick was confirmed to be anatase crystallites of TiO2. In order to elucidate the mechanism of low temperature crystallization thus observed, direct measurement of surface temperature of growing films during sputter deposition was carried out by two methods of an infrared thermometer from the outside of vacuum chamber and a thermocouple attached to the growing film surface. Upon the beginning of sputter deposition in Ar gas, film temperature increased rapidly and became constant at 120°C after 30 min. Addition of H2O gas to Ar gas for sputtering resulted in further increase in film temperature and reached to 230 °C depending on the deposition conditions. Furthermore, photocatalytic performance of decomposition of methylene blue was examined to be enhanced remarkably as a result of crystallization of the film. It was concluded that low temperature crystallization of TiO2 film by sputter deposition was explained in terms of local heating of thin shallow surface region of growing film by kinetic energy deposition of sputtered particles.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of conformal, functional, and responsive polymer films.

    PubMed

    Alf, Mahriah E; Asatekin, Ayse; Barr, Miles C; Baxamusa, Salmaan H; Chelawat, Hitesh; Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Petruczok, Christy D; Sreenivasan, Ramaswamy; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Trujillo, Nathan J; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Xu, Jingjing; Gleason, Karen K

    2010-05-11

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization utilizes the delivery of vapor-phase monomers to form chemically well-defined polymeric films directly on the surface of a substrate. CVD polymers are desirable as conformal surface modification layers exhibiting strong retention of organic functional groups, and, in some cases, are responsive to external stimuli. Traditional wet-chemical chain- and step-growth mechanisms guide the development of new heterogeneous CVD polymerization techniques. Commonality with inorganic CVD methods facilitates the fabrication of hybrid devices. CVD polymers bridge microfabrication technology with chemical, biological, and nanoparticle systems and assembly. Robust interfaces can be achieved through covalent grafting enabling high-resolution (60 nm) patterning, even on flexible substrates. Utilizing only low-energy input to drive selective chemistry, modest vacuum, and room-temperature substrates, CVD polymerization is compatible with thermally sensitive substrates, such as paper, textiles, and plastics. CVD methods are particularly valuable for insoluble and infusible films, including fluoropolymers, electrically conductive polymers, and controllably crosslinked networks and for the potential to reduce environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with solvents. Quantitative models aid the development of large-area and roll-to-roll CVD polymer reactors. Relevant background, fundamental principles, and selected applications are reviewed.

  4. Macroparticles Reduction Using Filter Free Cathodic Vacuum Arc Deposition Method in ZnO Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Yuvakkumar, R; Peranantham, P; Nathanael, A Joseph; Nataraj, D; Mangalaraj, D; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-03-01

    We report a new method to reduce macroparticles in ZnO thin films using filter free cathodic vacuum arc deposition without using any cooling arrangements operated at low arc current. The detailed mechanism has been proposed to reduce macroparticles during thin film deposition. The successful reduction of macroparticles was confirmed employing FESEM-EDX studies. FESEM images of ZnO thin films deposited with cathode spot to substrate distance from 10 to 20 cm revealed that the population of the macroparticles were reduced with the increase of cathode spot to substrate distances at low arc current. The prepared ZnO films were characterised and showed good structural and optical properties.

  5. Thin films of SiO2 and hydroxyapatite on titanium deposited by spray pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jokanovic, V; Jokanovic, B; Izvonar, D; Dacic, B

    2008-05-01

    Wet spray pyrolysis of fine, well-dispersed a SiO2 sol was used for the deposition of thin films of silicon dioxide. The sol was obtained by hydrothermal precipitation of silicon acid from a solution at pH = 10. The morphology, roughness, phase composition, chemical homogeneity and the mechanism of the films were investigated by SEM, EDS and IR spectroscopy. The obtained results show a complete covering of the titanium substrate with SiO2 after 3 h of deposition. It was observed that the film thickness increased from 3 to 19 microm, the roughness of the film decreased from 12 to 3 microm, while the morphology of the deposit changed considerably. A hydroxyapatite film was prepared on the so-obtained SiO2 thin film by spray pyrolysis deposition and its morphology and phase composition were investigated.

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of polyacrylic acid and composite films containing nanotubes and oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Deen, I; Zhitomirsky, I

    2011-10-15

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method has been developed for the deposition of thin films of polyacrylic acid (PAA). This method allowed the formation of uniform films of controlled thickness on conductive substrates. It was shown that PAA can be used as a common dispersing agent suitable for charging and EPD of various materials, such as multiwalled carbon nanotubes, halloysite nanotubes, MnO(2), NiO, TiO(2) and SiO(2). The feasibility of EPD of composite films containing the nanotubes and oxide particles in a PAA matrix has been demonstrated. The kinetics of deposition and deposition mechanisms were investigated and discussed. The films were studied by thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that film thickness and composition can be varied. Obtained results pave the way for the fabrication of PAA and composite films for biomedical, electrochemical and other applications.

  7. Deposition of thermoelectric strontium hexaboride thin films by a low pressure CVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynell, Tommi; Aizawa, Takashi; Ohkubo, Isao; Nakamura, Katsumitsu; Mori, Takao

    2016-09-01

    Thin films of SrB6 were deposited on sapphire substrates using a chemical vapor deposition method, with elemental strontium and decaborane, B10H14, used as the strontium and boron sources, respectively. The formation of highly crystalline, phase-pure SrB6 films was confirmed with X-ray diffraction and reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED) analysis, and the films' thermoelectric transport properties were measured. A relatively high deposition temperature of 850-950 °C was found to be optimal for obtaining well-crystallized films at an extremely high deposition rate. The thermoelectric transport properties of the SrB6 thin films were observed to be comparable to those reported for bulk materials, but an unexpectedly high electrical resistivity led to a reduced power factor value for the thin films.

  8. Effect of sputtering power on the growth of Ru films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhanwar, Prachi; Kumar, Arvind; Verma, Seema; Rangra, K. J.

    2016-04-01

    Ruthenium is deposited by DC magnetron sputtering at different powers and is characterized. The effect of sputtering power on the electrical and structural properties of the film is investigated experimentally. High resolution X-ray diffraction is used to characterize the microstructure of Ru films deposited on SiO2 surface. The peak (002) is more sharp and intense with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.37° at 250W. The grain size increases with increase in sputtering power improving the crystallinity of the film. The film deposited at high sputtering power also showed lower resistivity (12.40 µΩ-cm) and higher mobility (4.82 cm2/V.s) as compared to the film deposited at low power. The surface morphology of the film is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  9. Engineering Properties of Superhard Films with Ion Energy and Post-Deposition Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

    2003-08-26

    Recent developments in plasma synthesis of hard materials using energetic ions are described. Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) has been used to prepare several hard films: from diamondlike carbon (DLC) to carbides, from nitrides to oxides. The energy of the depositing species is controlled to maximize adhesion as well as to change the physical and chemical properties of the films. Adhesion is promoted by the creation of a graded interface between the film and the substrate. The energy of the depositing ions is also used to modify and control the intrinsic stresses and the microstructure of the films. The deposition is carried out at room temperature, which is important for temperature sensitive substrates. A correlation between intrinsic stresses and the energetics of the deposition is presented for the case of DLC films, and means to reduce stress levels are discussed.

  10. Engineering properties of superhard films with ion energy and post-deposition processing

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Mari-Paule

    2002-10-14

    Recent developments in plasma synthesis of hard materials using energetic ions are described. Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) has been used to prepare several hard films: from diamondlike carbon (DLC) to carbides, from nitrides to oxides. The energy of the depositing species is controlled to maximize adhesion as well as to change the physical and chemical properties of the films. Adhesion is promoted by the creation of a graded interface between the film and the substrate. The energy of the depositing ions is also used to modify and control the intrinsic stresses and the microstructure of the films. The deposition is carried out at room temperature, which is important for temperature sensitive substrates. A correlation between intrinsic stresses and the energetics of the deposition is presented for the case of DLC films, and means to reduce stress levels are discussed.

  11. Cu and Cu(Mn) films deposited layer-by-layer via surface-limited redox replacement and underpotential deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J. S.; Sun, S. L.; Cheng, Y. L.; Chen, G. S.; Chin, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports Cu and Cu(Mn) films prepared layer-by-layer using an electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method. The structure and properties of the films were investigated to elucidate their suitability as Cu interconnects for microelectronics. Previous studies have used primarily a vacuum-based atomic layer deposition to form a Cu metallized film. Herein, an entirely wet chemical process was used to fabricate a Cu film using the ECALD process by combining underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). The experimental results indicated that an inadequate UPD of Pb affected the subsequent SLRR of Cu and lead to the formation of PbSO4. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. Layer-by-layer deposition of Cu(Mn) films was successfully performed by alternating the deposition cycle-ratios of SLRR-Cu and UPD-Mn. The proposed self-limiting growth method offers a layer-by-layer wet chemistry-based deposition capability for fabricating Cu interconnects.

  12. Deposition of hydroxyapatite thin films by Nd:YAG laser ablation: a microstructural study

    SciTech Connect

    Nistor, L.C.; Ghica, C.; Teodorescu, V.S.; Nistor, S.V. . E-mail: snistor@alpha1.infim.ro; Dinescu, M.; Matei, D.; Frangis, N.; Vouroutzis, N.; Liutas, C.

    2004-11-02

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) thin films has been successfully deposited by Nd:YAG laser ablation at {lambda} = 532 nm. The morphology and microstructure of the deposited layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). Polycrystalline HA films were directly obtained with the substrate at 300 deg. C and without introducing water vapors in the deposition chamber. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements show that the oxygen stoichiometry in the HA films is also maintained. Depositions performed at {lambda} = 335 nm laser wavelength and 300 deg. C substrate temperature resulted in polycrystalline layers of mixed composition of HA and tricalciumphosphate (TCP)

  13. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Tracy, C. Edwin; King, David E.; Stanley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  14. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  15. Noncontact atomic force microscopy studies of ultrathin films of amorphous solid water deposited on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Donev, J M K; Yu, Q; Long, B R; Bollinger, R K; Fain, S C

    2005-07-22

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy was used to study the morphological changes of an ultrathin amorphous solid water (ASW) film as a function of deposition temperature, annealing temperature, and annealing time. ASW deposited at 80 or 108 K on Au(111) formed truncated hemispherical clusters of increasing size during annealing at 134 K; these clusters were inferred to be crystalline. The number of nuclei present at the outer surface of the film after deposition was greater for higher deposition temperature. For lower cluster densities, depletion of the ASW film around the clusters was observed when the clusters became larger and dendritic growth was observed when the apparent cluster footprint radius exceeded 100 nm.

  16. High temperature diamond film deposition on a natural diamond anvil

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, T.S.; Vohra, Y.K.

    1995-12-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of a 100 {mu}m thick by 350 {mu}m diameter diamond layer on the culet of a type Ia brilliant cut natural diamond anvil by microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD). While our previous work [1] on diamond anvils resulted in homoepitaxial film growth at a rate of approximately 20 {mu}m/hr, the present 100 {mu}m thick diamond layer grew in less than 2 hours. This unprecedented growth rate of {approximately} 50 {mu}m/hr is believed to be the result of the extremely high substrate temperature (1800{degrees}-2100{degrees}C) during deposition. The translucent diamond layer was characterized by micro-Raman, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation spectroscopy, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman analysis shows the deposit to be of high quality. The PL spectra show numerous features, including prominent emission bands at 575 nm (2.16 eV), 636 nm (1.95 eV), 735 nm (1.68 eV) and 777 run, (1.60 eV).

  17. Preparation of cuxinygazsen precursor films and powders by electroless deposition

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Batchelor, Wendi Kay; Wiesner, Holm; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1999-01-01

    A method for electroless deposition of Cu.sub.x In.sub.y Ga.sub.z Se.sub.n (x=0-2, y=0-2, z=0-2, n=0-3) precursor films and powders onto a metallic substrate comprising: preparing an aqueous bath solution of compounds selected from the group consisting of: I) a copper compound, a selenium compound, an indium compound and gallium compound; II) a copper compound, a selenium compound and an indium compound; III) a selenium compound, and indium compound and a gallium compound; IV) a selenium compound and a indium compound; and V) a copper compound and selenium compound; each compound being present in sufficient quantity to react with each other to produce Cu.sub.x In.sub.y Ga.sub.z Se.sub.n (x=0-2, y=0-2, z=0-2, n=0-3); adjusting the pH of the aqueous bath solution to an acidic value by the addition of a dilute acid; and initiating an electroless reaction with an oxidizing counterelectrode for a sufficient time to cause a deposit of Cu.sub.x In.sub.y Ga.sub.z Se.sub.n (x=0-2, y=0-2, z=0-2, n=0-3) from the aqueous bath solution onto a metallic substrate.

  18. Composition variations in pulsed-laser-deposited Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films as a function of deposition parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Jones, B. B.; Hunt, B. D.; Barner, J. B.; Vasquez, R. P.; Bajuk, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The composition of pulsed-ultraviolet-laser-deposited Y-Ba-Cu-O films was examined as a function of position across the substrate, laser fluence, laser spot size, substrate temperature, target conditioning, oxygen pressure and target-substrate distance. Laser fluence, laser spot size, and substrate temperature were found to have little effect on composition within the range investigated. Ablation from a fresh target surface results in films enriched in copper and barium, both of which decrease in concentration until a steady state condition is achieved. Oxygen pressure and target-substrate distance have a significant effect on film composition. In vacuum, copper and barium are slightly concentrated at the center of deposition. With the introduction of an oxygen background pressure, scattering results in copper and barium depletion in the deposition center, an effect which increases with increasing target-substrate distance. A balancing of these two effects results in stoichiometric deposition.

  19. Microstructure of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    films, including chemical vapor deposition [4,5], atomic layer deposition [6], solution based hydrothermal deposition [7], fil- tered vacuum cathodic arc...transmission electronmicroscopy, scanning electronmicroscopy and atomic force spectroscopy measurements. Deposition pressure and target–substrate...cm) with a 100 nm thick SiO2 layer . Before deposition the substrates were sonicated in acetone, rinsed, sonicated withmethanol, rinsed with ultra-pure

  20. Method of depositing a carbon film on a substrate and products obtained thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, G.; Nir, D.

    1984-12-04

    There is disclosed a method for depositing a diamond or diamond-like carbon film on at least one substrate employing a hydrocarbon gas and at least one gas which preferentially removes by chemical sputtering other forms of carbon, especially graphite from said film to thereby obtain useful carbon film coated products.

  1. Thin-film ferrites vapor deposited by one-step process in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacskaylo, M.

    1966-01-01

    Thin-film ferrites are formed by vapor deposition of a mixture of powdered ferrites and powdered boron oxide at controlled temperatures in a vacuum chamber. These films are used in memory devices for computers and as thin-film inductors in communications and telemetry systems.

  2. Deposition and characterization of molybdenum thin films using dc-plasma magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Majid; Islam, Mohammad

    2013-12-15

    Molebdenum (Mo) thin films were deposited on well-cleaned soda-lime glass substrates using DC-plasma magnetron sputtering. In the design of experiment deposition was optimized for maximum beneficial characteristics by monitoring effect of process variables such as deposition power (100–200 W). Their electrical, structural and morphological properties were analyzed to study the effect of these variables. The electrical resistivity of Mo thin films could be reduced by increasing deposition power. Within the range of analyzed deposition power, Mo thin films showed a mono crystalline nature and the crystallites were found to have an orientation along [110] direction. The surface morphology of thin films showed that a highly dense micro structure has been obtained. The surface roughness of films increased with deposition power. The adhesion of Mo thin films could be improved by increasing the deposition power. Atomic force microscopy was used for the topographical study of the films and to determine the roughness of the films. X-ray diffractrometer and scanning electron microscopy analysis were used to investigate the crystallinity and surface morphology of the films. Hall effect measurement system was used to find resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of deposited films. The adhesion test was performed using scotch hatch tape adhesion test. Mo thin films prepared at deposition power of 200 W, substrate temperature of 23°C and Ar pressure of 0.0123 mbar exhibited a mono crystalline structure with an orientation along (110) direction, thickness of ∼550 nm and electrical resistivity value of 0.57 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm.

  3. Correlation between Optical Properties and Chemical Composition of Sputter-Deposited Germanium Oxide (GEOX) Films (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0154 CORRELATION BETWEEN OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SPUTTER- DEPOSITED GERMANIUM OXIDE (GEOX) FILMS...DEPOSITED GERMANIUM OXIDE (GEOX) FILMS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6...dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.optmat.2014.02.023. 14. ABSTRACT Germanium oxide (GeOx) films were grown on (100) Si substrates by reactive Direct-Current (DC

  4. The Application of Pulsed Laser Deposition in Producing Bioactive Ceramic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafan; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a relatively new technique for producing thin films. It presents unique advantages for the deposition of bioactive ceramics. The mechanism and characteristics of the technique PLD are introduced. Its applications and current research status in hydroxyapatite and bioglass thin films are reviewed. The effect of processing parameters of PLD, including atmosphere, substrate temperature, laser wavelength and target properties, on the structures and the properties of the hydroxyapatite film, is analyzed in detail. Future application trends are also analyzed.

  5. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; McCumiskey, E. J.; Taylor, C. R.; Martin, C.; Argibay, Nicolas; Craciun, V.; Tanner, D. B.

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited under higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.

  6. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    DOE PAGES

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; ...

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited undermore » higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.« less

  7. The effect of bias voltage on the morphology and wettability of plasma deposited titanium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Yan; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    Hydrophobic and hydrophilic films with titanium oxide inside were grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF--PECVD) on glass substrates. Bias voltage was used as an assistant for the deposition process. And a comparison was made between with and without the bias voltage. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP-Ti (OC 3H 7) 4) was used as the precursor compound. Film wettability was tested by water contact angle measurement (CAM). The water contact angle (WAC) of the film deposited in plasma without biased voltage was greater than 145°, while the WAC of the film deposited in plasma with biased voltage was less than 30°. The morphology of the deposited films was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that the films grown without bias voltage were covered with lots of nano grain and pores, but the surface of the films deposition with bias voltage was much dense. The chemical structure and property of the deposited films were analyzed by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while the plasma phase was investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES).

  8. DCEMS Study of Thin Stainless Steel Films Deposited by RF Sputtering of AISI316L

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K.; Iio, S.; Ujihira, Y.; Terai, T.

    2005-04-26

    Thin stainless steel films were prepared on SiO2/Si plate heated at 100 deg. C and 400 deg. C using AISI316L as target, by a RF magnetron Ar sputtering method. RF sputtered-deposited films and the oxidized surface layers by post heating were characterized by depth selective conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (DCEMS) using a He+5%CH4 gas proportional counter. The as-deposited films consisted of magnetic phases, the magnetic orientation of which had a tendency to be perpendicular to the surface of the film. In the case of the deposited films at substrate temperature of 100 deg. C, a small amount of Fe2O3 and ferritic stainless steel formed by post-heating in air. A magnetic subcomponent and a austenite phase were formed in the films deposited at substrate temperature of 400 deg. C. {alpha}-Fe2O3 and magnetite formed easily on the top and middle layers of the films by post-heating in air. The oxide states of the films deposited at different temperatures of substrate were clearly distinguished by post-heating. Thus it was found by DCEMS that the structures of the deposited films were strongly affected by the preparation method and the temperature of the substrate.

  9. Effect of substrate temperature on deposition rate of rf plasma-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andújar, J. L.; Bertran, E.; Canillas, A.; Campmany, J.; Morenza, J. L.

    1991-03-01

    We present a study about the influence of substrate temperature on deposition rate of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films prepared by rf glow discharge decomposition of pure silane gas in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor. Two different behaviors are observed depending on deposition pressure conditions. At high pressure (30 Pa) the influence of substrate temperature on deposition rate is mainly through a modification of gas density, in such a way that the substrate temperature of deposition rate is similar to pressure dependence at constant temperature. On the contrary, at low pressure (3 Pa), a gas density effect cannot account for the observed increase of deposition rate as substrate temperature rises above 450 K with an activation energy of 1.1 kcal/mole. In accordance with laser-induced fluorescence measurements reported in the literature, this rise has been ascribed to an increase of secondary electron emission from the growing film surface as a result of molecular hydrogen desorption.

  10. Wettability of polymeric solids by ternary mixtures composed of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Szymczyk, Katarzyna

    2011-11-01

    Contact angle (θ) measurements on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) surface were carried out for the systems containing ternary mixtures of surfactants composed of: p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenoxypoly(ethylene glycols), Triton X-100 (TX100), Triton X-165 (TX165) and Triton X-114 (TX114), and fluorocarbon surfactants, Zonyl FSN100 (FSN100) and Zonyl FSO100 (FSO100). The aqueous solutions of ternary surfactant mixtures were prepared by adding TX114, FSN100 or FSO100 to binary mixtures of TX100+TX165, where the synergistic effect in the reduction of the surface tension of water (γ(LV)) was determined. From the obtained contact angle values, the relationships between cosθ, the adhesion tension and surface tension of solutions, cosθ and the reciprocal of the surface tension were determined. On the basis of these relationships, the correlation between the critical surface tension of PTFE and PMMA wetting and the surface tension of these polymers as well as the work of adhesion of aqueous solutions of ternary surfactant mixtures to PTFE and PMMA surface were discussed. The critical surface tension of PTFE and PMMA wetting, γ(C), determined from the contact angle measurements of aqueous solutions of surfactants including FSN100 or FSO100 was also discussed in the light of the surface tension changes of PTFE and PMMA under the influence of film formation by fluorocarbon surfactants on the surface of these polymers. The γ(C) values of the studied polymeric solids were found to be different for the mixtures composed of hydrocarbon surfactants in comparison with those of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants. In the solutions containing fluorocarbon surfactants, the γ(C) values were different taking into account the contact angle in the range of FSN100 and FSO100 concentration corresponding to their unsaturated monolayer at water-air interface or to that saturated.

  11. Low resistance tungsten films on GaAs deposited by means of rapid thermal low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, A.; Feingold, A.; Nakahara, S.; Pearton, S. J.; Lane, E.

    1992-08-01

    Low resistance tungsten (W) films were deposited onto GaAs substrates by means of rapid thermal low pressure chemical vapor deposition (RT-LPCVD), using tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) gas reduced by hydrogen (H2). Deposition temperatures up to 550 °C for durations of up to 30 s were explored, resulting in deposition of relatively pure W films (containing less than 2% O2 and C). Post-deposition sintering of the layers led to significant reduction of the resistivity to values as low as 50 μΩ cm. The efficiency of the deposition improved upon increasing the H2 flow rate up to 1250 sccm resulting in a deposition rate of about 10 nm/s at a total chamber pressure of 3.5 Torr and temperature of 500 °C. The films appeared to be polycrystalline with a very fine grain structure, regardless of the deposition temperature with good morphology and underwent a limited reaction with the underlying GaAs substrates.

  12. Underpotential deposition-mediated layer-by-layer growth of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jia Xu; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-05-19

    A method of depositing contiguous, conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin films with atomic-level control is described. The process involves the use of underpotential deposition of a first element to mediate the growth of a second material by overpotential deposition. Deposition occurs between a potential positive to the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element where a full monolayer of mediating element forms, and a potential which is less than, or only slightly greater than, the bulk deposition potential of the material to be deposited. By cycling the applied voltage between the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element and the material to be deposited, repeated desorption/adsorption of the mediating element during each potential cycle can be used to precisely control film growth on a layer-by-layer basis. This process is especially suitable for the formation of a catalytically active layer on core-shell particles for use in energy conversion devices such as fuel cells.

  13. Impact of deposition-rate fluctuations on thin-film thickness and uniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Joli B.

    2016-11-04

    Variations in deposition rate are superimposed on a thin-film–deposition model with planetary rotation to determine the impact on film thickness. Variations in magnitude and frequency of the fluctuations relative to the speed of planetary revolution lead to thickness errors and uniformity variations up to 3%. Sufficiently rapid oscillations in the deposition rate have a negligible impact, while slow oscillations are found to be problematic, leading to changes in the nominal film thickness. Finally, superimposing noise as random fluctuations in the deposition rate has a negligible impact, confirming the importance of any underlying harmonic oscillations in deposition rate or source operation.

  14. Thermal conductivity of nitride films of Ti, Cr, and W deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, Kasichainula

    2015-05-15

    Nitride films of Ti, Cr, and W were deposited using reactive magnetron sputtering from metal targets in argon and nitrogen plasma. TiN films with (200) orientation were achieved on silicon (100) at the substrate temperature of 500 and 600 °C. The films were polycrystalline at lower temperature. An amorphous interface layer was observed between the TiN film and Si wafer deposited at 600 °C. TiN film deposited at 600 °C showed the nitrogen to Ti ratio to be near unity, but films deposited at lower temperature were nitrogen deficient. CrN film with (200) orientation and good stoichiometry was achieved at 600 °C on Si(111) wafer but the film deposited at 500 °C showed cubic CrN and hexagonal Cr{sub 2}N phases with smaller grain size and amorphous back ground in the x-ray diffraction pattern. An amorphous interface layer was not observed in the cubic CrN film on Si(111) deposited at 600 °C. Nitride film of tungsten deposited at 600 °C on Si(100) wafer was nitrogen deficient, contained both cubic W{sub 2}N and hexagonal WN phases with smaller grain size. Nitride films of tungsten deposited at 500 °C were nonstoichiometric and contained cubic W{sub 2}N and unreacted W phases. There was no amorphous phase formed along the interface for the tungsten nitride film deposited at 600 °C on the Si wafer. Thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of all the nitride films of Ti, Cr, and W were determined by transient thermoreflectance technique. The thermal conductivity of the films as function of deposition temperature, microstructure, nitrogen stoichiometry and amorphous interaction layer at the interface was determined. Tungsten nitride film containing both cubic and hexagonal phases was found to exhibit much higher thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance. The amorphous interface layer was found to reduce effective thermal conductivity of TiN and CrN films.

  15. n-type In2S3 films deposited by pulsed laser deposition: effect of laser power on the properties of the films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunyan; Mao, Dun; Liu, Zhu; Liang, Qi; Chen, Shirong; Yu, Yongqiang; Wang, Li; Luo, Linbao; Xu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different levels of laser power was first used to deposit In2S3 films from homemade, high-purity In2S3 targets. This process was followed by post-annealing in an N2 atmosphere to improve the films’ crystallinity and conductivity. The annealed films were verified to be stoichiometric, body-centered, tetragonal In2S3 with the preferred orientation (103). The bandgap of the films decreased from 2.8 to 2.2 eV with an increase in the laser power, which was believed to be the result of the grain growth caused by the higher laser power. The electrical transport property of the bottom-gate field-effect transistor revealed the n-type conduction of the annealed In2S3 films, and the heterojunction p+-Si/annealed In2S3 film showed remarkable photovoltaic behavior upon light illumination, indicating that PLD-deposited In2S3 films may have great potential as a buffer layer in thin-film solar cells. What’s more, doped In2S3 films can be easily realized due to the fairly stoichiometric transfer of the PLD method.

  16. Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates

    DOEpatents

    Zuhr, Raymond A.; Haynes, Tony E.; Golanski, Andrzej

    1994-01-01

    An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repells the ionized particles.

  17. Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates

    DOEpatents

    Zuhr, Raymond A.; Haynes, Tony E.; Golanski, Andrzej

    1999-01-01

    An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repells the ionized particles.

  18. Effects of Buffer Salt Concentration on the Dominated Deposition Mechanism and Optical Characteristics of Chemically Deposited Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakhaki, Z. Makhdoumi; Youzbashi, A.; Sangpour, P.; Kazemzadeh, A.; Naderi, N.; Bazargan, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Effects of buffer salt concentration on the rate of deposition, dominated deposition mechanism and subsequently the structural, morphological, and optical properties of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) on glass substrate were investigated. The precursors were chosen to be cadmium chloride (CdCl2) as the cadmium source, thiourea (CS(NH2)2) as the sulfur source, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) as the buffer salt and ammonia as the complexing agent and the pH controller. The influence of the NH4NO3 concentration on the structure, morphology, film uniformity, stoichiometry and optical properties of CdS thin films was also studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, uv-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopes. The XRD studies revealed that all the deposited films exhibited a (002)h/(111)c preferred orientation. The crystallite size was increased from 20nm to 30nm by the increase of concentration of NH4NO3 from 0.5M to 2.5M. The morphology of CdS thin films were agglomerated spherical particles consisted of smaller particles. The surface of thin films deposited at the NH4NO3 concentration of 0.5M was compact and smooth. The increase of the concentration of NH4NO3 decreased the packing density of the films. The optical band gap was in the range of 2.25-2.4eV, which was decreased by the decrement of packing density. The PL spectra showed two peaks centered at 400nm and 500nm which are attributed to violet and band-to-band emissions, respectively.

  19. Metrology and Optical Characterization of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition, (PECVD), low temperature deposited Amorphous Carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrieu, F.; Chaton, C.; Neira, D.; Beitia, C.; Mota, L. Proenca; Papon, A. M.; Tarnowka, A.

    2007-09-01

    Amorphous Carbon films deposited by PECVD (RF) have recently been introduced as a new material for semiconductor processing, e.g. in 193 nm ARC lithography [1] and in the DRAM production [2]. A large amount of literature has already been published on with regard to the applications of this class of material [3]. Hence, it has been reported that Amorphous Carbon films undergo a hydrogen chemical desorption when deposited above 500 °C, together with an amorphous to graphite phase transition. Unfortunately, the intrinsic nature of the amorphous carbons depends strongly upon deposition techniques. Film morphology can be completely different from one case to another since there are so many deposition techniques. Optical characterization of these films has also undergone development for several decades. In Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE), several models have been proposed from simple Lorentz oscillators' absorption, toward the Tauc Lorentz or Forhoui Bloomer equations. Nevertheless, none of these models sufficiently quantitatively explain the experimental data. In some cases, a simple `Effective Medium Approximation', (EMA), is able to determine the sp2/sp3 bounds present in the film. However, the validity limitation of this approach remains questionable when considering films in a wide range of film thicknesses. In line, metrology for semiconductor requires robust models, which account for parameters such as temperature deposition, stress and film resistivity as well. Different solutions are investigated from our optical measurements, including a biaxial anisotropy hypothesis, which has been proposed by J. Leng et al. [3] from BPR (Beam Reflectometry Profile) and with SE measurements [4]. Our results are considered, together with other surface analysis techniques (XRD, IR and Raman) and confronted to TEM observations.

  20. Field emission characteristics of nano-structured carbon films deposited on differently pretreated Mo films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longyang; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Lei

    2008-12-01

    Nano-structured carbon films (NCFs) were grown on Mo layers by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) system. The Mo layers were deposited on ceramic substrates by electron beam deposition method and were pretreated by different techniques, which include ultrasonically scratching and laser-grooving technology (10 line/mm). NCFs were characterized by a field emission type scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Raman spectra and field emission (FE) I- V measurements. Effects of process parameters on morphologies, structures and FE properties of NCFs were examined. The experimental results show that two kinds of NCFs deposited at the same parameters employed for the MPCVD process were respectively composed of carbon nano-balls and reticular carbon nano-tubes inlayed by carbon nano-balls with dissimilar disorder structures, both NCFs showed each merits and exhibited good field emission properties, especially shown in the uniformity of FE, the uniform field emission images with areas of 4 cm 2 were obtained. Growth mechanism influenced by different pretreated method was discussed and the possible FE mechanisms of the NCFs were also investigated. Finally, the process characteristics of laser-grooving technology were analyzed, and its potential applications were predicted.

  1. Influence of solution deposition rate on properties of V2O5 thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Alghafour, N. M.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Hassan, Zai; Mohammad, Sabah M.

    2016-07-01

    Vanadium oxide (V2O5) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by using a cost-efficient spray pyrolysis technique. The films were grown at 350° through thermal decomposition of VCl3 in deionized water with different solution spray rates. The high resolution X-ray diffraction results revealed the formation of nanocrystalline films having orthorhombic structures with preferential orientation along (101) direction. The spray rate influenced the surface morphology and crystallite size of the films. The crystallite size was found to increase whereas the micro-strain was decreased by increasing the spray deposition rates. The increase in crystallite size and decrease in the macrostrain resulted in an improvement in the films' crystallinity. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis indicated that the average transmittance of all films lies in the range 75-80 %. The band gap of V2O5 film was decreased from 2.65 to 2.46 eV with increase of the spray deposition rate from 5 ml/min to 10 ml/min. first, second, and third level headings (first level heading).

  2. Effect of deposition time on structural and magnetic properties of pulse laser deposited hard-soft composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satalkar, M.; Kane, S. N.; Pasko, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2016-10-01

    Hard-soft composite (BaFe12O19:Mg0.1Ni0.3Zn0.6Fe2O4 (2:1) films, were deposited by ‘Pulsed Laser Deposition’ (PLD) technique on Si (100) substrate using different deposition time - 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes. Influence of deposition time on structural and magnetic properties were studied via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD confirms the presence of soft and hard phases in all the prepared thin films. Small amount of secondary phase - Fe2O3 is also detected in all the thin films except for the deposition time - 90 mins. With deposition time average grain diameter of both hard (BaFe12O19) and soft (Mg0.1Ni0.3Zn0.6Fe2O4) phase increases. Increase in the distance between the magnetic ions (Ni2+ and Fe3+) at tetrahedral (A) and octahedral [B] site leads to increase in the hopping length at A and B site except for the the deposition time of 60 minutes. Magnetic measurements shows that the coercivity and magnetization of the prepared thin films respectively ranges between 112.07 - 213.03 Oe and 1.4 x 10-7 - 3.15 x 10-7 Am2.

  3. Compositional study of silicon oxynitride thin films deposited using electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.; Sah, R.E.

    2005-05-01

    We have used backscattering spectrometry and {sup 15}N({sup 1}H,{alpha},{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis techniques to study in detail the variation in the composition of silicon oxynitride films with deposition parameters. The films were deposited using 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from mixtures of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at deposition temperature 90 deg. C. The deposition pressure and nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio have been found to have a pronounced influence on the composition of the films. When the deposition pressure was varied for a given nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio, the amount of silicon and nitrogen increased with the deposition pressure, while the amount of oxygen decreased. For a given deposition pressure, the amount of incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen decreased while that of oxygen increased with increasing nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio. For nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio of 5, we obtained films which contained neither chemically bonded nor nonbonded nitrogen atoms as revealed by the results of infrared spectroscopy, backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear reaction analysis. Our results demonstrate the nitrogen-free nearly stoichiometric silicon dioxide films can be prepared from a mixture of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at low substrate temperature using high-density PECVD technique. This avoids the use of a hazardous and an often forbidden pair of silane and oxygen gases in a plasma reactor.

  4. Studies on VOx thin films deposited over Si3N4 coated Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, P. Deepak; Gupta, Sudha; Sridharan, M.

    2015-06-01

    Vanadium oxide (VOx) thin films were deposited on to the silicon nitride (Si3N4) coated silicon (Si) substrate using reactive direct current magnetron sputtering at different substrate temperatures (Ts). The deposited films were characterized for their structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties. The average grain size of the deposited films was in the range of 95 to 178 nm and the strain varied from 0.071 to 0.054 %. The optical bandgap values of the films were evaluated using UV-Vis spectroscopy and lies in the range of 2.46 to 3.88 eV. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) for the film deposited at 125 °C was -1.23%/°C with the sheet resistivity of 2.7 Ω.cm.

  5. Epitaxial growth of magnetic ZnCuO thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Tae Cheol; Lee, Seung Han; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Jeong, Jaeeun; Han, Seung Ho

    2017-02-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of epitaxial ZnO thin films doped with 5 at% Cu on SrTiO3 (001) and (111) substrates were investigated. In the case of films deposited in oxygen, unique crystallographic growth directions on different substrates were observed, while a metallic phase was detected in films grown under vacuum. The Cu-doped ZnO thin films deposited on the SrTiO3 (111) substrates, with hexagonal structures, showed a single epitaxial relationship with the substrates, whereas those deposited on the SrTiO3 (001) substrates showed a double epitaxial growth mode. The epitaxial ZnCuO thin films deposited on the SrTiO3 (111) substrates under high vacuum exhibited a ferromagnetic signal at room temperature.

  6. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of spray deposited lithium doped CdO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, P.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Ramamurthi, K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, CdO and Li doped CdO thin films were deposited on microscopic glass substrates at 300˚C by a spray pyrolysis experimental setup. The deposited CdO and Li doped CdO thin films were subjected to XRD, SEM, UV-VIS spectroscopy and Hall measurement analyses. XRD studies revealed the polycrystalline nature of the deposited films and confirmed that the deposited CdO and Li doped CdO thin films belong to cubic crystal system. The Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed the information on shape of CdO and Li doped CdO films. Electrical study reveals the n-type semiconducting nature of CdO and the optical band gap is varied between 2.38 and 2.44 eV, depending on the Li doping concentrations.

  7. Effect of ablation parameters on infrared pulsed laser deposition of poly(ethylene glycol) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Daniel M.; Papantonakis, M. R.; Toftmann, B.; Horwitz, J. S.; McGill, R. A.; Chrisey, D. B.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2002-06-01

    Polymer thin films were deposited by laser ablation using infrared radiation both resonant (2.90, 3.40, 3.45, and 8.96 mum) and nonresonant (3.30, 3.92, and 4.17 mum) with vibrational modes in the starting material, polyethylene glycol. The chemical structure of the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, while the molecular weight distribution was investigated using gel permeation chromatography. The films deposited by resonant irradiation are superior to those deposited with nonresonant radiation with respect to both the chemical structure and the molecular weight distribution of the films. However, the molecular-weight distributions of films deposited at nonresonant infrared wavelengths show marked polymer fragmentation. Fluence and wavelength dependence studies show that the effects may be related to the degree of thermal confinement, and hence to the relative absorption strengths of the targeted vibrational modes.

  8. Photolytic deposition of aluminum nitride and oxy-nitride films at temperatures ≤ 350k

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Lince, Jeffrey R.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum nitride and oxy-nitride thin films have been deposited on Si(100) substrates at temperatures of 300-350K by gas-phase excimer laser photolysis at 193 nm. The precursors used for this deposition process are trimethylamine alane and ammonia. The properties of these laser-deposited films were studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and x-ray diffraction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been extensively used to provide information regarding the chemical compositions on the surface and in the bulk of these laser deposited films, as well as on the chemical states of the components of the films. Well-adhering, smooth, amorphous films of AlN are obtained at a substrate temperature of 350K using this technique.

  9. Substrate dependent structural and magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited Fe3O4 thin films.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Rajendra N; Kaur, Davinder; Pandey, Ashish K

    2010-12-01

    Nanocrystalline iron oxide thin films have been deposited on various substrates such as quartz, MgO(100), and Si(100) by pulsed laser deposition technique using excimer KrF laser (248 nm). The orientations, crystallite size and lattice parameters were studied using X-ray diffraction. The XRD results show that the films deposited on MgO and Si substrates are highly oriented and show only (400) and (311) reflections respectively. On the other hand, the orientation of the films deposited on quarts substrate changed from (311) to (400) with an increase in the substrate temperature from 400 degrees C to 600 degrees C, indicating thereby that the film growth direction is highly affected with nature of substrate and substrate temperature. The surface morphology of the deposited films was studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and spherical ball like regular features of nanometer size grains were obtained. The magnetic properties were studied by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer in the magnetic field +/- 6 Tesla. The magnetic field dependent magnetization (M-H) curves of all the Fe3O4 thin films measured at 5 K and 300 K show the ferrimagnetic nature. The electrochemical sensing of dopamine studied for these films shows that the film deposited on MgO substrate can be used as a sensing electrode.

  10. Bioinspired deposition of TiO2 thin films induced by hydrophobins.

    PubMed

    Santhiya, D; Burghard, Z; Greiner, C; Jeurgens, Lars P H; Subkowski, T; Bill, J

    2010-05-04

    The deposition of ceramic thin films from aqueous solutions at low temperature using biopolymers as templates has attracted much attention due to economic and environmental benefits. Titanium dioxide is one of the most attractive functional materials and shows a wide range of applications across vastly different areas because of its unique chemical, optical, and electrical properties. In the present work, we deposited smooth, nanocrystalline titania thin films by an aqueous deposition method on surface active and amphipathic proteins of fungal origin called hydrophobins. Initially, the hydrophobin molecules were self-assembled on a silicon substrate and characterized by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface potential measurements. Thin films of titanium dioxide were deposited on the surface of hydrophobin self-assembled monolayers from aqueous titanium(IV) bis(ammonium lactate) dihydroxide solution at near-ambient conditions. The microstructure of the as-deposited films was analyzed by AFM, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, which revealed the presence of nanocrystals. The titania films were also characterized using AR-XPS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) techniques. Appropriate mechanisms involved in film deposition are suggested. Additionally, nanoindentation tests on as deposited titania films showed their high resistance against mechanical stress.

  11. Electrochemical deposition of layered copper thin films based on the diffusion limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenhuinan; Wu, Guoxing; Yang, Sanjun; Liu, Qiming

    2016-10-01

    In this work layered copper films with smooth surface were successfully fabricated onto ITO substrate by electrochemical deposition (ECD) and the thickness of the films was nearly 60 nm. The resulting films were characterized by SEM, TEM, AFM, XPS, and XRD. We have investigated the effects of potential and the concentration of additives and found that 2D dendritic-like growth process leaded the formation of films. A suitable growth mechanism based on diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) mechanism for the copper films formation is presented, which are meaningful for further designing homogeneous and functional films.

  12. Electrochemical deposition of layered copper thin films based on the diffusion limited aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chenhuinan; Wu, Guoxing; Yang, Sanjun; Liu, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    In this work layered copper films with smooth surface were successfully fabricated onto ITO substrate by electrochemical deposition (ECD) and the thickness of the films was nearly 60 nm. The resulting films were characterized by SEM, TEM, AFM, XPS, and XRD. We have investigated the effects of potential and the concentration of additives and found that 2D dendritic-like growth process leaded the formation of films. A suitable growth mechanism based on diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) mechanism for the copper films formation is presented, which are meaningful for further designing homogeneous and functional films. PMID:27734900

  13. Annealing effect on structural and optical properties of chemical bath deposited MnS thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulutas, Cemal; Gumus, Cebrail

    2016-03-01

    MnS thin film was prepared by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method on commercial microscope glass substrate deposited at 30 °C. The as-deposited film was given thermal annealing treatment in air atmosphere at various temperatures (150, 300 and 450 °C) for 1 h. The MnS thin film was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectrophotometer and Hall effect measurement system. The effect of annealing temperature on the structural, electrical and optical properties such as optical constants of refractive index (n) and energy band gap (Eg) of the film was determined. XRD measurements reveal that the film is crystallized in the wurtzite phase and changed to tetragonal Mn3O4 phase after being annealed at 300 °C. The energy band gap of film decreased from 3.69 eV to 3.21 eV based on the annealing temperature.

  14. Nanostructured and amorphous-like tungsten films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellasega, D.; Merlo, G.; Conti, C.; Bottani, C. E.; Passoni, M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental investigation of nanostructured, micrometer-thick, tungsten films deposited by pulsed laser deposition is presented. The films are compact and pore-free, with crystal grain sizes ranging from 14 nm to less than 2 nm. It is shown how, by properly tailoring deposition rate and kinetic energy of ablated species, it is possible to achieve a detailed and separate control of both film morphology and structure. The role of the main process parameters, He background pressure, laser fluence, and energy, is elucidated. In contrast with W films produced with other PVD techniques, β-phase growth is avoided and the presence of impurities and contaminants, like oxygen, is not correlated with film structure. These features make these films interesting for the development of coatings with improved properties, like increased corrosion resistance and enhanced diffusion barriers.

  15. Effects of post-deposition argon implantation on the memory properties of plasma-deposited silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Q. A.; Brown, W. D.

    1989-10-01

    Post-deposition ion implantation has been used to introduce argon into plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon nitride films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the metal-silicon nitride-silicon oxide-silicon structure. Argon was implanted into the SiH4 -NH3 -N2 deposited films at energies ranging from 25 to 75 keV, current densities ranging from 0.1 to 75 μA/cm2 and fluences ranging from 1×1012 to 1×1016 ions/cm2. Physical properties of the films were studied by ellipsometry and infrared spectroscopy, while high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves were used to obtain programming, retention, and endurance characteristics.

  16. Thermally induced superhydrophilicity in TiO2 films prepared by supersonic aerosol deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Jae; Kim, Do-Yeon; Latthe, Sanjay S; Lee, Jong-Gun; Swihart, Mark T; Yoon, Sam S

    2013-07-10

    Superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces enable self-cleaning phenomena, either forming a continuous water film or forming droplets that roll off the surface, respectively. TiO2 films are well-known for their extreme hydrophilicity and photocatalytic characteristics. Here, we describe nanostructured TiO2 thin films prepared by supersonic aerosol deposition, including a thorough study of the effects of the annealing temperature on the crystal structure, surface morphology, surface roughness, and wetting properties. Powder X-ray diffraction showed that supersonic deposition resulted in fragmentation and amorphization of the micrometer-size anatase (60%)-rutile (40%) precursor powder and that, upon annealing, a substantial fraction of the film (~30%) crystallized in the highly hydrophilic but metastable brookite phase. The film morphology was also somewhat modified after annealing. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed rough granular films with high surface roughness. The as-deposited TiO2 films were moderately hydrophilic with a water contact angle (θ) of ~45°, whereas TiO2 films annealed at 500 °C became superhydrophilic (θ ~ 0°) without UV illumination. This thermally induced superhydrophilicity of the TiO2 films can be explained on the basis of the combined effects of the change in the crystal structure, surface microstructure, and surface roughness. Supersonic aerosol deposition followed by annealing is uniquely able to produce these nanostructured films containing a mixture of all three TiO2 phases (anatase, rutile, and brookite) and exhibiting superhydrophilicity without UV illumination.

  17. Effects of Al Doping on the Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Liu, Juan; Dai, Ning; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The tuning of structural, optical, and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique is reported in this work. With the increasing Al doping level, the evolution from (002) to (100) diffraction peaks indicates the change in growth mode of ZnO films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to study the thickness, optical constants, and band gap of AZO films. Due to the increasing carrier concentration after Al doping, a blue shift of band gap and absorption edge can be observed, which can be interpreted by Burstein-Moss effect. The carrier concentration and resistivity are found to vary significantly among different doping concentration, and the optimum value is also discussed. The modulations and improvements of properties are important for Al-doped ZnO films to apply as transparent conductor in various applications.

  18. Effects of Al Doping on the Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Liu, Juan; Dai, Ning; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-12-01

    The tuning of structural, optical, and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique is reported in this work. With the increasing Al doping level, the evolution from (002) to (100) diffraction peaks indicates the change in growth mode of ZnO films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to study the thickness, optical constants, and band gap of AZO films. Due to the increasing carrier concentration after Al doping, a blue shift of band gap and absorption edge can be observed, which can be interpreted by Burstein-Moss effect. The carrier concentration and resistivity are found to vary significantly among different doping concentration, and the optimum value is also discussed. The modulations and improvements of properties are important for Al-doped ZnO films to apply as transparent conductor in various applications.

  19. Plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon films and their tribological properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work on the properties of diamondlike carbon films and their dependence on preparation conditions are reviewed. The results of the study indicate that plasma deposition enables one to deposit a variety of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H ) films exhibiting more diamondlike behavior to more graphitic behavior. The plasma-deposited a-C:H can be effectively used as hard, wear-resistant, and protective lubricating films on ceramic materials such as Si(sub 3)N(sub 4) under a variety of environmental conditions such as moist air, dry nitrogrn, and vacuum.

  20. Thin films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; Galasso, A.; Rau, J. V.

    2012-09-01

    Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Deposition has been applied to the production of thin films from a tungsten carbide target. The gaseous phase obtained by the laser ablation shows a very weak primary plume, in contrast with a very strong secondary one. The deposited films, investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, present a mixture of WC and other phases with lower carbon content. All films are amorphous, independently from the substrate temperature. The characteristics of the deposits have been explained in terms of thermal evaporation and cooling rate of molten particles ejected from the target.

  1. Plume behavior and thin film deposition by laser ablation using a hellicoidal shadow mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Aurelian; Grigoriu, Constantin; Jang, W.; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2000-02-01

    The laser ablation is one of the best ways to obtain smooth thin film deposited on various substrates. However, to obtain a 'droplets-free' surface some special experimental setups are necessary.ONe of them is the 'eclipse' method, using a plane shadow mask. Based on studies on the plume behavior in a 'standard' deposition and in a plane shadow mask eclipse deposition, we prose a new shadow mask having a an helicoidal shape, which permit to obtain a abetter film quality - maximum droplets size about 10 times smaller than for the plane shadow mask. The plume behavior and thin film quality are presented and discussed.

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  3. Microstructural modification of nc-Si/SiOx films during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.

    2005-07-01

    Nanocrystalline-silicon embedded silicon oxide films are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 300 °C without post-heat treatment. Measurements of XPS, IR, XRD, and HREM are performed. Microstructural modifications are found occurring throughout the film deposition. The silica network with a high oxide state is suggested to be formed directly under the abduction of the former deposited layer, rather than processing repeatedly from the original low-oxide state of silica. Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a size of 6-10 nm are embedded in the SiOx film matrix, indicating the potential application in Si-based optoelectronic integrity.

  4. Biocompatibility of atomic layer-deposited alumina thin films.

    PubMed

    Finch, Dudley S; Oreskovic, Tammy; Ramadurai, Krishna; Herrmann, Cari F; George, Steven M; Mahajan, Roop L

    2008-10-01

    Presented in this paper is a study of the biocompatibility of an atomic layer-deposited (ALD) alumina (Al2O3) thin film and an ALD hydrophobic coating on standard glass cover slips. The pure ALD alumina coating exhibited a water contact angle of 55 degrees +/- 5 degrees attributed, in part, to a high concentration of -OH groups on the surface. In contrast, the hydrophobic coating (tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydro-octyl-methyl-bis(dimethylamino)silane) had a water contact angle of 108 degrees +/- 2 degrees. Observations using differential interference contrast microscopy on human coronary artery smooth muscle cells showed normal cell proliferation on both the ALD alumina and hydrophobic coatings when compared to cells grown on control substrates. These observations suggested good biocompatibility over a period of 7 days in vitro. Using a colorimetric assay technique to assess cell viability, the cellular response between the three substrates can be differentiated to show that the ALD alumina coating is more biocompatible and that the hydrophobic coating is less biocompatible when compared to the control. These results suggest that patterning a substrate with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups can control cell growth. This patterning can further enhance the known advantages of ALD alumina, such as conformality and excellent dielectric properties for bio-micro electro mechanical systems (Bio-MEMS) in sensors, actuators, and microfluidics devices.

  5. An investigation of diamond film deposition in a premixed oxyacetylene flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.; Paul, P. H.

    1989-09-01

    Polycrystalline diamond film synthesis has been demonstrated using a wide variety of enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. The method of choice depends on the end application of the deposited film or coating. Diamond film has been deposited in a single-nozzle pre-mixed oxy-acetylene flame. Results of runs of varying duration suggest that diamond is deposited via the transport of hydrocarbon fragments produced at the secondary flame front. Planar laser induced photodissociation fluorescence suggests that this region is rich in C2H species. Emission studies also suggest that the post primary flame zone presents a source of C2 radicals which may account for the observed graphite and diamond-like carbon deposited on the substrate exposed to this region of the flame. The results on the pre-mixed flame suggest that it would be possible and more convenient to attempt large area deposition using a multi-nozzle diffusion flame.

  6. Effect of target density on the growth and properties of YGBCO thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Linfei; Li, Yiejie; Wu, Xiang; Yao, Yanjie; Wang, Menglin; Wang, Binbin

    2016-12-01

    Some works found that target density had not a large effects on the superconducting or structural properties of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition. However, the possible effect of target density on the Y0.5Gd0.5Ba2Cu3O7-δ (YGBCO) is not clear. In this paper, YGBCO thin films were deposited on flexible metal substrates by pulsed laser deposition using target with different densities. The density of each YGBCO target was varied from to 4.0 g/cm3 to 5.5 g/cm3. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the microstructure and superconducting properties of YGBCO films as a function of the target density. The film structures were examined by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The superconducting properties of the YGBCO films were evaluated using the conventional four-probe method and PPMS. It was found that all the YGBCO films had pure c-axis orientation. The target density had effect on the surface morphology and superconducting properties of the YGBCO thin films. With increasing target density, the pore became larger and the distribution density and size of the particles became higher and larger, and the critical current Ic decreased. The YGBCO film deposited at a target density of 4.0 g/cm3 exhibited the highest critical current density Jc of 5.4 MA/cm2 at 77 K and self-field, 47.2 MA/cm2 at 0 T and 8.8 MA/cm2 at 9 T at 4.2 K and B//c.

  7. Study on mixed vanadium oxide thin film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhang; Jianhui, Tu; Hao, Feng; Jingzhong, Cui

    Vanadium oxide (VOx) thin films were deposited on fused quartz using a pure metal vanadium target by RF reactive magnetron sputtering technique. Film microstructure, valence state, optical transmittance properties were studied. The mixed valence VOx thin films deposited with different thickness were found to be amorphous. And the optical transmittance curves are flatness in certain wavelength region. These films can be used to control the relative light intensity of the rubidium light beam between the rubidium lamp and the vapor cell, in order to optimize the working parameters of the rubidium frequency standard (RAFS).

  8. The thin-film deposition of conjugated molecules for organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Michael H.-C.

    2008-06-01

    Device-quality conjugated organic thin films are now routinely prepared in many different ways to fabricate light-emitting diodes, thin-film transistors, and photovoltaic devices. Understanding how to design molecules through versatile synthetic chemistry and the mechanisms of phase transformation and chemical reaction that occur during the thin-film deposition process becomes especially vital for the performance of the applications. This article reviews the current understanding of various thin-film deposition technologies for the conjugated organic molecules primarily used in optoelectronics, particularly in photovoltaic applications.

  9. Monte Carlo Modeling of Thin Film Deposition: Factors that Influence 3D Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmer, G H; Dalla Torre, J; Baumann, F H; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2002-01-04

    In this paper we discuss the use of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations to predict film microstructure evolution. We discuss physical vapor deposition, and are primarily concerned with films that are formed by the nucleation and coalescence of 3D islands. Multi-scale modeling is used in the sense that information obtained from molecular dynamics and first principles calculations provide atomic interaction energies, surface and grain boundary properties and diffusion rates for use in the Monte Carlo model. In this paper, we discuss some fundamental issues associated with thin film formation, together with an assessment of the sensitivity of the film morphology to the deposition conditions and materials properties.

  10. Low-temperature SiON films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition method using activated silicon precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Sungin; Kim, Jun-Rae; Kim, Seongkyung; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Hyeong Joon; Ryu, Seung Wook; Cho, Seongjae

    2016-01-15

    It has not been an easy task to deposit SiN at low temperature by conventional plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) since Si organic precursors generally have high activation energy for adsorption of the Si atoms on the Si-N networks. In this work, in order to achieve successful deposition of SiN film at low temperature, the plasma processing steps in the PE-ALD have been modified for easier activation of Si precursors. In this modification, the efficiency of chemisorption of Si precursor has been improved by additional plasma steps after purging of the Si precursor. As the result, the SiN films prepared by the modified PE-ALD processes demonstrated higher purity of Si and N atoms with unwanted impurities such as C and O having below 10 at. % and Si-rich films could be formed consequently. Also, a very high step coverage ratio of 97% was obtained. Furthermore, the process-optimized SiN film showed a permissible charge-trapping capability with a wide memory window of 3.1 V when a capacitor structure was fabricated and measured with an insertion of the SiN film as the charge-trap layer. The modified PE-ALD process using the activated Si precursor would be one of the most practical and promising solutions for SiN deposition with lower thermal budget and higher cost-effectiveness.

  11. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Studies of Deposition and Dissolution Mechanisms of Electrochromic Films of Diheptylviologen Bromide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-07

    to I (3 H*- ~" 2 study monolayer oxide formation on gold electrodes (28a), underpotential deposition of various metals (27b,c), bulk metal deposition ...total delivery of reactant to the surface. Thus, as was recently pointed out by Deakin and Melroy for the case of underpotential deposition (27c), the...Microbalance Studies of Deposition and Dissolution Mechanisms of Electrochromic Films of Diheptylviologen Bromide 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Gregory S. Ostrom

  12. The characteristics of Ta2O5 films deposited by radio frequency pure oxygen ion assisted deposition (RFOIAD) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinghua; Zhang, Qiuhui; Fan, Weixing; Feng, Guoying; Li, Yaguo; Wei, Aixiang; Hu, Ruifeng; Gu, Qiongqiong

    2017-02-01

    The characteristics of Ta2O5 films deposited by radio frequency pure oxygen ion assisted deposition (RFOIAD) technology were compared to a gas mixture of oxygen and argon (O2/Ar) ion beam assisted deposition experimentally and theoretically, inclusive of optical, electronic, and laser-induced damage resistance. The results showed that the RFOIAD could make removal of the pinholes and oxygen vacancies in the film and increase of the band gap, which resulted in the enhancement of refractive index, breakdown voltage, and the diminution of absorptivity as well as leakage current. The laser induced damage testing suggested that the damage induced damage threshold of the film deposited by RFOIAD could be increased, but the cracks appeared easily due to the concentration of thermal stress. While for the Ta2O5 film deposited using a sputtering gas of the mixtures of oxygen and argon, the porous characteristics were helpful to relief the thermal stress concentration, and the formation of cracks can be avoided.

  13. Vanadium dioxide film protected with an atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Yunzhen Yang, Chao; Yan, Lu; Li, Ying

    2016-01-15

    A VO{sub 2} film exposed to ambient air is prone to oxidation, which will degrade its thermochromic properties. In this work, the authors deposited an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film with atomic layer deposition (ALD) to protect the underlying VO{sub 2} film from degradation, and then studied the morphology and crystalline structure of the films. To assess the protectiveness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capping layer, the authors performed a heating test and a damp heating test. An ultrathin 5-nm-thick ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film was sufficient to protect the underlying VO{sub 2} film heated at 350 °C. However, in a humid environment at prolonged durations, a thicker ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film (15 nm) was required to protect the VO{sub 2}. The authors also deposited and studied a TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bilayer, which significantly improved the protectiveness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in a humid environment.

  14. Electrochemical preparation of lead-doped amorphous Se films and underpotential deposition of lead onto these films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitry K.; Osipovich, Nikolay P.; Poznyak, Sergey K.; Streltsov, Eugene A.

    2003-06-01

    The process of the underpotential deposition (UPD) of Pb adatoms (Pb ad) onto Se was used to produce nanocomposite films consisting of amorphous Se and nanosized PbSe clusters distributed throughout the film bulk. It was found that doping lead into Se films modifies their optical and photoelectrochemical properties and increases the efficiency of the charge transfer both in the film bulk and through the semiconductor | electrolyte interface. Introducing lead into the bulk of Se films significantly promotes the process of Pb ad UPD onto Se surface. The underpotentially deposited Pb ad interact chemically with Se surface atoms, resulting in the formation of a PbSe monolayer. The PbSe formed can be identified by the anodic peak corresponding to its electrochemical oxidation.

  15. Physical properties of a non-transparent cadmium oxide thick film deposited at low fluence by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Quiñones-Galván, J.G.; Lozada-Morales, R.; Jiménez-Sandoval, S.; Camps, Enrique; and others

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A non-transparent cadmium oxide film has been deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • The CdO film is polycrystalline and highly oriented in the (2 0 0) direction. • Thermal treatment was applied in order to see the effect on its physical properties. - Abstract: A stable non-transparent CdO film was grown by pulsed laser deposition. The sample was thermally annealed at 500 °C in air. A (2 0 0) highly oriented polycrystalline film was obtained. The annealed sample has not preferred orientation. Scanning electron micrographs show a grain size reduction for the annealed sample. By Raman spectroscopy, the defects related second order vibrational modes of CdO were observed. Chemical composition analysis shows the presence of CdO together with a substoichiometric CdO{sub x} phase for the as-grown sample. For the annealed sample a compensation of oxygen vacancies was observed. Electrical resistivity measurements give a value of 8.602 × 10{sup −4} (Ω cm) for the as-grown film. For the annealed sample the electrical resistivity increased to a value of 9.996 × 10{sup −3} (Ω cm). Zero transmission has never been reported for CdO films. The photoluminescence spectra were measured in order to shed some light on the origin of the zero transmission.

  16. Spray Deposition of High Quality CuInSe2 and CdTe Films: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C. J.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Leisch, J.; Hersh, P.; Nekuda, J.; Ginley, D. S.

    2008-05-01

    A number of different ink and deposition approaches have been used for the deposition of CuInSe2 (CIS), Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and CdTe films. For CIS and CIGS, soluble precursors containing Cu, In, and Ga have been developed and used in two ways to produce CIS films. In the first, In-containing precursor films were sprayed on Mo-coated glass substrates and converted by rapid thermal processing (RTP) to In2Se3. Then a Cu-containing film was sprayed down on top of the In2Se3 and the stacked films were again thermally processed to give CIS. In the second approach, the Cu-, In-, and Ga-containing inks were combined in the proper ratio to produce a mixed Cu-In-Ga ink that was sprayed on substrates and thermally processed to give CIGS films directly. For CdTe deposition, ink consisting of CdTe nanoparticles dispersed in methanol was prepared and used to spray precursor films. Annealing these precursor films in the presence of CdCl2 produced large-grained CdTe films. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Optimized spray and processing conditions are crucial to obtain dense, crystalline films.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin platinum films on tungsten atomic layer deposition adhesion layers: Application to high surface area substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Clancey, Joel W.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Kukreja, Ratandeep S.; Kongkanand, Anusorn; George, Steven M.

    2015-01-15

    Platinum (Pt) atomic layer deposition (ALD) usually yields Pt nanoparticles during initial film growth. In contrast, deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt films is needed for many important applications, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. A continuous and high radius of curvature Pt film is more stable and has a higher area-specific activity than the Pt nanoparticles commonly used in PEM fuel cells. However, the Pt film must be ultrathin and have a large surface area to be cost effective. In this paper, a review of earlier Pt ALD studies on flat substrates is presented that demonstrates that tungsten, with a higher surface energy than platinum, can serve as an adhesion layer to achieve Pt ALD films that are continuous at ultrathin thicknesses of ∼1.5 nm. This work utilized MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the Pt ALD reactants. The deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt ALD films using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the reactants is then studied on two high surface area substrate materials: TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed uniform and continuous Pt films with thicknesses of ∼4 nm on the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. TEM with electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis revealed W ALD and Pt ALD films with thicknesses of ∼3 nm that were continuous and conformal on the high aspect ratio NSTF substrates. These results demonstrate that cost effective use of Pt ALD on high surface area substrates is possible for PEM fuel cells.

  18. Spontaneous polarization of vapor-deposited 1-butanol films and its dependence on temperature.

    PubMed

    Gavra, Irini K; Pilidi, Alexandra N; Tsekouras, Athanassios A

    2017-03-14

    Films of 1-butanol were vapor deposited under vacuum conditions at cryogenic temperatures on a polycrystalline platinum foil. Kelvin probe measurements showed the generation of a large negative voltage on the vacuum side of the film relative to its back side in contact with the platinum foil. Voltages across vapor deposited films, which are known to require molecules with an electric dipole moment, were confirmed to be proportional to the amount of gas deposited at a given temperature. Voltages of several hundreds of volts were recorded for films that were a few thousand monolayers thick. As deposition temperature was reduced from 120 K, the film voltage was found to increase almost linearly from 0 V until a little below 38 K, where the trend was reversed. Ramping up the sample temperature after deposition at 15 K/min exhibited an initial increase in absolute magnitude and then a gradual elimination of the voltage as the temperature of 120 K was reached. Both the initial increase and the subsequent decrease were found to be irreversible and indicate structural changes in the amorphous film. The elimination of the film voltage is associated with small rearrangements of the deposited molecules which are facilitated by the gradual increase of the temperature and the cumulative electric field of the surrounding molecules.

  19. RF magnetron sputter deposition and analysis of strontium-doped lead zirconate titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Sharath; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Holland, Anthony S.; Fardin, Ernest; Kandasamy, Sasikaran

    2006-01-01

    The paper investigates conditions for depositing perovskite-oriented strontium-doped lead zirconate titanate (PSZT) thin films using RF magnetron sputtering. PSZT is a material that can exhibit high piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties. The deposition was conducted using an 8/65/35 PSZT sputtering target. The effects of sputtering conditions and the deposition rates for films sputtered onto several surfaces (including gold and platinum coated substrates) were studied. Combinations of in-situ heating during sputtering and post-deposition Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) were performed and resulting phases determined. RTA was carried out in argon to observe their effects. The sputtered films were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Results show dramatic differences in the grain structure of the deposited films on the different surfaces. The stoichiometry of the sputtered films is demonstrated using XPS. In the case of gold and platinum coated substrates, sputtering was also carried out for different durations, to establish the growth rate of the film, and to observe the variation in grain size with sputtering duration. The deposited thin films were resistant to most chemical wet etchants and were Ion Beam Etched (IBE) at 19 nm/min.

  20. Spontaneous polarization of vapor-deposited 1-butanol films and its dependence on temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavra, Irini K.; Pilidi, Alexandra N.; Tsekouras, Athanassios A.

    2017-03-01

    Films of 1-butanol were vapor deposited under vacuum conditions at cryogenic temperatures on a polycrystalline platinum foil. Kelvin probe measurements showed the generation of a large negative voltage on the vacuum side of the film relative to its back side in contact with the platinum foil. Voltages across vapor deposited films, which are known to require molecules with an electric dipole moment, were confirmed to be proportional to the amount of gas deposited at a given temperature. Voltages of several hundreds of volts were recorded for films that were a few thousand monolayers thick. As deposition temperature was reduced from 120 K, the film voltage was found to increase almost linearly from 0 V until a little below 38 K, where the trend was reversed. Ramping up the sample temperature after deposition at 15 K/min exhibited an initial increase in absolute magnitude and then a gradual elimination of the voltage as the temperature of 120 K was reached. Both the initial increase and the subsequent decrease were found to be irreversible and indicate structural changes in the amorphous film. The elimination of the film voltage is associated with small rearrangements of the deposited molecules which are facilitated by the gradual increase of the temperature and the cumulative electric field of the surrounding molecules.

  1. Continuous equilibrated growth of ordered block copolymer thin films by electrospray deposition.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hanqiong; Rangou, Sofia; Kim, Myungwoong; Gopalan, Padma; Filiz, Volkan; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2013-04-23

    Deposition of block copolymer thin films is most often accomplished in a serial process where material is spin coated onto a substrate and subsequently annealed, either thermally or by solvent vapor, to produce a well-ordered morphology. Here we show that under appropriate conditions, well-ordered block copolymer films may be continuously grown under substrate equilibrated conditions by slow deposition of discrete subattoliter quantities of material using electrospray. We conduct time-resolved observations and investigate the effects of process parameters that underpin film morphology including solvent selectivity, substrate temperature, block-substrate selectivity, and flow rate of the feed solution. For a PEO cylinder-forming poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) block copolymer, we uncover a wide temperature window from 90 to 150 °C and an ideal flow rate of 2 μL/min for ordered film deposition from dilute acetone solutions. PEO cylinders aligned with their long axes perpendicular to the film-air interface at optimal spray conditions. Using poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) deposited onto neutrally selective surfaces, we show that the substrate-equilibrated process results in vertically oriented microdomains throughout the film, indicating a preservation of the initial substrate-dictated morphology during the film deposition. Electrospray offers a new and potentially exciting route for controlled, continuous growth of block copolymer thin films and manipulation of their microstructure.

  2. Nanoscale compositional analysis of NiTi shape memory alloy films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S. K.; Mohan, S.; Bysakh, S.; Kumar, A.; Kamat, S. V.

    2013-11-15

    The formation of surface oxide layer as well as compositional changes along the thickness for NiTi shape memory alloy thin films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering at substrate temperature of 300 °C in the as-deposited condition as well as in the postannealed (at 600 °C) condition have been thoroughly studied by using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. Formation of titanium oxide (predominantly titanium dioxide) layer was observed in both as-deposited and postannealed NiTi films, although the oxide layer was much thinner (8 nm) in as-deposited condition. The depletion of Ti and enrichment of Ni below the oxide layer in postannealed films also resulted in the formation of a graded microstructure consisting of titanium oxide, Ni{sub 3}Ti, and B2 NiTi. A uniform composition of B2 NiTi was obtained in the postannealed film only below a depth of 200–250 nm from the surface. Postannealed film also exhibited formation of a ternary silicide (Ni{sub x}Ti{sub y}Si) at the film–substrate interface, whereas no silicide was seen in the as-deposited film. The formation of silicide also caused a depletion of Ni in the film in a region ∼250–300 nm just above the film substrate interface.

  3. Effects of deposition temperature on the mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, B. A.; Liu, Y.; Hu, X. Z.; Bush, M. B.; Winchester, K. J.; Martyniuk, M.; Dell, J. M.; Faraone, L.

    2005-08-01

    This study investigates the mechanical and physical properties of low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited silicon nitride thin films, with particular respect to the effect of deposition temperature. The mechanical properties of the films were evaluated by both nanoindentation and microcantilever beam-bending techniques. The cantilever beam specimens were fabricated from silicon nitride thin films deposited on (100) silicon wafer by bulk micromachining. The density of the films was determined from quartz crystal microbalance measurements, as well as from the resonant modes of the cantilever beams, which were mechanically excited using an atomic force microscope. It was found that both the Young's modulus and density of the films were significantly reduced with decreasing deposition temperature. The decrease in Young's modulus is attributed to the decreasing material density. The decrease in density with decreasing deposition temperature is believed to be due to the slower diffusion rates of the deposited species, which retarded the densification of the film during the deposition process.

  4. Low temperature temporal and spatial atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Aghaee, Morteza Maydannik, Philipp S.; Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka; Creatore, Mariadriana; Homola, Tomáš; Cameron, David C.

    2015-07-15

    Titanium dioxide films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide as a titanium precursor and water, ozone, or oxygen plasma as coreactants. Low temperatures (80–120 °C) were used to grow moisture barrier TiO{sub 2} films on polyethylene naphthalate. The maximum growth per cycle for water, ozone, and oxygen plasma processes were 0.33, 0.12, and 0.56 Å/cycle, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry was used to evaluate the chemical composition of the layers and the origin of the carbon contamination was studied by deconvoluting carbon C1s peaks. In plasma-assisted ALD, the film properties were dependent on the energy dose supplied by the plasma. TiO{sub 2} films were also successfully deposited by using a spatial ALD (SALD) system based on the results from the temporal ALD. Similar properties were measured compared to the temporal ALD deposited TiO{sub 2}, but the deposition time could be reduced using SALD. The TiO{sub 2} films deposited by plasma-assisted ALD showed better moisture barrier properties than the layers deposited by thermal processes. Water vapor transmission rate values lower than 5 × 10{sup −4} g day{sup −1} m{sup −2} (38 °C and 90% RH) was measured for 20 nm of TiO{sub 2} film deposited by plasma-assisted ALD.

  5. Morphology control of zinc oxide films via polysaccharide-mediated, low temperature, chemical bath deposition

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andreas M; Eiden, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this study we present a three-step process for the low-temperature chemical bath deposition of crystalline ZnO films on glass substrates. The process consists of a seeding step followed by two chemical bath deposition steps. In the second step (the first of the two bath deposition steps), a natural polysaccharide, namely hyaluronic acid, is used to manipulate the morphology of the films. Previous experiments revealed a strong influence of this polysaccharide on the formation of zinc oxide crystallites. The present work aims to transfer this gained knowledge to the formation of zinc oxide films. The influence of hyaluronic acid and the time of its addition on the morphology of the resulting ZnO film were investigated. By meticulous adjustment of the parameters in this step, the film morphology can be tailored to provide an optimal growth platform for the third step (a subsequent chemical bath deposition step). In this step, the film is covered by a dense layer of ZnO. This optimized procedure leads to ZnO films with a very high electrical conductivity, opening up interesting possibilities for applications of such films. The films were characterized by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and measurements of the electrical conductivity. PMID:25977851

  6. Effects of deposition conditions on the phase formation of YBCO films prepared by spray pyrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Jin; Joo, Jinho; Park, Shin-Geun; Hong, Suck-Kwan; Lee, Sun-Wang; Lim, Sun-Weon; Hong, Gye-Won; Lee, Hee-Gyoun

    2006-10-01

    YBa2Cu3Oy superconducting films were deposited on LaAlO3(1 0 0) single crystal substrates by spray pyrolysis method. Two types of ultrasonic and concentric nebulizer were used in order to generate fine droplets of metal-inorganic precursor solution. c-Axis oriented films were obtained at deposition temperature of 750-850 °C and at working pressures of 100 Torr and 500 Torr. In case of ultrasonic nebulizer, the films showed rough surface morphology due to the presence of enormous droplets, whereas smooth and dense films were obtained for concentric nebulizer. The good c-axis oriented YBCO films were formed at the wide range of the oxygen partial pressure. Oxygen which is generated via the decomposition of nitrate precursors is considered to participate in the formation reaction of YBCO film. Microstructures of YBCO films varied depending on oxygen partial pressure and rod-like grains were appeared when the oxygen partial pressure was lower than 30 Torr. YBCO films were deposited epitaxially on LAO(1 0 0) substrate. Δϕ of in-plane and Δω of out-of-plane texture were measured as 3.3° and 1.0°, respectively. A transport Jc value of 0.50 MA/cm2 at 77 K and self-field was achieved for the YBCO film deposited on LaAlO3(1 0 0) single crystal substrate.

  7. Photoassisted Chemically Deposited Tin Sulfide Thin Films Based on Two Different Chemical Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remadevi, T. L.; Dhanya, A. C.; Deepa, K.

    2014-11-01

    Photoassisted chemical deposition is a customized form of chemical bath deposition where the reaction is carried out in the presence of ultraviolet light. Deposition of tin sulfide films was carried out by this method using two different chemical baths. The as-prepared samples from the acetone bath were crystalline, exhibiting the orthorhombic structure of the Sn2S3 phase, but those from the glacial acetic acid bath were amorphous. The crystallinity of the films was improved on annealing. The deposition rate was found to depend on the pH of the bath and the chemical formulation. Distinct morphology was obtained for as-grown films. The films from the acetone bath were compact with uniform morphology of needle-shaped grains having equal diameters and lengths. The films from the glacial acetic acid bath were similar, with smaller needles. The high absorption coefficients of as-grown and annealed films show their potential application as absorber layers in photovoltaic devices. The refractive index was estimated from the reflectance of the films. The estimated activation energies of the as-prepared films from the acetone and glacial acetic acid baths were 0.4 eV and 0.46 eV, whereas those of the annealed samples were 0.2 eV and 0.44 eV, respectively. The activation energy was found to decrease for annealed films due to a decrease in trap sites.

  8. Structural and gasochromic properties of WO3 films prepared by reactive sputtering deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Hakoda, T.; Miyashita, A.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2015-02-01

    The effects of deposition temperature and film thickness on the structural and gasochromic properties of tungsten trioxide (WO3) films used for the optical detection of diluted cyclohexane gas have been investigated. The WO3 films were prepared on SiO2 substrates by magnetron sputtering, with the deposition temperature ranging from 300 to 550 °C in an Ar and O2 gas mixture. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The gasochromic properties of the WO3 films, coated with a catalytic Pt layer, were examined by exposing them to up to 5% cyclohexane in N2 gas. It was found that (001)-oriented monoclinic WO3 films, with a columnar structure, grew at deposition temperatures between 400 and 450 °C. Furthermore, (010)-oriented WO3 films were preferably formed at deposition temperatures higher than 500 °C. The gasochromic characterization of the Pt/WO3 films revealed that (001)-oriented WO3 films, with cauliflower-like surface morphology, were appropriate for the optical detection of cyclohexane gas.

  9. Electrophoretic deposition of PTFE particles on porous anodic aluminum oxide film and its tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongya; Dong, Guangneng; Chen, Yinjuan; Zeng, Qunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite film was successfully fabricated by depositing PTFE particles into porous anodic aluminum oxide film using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Firstly, porous anodic aluminum oxide film was synthesized by anodic oxidation process in sulphuric acid electrolyte. Then, PTFE particles in suspension were directionally deposited into the porous substrate. Finally, a heat treatment at 300 °C for 1 h was utilized to enhance PTFE particles adhesion to the substrate. The influence of anodic oxidation parameters on the morphology and micro-hardness of the porous anodic aluminum oxide film was studied and the PTFE particles deposited into the pores were authenticated using energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tribological properties of the PTFE composite film were investigated under dry sliding. The experimental results showed that the composite film exhibit remarkable low friction. The composite film had friction coefficient of 0.20 which deposited in 15% PTFE emulsion at temperature of 15 °C and current density of 3 A/dm2 for 35 min. In addition, a control specimen of porous anodic aluminum oxide film and the PTFE composite film were carried out under the same test condition, friction coefficient of the PTFE composite film was reduced by 60% comparing with the control specimen at 380 MPa and 100 mm/s. The lubricating mechanism was that PTFE particles embedded in porous anodic aluminum oxide film smeared a transfer film on the sliding path and the micro-pores could support the supplement of solid lubricant during the sliding, which prolonged the lubrication life of the aluminum alloys.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition of AlMgB14 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Britson, Jason Curtis

    2008-11-18

    Hard, wear-resistant coatings of thin film borides based on AlMgB14 have the potential to be applied industrially to improve the tool life of cutting tools and pump vanes and may account for several million dollars in savings as a result of reduced wear on these parts. Past work with this material has shown that it can have a hardness of up to 45GPa and be fabricated into thin films with a similar hardness using pulsed laser deposition. These films have already been shown to be promising for industrial applications. Cutting tools coated with AlMgB14 used to mill titanium alloys have been shown to substantially reduce the wear on the cutting tool and extend its cutting life. However, little research into the thin film fabrication process using pulsed laser deposition to make AlMgB14 has been conducted. In this work, research was conducted into methods to optimize the deposition parameters for the AlMgB14 films. Processing methods to eliminate large particles on the surface of the AlMgB14 films, produce films that were at least 1m thick, reduce the surface roughness of the films, and improve the adhesion of the thin films were investigated. Use of a femtosecond laser source rather than a nanosecond laser source was found to be effective in eliminating large particles considered detrimental to wear reduction properties from the films. Films produced with the femtosecond laser were also found to be deposited at a rate 100 times faster than those produced with the nanosecond laser. However, films produced with the femtosecond laser developed a relatively high RMS surface roughness around 55nm. Attempts to decrease the surface roughness were largely unsuccessful. Neither increasing the surface temperature of the substrate during deposition nor using a double pulse to ablate the material was found to be extremely successful to reduce the surface roughness. Finally, the adhesion of the thin films to M2 tool steel

  11. Effect of incident deposition angle on optical properties and surface roughness of TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongqiang; Yang, Chen

    2016-10-01

    Optical properties, surface roughness and packing density of TiO2 thin films are studied by obliquely deposited on K9 glass by electron beam evaporation. The surface roughness of TiO2 thin films with different incident deposition angle is compared. The experimental results show that the transmittance increases and transmittance peak shifts to short wavelength with increasing incident deposition angle, the packing density of TiO2 thin films decrease from 0.80 to 0.34 with incident deposition angle increasing from 0° to 75°. The surface roughness of TiO2 thin films increase with increasing incident deposition angle. The surface roughness of TiO2 thin films is slightly bigger than the surface roughness of K9 substrate when the incident deposition angle is 75°. When the incident deposition angle is constant, TiO2 thin films surface roughness decrease with increase of film thickness.

  12. ZnO Thin Films Deposited on Textile Material Substrates for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, L.; Popescu, A. C.; Dorcioman, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Stan, G. E.; Zgura, I.; Enculescu, I.; Dumitrescu, I.

    We report on the coating with ZnO adherent thin films of cotton woven fabrics by Pulsed laser deposition technique in order to obtain innovative textile materials, presenting protective effects against UV radiations and antifungal action.

  13. Impact of sputter deposition parameters on molybdenum nitride thin film properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöber, L.; Konrath, J. P.; Krivec, S.; Patocka, F.; Schwarz, S.; Bittner, A.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U.

    2015-07-01

    Molybdenum and molybdenum nitride thin films are presented, which are deposited by reactive dc magnetron sputtering. The influence of deposition parameters, especially the amount of nitrogen during film synthesization, to mechanical and electrical properties is investigated. The crystallographic phase and lattice constants are determined by x-ray diffraction analyses. Further information on the microstructure as well as on the biaxial film stress are gained from techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and the wafer bow. Furthermore, the film resistivity and the temperature coefficient of resistance are measured by the van der Pauw technique starting from room temperature up to 300 °C. Independent of the investigated physical quantity, a dominant dependence on the sputtering gas nitrogen content is observed compared to other deposition parameters such as the plasma power or the sputtering gas pressure in the deposition chamber.

  14. Photoluminescence studies of chemically bath deposited nanocrystalline lead sulphide (PbS) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, L. Rajen; Singh, S. Bobby; London, R. K.; Sharma, H. B.; Rahman, A.

    2012-07-01

    Nanocrystalline lead sulphide (PbS) films have been deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. Lead acetate [Pb(CH3COOH)2] and thiourea [(NH2)2CS] were used as starting materials for deposition of PbS thin films. The as-deposited thin films were found to be crystalline having cubic phase structure with the strongest diffraction intensity along (200) plane. The grain sizes calculated from XRD spectra were found to decrease from 17 to 15 nm with the decrease in molar concentration of the precursor solutions. The structural, optical and photoluminescence properties of the PbS nanocrystalline thin film with different molar concentration were studied.

  15. Effects of the substrate temperature on the bioglass films deposited by pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafan; Song, Mingda; Chen, Chuanzhong; Liu, Jian

    2008-08-01

    Effects of the substrate temperature on the bonding configuration and adhesion strength of the bioglass films deposited by pulsed laser were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scratch apparatus. Morphology of the films is compact with the particles on the surface of them and the structure is amorphous glass. Bonding configuration is different from that of the target. Si-O-NBO/Si-O-Si (s) intensity ratios of the films decline as compared with the target. Besides, this tendency is obvious as the substrate temperature decreases. This effect is attributed to the network rearrangement during the film growth, which is associated to special structure of glass and complex physical mechanisms of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Scratch test results show that the film deposited at 200 °C has the highest adhesion strength.

  16. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases.

  17. Transparent ferrimagnetic semiconducting CuCr2O4 thin films by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, T. S.; Yadav, C. S.; Karppinen, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the magnetic and optical properties of CuCr2O4 thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from Cu(thd)2, Cr(acac)3, and ozone; we deposit 200 nm thick films and anneal them at 700 °C in oxygen atmosphere to crystallize the spinel phase. A ferrimagnetic transition at 140 K and a direct bandgap of 1.36 eV are determined for the films from magnetic and UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. Electrical transport measurements confirm the p-type semiconducting behavior of the films. As the ALD technique allows the deposition of conformal pin-hole-free coatings on complex 3D surfaces, our CuCr2O4 films are interesting material candidates for various frontier applications.

  18. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-11-03

    Iron oxide films were deposited onto Si substrates using ion-beam-assisted deposition. The films were ~300 nm thick polycrystalline magnetite with an average crystallite size of ~6 nm. Additionally, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction both indicate that the films are single-phase magnetite. Since no direct evidence of a second phase could be found, exchange bias likely arises due to defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples have such small grains, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field. The high energy deposition process results in an oxygen-rich, argon-containing magnetite film with low temperature exchange bias due to defects at the high concentration of grain boundaries.

  19. Atomic Oxygen Sensors Based on Nanograin ZnO Films Prepared by Pulse Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunfei; Chen Xuekang; Li Zhonghua; Zheng Kuohai; Wang Lanxi; Feng Zhanzu; Yang Shengsheng

    2009-01-05

    High-quality nanograin ZnO thin films were deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates by pulse laser deposition (PLD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the samples. The structural and morphological properties of ZnO films under different deposition temperature have been investigated before and after atomic oxygen (AO) treatment. XRD has shown that the intensity of the (0 0 2) peak increases and its FWHM value decreases after AO treatment. The AO sensing characteristics of nano ZnO film also has been investigated in a ground-based atomic oxygen simulation facility. The results show that the electrical conductivity of nanograin ZnO films decreases with increasing AO fluence and that the conductivity of the films can be recovered by heating.

  20. Photocatalytic property of titanium dioxide thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in argon and water vapour plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, L.; Hatanaka, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is investigating the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 thin films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering of a pure TiO2 target in Ar and Ar/H2O (pressure ratio 40/3) plasmas. Optical absorption, structure, surface morphology and chemical structure of the deposited films were comparatively studied. The films were amorphous and included a large amount of hydroxyl groups (about 5% of oxygen atoms were bounded to hydrogen) irrespective of the intentional content of water in the deposition chamber. Incorporation of hydroxyl groups in the film deposited in pure Ar plasma is explained as contamination of the working gas with water molecules desorbed by plasma from the deposition chamber walls. However, intentional input of water vapour into the discharge chamber decreased the deposition speed and roughness of the deposited films. The good photocatalytic activity of the deposited films could be attributed hydroxyl groups in their structures.

  1. A simple chemical method for deposition of electrochromic Prussian blue thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Demiri, Sani; Najdoski, Metodija; Velevska, Julijana

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prussian blue thin films were prepared by a simple chemical deposition method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films can be easily prepared from aqueous solution of Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and K{sub 4}[Fe(CN){sub 6}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films show good electrochromic properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They change from deep blue color into green, and then back to blue and colorless. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PB thin films exhibit stability and excellent reversibility. -- Abstract: This paper is about a recently developed new chemical method for deposition of Prussian blue thin films. The films are easily prepared by successive immersion of the substrates into an acidic aqueous solution of Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and K{sub 4}[Fe(CN){sub 6}]. It is calculated of the results from AFM analysis that the growth in the film thickness by one immersion cycle corresponds to an average increase of 6 nm. The characterization of the films with X-ray diffraction, SEM-EDS analysis and FTIR spectroscopy shows that the deposited material is amorphous hydrated Fe{sub 4}[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sub 3}. The electrochromic properties are characterized by cyclic voltammetry and VIS spectrophotometry. The PB thin films exhibit stability and excellent reversibility, which make these films favorable for electrochromic devices.

  2. Investigation on vanadium oxide thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margoni, Mudaliar Mahesh; Mathuri, S.; Ramamurthi, K.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Sethuraman, K.

    2016-05-01

    Vanadium oxide thin films were deposited at 400 °C by spray pyrolysis technique using 0.1 M aqueous precursor solution of ammonium meta vanadate (AMV) with two different pH values. X-ray diffraction results showed that the film prepared using aqueous precursor AMV solution (solution A; pH 7) is amorphous in nature and the film prepared by adding HNO3 in the AMV aqua solution A (solution B; pH 3) is polycrystalline in nature. Vanadium oxide film prepared from the precursor solution B is in the mixed phases of V2O5 and V4O7. Crystallinity is improved for the film prepared using solution B when compared to film prepared from solution A. Crystallite size, strain and dislocation density calculated for the film prepared from solution B is respectively 72.1 nm, 0.4554 × 10-3 lin.-2m-4 and 1.7263 × 1014 lin.m-2. Morphology study revealed that the size of the flakes formed on the surface of the films is influenced by the pH of the precursor solution. Average Visible Transmittance and maximum transmittance of the deposited films exceed 70% and the direct optical band gap value calculated for the films deposited from A and B solution is 1.91 eV and 2.08 eV respectively.

  3. Fluorocarbon compounds in MRI diagnostics and medical therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The lecture describes the application of fluorocarbon compounds as blood substitutes and contrasting preparations in MRI diagnostics. A blood substitute product fluorocarbon Perfluorane® has shown effectiveness in oxygen delivery to the tissues of living organisms, and cardioprotective effect which does not depend on the patient's blood group. Inclusion of paramagnetic atoms (gadolinium, iron, etc.) to the Perfluorane® chemical formula creates a new compound with high MRI contrast efficiencies at Larmor frequencies of protons so and fluorine-19 nuclei.

  4. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  5. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.; Roybal, Herman E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  6. Resistivity, grain size, and impurity effects in chemically vapor-deposited tungsten films

    SciTech Connect

    Learn, A.J.; Foster, D.W.

    1985-09-01

    The room-temperature electrical resistivity, grain size, and impurity content of tungsten films deposited at low pressure on silicon wafers from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen reactants were determined. These properties were examined as functions of deposition temperature and film thickness. The resistivity is independent of thickness at a value of approximately 13.5 ..mu cap omega.. cm for films deposited at 300 /sup 0/C. For films deposited at 400 /sup 0/C, the resistivity decreases from 24 to 8.5 ..mu cap omega.. cm as thickness increases from 0.075 to 1 ..mu..m. The resistivity behavior is interpreted in terms of grain-boundary scattering with a zero reflection coefficient for the 300 /sup 0/C films. For the 400 /sup 0/C films, a reflection coefficient that decreases from 0.67 to 0.38 over the above thickness range and a linear dependence of grain size on thickness are utilized. For both deposition temperatures, the grain size exhibits a rapid initial growth to 30 nm followed by growth at a slope of 0.32 with respect to thickness. The rapid initial growth is associated with the rapid, self-limiting tungsten hexafluoride/silicon reaction. The oxygen content of the films tracks the trend of the reflection coefficient in that it increases with increased deposition temperature or decreased film thickness. Evidence suggests that the oxygen is located predominantly at grain boundaries and may be the primary determinant of boundary scattering. Fluorine is found in films at concentrations (0.03--0.05 at. %) similar to those of oxygen but does not vary with thickness and decreases with increased deposition temperature. No evidence is found for surface scattering of carriers suggesting that all are specularly scattered.

  7. Crystallinity of inorganic films grown by atomic layer deposition: Overview and general trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Leskelä, Markku; Ritala, Mikko; Puurunen, Riikka L.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is gaining attention as a thin film deposition method, uniquely suitable for depositing uniform and conformal films on complex three-dimensional topographies. The deposition of a film of a given material by ALD relies on the successive, separated, and self-terminating gas-solid reactions of typically two gaseous reactants. Hundreds of ALD chemistries have been found for depositing a variety of materials during the past decades, mostly for inorganic materials but lately also for organic and inorganic-organic hybrid compounds. One factor that often dictates the properties of ALD films in actual applications is the crystallinity of the grown film: Is the material amorphous or, if it is crystalline, which phase(s) is (are) present. In this thematic review, we first describe the basics of ALD, summarize the two-reactant ALD processes to grow inorganic materials developed to-date, updating the information of an earlier review on ALD [R. L. Puurunen, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 121301 (2005)], and give an overview of the status of processing ternary compounds by ALD. We then proceed to analyze the published experimental data for information on the crystallinity and phase of inorganic materials deposited by ALD from different reactants at different temperatures. The data are collected for films in their as-deposited state and tabulated for easy reference. Case studies are presented to illustrate the effect of different process parameters on crystallinity for representative materials: aluminium oxide, zirconium oxide, zinc oxide, titanium nitride, zinc zulfide, and ruthenium. Finally, we discuss the general trends in the development of film crystallinity as function of ALD process parameters. The authors hope that this review will help newcomers to ALD to familiarize themselves with the complex world of crystalline ALD films and, at the same time, serve for the expert as a handbook-type reference source on ALD processes and film crystallinity.

  8. Low temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of group 14 oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M.; Atagi, L.M. |; Chu, Wei-Kan; Liu, Jia-Rui; Zheng, Zongshuang; Rubiano, R.R.; Springer, R.W.; Smith, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    Depositions of high quality SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} films from the reaction of homoleptic amido precursors M(NMe{sub 2})4 (M = Si,Sn) and oxygen were carried out in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition r. The films were deposited on silicon, glass and quartz substrates at temperatures of 250 to 450C. The silicon dioxide films are stoichiometric (O/Si = 2.0) with less than 0.2 atom % C and 0.3 atom % N and have hydrogen contents of 9 {plus_minus} 5 atom %. They are deposited with growth rates from 380 to 900 {angstrom}/min. The refractive indexes of the SiO{sub 2} films are 1.46, and infrared spectra show a possible Si-OH peak at 950 cm{sup {minus}1}. X-Ray diffraction studies reveal that the SiO{sub 2} film deposited at 350C is amorphous. The tin oxide films are stoichiometric (O/Sn = 2.0) and contain less than 0.8 atom % carbon, and 0.3 atom % N. No hydrogen was detected by elastic recoil spectroscopy. The band gap for the SnO{sub 2} films, as estimated from transmission spectra, is 3.9 eV. The resistivities of the tin oxide films are in the range 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega}cm and do not vary significantly with deposition temperature. The tin oxide film deposited at 350C is cassitterite with some (101) orientation.

  9. Annealing effect on Cu2S thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Pawan; Dhanayat, Swapnali; Gattu, Ketan; Mahajan, Sandeep; Upadhye, Deepak; Sharma, Ramphal

    2016-05-01

    In present work Cu2S thin film fabricated on glass substrate by simple, cost effective chemical bath deposition method subsequently it annealed at 150°c.These films were studied for their structural, optical and electrical properties using X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectrophotometer and I-V system. The results show successful synthesis of Cu2S thin films and improvement in crystalline nature of the thin film which resulted in reduced bad gap and resistance of the film. Thus these thinfilms prove to be a promising candidate for solar cell application.

  10. Ion beam analysis of copper selenide thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, E.; García, V. M.; Nair, P. K.; Nair, M. T. S.; Zavala, E. P.; Huerta, L.; Rocha, M. F.

    2000-03-01

    Analyses of Rutherford back scattered (RBS) 4He+-particle spectra of copper selenide thin films deposited on glass slides by chemical bath were carried out to determine the changes brought about in the thin film by annealing processes. The atomic density per unit area and composition of the films were obtained from these measurements. This analysis shows that annealing in a nitrogen atmosphere at 400°C leads to the conversion of Cu xSe thin film to Cu 2Se. Results of X-ray diffraction, optical, and electrical characteristics on the films are presented to supplement the RBS results.

  11. Formation of needlelike crystallites during growth of diamond films by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kopylov, P. G.; Obraztsov, A. N. Shvets, P. V.

    2010-07-15

    Diamond polycrystalline films have been grown by chemical vapor deposition from a hydrogenmethane mixture. The phase composition and structure of the films were studied using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and thermogravimetry. It is found that, upon heating in air, the oxidation of the carbon material forming the films occurs at significantly different temperatures, depending on the degree of its order and the crystallite size. This difference is used for selective oxidation of the least ordered fine-grained component of the films. The material obtained by this selective oxidation of the films consists of diamond crystallites shaped like regular micrometer-sized tetragonal pyramids with a radius of tip curvature of several nanometers.

  12. Deposition and characterization of far-infrared absorbing gold black films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Advena, Donna J.; Bly, Vincent T.; Cox, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for producing gold black films with high absorptance in the far IR. The optical and electrical properties of these films have been studied with particular emphasis on the absorptance of films at wavelengths as long as 50 microns. A substantial decrease in absorptance near 50 microns has been observed for pure gold black films on aging in air. This degradation can be largely avoided by alloying the gold with a small percentage of copper during the deposition. Preliminary results on two methods for delineating gold black films are also presented.

  13. IN-SITU Diagnostics For Deposition And Processing Of High Tc Superconducting Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1990-02-01

    The deposition of high quality superconducting thin films based on the metal oxides has given rise to a variety of needs for diagnostic techniques. These needs are primarily for monitoring, 1. the material ejection process from the target, 2. the ejected vapor interaction with the background oxygen, 3. the crystallization dynamics at the substrate and 4. post deposition analysis and processing of the film. This paper summarizes some of the recent work in this direction

  14. Optimization of the Automated Spray Layer-by-Layer Technique for Thin Film Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The operational parameters of the automated Spray- LbL technique for thin film deposition have been investigated in...order to-identify their effects on film thickness and roughness. We use the automated Spray- LbL system developed at MIT by the Hammond lab to build...This interdiffusion is investigated using both the conventional dipped LbL and Spray- LbL deposition techniques. Interdiffusion is shown to be dependent

  15. Composition and submicron structure of chemically deposited Cu2Se-In2Se3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V. F.; Tulenin, S. S.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Kuznetsov, M. V.; Barbin, N. M.

    2012-03-01

    Films of substitutional solid solutions of the Cu2Se-In2Se3 system containing up to 7.5 at. % In have been obtained by chemical deposition from aqueous media. The composition, structure, and morphology of the films have been studied. Data of X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that copper in the solid solution occurs in a single-valence state (Cu+). The deposited layers possess a globular morphology and are nanostructured.

  16. Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; McCamy, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

  17. Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films by pressure control

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; McCamy, James W.

    1996-01-01

    A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

  18. Chemical bath deposition of thin film cadmium selenide for photoelectrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, R.A.; Raugh, R.D.

    1983-02-01

    Chemical bath deposition provides an attractive, low cost method of producing cadmium chalcogenide thin films. Intimate contact between the bath solution and the substrate material permits uniform deposition on substrates of complex geometry, presently difficult with spray pyrolysis, vacuum evaporation, or electrodeposition techniques. For CdSe, rigorous control of deposition conditions promotes the formation of a hexagonal, specularly reflecting deposit rather than a less desirable sphalerite (cubic) powdery deposit. Scanning electron microscopy reveals a small grained layered plate morphology similar to that produced by the evaporation method. Specularly reflecting CdSe films can be formed over large area substrates at a thickness optimal for their use as photoelectrochemical cells (PEC). Employing polysulfide as the redox couple, conversion efficiencies as high as 6.8% have been achieved in the authors' laboratory for these films using a tungstenhalogen white light source.

  19. Fluorocarbon nano-coating of polyester fabrics by atmospheric air plasma with aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, F.; Campagne, C.; Perwuelz, A.; Gengembre, L.

    2008-04-01

    A fluorocarbon coating was deposited on polyester (PET) woven fabric using pulse discharge plasma treatment by injecting a fluoropolymer directly into the plasma dielectric barrier discharge. The objective of the treatment was to improve the hydrophobic properties as well as the repellent behaviour of the polyester fabric. Plasma treatment conditions were optimised to obtain optimal hydrophobic properties which were evaluated using water contact angle measurement as well as spray-test method at the polyester fabric surface. The study showed that adhesion of the fluoropolymer to the woven PET was greatly enhanced by the air plasma treatment. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed chemical surface modifications occurring after the plasma treatments.

  20. Synthesis and Application of Ferroelectric Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-co-Trifluoroethylene) Films using Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jeongjae; No, Kwangsoo; Kim, Yeontae; Park, Eugene; Hong, Seungbum

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the deposition kinetics of polyvinylidene fluoride copolymerized with trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) particles on stainless steel substrates during the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The effect of applied voltage and deposition time on the structure and ferroelectric property of the P(VDF-TrFE) films was studied in detail. A method of repeated EPD and heat treatment above melting point were employed to fabricate crack-free P(VDF-TrFE) thick films. This method enabled us to fabricate P(VDF-TrFE) films with variable thicknesses. The morphology of the obtained films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the formation of β-phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. P(VDF-TrFE) films prepared with various thicknesses showed remnant polarization (Pr) of around 4 μC/cm2. To demonstrate the applicability of our processing recipe to complex structures, we fabricated a spring-type energy harvester by depositing P(VDF-TrFE) films on stainless steel springs using EPD process. Our preliminary results show that an electrophoretic deposition can be applied to produce high-quality P(VDF-TrFE) films on planar as well as three-dimensional (3-D) substrates.

  1. Synthesis and Application of Ferroelectric Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-co-Trifluoroethylene) Films using Electrophoretic Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeongjae; No, Kwangsoo; Kim, Yeontae; Park, Eugene; Hong, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the deposition kinetics of polyvinylidene fluoride copolymerized with trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) particles on stainless steel substrates during the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The effect of applied voltage and deposition time on the structure and ferroelectric property of the P(VDF-TrFE) films was studied in detail. A method of repeated EPD and heat treatment above melting point were employed to fabricate crack-free P(VDF-TrFE) thick films. This method enabled us to fabricate P(VDF-TrFE) films with variable thicknesses. The morphology of the obtained films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the formation of β-phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. P(VDF-TrFE) films prepared with various thicknesses showed remnant polarization (Pr) of around 4 μC/cm2. To demonstrate the applicability of our processing recipe to complex structures, we fabricated a spring-type energy harvester by depositing P(VDF-TrFE) films on stainless steel springs using EPD process. Our preliminary results show that an electrophoretic deposition can be applied to produce high-quality P(VDF-TrFE) films on planar as well as three-dimensional (3-D) substrates. PMID:27805008

  2. Synthesis and Application of Ferroelectric Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-co-Trifluoroethylene) Films using Electrophoretic Deposition.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jeongjae; No, Kwangsoo; Kim, Yeontae; Park, Eugene; Hong, Seungbum

    2016-11-02

    In this study, we investigated the deposition kinetics of polyvinylidene fluoride copolymerized with trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) particles on stainless steel substrates during the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The effect of applied voltage and deposition time on the structure and ferroelectric property of the P(VDF-TrFE) films was studied in detail. A method of repeated EPD and heat treatment above melting point were employed to fabricate crack-free P(VDF-TrFE) thick films. This method enabled us to fabricate P(VDF-TrFE) films with variable thicknesses. The morphology of the obtained films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the formation of β-phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. P(VDF-TrFE) films prepared with various thicknesses showed remnant polarization (Pr) of around 4 μC/cm(2). To demonstrate the applicability of our processing recipe to complex structures, we fabricated a spring-type energy harvester by depositing P(VDF-TrFE) films on stainless steel springs using EPD process. Our preliminary results show that an electrophoretic deposition can be applied to produce high-quality P(VDF-TrFE) films on planar as well as three-dimensional (3-D) substrates.

  3. Differing morphologies of textured diamond films with electrical properties made with microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wen Chi; Wu, Yu-Shiang; Chang, Hou-Cheng; Lee, Yuan-Haun

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the orientation of textured diamond films produced through microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at 1200 W, 110 Torr, CH 4/H 2 = 1/20, with depositions times of 0.5-4.0 h. After a growth period of 2.0-4.0 h, this particular morphology revealed a rectangular structure stacked regularly on the diamond film. The orientation on {1 1 1}-textured diamond films grew a preferred orientation of {1 1 0} on the surface, as measured by XRD. The formation of the diamond epitaxial film formed textured octahedrons in ball shaped (or cauliflower-like) diamonds in the early stages (0.5 h), and the surface of the diamond film extended to pile the rectangular structure at 4.0 h. The width of the tier was approximately 200 nm at the 3.0 h point of deposition, according to TEM images. The results revealed that the textured diamond films showed two different morphological structures (typical ball shaped and rectangular diamonds), at different stages of the deposition period. The I- V characteristics of the oriented diamond films after 4.0 h of deposition time showed good conformity with the ohmic contact.

  4. In situ monitoring of atomic layer deposition in nanoporous thin films using ellipsometric porosimetry.

    PubMed

    Dendooven, Jolien; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Levrau, Elisabeth; Van Hove, Robbert; Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Baklanov, Mikhail R; Martens, Johan A; Detavernier, Christophe

    2012-02-28

    Ellipsometric porosimetry (EP) is a handy technique to characterize the porosity and pore size distribution of porous thin films with pore diameters in the range from below 1 nm up to 50 nm and for the characterization of porous low-k films especially. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to functionalize porous films and membranes, e.g., for the development of filtration and sensor devices and catalytic surfaces. In this work we report on the implementation of the EP technique onto an ALD reactor. This combination allowed us to employ EP for monitoring the modification of a porous thin film through ALD without removing the sample from the deposition setup. The potential of in situ EP for providing information about the effect of ALD coating on the accessible porosity, the pore radius distribution, the thickness, and mechanical properties of a porous film is demonstrated in the ALD of TiO(2) in a mesoporous silica film.

  5. Investigations of LBMO thin films deposited on different substrates by electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshendra Reddy, Ch.; Ashoka Reddy, Ch.; Sivasankar Reddy, A.; Sreedhara Reddy, P.

    2016-04-01

    La0.7Ba0.3MnO3 (LBMO) thin films were prepared on different substrates such as Si, MgO, and c-ZrO2 substrates at substrate temperature 1023 K using electron beam evaporation technique for first time. Through optimizing the preparation condition, the better film uniformity of thickness, composition, and temperature was achieved. To find the influence of substrates, we studied the structural, compositional, morphological, and electrical properties of LBMO thin films. All the LBMO films exhibited a single phase and good crystallinity with no impurity phases. Films deposited on MgO have high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) value with low transition temperature (245 K). Better TCR (4.09 %/K) value at room temperature is observed in LBMO films deposited on Si substrate.

  6. Fundamental tribological properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.

    1990-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride (BN) films are reviewed. The BN films are examined in contact with BN metals and other harder materials. For simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. First, the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces are discussed. The effects of surface films, hardness of metals, and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are considered. The second part deals with the abrasion of the BN films. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of the BN films in solid-state contact are discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of BN films deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  7. Fundamental tribological properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride (BN) films are reviewed. The BN films are examined in contact with BN metals and other harder materials. For simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. First, the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces are discussed. The effects of surface films, hardness of metals, and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are considered. The second part deals with the abrasion of the BN films. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of the BN films in solid-state contact are discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of BN films deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  8. Investigation on single walled carbon nanotube thin films deposited by Langmuir Blodgett method

    SciTech Connect

    Vishalli, Dharamvir, Keya; Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.

    2015-05-15

    Langmuir Blodgett is a technique to deposit a homogeneous film with a fine control over thickness and molecular organization. Thin films of functionalized SWCNTs have been prepared by Langmuir Blodgett method. The good surface spreading properties of SWCNTs at air/water interface are indicated by surface pressure-area isotherm and the monolayer formed on water surface is transferred onto the quartz substrate by vertical dipping. A multilayer film is thus obtained in a layer by layer manner. The film is characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and FTIR.AFM shows the surface morphology of the deposited film. UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy shows the characteristic peaks of semiconducting SWCNTs. The uniformity of LB film can be used further in understanding the optical and electrical behavior of these materials.

  9. Direct current magnetron sputtering deposition of InN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xing-Min; Hao, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Fan, Ping

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, InN thin films were deposited on Si (1 0 0) and K9 glass by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering. The target was In metal with the purity of 99.999% and the gases were Ar (99.999%) and N 2 (99.999%). The properties of InN thin films were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the film surface is very rough and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) shows that the film contains In, N and very little O. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman scattering reveal that the film mainly contains hexagonal InN. The four-probe measurement shows that InN film is conductive. The transmission measurement demonstrates that the transmission of InN deposited on K9 glass is as low as 0.5% from 400 nm to 800 nm.

  10. Continuous Microreactor-Assisted Solution Deposition for Scalable Production of CdS Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, Sudhir; Su, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chih-Hung; Paul, Brian; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-06-13

    Solution deposition offers an attractive, low temperature option in the cost effective production of thin film solar cells. Continuous microreactor-assisted solution deposition (MASD) was used to produce nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) films on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates with excellent uniformity. We report a novel liquid coating technique using a ceramic rod to efficiently and uniformly apply reactive solution to large substrates (152 mm × 152 mm). This technique represents an inexpensive approach to utilize the MASD on the substrate for uniform growth of CdS films. Nano-crystalline CdS films have been produced from liquid phase at ~90°C, with average thicknesses of 70 nm to 230 nm and with a 5 to 12% thickness variation. The CdS films produced were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-Ray diffraction to demonstrate their suitability to thin-film solar technology.

  11. Interfacial development of electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, Sumin; Dickerson, James H.; Pham, Viet Hung; ...

    2015-07-28

    Adhesion between film and substrate is critical for electronic device and coating applications. Interfacial development between electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al 1100 and Al 5052 alloys were investigated using FT-IR and XPS depth profiling techniques. Obtained results suggest metal ion permeation from the substrates into deposited graphene oxide films. The interface between the films and the substrates were primarily composed of Al-O-C bonds from oxygenated defects on graphene oxide plane rather than expected Al-C formation. Films heat treated at 150 °C had change in microstructure and peak shifts in XPS spectra suggesting change in chemical structure of bondsmore » between the films and the substrates.« less

  12. Interfacial development of electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sumin; Dickerson, James H.; Pham, Viet Hung; Brochu, Mathieu

    2015-07-28

    Adhesion between film and substrate is critical for electronic device and coating applications. Interfacial development between electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al 1100 and Al 5052 alloys were investigated using FT-IR and XPS depth profiling techniques. Obtained results suggest metal ion permeation from the substrates into deposited graphene oxide films. The interface between the films and the substrates were primarily composed of Al-O-C bonds from oxygenated defects on graphene oxide plane rather than expected Al-C formation. Films heat treated at 150 °C had change in microstructure and peak shifts in XPS spectra suggesting change in chemical structure of bonds between the films and the substrates.

  13. Silicon carbon alloy thin film depositions using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon carbon films (a-SiC:H, micro-c-SiC:H) have been deposited using SiH4, CH4 and H2 mixed gas ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasmas. The optical bandgap of a-SiC:H films is not dependent on the hydrogen dilution in the ECR plasma. The deposition rate of a-SiC:H films is found to be strongly dependent on the ECR magnetic field and the hydrogen dilution. The hydrogen dilution effect on the deposition rate indicates that the etching in ECR hydrogen plasmas plays an important role in the deposition of a-SiC:H films. The optical constants n and k of ECR-deposited a-SiC:H films in the wavelength region of 0.4 to 1.0 micron are determined to be 2.03-1.90 and 0.04-0.00, respectively. The microstructures of ECR-deposited micro-c-SiC:H films are shown by X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) to be composed of 1000-A alpha-SiC microcrystallites and amorphous network structures.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons and isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and computer code are given for the thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons in chemical equilibrium. In addition, isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon are included. The computer code calculates the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and, in some cases, the transport properties for the following fluorocarbons: CCl2F, CCl2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CHCl2F, CHF3, CCL2F-CCl2F, CCLF2-CClF2, CF3-CF3, and C4F8. Equilibrium thermodynamic properties are tabulated for six of the fluorocarbons(CCl3F, CCL2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CF3-CF3, and C4F8) and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented for CBrF3.

  15. Optical properties of multilayer bimetallic films obtained by laser deposition of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, A.; Arakelian, S.; Vartanyan, T.; Gerke, M.; Istratov, A.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Kucherik, A.; Osipov, A.

    2016-11-01

    The optical properties of multilayer bimetallic films composed of silver and gold nanoparticles have been investigated. The dependence of the transmission spectra of the films on their morphology is demonstrated. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation has confirmed that there is a dependence of the transmission spectra on the average distance between particles and the number of deposited layers.

  16. Deposition of thin mesoporous silica films on glass substrates from basic solution.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Naoki; Ogawa, Makoto

    2006-11-01

    Transparent thin (ca. 100 nm) films of silica-surfactant mesostructured materials were deposited on borosilicate glass plates and soda-lime glass tubes from aqueous solutions containing tetraethoxysilane, alkyltrimethylammonium chloride, ammonia, and methanol. By calcination in air, the films became mesoporous (BET surface area of 700-900 m2 g-1) with pore diameter 2.0-2.8 nm.

  17. RESEARCH ON THE DEPOSITION OF MAGNETIC INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN THIN FILMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A process for the vacuum deposition of thin films of intermetallic compounds of cobalt and yttrium, samarium, or neodymium, was developed. The...of the evaporation rates. Thin films of the desired stoichiometric compositions, Co5R, were produced in an extensive series of sequential experiments

  18. Characterization of lead zirconate titanate--lanthanum ruthenate thin film structures prepared by chemical solution deposition.

    PubMed

    Bencan, Andreja; Malic, Barbara; Drazic, Goran; Vukadinović, Miso; Kosec, Marija

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the results of compositional and microstructural analysis of lead zirconate titanate--lanthanum ruthenate thin film structures prepared by chemical solution deposition are discussed. The cross-section transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs of the La-Ru-O film deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate and annealed at 700 degrees C revealed RuO2 crystals embedded in a glassy silicate matrix. When the La-Ru-O film was deposited on a Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrate, RuO2 and La4Ru6O19 crystallized after annealing at 700 degrees C. After firing at 550 degrees C randomly oriented lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films crystallized on the La-Ru-O/SiO2/Si substrate, while on La-Ru-O/Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrates PZT thin films with (111) preferred orientation were obtained. No diffusion of the Ru atoms in the PZT film was found. Ferroelectric response of PZT thin films on these substrates is shown in comparison with the PZT film deposited directly on the Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrate without a La-Ru-O layer.

  19. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  20. Development of plasma assisted thermal vapor deposition technique for high-quality thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang-Il; Choi, Yong Sup; Park, Hyun Jae

    2016-12-01

    The novel technique of Plasma-Assisted Vapor Deposition (PAVD) is developed as a new deposition method for thin metal films. The PAVD technique yields a high-quality thin film without any heating of the substrate because evaporated particles acquire energy from plasma that is confined to the inside of the evaporation source. Experiments of silver thin film deposition have been carried out in conditions of pressure lower than 10-3 Pa. Pure silver plasma generation is verified by the measurement of the Ag-I peak using optical emission spectroscopy. A four point probe and a UV-VIS spectrophotometer are used to measure the electrical and optical properties of the silver film that is deposited by PAVD. For an ultra-thin silver film with a thickness of 6.5 nm, we obtain the result of high-performance silver film properties, including a sheet resistance <20 Ω sq-1 and a visible-range transmittance >75%. The PAVD-film properties show a low sheet resistance of 30% and the same transmittance with conventional thermal evaporation film. In the PAVD source, highly energetic particles and UV from plasma do not reach the substrate because the plasma is completely shielded by the optimized nozzle of the crucible. This new PAVD technique could be a realistic solution to improve the qualities of transparent electrodes for organic light emission device fabrication without causing damage to the organic layers.

  1. Development of plasma assisted thermal vapor deposition technique for high-quality thin film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Il; Choi, Yong Sup; Park, Hyun Jae

    2016-12-01

    The novel technique of Plasma-Assisted Vapor Deposition (PAVD) is developed as a new deposition method for thin metal films. The PAVD technique yields a high-quality thin film without any heating of the substrate because evaporated particles acquire energy from plasma that is confined to the inside of the evaporation source. Experiments of silver thin film deposition have been carried out in conditions of pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. Pure silver plasma generation is verified by the measurement of the Ag-I peak using optical emission spectroscopy. A four point probe and a UV-VIS spectrophotometer are used to measure the electrical and optical properties of the silver film that is deposited by PAVD. For an ultra-thin silver film with a thickness of 6.5 nm, we obtain the result of high-performance silver film properties, including a sheet resistance <20 Ω sq(-1) and a visible-range transmittance >75%. The PAVD-film properties show a low sheet resistance of 30% and the same transmittance with conventional thermal evaporation film. In the PAVD source, highly energetic particles and UV from plasma do not reach the substrate because the plasma is completely shielded by the optimized nozzle of the crucible. This new PAVD technique could be a realistic solution to improve the qualities of transparent electrodes for organic light emission device fabrication without causing damage to the organic layers.

  2. Effect of Post Deposition Annealing Treatments on Properties of AZO Thin Films for Schottky Diode Applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shaivalini; Park, Si-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    High-quality aluminum (Al) doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by RF sputtering at room temperature. The deposited films were annealed from the temperatures 350 °C to 650 °C in pure nitrogen (N₂) ambient. The effects of annealing on the microstructural, optical and electrical properties of the AZO films were investigated. A detailed analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Four Probe and Hall measurements was performed to study the properties of these AZO thin films. It was observed that all of the as-deposited and annealed AZO films have homogenous surfaces and hexagonal wurtzite structures with good crystalline quality. The study also suggested that there was an intermediate post annealing temperature (450 °C) at which the deposited ZnO film exhibit best surface characteristics. Pd/AZO Schottky devices were fabricated with 450 °C annealed AZO thin films and the parameters of Schottky devices were extracted from I-V characteristics. These results indicated that the Pd/AZO films were very much suitable for various optoelectronics applications particularly for metal semiconductor metal based UV detector application.

  3. Magnetism of Amorphous and Nano-Crystallized Dc-Sputter-Deposited MgO Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeva, Sreekanth K.; Fan, Jincheng; Biswas, Anis; Sreelatha, K.S.; Belova, Lyubov; Rao, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    We report a systematic study of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) in pristine MgO thin films in their amorphous and nano-crystalline states. The as deposited dc-sputtered films of pristine MgO on Si substrates using a metallic Mg target in an O2 containing working gas atmosphere of (N2 + O2) are found to be X-ray amorphous. All these films obtained with oxygen partial pressure (PO2) ~10% to 80% while maintaining the same total pressure of the working gas are found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature. The room temperature saturation magnetization (MS) value of 2.68 emu/cm3 obtained for the MgO film deposited in PO2 of 10% increases to 9.62 emu/cm3 for film deposited at PO2 of 40%. However, the MS values decrease steadily for further increase of oxygen partial pressure during deposition. On thermal annealing at temperatures in the range 600 to 800 °C, the films become nanocrystalline and as the crystallite size grows with longer annealing times and higher temperature, MS decreases. Our study clearly points out that it is possible to tailor the magnetic properties of thin films of MgO. The room temperature ferromagnetism in MgO films is attributed to the presence of Mg cation vacancies.

  4. Novel photoresist thin films with in-situ photoacid generator by molecular layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Han; Bent, Stacey F.

    2013-03-01

    Current photoresist materials are facing many challenges introduced by advanced lithographies, particularly the need for excellent compositional homogeneity and ultrathin film thickness. Traditional spin-on polymeric resists have inherent limitations in achieving a high level of control over the chemical composition, leading to interest in development of alternative methods for making photoresists. In this work, we demonstrate that molecular layer deposition (MLD) is a potential method for synthesizing photoresists because it allows for precise control over organic film thickness and composition. MLD utilizes sequential, self-limiting reactions of organic precursors to build a thin film directly on a substrate surface and grows organic films by depositing only one molecular layer at each precursor dose, which in turn allows for fine-tuning of the position and concentration of various functionalities in the deposited film. In this study, we use bifunctional precursors, diamine and diisocyanate, to build polyurea resist films via urea coupling reaction between the amine and isocyanate groups. Acid-labile groups and photoacid generators (PAGs) are embedded in the backbone of the resist films with a highly uniform distribution. The resist films were successfully deposited and characterized for both materials properties and resist response. E-beam patterning was achieved with the resist films. Cross-linking behavior of the resist films was observed, likely due to the aromatic rings in the films, which is undesirable for application as a positive-tone photoresist. Moreover, the in-situ polymer-bound PAGs had low sensitivity. It is suggested that this effect may arise because the PAG is cation-bound, leading to lower efficiency of sulfur-carbon bond cleavage in the sulfonium cation, which is needed to produce the photoacid, and consequently a lower photoacid yield. Further work is needed to improve the performance of the MLD resist films.

  5. Transparent and Conductive Cadmium-Tin Oxide Films Deposited by Atom Beam Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Tatsuo; Ito, Kentaro

    1988-09-01

    Transparent and conductive cadmium-tin oxide films with resistivities of 9× 10-4 Ω cm and transmittance higher than 80% over the visible range were prepared by atom beam sputtering. The structure of the deposited film was amorphous and its composition was highly deficient in CdO compared with Cd2SnO4. This CTO film was used as the window layer of a heterojunction solar cell.

  6. Deposition of nanostructured photocatalytic zinc ferrite films using solution precursor plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Dom, Rekha; Sivakumar, G.; Hebalkar, Neha Y.; Joshi, Shrikant V.; Borse, Pramod H.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly economic solution precursor route capable of producing films/coating even for mass scale production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pure spinel phase ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} porous, immobilized films deposited in single step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parameter optimization yields access to nanostructuring in SPPS method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ecofriendly immobilized ferrite films were active under solar radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such magnetic system display advantage w.r.t. recyclability after photocatalyst extraction. -- Abstract: Deposition of pure spinel phase, photocatalytic zinc ferrite films on SS-304 substrates by solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) has been demonstrated for the first time. Deposition parameters such as precursor solution pH, concentration, film thickness, plasma power and gun-substrate distance were found to control physico-chemical properties of the film, with respect to their crystallinity, phase purity, and morphology. Alkaline precursor conditions (7 < pH {<=} 10) were found to favor oxide film formation. The nanostructured films produced under optimized conditions, with 500 mM solution at pH {approx} 8.0, yielded pure cubic phase ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} film. Very high/low precursor concentrations yielded mixed phase, less adherent, and highly inhomogeneous thin films. Desired spinel phase was achieved in as-deposited condition under appropriately controlled spray conditions and exhibited a band gap of {approx}1.9 eV. The highly porous nature of the films favored its photocatalytic performance as indicated by methylene blue de-coloration under solar radiation. These immobilized films display good potential for visible light photocatalytic applications.

  7. Enhanced crystallinity of low temperature deposited silicon films on graphite subtrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    The previously developed technique of a sandwich coating for silicon crystallinity enhancement in silicon films deposited at low temperature is applied to graphite substrates. The measured increase in silicon crystallinity is comparable to that observed earlier using a quartz substrate. The distribution of aluminum in the silicon films is determined using Auger spectroscopic depth profiling. Carbon diffusion from the substrate into the silicon film is shown to be negligible at a substrate temperature of 600 C.

  8. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Turner, John A.; Liu, Ping

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

  9. Assessment of effects on vegetation of degradation products from alternative fluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccune, D. C.; Weinstein, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Concern with the effects of fluorides on plants has been devoted to that resulting from dry deposition (mainly with reference to gaseous HF and secondarily with particulate forms). The occurrence of precipitation as rain or mist and the presence of dew or free water on the foliage has mainly been considered with respect to their effects on the accumulation of air-borne fluoride and not with fluoride in wet deposition. That is, precipitation has been viewed primarily with respect to its facilitation of the solution and subsequent absorption of deposits by the foliar tissues or its elution of deposited fluoride from foliage. Accordingly, our evaluation of inorganic fluoride from fluorocarbon degradation rests upon a comparison with what is known about the effects of industrial emissions and what could be considered the natural condition.

  10. New p-type absorber films formed by interfacial diffusion in chemically deposited metal chalcogenide multilayer films

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, P.K.; Nair, M.T.S.; Hu, H.; Huang, L.; Zingaro, R.A.; Meyers, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    The authors report on new p-type ternary metal chalcogenide absorber films for possible solar energy applications. The films are formed by interfacial diffusion in chemically deposited multilayer films: CuS films (0.15--0.6 {micro}m) deposited on ZnS, PbS or Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} films ({approx} 0.1 {micro}m). The diffusion takes place during annealing at temperatures above 150 C and is shown in the XPS depth profile spectra of the annealed samples: metal atoms (Zn, Pb or Bi) of the underlying substrate films are detected at the surface layers after the annealing. The peculiarity of the multilayer films is that they show almost constant sheet resistance upon further annealing until 350 C. The sheet resistances are in the range of 20--100 {Omega} suggesting conductivities (p-type) of up to 400 {Omega}{sup {minus}1}. In the case of CuS on Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} films, the formation of a compound, Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}, is clearly detected. These have applications for solar cells.

  11. The impact of thickness and thermal annealing on refractive index for aluminum oxide thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Lu, Hong-Liang; Chen, Xin; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Yan-Feng; Xu, Ji-Ping; Wang, Song-You; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The aluminum oxide (Al2O3) thin films with various thicknesses under 50 nm were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on silicon substrate. The surface topography investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the samples were smooth and crack-free. The ellipsometric spectra of Al2O3 thin films were measured and analyzed before and after annealing in nitrogen condition in the wavelength range from 250 to 1,000 nm, respectively. The refractive index of Al2O3 thin films was described by Cauchy model and the ellipsometric spectra data were fitted to a five-medium model consisting of Si substrate/SiO2 layer/Al2O3 layer/surface roughness/air ambient structure. It is found that the refractive index of Al2O3 thin films decrease with increasing film thickness and the changing trend revised after annealing. The phenomenon is believed to arise from the mechanical stress in ALD-Al2O3 thin films. A thickness transition is also found by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SE after 900°C annealing.

  12. Characteristics of nanocomposite ZrO2/Al2O3 films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun Jin; Lim, Jung Wook; Kim, Hyun-Tak

    2007-11-01

    Nanocomposite ZrO2/Al2O3 (ZAO) films were deposited on Si by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition and the film characteristics including interfacial oxide formation, dielectric constant (k), and electrical breakdown strength were investigated without post-annealing process. In both the mixed and nano-laminated ZAO films, the thickness of the interfacial oxide layer (T(IL)) was considerably reduced compared to ZrO2 and Al2O3 films. The T(IL) was 0.8 nm in nano-composite films prepared at a mixing ratio (ZrO2:Al2O3) of 1:1. The breakdown strength and the leakage current level were greatly improved by adding Al2O3 as little as 7.9% compared to that of ZrO2 and were enhanced more with increasing content of Al2O3. The k of ZrO2 and mixed ZAO (Al2O3 7.9%) films were 20.0 and 16.5, respectively. These results indicate that the addition of Al2O3 to ZrO2 greatly improves the electrical properties with less cost of k compared to the addition of SiO2.

  13. Microstructural and conductivity changes induced by annealing of ZnO:B thin films deposited by chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    David, C; Girardeau, T; Paumier, F; Eyidi, D; Lacroix, B; Papathanasiou, N; Tinkham, B P; Guérin, P; Marteau, M

    2011-08-24

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have attracted much attention in recent years due to progress in crystal growth for a large variety of technological applications including optoelectronics and transparent electrodes in solar cells. Boron (B)-doped ZnO thin films are deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) on Si(100). These films exhibit a strong (002) texture with a pyramidal grain structure. The ZnO films were annealed after growth; the annealing temperature and the atmosphere appear to strongly impact the layer conductivity. This work will first present the modification of the physical properties (carrier concentration, mobility) extracted from the simulation of layer reflection in the infrared range. At low annealing temperatures the mobility increases slightly before decreasing drastically above a temperature close to 250 °C. The chemical and structural evolution (XPS, x-ray diffraction) of the films was also studied to identify the relationship between microstructural modifications and the variations observed in the film conductivity. An in situ XRD study during annealing has been performed under air and low pressure conditions. As observed for electrical properties, the microstructural modifications shift to higher temperatures for vacuum annealing.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of In2S3 Thin Films Deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition on Polyethylene Naphthalate Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelo-González, O. A.; Santacruz-Ortega, H. C.; Quevedo-López, M. A.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Indium sulfide (In2S3) thin films were deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) by chemical bath deposition (CBD). The materials were characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the influence of the polymeric substrate on the resulting thin In2S3. The films showed polycrystalline (cubic and tetragonal) structure. A reduction of the ordering of the polymeric chains at the surface of the PEN was also observed, demonstrated by the appearance of two infrared bands at 1094 cm-1 and 1266 cm-1. Presence of oxygen during the early stages of In2S3 growth was also identified. We propose a reaction mechanism for both the equilibrium and nucleation stages. These results demonstrate that In2S3 can be deposited at room temperature on a flexible substrate.

  15. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarella, F. Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A.; Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  16. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated films on silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films in sliding contact with silicon nitride pins in both dry nitrogen and humid air environments. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films approximately 0.06 micron thick were deposited on silicon nitride flat substrates by using the 30 kHz ac glow discharge of a planar plasma reactor. The results indicate that an increase in plasma deposition power gives an increase in film density and hardness. The high-density a-C:H films deposited behaved tribologically much like bulk diamond. In the dry nitrogen environment, a tribochemical reaction produced a substance, probably a hydrocarbon-rich layer, that decreased the coefficient of friction. In the humid air environment, tribochemical interactions drastically reduced the wear life of a-C:H films and water vapor greatly increased the friction. Even in humid air, effective lubrication is possible with vacuum-annealed a-C:H films. The vacuum-annealed high-density a-C:H film formed an outermost superficial graphitic layer, which behaved like graphite, on the bulk a-C:H film. Like graphite, the annealed a-C:H film with the superficial graphitic layer showed low friction when adsorbed water vapor was present.

  17. Formation and stability of lanthanum oxide thin films deposited from β-diketonate precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Minna; Putkonen, Matti; Niinistö, Lauri

    2001-04-01

    Lanthanum oxide thin film deposition by atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) was studied at 180-425°C on soda-lime glass and Si(1 0 0) substrates using a β-diketonate type precursor La(thd) 3 and ozone. The chemical constituents of the films were analyzed by TOF-ERDA, RBS and FTIR while XRD and AFM were used to determine the crystallinity and surface morphology. Films grown below 275°C were amorphous La 2O 2CO 3, while at deposition temperatures above 300°C XRD patterns indicated that cubic La 2O 3 phase was formed. All the films were transparent and uniform with only small thickness variations. Carbonate type impurity was found in all films, but the carbon content of the films decreased with growth temperature being 3 at.% in films grown above 400°C. Hexagonal La 2O 3 was obtained when the films grown on silicon substrates were annealed at 800°C or above in a nitrogen flow. The as-deposited cubic and annealed hexagonal La 2O 3 films were found to be chemically unstable in ambient air since a transformation to monoclinic LaO(OH) and hexagonal La(OH) 3 was detected, respectively.

  18. Engineering the Crystalline Morphology of Polymer Thin Films via Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyuncheol; Arnold, Craig; Priestley, Rodney

    Thin-film growth via physical vapor deposition (PVD) has been successfully exploited for the delicate control of film structure for molecular and atomic systems. The application of such a high-energetic process to polymeric film growth has been challenged by chemical degradation. However, recent development of Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique opened up a way to deposit a variety of macromolecules in a PVD manner. Here, employing MAPLE technique to the growth of semicrystalline polymer thin films, we show the engineering of crystalline film morphology can be achieved via manipulation of substrate temperature. This is accomplished by exploiting temperature effect on crystallization kinetics of polymers. During the slow film growth crystallization can either be permitted or suppressed, and crystal thickness can be tuned via temperature modulation. In addition, we report that the crystallinity of polymer thin films may be significantly altered with deposition temperature in MAPLE processing. We expect that this ability to manipulate crystallization kinetics during polymeric film growth will open the possibility to engineer structure in thin film polymeric-based devices in ways that are difficult by other means.

  19. Use of surface plasmon resonance to investigate lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of polydopamine films.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cui, Dafu; Cai, Haoyuan; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Xing; Sun, Jianhai; Chao, Yapeng

    2013-03-15

    Dopamine (DA) is a particularly important neurotransmitter. Polydopamine (pDA) films have been demonstrated to be important materials for the immobilization of biomolecules onto almost any type of solid substrate. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensor system with the sensor chip surface parallel to the direction of gravity was used to investigate the lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of pDA films. The deposition kinetics of pDA Films are limited by the oxidation process. The pDA film could not be removed from the sensor chip completely by a strongly alkaline solution, indicating that the pDA film was heterogeneous in the direction of deposition. The pDA film formed near the interior of the solution was less stable than the film formed near the gold-solution interface. Adsorption of proteins on pDA film was studied compared with that on bare gold and dextran sensor chip. The reduction of Au(111) cations by the pDA film, forming a layer of gold particles, was monitored using SPR.

  20. Chemical-bath deposition of ZnSe thin films: Process and material characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J.

    1995-03-01

    Chemical-bath deposition of ZnSe thin films from NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/SeC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/ZnSO{sub 4} solutions has been studied. The effect of various process parameters on the growth and the film quality is presented. A first approach to a mechanistic interpretation of the chemical process, based on the influence of the process parameters on the film growth rate, is reported. The structural, optical, chemical, and electrical properties of the ZnSe thin-films deposited by this method have been studied. The electron diffraction (EDS) analysis shows that the films are microcrystalline with mixed cubic and hexagonal structure. EDS analysis has demonstrated that the films are highly stoichiometric. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the ZnSe thin films deposited by this method show that the films are continuous and homogeneous. Optical measurements have allowed the authors to detect the presence of the spin-orbit splitting effect in this material. Electrical conductivity measurements have shown the highly resistive nature of these films ({rho} {approximately} 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm).

  1. Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film Deposition by Laser Back Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Kenneth M.; Wiley, William R.; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2009-09-30

    Indium selenide thin films are important due to their applications in non-volatile memory and solar cells. In this work, we present an initial study of a new application of deposition-site selective laser back ablation (LBA) for making thin films of In2Se3. In-vacuo annealing and subsequent characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that control of substrate temperature during deposition and post-deposition annealing temperature is critical in determining the phase and composition of the films. The initial laser fluence and target film thickness determine the amount of material deposited onto the substrate.

  2. The Deposition of Electro-Optic Films on Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-08

    Electro - optic properties of KNbO3 films on MgO are found to be similar to bulk, although the scattering losses are very high for these films. In comparison KNbO3 films grown on KTaO3 exhibit low losses of less than 8 dB, while losses for films on spinel showed to be in between those two. The variety of substrates provide us with differences in lattice mismatch, refractive index mismatch, surface morphologies, and microstructure, all of which influence loss

  3. Carbon Nitride Thin Films Deposited by Cathodic Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chuanbao; Fu, Jiyu; Zhu, Hesun

    Carbon nitride thin films were prepared by cathodic electrodeposition. The dicyandiamide compound dissovled in acetone was selected as the organic precursor. Single crystal silicon wafers and conductive glass (ITO) wafers were used as substrates. XPS measurements indicated that the films composed of carbon and nitrogen elements. The nitrogen content reached 41%. The polycrystalline β-C3N4 should exit in the prepared film from TED measurements. The nano hardness of the films on ITO substrates were as high as 13 GPa. The structure and properties were studies.

  4. Near-failure detonation behavior of vapor-deposited hexanitrostilbene (HNS) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knepper, Robert; Wixom, Ryan R.; Marquez, Michael P.; Tappan, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) films were deposited onto polycarbonate substrates using vacuum thermal sublimation. The deposition conditions were varied in order to alter porosity in the films, and the resulting microstructures were quantified by analyzing ion-polished cross-sections using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of these changes in microstructure on detonation velocity and the critical thickness needed to sustain detonation were determined. The polycarbonate substrates also acted as recording plates for detonation experiments, and films near the critical thickness displayed distinct patterns in the dent tracks that indicate instabilities in the detonation front when approaching failure conditions.

  5. Metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of polycrystalline tetragonal indium sulphide (InS) thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macinnes, Andrew N.; Cleaver, William M.; Barron, Andrew R.; Power, Michael B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    1992-01-01

    The dimeric indium thiolate /(t Bu)2In(mu-S sup t Bu)/2 has been used as a single-source precursor for the MOCVD of InS thin films. The dimeric In2S2 core is proposed to account for the formation of the nonequilibrium high-pressure tetragonal phase in the deposited films. Analysis of the deposited films has been obtained by TEM, with associated energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  6. Laser deposition of SmCo thin film and coating on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allocca, L.; Bonavolontà, C.; Giardini, A.; Lopizzo, T.; Morone, A.; Valentino, M.; Verrastro, M. F.; Viggiano, V.

    2008-10-01

    Thin films and coatings of permanent magnetic materials are very important for different electronic and micromechanical applications. This paper deals with the fabrication, using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique, of good quality magnetic SmCo thin films on polycarbonate, steel, silicon and amorphous quartz substrates, for low cost electronic applications like radio frequency identification (RFID) antennas and electromechanical devices for fuel feeding control in the automotive. X-ray fluorescence and magnetic scanning measurements using giant magneto-resistive (GMR) sensors have been performed to study the functional magnetic properties of the deposited thin films.

  7. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) SiC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y. H.; Sham, T.-K.; Yang, D.; Xue, L.

    2006-03-01

    Si K-edge XAFS was used to characterize a stoichiometric SiC film prepared by pulsed KrF laser deposition. The film was deposited on a p-type Si(1 0 0) wafer at a substrate temperature of 250 °C in high vacuum with a laser fluence of ˜5 J/cm 2. The results reveal that the film contains mainly a SiC phase with an amorphous structure in which the Si atoms are bonded to C atoms in its first shell similar to that of crystalline SiC powder but with significant disorder.

  8. Tb and Ce Doped Y123 Films Processed by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    onto SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by pulsed laser ablation. Doped YBCO films were characterized for Tc, magnetic field dependence of Jc (at 77 K...AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2006-221 Tb AND Ce DOPED Y123 FILMS PROCESSED BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION Joseph W. Kell, Timothy J. Haugan, Mary Frances Locke...From - To) 05/10/2003 — 05/10/2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tb AND Ce DOPED Y123 FILMS PROCESSED BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In

  9. Aligned carbon nanotube, graphene and graphite oxide thin films via substrate-directed rapid interfacial deposition.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Julio M; Tran, Henry D; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K; Kaner, Richard B

    2012-05-21

    A procedure for depositing thin films of carbon nanostructures is described that overcomes the limitations typically associated with solution based methods. Transparent and conductively continuous carbon coatings can be grown on virtually any type of substrate within seconds. Interfacial surface tension gradients result in directional fluid flow and film spreading at the water/oil interface. Transparent films of carbon nanostructures are produced including aligned ropes of single-walled carbon nanotubes and assemblies of single sheets of chemically converted graphene and graphite oxide. Process scale-up, layer-by-layer deposition, and a simple method for coating non-activated hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  10. The deposition of boron nitride and carbon films on silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.; Rye, R.R.

    1993-11-01

    A chemical vapor deposition technique is used to produce amorphous boron nitride and carbon thin films on high strength silica glass fibers. In this method, the fiber is drawn under ultra high vacuum conditions and low pressure process gases, in the presence of a hot tungsten filament, are used to grow films at low substrate temperatures. Films deposited with this technique do not degrade the intrinsic pristine strength of the silica fibers under dry conditions and, when stressed in chemically aggressive environments, act as effective barrier coatings.

  11. Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-11

    Naval Research Laboratory AD-A255 222 Dunon C 203MU32 tID~li ___ NR1JMR6176-02-nM3 Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films...unlimited.J 13. ABSTRACT (fxMmrn, 200 iw~tds Vacuum-deposited films of molybdenum disulfide ( MoS2 ) ame effective as solid lubricants. Ion-beam...optimized and the assist beamn ion flux was quantified and found to follow a power-law relationship with beam power. The beat way to produce MoS2 films was

  12. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to sputter deposit 17 different metal and metal oxide films ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 micrometers on H-13 steel substrates. The film adherence to the substrate surface was measured using a tensile test apparatus. Comparisons in bond strength were made between ion beam, ion plating, and RF deposited films. A protective coating to prevent heat checking in H-13 steel dies used for aluminum die casting was studied. The results of exposing the coated substrates to temperatures up to 700 degrees are presented.

  13. Laser Ablative Deposition of Polymer Films: A Promise for Sensor Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevska-Gilev, Jadranka; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    There is a continuing interest in the use of polymer films as insulating components of sensors; a number of such films have been prepared by polymer sputtering or vacuum deposition processes involving gas phase pyrolysis/photolysis and by plasma decomposition of monomers. An attractive and rather new technique for the deposition of novel polymer films is IR laser ablation of polymers containing polar groups. We have recently studied this process with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) and poly(vinyl chloride-co-vinyl acetate) P(VC/VAc) to establish its specific features and differences to conventional pyrolysis.

  14. Dopamine-melanin film deposition depends on the used oxidant and buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Ball, Vincent; Addiego, Frédéric; Ponche, Arnaud; Michel, Marc; Gracio, José Joaquin de Almeida; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David

    2011-03-15

    The deposition of "polydopamine" films, from an aqueous solution containing dopamine or other catecholamines, constitutes a new and versatile way to functionalize solid-liquid interfaces. Indeed such films can be deposited on almost all kinds of materials. Their deposition kinetics does not depend markedly on the surface chemistry of the substrate, and the films can reach thickness of a few tens of nanometers in a single reaction step. Up to now, even if a lot is known about the oxidation mechanism of dopamine in solution, only little information is available to describe the deposition mechanism on surfaces either by oxidation in solution or by electrodeposition. The deposition kinetics of melanin was only investigated from dopamine solutions using oxygen or ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and from a tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (Tris) containing buffer solutions at pH 8.5. Many other oxidants could be used, and the buffer agent containing a primary amine group may influence the deposition process. Herein we show that the deposition kinetics of melanin from dopamine containing buffers at pH 8.5 can be markedly modified using Cu(2+) instead of O2 as an oxidant: the deposition kinetics remains linear up to thicknesses of more than 70 nm, whereas the film growth stops at 45 ± 5 nm in the presence of 02. In addition, the films prepared from Cu(2+) containing solutions display an absorption spectrum with defined peaks at 320 and 370 nm, which are absent in the spectra of films prepared in oxygenated solutions. The replacement of Tris buffer by phosphate buffer also has a marked effect on the melanin deposition kinetics.

  15. Optical properties of electrochemically deposited ZnO thin films on colloidal crystal film of SiO2 microspheres.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yong Taeg; Choi, Bum Ho; Shin, Dong Chan

    2012-02-01

    The optical properties of electrochemically deposited ZnO thin films on colloidal crystal film of SiO2 microspheres structures were studied. Colloidal crystal film of SiO2 microspheres were self-assembled by evaporation using SiO2 in solution at a constant 0.1 wt%. ZnO in thin films was then electrochemically deposited on to colloidal crystal film of SiO2 microspheres. During electrochemical deposition, the content of Zn(NO3)2 x 6H2O in solution was 5 wt%, and the process's conditions were varied between of 2-4 V and 30-120 s at room temperature, with subsequent heat-treatment between 200 and 400 degrees C. A smooth surface and uniform thickness of 1.8 microm were obtained at 3 V for 90 s. The highest PL peak intensity was obtained in the ZnO thin film heat-treated at 400 degrees C. The double layered ZnO/SiO2 colloidal crystals showed clearly better emission properties than the SiO2/ZnO and ZnO structures.

  16. Barrier properties to surrogates of hydrogenated carbon nano-films deposited on PET by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Éder C; Echegoyen, Yolanda; Nerin, Cristina; Cruz, Sandra A

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) resin was contaminated with a series of surrogates using a US Food and Drug Administration protocol. The contaminated samples were coated with two different kinds of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films (a-C:H): one with diamond-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon and another with polymer-like hydrogenated carbon (PLCH) phases. To evaluate the barrier properties of the a-C:H films, migration assays were performed using food simulants. After the tests, analysis by gas chromatography with different detectors was carried out. The appearance of the films before and after the migration experiments was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that a-C:H films have good barrier properties for most of the evaluated compounds, mainly when they are deposited as PLCH phase.

  17. Low-temperature deposition of transparent diamond films with a microwave cavity plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulczynski, Michael J.

    1998-10-01

    Low-temperature diamond deposition with Microwave Cavity Plasma Reactor (MCPR) technology was investigated for application to temperature sensitive substrates. The substrate temperature during most CVD diamond deposition processes is typically greater then 600 C; however, there are some applications where temperature sensitive materials are used and the deposition temperature must be maintained below 550 C. These applications include materials like boro-silicate glass, which has a relatively low strain-point temperature, and integrated circuits that contain low melting point components. Experiments were conducted in three areas. The first area was MCPR development, the second was benchmark deposition and characterization of diamond films on silicon substrates and the third was deposition and characterization of diamond films on boro-silicate glass substrates. MCPR development included an investigation of various MCPR configurations that were designed and adapted for uniform, low-temperature diamond deposition over areas as large as 80-cm2. Reactors were investigated with end-feed microwave excitation and side-feed microwave excitation for maximum deposition area and uniformity. Various substrate receptor configurations were also investigated including a substrate heater and cooler. From these investigations, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition rate, deposition area and deposition uniformity were characterized. The benchmark silicon diamond deposition experiments were conducted for comparison to previous high temperature, >550 C, MCPR research and growth models. Here deposition results such as deposition rate and film quality were compared with applications of diamond growth models by Harris-Goodwin and Bachmann. Additionally, characterization experiments were conducted to investigate film attributes that are critical to optical applications, such as film surface roughness and deposition uniformity. Included as variables in these

  18. The effects of substrate position on electroless polyol deposited nanostructured FeNi films.

    PubMed

    Yin, H; Chow, G M

    2006-04-01

    The nanostructured FeNi thin films were deposited on a polycrystalline Cu substrate by reducing constituent metal salts in refluxing ethylene glycol. The effect of substrate position was investigated. During deposition, the substrate was subject to one of the following processes: (a) complete immersion in solution, (b) repeated immersion followed by suspension above solution (denoted as quenching), and (c) suspension above the solution. Compared to the conventional polyol synthesis of FeNi where Fe concentration could not exceed 30 at%, the quenching process dramatically increased Fe at% to above 40%. Complete suspension of substrate above the solution resulted in Fe-rich films where Fe at% >90%. The microhardness, adhesion, and magnetic properties of deposited films showed a strong dependence on the long-range and short-range order of the film, which, in turn, depended on the substrate position. Quenched films with ordered local Ni environment and higher crystallinity had the highest Vickers hardness, best adhesion to substrate, and largest saturation magnetization compared to those deposited on substrates placed in other positions. The oxidation of Fe occurring in the vapor deposition significantly affected the film properties.

  19. Dense nanocrystalline yttrium iron garnet films formed at room temperature by aerosol deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Scooter D. Glaser, Evan R.; Cheng, Shu-Fan; Hite, Jennifer

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We deposit yttrium iron garnet films at room temperature using aerosol deposition. • Films are 96% of theoretical density for yttrium iron garnet. • We report magnetic and structural properties post-deposition and post-annealing. • Low-temperature annealing decreases the FMR linewidth. • We discuss features of the FMR spectra at each anneal temperature. - Abstract: We have employed aerosol deposition to form polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films on sapphire at room temperature that are 90–96% dense. We characterize the structural and dynamic magnetic properties of the dense films using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and ferromagnetic resonance techniques. We find that the as-deposited films are pure single-phase YIG formed of compact polycrystallites ∼20 nm in size. The ferromagnetic resonance mode occurs at 2829 G with a linewidth of 308 G. We perform a series of successive anneals up to 1000 °C on a film to explore heat treatment on the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth. We find the narrowest linewidth of 98 G occurs after a 750 °C anneal.

  20. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of hyaluronic acid and composite films for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HYH) is a natural biopolymer, which has tremendous potential for various biomedical applications. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) methods have been developed for the fabrication of HYH films and composites. New methods for the immobilization of drugs and proteins have been utilized for the fabrication of organic composites. Electrophoretic deposition enabled the fabrication of organic-inorganic composites containing bioceramics and bioglass in the HYH matrix. It was shown that the deposition yield, microstructure, and composition of the films can be controlled. Potential applications of EPD for the surface modification of biomedical implants and fabrication of biosensors are highlighted.

  2. Laser-induced chemical vapour deposition of conductive and insulating thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisse, G.; Gaensicke, F.; Ebert, R.; Illmann, U.; Johansen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations concerning the laser-induced chemical vapour deposition of Mo, W, Co and TiSi 2 conductive thin film structures from Mo(CO) 6, W(CO) 6, Co 2(CO) 8, TiCl 4 and SiH 4 using a direct writing method are presented. SiO 2 thin films were deposited from SiH 4 and N 2O in a large area deposition process stimulated by an excimer laser by using a parallel beam configuration.

  3. Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Prepared For: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Lab(WRDC/MLBT), Wright-Patterson AFB,OH 45433 Descriptors, Keywords: ion beam film deposition MoS2 solid...NUMBERS Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films PE - 63224C, 61153N WU -2855, 3409 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert N. Bolster 7... MoS2 ) are effective as solid lubricants. Ion-beam-assisted deposition, which employs ion beam sputtering with an assist beam impinging on the growing

  4. Deposition of dielectric films on silicon using a fore-vacuum plasma electron source.

    PubMed

    Zolotukhin, D B; Oks, E M; Tyunkov, A V; Yushkov, Yu G

    2016-06-01

    We describe an experiment on the use of a fore-vacuum-pressure, plasma-cathode, electron beam source with current up to 100 mA and beam energy up to 15 keV for deposition of Mg and Al oxide films on Si substrates in an oxygen atmosphere at a pressure of 10 Pa. The metals (Al and Mg) were evaporated and ionized using the electron beam with the formation of a gas-metal beam-plasma. The plasma was deposited on the surface of Si substrates. The elemental composition of the deposited films was analyzed.

  5. High-performance ZnO thin-film transistor fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Byeong-Yun; Kim, Young-Hwan; Lee, Hee-Jun; Kim, Byoung-Yong; Park, Hong-Gyu; Han, Jin-Woo; Heo, Gi-Seok; Kim, Tae-Won; Kim, Kwang-Young; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2011-08-01

    We report the fabrication and characteristics of a ZnO thin-film transistor (TFT) using a 50 nm thick ZnO film as an active layer on an Al2O3 gate dielectric film deposited by atomic layer deposition. Lowering the deposition temperature allowed the control of the carrier concentration of the active channel layer (ZnO film) in the TFT device. The ZnO TFT fabricated at 110 °C exhibited high-performance TFT characteristics including a saturation field-effect mobility of 11.86 cm2 V-1 s-1, an on-to-off current ratio of 3.09 × 107 and a sub-threshold gate-voltage swing of 0.72 V decade-1.

  6. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaji, S.; Garcia, L. V.; Loredo, S. L.; Krishnan, B.; Aguilar Martinez, J. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Avellaneda, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb2S3 thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb2S3 thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of V2O5 thin films deposited by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, R.; Loureiro, J.; Nogueira, A.; Elangovan, E.; Pinto, J. V.; Veiga, J. P.; Busani, T.; Fortunato, E.; Martins, R.; Ferreira, I.

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the structural, optical, electrical and thermoelectric properties of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) thin films deposited at room temperature by thermal evaporation on Corning glass substrates. A post-deposition thermal treatment up to 973 K under atmospheric conditions induces the crystallization of the as-deposited amorphous films with an orthorhombic V2O5 phase with grain sizes around 26 nm. As the annealing temperature rises up to 773 K the electrical conductivity increases. The films exhibit thermoelectric properties with a maximum Seebeck coefficient of -218 μV/K and electrical conductivity of 5.5 (Ω m)-1. All the films show NIR-Vis optical transmittance above 60% and optical band gap of 2.8 eV.

  8. Perpendicular coercivity enhancement of CoPt/TiN films by nitrogen incorporation during deposition

    SciTech Connect

    An, Hongyu; Harumoto, Takashi; Sannomiya, Takumi; Muraishi, Shinji; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji; Wang, Jian; Szivos, Janos; Safran, Gyorgy

    2015-11-28

    The effect of N incorporation on the structure and magnetic properties of CoPt thin films deposited on glass substrates with TiN seed layers has been investigated. During the deposition of CoPt, introducing 20% N{sub 2} into Ar atmosphere promotes the (001) texture and enhances the perpendicular coercivity of CoPt film compared with the film deposited in pure Ar and post-annealed under the same conditions. From the in situ x-ray diffraction results, it is confirmed that N incorporation expands the lattice parameter of CoPt, which favors the epitaxial growth of CoPt on TiN. During the post-annealing process, N releases from CoPt film and promotes the L1{sub 0} ordering transformation of CoPt.

  9. Bismuth Oxide Thin Films Deposited on Silicon Through Pulsed Laser Ablation, for Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache-Bota, Simona; Constantinescu, Catalin; Tigau, Nicolae; Praisler, Mirela

    2016-12-01

    Infrared detectors are used in many human activities, from industry to military, telecommunications, environmental studies and even medicine. Bismuth oxide thin films have proved their potential for optoelectronic applications, but their uses as infrared sensors have not been thoroughly studied so far. In this paper, pulsed laser ablation of pure bismuth targets within a controlled oxygen atmosphere is proposed for the deposition of bismuth oxide films on Si (100) substrates. Crystalline films were obtained, whose uniformity depends on the deposition conditions (number of laser pulses and the use of a radio-frequency (RF) discharge of the oxygen inside the deposition chamber). The optical analysis proved that the refractive index of the films is higher than 3 and that their optical bandgap is around 1eV, recommending them for infrared applications.

  10. Microstructure of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Films Deposited in Low Se Vapor Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiwaki, Shiro; Kohara, Naoki; Negami, Takayuki; Miyake, Hideo; Wada, Takahiro

    1999-05-01

    The microstructure of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films deposited under low Se flux was studied using scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger electron spectroscopy and high resolution and analytical electron microscopy. CIGS films were deposited on Mo coated soda-lime glass substrate using the “3-stage” process in which the Se flux used during the third stage was restricted to a forth of standard value. In the as-grown CIGS films, voids were observed along the grain boundaries and a Cu2Se phase was identified at the surface and the grain boundaries. The voids and Cu2Se layer were produced by vaporization of an In Se compound from the films during the third stage of deposition. A reaction model on the CIGS grain surface is proposed based on the microstructure observations.

  11. Interaction of platelets, fibrinogen and endothelial cells with plasma deposited PEO-like films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhilu; Wang, Jin; Li, Xin; Tu, Qiufen; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2012-02-01

    For blood-contacting biomedical implants like retrievable vena cava filters, surface-based diagnostic devices or in vivo sensors, limiting thrombosis and cell adhesion is paramount, due to a decrease even failure in performance. Plasma deposited PEO-like films were investigated as surface modifications. In this work, mixed gas composed of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) vapor and oxygen was used as precursor. It was revealed that plasma polymerization under high ratio of oxygen/tetraglyme led to deposition of the films that had high content of ether groups. This kind of PEO-like films had good stability in phosphate buffer solution. In vitro hemocompatibility and endothelial cell (EC) adhesion revealed low platelet adhesion, platelet activation, fibrinogen adhesion, EC adhesion and proliferation on such plasma deposited PEO-like films. This made it a potential candidate for the applications in anti-fouling surfaces of blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  12. Mechanical and structural characterization of atomic layer deposition-based ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapily, K.; Gu, D.; Baumgart, H.; Namkoong, G.; Stegall, D.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2011-11-01

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The structural and mechanical properties of the thin films were investigated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and nanoindentation. Diethyl zinc was used as the chemical precursor for zinc and water vapor was used as the oxidation agent. The samples were deposited at 150 °C and at a pressure of 2.1 × 10-1 Torr in the ALD reactor. A growth rate of 2 Å per cycle was calculated in the ALD process window. The Nano Indenter XP was used in conjunction with the continuous stiffness method in depth control mode in order to measure and to analyze the mechanical properties of hardness and modulus of ALD ZnO thin film samples. For comparison, we benchmarked the mechanical properties of single crystal bulk ZnO samples against those of our ALD ZnO thin films.

  13. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Mark D. Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna; Czigány, Zsolt

    2014-04-14

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CN{sub x}, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “fullerene-like” (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CN{sub x} films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N{sub 2} pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp{sup 3}-hybridized films to sp{sup 2} films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CN{sub x} films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  14. Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposited Thin Films for Space Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; McNatt, Jeremiah; Dickman, John E.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Kelly, Christopher V.; AquinoGonzalez, Angel R.; Rockett, Angus A.

    2006-01-01

    Copper indium disulfide thin films were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using single source precursors. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties in order to optimize device-quality material. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hot-wall reactor at 395 C yielded best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier, smoother, denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands (1.45, 1.43, 1.37, and 1.32 eV) and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was 1.03 percent.

  15. Structural and optical characterizations of chemically deposited cadmium selenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Khomane, A.S.

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} CdSe thin films deposited first time using formic acid as a complexing agent. {yields} The deposited thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, UV-vis-NIR and electrical techniques. {yields} X-ray diffraction analysis shows presence of zinc blende crystal structure. -- Abstract: Synthesis of cadmium selenide thin films by CBD method has been presented. The deposited film samples were subjected to XRD, SEM, UV-vis-NIR and TEP characterization. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that CdSe film sample crystallized in zinc blende or cubic phase structure. SEM studies reveal that the grains are spherical in shape and uniformly distributed all over the surface of the substrates. The optical band gap energy of as deposited film sample was found to be in the order of 1.8 eV. The electrical conductivity of the film sample was found to be 10{sup -6} ({Omega} cm){sup -1} with n-type of conduction mechanism.

  16. Yttrium Iron Garnet Thick Films Formed by the Aerosol Deposition Method for Microwave Inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Scooter; Newman, Harvey; Glaser, E. R.; Cheng, Shu-Fan; Tadjer, Marko; Kub, Fritz; Eddy, Charles, Jr.

    2014-03-01

    We have employed the aerosol deposition method (ADM) to direct-write 40 μm-thick polycrystalline films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG, Y3Fe5O12) at room temperature onto patterned gold inductors on sapphire substrates at a deposition rate of 1-3 μm/min as a first step toward integration into microwave magnetic circuits. A challenge to integrating magnetic films into current semiconductor technology is the high-temperature regime (900-1400°C) at which conventional ferrite preparation takes place. The ability of the ADM to form dense, thick films at room temperature makes this a promising approach for integrated magnetics where low-temperature deposition and thick films are required. The ADM YIG film has an rms roughness of 3-4 μm, is comprised of nano-crystalline grains with a density 50% of the theoretical value. XRD patterns of the as-deposited film and starting powder indicate a polycrystalline single-phase film. In-plane VSM and FMR measurements reveal a saturation of 22 emu/g, coercivity of 27 Oe, and linewidth of 360 Oe. Early measurements of air-filled and YIG-filled gold inductors between 0.01-10 GHz indicate an improved inductance of nearly a factor of 2 at low frequency. At higher frequency, resonance effects diminish this improvement. This work is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under program number N0001413WX20845 (Dr. Daniel Green, Program Manager).

  17. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Czigány, Zsolt; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CNx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A "fullerene-like" (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CNx films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N2 pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp3-hybridized films to sp2 films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CNx films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  18. Effects of Implant Copper Layer on Diamond Film Deposition on Cemented Carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhi-bin; Wang, Jian-hua; Wu, Qin-chong; Wang, Chuan-xin

    2001-02-01

    The deposition of high-quality diamond films and their adhesion on cemented carbides are strongly influenced by the catalytic effect of cobalt under typical deposition conditions. Decreasing Co content on the surface of the cemented carbide is often used for the diamond film deposition. But the leaching of Co from the WC-Co substrate leading to a mechanical weak surface often causes a poor adhesion. In this paper we adopted an implant copper layer prepared by vaporization to improve the mechanical properties of the Co-leached substrate. The diamond films were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH4:H2 gas mixture. The cross section and the morphology of the diamond film were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The non-diamond content in the film was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The effects of pretreatment on the concentrations of Co and Cu near the interfacial region were examined by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) equipped with SEM. The adhesion of the diamond on the substrate was evaluated with a Rockwell-type hardness tester. The results indicate that the diamond films prepared with implant copper layer have a good adhesion to the cemented carbide substrate due to the recovery of the mechanical properties of the Co-depleted substrate after the copper implantation and the formation of less amorphous carbon between the substrate and the diamond film.

  19. Sequential pulsed laser deposition of homoepitaxial SrTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenendijk, D. J.; Gariglio, S.

    2016-12-01

    The control of thin film stoichiometry is of primary relevance to achieve desired functionality. Pulsed laser deposition ablating from binary-oxide targets (sequential deposition) can be applied to precisely control the film composition, offsetting the importance of growth conditions on the film stoichiometry. In this work, we demonstrate that the cation stoichiometry of SrTiO3 thin films can be finely tuned by sequential deposition from SrO and TiO2 targets. Homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films were deposited at different substrate temperatures and Ti/Sr pulse ratios, allowing the establishment of a growth window for stoichiometric SrTiO3. The growth kinetics and nucleation processes were studied by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy, providing information about the growth mode and the degree of off-stoichiometry. At the optimal (stoichiometric) growth conditions, films exhibit atomically flat surfaces, whereas off-stoichiometry is accommodated by crystal defects, 3D islands, and/or surface precipitates depending on the substrate temperature and the excess cation. This technique opens the way to precisely control stoichiometry and doping of oxide thin films.

  20. Properties of NiO thin films deposited by intermittent spray pyrolysis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguig, B. A.; Khelil, A.; Cattin, L.; Morsli, M.; Bernède, J. C.

    2007-02-01

    NiO thin films have been grown on glass substrates by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition of NiCl 2·6H 2O diluted in distilled water, using a simple "perfume atomizer". The effect of the solution molarity on their properties was studied and compared to those of NiO thin films deposited with a classical spray system. It is shown that NiO thin films crystallized in the NiO structure are achieved after deposition. Whatever the precursor molarity, the grain size is around 25-30 nm. The crystallites are preferentially oriented along the (1 1 1) direction. All the films are p-type. However, the thickness and the conductivity of the NiO films depend on the precursor contraction. By comparison with the properties of films deposited by classical spray technique, it is shown that the critical precursor concentration, which induces strong thin films properties perturbations, is higher when a perfume atomizer is used. This broader stability domain can be attributed to better chlorides decomposition during the rest time used in the perfume atomizer technique.