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Sample records for fluoromisonidazole pet predicts

  1. Ischemic penumbra in acute stroke: Demonstration by PET with fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Liu, R.S.; Hu, H.H.

    1994-05-01

    Ischemic penumbra (IP) in acute stroke has gained clinical interest since tissue functions may be recovered if perfusion can be reestablished. However, such therapeutic intervention is {open_quotes}blind{close_quotes} since clinical examination can not distinguish IP from developing infarction. In vivo demonstration of IP may have significance for stroke patient management. This study was a preliminary evaluation of detecting IP in vivo by F-18 fluoromisonidazole ([F-18]-FMISO), a hypoxic imaging agent. Static PET imaging was performed after IV injection of 370 MBq of [F-18]-FMISO at 20 and 120 min. Tomograms were reconstructed and evaluated visually in correlation with CT or MR scans. In acute stroke, patients (pts) were called back for the second PET study one month after the initial study. CT was used for confirming infarction. In 6 pts with acute cerebral infarction, three of them had intense [F-18]-FMISO retention in the penumbra surrounding the central, eclipse-like zone of absent radio-activity (infarction) at 2 hr in the acute state, and the penumbra disappeared in association with increased area of infarction on CT in one case in the chronic state. In five pts with chronic infarction, all had no penumbra of [F-18]-FMISO retention. In summary, our preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using [F-18]-FMISO PET to detect ischemic penumbra in vivo.

  2. [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole and a New PET System With Semiconductor Detectors and a Depth of Interaction System for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Koichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru; Katoh, Norio; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Takeuchi, Wataru; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of a new type of positron emission tomography (New PET) with semiconductor detectors using {sup 18}F-labeled fluoromisonidazole (FMISO)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was compared with a state-of-the-art PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) system in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with non-NPC malignant tumors (control group) and 16 patients with NPC were subjected to FMISO-PET. The threshold of the tumor-to-muscle (T/M) ratio in each PET scan was calculated. The hypoxic volume within the gross tumor volume (GTVh) was determined using each PET ({sub NewPET}GTVh and {sub PET/CT}GTVh, respectively). Dose escalation IMRT plans prescribing 84 Gy to each GTVh were carried out. Results: The threshold of the T/M ratio was 1.35 for New PET and 1.23 for PET/CT. The mean volume of {sub NewPET}GTVh was significantly smaller than that of {sub PET/CT}GTVh (1.5 {+-} 1.6 cc vs 4.7 {+-} 4.6 cc, respectively; P=.0020). The dose escalation IMRT plans using New PET were superior in dose distribution to those using PET/CT. Dose escalation was possible in all 10 New PET-guided plans but not in 1 PET/CT-guided plan, because the threshold dose to the brainstem was exceeded. Conclusions: New PET was found to be useful for accurate dose escalation in FMISO-guided IMRT for patients with NPC.

  3. A Comparative Study of Noninvasive Hypoxia Imaging with 18F-Fluoroerythronitroimidazole and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Yu, Qingxi; Zhu, Shouhui; Wang, Suzhen; Zhao, Shuqiang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This is a clinical study to compare noninvasive hypoxia imaging using 18F-fluoroerythronitroimidazole (18F-FETNIM) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer. Methods A total of forty-two patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT (n = 18) and 18F-FMISO PET/CT (n = 24) before chemo/radiation therapy. The standard uptake values (SUVs) of malignant and normal tissues depict 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT uptake. Tumor-to-blood ratios (T/B) were used to quantify hypoxia. Results All patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT successfully. Compared to 18F-FMISO, 18F-FETNIM showed similar uptake in muscle, thyroid, spleen, pancreas, heart, lung and different uptake in blood, liver, and kidney. Significantly higher SUV and T/B ratio with 18F-FMISO (2.56±0.77, 1.98±0.54), as compared to 18F-FETNIM (2.12±0.56, 1.42±0.33) were seen in tumor, P = 0.022, <0.001. For the patients with different histopathological subtypes, no significant difference of SUV (or T/B ratio) was observed both in 18F-FMISO and 18F-FETNIM in tumor. A significantly different SUV (or T/B ratio) was detected between < = 2cm, 2~5cm, and >5cm groups in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.015 (or P = 0.029), whereas no difference was detected in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.446 (or P = 0.707). Both 18F-FETNIM and 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher SUVs (or T/B ratios) in stage IV than stage III, P = 0.021, 0.013 (or P = 0.032, 0.02). Conclusion 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher uptake than 18F-FETNIM in tumor/non-tumor ratio and might be a better hypoxia tracer in lung cancer. PMID:27322586

  4. [18F] fluoromisonidazole and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in response evaluation after chemo-/radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Gagel, Bernd; Reinartz, Patrick; Demirel, Cengiz; Kaiser, Hans J; Zimny, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Pinkawa, Michael; Stanzel, Sven; Asadpour, Branka; Hamacher, Kurt; Coenen, Heinz H; Buell, Ulrich; Eble, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental and clinical evidence suggest that hypoxia in solid tumours reduces their sensitivity to conventional treatment modalities modulating response to ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of the present study was to show the feasibility of determining radiotherapeutically relevant hypoxia and early tumour response by ([18F] Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and [18F]-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET. Methods Eight patients with non-small-cell lung cancer underwent PET scans. Tumour tissue oxygenation was measured with FMISO PET, whereas tumour glucose metabolism was measured with FDG PET. All PET studies were carried out with an ECAT EXACT 922/47® scanner with an axial field of view of 16.2 cm. FMISO PET consisted of one static scan of the relevant region, performed 180 min after intravenous administration of the tracer. The acquisition and reconstruction parameters were as follows: 30 min emission scanning and 4 min transmission scanning with 68-Ge/68-Ga rod sources. The patients were treated with chemotherapy, consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine (1200 mg/m2) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m2) followed by concurrent radio- (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine (300–500 mg/m2) every two weeks. FMISO PET and FDG PET were performed in all patients 3 days before and 14 days after finishing chemotherapy. Results FMISO PET allowed for the qualitative and quantitative definition of hypoxic sub-areas which may correspond to a localization of local recurrences. In addition, changes in FMISO and FDG PET measure the early response to therapy, and in this way, may predict freedom from disease, as well as overall survival. Conclusion These preliminary results warrant validation in larger trials. If confirmed, several novel treatment strategies may be considered, including the early use of PET to evaluate the effectiveness of the selected therapy. PMID:16515707

  5. Modelling and simulation of [18F]fluoromisonidazole dynamics based on histology-derived microvessel maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönnich, David; Troost, Esther G. C.; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Alber, Markus; Thorwarth, Daniela

    2011-04-01

    Hypoxia can be assessed non-invasively by positron emission tomography (PET) using radiotracers such as [18F]fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso) accumulating in poorly oxygenated cells. Typical features of dynamic Fmiso PET data are high signal variability in the first hour after tracer administration and slow formation of a consistent contrast. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether these characteristics can be explained by the current conception of the underlying microscopic processes and to identify fundamental effects. This is achieved by modelling and simulating tissue oxygenation and tracer dynamics on the microscopic scale. In simulations, vessel structures on histology-derived maps act as sources and sinks for oxygen as well as tracer molecules. Molecular distributions in the extravascular space are determined by reaction-diffusion equations, which are solved numerically using a two-dimensional finite element method. Simulated Fmiso time activity curves (TACs), though not directly comparable to PET TACs, reproduce major characteristics of clinical curves, indicating that the microscopic model and the parameter values are adequate. Evidence for dependence of the early PET signal on the vascular fraction is found. Further, possible effects leading to late contrast formation and potential implications on the quantification of Fmiso PET data are discussed.

  6. Predictive and prognostic value of FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The predictive and prognostic value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) in non-small-cell lung carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and lymphoma is discussed. The degree of FDG uptake is of prognostic value at initial presentation, after induction treatment prior to resection and in the case of relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In locally advanced and advanced stages of NSCLC, FDG-PET has been shown to be predictive for clinical outcome at an early stage of treatment. In colorectal carcinoma, limited studies are available on the prognostic value of FDG-PET, however, the technique appears to have great potential in monitoring the success of local ablative therapies soon after intervention and in the prediction and evaluation of response to radiotherapy, systemic therapy, and combinations thereof. The prognostic value of end-of treatment FDG-PET for FDG-avid lymphomas has been established, and the next step is to define how to use this information to optimize patient outcome. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, FDG-PET has a high negative predictive value, however, histological confirmation of positive findings should be sought where possible. For non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the opposite applies. The newly published standardized guidelines for interpretation formulates specific criteria for visual interpretation and for defining PET positivity in the liver, spleen, lung, bone marrow and small residual lesions. The introduction of these guidelines should reduce variability among studies. Interim PET offers a reliable method for early prediction of long-term remission, however it should only be performed in prospective randomized controlled trials. Many of the diagnostic and management questions considered in this review are relevant to other tumour types. Further research in this field is of great importance, since it may lead to a change in the therapeutic concept of cancer. The preliminary findings call for systematic inclusion of FDG-PET

  7. Multiparametric [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose/ [18F]Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/ Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer for the Non-Invasive Detection of Tumor Heterogeneity: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewski, Piotr; Baltzer, Pascal; Polanec, Stephan H.; Sturdza, Alina; Georg, Dietmar; Helbich, Thomas H.; Karanikas, Georgios; Grimm, Christoph; Polterauer, Stephan; Poetter, Richard; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Georg, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate fused multiparametric positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MP PET/MRI) at 3T in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, using high-resolution T2-weighted, contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and the radiotracers [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and [18F]fluoromisonidazol ([18F]FMISO) for the non-invasive detection of tumor heterogeneity for an improved planning of chemo-radiation therapy (CRT). Materials and Methods Sixteen patients with locally advanced cervix were enrolled in this IRB approved and were examined with fused MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI and in eleven patients complete data sets were acquired. MP PET/MRI was assessed for tumor volume, enhancement (EH)-kinetics, diffusivity, and [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO-avidity. Descriptive statistics and voxel-by-voxel analysis of MRI and PET parameters were performed. Correlations were assessed using multiple correlation analysis. Results All tumors displayed imaging parameters concordant with cervix cancer, i.e. type II/III EH-kinetics, restricted diffusivity (median ADC 0.80x10-3mm2/sec), [18F]FDG- (median SUVmax16.2) and [18F]FMISO-avidity (median SUVmax3.1). In all patients, [18F]FMISO PET identified the hypoxic tumor subvolume, which was independent of tumor volume. A voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed only weak correlations between the MRI and PET parameters (0.05–0.22), indicating that each individual parameter yields independent information and the presence of tumor heterogeneity. Conclusion MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI in patients with cervical cancer facilitates the acquisition of independent predictive and prognostic imaging parameters. MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI enables insights into tumor biology on multiple levels and provides information on tumor heterogeneity, which has the potential to improve the planning of CRT. PMID:27167829

  8. Nanoreporter PET predicts the efficacy of anti-cancer nanotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Yiming; Fayad, Zahi A; Lewis, Jason S; Mulder, Willem J M; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The application of nanoparticle drug formulations, such as nanoliposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), is increasingly integrated in clinical cancer care. Despite nanomedicine's remarkable potential and growth over the last three decades, its clinical benefits for cancer patients vary. Here we report a non-invasive quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) nanoreporter technology that is predictive of therapeutic outcome in individual subjects. In a breast cancer mouse model, we demonstrate that co-injecting Doxil and a Zirconium-89 nanoreporter ((89)Zr-NRep) allows precise doxorubicin (DOX) quantification. Importantly, (89)Zr-NRep uptake also correlates with other types of nanoparticles' tumour accumulation. (89)Zr-NRep PET imaging reveals remarkable accumulation heterogeneity independent of tumour size. We subsequently demonstrate that mice with >25 mg kg(-1) DOX accumulation in tumours had significantly better growth inhibition and enhanced survival. This non-invasive imaging tool may be developed into a robust inclusion criterion for patients amenable to nanotherapy. PMID:27319780

  9. Nanoreporter PET predicts the efficacy of anti-cancer nanotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Yiming; Fayad, Zahi A; Lewis, Jason S; Mulder, Willem J M; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-06-20

    The application of nanoparticle drug formulations, such as nanoliposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), is increasingly integrated in clinical cancer care. Despite nanomedicine's remarkable potential and growth over the last three decades, its clinical benefits for cancer patients vary. Here we report a non-invasive quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) nanoreporter technology that is predictive of therapeutic outcome in individual subjects. In a breast cancer mouse model, we demonstrate that co-injecting Doxil and a Zirconium-89 nanoreporter ((89)Zr-NRep) allows precise doxorubicin (DOX) quantification. Importantly, (89)Zr-NRep uptake also correlates with other types of nanoparticles' tumour accumulation. (89)Zr-NRep PET imaging reveals remarkable accumulation heterogeneity independent of tumour size. We subsequently demonstrate that mice with >25 mg kg(-1) DOX accumulation in tumours had significantly better growth inhibition and enhanced survival. This non-invasive imaging tool may be developed into a robust inclusion criterion for patients amenable to nanotherapy.

  10. Nanoreporter PET predicts the efficacy of anti-cancer nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Yiming; Fayad, Zahi A.; Lewis, Jason S.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The application of nanoparticle drug formulations, such as nanoliposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), is increasingly integrated in clinical cancer care. Despite nanomedicine's remarkable potential and growth over the last three decades, its clinical benefits for cancer patients vary. Here we report a non-invasive quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) nanoreporter technology that is predictive of therapeutic outcome in individual subjects. In a breast cancer mouse model, we demonstrate that co-injecting Doxil and a Zirconium-89 nanoreporter (89Zr-NRep) allows precise doxorubicin (DOX) quantification. Importantly, 89Zr-NRep uptake also correlates with other types of nanoparticles' tumour accumulation. 89Zr-NRep PET imaging reveals remarkable accumulation heterogeneity independent of tumour size. We subsequently demonstrate that mice with >25 mg kg−1 DOX accumulation in tumours had significantly better growth inhibition and enhanced survival. This non-invasive imaging tool may be developed into a robust inclusion criterion for patients amenable to nanotherapy. PMID:27319780

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  12. Respiratory trace feature analysis for the prediction of respiratory-gated PET quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyi; Bowen, Stephen R.; Chaovalitwongse, W. Art; Sandison, George A.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-02-01

    The benefits of respiratory gating in quantitative PET/CT vary tremendously between individual patients. Respiratory pattern is among many patient-specific characteristics that are thought to play an important role in gating-induced imaging improvements. However, the quantitative relationship between patient-specific characteristics of respiratory pattern and improvements in quantitative accuracy from respiratory-gated PET/CT has not been well established. If such a relationship could be estimated, then patient-specific respiratory patterns could be used to prospectively select appropriate motion compensation during image acquisition on a per-patient basis. This study was undertaken to develop a novel statistical model that predicts quantitative changes in PET/CT imaging due to respiratory gating. Free-breathing static FDG-PET images without gating and respiratory-gated FDG-PET images were collected from 22 lung and liver cancer patients on a PET/CT scanner. PET imaging quality was quantified with peak standardized uptake value (SUVpeak) over lesions of interest. Relative differences in SUVpeak between static and gated PET images were calculated to indicate quantitative imaging changes due to gating. A comprehensive multidimensional extraction of the morphological and statistical characteristics of respiratory patterns was conducted, resulting in 16 features that characterize representative patterns of a single respiratory trace. The six most informative features were subsequently extracted using a stepwise feature selection approach. The multiple-regression model was trained and tested based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The predicted quantitative improvements in PET imaging achieved an accuracy higher than 90% using a criterion with a dynamic error-tolerance range for SUVpeak values. The results of this study suggest that our prediction framework could be applied to determine which patients would likely benefit from respiratory motion compensation

  13. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Jiliu; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  14. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Jiliu; Lalush, David S; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures. PMID:26732849

  15. Relevance of PET for pretherapeutic prediction of doses in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Blaickner, Matthias; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Personalized dosimetry in radionuclide therapy has gained much attention in recent years. This attention has also an impact on peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This article reviews the PET-based imaging techniques that can be used for pretherapeutic prediction of doses in PRRT. More specifically the usage of (86)Y, (90)Y, (68)Ga, and (44)Sc are discussed: their characteristics for PET acquisition, the available peptides for labeling, the specifics of the imaging protocols, and the experiences gained from phantom and clinical studies. These techniques are evaluated with regard to their usefulness for dosimetry predictions in PRRT, and future perspectives are discussed.

  16. PET imaging predicts future body weight and cocaine preference

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides M.; Wang G.; Michaelides M.; Thanos P.K. Kim R.; Cho J.; Ananth M.; Wang G.-J.; Volkow N.D.

    2011-08-28

    Deficits in dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) binding availability using PET imaging have been reported in obese humans and rodents. Similar deficits have been reported in cocaine-addicts and cocaine-exposed primates. We found that D2R/D3R binding availability negatively correlated with measures of body weight at the time of scan (ventral striatum), at 1 (ventral striatum) and 2 months (dorsal and ventral striatum) post scan in rats. Cocaine preference was negatively correlated with D2R/D3R binding availability 2 months (ventral striatum) post scan. Our findings suggest that inherent deficits in striatal D2R/D3R signaling are related to obesity and drug addiction susceptibility and that ventral and dorsal striatum serve dissociable roles in maintaining weight gain and cocaine preference. Measuring D2R/D3R binding availability provides a way for assessing susceptibility to weight gain and cocaine abuse in rodents and given the translational nature of PET imaging, potentially primates and humans.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging of Residual Skull Base Chordoma Before Radiotherapy Using Fluoromisonidazole and Fluorodeoxyglucose: Potential Consequences for Dose Painting

    SciTech Connect

    Mammar, Hamid; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Nataf, Valerie; Pontvert, Dominique; Clemenceau, Stephane; Lot, Guillaume; George, Bernard; Polivka, Marc; Mokhtari, Karima; Ferrand, Regis; Feuvret, Loiec; Habrand, Jean-louis; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie; Talbot, Jean-Noeel

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To detect the presence of hypoxic tissue, which is known to increase the radioresistant phenotype, by its uptake of fluoromisonidazole (18F) (FMISO) using hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, and to compare it with the glucose-avid tumor tissue imaged with fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) (FDG), in residual postsurgical skull base chordoma scheduled for radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seven patients with incompletely resected skull base chordomas were planned for high-dose radiotherapy (dose {>=}70 Gy). All 7 patients underwent FDG and FMISO PET/CT. Images were analyzed qualitatively by visual examination and semiquantitatively by computing the ratio of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumor and cerebellum (T/C R), with delineation of lesions on conventional imaging. Results: Of the eight lesion sites imaged with FDG PET/CT, only one was visible, whereas seven of nine lesions were visible on FMISO PET/CT. The median SUVmax in the tumor area was 2.8 g/mL (minimum 2.1; maximum 3.5) for FDG and 0.83 g/mL (minimum 0.3; maximum 1.2) for FMISO. The T/C R values ranged between 0.30 and 0.63 for FDG (median, 0.41) and between 0.75 and 2.20 for FMISO (median,1.59). FMISO T/C R >1 in six lesions suggested the presence of hypoxic tissue. There was no correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake in individual chordomas (r = 0.18, p = 0.7). Conclusion: FMISO PET/CT enables imaging of the hypoxic component in residual chordomas. In the future, it could help to better define boosted volumes for irradiation and to overcome the radioresistance of these lesions. No relationship was founded between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in these tumors after initial surgery.

  18. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with PET Imaging Using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Ypsilantis, Petros-Pavlos; Siddique, Musib; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Davies, Andrew; Cook, Gary; Goh, Vicky; Montana, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) has become a standard component of diagnosis and staging in oncology, and is becoming more important as a quantitative monitor of individual response to therapy. In this article we investigate the challenging problem of predicting a patient's response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy from a single 18F-FDG PET scan taken prior to treatment. We take a "radiomics" approach whereby a large amount of quantitative features is automatically extracted from pretherapy PET images in order to build a comprehensive quantification of the tumor phenotype. While the dominant methodology relies on hand-crafted texture features, we explore the potential of automatically learning low- to high-level features directly from PET scans. We report on a study that compares the performance of two competing radiomics strategies: an approach based on state-of-the-art statistical classifiers using over 100 quantitative imaging descriptors, including texture features as well as standardized uptake values, and a convolutional neural network, 3S-CNN, trained directly from PET scans by taking sets of adjacent intra-tumor slices. Our experimental results, based on a sample of 107 patients with esophageal cancer, provide initial evidence that convolutional neural networks have the potential to extract PET imaging representations that are highly predictive of response to therapy. On this dataset, 3S-CNN achieves an average 80.7% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity in predicting non-responders, and outperforms other competing predictive models.

  19. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with PET Imaging Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ypsilantis, Petros-Pavlos; Siddique, Musib; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Davies, Andrew; Cook, Gary; Goh, Vicky; Montana, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) has become a standard component of diagnosis and staging in oncology, and is becoming more important as a quantitative monitor of individual response to therapy. In this article we investigate the challenging problem of predicting a patient’s response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy from a single 18F-FDG PET scan taken prior to treatment. We take a “radiomics” approach whereby a large amount of quantitative features is automatically extracted from pretherapy PET images in order to build a comprehensive quantification of the tumor phenotype. While the dominant methodology relies on hand-crafted texture features, we explore the potential of automatically learning low- to high-level features directly from PET scans. We report on a study that compares the performance of two competing radiomics strategies: an approach based on state-of-the-art statistical classifiers using over 100 quantitative imaging descriptors, including texture features as well as standardized uptake values, and a convolutional neural network, 3S-CNN, trained directly from PET scans by taking sets of adjacent intra-tumor slices. Our experimental results, based on a sample of 107 patients with esophageal cancer, provide initial evidence that convolutional neural networks have the potential to extract PET imaging representations that are highly predictive of response to therapy. On this dataset, 3S-CNN achieves an average 80.7% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity in predicting non-responders, and outperforms other competing predictive models. PMID:26355298

  20. Potential Clinical Value of Multiparametric PET in the Prediction of Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueqi; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Rongfu; Cao, Haoyin; Reid, Savina; Gao, Rui; Han, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential clinical value of quantitative functional FDG PET and pathological amyloid-β PET with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and clinical assessments in the prediction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. Methods We studied 82 subjects for up to 96 months (median = 84 months) in a longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. All preprocessed PET images were spatially normalized to standard Montreal Neurologic Institute space. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined on MRI template, and standard uptake values ratios (SUVRs) to the cerebellum for FDG and amyloid-β PET were calculated. Predictive values of single and multiparametric PET biomarkers with and without clinical assessments and CSF biomarkers for AD progression were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and logistic regression model. Results The posterior precuneus and cingulate SUVRs were identified for both FDG and amyloid-β PET in predicating progression in normal controls (NCs) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). FDG parietal and lateral temporal SUVRs were suggested for monitoring NCs and MCI group progression, respectively. 18F-AV45 global cortex attained (78.6%, 74.5%, 75.4%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy) in predicting NC progression, which is comparable to the 11C-PiB global cortex SUVR’s in predicting MCI to AD. A logistic regression model to combine FDG parietal and posterior precuneus SUVR and Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) Total Mod was identified in predicating NC progression with (80.0%, 94.9%, 93.9%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). The selected model including FDG posterior cingulate SUVR, ADAS-Cog Total Mod, and Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores for predicating MCI to AD attained (96.4%, 81.2%, 83.6%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). 11C-PiB medial temporal SUVR with MMSE significantly increased 11C-PiB PET AUC to 0.915 (p<0

  1. A patient-specific computational model of hypoxia-modulated radiation resistance in glioblastoma using 18F-FMISO-PET

    PubMed Central

    Rockne, Russell C.; Trister, Andrew D.; Jacobs, Joshua; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea J.; Neal, Maxwell L.; Hendrickson, Kristi; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Kinahan, Paul; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive primary brain tumour that has poor prognosis despite aggressive treatment. A hallmark of these tumours is diffuse invasion into the surrounding brain, necessitating a multi-modal treatment approach, including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. We have previously demonstrated the ability of our model to predict radiographic response immediately following radiation therapy in individual GBM patients using a simplified geometry of the brain and theoretical radiation dose. Using only two pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging scans, we calculate net rates of proliferation and invasion as well as radiation sensitivity for a patient's disease. Here, we present the application of our clinically targeted modelling approach to a single glioblastoma patient as a demonstration of our method. We apply our model in the full three-dimensional architecture of the brain to quantify the effects of regional resistance to radiation owing to hypoxia in vivo determined by [18F]-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (FMISO-PET) and the patient-specific three-dimensional radiation treatment plan. Incorporation of hypoxia into our model with FMISO-PET increases the model–data agreement by an order of magnitude. This improvement was robust to our definition of hypoxia or the degree of radiation resistance quantified with the FMISO-PET image and our computational model, respectively. This work demonstrates a useful application of patient-specific modelling in personalized medicine and how mathematical modelling has the potential to unify multi-modality imaging and radiation treatment planning. PMID:25540239

  2. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Microenvironment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Neck Nodal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang Ya

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess noninvasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head-and-neck cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: Thirteen newly diagnosed head-and-neck cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging before chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from {sup 18}F-FMISO PET, the nonparametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV ({rho} = 0.74, p < 0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median k{sub ep} (redistribution rate constant) value ({rho} = -0.58, p = 0.042) and the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant) (p = 0.049) and median k{sub ep} (p = 0.027) values than did nonhypoxic nodes (no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion: This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower K{sup trans} and k{sub ep} values) compared with nonhypoxic nodes.

  3. A Model of Reoxygenation Dynamics of Head-And-Neck Tumors Based on Serial 18F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Thorwarth, Daniela . E-mail: daniela.thorwarth@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Eschmann, Susanne-Martina; Paulsen, Frank; Alber, Markus

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for reoxygenation dynamic and its relationship to local control after radiotherapy (RT), based on repeated dynamic [{sup 18}F]-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET) examinations in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Ten head-and-neck cancer patients were examined with dynamic FMISO PET before RT with 70 Gy and after approximately 20 Gy. Two of these patients had two additional dynamic FMISO scans during treatment. Local recurrence was assessed by computed tomography-based follow-up 8-24 months after RT. Tumor-specific values for the level of FMISO retention R and the vascular perfusion efficiency P were determined with a kinetic compartment model. Results: Individual R-P scattergrams before and during therapy were analyzed, and significant therapy-induced changes in the characteristic R-P patterns were observed. A tumor control probability model was derived that involves the tissue parameters R and P and estimates the time to reoxygenation. On the basis of this model, a malignancy value M was introduced and calibrated by a fit to the observed outcome data. Reoxygenation is reflected by the model as a progression to less-malignant tumor types (i.e., smaller values of M). In 4 of 6 patients with severe hypoxia, M had decreased after 20 Gy, whereas 2 patients showed increasing M. Four patients showed no hypoxia in the pretreatment scan. Conclusion: A tumor control probability model was developed based on repeated FMISO PET scans during RT. The model combines the local perfusion efficiency and the degree of hypoxia to estimate reoxygenation time. It constitutes a key for hypoxia image-guided dose escalation in RT.

  4. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley PL; Sagebiel, Richard W; III, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan. PMID:27766186

  5. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer.

  6. Tryptophan PET predicts spatial and temporal patterns of post-treatment glioblastoma progression detected by contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Robinette, Natasha L; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid PET is increasingly utilized for the detection of recurrent gliomas. Increased amino acid uptake is often observed outside the contrast-enhancing brain tumor mass. In this study, we evaluated if non-enhancing PET+ regions could predict spatial and temporal patterns of subsequent MRI progression in previously treated glioblastomas. Twelve patients with a contrast-enhancing area suspicious for glioblastoma recurrence on MRI underwent PET scanning with the amino acid radiotracer alpha-[(11)C]-methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT). Brain regions showing increased AMT uptake in and outside the contrast-enhancing volume were objectively delineated to include high uptake consistent with glioma (as defined by previous studies). Volume and tracer uptake of such non-enhancing PET+ regions were compared to spatial patterns and timing of subsequent progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, as defined by serial surveillance MRI. Non-enhancing PET+ volumes varied widely across patients and extended up to 24 mm from the edge of MRI contrast enhancement. In ten patients with clear progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, the non-enhancing PET+ volumes predicted the location of new enhancement, which extended beyond the PET+ brain tissue in six. In two patients, with no PET+ area beyond the initial contrast enhancement, MRI remained stable. There was a negative correlation between AMT uptake in non-enhancing brain and time to subsequent progression (r = -0.77, p = 0.003). Amino acid PET imaging could complement MRI not only for detecting glioma recurrence but also predicting the location and timing of subsequent tumor progression. This could support decisions for surgical intervention or other targeted therapies for recurrent gliomas.

  7. Predictive Value of Interim PET/CT in DLBCL Treated with R-CHOP: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na; Zhao, Jinhua; Qiao, Wenli; Wang, Taisong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP chemotherapy. Methods. We searched for articles published in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Wiley, Scopus, and Ovid database from inception to March 2014. Articles related to interim PET/CT in patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP chemotherapy were selected. PFS with or without OS was chosen as the endpoint to evaluate the prognostic significance of interim PET/CT. Results. Six studies with a total of 605 cases were included. The sensitivity of interim PET/CT ranged from 21.2% to 89.7%, and the pooled sensitivity was 52.4%. The specificity of interim PET/CT ranged from 37.4% to 90.7%, and the pooled specificity was 67.8%. The pooled positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 1.780 and 0.706, respectively. The explained AUC was 0.6978 and the Q* was 0.6519. Conclusions. The sensitivity and specificity of interim PET/CT in predicting the outcome of DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP chemotherapy were not satisfactory (52.4% and 67.8%, resp.). To improve this, some more work should be done to unify the response criteria and some more research to assess the prognostic value of interim PET/CT with semiquantitative analysis. PMID:25710013

  8. [18F]-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Visualization of Tumor Hypoxia in Patients With Chordoma of the Mobile and Sacrococcygeal Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, Matthew D.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lim, Ruth; Winrich, Barbara K.; Grosu, Anca L.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Depauw, Nicolas; Shih, Helen A.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Hornicek, Francis J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate [18F]-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FMISO-PET/CT) detection of targetable hypoxic subvolumes (HSVs) in chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine. Methods and Materials: A prospective, pilot study of 20 patients with primary or locally recurrent chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine treated with proton or combined proton/photon radiation therapy (RT) with or without surgery was completed. The FMISO-PET/CT was performed before RT and after 19.8-34.2 GyRBE (relative biologic effectiveness). Gross tumor volumes were delineated and HSVs defined including voxels with standardized uptake values ≥1.4 times the muscle mean. Clinical characteristics and treatments received were compared between patients with and without HSVs. Results: The FMISO-PET/CT detected HSVs in 12 of 20 patients (60%). Baseline and interval HSV spatial concordance varied (0%-94%). Eight HSVs were sufficiently large (≥5 cm{sup 3}) to potentially allow an intensity modulated proton therapy boost. Patients with HSVs had significantly larger gross tumor volumes (median 410.0 cm{sup 3} vs 63.4 cm{sup 3}; P=.02) and were significantly more likely to have stage T2 tumors (5 of 12 vs 0 of 8; P=.04). After a median follow-up of 1.8 years (range, 0.2-4.4 years), a local recurrence has yet to be observed. Three patients developed metastatic disease, 2 with HSVs. Conclusions: Detection of targetable HSVs by FMISO-PET/CT within patients undergoing RT with or without surgery for treatment of chordoma of the mobile and sacrococcygeal spine is feasible. The study's inability to attribute interval HSV changes to treatment, rapidly changing hypoxic physiology, or imaging inconsistencies is a limitation. Further study of double-baseline FMISO-PET/CT and hypoxia-directed RT dose escalation, particularly in patients at high risk for local recurrence, is warranted.

  9. PET-Based Treatment Response Evaluation in Rectal Cancer: Prediction and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco H.M.; Oellers, Michel C.; Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van; Riedl, Robert G.; Bogaard, Jorgen van den; Buijsen, Jeroen; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To develop a positron emission tomography (PET)-based response prediction model to differentiate pathological responders from nonresponders. The predictive strength of the model was validated in a second patient group, treated and imaged identical to the patients on which the predictive model was based. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one rectal cancer patients were prospectively included in this study. All patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-computed tomography (CT) imaging both before the start of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and after 2 weeks of treatment. Preoperative treatment with CRT was followed by a total mesorectal excision. From the resected specimen, the tumor regression grade (TRG) was scored according to the Mandard criteria. From one patient group (n = 30), the metabolic treatment response was correlated with the pathological treatment response, resulting in a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve based cutoff value for the reduction of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) within the tumor to differentiate pathological responders (TRG 1-2) from nonresponders (TRG 3-5). The applicability of the selected cutoff value for new patients was validated in a second patient group (n = 21). Results: When correlating the metabolic and pathological treatment response for the first patient group using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve = 0.98), a cutoff value of 48% SUV{sub max} reduction was selected to differentiate pathological responders from nonresponders (specificity of 100%, sensitivity of 64%). Applying this cutoff value to the second patient group resulted in a specificity and sensitivity of, respectively, 93% and 83%, with only one of the pathological nonresponders being false positively predicted as pathological responding. Conclusions: For rectal cancer, an accurate PET-based prediction of the pathological treatment response is feasible already after 2 weeks of CRT. The presented predictive model could be used to

  10. Week one FLT-PET response predicts complete remission to R-CHOP and survival in DLBCL

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Tibor; Abbrederis, Kathrin; Blümel, Christina; Santi, Ivan; Rudelius, Martina; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Peschel, Christian; Schwaiger, Markus; Dechow, Tobias; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Despite improved survival in the Rituximab (R) era, a considerable number of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) ultimately die from the disease. Functional imaging using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is suggested for assessment of residual viable tumor very early during treatment but is compromised by non-specific tracer retention in inflammatory lesions. The PET tracer [18F]fluorodeoxythymidine (FLT) as surrogate marker of tumor proliferation may overcome this limitation. We present results of a prospective clinical study testing FLT-PET as superior and early predictor of response to chemotherapy and outcome in DLBCL. 54 patients underwent FLT-PET prior to and one week after the start of R-CHOP chemotherapy. Repetitive FLT-PET imaging was readily implemented into the diagnostic work-up. Our data demonstrate that the reduction of FLT standard uptake valuemean (SUVmean) and SUVmax one week after chemotherapy was significantly higher in patients achieving complete response (CR, n=48; non-CR, n=6; p<0.006). Martingale-residual and Cox proportional hazard analyses showed a significant monotonous decrease of mortality risk with increasing change in SUV. Consistent with these results, early FLT-PET response showed relevant discriminative ability in predicting CR. In conclusion, very early FLT-PET in the course of R-CHOP chemotherapy is feasible and enables identification of patients at risk for treatment failure. PMID:24979177

  11. Predicting location of recurrence using FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET in canine sinonasal tumors treated with radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Tyler; Fu, Rau; Bowen, Stephen; Zhu, Jun; Forrest, Lisa; Jeraj, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Dose painting relies on the ability of functional imaging to identify resistant tumor subvolumes to be targeted for additional boosting. This work assessed the ability of FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET imaging to predict the locations of residual FDG PET in canine tumors following radiotherapy. Nineteen canines with spontaneous sinonasal tumors underwent PET/CT imaging with radiotracers FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM prior to hypofractionated radiotherapy. Therapy consisted of 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy to the sinonasal cavity with or without an integrated boost of 0.8 Gy to the GTV. Patients had an additional FLT PET/CT scan after fraction 2, a Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan after fraction 3, and follow-up FDG PET/CT scans after radiotherapy. Following image registration, simple and multiple linear and logistic voxel regressions were performed to assess how well pre- and mid-treatment PET imaging predicted post-treatment FDG uptake. R2 and pseudo R2 were used to assess the goodness of fits. For simple linear regression models, regression coefficients for all pre- and mid-treatment PET images were significantly positive across the population (P < 0.05). However, there was large variability among patients in goodness of fits: R2 ranged from 0.00 to 0.85, with a median of 0.12. Results for logistic regression models were similar. Multiple linear regression models resulted in better fits (median R2 = 0.31), but there was still large variability between patients in R2. The R2 from regression models for different predictor variables were highly correlated across patients (R ≈ 0.8), indicating tumors that were poorly predicted with one tracer were also poorly predicted by other tracers. In conclusion, the high inter-patient variability in goodness of fits indicates that PET was able to predict locations of residual tumor in some patients, but not others. This suggests not all patients would be good candidates for dose painting based on a single biological target.

  12. Predicting location of recurrence using FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET in canine sinonasal tumors treated with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Tyler; Fu, Rau; Bowen, Stephen; Zhu, Jun; Forrest, Lisa; Jeraj, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Dose painting relies on the ability of functional imaging to identify resistant tumor subvolumes to be targeted for additional boosting. This work assessed the ability of FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET imaging to predict the locations of residual FDG PET in canine tumors following radiotherapy. Nineteen canines with spontaneous sinonasal tumors underwent PET/CT imaging with radiotracers FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM prior to hypofractionated radiotherapy. Therapy consisted of 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy to the sinonasal cavity with or without an integrated boost of 0.8 Gy to the GTV. Patients had an additional FLT PET/CT scan after fraction 2, a Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan after fraction 3, and follow-up FDG PET/CT scans after radiotherapy. Following image registration, simple and multiple linear and logistic voxel regressions were performed to assess how well pre- and mid-treatment PET imaging predicted post-treatment FDG uptake. R(2) and pseudo R(2) were used to assess the goodness of fits. For simple linear regression models, regression coefficients for all pre- and mid-treatment PET images were significantly positive across the population (P < 0.05). However, there was large variability among patients in goodness of fits: R(2) ranged from 0.00 to 0.85, with a median of 0.12. Results for logistic regression models were similar. Multiple linear regression models resulted in better fits (median R(2) = 0.31), but there was still large variability between patients in R(2). The R(2) from regression models for different predictor variables were highly correlated across patients (R ≈ 0.8), indicating tumors that were poorly predicted with one tracer were also poorly predicted by other tracers. In conclusion, the high inter-patient variability in goodness of fits indicates that PET was able to predict locations of residual tumor in some patients, but not others. This suggests not all patients would be good candidates for dose painting based on a single biological target. PMID

  13. Response Assessment and Prediction in Esophageal Cancer Patients via F-18 FDG PET/CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Kyle J.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to utilize F-18 FDG PET/CT scans to determine an indicator for the response of esophageal cancer patients during radiation therapy. There is a need for such an indicator since local failures are quite common in esophageal cancer patients despite modern treatment techniques. If an indicator is found, a patient's treatment strategy may be altered to possibly improve the outcome. This is investigated with various standard uptake volume (SUV) metrics along with image texture features. The metrics and features showing the most promise and indicating response are used in logistic regression analysis to find an equation for the prediction of response. Materials and Methods: 28 patients underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT scans prior to the start of radiation therapy (RT). A second PET/CT scan was administered following the delivery of ~32 Gray (Gy) of dose. A physician contoured gross tumor volume (GTV) was used to delineate a PET based GTV (GTV-pre-PET) based on a threshold of >40% and >20% of the maximum SUV value in the GTV. Deformable registration was used in VelocityAI software to register the pre-treatment and intra-treatment CT scans so that the GTV-pre-PET contours could be transferred from the pre to intra scans (GTV-intra-PET). The fractional decrease in the maximum, mean, volume to the highest intensity 10%-90%, and combination SUV metrics of the significant previous SUV metrics were compared to post-treatment pathologic response for an indication of response. Next for the >40% threshold, texture features based on a neighborhood gray-tone dimension matrix (NGTDM) were analyzed. The fractional decrease in coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity, and texture strength were compared to the pathologic response of the patients. From these previous two types of analysis, SUV and texture features, the two most significant results were used in logistic regression analysis to find an equation to predict the probability of a non

  14. 18F-EF5 PET Is Predictive of Response to Fractionated Radiotherapy in Preclinical Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rehan; Apte, Sandeep; Vilalta, Marta; Subbarayan, Murugesan; Miao, Zheng; Chin, Frederick T.; Graves, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between pre-treatment positron emission tomography (PET) using the hypoxic tracer 18F-[2-(2-nitro-1-H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3- pentafluoropropyl) acetamide] (18F-EF5) and the response of preclinical tumor models to a range of fractionated radiotherapies. Subcutaneous HT29, A549 and RKO tumors grown in nude mice were imaged using 18F-EF5 positron emission tomography (PET) in order to characterize the extent and heterogeneity of hypoxia in these systems. Based on these results, 80 A549 tumors were subsequently grown and imaged using 18F-EF5 PET, and then treated with one, two, or four fraction radiation treatments to a total dose of 10–40 Gy. Response was monitored by serial caliper measurements of tumor volume. Longitudinal post-treatment 18F-EF5 PET imaging was performed on a subset of tumors. Terminal histologic analysis was performed to validate 18F-EF5 PET measures of hypoxia. EF5-positive tumors responded more poorly to low dose single fraction irradiation relative to EF5-negative tumors, however both groups responded similarly to larger single fraction doses. Irradiated tumors exhibited reduced 18F-EF5 uptake one month after treatment compared to control tumors. These findings indicate that pre- treatment 18F-EF5 PET can predict the response of tumors to single fraction radiation treatment. However, increasing the number of fractions delivered abrogates the difference in response between tumors with high and low EF5 uptake pre-treatment, in agreement with traditional radiobiology. PMID:26431331

  15. Prediction of Pathologic Grade and Prognosis in Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Lung Using 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byungjoon; Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Zo, Jae Il; Choi, Joon Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma (PMEC) in fluorine-18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) was evaluated as a preoperative predictor of pathologic grade and survival rate. Materials and Methods Twenty-three patients who underwent preoperative PET/CT and complete resection for PMEC were enrolled. The optimal cut-off SUVmax for tumor grade was calculated as 6.5 by receiver operating characteristic curve. The patients were divided into a high SUV group (n = 7) and a low SUV group (n = 16). Clinicopathologic features were compared between the groups by χ2 test and overall survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results The mean SUVmax was 15.4 ± 11.5 in the high SUV group and 3.9 ± 1.3 in the low SUV group. All patients except one from the low SUV group had low grade tumors and all had no nodal metastasis. The sensitivity and specificity of SUVmax from PET/CT for predicting tumor grade was 85.7% and 93.8%, respectively. During the follow-up period (mean, 48.6 ± 38.7 months), four patients from the high SUV group experienced cancer recurrence, and one died of cancer. In contrast, none of the low SUV group had recurrence or mortality. Five-year overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low SUV group (100% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.031). Conclusion Pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma patients with high SUVmax in PET/CT had higher tumor grade, more frequent lymph node metastasis and worse long-term outcome. Therefore, PMEC patients with high uptake on PET/CT imaging might require aggressive mediastinal lymph node dissection and adjuvant therapies. PMID:26175595

  16. Amyloid-PET predicts inhibition of de novo plaque formation upon chronic γ-secretase modulator treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brendel, M; Jaworska, A; Herms, J; Trambauer, J; Rötzer, C; Gildehaus, F-J; Carlsen, J; Cumming, P; Bylund, J; Luebbers, T; Bartenstein, P; Steiner, H; Haass, C; Baumann, K; Rominger, A

    2015-01-01

    In a positron-emission tomography (PET) study with the β-amyloid (Aβ) tracer [18F]-florbetaben, we previously showed that Aβ deposition in transgenic mice expressing Swedish mutant APP (APP-Swe) mice can be tracked in vivo. γ-Secretase modulators (GSMs) are promising therapeutic agents by reducing generation of the aggregation prone Aβ42 species without blocking general γ-secretase activity. We now aimed to investigate the effects of a novel GSM [8-(4-Fluoro-phenyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5–a]pyridin-2-yl]-[1-(3-methyl-[1,2,4]thiadiazol-5-yl)-piperidin-4-yl]-amine (RO5506284) displaying high potency in vitro and in vivo on amyloid plaque burden and used longitudinal Aβ-microPET to trace individual animals. Female transgenic (TG) APP-Swe mice aged 12 months (m) were assigned to vehicle (TG-VEH, n=12) and treatment groups (TG-GSM, n=12), which received daily RO5506284 (30 mg kg−1) treatment for 6 months. A total of 131 Aβ-PET recordings were acquired at baseline (12 months), follow-up 1 (16 months) and follow-up 2 (18 months, termination scan), whereupon histological and biochemical analyses of Aβ were performed. We analyzed the PET data as VOI-based cortical standard-uptake-value ratios (SUVR), using cerebellum as reference region. Individual plaque load assessed by PET remained nearly constant in the TG-GSM group during 6 months of RO5506284 treatment, whereas it increased progressively in the TG-VEH group. Baseline SUVR in TG-GSM mice correlated with Δ%-SUVR, indicating individual response prediction. Insoluble Aβ42 was reduced by 56% in the TG-GSM versus the TG-VEH group relative to the individual baseline plaque load estimates. Furthermore, plaque size histograms showed differing distribution between groups of TG mice, with fewer small plaques in TG-GSM animals. Taken together, in the first Aβ-PET study monitoring prolonged treatment with a potent GSM in an AD mouse model, we found clear attenuation of de novo amyloidogenesis. Moreover

  17. Optimization of Early Response Monitoring and Prediction of Cancer Antiangiogenesis Therapy via Noninvasive PET Molecular Imaging Strategies of Multifactorial Bioparameters

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Luo, Jian-Min; Wang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Antiangiogenesis therapy (AAT) has provided substantial benefits regarding improved outcomes and survival for suitable patients in clinical settings. Therefore, the early definition of therapeutic effects is urgently needed to guide cancer AAT. We aimed to optimize the early response monitoring and prediction of AAT efficacy, as indicated by the multi-targeted anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib in U87MG tumors, using noninvasive positron emission computed tomography (PET) molecular imaging strategies of multifactorial bioparameters. Methods: U87MG tumor mice were treated via intragastric injections of sunitinib (80 mg/kg) or vehicle for 7 consecutive days. Longitudinal MicroPET/CT scans with 18F-FDG, 18F-FMISO, 18F-ML-10 and 18F-Alfatide II were acquired to quantitatively measure metabolism, hypoxia, apoptosis and angiogenesis on days 0, 1, 3, 7 and 13 following therapy initiation. Tumor tissues from a dedicated group of mice were collected for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of key biomarkers (Glut-1, CA-IX, TUNEL, ανβ3 and CD31) at the time points of PET imaging. The tumor sizes and mouse weights were measured throughout the study. The tumor uptake (ID%/gmax), the ratios of the tumor/muscle (T/M) for each probe, and the tumor growth ratios (TGR) were calculated and used for statistical analyses of the differences and correlations. Results: Sunitinib successfully inhibited U87MG tumor growth with significant differences in the tumor size from day 9 after sunitinib treatment compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The uptakes of 18F-FMISO (reduced hypoxia), 18F-ML-10 (increased apoptosis) and 18F-Alfatide II (decreased angiogenesis) in the tumor lesions significantly changed during the early stage (days 1 to 3) of sunitinib treatment; however, the uptake of 18F-FDG (increased glucose metabolism) was significantly different during the late stage. The PET imaging data of each probe were all confirmed via ex vivo IHC of the relevant biomarkers

  18. Optimization of Early Response Monitoring and Prediction of Cancer Antiangiogenesis Therapy via Noninvasive PET Molecular Imaging Strategies of Multifactorial Bioparameters

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Luo, Jian-Min; Wang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Antiangiogenesis therapy (AAT) has provided substantial benefits regarding improved outcomes and survival for suitable patients in clinical settings. Therefore, the early definition of therapeutic effects is urgently needed to guide cancer AAT. We aimed to optimize the early response monitoring and prediction of AAT efficacy, as indicated by the multi-targeted anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib in U87MG tumors, using noninvasive positron emission computed tomography (PET) molecular imaging strategies of multifactorial bioparameters. Methods: U87MG tumor mice were treated via intragastric injections of sunitinib (80 mg/kg) or vehicle for 7 consecutive days. Longitudinal MicroPET/CT scans with 18F-FDG, 18F-FMISO, 18F-ML-10 and 18F-Alfatide II were acquired to quantitatively measure metabolism, hypoxia, apoptosis and angiogenesis on days 0, 1, 3, 7 and 13 following therapy initiation. Tumor tissues from a dedicated group of mice were collected for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of key biomarkers (Glut-1, CA-IX, TUNEL, ανβ3 and CD31) at the time points of PET imaging. The tumor sizes and mouse weights were measured throughout the study. The tumor uptake (ID%/gmax), the ratios of the tumor/muscle (T/M) for each probe, and the tumor growth ratios (TGR) were calculated and used for statistical analyses of the differences and correlations. Results: Sunitinib successfully inhibited U87MG tumor growth with significant differences in the tumor size from day 9 after sunitinib treatment compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The uptakes of 18F-FMISO (reduced hypoxia), 18F-ML-10 (increased apoptosis) and 18F-Alfatide II (decreased angiogenesis) in the tumor lesions significantly changed during the early stage (days 1 to 3) of sunitinib treatment; however, the uptake of 18F-FDG (increased glucose metabolism) was significantly different during the late stage. The PET imaging data of each probe were all confirmed via ex vivo IHC of the relevant biomarkers

  19. The Predictive Value of Early Behavioural Assessments in Pet Dogs – A Longitudinal Study from Neonates to Adults

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2–10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40–50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited. PMID:25003341

  20. The predictive value of early behavioural assessments in pet dogs--a longitudinal study from neonates to adults.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2-10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40-50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited.

  1. A novel metric for quantification of homogeneous and heterogeneous tumors in PET for enhanced clinical outcome prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmim, Arman; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Jackson, Andrew; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Marcus, Charles; Ashrafinia, Saeed; Soltani, Madjid; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncologic PET images provide valuable information that can enable enhanced prognosis of disease. Nonetheless, such information is simplified significantly in routine clinical assessment to meet workflow constraints. Examples of typical FDG PET metrics include: (i) SUVmax, (2) total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and (3) metabolic tumor volume (MTV). We have derived and implemented a novel metric for tumor quantification, inspired in essence by a model of generalized equivalent uniform dose as used in radiation therapy. The proposed metric, denoted generalized effective total uptake (gETU), is attractive as it encompasses the abovementioned commonly invoked metrics, and generalizes them, for both homogeneous and heterogeneous tumors, using a single parameter a. We evaluated this new metric for improved overall survival (OS) prediction on two different baseline FDG PET/CT datasets: (a) 113 patients with squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx, and (b) 72 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed, where the subjects were subdivided into two groups using the median threshold, from which the hazard ratios (HR) were computed in Cox proportional hazards regression. For the oropharyngeal cancer dataset, MTV, TLG, SUVmax, SUVmean and SUVpeak produced HR values of 1.86, 3.02, 1.34, 1.36 and 1.62, while the proposed gETU metric for a  = 0.25 (greater emphasis on volume information) enabled significantly enhanced OS prediction with HR  =  3.94. For the pancreatic cancer dataset, MTV, TLG, SUVmax, SUVmean and SUVpeak resulted in HR values of 1.05, 1.25, 1.42, 1.45 and 1.52, while gETU at a  = 3.2 (greater emphasis on SUV information) arrived at an improved HR value of 1.61. Overall, the proposed methodology allows placement of differing degrees of emphasis on tumor volume versus uptake for different types of tumors to enable enhanced clinical outcome prediction.

  2. WE-E-17A-03: FDG-PET-Based Radiomics to Predict Local Control and Survival Following Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J; Apte, A; Folkerts, M; Kohutek, Z; Wu, A; Rimmer, A; Lee, N; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: An exploding field in cancer research is “radiomics,” based on the hypothesis that there is statistical (hidden) information in medical images that is prognostic or predictive of outcomes. Our group has developed an efficient pipeline to extract and analyze quantitative image features from medical images as related to outcomes or diagnosis. In this work, we summarize our previous studies with positron emission tomography (PET) images and show the potential of the use of radiomics for outcomes research. Methods: We analyzed two cancer datasets, each consisting of pre-radiotherapy-treatment PET scans: 163 T1-2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and 174 head and neck (H and N) cancer patients with stage III–IV. The PET scans were converted to Computational Environment for Radiological Research (CERR) format, and CERR was used to generate 24 shape, texture, and intensity-histogram based image features. Data-mining and logistic regression methods were then used to model local failure (LF) and overall survival (OS). Unbiased estimates of performance were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). Results: For predicting LF, the models with biologically equivalent dose (BED) and TLG (metabolic tumor volume (MTV) x SUVmean) in NSCLC, and skewness and MTV in H and N, achieved the best performance with AUC=0.818 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.826 (p=0.0002), respectively. For predicting OS, the models with kurtosis and volume in NSCLC and SUVmax and homogeneity in H and N achieved the best performance with AUC=0.706 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.656 (p=0.0003), respectively. On LOOCV, all these models retained significant predictive power. Interestingly, MTV was highly correlated with LF in both sites. Conclusion: PET-based imaged features are promising tools for improving treatment management decision making. Much more research is needed to identify optimal radiomics metrics and to correlate imaging phenotype with other clinical or genomic information.

  3. Can technical characteristics predict clinical performance in PET/CT imaging? A correlation study for thyroid cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Metaxas, Marinos; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether image characteristics could be used to predict the outcome of ROC studies in PET/CT imaging. Patients suspected for recurrent thyroid cancer underwent a standard whole body (WB) examination and an additional high-resolution head-and-neck (HN) F18-FDG PET/CT scan. The value of the latter was determined with an ROC study, the results of which showed that the WB+HN combination was better than WB alone for thyroid cancer detection and diagnosis. Following the ROC experiment, the WB and HN images of confirmed benign or malignant thyroid disease were analyzed and first and second order textural features were determined. Features included minimum, mean, and maximum intensity, as well as contrast in regions of interest encircling the thyroid lesions. Lesion size and standard uptake values (SUV) were also determined. Bivariate analysis was applied to determine relationships between WB and HN features and between observer ROC responses and the various feature values. The two sets showed significant associations in the values of SUV, contrast, and lesion size. They were completely different when the intensities were considered; no relationship was found between the WB minimum, maximum, and mean ROI values and their HN counterparts. SUV and contrast were the strongest predictors of ROC performance on PET/CT examinations of thyroid cancer. The high resolution HN images seem to enhance these relationships but without a single dramatic effect as was projected from the ROC results. A combination of features from both WB and HN datasets may possibly be a more robust predictor of ROC performance.

  4. In vivo delineation of myocardial hypoxia during coronary occlusion using fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole and positron emission tomography: A potential approach for identification of jeopardized myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, M.E.; Dence, C.S.; Hwang, D.R.; Herrero, P.; Welch, M.J.; Bergmann, S.R. )

    1990-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the positron-emitting fluorine-18 (18F)-labeled fluoromisonidazole is a specific tracer of myocardial hypoxia. Its fractional extraction is enhanced in ischemic or hypoxic myocardium but returns to baseline levels on reperfusion and recovery of normal function. Thus, this agent might be useful in delineating acutely hypoxic but potentially salvageable myocardium. Accordingly, to delineate the relation between the myocardial extraction of 18F-fluoromisonidazole after intravenous administration and the time of antecedent ischemia in vivo, uptake of tracer was measured with positron emission tomography and direct postmortem tissue analysis in 14 dogs in which tracer was administered within 3 h of coronary occlusion (a time associated with marked potential for salvage on reperfusion); in 4 dogs after 6 h of coronary occlusion (a time associated with minimal salvage of myocardium on reperfusion); and in 8 dogs after greater than 24 h of coronary occlusion (to delineate uptake in tissue that is irreversibly damaged). The residual fraction (that is, the amount of tracer extracted and retained in a region) in ischemic myocardium in the dogs in which 18F-fluoromisonidazole was administered within 3 h after occlusion averaged (+/- standard deviation) 23 +/- 18%, which was higher than the residual fraction in myocardium subjected to ischemia for either 6 or greater than 24 h before tracer administration (12 +/- 7% and 5 +/- 2%, respectively, p less than 0.01 for both). Retention of tracer in remote normal myocardium averaged 2 +/- 1%.

  5. A radiomics model from joint FDG-PET and MRI texture features for the prediction of lung metastases in soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallières, M.; Freeman, C. R.; Skamene, S. R.; El Naqa, I.

    2015-07-01

    This study aims at developing a joint FDG-PET and MRI texture-based model for the early evaluation of lung metastasis risk in soft-tissue sarcomas (STSs). We investigate if the creation of new composite textures from the combination of FDG-PET and MR imaging information could better identify aggressive tumours. Towards this goal, a cohort of 51 patients with histologically proven STSs of the extremities was retrospectively evaluated. All patients had pre-treatment FDG-PET and MRI scans comprised of T1-weighted and T2-weighted fat-suppression sequences (T2FS). Nine non-texture features (SUV metrics and shape features) and forty-one texture features were extracted from the tumour region of separate (FDG-PET, T1 and T2FS) and fused (FDG-PET/T1 and FDG-PET/T2FS) scans. Volume fusion of the FDG-PET and MRI scans was implemented using the wavelet transform. The influence of six different extraction parameters on the predictive value of textures was investigated. The incorporation of features into multivariable models was performed using logistic regression. The multivariable modeling strategy involved imbalance-adjusted bootstrap resampling in the following four steps leading to final prediction model construction: (1) feature set reduction; (2) feature selection; (3) prediction performance estimation; and (4) computation of model coefficients. Univariate analysis showed that the isotropic voxel size at which texture features were extracted had the most impact on predictive value. In multivariable analysis, texture features extracted from fused scans significantly outperformed those from separate scans in terms of lung metastases prediction estimates. The best performance was obtained using a combination of four texture features extracted from FDG-PET/T1 and FDG-PET/T2FS scans. This model reached an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.984 ± 0.002, a sensitivity of 0.955 ± 0.006, and a specificity of 0.926 ± 0.004 in bootstrapping

  6. Migration of antimony from PET trays into food simulant and food: determination of Arrhenius parameters and comparison of predicted and measured migration data

    PubMed Central

    Haldimann, M.; Alt, A.; Blanc, A.; Brunner, K.; Sager, F.; Dudler, V.

    2013-01-01

    Migration experiments with small sheets cut out from ovenable PET trays were performed in two-sided contact with 3% acetic acid as food simulant at various temperatures. The fraction of diffusible antimony (Sb) was estimated to be 62% in the PET sample under study. Apparent diffusion coefficients of Sb in PET trays were determined experimentally. Measurement of migration between 20 and 150°C yielded a linear Arrhenius plot over a wide temperature range from which the activation energy (Ea) of 188 ± 36 kJ mol−1 and the pre-exponential factor (D0) of 3.6 × 1014 cm2s−1 were determined for diffusing Sb species. Ea was similar to previously reported values for PET bottles obtained with a different experimental approach. Ea and D0 were applied as model parameters in migration modelling software for predicting the Sb transfer in real food. Ready meals intended for preparation in a baking oven were heated in the PET trays under study and the actual Sb migration into the food phase was measured by isotope dilution ICP-MS. It was shown that the predictive modelling reproduces correctly experimental data. PMID:23286325

  7. Explorative analyses on the value of interim PET for prediction of response in pediatric and adolescent non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study is to evaluate the predictive value of FDG-PET (PET) in pediatric and adolescent patients suffering from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (pNHL) in comparison to information provided by conventional imaging methods (CIM). Methods Imaging was performed at baseline and at interim (after 2 cycles of chemotherapy). The response assessment in PET was carried out visually and semi-quantitatively, the latter one by use of percentage decrease in SUVmax from baseline to interim (ΔSUVmax). The PET-based results were compared to the findings by CIM. Progression-free survival (PFS) was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves (KM) and log-rank test. Results The final study included 16 patients (mean follow-up time, 60.2 months (range, 4.0 to 85.7 months)). Relapse occurred in four patients. Visual PET compared to CIM revealed higher sensitivity (3/4 vs 1/4) and NPV (6/7 vs 10/13), and equal PPV (3/9 vs 1/3), but lower specificity (6/12 vs 10/12) and accuracy (9/16 vs 11/16). False-positive findings in PET at interim were predominantly observed in patients presenting bulky disease (5/6), whereas CIM was true-negative in all of these cases. KM analyses revealed no significant differences in 5-year PFS neither for CIM (76.9% vs 66.7%; p = 0.67) nor for visual PET (85.7% vs 66.7%; p = 0.34) nor for ΔSUVmax (88.9% vs 57.1%; p = 0.12). Conclusions The predictive value of iPET in pediatric patients suffering from NHL was limited due to considerably high amount of false-positive findings, especially in patients suffering from bulky disease. However, due to our limited sample size, final conclusions cannot be drawn and, thus, call for further evaluation of PET in pNHL in larger and more homogenous patient series. PMID:24139528

  8. Progression-free and overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with abiraterone acetate can be predicted with serial C11-acetate PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Farnebo, Jacob; Wadelius, Agnes; Sandström, Per; Nilsson, Sten; Jacobsson, Hans; Blomqvist, Lennart; Ullén, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this retrospective study, we evaluated the benefit of repeated carbon 11 (C11)-acetate positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to assess response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with abiraterone acetate (AA). A total of 30 patients with mCRPC were monitored with C11-acetate PET/CT and PSA levels during their treatment with AA. Retrospective evaluation of their response was made after 102 days (median; range 70–155) of treatment. Statistical analyses were employed to detect predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and potential correlation between serum levels of PSA, standardized uptake values (SUVpeak), and bone lesion index measured from PET were investigated. At follow-up 10 patients exhibited partial response (PR), 10 progressive disease (PD), and 10 stable disease (SD), as assessed by PET/CT. In survival analysis, both PR and PD were significantly associated with PFS and OS. CT response was also associated with OS, but only 19/30 patients demonstrated a lesion meeting target lesion criteria according to RECIST 1.1. No PET/CT baseline characteristic was significantly associated with PFS or OS. A PSA response (reduction in the level by >50%) could also predict PFS and OS. In the subgroup lacking a PSA response, those with PD had significantly shorter OS than those with PR or SD. PFS and OS in patients with mCRPC treated with AA can be predicted from repeated C11-acetate PET/CT. This may be of particular clinical value in patients who do not exhibit a PSA response to treatment. PMID:27495034

  9. Progression-free and overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with abiraterone acetate can be predicted with serial C11-acetate PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Farnebo, Jacob; Wadelius, Agnes; Sandström, Per; Nilsson, Sten; Jacobsson, Hans; Blomqvist, Lennart; Ullén, Anders

    2016-08-01

    In this retrospective study, we evaluated the benefit of repeated carbon 11 (C11)-acetate positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to assess response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with abiraterone acetate (AA).A total of 30 patients with mCRPC were monitored with C11-acetate PET/CT and PSA levels during their treatment with AA. Retrospective evaluation of their response was made after 102 days (median; range 70-155) of treatment. Statistical analyses were employed to detect predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and potential correlation between serum levels of PSA, standardized uptake values (SUVpeak), and bone lesion index measured from PET were investigated.At follow-up 10 patients exhibited partial response (PR), 10 progressive disease (PD), and 10 stable disease (SD), as assessed by PET/CT. In survival analysis, both PR and PD were significantly associated with PFS and OS. CT response was also associated with OS, but only 19/30 patients demonstrated a lesion meeting target lesion criteria according to RECIST 1.1. No PET/CT baseline characteristic was significantly associated with PFS or OS. A PSA response (reduction in the level by >50%) could also predict PFS and OS. In the subgroup lacking a PSA response, those with PD had significantly shorter OS than those with PR or SD.PFS and OS in patients with mCRPC treated with AA can be predicted from repeated C11-acetate PET/CT. This may be of particular clinical value in patients who do not exhibit a PSA response to treatment. PMID:27495034

  10. WE-E-17A-02: Predictive Modeling of Outcome Following SABR for NSCLC Based On Radiomics of FDG-PET Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, R; Aguilera, T; Shultz, D; Rubin, D; Diehn, M; Loo, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to develop predictive models of patient outcome by extracting advanced imaging features (i.e., Radiomics) from FDG-PET images. Methods: We acquired pre-treatment PET scans for 51 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SABR. We calculated 139 quantitative features from each patient PET image, including 5 morphological features, 8 statistical features, 27 texture features, and 100 features from the intensity-volume histogram. Based on the imaging features, we aim to distinguish between 2 risk groups of patients: those with regional failure or distant metastasis versus those without. We investigated 3 pattern classification algorithms: linear discriminant analysis (LDA), naive Bayes (NB), and logistic regression (LR). To avoid the curse of dimensionality, we performed feature selection by first removing redundant features and then applying sequential forward selection using the wrapper approach. To evaluate the predictive performance, we performed 10-fold cross validation with 1000 random splits of the data and calculated the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: Feature selection identified 2 texture features (homogeneity and/or wavelet decompositions) for NB and LR, while for LDA SUVmax and one texture feature (correlation) were identified. All 3 classifiers achieved statistically significant improvements over conventional PET imaging metrics such as tumor volume (AUC = 0.668) and SUVmax (AUC = 0.737). Overall, NB achieved the best predictive performance (AUC = 0.806). This also compares favorably with MTV using the best threshold at an SUV of 11.6 (AUC = 0.746). At a sensitivity of 80%, NB achieved 69% specificity, while SUVmax and tumor volume only had 36% and 47% specificity. Conclusion: Through a systematic analysis of advanced PET imaging features, we are able to build models with improved predictive value over conventional imaging metrics. If validated in a large independent cohort, the proposed techniques could potentially aid in

  11. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  12. [F-18]-Fluoromisonidazole Quantification of Hypoxia in Human Cancer Patients using Image-derived Blood Surrogate Tissue Reference Regions

    PubMed Central

    Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; O’Sullivan, Janet N.; Fink, James R.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; McLaughlin, Lena J.; Muzi, John P.; Mankoff, David A.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    18F-FMISO is the most widely used PET agent for imaging hypoxia, a condition associated with resistance to tumor therapy. 18F-FMISO equilibrates in normoxic tissues, but is retained under hypoxic conditions because of reduction and binding to macromolecules. A simple tissue-to-blood ratio (TB) is suitable for quantifying hypoxia. A threshold of TB ≥ 1.2 is useful in discriminating the hypoxic volume (HV) of tissue; TBmax is the maximum intensity of the hypoxic region and does not invoke a threshold. Because elimination of blood sampling would simplify clinical use, we tested the validity of using imaging regions as a surrogate for blood sampling. Methods Patients underwent 20 min 18F-FMISO scans during the 90–140 min interval post-injection with venous blood sampling. 223 18F-FMISO patient studies had detectable surrogate blood regions in the field-of-view. Quantitative parameters of hypoxia (TBmax, HV) derived from blood samples were compared to values using surrogate blood regions derived from heart, aorta and/or cerebellum. In a subset of brain cancer patients, parameters from blood samples and from cerebellum were compared for their ability to independently predict outcome. Results Vascular regions of heart showed the highest correlation to measured blood activity (R2 = 0.84). For brain studies, cerebellar activity was similarly correlated to blood samples. In brain cancer patients, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that image-derived reference regions had nearly identical predictive power as parameters derived from blood, thus obviating the need for venous sampling in these patients. Conclusions Simple static analysis of 18F-FMISO PET captures both the intensity (TBmax) and spatial extent (HV) of tumor hypoxia. An image-derived region to assess blood activity can be used as a surrogate for blood sampling in quantification of hypoxia. PMID:26112020

  13. F18 Fluoromisonidazole for Imaging Tumor Hypoxia: Imaging the Microenvironment for Personalized Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, JG; Krohn, KA

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia in solid tumors is one of the seminal mechanisms for developing aggressive trait and treatment resistsance in solid tumors. This evolutionarily conserved biological mechanism along with de-repression of cellular functions in cancer, although resulting in many challenges, provide us with opportunities to use these adversities to our advantage. Our ability to use molecular imaging to characterize therapeutic targets such as hypoxia and apply this information for therapeutic interventions is growing rapidly. Evaluation of hypoxia and its biological ramifications to effectively plan appropriate therapy that can overcome the cure-limiting effects of hypoxia provides an objective means for treatment selection and planning. FMISO PET imaging of tumor hypoxia continues to be the lead radiopharmaceutical for the evaluation, prognostication and quantification of hypoxia, one of the key elements of the tumor microenvironment. FMISO is less confounded by blood flow and, although the images have less contrast than FDG PET, its uptake after 2 hours is an accurate reflection of inadequate regional Po2 at the time of radiopharmaceutical administration. By virtue of extensive clinical utilization, FMISO remains the lead candidate for imaging and quantifying hypoxia. The past decade has seen significant technological advances in investigating hypoxia imaging in radiation treatment planning and in providing us with the ability to individualize radiation delivery and target volume coverage. The presence of widespread hypoxia in the tumor can be effectively targeted with a systemic hypoxic cell cytotoxin or other agents that are more effective with diminished PO2, either alone or in combination. Molecular imaging in general and hypoxia imaging in particular will likely become an important in vivo imaging biomarker of the future, complementing the traditional direct tissue sampling methods by providing a snap shot of a primary tumor and metastatic disease and in following

  14. Advanced [18F]FDG and [11C]flumazenil PET analysis for individual outcome prediction after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery for hippocampal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yankam Njiwa, J.; Gray, K.R.; Costes, N.; Mauguiere, F.; Ryvlin, P.; Hammers, A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that an imaging marker, increased periventricular [11C]flumazenil ([11C]FMZ) binding, is associated with failure to become seizure free (SF) after surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Here, we investigated whether increased preoperative periventricular white matter (WM) signal can be detected on clinical [18F]FDG-PET images. We then explored the potential of periventricular FDG WM increases, as well as whole-brain [11C]FMZ and [18F]FDG images analysed with random forest classifiers, for predicting surgery outcome. Methods Sixteen patients with MRI-defined HS had preoperative [18F]FDG and [11C]FMZ-PET. Fifty controls had [18F]FDG-PET (30), [11C]FMZ-PET (41), or both (21). Periventricular WM signal was analysed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8), and whole-brain image classification was performed using random forests implemented in R (http://www.r-project.org). Surgery outcome was predicted at the group and individual levels. Results At the group level, non-seizure free (NSF) versus SF patients had periventricular increases with both tracers. Against controls, NSF patients showed more prominent periventricular [11C]FMZ and [18F]FDG signal increases than SF patients. All differences were more marked for [11C]FMZ. For individuals, periventricular WM signal increases were seen at optimized thresholds in 5/8 NSF patients for both tracers. For SF patients, 1/8 showed periventricular signal increases for [11C]FMZ, and 4/8 for [18F]FDG. Hence, [18F]FDG had relatively poor sensitivity and specificity. Random forest classification accurately identified 7/8 SF and 7/8 NSF patients using [11C]FMZ images, but only 4/8 SF and 6/8 NSF patients with [18F]FDG. Conclusion This study extends the association between periventricular WM increases and NSF outcome to clinical [18F]FDG-PET, but only at the group level. Whole-brain random forest classification increases [11C]FMZ-PET's performance for predicting

  15. pO polarography, contrast enhanced color duplex sonography (CDS), [18F] fluoromisonidazole and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography: validated methods for the evaluation of therapy-relevant tumor oxygenation or only bricks in the puzzle of tumor hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc; Pinkawa, Michael; Reinartz, Patrick; Zimny, Michael; Kaiser, Hans J; Stanzel, Sven; Asadpour, Branka; Demirel, Cengiz; Hamacher, Kurt; Coenen, Heinz H; Scholbach, Thomas; Maneschi, Payam; DiMartino, Ercole; Eble, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Background The present study was conducted to analyze the value of ([18F] fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and [18F]-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET as well as color pixel density (CPD) and tumor perfusion (TP) assessed by color duplex sonography (CDS) for determination of therapeutic relevant hypoxia. As a standard for measuring tissue oxygenation in human tumors, the invasive, computerized polarographic needle electrode system (pO2 histography) was used for comparing the different non invasive measurements. Methods Until now a total of 38 Patients with malignancies of the head and neck were examined. Tumor tissue pO2 was measured using a pO2-histograph. The needle electrode was placed CT-controlled in the tumor without general or local anesthesia. To assess the biological and clinical relevance of oxygenation measurement, the relative frequency of pO2 readings, with values ≤ 2.5, ≤ 5.0 and ≤ 10.0 mmHg, as well as mean and median pO2 were stated. FMISO PET consisted of one static scan of the relevant region, performed 120 min after intravenous administration. FMISO tumor to muscle ratios (FMISOT/M) and tumor to blood ratios (FMISOT/B) were calculated. FDG PET of the lymph node metastases was performed 71 ± 17 min after intravenous administration. To visualize as many vessels as possible by CDS, a contrast enhancer (Levovist®, Schering Corp., Germany) was administered. Color pixel density (CPD) was defined as the ratio of colored to grey pixels in a region of interest. From CDS signals two parameters were extracted: color hue – defining velocity (v) and color area – defining perfused area (A). Signal intensity as a measure of tissue perfusion (TP) was quantified as follows: TP = vmean × Amean. Results In order to investigate the degree of linear association, we calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient. Slight (|r| > 0.4) to moderate (|r| > 0.6) correlation was found between the parameters of pO2 polarography (pO2 readings with values ≤ 2.5, ≤ 5

  16. SU-D-201-02: Prediction of Delivered Dose Based On a Joint Histogram of CT and FDG PET Images

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Choi, Y; Cho, A; Hwang, S; Cha, J; Lee, N; Yun, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether pre-treatment images can be used in predicting microsphere distribution in tumors. When intra-arterial radioembolization using Y90 microspheres was performed, the microspheres were often delivered non-uniformly within the tumor, which could lead to an inefficient therapy. Therefore, it is important to estimate the distribution of microspheres. Methods: Early arterial phase CT and FDG PET images were acquired for patients with primary liver cancer prior to radioembolization (RE) using Y90 microspheres. Tumor volume was delineated on CT images and fused with FDG PET images. From each voxel (3.9×3.9×3.3 mm3) in the tumor, the Hounsfield unit (HU) from the CT and SUV values from the FDG PET were harvested. We binned both HU and SUV into 11 bins and then calculated a normalized joint-histogram in an 11×11 array.Patients also underwent a post-treatment Y90 PET imaging. Radiation dose for the tumor was estimated using convolution of the Y90 distribution with a dose-point kernel. We also calculated a fraction of the tumor volume that received a radiation dose great than 100Gy. Results: Averaged over 40 patients, 55% of tumor volume received a dose greater than 100Gy (range : 1.1 – 100%). The width of the joint histogram was narrower for patients with a high dose. For patients with a low dose, the width was wider and a larger fraction of tumor volume had low HU. Conclusion: We have shown the pattern of joint histogram of the HU and SUV depends on delivered dose. The patterns can predict the efficacy of uniform intra-arterial delivery of Y90 microspheres.

  17. Pet Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for your family. What is each ... Does anyone have pet allergies? What type of animal suits your lifestyle and budget? Once you own ...

  18. Spatial-Temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Features for Predicting Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Shan; Kligerman, Seth; Chen, Wengen; Lu, Minh; Kim, Grace; Feigenberg, Steven; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To extract and study comprehensive spatial-temporal {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) features for the prediction of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were treated with trimodal therapy (CRT plus surgery) and underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT scans both before (pre-CRT) and after (post-CRT) CRT. The 2 scans were rigidly registered. A tumor volume was semiautomatically delineated using a threshold standardized uptake value (SUV) of ≥2.5, followed by manual editing. Comprehensive features were extracted to characterize SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns (texture), tumor geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT. The usefulness of each feature in predicting pathologic tumor response to CRT was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value. Results: The best traditional response measure was decline in maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}; AUC, 0.76). Two new intensity features, decline in mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and skewness, and 3 texture features (inertia, correlation, and cluster prominence) were found to be significant predictors with AUC values ≥0.76. According to these features, a tumor was more likely to be a responder when the SUV{sub mean} decline was larger, when there were relatively fewer voxels with higher SUV values pre-CRT, or when [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake post-CRT was relatively homogeneous. All of the most accurate predictive features were extracted from the entire tumor rather than from the most active part of the tumor. For SUV intensity features and tumor size features, changes were more predictive than pre- or post-CRT assessment alone. Conclusion: Spatial-temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET features were found to be useful predictors of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant CRT in esophageal cancer.

  19. SU-E-J-254: Evaluating the Role of Mid-Treatment and Post-Treatment FDG-PET/CT in Predicting Progression-Free Survival and Distant Metastasis of Anal Cancer Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Wang, J; Chuong, M; D’Souza, W; Choi, W; Lu, W; Latifi, K; Hoffe, S; Moros, E; Saeed, Nadia; Tan, S; Shridhar, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of mid-treatment and post-treatment FDG-PET/CT in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and distant metastasis (DM) of anal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 17 anal cancer patients treated with CRT were retrospectively studied. The median prescription dose was 56 Gy (range, 50–62.5 Gy). All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before and after CRT. 16 of the 17 patients had an additional FDG-PET/CT image at 3–5 weeks into the treatment (denoted as mid-treatment FDG-PET/CT). 750 features were extracted from these three sets of scans, which included both traditional PET/CT measures (SUVmax, SUVpeak, tumor diameters, etc.) and spatialtemporal PET/CT features (comprehensively quantify a tumor’s FDG uptake intensity and distribution, spatial variation (texture), geometric property and their temporal changes relative to baseline). 26 clinical parameters (age, gender, TNM stage, histology, GTV dose, etc.) were also analyzed. Advanced analytics including methods to select an optimal set of predictors and a model selection engine, which identifies the most accurate machine learning algorithm for predictive analysis was developed. Results: Comparing baseline + mid-treatment PET/CT set to baseline + posttreatment PET/CT set, 14 predictors were selected from each feature group. Same three clinical parameters (tumor size, T stage and whether 5-FU was held during any cycle of chemotherapy) and two traditional measures (pre- CRT SUVmin and SUVmedian) were selected by both predictor groups. Different mix of spatial-temporal PET/CT features was selected. Using the 14 predictors and Naive Bayes, mid-treatment PET/CT set achieved 87.5% accuracy (2 PFS patients misclassified, all local recurrence and DM patients correctly classified). Post-treatment PET/CT set achieved 94.0% accuracy (all PFS and DM patients correctly predicted, 1 local recurrence patient misclassified) with logistic regression, neural network or

  20. Preoperative Standardized Uptake Value of Metastatic Lymph Nodes Measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT Improves the Prediction of Prognosis in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bong-Il; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Ryu, Seung Wan; Sohn, Soo Sang; Kang, Yu Na

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study assessed whether preoperative maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) measured by 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) could improve the prediction of prognosis in gastric cancer. One hundred fifty-one patients with gastric cancer and pathologically confirmed LN involvement who had undergone preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT prior to curative surgical resection were retrospectively enrolled. To obtain nodal SUVmax, a transaxial image representing the highest 18F-FDG uptake was carefully selected, and a region of interest was manually drawn on the highest 18F-FDG accumulating LN. Conventional prognostic parameters and PET findings (primary tumor and nodal SUVmax) were analyzed for prediction of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Furthermore, prognostic accuracy of survival models was assessed using c-statistics. Of the 151 patients, 38 (25%) experienced recurrence and 34 (23%) died during follow-up (median follow-up, 48 months; range, 5–74 months). Twenty-seven patients (18%) showed positive 18F-FDG nodal uptake (range, 2.0–22.6). In these 27 patients, a receiver-operating characteristic curve demonstrated a nodal SUVmax of 2.8 to be the optimal cutoff for predicting RFS and OS. The univariate and multivariate analyses showed that nodal SUVmax (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.71, P < 0.0001), pathologic N (pN) stage (HR = 2.58, P = 0.0058), and pathologic T (pT) stage (HR = 1.77, P = 0.0191) were independent prognostic factors for RFS. Also, nodal SUVmax (HR = 2.80, P < 0.0001) and pN stage (HR = 2.28, P = 0.0222) were independent prognostic factors for OS. A predictive survival model incorporating conventional risk factors (pT/pN stage) gave a c-statistic of 0.833 for RFS and 0.827 for OS, whereas a model combination of nodal SUVmax with pT/pN stage gave a c-statistic of 0.871 for RFS (P = 0

  1. PiB-PET Imaging-Based Serum Proteome Profiles Predict Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seokjo; Jeong, Hyobin; Baek, Je-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Jin; Han, Sun-Ho; Cho, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hee; Hong, Hyun Seok; Kim, Young Ho; Yi, Eugene C; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L; Hwang, Daehee; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-07-01

    Development of a simple, non-invasive early diagnosis platform of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using blood is urgently required. Recently, PiB-PET imaging has been shown to be powerful to quantify amyloid-β plaque loads leading to pathophysiological alterations in AD brains. Thus, there has been a need for serum biomarkers reflecting PiB-PET imaging data as an early diagnosis platform of AD. Here, using LC-MS/MS analysis coupled with isobaric tagging, we performed comprehensive proteome profiling of serum samples from cognitively normal controls, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD patients, who were selected using PiB-PET imaging. Comparative analysis of the proteomes revealed 79 and 72 differentially expressed proteins in MCI and AD, respectively, compared to controls. Integrated analysis of these proteins with genomic and proteomic data of AD brain tissues, together with network analysis, identified three biomarker candidates representing the altered proteolysis-related process in MCI or AD: proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), coagulation factor XIII, A1 polypeptide (F13A1), and dermcidin (DCD). In independent serum samples of MCI and AD, we confirmed the elevation of the candidates using western blotting and ELISA. Our results suggest that these biomarker candidates can serve as a potential non-invasive early diagnosis platform reflecting PiB-PET imaging for MCI and AD. PMID:27392853

  2. Predictive Role of Functional Visceral Fat Activity Assessed by Preoperative F-18 FDG PET/CT for Regional Lymph Node or Distant Metastasis in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pahk, Kisoo; Rhee, Seunghong; Kim, Sungeun; Choe, Jae Gol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role of functional visceral fat activity assessed by preoperative F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in colorectal cancer (CRC) for predicting regional lymph node (LN) or distant metastasis. Method We evaluated 131 patients with newly diagnosed CRC. They all underwent pre-operative 18F-FDG PET/CT and surgery. Functional fat activity was measured by maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) using 18F-FDG PET/CT. Functional visceral fat activity was measured by SUVmax of visceral fat/SUVmax of subcutaneous fat (V/S) ratio. Mann-Whitney U test, χ2 test, Fisher’s exact test, receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, Spearrman’s correlation coefficient, and uni- and multivariate logistic regression statistical analyses were done. Results Patients with higher V/S ratio displayed a significantly higher rate of regional LN (p = 0.004) and distant metastasis (p<0.001). In addition, V/S ratio was the only factor that was significantly associated with distant metastasis. An optimal cut-off V/S ratio of 1.88 was proposed for predicting distant metastasis with a sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 78.8% (area under the curve: 0.86; p<0.0001) Conclusion Functional visceral fat activity is significantly associated with distant metastasis in CRC patients. Furthermore, V/S ratio can be useful as a complementary factor in predicting distant metastasis. PMID:26862754

  3. Lesion regression rate based on RECIST: prediction of treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy compared with FDG PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Munetaka; Tuji, Hiroyuki; Shimode, Yuzo; Kondo, Tamaki; Oota, Kiyotaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the lesion regression rate (ΔLR) based on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria could be used for the prediction of treatment outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) compared with FDG PET-CT. A total of 33 patients underwent MRI and PET-CT at pretreatment and at 8 weeks after CRT. We assessed the treatment outcome by analyzing the following parameters: the RECIST criteria, ΔLR, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria, and pretreatment SUVmax of the primary tumor and node. The correlation between the analysis of the parameters and the results of the long-term follow-up of the patients was determined. The RECIST did not significantly correlate with locoregional control (LRC) or survival. The ΔLR was significantly lower for the lesions with locoregional failure (LRF) than for those with LRC. A threshold ΔLR of 48% revealed a sensitivity of 72.7% and specificity of 77.3% for the prediction of LRF. Progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with ΔLR ≥ 48% was significantly better than that of patients with ΔLR < 48% (P = 0.001), but not overall survival. There was a significant correlation between LRC and the EORTC (P = 0.02). The patients who achieved a complete response by the EORTC criteria showed significantly better PFS and overall survival (P = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). The ΔLR was inferior to FDG PET-CT with respect to the prediction of patient survival; however, it may be useful for selecting patients in need of more aggressive monitoring after CRT. PMID:25829531

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals in Preclinical and Clinical Development for Monitoring of Therapy with PET

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Mark PS.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2010-01-01

    This review article discusses PET agents, other than 18F-FDG, with the potential to monitor the response to therapy before, during, or after therapeutic intervention. This review deals primarily with non–18F-FDG PET tracers that are in the final stages of preclinical development or in the early stages of clinical application for monitoring the therapeutic response. Four sections related to the nature of the tracers are included: radiotracers of DNA synthesis, such as the 2 most promising agents, the thymidine analogs 3′-18F-fluoro-3′-deoxythymidine and 18F-1-(2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-β-d-arabinofuranosyl)thymine; agents for PET imaging of hypoxia within tumors, such as 60/62/64Cu-labeled diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole; amino acids for PET imaging, including the most popular such agent, l-[methyl-11C]methionine; and agents for the imaging of tumor expression of androgen and estrogen receptors, such as 16β-18F-fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone and 16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol, respectively. PMID:19380404

  5. Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque and Prediction of Thrombosis Events in a Rabbit Model Using 18F-FDG -PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Quan-ming; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Ting-ting; Zhang, Ming-duo; Zhuang, Xu-cui; Zhao, Xue-cheng; Li, Li-qin; Li, De-peng; Liu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Detection of vulnerable plaques could be clinically significant in the prevention of cardiovascular events. We aimed to compare Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake in vulnerable and stable plaques, and investigate the feasibility of predicting thrombosis events using Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) angiography. Methods Atherosclerosis was induced in 23 male New Zealand white rabbits. The rabbits underwent pharmacological triggering to induce thrombosis. A pre-triggered PET/CTA scan and a post-triggered PET/CTA scan were respectively performed. 18F-FDG uptake by the aorta was expressed as maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and mean SUV (SUVmean). SUVs were measured on serial 7.5 mm arterial segments. Results Thrombosis was identified in 15 of 23 rabbits. The pre-triggered SUVmean and SUVmax were 0.768±0.111 and 0.804±0.120, respectively, in the arterial segments with stable plaque, and 1.097±0.189 and 1.229±0.290, respectively, in the arterial segments with vulnerable plaque (P<0.001, respectively). The post-triggered SUVmean and SUVmax were 0.849±0.167 and 0.906±0.191, respectively in the arterial segments without thrombosis, and 1.152±0.258 and 1.294±0.313, respectively in the arterial segments with thrombosis (P<0.001, respectively). The values of SUVmean in the pre-triggered arterial segments were used to plot a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) for predicting thrombosis events. Area under the curve (AUC) was 0.898. Maximal sensitivity and specificity (75.4% and 88.5%, respectively) were obtained when SUVmean was 0.882. Conclusions Vulnerable and stable plaques can be distinguished by quantitative analysis of 18F-FDG uptake in the arterial segments in this rabbit model. PET/CT may be used for predicting thrombosis events and risk-stratification in patients with atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23613798

  6. 18FDG PET-CT standardized uptake value for the prediction of radiation pneumonitis in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YONG; YU, YONGHUA; YU, JINMING; FU, ZHENG; LIU, TONGHAI; GUO, SHOUFANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine if the standardized uptake value (SUV) determined with 18F-FDG PET-CT can be used to predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) in lung cancer patients who receive radiotherapy. A total of 40 patients with non-small cell lung cancer received 18F-FDG PET-CT examinations prior to and following radiotherapy. The average SUV of lung tissue prior to and following radiation were measured at differing radiation doses. SUV differences between patients with and without RP, and the SUV ratio of the irradiated lung tissues compared with that of non-irradiated lung tissues (L/B) were compared. There were no differences in the mean SUV between the RP and no RP groups prior to radiotherapy. There were also no significant differences in the mean SUV of lung tissue within groups or between the no RP and RP groups with radiation doses of <5 Gy, 5 to ≤14.9 Gy and 15 to ≤34.9 Gy (all P>0.05) following radiotherapy. There were, however, statistically significant differences in the mean SUV of lung tissue within groups or between the no RP and RP groups with doses of ≥60 Gy prior to therapy and 35 to ≤59.9 Gy and ≥60 Gy following therapy (all P<0.05). When the L/B ratio was ≥3, the incidence of RP was 50%, and when the L/B ratio was ≥2.5 the incidence was 40.7%. When the L/B ratio was <2, there were no cases of RP. In conclusion, the present study indicates that 18F-FDG PET-CT can be used to predict RP by L/B ratio. PMID:26722262

  7. Prediction of Extracapsular Invasion at Metastatic Sentinel Nodes and Non-sentinel Lymph Nodal Metastases by FDG-PET in Cases with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takaaki; Yajima, Reina; Tatsuki, Hironori; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported that the presence of an extracapsular invasion (ECI) at sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) is a strong predictor of non-SLN metastasis in breast cancer. We hypothesized that(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake by metastatic SLNs reflects invasive disease, or ECI. In this study, we evaluated the association of FDG uptake with ECI on SLNs and the possibility of FDG-positron-emission tomography (PET) assessment of axillary non-SLN metastases. We retrospectively investigated the cases of 156 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent SLN biopsy and FDG-PET preoperatively. Among 35 patients (22.4%) in whom the presence of SLN metastases was diagnosed, 10 cases (28.6%) had FDG uptake in the axillary lesion. The sensitivity, specificity, overall accuracy, and false-negative rates in the diagnosis of SLN status by FDG-PET were 28.6%, 99.2%, 83.3%, and 71.4%, respectively. The false-positive rate of FDG-PET evaluation was 0.8%. The 35 cases with lymph node metastases were divided into two groups based on the presence of FDG uptake in the axillary lesions. None of the clinicopathological features of the primary tumor were significantly associated with FDG uptake in the axillary lesion. The present analysis revealed that only tumor size of the metastatic lymph node was significantly associated with FDG uptake in the axillary lesion. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of presence of ECI and non-SLN metastasis. Among the 35 cases with SLN metastases, 13 cases (37.1%) had non-SLN metastasis. Only ECI was a predictor of non-SLN involvement. FDG uptake in the axilla was not associated with non-SLN metastasis in this study. In conclusion, FDG-PET evaluation of lymph nodes is not a sufficient indicator of ECI at SLN metastasis or non-SLN metastasis, suggesting that axillary lymph node dissection cannot be avoided. However, since the positive predictive value for SLN metastasis is high, positive FDG uptake in the axillary

  8. A new role of PET/CT for target delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning for head and neck carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zygogianni, Anna; Kyrgias, George; Kouvaris, John; Pistevou-Gompaki, Kyriaki; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose- positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) in head and neck cancer patients is useful for staging, identification of macroscopic disease, detection of invaded lymph nodes and distant metastases, delineation of radiotherapy target volume and assessment of treatment response. This brief review addresses the potential role of PET in radiotherapy planning as compared to MRI and CT scan. Positron emission tomography is considered by radiation oncologists a useful test for the identification of the specific target volume for treatment. In addition, a number of hypoxia-related PET radiopharmaceuticals such as the fluorine-18-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) and the fluorine-18-fluoroazomycin arabinoside ((18)F-FAZA) are now available in order to identify hypoxic tumor subvolumes helping to implement new radiotherapy techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the advantage to discriminate the soft tissue contrast from the tumor, against computerized tomography (CT), but PET/CT scans have the additional advantage to incorporate the metabolic imaging for improving the delineation of variable and hypoxic tumor tissue in the head and neck region. Regardless of the method used for determining the gross tumor volume, clinical examination remains irreplaceable. In conclusion, PET/CT offers complementary information for the delineation of the primary tumor and the corresponding lymph nodes compared to the use of MRI and CT and can support the use of modern radiotherapy techniques, having fewer toxicities.

  9. Metabolic Response on Post-therapy FDG-PET Predicts Patterns of Failure After Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of failure in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy and evaluated for metabolic response with early posttherapy {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Methods and Materials: The records of 238 patients with cervical cancer were reviewed. All patients were treated with a combination of external radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. Two hundred and nineteen patients (92%) received concurrent chemotherapy. All patients underwent pretreatment FDG-PET, and posttherapy FDG-PET was performed within 8-16 weeks of the completion of radiotherapy. Posttherapy FDG-PET results were categorized as complete metabolic response (CMR), partial metabolic response (PMR), and progressive disease (PD). Failure patterns were categorized as none, isolated local failure (central pelvis {+-} pelvic lymph nodes), distant failure, or combined local plus distant failure. Results: Of the 91 patients (38%) who had a recurrence, 22 had isolated local failures, and 69 had distant failures (49 distant failures and 20 combined local plus distant failures). Of the 173 patients with a CMR, 40 (23%) experienced treatment failure. All 25 patients with PD experienced treatment failure, which was distant in 24 patients (96%). Among the 40 patients with PMR, no failure has been observed for 14 patients (35%). Of the 26 failures within the PMR group, 15 (58%) were limited to the pelvis. Differences in the patterns of failure between the three groups (CMR, PMR, PD) were statistically significant (chi-square test; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The majority of failures after definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer include distant failures, even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. PMR within the cervix or lymph nodes is more commonly associated with isolated local recurrence.

  10. ImmunoPET helps predicting the efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates targeting TENB2 and STEAP1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Simon-Peter; Ogasawara, Annie; Tinianow, Jeff N.; Flores, Judith E.; Kan, David; Lau, Jeffrey; Go, MaryAnn; Vanderbilt, Alexander N.; Gill, Herman S.; Miao, Li; Goldsmith, Joshua; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Mao, Weiguang; Firestein, Ron; Yu, Shang-Fan; Marik, Jan; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G.T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) targeted to solid tumors depends on biological processes that are hard to monitor in vivo. 89Zr-immunoPET of the ADC antibodies could help understand the performance of ADCs in the clinic by confirming the necessary penetration, binding, and internalization. This work studied monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) ADCs against two targets in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, TENB2 and STEAP1, in four patient-derived tumor models (LuCaP35V, LuCaP70, LuCaP77, LuCaP96.1). Three aspects of ADC biology were measured and compared: efficacy was measured in tumor growth inhibition studies; target expression was measured by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry; and tumor antibody uptake was measured with 111In-mAbs and gamma counting or with 89Zr-immunoPET. Within each model, the mAb with the highest tumor uptake showed the greatest potency as an ADC. Sensitivity between models varied, with the LuCaP77 model showing weak efficacy despite high target expression and high antibody uptake. Ex vivo analysis confirmed the in vivo results, showing a correlation between expression, uptake and ADC efficacy. We conclude that 89Zr-immunoPET data can demonstrate which ADC candidates achieve the penetration, binding, and internalization necessary for efficacy in tumors sensitive to the toxic payload. PMID:27029064

  11. The preclinical study of predicting radiosensitivity in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenografts by 18F-ML-10 animal- PET/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyang; Zheng, Yujia; Wang, Mingwei; Gu, Bingxin; Zhang, Jianping; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Yingjian

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that the radiosensitivity is associated with apoptosis. Hereby, we aimed to investigate the value of 18F-ML-10 PET/CT, which selectively targeted cells undergoing apoptosis, in predicting radiosensitivity of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) xenografts. We used CNE1 (highly differentiated) and CNE2 (poorly differentiated) NPC cell lines to construct tumor models, which had very different radiosensitivities. After irradiation, the volumes of CNE2 tumors decreased significantly while those of CNE1 tumors increased. In 18F-ML-10 imaging, the values of tumor/muscle (T/M) between CNE1 and CNE2 mice were statistically different at both 24 h and 48 h after irradiation. Besides, ΔT/M1-0 and ΔT/M2-0 of CNE2 mice were higher than those of CNE1 mice, demonstrating obvious discrepancy. Furthermore, we observed obvious changes of radioactive distribution in CNE2 group. On the contrary, T/M of 18F-FDG in irradiation group revealed no obvious change in both CNE1 and CNE2 groups. In conclusion, 18F-ML-10 animal PET/CT showed its potential to predict radiosensitivity in NPC. PMID:26942701

  12. Metabolic Tumour Burden Measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT Predicts Malignant Transformation in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type-1

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Zehou, Ouidad; Djelbani-Ahmed, Soraya; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Ortonne, Nicolas; Brugières, Pierre; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Sbidian, Emilie; Itti, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic performances of 18F-FDG PET/CT measures of metabolic tumour burden in patients with neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1), suspect of malignant transformation. Methods This retrospective study included 49 patients (15–60 years old, 30 women) with a diagnosis of NF1, followed in our Reference Centre for Rare Neuromuscular Diseases, who presented clinical signs of tumour progression (pain, neurological deficit, tumour growth). Quantitative metabolic parameters were measured on 149 tumoral targets, using semi-automatic software and the best cut off values to predict transformation was assessed by Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis. Prognostic value of PET/CT metabolic parameters was assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival. Results Lesions were histologically documented in 40 patients: a sarcomatous transformation was found in 16, a dysplastic neurofibroma (NF) in 7, and a benign NF in 17; in the remaining 9 patients, a minimal follow-up of 12 mo (median 59 mo) confirmed the absence of transformation. The optimal cut off values for detection of malignant transformation were, in decreasing order of area under the ROC curves, a tumour-to-liver (T/L) ratio >2.5, SUVmax > 4.5, total lesion glycolysis (TLG) > 377, total metabolic tumour volume (TMTV) > 88 cm3, and heterogeneity index (HIsuv) > 1.69. The best prognostic marker was the TLG: the 4-y estimates of survival were 97% [95% CI, 90% - 100%] in patients with TLG ≤ 377 vs. 27% [95% CI, 5% - 49%] in patients with TLG > 377 (P < 0.0001; χ2 27.85; hazard ratio 13.27 [95% CI, 3.72–47.35]). T/L ratio, SUVmax and TMTV demonstrated slightly lower performance to predict survival, with χ2 ranging 14.41–19.12. The HIsuv index was not predictive of survival. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that TLG and TMTV, as PET/CT measures of metabolic tumour burden, may be used clinically to identify sarcomatous transformation in patients with NF1 and

  13. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGES

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; Eckardt, Jeffrey J.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.; Dry, Sarah M.; Phelps, Michael E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  16. Prediction of Large Joint Destruction in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Using 18F-FDG PET/CT and Disease Activity Score.

    PubMed

    Suto, Takahito; Okamura, Koichi; Yonemoto, Yukio; Okura, Chisa; Tsushima, Yoshito; Takagishi, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The assessments of joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are mainly restricted to small joints in the hands and feet. However, the development of arthritis in RA patients often involves the large joints, such as the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle. Few studies have been reported regarding the degree of large joint destruction in RA patients. F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) visualizes the disease activity in large joints affected by RA. In this study, the associations between destruction of the large joints and the findings of FDG-PET/CT as well as laboratory parameters were investigated, and factors associated with large joint destruction after the administration of biological therapy were identified in RA patients. A total of 264 large joints in 23 RA patients (6 men and 17 women; mean age of 66.9 ± 7.9 years) were assessed in this study. FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of biological therapy. The extent of FDG uptake in large joints (shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle) was analyzed using the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Radiographs of the 12 large joints per patient obtained at baseline and after 2 years were assessed according to Larsen's method. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors most significantly contributing to the progression of joint destruction within 2 years. Radiographic progression of joint destruction was detected in 33 joints. The SUVmax at baseline and 6 months, and the disease activity score (DAS) 28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at 6, 12, and 24 months were significantly higher in the group with progressive joint destruction. The SUVmax at baseline and DAS28-ESR at 6 months were found to be factors associated with joint destruction at 2 years (P < 0.05). The FDG uptake in the joints with destruction was higher than that observed in the joints

  17. Prediction of Large Joint Destruction in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Using 18F-FDG PET/CT and Disease Activity Score

    PubMed Central

    Suto, Takahito; Okamura, Koichi; Yonemoto, Yukio; Okura, Chisa; Tsushima, Yoshito; Takagishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The assessments of joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are mainly restricted to small joints in the hands and feet. However, the development of arthritis in RA patients often involves the large joints, such as the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle. Few studies have been reported regarding the degree of large joint destruction in RA patients. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) visualizes the disease activity in large joints affected by RA. In this study, the associations between destruction of the large joints and the findings of FDG-PET/CT as well as laboratory parameters were investigated, and factors associated with large joint destruction after the administration of biological therapy were identified in RA patients. A total of 264 large joints in 23 RA patients (6 men and 17 women; mean age of 66.9 ± 7.9 years) were assessed in this study. FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of biological therapy. The extent of FDG uptake in large joints (shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle) was analyzed using the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Radiographs of the 12 large joints per patient obtained at baseline and after 2 years were assessed according to Larsen's method. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors most significantly contributing to the progression of joint destruction within 2 years. Radiographic progression of joint destruction was detected in 33 joints. The SUVmax at baseline and 6 months, and the disease activity score (DAS) 28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at 6, 12, and 24 months were significantly higher in the group with progressive joint destruction. The SUVmax at baseline and DAS28-ESR at 6 months were found to be factors associated with joint destruction at 2 years (P < 0.05). The FDG uptake in the joints with destruction was higher than that observed in the

  18. SU-E-J-258: Prediction of Cervical Cancer Treatment Response Using Radiomics Features Based On F18-FDG Uptake in PET Images

    SciTech Connect

    Altazi, B; Fernandez, D; Zhang, G; Biagioli, M; Moros, E; Moffitt, H. Lee

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiomics have shown potential for predicting treatment outcomes in several body sites. This study investigated the correlation between PET Radiomics features and treatment response of cervical cancer outcomes. Methods: our dataset consisted of a cohort of 79 patients diagnosed with cervical cancer, FIGO stage IB-IVA, age range 25–86 years, (median age at diagnosis: 50 years) all treated between: 2009–14 with external beam radiation therapy to a dose range between: 45–50.4 Gy (median= 45 Gy), concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and MRI-based brachytherapy to a dose of 20–30 Gy (median= 28 Gy). Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) in patient’s primary site was delineated on pretreatment PET/CT by two board certified Radiation Oncologists. The features extracted from each patient’s volume were: 26 Co-occurrence matrix (COM) Feature, 11 Run-Length Matrix (RLM), 11 Gray Level Size Zone Matrix (GLSZM) and 33 Intensity-based features (IBF). The treatment outcome was divided based on the last follow up status into three classes: No Evidence of Disease (NED), Alive with Disease (AWD) and Dead of Disease (DOD). The ability for the radiomics features to differentiate between the 3 treatments outcome categories were assessed by One-Way ANOVA test with p-value < 0.05 was to be statistically significant. The results from the analysis were compared with the ones obtained previously for standard Uptake Value (SUV). Results: Based on patients last clinical follow-up; 52 showed NED, 17 AWD and 10 DOD. Radiomics Features were able to classify the patients based on their treatment response. A parallel analysis was done for SUV measurements for comparison. Conclusion: Radiomics features were able to differentiate between the three different classes of treatment outcomes. However, most of the features were only able to differentiate between NED and DOD class. Also, The ability or radiomics features to differentiate types of response were more significant than SUV.

  19. High total metabolic tumor volume in PET/CT predicts worse prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients with bone marrow involvement in rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Song, Moo-Kon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Lim, Sung-Nam; Shin, Seunghyeon; Pak, Kyoung June; Kwon, Seong Young; Shim, Hye Kyung; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, In-Suk; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Geun; Oh, So-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow involvement (BMI) in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was naively regarded as an adverse clinical factor. However, it has been unknown which factor would separate clinical outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. Recently, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was suggested to predict prognosis in several lymphoma types. Therefore, we investigated whether MTV would separate the outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. MTV on PET/CT was defined as an initial tumor burden as target lesion ≥ standard uptake value, 2.5 in 107 patients with BMI. Intramedullary (IM) MTV was defined as extent of BMI and total MTV was as whole tumor burden. 260.5 cm(3) and 601.2 cm(3) were ideal cut-off values for dividing high and low MTV status in the IM and total lymphoma lesions in Receiver Operating Curve analysis. High risk NCCN-IPI (p<0.001, p<0.001), bulky disease (p=0.011, p=0.005), concordant subtype (p=0.025, p=0.029), high IM MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), high total MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), and ≥ 2CAs in BM (p=0.037, p=0.033) were significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) than other groups. In multivariate analysis, high risk NCCN-IPI (PFS, p=0.006; OS, p=0.013), concordant subtype (PFS, p=0.005; OS, p=0.007), and high total MTV status (PFS, p<0.001; OS, p<0.001) had independent clinical impacts. MTV had prognostic significances for survivals in DLBCL with BMI. PMID:26851438

  20. Influence of Software Tool and Methodological Aspects of Total Metabolic Tumor Volume Calculation on Baseline [18F]FDG PET to Predict Survival in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kanoun, Salim; Tal, Ilan; Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Rossi, Cédric; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Legrand, Louis; Humbert, Olivier; Casasnovas, Olivier; Brunotte, François; Cochet, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the respective influence of software tool and total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV0) calculation method on prognostic stratification of baseline 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) in newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods 59 patients with newly diagnosed HL were retrospectively included. [18F]FDG-PET was performed before any treatment. Four sets of TMTV0 were calculated with Beth Israel (BI) software: based on an absolute threshold selecting voxel with standardized uptake value (SUV) >2.5 (TMTV02.5), applying a per-lesion threshold of 41% of the SUVmax (TMTV041) and using a per-patient adapted threshold based on SUVmax of the liver (>125% and >140% of SUVmax of the liver background; TMTV0125 and TMTV0140). TMTV041 was also determined with commercial software for comparison of software tools. ROC curves were used to determine the optimal threshold for each TMTV0 to predict treatment failure. Results Median follow-up was 39 months. There was an excellent correlation between TMTV041 determined with BI and with the commercial software (r = 0.96, p<0.0001). The median TMTV0 value for TMTV041, TMTV02.5, TMTV0125 and TMTV0140 were respectively 160 (used as reference), 210 ([28;154] p = 0.005), 183 ([-4;114] p = 0.06) and 143ml ([-58;64] p = 0.9). The respective optimal TMTV0 threshold and area under curve (AUC) for prediction of progression free survival (PFS) were respectively: 313ml and 0.70, 432ml and 0.68, 450ml and 0.68, 330ml and 0.68. There was no significant difference between ROC curves. High TMTV0 value was predictive of poor PFS in all methodologies: 4-years PFS was 83% vs 42% (p = 0.006) for TMTV02.5, 83% vs 41% (p = 0.003) for TMTV041, 85% vs 40% (p<0.001) for TMTV0125 and 83% vs 42% (p = 0.004) for TMTV0140. Conclusion In newly diagnosed HL, baseline metabolic tumor volume values were significantly influenced by the choice of the method used for determination of volume. However, no significant

  1. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the assessment of pulmonary solitary nodules: comparison of different analysis methods and risk variables in the prediction of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    García Vicente, Ana María; Honguero Martínez, Antonio Francisco; Jiménez Londoño, Germán Andrés; Vega Caicedo, Carlos Hugo; León Atance, Pablo; Soriano Castrejón, Ángel María

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of different metabolical, morphological and clinical criteria for correct presurgical classification of the solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). Methods Fifty-five patients, with SPN were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent preoperative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Maximum diameter in CT, maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax), histopathologic result, age, smoking history and gender were obtained. Different criteria were established to classify a SPN as malignant: (I) visually detectable metabolism, (II) SUVmax >2.5 regardless of SPN diameter, (III) SUVmax threshold depending of SPN diameter, and (IV) ratio SUVmax/diameter greater than 1. For each criterion, statistical diagnostic parameters were obtained. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to select the best diagnostic SUVmax and SUVmax/diameter cutoff. Additionally, a predictive model of malignancy of the SPN was derived by multivariate logistic regression. Results Fifteen SPN (27.3%) were benign and 40 (72.7%) malignant. The mean values ± standard deviation (SD) of SPN diameter and SUVmax were 1.93±0.57 cm and 3.93±2.67 respectively. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of the different diagnostic criteria were (I): 97.5% and 13.1%; (II) 67.5% and 53.3%; (III) 70% and 53.3%; and (IV) 85% and 33.3%, respectively. The SUVmax cut-off value with the best diagnostic performance was 1.95 (Se: 80%; Sp: 53.3%). The predictive model had a Se of 87.5% and Sp of 46.7%. The SUVmax was independent variables to predict malignancy. Conclusions The assessment by semiquantitative methods did not improve the Se of visual analysis. The limited Sp was independent on the method used. However, the predictive model combining SUVmax and age was the best diagnostic approach. PMID:26207210

  2. Joint PET-MR respiratory motion models for clinical PET motion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F.; Wan, Simon; McClelland, Jamie; Barnes, Anna; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Atkinson, David

    2016-09-01

    Patient motion due to respiration can lead to artefacts and blurring in positron emission tomography (PET) images, in addition to quantification errors. The integration of PET with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in PET-MR scanners provides complementary clinical information, and allows the use of high spatial resolution and high contrast MR images to monitor and correct motion-corrupted PET data. In this paper we build on previous work to form a methodology for respiratory motion correction of PET data, and show it can improve PET image quality whilst having minimal impact on clinical PET-MR protocols. We introduce a joint PET-MR motion model, using only 1 min per PET bed position of simultaneously acquired PET and MR data to provide a respiratory motion correspondence model that captures inter-cycle and intra-cycle breathing variations. In the model setup, 2D multi-slice MR provides the dynamic imaging component, and PET data, via low spatial resolution framing and principal component analysis, provides the model surrogate. We evaluate different motion models (1D and 2D linear, and 1D and 2D polynomial) by computing model-fit and model-prediction errors on dynamic MR images on a data set of 45 patients. Finally we apply the motion model methodology to 5 clinical PET-MR oncology patient datasets. Qualitative PET reconstruction improvements and artefact reduction are assessed with visual analysis, and quantitative improvements are calculated using standardised uptake value (SUVpeak and SUVmax) changes in avid lesions. We demonstrate the capability of a joint PET-MR motion model to predict respiratory motion by showing significantly improved image quality of PET data acquired before the motion model data. The method can be used to incorporate motion into the reconstruction of any length of PET acquisition, with only 1 min of extra scan time, and with no external hardware required.

  3. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy may predict response in HER2-negative, but not in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Miao; Bao, Xiao; Zhang, Yingjian; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Daoying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer, and to investigate whether timing of the scan and trastuzumab treatment influence the accuracy of pCR prediction in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer patients. We treated 81 locally advanced breast cancer patients with four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). HER2-negative breast cancer patients received NAC alone, while HER2-positive breast cancer patients received NAC plus trastuzumab. 18FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled at baseline and after the second cycle of NAC. Axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection was performed after the last cycle of neoadjuvant therapy. Relative changes in standardized uptake values (SUV) between the two PET/CT scans (ΔSUV) in primary tumors and ALN metastases were calculated. There were 75 patients with 150 PET/CT scans in the final analysis, including 41 HER2-negative and 34 HER2-positive cases. In the HER2-negative group, the ΔSUV predicted overall and ALN pCR; the receiver operating characteristics-areas under curve (ROC-AUC) were 0.87 and 0.80 (P = 0.0014 and 0.031, respectively) and the negative predictive values were 94% and 89% respectively. However, in the HER2-positive group, ΔSUV could predict neither overall nor ALN pCR; the ROC-AUCs were only 0.56 and 0.53, with P = 0.53 and 0.84, respectively. Hence, the ΔSUV after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy could predict pCR in HER2-negative patients treated with NAC alone, but not in HER2-positive patients treated with NAC plus trastuzumab. PMID:26336821

  4. Exploring the nature of atheroma and cardiovascular inflammation in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become widely established in oncology. Subsequently, a whole new “toolbox” of tracers have become available to look at different aspects of cancer cell function and dysfunction, including cell protein production, DNA synthesis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. In the past 5 years, these tools have been used increasingly to look at the other great killer of the developed world: cardiovascular disease. For example, inflammation of the unstable plaque can be imaged with 18-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), and this uptake can be quantified to show the effect that statins have in reducing inflammation and explains how these drugs can reduce the risk of stroke. 18F-FDG has also become established in diagnosing and monitoring large-vessel vasculitis and has now entered routine practice. Other agents such as gallium-68 (68Ga) octreotide have been shown to identify vascular inflammation possibly more specifically than 18F-FDG. Hypoxia within the plaque can be imaged with 18F-fluoromisonidazole and resulting angiogenesis with 18F-RGD peptides. Active calcification such as that found in unstable atheromatous plaques can be imaged with 18F-NaF. PET imaging enables us to understand the mechanisms by which cardiovascular disease, including atheroma, leads to morbidity and death and thus increases the chance of finding new and effective treatments. PMID:26110339

  5. Evaluation of the anti-HER2 C6.5 diabody as a PET radiotracer to monitor HER2 status and predict response to trastuzumab treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Smitha; Shaller, Calvin C.; Doss, Mohan; Shchaveleva, Irina; Marks, James D.; Yu, Jian Q.; Robinson, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The rapid tumor targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of engineered antibodies make them potentially suitable for use in imaging strategies to predict and monitor response to targeted therapies. This study aims to evaluate C6.5 diabody (C6.5db), a non-covalent anti-HER2 single chain-Fv dimer, as a radiotracer for predicting response to HER2-targeted therapies such as trastuzumab. Experimental Design Immunodeficient mice bearing established HER2-positive tumor xenografts were injected with radioiodinated C6.5db and imaged using PET/CT. Radiotracer biodistribution was quantified using biopsied tumor and normal tissues. Potential competition between trastuzumab and C6.5db was examined in vitro by flow cytometry and co-immunoprecipitations. Results Biodistribution analysis of mice bearing xenografts with varying HER2 density revealed that the tumor uptake of 125I-C6.5db correlates with HER2 tumor density. In vitro competition experiments suggest that the C6.5db targets an epitope on HER2 that is distinct from that bound by trastuzumab. Treatment of SK-OV-3-tumored mice with trastuzumab for 3 d caused a 42% (P=0.002) decrease in tumor uptake of 125I-C6.5db. This is consistent with a dramatic decrease in the tumor PET signal of 124I-C6.5db after trastuzumab treatment. Furthermore, BT-474-tumored mice showed a ∼60% decrease (P=0.0026) in C6.5db uptake after 6 d of trastuzumab treatment. Immunohistochemistry of excised xenograft sections and in vitro flow cytometry revealed that the decreased C6.5db uptake upon trastuzumab treatment is not associated with HER2 downregulation. Conclusions These studies suggest that 124I-C6.5db-based imaging can be used to evaluate HER2 levels as a predictor of respone to HER2-directed therapies. PMID:21177408

  6. Comparison of 18F-FES, 18F-FDG, and 18F-FMISO PET Imaging Probes for Early Prediction and Monitoring of Response to Endocrine Therapy in a Mouse Xenograft Model of ER-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, ZhongYi; Zhang, JianPing; Zhang, YongPing; Luo, JianMin; Zhang, YingJian

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need to characterize biological processes for early prediction and monitoring of response to endocrine therapy in breast cancer using multiple positron emission tomography (PET) imaging probes. However, use of more than two PET tracers in a single clinical trial is quite challenging. In this study we carried out a longitudinal investigation of 18F-FES, 18F-FDG, and 18F-FMISO PET imaging probes for early prediction and monitoring of response to endocrine therapy in a mouse xenograft model of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Method ER+ human breast cancer ZR-75-1 models were established in female mice that were then randomly assigned to a treatment (fulvestrant, 5.0 mg/week for 21 days) or vehicle group. Micro-PET/CT imaging with 18F-FES, 18F-FDG, and 18F-FMISO was performed on days 0, 3, 14, and 21 after treatment. The uptake value (percentage injected dose per gram, %ID/g) for each probe in tumor (T) tissue and contralateral muscle (M) was measured for quantitative analysis and T/M calculation. Tumor volume was measured to record tumor growth at each time point. Tumor tissues were sampled for immunohistochemical staining of ER expression. Correlations for tumor volume and ERα levels with uptake data for the probe were tested. Results Uptake data for 18F-FES in ZR-75-1 tumor tissues corresponded well with tumor response to endocrine therapy, but not for 18F-FDG and 18F-FMISO, according to longitudinal micro-PET/CT imaging and quantitative correlation analysis. There was a significant positive correlation between 18F-FES uptake and ER levels (%ID/gmax r2 = 0.76, P< 0.05; T/M r2 = 0.82, P<0.05). Notably, 18F-FES uptake on day 3 was significantly correlated with the day 21/baseline tumor volume ratio (%ID/gmax r2 = 0.74, P < 0.05; T/M r2 = 0.78, P < 0.05). Conclusions Comparison of 18F-FES, 18F-FDG, and 18F-FMISO probes revealed that 18F-FES PET/CT molecular imaging can provide a precise early prediction of tumor

  7. Pet Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  8. The Value of 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging Combined With Pretherapeutic Ki67 for Early Prediction of Pathologic Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jurui; Zhou, Zhirui; Yang, Zhaozhi; Chen, Xingxing; Cheng, Jinyi; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Xiaomao; Tuan, Jeffrey; Fu, Xiaolong; Yu, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the value of F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) and pretherapeutic Ki67 in predicting pathologic response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC).As a training set, total 301 LABC patients treated with NAC were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the potential predictive value of pretherapeutic Ki67 for pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC. Another 60 LABC patients were prospectively included as a validation set to evaluate the value of Ki67 combined PET/CT as pCR predictors. Ki67 was assessed in pretherapy core needle biopsy specimens and PET/CT scans were performed at baseline (before initiating NAC), after the 2nd, and 4th cycle of NAC. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and its changes relative to baseline (ΔSUVmax%) were used as parameters of PEC/CT.In the training set, Ki67 was a predictor of pCR to NAC, with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.624 (P = 0.003) in receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the validation set, Ki67 alone did not show significant value in predicting pCR in the validation set. ΔSUVmax% after then 2nd or 4th course are predictors of pCR to NAC with the AUC of 0.774 (P = 0.002) and 0.791 (P = 0.002), respectively. When combined with ΔSUVmax% after the 2nd and 4th course NAC, Ki67 increased the value of ΔSUVmax% in predicting pCR with the AUC of 0.824 (P = 0.001). Baseline SUVmax and after 2nd, 4th course NAC had no predictive value for pCR, but SUVmax after the 2nd and 4th course showed remarkable predictive value for nonpathologic response (Grade 1 in Miller-Payne Grading System) with the AUC of 0.898 (P = 0.0001) and 0.801 (P = 0.003).Both PET/CT and Ki67 can predict pCR to NAC in LABC patients in the early phases of treatment. PET/CT combined Ki67 is a better pCR predictor for response to NAC. This helps the physician to predict the probability of pCR, and facilitates the

  9. 18F-FDG PET/CT focal, but not osteolytic, lesions predict the progression of smoldering myeloma to active disease.

    PubMed

    Zamagni, E; Nanni, C; Gay, F; Pezzi, A; Patriarca, F; Bellò, M; Rambaldi, I; Tacchetti, P; Hillengass, J; Gamberi, B; Pantani, L; Magarotto, V; Versari, A; Offidani, M; Zannetti, B; Carobolante, F; Balma, M; Musto, P; Rensi, M; Mancuso, K; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A; Chauviè, S; Rocchi, S; Fard, N; Marzocchi, G; Storto, G; Ghedini, P; Palumbo, A; Fanti, S; Cavo, M

    2016-02-01

    Identification of patient sub-groups with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) at high risk of progression to active disease (MM) is an important goal. 18F-FDG PET/CT (positron emission tomography (PET) integrated with computed tomography (PET/CT) using glucose labelled with the positron-emitting radionuclide (18)F) allows for assessing early skeletal involvement. Identification of osteolytic lesions by this technique has recently been incorporated into the updated International Myeloma Working Group criteria for MM diagnosis. However, no data are available regarding the impact of focal lesions (FLs) without underlying osteolysis on time to progression (TTP) to MM. We hence prospectively studied a cohort of 120 SMM patients with PET/CT. PET/CT was positive in 16% of patients (1 FL: 8, 2 FLs: 3, >3 FLs: 6, diffuse bone marrow involvement: 2). With a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 38% of patients progressed to MM, in a median time of 4 years, including 21% with skeletal involvement. The risk of progression of those with positive PET/CT was 3.00 (95% confidence interval 1.58-5.69, P=0.001), with a median TTP of 1.1 versus 4.5 years for PET/CT-negative patients. The probability of progression within 2 years was 58% for positive versus 33% for negative patients. In conclusion, PET/CT positivity significantly increased the risk of progression of SMM to MM. PET/CT could become a new tool to define high-risk SMM. PMID:26490489

  10. FDG-PET imaging in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Valls, L; Badve, C; Avril, S; Herrmann, K; Faulhaber, P; O'Donnell, J; Avril, N

    2016-07-01

    The majority of aggressive lymphomas is characterized by an up regulated glycolytic activity, which enables the visualization by F-18 FDG-PET/CT. One-stop hybrid FDG-PET/CT combines the functional and morphologic information, outperforming both, CT and FDG-PET as separate imaging modalities. This has resulted in several recommendations using FDG-PET/CT for staging, restaging, monitoring during therapy, and assessment of treatment response as well as identification of malignant transformation. FDG-PET/CT may obviate the need for a bone marrow biopsy in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. FDG-PET/CT response assessment is recommended for FDG-avid lymphomas, whereas CT-based response evaluation remains important in lymphomas with low or variable FDG avidity. The treatment induced change in metabolic activity allows for assessment of response after completion of therapy as well as prediction of outcome early during therapy. The five-point scale Deauville Criteria allows the assessment of treatment response based on visual FDG-PET analysis. Although the use of FDG-PET/CT for prediction of therapeutic response is promising it should only be conducted in the context of clinical trials. Surveillance FDG-PET/CT after complete remission is discouraged due to the relative high number of false-positive findings, which in turn may result in further unnecessary investigations. Future directions include the use of new PET tracers such as F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT), a surrogate biomarker of cellular proliferation and Ga-68 CXCR4, a chemokine receptor imaging biomarker as well as innovative digital PET/CT and PET/MRI techniques. PMID:27090170

  11. Predicting induced activity in the Havar foils of the (18)F production targets of a PET cyclotron and derived radiological risk.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Serrano, J Javier; Diez de Los Rios, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    The PET cyclotron at the Centre of Molecular Imaging of the Universidad de Malaga (CIMES) is a 16.5 MeV GE PETtrace cyclotron working at dual beam (40 μA beam). The cyclotron is dedicated mainly to F production. The F target has two thin circular foils composed of a metal alloy (Havar), that are highly activated by the proton beam and secondary neutrons. The main purpose of this study is to assess induced activity radiological risk derived from the Havar foils activation. Induced activity in Havar foils was estimated by two procedures. One consisted in estimating neutron and proton fluxes with MCNPX and using them as inputs in the activation code ACAB. Alternatively, given the regular periodicity of the irradiation cycles, an analytical expression was derived to estimate activity concentrations of activation products using production rates calculated with MCNPX. Large differences were found in the induced foil activities predicted by the two procedures. Therefore, an irradiated vacuum foil was measured with a Ge detector to analyze activity levels. Cobalt-58 (Co) and Co activities calculated with ACAB match well with measurements. Cobalt-60 (Co) activity estimated with the alternative method agrees acceptably with the measured activity, and Co activity is slightly overestimated. Cobalt-57 (Co) is the activation product of concern in the long term. The vacuum and window foils will be exempted in 3.3 y and 5.5 y, respectively, after replacement. Calculated effective dose with MCNPX and ICRP reference HML phantoms in the foils replacement operation is 0.34 mSv, and annual effective dose would be 2.1 mSv, which is below the annual limits.

  12. TU-F-12A-03: Using 18F-FDG-PET-CT and Deformable Registration During Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) to Predict Treatment Response

    SciTech Connect

    Vergalasova, I; Mowery, Y; Yoo, D; Brizel, D; Das, S

    2014-06-15

    neither registration should be solely relied upon for nodal GTVs. Of the four SUV parameters found to be predictive of CR vs. ICR, SUV-MEAN was the strongest. Preliminary results show promise for using intra-treatment 18F-FDG-PET-CT with deformable registration to predict treatment response.

  13. Pet Bonding and Pet Bereavement among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied adolescent-pet bonding and bereavement following pet loss (n=55). Hypothesized that highly-bonded adolescents experience more intense grief when a pet dies than do those less bonded; degree of bonding is greater for girls than for boys; and intensity of bereavement is greater for girls than for boys. Results supported the hypotheses. (RB)

  14. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  15. Contribution of [64Cu]-ATSM PET in molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia compared to classical [18F]-MISO--a selected review.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Mickaël; Rajerison, Holisoa; Guerard, François; Mougin-Degraef, Marie; Barbet, Jacques; Michel, Nathalie; Cherel, Michel; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain

    2011-01-01

    During the carcinogenesis process, tumour cells often have a more rapid proliferation potential than cells that participate in blood capillary formation by neoangiogenesis. As a consequence of the poorly organized vasculature of various solid tumours, a limited oxygen delivery is observed. This hypoxic mechanism frequently occurs in solid cancers and can lead to therapeutic resistance. The present selected literature review is focused on the comparison of two positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals agents, which are currently leaders in tumour hypoxia imaging by PET. {18F}-fluoromisonidazole (=FMISO) is most commonly used as an investigational PET agent with an investigational new drug exemption from the FDA, while {64Cu}-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-ATSM) has been presented as an alternative radiopharmaceutical not yet readily available. The comparison of these two radiopharmaceutical agents is particularly focused on isotope properties, radiopharmaceutical labelling process, pharmacological mechanisms, dosimetry data in patients, and clinical results in terms of image contrast. PET imaging has demonstrated a good efficacy in tumour hypoxia imaging with both FMISO and Cu-ATSM, but FMISO has presented too slow an in vivo accumulation and a weak image contrast of the hypoxia area. Despite a less favourable dosimetry, 64Cu-ATSM appears superior in terms of imaging performance, calling for industrial and clinical development of this innovative radiopharmaceutical.

  16. TBCRC 008: Early Change in 18F-FDG Uptake on PET Predicts Response to Preoperative Systemic Therapy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Primary Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Roisin M.; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Xian C.; Jacobs, Lisa K.; Mhlanga, Joyce; Joo, H O; Carpenter, John; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Watkins, Stanley; Fetting, John H.; Miller, Robert S.; Sideras, Kostandinos; Jeter, Stacie C.; Walsh, Bridget; Powers, Penny; Zorzi, Jane; Boughey, Judy C.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Carey, Lisa A.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Khouri, Nagi; Gabrielson, Edward; Wahl, Richard L.; Stearns, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifiers, including the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat, may sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and enhance outcomes. We conducted a multicenter randomized phase II neo-adjuvant trial of carboplatin and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (CP) with vorinostat or placebo in women with stage II/III, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–negative breast cancer, in which we also examined whether change in maximum standardized uptake values corrected for lean body mass (SULmax) on 18F-FDG PET predicted pathologic complete response (pCR) in breast and axillary lymph nodes. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to 12 wk of preoperative carboplatin (area under the curve of 2, weekly) and nab-paclitaxel (100 mg/m2 weekly) with vorinostat (400 mg orally daily, days 1–3 of every 7-d period) or placebo. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET and research biopsy at baseline and on cycle 1 day 15. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate. Secondary objectives included correlation of change in tumor SULmax on 18F-FDG PET by cycle 1 day 15 with pCR and correlation of baseline and change in Ki-67 with pCR. Results In an intent-to-treat analysis (n = 62), overall pCR was 27.4% (vorinostat, 25.8%; placebo, 29.0%). In a pooled analysis (n = 59), we observed a significant difference in median change in SULmax 15 d after initiating preoperative therapy between those achieving pCR versus not (percentage reduction, 63.0% vs. 32.9%; P = 0.003). Patients with 50% or greater reduction in SULmax were more likely to achieve pCR, which remained statistically significant in multivariable analysis including estrogen receptor status (odds ratio, 5.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–22.7; P = 0.023). Differences in baseline and change in Ki-67 were not significantly different between those achieving pCR versus not. Conclusion Preoperative CP with vorinostat or placebo is associated with similar pCR rates. Early change in SULmax on 18F-FDG PET 15 d after the

  17. Imaging and PET-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Von Schulthess, Gustav K; Hany, Thomas F

    2008-03-01

    PET-CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes "hardware-fusion" to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. For this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several well-designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT.

  18. Trends in PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  19. PK-PD modeling of individual lesion FDG-PET response to predict overall survival in patients with sunitinib-treated gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Schindler, E; Amantea, M A; Karlsson, M O; Friberg, L E

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacometric models were developed to characterize the relationships between lesion-level tumor metabolic activity, as assessed by the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) obtained on [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), tumor size, and overall survival (OS) in 66 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) treated with intermittent sunitinib. An indirect response model in which sunitinib stimulates tumor loss best described the typically rapid decrease in SUVmax during on-treatment periods and the recovery during off-treatment periods. Substantial interindividual and interlesion variability were identified in SUVmax baseline and drug sensitivity. A parametric time-to-event model identified the relative change in SUVmax at one week for the lesion with the most pronounced response as a better predictor of OS than tumor size. Based on the proposed modeling framework, early changes in FDG-PET response may serve as predictor for long-term outcome in sunitinib-treated GIST. PMID:27299707

  20. Microglia activation in multiple sclerosis black holes predicts outcome in progressive patients: an in vivo [(11)C](R)-PK11195-PET pilot study.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Paolo; Politis, Marios; Su, Paul; Turkheimer, Federico; Malik, Omar; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Wu, Kit; Reynolds, Richard; Nicholas, Richard; Piccini, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The pathophysiological correlates and the contribution to persisting disability of hypointense T1-weighted MRI lesions, black holes (BH), in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still unclear. In order to study the in vivo functional correlates of this MRI finding, we used 11C-PK11195 PET (PK-PET) to investigate changes in microglial activity. Ten relapsing and 9 progressive MS subjects had a PK-PET scan and a MRI scan alongside a full clinical assessment, including the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) for evaluation of disability. We studied the PK binding potential of the specifically bound radioligand relative to the non-displaceable radioligand in tissue (BPND) in T1 BHs. Out of a total of 1242 BHs identified, 947 were PK enhancing. The PKBPND was correlated with the EDSS (r=0.818; p<0.05) only in the progressive group. In the relapsing patients there was an inverse correlation between PKBPND and BH total lesion volume in whole brain (r=-0.781; p<0.05). When progressive patients were grouped according to the disability outcome at 2years from the PK-PET scan, the total PKBPND in BHs was found to be a significant outcome predictor of disability (p<0.01). Our findings show that relapsing and progressive patients have heterogeneous patterns of PKBPND in T1 BHs and indicate that BHs are not just "holes" representing loss of axons and myelin, but display inflammatory activity in the form of activated microglia. The significant association between PKBPND, neurological impairment and outcome in progressive subjects supports a role for activated microglia in disability progression.

  1. Birds Kept as Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... restricts the importation of pet birds from certain countries and enforces a 30-day quarantine for all imported birds except those that come from Canada. People interested in importing pet birds should visit the USDA non-US Origin Pet Bird Importation website . Choosing a bird Match ...

  2. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  3. Clinical Utility and Future Applications of PET/CT and PET/CMR in Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jonathan A.; Salerno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, there have been major advances in cardiovascular positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with either computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). These multi-modality approaches have significant potential to leverage the strengths of each modality to improve the characterization of a variety of cardiovascular diseases and to predict clinical outcomes. This review will discuss current developments and potential future uses of PET/CT and PET/CMR for cardiovascular applications, which promise to add significant incremental benefits to the data provided by each modality alone. PMID:27598207

  4. Clinical Utility and Future Applications of PET/CT and PET/CMR in Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jonathan A; Salerno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, there have been major advances in cardiovascular positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with either computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). These multi-modality approaches have significant potential to leverage the strengths of each modality to improve the characterization of a variety of cardiovascular diseases and to predict clinical outcomes. This review will discuss current developments and potential future uses of PET/CT and PET/CMR for cardiovascular applications, which promise to add significant incremental benefits to the data provided by each modality alone. PMID:27598207

  5. Laboratory and cyclotron requirements for PET research

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes four types of PET facilities: Clinical PET with no radionuclide production; clinical PET with a small accelerator; clinical PET with research support; and research PET facilities. General facility considerations are also discussed.

  6. Respiration-Averaged CT for Attenuation Correction of PET Images – Impact on PET Texture Features in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Tsan, Din-Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared attenuation correction of PET images with helical CT (PET/HCT) and respiration-averaged CT (PET/ACT) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with the goal of investigating the impact of respiration-averaged CT on 18F FDG PET texture parameters. Materials and Methods A total of 56 patients were enrolled. Tumors were segmented on pretreatment PET images using the adaptive threshold. Twelve different texture parameters were computed: standard uptake value (SUV) entropy, uniformity, entropy, dissimilarity, homogeneity, coarseness, busyness, contrast, complexity, grey-level nonuniformity, zone-size nonuniformity, and high grey-level large zone emphasis. Comparisons of PET/HCT and PET/ACT were performed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves as well as univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to identify the parameters significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS). A fixed threshold at 45% of the maximum SUV (T45) was used for validation. Results SUV maximum and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were significantly higher in PET/ACT. However, texture parameters obtained with PET/ACT and PET/HCT showed a high degree of agreement. The lowest levels of variation between the two modalities were observed for SUV entropy (9.7%) and entropy (9.8%). SUV entropy, entropy, and coarseness from both PET/ACT and PET/HCT were significantly associated with DSS. Validation analyses using T45 confirmed the usefulness of SUV entropy and entropy in both PET/HCT and PET/ACT for the prediction of DSS, but only coarseness from PET/ACT achieved the statistical significance threshold. Conclusions Our results indicate that 1) texture parameters from PET/ACT are clinically useful in the prediction of survival in NSCLC patients and 2) SUV entropy and entropy are robust to attenuation correction methods. PMID:26930211

  7. Profits from precious pets.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, E

    2000-06-01

    In 1998, an anonymous millionaire, hoping to clone his pet dog Missy, awarded a Texas A&M University animal scientist $2.3 million to develop the necessary techniques. Now several companies are cashing in on the boom in frozen-tissue storage of pets for future cloning.

  8. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  9. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  10. A Comparison of the Imaging Characteristics and Microregional Distribution of 4 Hypoxia PET Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Sean; Zhang, Hanwen; Reese, Megan; Ramos, Nicholas N.; Chen, Qing; Ricketts, Sally-Ann

    2014-01-01

    We compared the imaging characteristics and hypoxia selectivity of 4 hypoxia PET radiotracers (18F-fluoromisonidazole [18F-FMISO], 18F-flortanidazole [18F-HX4], 18F-fluoroazomycin arabinoside [18F-FAZA], and 64Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylsemicarbazone) [64Cu-ATSM]) in a single murine xenograft tumor model condition using small-animal PET imaging and combined ex vivo autoradiography and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Methods Nude mice bearing SQ20b xenograft tumors were administered 1 of 4 hypoxia PET tracers and images acquired 80–90 min after injection. Frozen sections from excised tumors were then evaluated for tracer distribution using digital autoradiography and compared with histologic markers of tumor hypoxia (pimonidazole, carbonic anydrase 9 [CA9]) and vascular perfusion (Hoechst 33342). Results The highest tumor uptake was observed with 64Cu-ATSM (maximum standardized uptake values [SUVmax], 1.26 ± 0.13) and the lowest with 18F-FAZA (SUVmax, 0.41 ± 0.24). 18F-FMISO and 18F-HX4 had similar intermediate tumor uptake (SUVmax, 0.76 ± 0.38 and 0.65 ± 0.19, respectively). Digital autoradiographs of hypoxia tracer distribution were compared pixel by pixel with images of immunohistochemistry stains. The fluorinated nitroimidazoles all showed radiotracer uptake increasing with pimonidazole and CA9 staining. 64Cu-ATSM showed the opposite pattern, with highest radiotracer uptake observed in regions with the lowest pimonidazole and CA9 staining. Conclusion The fluorinated nitroimidazoles showed similar tumor distributions when compared with immunohistochemistry markers of hypoxia. Variations in tumor standardized uptake value and normal tissue distribution may determine the most appropriate clinical setting for each tracer. 64Cu-ATSM showed the highest tumor accumulation and little renal clearance. However, the lack of correlation between 64Cu-ATSM distribution and immunohistochemistry hypoxia markers casts some doubt on the hypoxia selectivity of 64Cu

  11. SU-C-204-01: A Fast Analytical Approach for Prompt Gamma and PET Predictions in a TPS for Proton Range Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Kroniger, K; Herzog, M; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Traneus, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We describe and demonstrate a fast analytical tool for prompt-gamma emission prediction based on filter functions applied on the depth dose profile. We present the implementation in a treatment planning system (TPS) of the same algorithm for positron emitter distributions. Methods: The prediction of the desired observable is based on the convolution of filter functions with the depth dose profile. For both prompt-gammas and positron emitters, the results of Monte Carlo simulations (MC) are compared with those of the analytical tool. For prompt-gamma emission from inelastic proton-induced reactions, homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms alongside with patient data are used as irradiation targets of mono-energetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of the tool is assessed in terms of the shape of the analytically calculated depth profiles and their absolute yields, compared to MC. For the positron emitters, the method is implemented in a research RayStation TPS and compared to MC predictions. Digital phantoms and patient data are used and positron emitter spatial density distributions are analyzed. Results: Calculated prompt-gamma profiles agree with MC within 3 % in terms of absolute yield and reproduce the correct shape. Based on an arbitrary reference material and by means of 6 filter functions (one per chemical element), profiles in any other material composed of those elements can be predicted. The TPS implemented algorithm is accurate enough to enable, via the analytically calculated positron emitters profiles, detection of range differences between the TPS and MC with errors of the order of 1–2 mm. Conclusion: The proposed analytical method predicts prompt-gamma and positron emitter profiles which generally agree with the distributions obtained by a full MC. The implementation of the tool in a TPS shows that reliable profiles can be obtained directly from the dose calculated by the TPS, without the need of full MC simulation.

  12. PET tracer development—a tale of mice and men

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Rodney J; Dorow, Donna; Roselt, Peter

    2006-01-01

    PET scanning is an emerging technology for the clinical evaluation of many disease processes in man. The vast majority of clinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies are performed using a single tracer, fluorodeoxyglucose. Despite the excellent diagnostic performance of this tracer, it has recognised limitations. New tracers offer the potential to both address these limitations, and to establish new applications for PET. Small animal PET is a logical technique for validating new tracers relevant to human diseases. However, interspecies differences in the handling of chemicals may significantly influence the handling of novel tracers. This requires caution in extrapolating findings in animals to expectations of performance in man. Already there are several examples where biodistribution studies in mice would not have predicted the clinical utility of existing PET tracers. Nevertheless, application of a systematic approach to tracer development is likely to speed transition of new tracers from animals into man. PMID:17114061

  13. Healthy Pets and People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnant women should avoid adopting or handling stray cats, especially kittens. They particularly should not clean litter ... may be sick. Many pets, such as dogs, cats, reptiles, rodents, and birds, carry germs that can ...

  14. Pets and Parasites

    MedlinePlus

    ... make me sick? Household pets such as dogs, cats, birds and reptiles can carry diseases or parasites ... might be used as litter boxes by neighborhood cats. Keep your children out of the dirt in ...

  15. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... large tunnel-shaped scanner. Electrodes for an electrocardiogram ( ECG ) will be placed on your chest. The PET ... often used when other tests, such as echocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac stress tests do not provide enough ...

  16. Household Hazards to Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... health by becoming aware of the most common health hazards found in many pet-owning households. Hazards in the Kitchen Foods Many foods are perfectly safe for humans, but could be harmful or potentially deadly to ...

  17. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  18. PET studies in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  19. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  20. Interim fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET-computed tomography and cell of origin by immunohistochemistry predicts progression-free and overall survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients in the rituximab era

    PubMed Central

    Hallack Neto, Abrahão; Siqueira, Sheila; Lage, Luis Alberto de Padua Covas; de Paula, Henrique M.; Coutinho, Arthur M.; Pereira, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic value of the interim PET (iPET)-computed tomography (CT) (iPET-CT) after two cycles of immunochemotherapy with the R-CHOP protocol in patients with diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with a curative intent in combination with the neoplastic cell origin defined by Hans’s immunohistochemstry algorithm followed in a reference center for cancer treatment in Brazil. Materials and methods We prospectively evaluated 147 DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP-21 to assess the value of the International Prognostic Index, iPET-CT, and cell of origin by immunohistochemistry as prognostic markers in the rituximab era. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT was performed after two cycles (iPET-CT) and at the end of treatment in 111 patients. Lymphoma cases were categorized into germinal center (GC) and nongerminal center subtypes by immunohistochemistry according to Hans’s algorithm. Results The median age of GC-DLBCL patients (52.7 years) was lower than that of nongerminal center-DLBCL patients (59.4 years) (P=0.021); in addition, it was lower in patients with negative iPET-CT findings (52.7 years) versus positive findings (59.4 years) (P=0.031). The overall survival at 48 months was 100% for iPET-CT-negative GC-DLBCL patients and 61.2% for iPET-CT-positive GC-DLBCL patients (P=0.002). Progression-free survival at 30 months was 100% for iPET-CT-negative GC-DLBCL patients and 60.3% for iPET-CT-positive GC-DLBCL patients (P=0.001). Conclusion We conclude that iPET-CT associated with cell origin identified a very good prognostic group in DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. Video Abstract: http://links.lww.com/NMC/A59 PMID:27281359

  1. PET/MR Imaging in Vascular Disease: Atherosclerosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    For imaging of atherosclerotic disease, lumenography using computed tomography, ultrasonography, or invasive angiography is still the backbone of evaluation. However, these methods are less effective to predict the likelihood of future thromboembolic events caused by vulnerability of plaques. PET and MR imaging have been used separately with success for plaque characterization. Where MR imaging has the ability to reveal plaque composition, PET has the ability to visualize plaque activity. Together this leads to a comprehensive evaluation of plaque vulnerability. In this review, the authors go through data and arguments that support increased use of PET/MR imaging in atherosclerotic imaging. PMID:27593251

  2. Pet Loss: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkin, Bruce S.; Bahrick, Audrey S.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to increase awareness of counselors about topic of pet loss. Discusses how counselors can be actively involved through practice, consultation, and research to help people deal with emotional impact of pet loss. (Author/NB)

  3. The ADNI PET Core: 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Landau, Susan M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Foster, Norman L.; Wang, Angela Y.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This paper reviews the work done in the ADNI PET core over the past 5 years, largely concerning techniques, methods, and results related to amyloid imaging in ADNI. METHODS The PET Core has utilized [18F]florbetapir routinely on ADNI participants, with over 1600 scans available for download. Four different laboratories are involved in data analysis, and have examined factors such as longitudinal florbetapir analysis, use of FDG-PET in clinical trials, and relationships between different biomarkers and cognition. RESULTS Converging evidence from the PET Core has indicated that cross-sectional and longitudinal florbetapir analyses require different reference regions. Studies have also examined the relationship between florbetapir data obtained immediately after injection, which reflects perfusion, and FDG-PET results. Finally, standardization has included the translation of florbetapir PET data to a centiloid scale. CONCLUSION The PET Core has demonstrated a variety of methods for standardization of biomarkers such as florbetapir PET in a multicenter setting. PMID:26194311

  4. An Educational PET Camera Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Tegner, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are now in widespread use in hospitals. A model of a PET camera has been installed in Stockholm House of Science and is used to explain the principles of PET to school pupils as described here.

  5. Pets and the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on pets and the elderly. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  6. Childhood pet ownership, attachment to pets, and subsequent meat avoidance. The mediating role of empathy toward animals.

    PubMed

    Rothgerber, Hank; Mican, Frances

    2014-08-01

    Researchers studying childhood pet ownership outcomes do not typically focus on measures of adult diet, and those studying the psychology of meat consumption do not normally consider early experiences with companion animals. The present research sought to integrate these two areas by examining relationships between childhood pet ownership, pet attachment, empathy toward animals, belief in human-animal similarity, meat avoidance, and justifications for eating meat. Results from 273 individuals responding to a survey on an internet platform revealed that participants with greater childhood attachment to a pet reported greater meat avoidance as adults, an effect that disappeared when controlling for animal empathy. Greater childhood pet attachment was also related to the use of indirect, apologetic justifications for meat consumption, and this effect too, was mediated by empathy toward animals. Child pet ownership itself predicted views toward animals but not dietary behavior or meat-eating justifications. The authors propose a sequence of events by which greater childhood pet attachment leads to increased meat avoidance, focusing on the central role played by empathy toward animals.

  7. Childhood pet ownership, attachment to pets, and subsequent meat avoidance. The mediating role of empathy toward animals.

    PubMed

    Rothgerber, Hank; Mican, Frances

    2014-08-01

    Researchers studying childhood pet ownership outcomes do not typically focus on measures of adult diet, and those studying the psychology of meat consumption do not normally consider early experiences with companion animals. The present research sought to integrate these two areas by examining relationships between childhood pet ownership, pet attachment, empathy toward animals, belief in human-animal similarity, meat avoidance, and justifications for eating meat. Results from 273 individuals responding to a survey on an internet platform revealed that participants with greater childhood attachment to a pet reported greater meat avoidance as adults, an effect that disappeared when controlling for animal empathy. Greater childhood pet attachment was also related to the use of indirect, apologetic justifications for meat consumption, and this effect too, was mediated by empathy toward animals. Child pet ownership itself predicted views toward animals but not dietary behavior or meat-eating justifications. The authors propose a sequence of events by which greater childhood pet attachment leads to increased meat avoidance, focusing on the central role played by empathy toward animals. PMID:24704704

  8. MR/PET or PET/MRI: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Beyer, Thomas; Moser, Ewald

    2013-02-01

    After the very successful clinical introduction of combined PET/CT imaging a decade ago, a hardware combination of PET and MR is following suit. Today, three different approaches towards integrated PET/MR have been proposed: (1) a triple-modality system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT installed in adjacent rooms, (2) a tandem system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT in a co-planar installation with a joint patient handling system, and (3) a fully-integrated system with a whole-body PET system mounted inside a 3T MRI system. This special issue of MAGMA brings together contributions from key experts in the field of PET/MR, PET/CT and CT. The various papers share the author's perspectives on the state-of-the-art PET/MR imaging with any of the three approaches mentioned above. In addition to several reviews discussing advantages and challenges of combining PET and MRI for clinical diagnostics, first clinical data are also presented. We expect this special issue to nurture future improvements in hardware, clinical protocols, and efficient post-processing strategies to further assess the diagnostic value of combined PET/MR imaging. It remains to be seen whether a so-called "killer application" for PET/MRI will surface. In that case PET/MR is likely to excel in pre-clinical and selected research applications for now. This special issue helps the readers to stay on track of this exciting development. PMID:23385880

  9. 24 CFR 960.707 - Pet ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pet ownership. 960.707 Section 960... ADMISSION TO, AND OCCUPANCY OF, PUBLIC HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.707 Pet ownership. (a..., may own one or more common household pets or have one or more common household pets present in...

  10. 24 CFR 960.707 - Pet ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pet ownership. 960.707 Section 960... ADMISSION TO, AND OCCUPANCY OF, PUBLIC HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.707 Pet ownership. (a..., may own one or more common household pets or have one or more common household pets present in...

  11. Talking with Children about Furry Classroom Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Notes that rodents and rabbits share many characteristics that make them suitable classroom pets and gives background information on rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils. Offers advice on buying a classroom pet, the pet's home, feeding, helping the children handle the pet, and pet health and family planning. (TJQ)

  12. [The PET, Past and Future].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique nuclear medicine test using positron emitters such as 18F and 11C. In PET tests, various kinds of functional aspects of human bodies can be evaluated by using compounds labeled by these positron emitters. Recently, combined scanners of PET and anatomical imaging modalities such as CT and MRI have been developed and functional information with anatomical location can be easily obtained, increasing the usefulness of PET tests. PET tests are now essential imaging tools to diagnose various kinds of disease with functional abnormalities. In the field of oncology, 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose PET tests are routinely used in clinical practice under health insurance. In the field of neurology, PET tests are actively used to investigate cerebral function by labeled neurotransmitters and so on. Currently, brain PET tests to detect beta-amyloid are applied to the diagnosis of dementia. In the field of cardiology, cardiac perfusion and myocardial metabolism are quantitatively measured by using PET and obtained results have successfully revealed the pathogenesis of intractable cardiac diseases. Future technical advances will enhance the usefulness of PET tests more and more. PMID:26753390

  13. Prospective Study of FLT PET for Early Interim Response Assessment in Advanced Stage B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schöder, Heiko; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Hamlin, Paul; Gavane, Somali; Horwitz, Steven; Matasar, Matthew; Moskowitz, Alison; Noy, Ariela; Palomba, Lia; Portlock, Carol; Straus, David; Grewal, Ravinder; Migliacci, Jocelyn C.; Larson, Steven M.; Moskowitz, Craig H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current clinical and imaging tools remain suboptimal for early assessment of prognosis and treatment response in aggressive lymphomas. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) can be used to measure tumor cell proliferation and treatment response. In a prospective study in patients with advanced stage B-cell lymphoma we investigated the prognostic and predictive value of FLT PET in comparison to standard imaging with FDG PET and clinical outcome. Patients and Methods 65 patients were treated with an induction/consolidation regimen consisting of four cycles of R-CHOP-14 followed by 3 cycles of ICE. FLT PET was performed at baseline and at interim (iPET) after 1–2 cycles of therapy. FDG PET was performed at baseline, after cycle 4, and at the end of therapy. The relationship between PET findings, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was investigated. Results With a median follow-up of 51 months, PFS and OS were 71% and 86% respectively. FLT iPET, analyzed visually, using a 5-point score, or semi-quantitatively, using SUV and ΔSUV, predicted both PFS and OS (p<0.01 for all parameters). Residual FLT SUVmax on iPET was associated with an inferior PFS (HR: 1.26, p=0.001) and OS (HR: 1.27, p=0.002). Using FDG PET, findings in the end of treatment scan were better predictors of PFS and OS than findings on interim scan. Baseline PET imaging parameters, including SUV, proliferative or metabolic tumor volume, did not correlate with outcome. Conclusion FLT PET after 1–2 cycles of chemotherapy predicts PFS and OS, and a negative FLT iPET may potentially help design risk-adapted therapies in patients with aggressive lymphomas. In contrast, the positive predictive value of FLT iPET remains too low to justify changes in patient management. PMID:26719374

  14. Advantages of percutaneous abdominal biopsy under PET-CT/ultrasound fusion imaging guidance: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Paparo, Francesco; Piccazzo, Riccardo; Cevasco, Luca; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Pinna, Francesco; Belli, Fiorenza; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Biscaldi, Ennio; De Caro, Giovanni; Rollandi, Gian Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique that can investigate the metabolic characteristics of tissues. Currently, PET images are acquired and co-registered with a computed tomography (CT) scan (PET-CT), which is employed for correction of attenuation and anatomical localization. In spite of the high negative predictive value of PET, false-positive results may occur; indeed, Fluorine 18 ((18)F)-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake is not specific to cancer. As (18)F-FDG uptake may also be seen in non-malignant infectious or inflammatory processes, FDG-avid lesions may necessitate biopsy to confirm or rule out malignancy. However, some PET-positive lesions may have little or no correlative ultrasound (US) and/or CT findings (i.e., low conspicuity on morphological imaging). Since it is not possible to perform biopsy under PET guidance alone, owing to intrinsic technical limitations, PET information has to be integrated into a CT- or US-guided biopsy procedure (multimodal US/PET-CT fusion imaging). The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe the technique of multimodal imaging fusion between real-time US and PET/CT, and to provide an overview of the clinical settings in which this multimodal integration may be useful in guiding biopsy procedures in PET-positive abdominal lesions.

  15. Progress reported in PET recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The Goodyear Polyester Division has demonstrated its ability to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET) from recycled plastic soft drink bottles and remanufacture the material into PET suitable for containers. Most people are familiar with PET in the form of lightweight, shatter resistant beverage bottles. About 20 percent of these beverage containers currently are being recycled. The recycled PET is currently used in many applications such as carpeting, pillow stuffing, sleeping bag filling, insulation for water heaters and non-food containers. This is the first step of Goodyear's increased efforts to recycle PET from containers into a material suitable for food packing. The project is extremely complex, involving sophisticated understanding of the chemical reactions involved, PET production and the technology testing protocols necessary to design a process that addresses all the technical, safety, and regulatory concerns. The research conducted so far indicated that additional processing beyond simply cleaning the shredded material, called flake, will be required to assure a quality polymer.

  16. Ingredients: where pet food starts.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Angele

    2008-08-01

    Every clinician is asked "What should I feed my pet?" Understanding the ingredients in pet food is an important part of making the best recommendation. Pet food can be as simple as one ingredient or as complicated as containing more than 60 ingredients. Pet food and its ingredients are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and state feed officials. Part of that regulation is the review and definition of ingredients. Existing ingredients change and new ingredients become available so the need for ingredient definitions grows. Ingredients for product formulations are chosen based on their nutrient content, digestibility, palatability, functionality, availability, and cost. As an example, a typical, nutritionally complete dry dog food with 42 ingredients is examined and the ingredients are discussed here. Safe, healthy pet food starts with safe ingredients sourced from well-monitored suppliers. The ultimate goal of both veterinarians and pet food manufacturers is the same--long healthy lives for dogs and cats.

  17. PET/CT Imaging for Monitoring Recurrence and Evaluating Response to Treatment in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Wang, Xiaojia; Chen, Zhanhong

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring recurrence and evaluating response to therapy are important aspects of clinical decision making in the treatment of breast cancer. In this literature review, the authors highlight several of the key areas where integrated fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) measurements are anticipated to have a significant impact on monitoring recurrence and evaluating response to therapy. These areas include comparing FDG PET/CT with conventional imaging for detecting breast cancer metastases; evaluating the role of FDG PET/CT in the presence of elevated tumor markers during follow-up period after the primary surgery; using FDG PET/CT to assess response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), targeted and endocrine therapies; using FDG PET/CT to predict response to NAC according to different molecular phenotypes of breast cancer; and applying PET/CT and some new breast-related PET tracers to evaluate response to anticancer treatment. The authors consider the relative advantages afforded by PET/CT and summarize current evidence as to the likely value of PET/CT in recurrence detection and anticancer treatment response prediction. PMID:27627573

  18. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals. PMID:2646816

  19. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals.

  20. Extended suicide with a pet.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases. PMID:24051598

  1. FDG PET imaging in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sobic-Saranovic, Dragana; Artiko, Vera; Obradovic, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the clinical utility of FDG-PET/CT for evaluation of patients with chronic sarcoidosis. The emphasis was on the potential advantages and disadvantages of this technique in these patients based on which recommendations were made. The advantage of FDG-PET/CT technique is that it can visualize FDG accumulation in activated inflammatory cells and simultaneously provide PET and CT images. Of particular interest is the use of FDG-PET/CT for the staging and identification of occult sites and sites suitable for biopsy and for the assessment of inflammatory active sarcoidosis in patients with prolonged symptoms, especially when other markers of the disease are within normal values. FDG-PET/CT also provides a better visualization of extrathoracic sites of active sarcoidosis, such as in the bones, liver, spleen, and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The use of FDG-PET/CT is of special interest in cardiac sarcoidosis because this potentially life-threatening disease is sometimes present in asymptomatic patients. FDG-PET/CT also has a role in the clinical management of patients with chronic persistent sarcoidosis, such as for planning treatment, monitoring response, and long-term follow-up. The limitations of FDG-PET/CT in patients with sarcoidosis are discussed in the context of a "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome" and potentially excessive radiation exposure. Further prospective multicentre studies are needed to refine the clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in patients with sarcoidosis and drive the field forward.

  2. Molecular imaging using PET for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Chikako; Miyakita, Yasuji; Yoshida, Masayuki; Hamada, Akinobu; Kanayama, Yousuke; Yonemori, Kan; Hashimoto, Jun; Tani, Hitomi; Kodaira, Makoto; Yunokawa, Mayu; Yamamoto, Harukaze; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging can visualize the biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in vivo using certain tracers for specific molecular targets. Molecular imaging of breast cancer can be performed with various imaging modalities, however, positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive and non-invasive molecular imaging technology and this review will focus on PET molecular imaging of breast cancer, such as FDG-PET, FLT-PET, hormone receptor PET, and anti-HER2 PET.

  3. Get Set for a Pet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRosa, Bill

    1987-01-01

    Describes a game in which students deal with some of the factors involved in being a responsible pet owner. Includes a list of the materials needed for the game and provides the game board and the game pieces, along with a fold-out poster about neutering and spaying pets. (TW)

  4. Meet the Alpha-Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zitlaw, Jo Ann Bruce; Frank, Cheryl Standish

    1985-01-01

    "Alpha-Pets" are the focal point of an integrated, multidisciplinary curriculum. Each pet is featured for a week in a vocabulary-rich story and introduces related activities beginning with the featured letter, such as the four food groups during Freddie Fish's week or universe during Ulysses Unicorn's week. (MT)

  5. Recent Developments in PET Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used in the clinic and in vivo small animal research to study molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders, and to guide the discovery and development of new treatments. This paper reviews current challenges of advancing PET technology and some of newly developed PET detectors and systems. The paper focuses on four aspects of PET instrumentation: high photon detection sensitivity; improved spatial resolution; depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and time-of-flight (TOF). Improved system geometry, novel non-scintillator based detectors, and tapered scintillation crystal arrays are able to enhance the photon detection sensitivity of a PET system. Several challenges for achieving high resolution with standard scintillator-based PET detectors are discussed. Novel detectors with 3-D positioning capability have great potential to be deployed in PET for achieving spatial resolution better than 1 mm, such as cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) and position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). DOI capability enables a PET system to mitigate parallax error and achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view (FOV). Six common DOI designs, as well as advantages and limitations of each design, are discussed. The availability of fast scintillation crystals such as LaBr3, and the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) greatly advances TOF-PET development. Recent instrumentation and initial results of clinical trials are briefly presented. If successful, these technology advances, together with new probe molecules, will substantially enhance the molecular sensitivity of PET and thus increase its role in preclinical and clinical research as well as evaluating and managing disease in the clinic. PMID:20497121

  6. Clinical evaluation of 4D PET motion compensation strategies for treatment verification in ion beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianoli, Chiara; Kurz, Christopher; Riboldi, Marco; Bauer, Julia; Fontana, Giulia; Baroni, Guido; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-06-01

    A clinical trial named PROMETHEUS is currently ongoing for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT, Germany). In this framework, 4D PET-CT datasets are acquired shortly after the therapeutic treatment to compare the irradiation induced PET image with a Monte Carlo PET prediction resulting from the simulation of treatment delivery. The extremely low count statistics of this measured PET image represents a major limitation of this technique, especially in presence of target motion. The purpose of the study is to investigate two different 4D PET motion compensation strategies towards the recovery of the whole count statistics for improved image quality of the 4D PET-CT datasets for PET-based treatment verification. The well-known 4D-MLEM reconstruction algorithm, embedding the motion compensation in the reconstruction process of 4D PET sinograms, was compared to a recently proposed pre-reconstruction motion compensation strategy, which operates in sinogram domain by applying the motion compensation to the 4D PET sinograms. With reference to phantom and patient datasets, advantages and drawbacks of the two 4D PET motion compensation strategies were identified. The 4D-MLEM algorithm was strongly affected by inverse inconsistency of the motion model but demonstrated the capability to mitigate the noise-break-up effects. Conversely, the pre-reconstruction warping showed less sensitivity to inverse inconsistency but also more noise in the reconstructed images. The comparison was performed by relying on quantification of PET activity and ion range difference, typically yielding similar results. The study demonstrated that treatment verification of moving targets could be accomplished by relying on the whole count statistics image quality, as obtained from the application of 4D PET motion compensation strategies. In particular, the pre-reconstruction warping was shown to represent a promising choice when combined with intra

  7. Value of PET restaging after chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Implications for consolidation radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon T.; Flowers, Christopher; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Hollenbach, Kathryn; Johnstone, Peter . E-mail: peter@radonc.emory.org

    2006-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: Patients treated for non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) frequently are restaged for response using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. This study investigates the role of subsequent consolidation radiation therapy (CRT) based on PET response to chemotherapy. Materials/Methods: An IRB-approved database was queried for patients who underwent PET scans after chemotherapy for NHL between 1995 and 2004; 77 patients were identified. To determine benefit of CRT, overall survival and local control were assessed with median follow-up of 39.8 months (range, 2-125 months). Results: Median age of patients was 53 (range, 18-82 years). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, indolent vs. aggressive histology, and time from chemotherapy to PET revealed PET positive scans (RR = 30.5; 95%CI = 5.9, 156.4), lack of RT (RR = 5.25; 95%CI = 1.26, 21.79), and Stage III/IV presentation (RR = 4.35; 95%CI = 1.03, 20) predicted increased likelihood of recurrence. Patients with positive PET scans after chemotherapy had significantly higher risk of relapse than those with negative scans (58.1% vs. 15.2%; p < 0.0001), although not everyone with positive scans recurred. Patients with positive PET scans receiving RT were not protected from relapse (63.2% relapse with RT, 50% relapse without RT; p = 0.71); in fact, over half the relapses in patients receiving RT for persistently positive PET scans were in-field. Crude 2 year OS was significantly different between PET positive and PET negative cohorts (p < 0.01). Conclusions: While RT may control relapse in PET negative patients, NHL patients who remain PET positive after chemotherapy are not well managed by RT alone.

  8. Clinical evaluation of 4D PET motion compensation strategies for treatment verification in ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Kurz, Christopher; Riboldi, Marco; Bauer, Julia; Fontana, Giulia; Baroni, Guido; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-06-01

    A clinical trial named PROMETHEUS is currently ongoing for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT, Germany). In this framework, 4D PET-CT datasets are acquired shortly after the therapeutic treatment to compare the irradiation induced PET image with a Monte Carlo PET prediction resulting from the simulation of treatment delivery. The extremely low count statistics of this measured PET image represents a major limitation of this technique, especially in presence of target motion. The purpose of the study is to investigate two different 4D PET motion compensation strategies towards the recovery of the whole count statistics for improved image quality of the 4D PET-CT datasets for PET-based treatment verification. The well-known 4D-MLEM reconstruction algorithm, embedding the motion compensation in the reconstruction process of 4D PET sinograms, was compared to a recently proposed pre-reconstruction motion compensation strategy, which operates in sinogram domain by applying the motion compensation to the 4D PET sinograms. With reference to phantom and patient datasets, advantages and drawbacks of the two 4D PET motion compensation strategies were identified. The 4D-MLEM algorithm was strongly affected by inverse inconsistency of the motion model but demonstrated the capability to mitigate the noise-break-up effects. Conversely, the pre-reconstruction warping showed less sensitivity to inverse inconsistency but also more noise in the reconstructed images. The comparison was performed by relying on quantification of PET activity and ion range difference, typically yielding similar results. The study demonstrated that treatment verification of moving targets could be accomplished by relying on the whole count statistics image quality, as obtained from the application of 4D PET motion compensation strategies. In particular, the pre-reconstruction warping was shown to represent a promising choice when combined with intra

  9. Role for 11C-choline PET in active surveillance of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boychak, Oleksandr; Vos, Larissa; Makis, William; Buteau, Francois-Alexandre; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; Usmani, Nawaid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Active surveillance (AS) is an increasingly popular management strategy for men diagnosed with low-risk indolent prostate cancer. Current tests (prostate-specific antigen [PSA], clinical staging, and prostate biopsies) to monitor indolent disease lack accuracy. 11C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) has excellent detection rates in local and distant recurrence of prostate cancer. We examine 11C-choline PET for identifying aggressive prostate cancer warranting treatment in the AS setting. Methods: In total, 24 patients on AS had clinical assessment and PSA testing every 6 months and 11C-choline PET and prostate biopsies annually. The sensitivity and specificity to identify prostate cancer and progressive disease (PD) were calculated for each 11C-choline PET scan. Results: In total, 62 biopsy-paired, serial 11C-choline PET scans were analyzed using a series of standard uptake value-maximum (SUVmax) cut-off thresholds. During follow-up (mean 25.3 months), 11 of the 24 low-risk prostate cancer patients developed PD and received definitive treatment. The prostate cancer detection rate with 11C-choline PET had moderate sensitivity (72.1%), but low specificity (45.0%). PD prediction from baseline 11C-choline PET had satisfactory sensitivity (81.8%), but low specificity (38.5%). The addition of clinical parameters to the baseline 11C-choline PET improved specificity (69.2%), with a slight reduction in sensitivity (72.7%) for PD prediction. Conclusions: Addition of 11C-choline PET imaging during AS may help to identify aggressive disease earlier than traditional methods. However, 11C-choline PET alone has low specificity due to overlap of SUV values with benign pathologies. Triaging low-risk prostate cancer patients into AS versus therapy will require further optimization of PET protocols or consideration of alternative strategies (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging, biomarkers). PMID:25844108

  10. Openability of soft drinks PET packagings.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo Corrêa; Paschoarelli, Luis Carlos; da Silva, José Carlos Plácido

    2012-01-01

    Studies on packaging accessibility are still incipient in Brazil. Many of these packagings can represent a challenge to users, whether due to non-informative labels, tricky tabs or seals, or even those that need strength to open. This paper brings a simple test to determine the necessary torque force to open PET bottles, and to predict the amount of users that could not open it. The findings suggest that a considerable amount of users could not open it or would have some difficulties to exert the necessary force. PMID:22316905

  11. 36 CFR 1002.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 1002.15 Section 1002.15....15 Pets. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Possessing a pet in a public building, public... possession of pets by the Board. This paragraph shall not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually...

  12. 36 CFR 1002.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 1002.15 Section 1002.15....15 Pets. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Possessing a pet in a public building, public... possession of pets by the Board. This paragraph shall not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually...

  13. 7 CFR 502.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 502.11 Section 502.11 Agriculture Regulations of... CONDUCT ON BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.11 Pets. Pets... vaccinations. Pets that are the property of employees residing on BARC must be up to date on their...

  14. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  15. Dynamic-compliance and viscosity of PET and PEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weick, Brian L.

    2016-05-01

    Complex dynamic-compliance and in-phase dynamic-viscosity data are presented and analyzed for PET and PEN advanced polyester substrates used for magnetic tapes. Frequency-temperature superposition is used to predict long-term behavior. Temperature and frequency ranges for the primary glass transition and secondary transitions are discussed and compared for PET and PEN. Shift factors from frequency-temperature superposition are used to determine activation energies for the transitions, and WLF parameters are determined for the polyester substrates.

  16. Accuracy of FDG-PET to diagnose lung cancer in a region of endemic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Deppen, Stephen; Putnam, Joe B.; Andrade, Gabriela; Speroff, Theodore; Nesbitt, Jonathan C.; Lambright, Eric S.; Massion, Pierre P.; Walker, Ron; Grogan, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Background 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is used to evaluate suspicious pulmonary lesions due to its diagnostic accuracy. The southeastern United States has a high prevalence of infectious granulomatous lung disease, and the accuracy of FDGPET may be reduced in this population. We examined the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET in patients with known or suspected NSCLC treated at our institution. Methods 279 patients identified through our prospective database, underwent an operation for known or suspected lung cancer. Preoperative FDG-PET in 211 eligible patients was defined by standardized uptake value, SUV > 2.5 or by description (“moderate” or “intense”) as avid. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios, and decision diagrams were calculated for FDG-PET in all patients and in patients with indeterminate nodules. Results In all eligible patients (n=211), sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET were 92% and 40%. Positive and negative predictive values were 86% and 55%. Overall FDG-PET accuracy to diagnose lung cancer was 81%. Preoperative positive likelihood ratio for FDG-PET diagnosis of lung cancer in this population was 1.5 compared to previously published values of 7.1. In 113 indeterminate lesions, 65% had lung cancer and the sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 40% respectively. 24 benign nodules (60%) had false positive FDG-PET scans. 22 of 43 benign nodules (51%) were granulomas. Conclusions In a region with endemic granulomatous diseases, the specificity of FDG-PET for diagnosis of lung cancer was 40%. Clinical decisions and future clinical predictive models for lung cancer must accommodate regional variation of FDG-PET scan results. PMID:21592456

  17. 18F-FMISO PET/CT Visualization of Tumor Hypoxia in Patients with Chordoma of the Mobile and Sacrococcygeal Spine

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, Matthew D.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lim, Ruth; Winrich, Barbara K.; Grosu, Anca L.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Depauw, Nicolas; Shih, Helen A.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Hornicek, Francis J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Local recurrence (LR) rates in chordoma patients following surgery ± radiation therapy (RT) or definitive RT are high. Tumor hypoxia is associated with radioresistance and LR. In this prospective study, [18F]-FMISO-PET/CT detected hypoxic tumor sub-volumes in 60% of patients with chordoma of the mobile and sacrococcygeal spine, the majority of which were sufficiently large to allow an RT boost. Further study of hypoxia-directed, dose-escalated RT, particularly in patients at high risk for LR, is warranted. Purpose/Objectives Local recurrence (LR) rates in chordoma patients following surgery ± radiation therapy (RT) or definitive RT are high. Tumor hypoxia is associated with radioresistance and LR. [18F] fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FMISO-PET/CT) can visualize skull base chordoma hypoxic sub-volumes (HSV) and feasibility of hypoxia-directed RT dose-escalation has been demonstrated in head and neck cancer. This study investigates FMISO-PET/CT detection of targetable HSVs in chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine. Methods and Materials A prospective, pilot study of 20 patients with primary or locally recurrent chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine treated with proton or combined proton/photon RT ± surgery was completed. FMISO-PET/CT was performed prior to RT and after 19.8-34.2 GyRBE (relative biologic effectiveness). Gross tumor volumes (GTV) were delineated and HSVs defined including voxels with standardized uptake values ≥ 1.4 times the muscle mean. Clinical characteristics and treatments received were compared between patients with and without HSVs. Results FMISO-PET/CT detected HSVs in 12 (60%; 12/20) patients. Baseline and interval HSV spatial concordance varied (0-94%). Eight HSVs were sufficiently large (≥ 5cc) to potentially allow an intensity modulated proton therapy boost. Patients with HSVs had significantly larger GTVs (median =410.0 cc vs. 63.4 cc; p=0.02) and were significantly more

  18. In Vivo ¹⁸F-FDG-PET Imaging in Mouse Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Jesús; Bilbao, Izaskun; Vaquero, Juan José; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; España, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an important technique in cardiovascular research. Vascular inflammation detected by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET has been shown to predict cardiovascular (CV) events independent of traditional risk factors and is also highly associated with overall burden of atherosclerosis. The use of PET imaging in mouse models of atherosclerosis is challenged by the reduced size of the scanned organs. However, the last generation of dedicated PET scanners has an improved spatial resolution (<1 mm) and increased sensitivity allowing those studies to be performed. Here, we describe a procedure to perform FDG-PET experiments in atherosclerosis mouse models, the required equipment for animal handling and imaging, and the tools and procedures for image analysis and validation of the results.

  19. The impact of pet loss on the perceived social support and psychological distress of hurricane survivors.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Rhodes, Jean E; Zwiebach, Liza; Chan, Christian S

    2009-06-01

    Associations between pet loss and posthurricane perceived social support and psychological distress were explored. Participants (N = 365) were primarily low-income African American single mothers who were initially part of an educational intervention study. All participants were exposed to Hurricane Katrina, and 47% experienced Hurricane Rita. Three waves of survey data, two from before the hurricanes, were included. Sixty-three participants (17.3%) reported losing a pet due to the hurricanes and their aftermath. Pet loss significantly predicted postdisaster distress, above and beyond demographic variables, pre- and postdisaster perceived social support, predisaster distress, hurricane-related stressors, and human bereavement, an association that was stronger for younger participants. Pet loss was not a significant predictor of postdisaster perceived social support, but the impact of pet loss on perceived social support was significantly greater for participants with low levels of predisaster support.

  20. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  1. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  2. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    MedlinePlus

    ... their pets to avoid getting diseases from the animals. Persons in this category include those who take ... risk of diseases that can be passed from animals to humans. Here are some tips: Ask your ...

  3. 10 "Poison Pills" for Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... left on the bedside table. Zolpidem may make cats wobbly and sleepy, but most pets become very ... very common pain killer found in most households. Cats are extremely sensitive to acetaminophen, but dogs can ...

  4. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... pets in households with young children. [775 KB] Animals and Health Check out two CDC websites with helpful resources. Gastrointestinal (Enteric) Diseases from Animals : Information about zoonotic outbreaks, prevention messages, and helpful ...

  5. Feasibility of Using Distal Endpoints for In-room PET Range Verification of Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Winey, Brian; Bortfeld, Thomas; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to verify the dose delivery in proton therapy, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans have been employed to measure the distribution of β+ radioactivity produced from nuclear reactions of the protons with native nuclei. Because the dose and PET distributions are difficult to compare directly, the range verification is currently carried out by comparing measured and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation predicted PET distributions. In order to reduce the reliance on MC, simulated PET (simPET) and dose distal endpoints were compared to explore the feasibility of using distal endpoints for in-room PET range verification. MC simulations were generated for six head and neck patients with corrections for radiological decay, biological washout, and PET resolution. One-dimensional profiles of the dose and simPET were examined along the direction of the beam and covering the cross section of the beam. The chosen endpoints of the simPET (x-intercept of the linear fit to the distal falloff) and planned dose (20–50% of maximum dose) correspond to where most of the protons are below the threshold energy for the nuclear reactions. The difference in endpoint range between the distal surfaces of the dose and MC-PET were compared and the spread of range differences were assessed. Among the six patients, the mean difference between MC-PET and dose depth was found to be −1.6 mm to +0.5 mm between patients, with a standard deviation of 1.1 to 4.0 mm across the individual beams. In clinical practice, regions with deviations beyond the safety margin need to be examined more closely and can potentially lead to adjustments to the treatment plan. PMID:24464031

  6. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system. PMID:23493530

  7. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  8. PET Scans for Staging and Restaging in Diffuse Large B-Cell and Follicular Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Barrington, Sally F; Mikhaeel, N George

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT was recommended in updated international guidelines for staging/restaging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL). In FL, PET was previously regarded as a research application only. This review concentrates on new publications related to PET in these diseases. In DLBCL, PET appears appropriate for staging using prognostic indices established with CT and baseline PET parameters, e.g. metabolic tumour volume, are prognostic of outcome. Early complete metabolic response (CMR) predicts end-of-treatment CMR with excellent prognosis. Patients without CMR at interim should not have treatment altered, but have a worse prognosis, and patients with other high risk features may need closer monitoring. The end-of-treatment scan is confirmed as the standard for remission assessment using Deauville criteria, which are also predictive for patients undergoing ASCT. In FL, PET is more sensitive for staging than CT but misses bone marrow involvement. PET-CT identifies patients at risk of progression after induction chemotherapy better than CT. PMID:27095319

  9. Parasites in pet reptiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles), belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (4)) of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3%) of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (6)) of endoparasites in 252 (76.1%) of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1) and Protozoa (2)) of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5%) animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners. PMID:21624124

  10. Prognostic significance of bone marrow infiltration detected by PET-CT in newly diagnosed diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jin-Hua; Sun, Jin; Wang, Li; Fan, Lei; Chen, Yao-Yu; Qu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Tian-Nv; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic value of bone marrow involvement (BMI) assessed by baseline PET-CT (PET(0)-BMI) in treatment-naïve patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). All patients from a single centre diagnosed as DLBCL between 2005 and 2014 had data extracted from staging PET-CT (PET(0)-CT), bone marrow biopsy (BMB), and treatment records. The PET(3)-CT (PET-CT scan after cycle 3 of immunochemotherapy) was performed on all the patients with PET(0)-BMI positivity (PET(0)-BMI(+)). Of 169 patients, 20 (11.8%) had BMI on BMB, whereas 35 (20.7%) were PET(0)-BMI positive. Among PET(0)-BMI(+) patients, patients with maximum of standard uptake value (SUVmax) of bone marrow (SUVmax(BM)) more than 8.6 were significantly associated with high IPI score (3–5) (P=0.002), worse progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.025 and P=0.002, respectively). In the 68 stage IV cases, 3-year OS was higher in the patients with negative PET(0)-BMI (PET(0)-BMI(−)) than that with PET(0)-BMI(+) (84.2%±6.5% vs. 44.1%±8.6%; P=0.003), while 3-year PFS only shown a trend of statistic significance (P=0.077) between the two groups. Among the 69 patients of inter-risk of IPI (2–3), patients with PET(0)-BMI(+) had significantly inferior PFS and OS than that with PET(0)-BMI(−) (P=0.009 and P<0.001, respectively). The cut-off value of the decreased percentage of SUVmax(BM) between PET(0)-CT and PET(3)-CT (ΔSUVmax(BM)) was 70.0%, which can predict PFS (P=0.003) and OS (P=0.023). These data confirmed that along with the increased sensitivity and accuracy of identifying bone marrow by PET-CT, novel prognostic values of marrow involvement were found in patients with DLBCL. PMID:26919239

  11. Mean and covariance properties of dynamic PET reconstructions from list-mode data.

    PubMed

    Asma, Evren; Leahy, Richard M

    2006-01-01

    We derive computationally efficient methods for the estimation of the mean and variance properties of penalized likelihood dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. This allows us to predict the accuracy of reconstructed activity estimates and to compare reconstruction algorithms theoretically. We combine a bin-mode approach in which data is modeled as a collection of independent Poisson random variables at each spatiotemporal bin with the space-time separabilities in the imaging equation and penalties to derive rapidly computable analytic mean and variance approximations. We use these approximations to compare bias/variance properties of our dynamic PET image reconstruction algorithm with those of multiframe static PET reconstructions.

  12. Detection performance analysis for time-of-flight PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nannan; Huesman, Ronald H.; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) in improving lesion detectability. We present a theoretical approach to compare lesion detectability of TOF versus non-TOF systems and perform computer simulations to validate the theoretical prediction. A single-ring TOF PET tomograph is simulated using SimSET software, and images are reconstructed in 2D from list-mode data using a maximum a posteriori method. We use a channelized Hotelling observer to assess the detection performance. Both the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and localization ROC curves are compared for the TOF and non-TOF PET systems. We first studied the SNR gains for TOF PET with different scatter and random fractions, system timing resolutions and object sizes. We found that the TOF information improves the lesion detectability and the improvement is greater with larger fractions of randoms, better timing resolution and bigger objects. The scatters by themselves have little impact on the SNR gain after correction. Since the true system timing resolution may not be known precisely in practice, we investigated the effect of mismatched timing kernels and showed that using a mismatched kernel during reconstruction always degrades the detection performance, no matter whether it is narrower or wider than the real value. Using the proposed theoretical framework, we also studied the effect of lumpy backgrounds on the detection performance. Our results indicated that with lumpy backgrounds, the TOF PET still outperforms the non-TOF PET, but the improvement is smaller compared with the uniform background case. More specifically, with the same correlation length, the SNR gain reduces with bigger number of lumpy patches and greater lumpy amplitudes. With the same variance, the SNR gain reaches the minimum when the width of the Gaussian lumps is close to the size of the tumor.

  13. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  14. Recent Understandings of Pet Allergies

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Dennis; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2016-01-01

    Allergic reactions to pets have been recognized for at least a hundred years. Yet our understanding of the effects of all of the interactions between pet exposures and human immune responses continues to grow. Allergists, epidemiologists, and immunologists have spent years trying to better understand how exposures to pet allergens lead to allergic sensitization (the production of allergen-specific immunoglobulin class E [IgE] antibodies) and subsequent allergic disease. A major new development in this understanding is the recognition that pet exposures consist of not only allergen exposures but also changes in microbial exposures. Exposures to certain pet-associated microbes, especially in the neonatal period, appear to be able to dramatically alter how a child’s immune system develops and this in turn reduces the risk of allergic sensitization and disease. An exciting challenge in the next few years will be to see whether these changes can be developed into a realistic preventative strategy with the expectation of significantly reducing allergic disease, especially asthma. PMID:26918180

  15. Children's drawings and attachment to pets.

    PubMed

    Kidd, A H; Kidd, R M

    1995-08-01

    To help confirm the concept that distances placed between the self and other figures in children's drawings represent emotional distances, 242 pet-owning and 35 nonpet-owning kindergartners through eighth graders drew pictures of themselves, a pet, and/or a family member. Owners drew pets significantly closer than family-figures although the younger the child, the greater the distance between self and pet. Older children drew themselves holding pets significantly more often, but younger children placed the family-figure between the self and the pet significantly more often. There were no significant gender differences in self-figure/pet-figure distances, but cats, dogs, caged animals, and farm animals were placed significantly closer to self-figures than were fish. Over-all, owners were clearly emotionally closer to pets than to family members, but nonowners were as close emotionally to family members as were owners. PMID:7501763

  16. Measurement of hypoxia-related parameters in three sublines of a rat prostate carcinoma using dynamic 18F-FMISO-Pet-Ct and quantitative histology

    PubMed Central

    Mena-Romano, Pamela; Cheng, Caixia; Glowa, Christin; Peschke, Peter; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Karger, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important resistance factor in radiotherapy and measuring its spatial distribution in tumors non-invasively is therefore of major importance. This study characterizes the hypoxic conditions of three tumor sublines (AT1, HI and H) of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor model, which differ in histology, differentiation degree, volume doubling time and androgenic sensitivity, using dynamic Fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO)-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and histology. Measurements were performed for two tumor volumes (average 0.8±0.5 cm3 vs 4.4±2.8 cm3). Data were analyzed according to tumor subline as well as to the shape of the time activity curves (TACs), based on standardized uptake values (SUVs) and a two-tissue compartment model. Quantitative immunohistochemical studies of the hypoxic fraction, vessel density and vessel size were performed using pimonidazole, Hoechst 33342 and CD31 dyes. No significant FMISO uptake was found in small tumors, which had a mean SUV of 0.64±0.36, 0.55±0.10 and 0.45±0.08, for AT1, HI and H sublines respectively. In large tumors, the SUVs were 1.33±0.52, 1.12±0.83 and 0.63±0.16 for AT1, HI and H sublines and the corresponding hypoxic fractions obtained with pimonidazole staining were 0.62±0.23, 0.54±0.24 and 0.07±0.10, respectively. The AT1- was the most and H-tumor was the least hypoxic for both methods (P<0.05). All measurements were able to discriminate different hypoxic conditions, however despite SUV and kinetic parameters correlated with the three identified TAC shapes, most of the histological results did not. These results demonstrate impact and limitations of static and dynamic PET-CT measurements to assess hypoxia non-invasively. PMID:26269773

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor C complements the ability of positron emission tomography to predict nodal disease in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Madtes, David K.; Wood, Douglas E.; Flum, David R.; Zadworny, Megan E.; Waworuntu, Rachel; Hwang, Billanna; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) C and D are biologically rational markers of nodal disease that could improve the accuracy of lung cancer staging. We hypothesized that these biomarkers would improve the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A cross-sectional study (2010–2013) was performed of patients prospectively enrolled in a lung nodule biorepository, staged by computed tomography (CT) and PET, and who underwent pathologic nodal evaluation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure biomarker levels in plasma from blood drawn before anesthesia. Likelihood ratio testing was used to compare the following logistic regression prediction models: ModelPET, ModelPET/VEGF-C, ModelPET/VEGF-D, and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D. To account for 5 planned pairwise comparisons, P values<.01 were considered significant. Results Among 62 patients (median age, 67 years; 48% men; 87% white; and 84% NSCLC), 58% had fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in hilar and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed lymph node metastases was 40%. Comparisons of prediction models revealed the following: ModelPET/VEGF-C versus ModelPET (P = .0069), ModelPET/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .1886), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .0146), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-C (P = .2818), and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-D (P = .0095). In ModelPET/VEGF-C, higher VEGF-C levels were associated with an increased risk of nodal disease (odds ratio, 2.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.26–6.90). Conclusions Plasma levels of VEGF-C complemented the ability of PET to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed NSCLC. VEGF-D did not improve prediction. PMID:26320776

  18. PET: a revolution in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Abass; Lakhani, Paras; Mavi, Ayse; Kung, Justin W; Zhuang, Hongming

    2004-11-01

    FDG-PET has had remarkable influence on the assessment of physiologic and pathologic states. The authors predict that FDG-PET imaging could soon become the most common procedure used by nuclear medicine laboratories and could remain so for an extended period of time. The power of molecular imaging lies in the vast potential for using biochemical and pharmacologic probes to extend applications arising from an understanding of cell biology to a large number of well-characterized pathologic states. Molecular imaging based upon tracer kinetics with positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals could become the main source of information for the management of cancer patients. In that case, nuclear medicine procedures might become the most common imaging studies performed in the practice of medicine. This speculation is not farfetched when one realizes the enormous change that a single biologically important compound, FDG, has brought to the medical arena. The major challenge today is to attract the highly qualified individuals and to secure the resources needed to harness the opportunities in the specialty of molecular imaging. PMID:15488553

  19. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The body's main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication-all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects. PMID:27679534

  20. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects. PMID:27679534

  1. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects.

  2. Latest achievements in PET techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Belcari, Nicola; Motta, Alfonso; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Sabba, Nicola; Zavattini, Guido

    2003-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has moved from a distinguished research tool in physiology, cardiology and neurology to become a major tool for clinical investigation in oncology, in cardiac applications and in neurological disorders. Much of the PET accomplishments is due to the remarkable improvements in the last 10 years both in hardware and software aspects. Nowadays a similar effort is made by many research groups towards the construction of dedicated PET apparatus in new emerging fields such as molecular medicine, gene therapy, breast cancer imaging and combined modalities. This paper reports on some recent results we have obtained in small animal imaging and positron emission mammography, based on the use of advanced technology in the field of scintillators and photodetectors, such as Position-Sensitive Detectors coupled to crystal matrices, combined use of scintillating fibers and Hybrid-Photo-Diodes readout, and Hamamatsu flat panels. New ideas and future developments are discussed.

  3. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R G

    1994-01-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that product an image. If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive. On the other hand, if a product performs well, the word-of-mouth will be positive and that mode of advertising is one of the most effective. PMID:8076285

  4. 36 CFR 13.1234 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 13.1234 Section 13.1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... § 13.1234 Pets. Possessing a pet in the BCDA is prohibited....

  5. Pet therapy: dogs de-stress students.

    PubMed

    Young, Judith S

    2012-01-01

    Research supports the efficacy of the human-animal bond and pet therapy in a variety of settings. At nursing students' request at one school, the author began offering pet therapy prior to examinations. Anecdotal evidence of a study with the author's Golden Retriever, Goldilocks, demonstrates that pet therapy can reduce test anxiety and improve nursing student performance. PMID:23082615

  6. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  7. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  8. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  9. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  10. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  11. A Guide to Managing Your Classroom Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caras, Robert

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests eight ideal classroom pets: hamsters; turtles; snakes; spiders; frogs and toads; fish; and birds. For each he gives suggestions on selecting the pet and housing and feeding it in the classroom. Desert terrariums and home pet care training are also discussed. (SJL)

  12. 7 CFR 500.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 500.10 Section 500.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.10 Pets. Pets brought upon...

  13. Saying Goodbye: Pet Loss and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Thelma

    2005-01-01

    Pets can be loyal, loving, and entertaining members of a family. Their deaths are generally experienced as painful losses by the people who love them, even though the grief experience is often culturally disenfranchised. In this manuscript, we discuss the role that pets can play in a person's life; the effects that pet loss can have on the people…

  14. 36 CFR 13.1234 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 13.1234 Section 13.1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... § 13.1234 Pets. Possessing a pet in the BCDA is prohibited....

  15. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in scanned ion beam therapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Stützer, Kristin; Bert, Christoph; Parodi, Katia

    2015-08-01

    At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, patient irradiation with scanned proton and carbon ion beams is verified by offline positron emission tomography (PET) imaging: the {β+} -activity measured within the patient is compared to a prediction calculated on the basis of the treatment planning data in order to identify potential delivery errors. Currently, this monitoring technique is limited to the treatment of static target structures. However, intra-fractional organ motion imposes considerable additional challenges to scanned ion beam radiotherapy. In this work, the feasibility and potential of time-resolved (4D) offline PET-based treatment verification with a commercial full-ring PET/CT (x-ray computed tomography) device are investigated for the first time, based on an experimental campaign with moving phantoms. Motion was monitored during the gated beam delivery as well as the subsequent PET acquisition and was taken into account in the corresponding 4D Monte-Carlo simulations and data evaluation. Under the given experimental conditions, millimeter agreement between the prediction and measurement was found. Dosimetric consequences due to the phantom motion could be reliably identified. The agreement between PET measurement and prediction in the presence of motion was found to be similar as in static reference measurements, thus demonstrating the potential of 4D PET-based treatment verification for future clinical applications.

  16. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in scanned ion beam therapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Stützer, Kristin; Bert, Christoph; Parodi, Katia

    2015-08-21

    At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, patient irradiation with scanned proton and carbon ion beams is verified by offline positron emission tomography (PET) imaging: the β+-activity measured within the patient is compared to a prediction calculated on the basis of the treatment planning data in order to identify potential delivery errors. Currently, this monitoring technique is limited to the treatment of static target structures. However, intra-fractional organ motion imposes considerable additional challenges to scanned ion beam radiotherapy. In this work, the feasibility and potential of time-resolved (4D) offline PET-based treatment verification with a commercial full-ring PET/CT (x-ray computed tomography) device are investigated for the first time, based on an experimental campaign with moving phantoms. Motion was monitored during the gated beam delivery as well as the subsequent PET acquisition and was taken into account in the corresponding 4D Monte-Carlo simulations and data evaluation. Under the given experimental conditions, millimeter agreement between the prediction and measurement was found. Dosimetric consequences due to the phantom motion could be reliably identified. The agreement between PET measurement and prediction in the presence of motion was found to be similar as in static reference measurements, thus demonstrating the potential of 4D PET-based treatment verification for future clinical applications. PMID:26237315

  17. Development of PhytoPET: A plant imaging PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H; Lee, S J; McKisson, J; Xi, W; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Cumberbatch, L; Reid, C D; Smith, M F; Stolin, A

    2012-02-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system to image the biodistribution of positron emitting tracers in live plants is underway. The positron emitting {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer is used in plant biology research investigating carbon sequestration in biomass, optimization of plant productivity and biofuel development. This PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single 5 cm x 5 cm Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. Each H8500 is coupled to a LYSO:Ce scintillator array composed of 48 x 48 elements that are 10 mm thick arranged with a 1.0 mm pitch. An Ethernet based 12-bit flash analog to digital data acquisition system with onboard coincident matrix definition is under development to digitize the signals. The detector modules of the PhytoPET system can be arranged and stacked to accommodate various sized plants and plant structures.

  18. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  19. PET computer programs for use with the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, R.A.; Chlosta, L.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes in detail several offline programs written for the PET computer which provide an efficient data management system to assist with the operation of the 88-Inch Cyclotron. This function includes the capability to predict settings for all cyclotron and beam line parameters for all beams within the present operating domain of the facility. The establishment of a data base for operational records is also described from which various aspects of the operating history can be projected.

  20. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, S A; Sastre, J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the pattern of sensitisation to pet IgE components and its association with clinical symptoms. Hundred and fifty nine consecutive patients with rhinitis/asthma sensitised to dog, cat, and horse were recruited. Specific IgE to whole extracts and to pet recombinant allergens were performed. Only 5% of patients were monosensitised to animal allergens. Specific IgE to Can f 1 was significantly associated with persistent rhinitis, Can f 2 with asthma diagnosis, Can f 3 with moderate/severe rhinitis (M/S-R) and asthma diagnosis (AD), and Can f 5 with persistent and M/S-R. Positive IgE to Fel d 2 was significantly associated with M/S-R and AD, Equ c 1 with M/S-R and Equ c 3 with persistent rhinitis, AD and severe asthma. Sensitisation to ≥2 molecules or to pet albumins was associated with more severe respiratory symptoms. Molecular diagnosis in patients with pet allergy may also help clinicians to predict clinical symptoms and their severity. PMID:27108666

  1. PET-Based Percutaneous Needle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Ghassan

    2016-07-01

    PET can be used to guide percutaneous needle biopsy to the most metabolic lesion, improving diagnostic yield. PET biopsy guidance can be performed using visual or software coregistration, electromagnetic needle tracking, cone-beam computed tomography (CT), and intraprocedural PET/CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsies allow the sampling of lesions that may not be clearly visible on anatomic imaging, or of lesions that are morphologically normal. PET can identify suspicious locations within complex tumors that are most likely to contain important diagnostic and prognostic information. PMID:27321036

  2. The MiniPET: a didactic PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, R.; Silva, J.; Gurriana, L.; Silva, J. M.; Maio, A.; Soares Augusto, J.

    2013-03-01

    The MiniPET project aims to design and build a small PET system. It consists of two 4 × 4 matrices of 16 LYSO scintillator crystals and two PMTs with 16 channels resulting in a low cost system with the essential functionality of a clinical PET instrument. It is designed to illustrate the physics of the PET technique and to provide a didactic platform for the training of students and nuclear imaging professionals as well as for scientific outreach. The PET modules can be configured to test for the coincidence of 511 keV gamma rays. The model has a flexible mechanical setup [1] and can simulate 14 diferent ring geometries, from a configuration with as few as 18 detectors per ring (ring radius phi=51 mm), up to a geometry with 70 detectors per ring (phi=200 mm). A second version of the electronic system [2] allowed measurement and recording of the energy deposited in 4 detector channels by photons from a 137Cs radioactive source and by photons resulting of the annihilation of positrons from a 22Na radioactive source. These energy spectra are used for detector performance studies, as well as angular dependency studies. In this paper, the mechanical setup, the front-end high-speed analog electronics, the digital acquisition and control electronics implemented in a FPGA, as well as the data-transfer interface between the FPGA board and a host PC are described. Recent preliminary results obtained with the 4 active channels in the prototype are also presented.

  3. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  4. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-12

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. PMID:24819419

  5. High performance polyester concrete using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes could be used in production of unsaturated polyester resins. In turn, these resins could be mixed with inorganic aggregates to produce polymer concrete (PC). Unsaturated polyesters based on recycled PET might be a potentially lower source cost of resins for producing useful PC based-products. The advantage of recycling PET in PC is that the PET materials do not have to be purified, including removal of colors, to the same extent as other PET recycling applications, which should facilitate the recycling operation and minimize its cost. The recycling of PET in PC could also help save energy and allow the long term disposal of the PET waste, an important advantage in recycling applications.

  6. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  7. Diseases Transmitted by Less Common House Pets.

    PubMed

    Chomel, Bruno B

    2015-12-01

    Beside dogs and cats, the most common pets worldwide, an increasing number of pocket pets and exotic pets are making their way to more and more households, especially in North America and Europe. Although many of these animals make appropriate pets, they also can be a source of many zoonotic diseases, especially in young children and immunocompromised individuals. Some of these diseases can be life threatening, such as rabies, rat bite fever, and plague. Some others are quite common, because of the frequency of the pathogens harbored by these species, such as salmonellosis in reptiles and amphibians. Appropriate knowledge of the zoonotic agents carried by these "new" pet species is strongly recommended prior to acquiring pocket or exotic pets. Furthermore, adopting wildlife as pets is strongly discouraged, because it is always a risky action that can lead to major health issues. PMID:27337276

  8. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Metabolic Metrics on Baseline Pre-Sunitinib FDG PET/CT in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Barkhodari, Amir; Harshman, Lauren; Srinivas, Sandy; Quon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate various quantitative metrics on FDG PET/CT for monitoring sunitinib therapy and predicting prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). Methods Seventeen patients (mean age: 59.0 ± 11.6) prospectively underwent a baseline FDG PET/CT and interim PET/CT after 2 cycles (12 weeks) of sunitinib therapy. We measured the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of all identified lesions (highest SUVmax), sum of SUVmax with maximum six lesions (sum of SUVmax), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) from baseline PET/CT and interim PET/CT, and the % decrease in highest SUVmax of lesion (%Δ highest SUVmax), the % decrease in sum of SUVmax, the % decrease in TLG (%ΔTLG) and the % decrease in MTV (%ΔMTV) between baseline and interim PET/CT, and the imaging results were validated by clinical follow-up at 12 months after completion of therapy for progression free survival (PFS). Results At 12 month follow-up, 6/17 (35.3%) patients achieved PFS, while 11/17 (64.7%) patients were deemed to have progression of disease or recurrence within the previous 12 months. At baseline, PET/CT demonstrated metabolically active cancer in all cases. Using baseline PET/CT alone, all of the quantitative imaging metrics were predictive of PFS. Using interim PET/CT, the %Δ highest SUVmax, %Δ sum of SUVmax, and %ΔTLG were also predictive of PFS. Otherwise, interim PET/CT showed no significant difference between the two survival groups regardless of the quantitative metric utilized including MTV and TLG. Conclusions Quantitative metabolic measurements on baseline PET/CT appears to be predictive of PFS at 12 months post-therapy in patients scheduled to undergo sunitinib therapy for mRCC. Change between baseline and interim PET/CT also appeared to have prognostic value but otherwise interim PET/CT after 12 weeks of sunitinib did not appear to be predictive of PFS. PMID:27123976

  9. Pet insurance--essential option?

    PubMed

    Stowe, J D

    2000-08-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day! PMID:10945132

  10. Pet insurance--essential option?

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, J D

    2000-01-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day! Images p639-a PMID:10945132

  11. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient’s survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI. PMID:27656421

  12. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient’s survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI.

  13. Derivation of the scan time requirement for maintaining a consistent PET image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Objectives: the image quality of PET for larger patients is relatively poor, even though the injection dose is optimized considering the NECR characteristics of the PET scanner. This poor image quality is due to the lower level of maximum NECR that can be achieved in these large patients. The aim of this study was to optimize the PET scan time to obtain a consistent PET image quality regardless of the body size, based on the relationship between the patient specific NECR (pNECR) and body weight. Methods: eighty patients (M/F=53/27, body weight: 059 ± 1 kg) underwent whole-body FDG PET scans using a Philips GEMINI GS PET/CT scanner after an injection of 0.14 mCi/kg FDG. The relationship between the scatter fraction (SF) and body weight was determined by repeated Monte Carlo simulations using a NEMA scatter phantom, the size of which varied according to the relationship between the abdominal circumference and body weight. Using this information, the pNECR was calculated from the prompt and delayed PET sinograms to obtain the prediction equation of NECR vs. body weight. The time scaling factor (FTS) for the scan duration was finally derived to make PET images with equivalent SNR levels. Results: the SF and NECR had the following nonlinear relationships with the body weight: SF=0.15 ṡ body weight0.3 and NECR = 421.36 (body weight)-0.84. The equation derived for FTS was 0.01ṡ body weight + 0.2, which means that, for example, a 120-kg person should be scanned 1.8 times longer than a 70 kg person, or the scan time for a 40-kg person can be reduced by 30%. Conclusion: the equation of the relative time demand derived in this study will be useful for maintaining consistent PET image quality in clinics.

  14. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient's survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI. PMID:27656421

  15. PET and PET/CT imaging of skeletal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone scintigraphy augmented with radiographs or cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has remained the commonest method to diagnose and follow up skeletal metastases. However, bone scintigraphy is associated with relatively poor spatial resolution, limited diagnostic specificity and reduced sensitivity for bone marrow disease. It also shows limited diagnostic accuracy in assessing response to therapy in a clinically useful time period. With the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners there has been an increasing interest in using various PET tracers to evaluate skeletal disease including [18F]fluoride (NaF) as a bone-specific tracer and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]choline as tumour-specific tracers. There is also early work exploring the receptor status of skeletal metastases with somatostatin receptor analogues. This review describes the potential utility of these tracers in the assessment of skeletal metastases. PMID:20663736

  16. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using (11)C-ITMM.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wagatsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2016-03-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-(11)C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ((11)C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  17. PET genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tzagoloff, A; Dieckmann, C L

    1990-01-01

    We describe a collection of nuclear respiratory-defective mutants (pet mutants) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of 215 complementation groups. This set of mutants probably represents a substantial fraction of the total genetic information of the nucleus required for the maintenance of functional mitochondria in S. cerevisiae. The biochemical lesions of mutants in approximately 50 complementation groups have been related to single enzymes or biosynthetic pathways, and the corresponding wild-type genes have been cloned and their structures have been determined. The genes defined by an additional 20 complementation groups were identified by allelism tests with mutants characterized in other laboratories. Mutants representative of the remaining complementation groups have been assigned to one of the following five phenotypic classes: (i) deficiency in cytochrome oxidase, (ii) deficiency in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase, (iii) deficiency in mitochondrial ATPase, (iv) absence of mitochondrial protein synthesis, and (v) normal composition of respiratory-chain complexes and of oligomycin-sensitive ATPase. In addition to the genes identified through biochemical and genetic analyses of the pet mutants, we have cataloged PET genes not matched to complementation groups in the mutant collection and other genes whose products function in the mitochondria but are not necessary for respiration. Together, this information provides an up-to-date list of the known genes coding for mitochondrial constituents and for proteins whose expression is vital for the respiratory competence of S. cerevisiae. PMID:2215420

  18. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Melissa G; Bogue, Kelsey; Rohrbaugh, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons.

  19. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Melissa G; Bogue, Kelsey; Rohrbaugh, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons. PMID:26487162

  20. Can 18-FDG-PET During Radiotherapy Replace Post-Therapy Scanning for Detection/Demonstration of Tumor Response in Head-and-Neck Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Ceulemans, Gaeetane; Voordeckers, Mia; Farrag, Ashraf; Verdries, Douwe; Storme, Guy; Everaert, Hendrik

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In routine practice, the tumor response in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) is assessed 3-4 months after radiotherapy (RT). We compared the results of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) during (47 Gy) and 4 months after RT. Methods and Materials: In 40 patients with HNC, PET was performed before (PET1), at the end of Week 4 (47 Gy) (PET2), and 4 months after RT (PET3). Visual analysis classified patients as having a complete response (CR) or a non-CR (NCR). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for PET2 and PET3 were determined. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate for a CR and NCR was calculated for both response evaluation points. Results: After a median follow-up of 26 months, 10 patients had died, 6 had residual disease, and 24 remained disease free. The overall sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy of PET2 vs. PET3 for the detection of a CR was 28.6%, 81.8%, 31.0%, 80.0%, and 42.5% vs. 78.6%, 75.0%, 60.0%, 88.0%, and 77.5%, respectively. The 2-year OS rate determined at 47 Gy was 90.0% and 71.8% for a CR and NCR, respectively, and did not appear to be significantly different (p = .50). For the study, at 4 months, the OS was significantly better in the CR group (91.8%) than in the NCR group (49.9%; p = .0055). Conclusion: The high specificity and positive predictive value for the evaluation of tumor response with PET2 and PET3 might avoid unnecessary salvage surgery in patients with a CR. In contrast to PET3, the sensitivity of PET 2 was low, and the difference in OS between the CR and NCR groups was not significantly different. Therefore, the evaluation of the tumor response with FDG-PET at 4 months after RT completion cannot be replaced by FDG-PET during RT at 47 Gy.

  1. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation). PMID:27593250

  2. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs.

  3. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation).

  4. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs. PMID:26778577

  5. PET-Computed Tomography in Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Randall, Elissa K

    2016-05-01

    PET/CT is an advanced imaging modality that is becoming more commonly used in veterinary medicine. It is most commonly used to image patients with cancer, and the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical is F-18 FDG. F-18 FDG is a glucose analog that highlights areas of increased glucose metabolism on the PET images. CT images provide excellent anatomic depiction and aid in interpretation of the PET data. Many types of cancer are hypermetabolic on PET/CT scans, but normal structures and areas of inflammation are also hypermetabolic, so knowledge of normal imaging and cytologic or histopathologic evaluation of lesions is essential.

  6. FDG PET with contrast-enhanced CT: a critical imaging tool for laryngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mae Mae A Y; Kositwattanarerk, Arpakorn; Lee, David J; Makkar, Jasnit S; Genden, Eric M; Kao, Johnny; Packer, Stuart H; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2010-09-01

    Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved to be an essential imaging modality in the evaluation of laryngeal carcinoma. Although the modality has limited utility in assessing the extent of the primary tumor, FDG PET has proved to be superior to anatomic modalities in the detection of lymph node and distant metastases. The role of FDG PET in the evaluation of patients with laryngeal tumors that are clinically classified as N0 has not shown consistent usefulness because of the innate resolution limitations of the camera. In the posttherapy setting, however, FDG PET has consistently demonstrated a high negative predictive value in the identification of recurrent disease, both during the course of therapy and during long-term follow-up. In addition, contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with FDG PET has demonstrated a complementary role by allowing for superior anatomic coregistration and therefore more definitive diagnosis. There is sufficient evidence that with further advances in PET technology, this modality will likely become more useful in the detection of small lesions and occult nodal disease, as well as in guiding the management of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:20833855

  7. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Melissa G.; Bogue, Kelsey; Rohrbaugh, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones during the 2011 Hurricane Irene were surveyed about whether or not they evacuated and about their experiences during the hurricane. Although pet-ownership was not statistically associated with evacuation failure, many pet owners who chose not to evacuate still claimed that they did not evacuate because of difficulties with evacuating their pet. These findings suggest that more work needs to be done in order to make evacuating with a pet easier. Abstract Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons. PMID:26487162

  8. RadioimmunoPET: Detection of colorectal carcinoma with positron-emitting copper-64-labeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Philpott, G.W.; Schwarz, S.W.; Anderson, C.J. ||

    1995-10-01

    Detection of tumor foci may be improved by combining the selective tumor-targeting properties of a monoclonal antibody with the superior sensitivity and contrast resolution of PET. An anti-colorectal carcinoma monoclonal antibody (MAb 1A3) was labeled with {sup 64}Cu, a positron-emitting radionuclide, by use of a bifunctional chelate (bromoacetamidobenzyl-TETA) and evaluated in 36 patients with suspected advanced primary or metastatic colorectal cancer. After radiopharmaceutical injection (5-20 mg protein, 10 mCi {sup 64}Cu), PET was performed once or twice, 4 to 36 hr later. All patients had CT scans and 18 patients were also studied with [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)PET. In 29 patients, one or more tumor sites (n= 56) were proven, in 5 patients the absence of active tumor was confirmed and in the remaining 2, tumor status is not yet confirmed. Of the 56 confirmed tumor sites, 40 were detected by MAb-PET as foci of increased activity (sensitivity 71%). The positive predictive value of MAb-PET was excellent, ranging from 89% (40/45) to 96% (43/45), depending on the ultimate classification of three image-positive, but as yet unconfirmed tumor sites. Also, MAb-PET detected 11 new occult tumor sites, including 9 small abdominopelvic foci less than 2.0 cm in diameter that were not detected by CT or MRI. There were no complications, but significantly elevated HAMA titers were found in 28% of the 29 patients tested 1 to 12 mo after injection. There was no apparent dose-related effect from 5 to 20 mg MAb 1A3. These Phase I/II results suggest that PET with radiolabeled MAbs (radioimmunoPET) may have important applications in clinical oncology, particulary for detecting smaller colorectal tumor foci in the abdomen or pelvis and for determining accurate dosimetry. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component of PET/CT and PET/MRI in MM patients. The study includes 30 MM patients. All patients initially underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT (60 min p.i.), followed by PET/MRI (120 min p.i.). PET/CT and PET/MRI data were assessed and compared based on qualitative (lesion detection) and quantitative (SUV) evaluation. The hybrid PET/MRI system provided good image quality in all cases without artefacts. PET/MRI identified 65 of the 69 lesions, which were detectable with PET/CT (94.2%). Quantitative PET evaluations showed the following mean values in MM lesions: SUVaverage=5.5 and SUVmax=7.9 for PET/CT; SUVaverage=3.9 and SUVmax=5.8 for PET/MRI. Both SUVaverage and SUVmax were significantly higher on PET/CT than on PET/MRI. Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between both lesional SUVaverage (r=0.744) and lesional SUVmax (r=0.855) values derived from PET/CT and PET/MRI. Regarding detection of myeloma skeletal lesions, PET/MRI exhibited equivalent performance to PET/CT. In terms of tracer uptake quantitation, a significant correlation between the two techniques was demonstrated, despite the statistically significant differences in lesional SUVs between PET/CT and PET/MRI. PMID:26550538

  10. Prognostic significance of volume-based PET parameters in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung Hwan; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Choi, Joon Young

    2013-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cancer prognosis before the start of treatment is important since these predictions often affect the choice of treatment. Prognosis is usually based on anatomical staging and other clinical factors. However, the conventional system is not sufficient to accurately and reliably determine prognosis. Metabolic parameters measured by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) have the potential to provide valuable information regarding prognosis and treatment response evaluation in cancer patients. Among these parameters, volume-based PET parameters such as metabolic tumor volume and total lesion glycolysis are especially promising. However, the measurement of these parameters is significantly affected by the imaging methodology and specific image characteristics, and a standard method for these parameters has not been established. This review introduces volume-based PET parameters as potential prognostic indicators, and highlights methodological considerations for measurement, potential implications, and prospects for further studies. PMID:23323025

  11. Preparation and characterization of solution cast films of PET, reorganized PET and their MWNT nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvind R.; Deshpande, Vineeta D.

    2013-06-01

    The samples of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), reorganized PET (r-PET) and their nanocomposites with 0.05 wt % and 0.1 wt % multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were prepared by standard solution casting method using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as a solvent. Reorganization of PET was obtained by precipitation method using TFA as a solvent and acetone as an antisolvent. Structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the thermal properties of the films. Bulk resistivity of the prepared samples was studied using LCR meter. The results show better dispersion of MWNT in r-PET than in PET. Better dispersion is attributed to the morphological changes in r-PET. The films obtained were conductive and transparent even after addition of MWNT signifying their use as a flexible solar substrate.

  12. 7 CFR 501.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pets. 501.10 Section 501.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.10 Pets. Animals shall be...

  13. 7 CFR 501.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 501.10 Section 501.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.10 Pets. Animals shall be...

  14. 7 CFR 501.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pets. 501.10 Section 501.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.10 Pets. Animals shall be...

  15. 7 CFR 501.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pets. 501.10 Section 501.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.10 Pets. Animals shall be...

  16. 7 CFR 501.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pets. 501.10 Section 501.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.10 Pets. Animals shall be...

  17. Integrating Pet Therapy into Daily School Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brous, Miriam T.

    2010-01-01

    Stories abound in literature of the ways that people and their pets have fostered and created valuable relationships. More recently, research has shown a strong impact from the pet relationship in health-related settings. Positive changes have been seen in people developing resilience, self-reliance, and in making progress in treatment. Children…

  18. Evaluating College Student Interest in Pet Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamle, Kathleen N.; Riley, Tracy A.; Carlson, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    The first year of college can be extremely stressful, especially for students residing on campus. Objective: The authors obtained information from college freshmen about their relationships with pets and investigated interest in a pet therapy program as social support for transient stressful periods. Participants: As part of a university…

  19. Recent developments in PET detector technology

    PubMed Central

    Lewellen, Tom K

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a tool for metabolic imaging that has been utilized since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. A key component of such imaging systems is the detector modules—an area of research and development with a long, rich history. Development of detectors for PET has often seen the migration of technologies, originally developed for high energy physics experiments, into prototype PET detectors. Of the many areas explored, some detector designs go on to be incorporated into prototype scanner systems and a few of these may go on to be seen in commercial scanners. There has been a steady, often very diverse development of prototype detectors, and the pace has accelerated with the increased use of PET in clinical studies (currently driven by PET/CT scanners) and the rapid proliferation of pre-clinical PET scanners for academic and commercial research applications. Most of these efforts are focused on scintillator-based detectors, although various alternatives continue to be considered. For example, wire chambers have been investigated many times over the years and more recently various solid-state devices have appeared in PET detector designs for very high spatial resolution applications. But even with scintillators, there have been a wide variety of designs and solutions investigated as developers search for solutions that offer very high spatial resolution, fast timing, high sensitivity and are yet cost effective. In this review, we will explore some of the recent developments in the quest for better PET detector technology. PMID:18695301

  20. [Innovation and Future Technologies for PET Scanners].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis, neuroimaging and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and manufacturing costs. Higher spatial resolution is essential to enable earlier diagnosis, and improved sensitivity results in reduced radiation exposure and shortened measurement time. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, innovation and future technologies for the next generation PET scanners, such as time-of-flight measurement and simultaneous PET/MRI measurement, are described. Among them, depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement in the radiation sensor will be a key technology to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment, is under development. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers. PMID:26753392

  1. 7 CFR 502.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pets. 502.11 Section 502.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.11 Pets....

  2. 7 CFR 502.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pets. 502.11 Section 502.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.11 Pets....

  3. 7 CFR 502.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.11 Pets. Pets, except assistance trained animals, brought upon BARC property must be kept on a leash and have...

  4. 7 CFR 502.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.11 Pets. Pets, except assistance trained animals, brought upon BARC property must be kept on a leash and have...

  5. Early assesment of radiation response using a novel functional imaging modality-[18F] Fluorocholine PET (FCH-PET): A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Rice, Samuel; Osborne, Joseph; Singh, Prabhsimranjot; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley; Chao, K.S. Clifford

    2013-01-01

    Purpose [18] Fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron-emission tomography/computerized tomography (FDG-PET) is commonly used to assess response to patients treated with radiation (RT) or Chemotherapy and RT (CRT). The intent of this pilot study is to explore whether FCH-PET can serve as an early predictive biomarker for early detection of RT/CRT response. Materials/Methods Fourteen patients have been accrued and analyzed. The lesions were base of tongue, tonsil, nodes, hypopharynx, maxilla, palate, lung, pancreas, brain, uterine and rectal. There were 16 lesions that were considered target lesion and were followed for correlation between change in FCH-PET SUVmax readings and clinical outcome. Median tumor size was 4.4 cm. Median RT dose was 66Gy. The change in SUVmax (Δ SUVmax) of FCH-PET scans performed before and during RT was correlated with clinical outcome at the last follow-up. Results The median FCH-PET SUVmax for the 1st and 2nd scans was 6.15 and 4.65 respectively. Fourteen (87.5%) lesions showed a reduction in SUVmax in either a CR/PR (complete/partial response) and 2 lesions showed an increase in SUVmax both of which were determined to be NR. The median percentage change between the 1st and 2nd scan was −19.5%. Forty-four percent lesions (7/16) had CR, 44% (7/16) had PR and 12% (2/16) had NR (No response). Median follow-up was 12 months. The results showed a difference between NR and PR, between NR and CR, showed a trend towards significance (p=0.06). Conclusion FCH-PET scan demonstrated changes in SUVmax during RT that were predictive of final outcome PMID:22846199

  6. Application of machine learning methodology for PET-based definition of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kerhet, A; Small, C; Quon, H; Riauka, T; Schrader, L; Greiner, R; Yee, D; McEwan, A; Roa, W

    2010-02-01

    We applied a learning methodology framework to assist in the threshold-based segmentation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumours in positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging for use in radiotherapy planning. Gated and standard free-breathing studies of two patients were independently analysed (four studies in total). Each study had a pet-ct and a treatment-planning ct image. The reference gross tumour volume (GTV) was identified by two experienced radiation oncologists who also determined reference standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that most closely approximated the GTV contour on each slice. A set of uptake distribution-related attributes was calculated for each PET slice. A machine learning algorithm was trained on a subset of the PET slices to cope with slice-to-slice variation in the optimal suv threshold: that is, to predict the most appropriate suv threshold from the calculated attributes for each slice. The algorithm's performance was evaluated using the remainder of the pet slices. A high degree of geometric similarity was achieved between the areas outlined by the predicted and the reference SUV thresholds (Jaccard index exceeding 0.82). No significant difference was found between the gated and the free-breathing results in the same patient. In this preliminary work, we demonstrated the potential applicability of a machine learning methodology as an auxiliary tool for radiation treatment planning in NSCLC.

  7. The value of PET/CT to assess clinically negative necks.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Enver; Naiboğlu, Barış; Meacham, Ryan; Ryoo, Cherie; Agrawal, Amit; Schuller, David E

    2012-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of [(18)F]-2-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in evaluating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to the cervical lymph nodes, with specific attention to the efficacy in regard to clinically negative necks. This was a retrospective review of 243 patients with HNSCC between years 2005 and 2007 treated at a comprehensive cancer care institution who underwent pre-operative PET/CT and neck dissection with either an N0 (112 patients) or N+ (131 patients) clinical nodal status. PET/CT findings were correlated with histopathological results of surgical specimens. A majority of the primary sites were oral cavity and oropharynx (70%), followed by larynx, unknown primary and hypopharynx. In the group of 112 patients who underwent 144 neck dissections with N0 nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive (NPV) and accuracy were 57, 82, 59, 80 and 74%, respectively. In the group of 131 patients who underwent 169 neck dissections with N+ nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 93, 70, 96, 58 and 91%, respectively. PET/CT has a much reduced rate of efficacy for the clinically negative neck compared to the clinically positive neck. PET/CT in its current stage does not appear to offer an advantage in staging the clinically N0 neck due to high rates of false positives and negatives.

  8. Hypoxia in Head and Neck Cancer in Theory and Practice: A PET-Based Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M.; Filip, Sanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in tumour recurrence among head and neck cancer patients. The identification and quantification of hypoxic regions are therefore an essential aspect of disease management. Several predictive assays for tumour oxygenation status have been developed in the past with varying degrees of success. To date, functional imaging techniques employing positron emission tomography (PET) have been shown to be an important tool for both pretreatment assessment and tumour response evaluation during therapy. Hypoxia-specific PET markers have been implemented in several clinics to quantify hypoxic tumour subvolumes for dose painting and personalized treatment planning and delivery. Several new radiotracers are under investigation. PET-derived functional parameters and tracer pharmacokinetics serve as valuable input data for computational models aiming at simulating or interpreting PET acquired data, for the purposes of input into treatment planning or radio/chemotherapy response prediction programs. The present paper aims to cover the current status of hypoxia imaging in head and neck cancer together with the justification for the need and the role of computer models based on PET parameters in understanding patient-specific tumour behaviour. PMID:25214887

  9. Evaluation of FLT-PET-CT as an imaging biomarker of proliferation in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, D K; Beresford, M; Li, S P; Dowsett, M; Sanghera, B; Wong, W L; Sonoda, L; Detre, S; Amin, V; Ah-See, M-L; Miles, D; Makris, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: [18F]fluorothymidine (FLT) has been proposed as a positron emission tomography (PET)-imaging biomarker of proliferation for breast cancer. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the feasibility of FLT-PET-CT as a technique for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in primary breast cancer and to compare baseline FLT with Ki-67. Methods: Twenty women with primary breast cancer had a baseline FLT-PET-CT scan that was repeated before the second cycle of chemotherapy. Expression of Ki-67 in the diagnostic biopsy was quantified. From the FLT-PET-CT scans lesion maximum and mean standardised uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean) were calculated. Results: Mean baseline SUVmax was 7.3, and 4.62 post one cycle of NAC, representing a drop of 2.68 (36.3%). There was no significant association between baseline, post chemotherapy, or change in SUVmax and pathological response to NAC. There was a significant correlation between pre-chemotherapy Ki-67 and SUVmax of 0.604 (P=0.006). Conclusions: Baseline SUVmax measurements of FLT-PET-CT were significantly related to Ki-67 suggesting that it is a proliferation biomarker. However, in this series neither the baseline value nor the change in SUVmax after one cycle of NAC were able to predict response as most patients had a sizeable SUVmax reduction. PMID:24832174

  10. PET/MRI – Technical Review

    PubMed Central

    Muzic, Raymond F.; DiFilippo, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    PET/MR is a hybrid imaging technology with the potential to combine the molecular and functional information of PET with the soft-tissue contrast of MR. Herein we review the technical features and challenges of putting these different technologies together. We emphasize the conceptual to make the material accessible to a wide audience. We begin by reviewing PET/CT, a more mature multi-modality imaging technology, to provide a basis for comparison to the history of PET/MR development. We discuss the motivation and challenges of PET/MR and different approaches that have been used to meet the challenges. We conclude with a speculation about the future of this exciting imaging method. PMID:25497909

  11. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  12. Pretreatment Primary Tumor SUVmax Measured by FDG-PET and Pathologic Tumor Depth Predict for Poor Outcomes in Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh, C.; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Huang, S.-F.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The pathologic tumor depth is an independent prognosticator for local control (LC) and survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We sought to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the primary tumor in OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes were investigated. All patients underwent 2-deoxy-2[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography within 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed for {>=}24 months after surgery or until death. The optimal cutoff value for the primary tumor SUVmax was selected according to the 5-year LC rate. Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 26 months (39 months for surviving patients). A cutoff SUVmax of 19.3 provided the greatest prognostic information for the 5-year LC rate (55% vs. 88%, p = 0.0135). A tumor depth {>=}12 mm appeared to be the most appropriate cutoff for predicting the 5-year LC rate (76% vs. 95%, p = 0.0075). A scoring system using the primary tumor SUVmax and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. Patients with both a SUVmax of {>=}19.3 and tumor depth of {>=}12 mm (n = 8) had significantly poorer 5-year LC, 5-year disease-free, 5-year disease-specific, and 5-year overall survival rates compared with the other patient groups. Conclusion: The combination of the primary tumor SUVmax ({>=}19.3) and pathologic tumor depth ({>=}12 mm) identified a subgroup of OSCC patients at greatest risk of poor LC and death.

  13. Utility of interim and end-of-treatment PET/CT in peripheral T-cell lymphomas: A review of 124 patients.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Pedersen, Martin Bjerregård; Hutchings, Martin; Mylam, Karen Juul; Madsen, Jakob; Gang, Anne Ortved; Bøgsted, Martin; de Nully Brown, Peter; Loft, Annika; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Hendel, Helle Westergreen; Iyer, Victor; Gormsen, Lars Christian

    2015-11-01

    According to the updated guidelines for imaging in lymphoma, 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is recommended for staging and evaluation of treatment response in FDG-avid lymphomas. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the utility of PET/CT in nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL). Patients with newly diagnosed nodal PTCL (peripheral T-cell lymphoma NOS, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, or angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma) seen at five Danish hematology centers during the period 2006 to 2012 were included, if they had been pretherapeutically staged with PET/CT. Medical records were reviewed for baseline clinical and follow-up information. Staging, interim (I-PET), and end-of-treatment PET/CT (E-PET) studies were centrally reviewed, and reported using the Deauville 5-point score (DS). A total of 124 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The median age was 58 years, and 88% received CHOP/CHOP-like therapy. Five years PFS and OS of the study population was 36.8% (95% CI 27.3-46.4) and 49.7% (95% CI 38.9-59.6), respectively. The presence of PET/CT-ascertained lung and/or liver involvement was associated with a worse outcome. The sensitivity of PET/CT for detecting biopsy-defined bone marrow involvement was only 18% (95% CI 4-43). An interim DS >3 was not prognostic for worse OS and PFS among CHOP/CHOP-like treated patients in uni- or multivariate analyses. A DS >3 after treatment predicted a worse prognosis. In conclusion, I-PET was not predictive of outcome in CHOP/CHOP-like treated PTCL patients when using the DS. Prospective studies are needed to determine the optimal use of PET/CT in PTCL including the role of quantitative PET/CT analysis.

  14. Some food toxic for pets

    PubMed Central

    Kovalkovičová, Natália; Šutiaková, Irena; Pistl, Juraj; Šutiak, Václav

    2009-01-01

    According to world statistics, dogs and cats are the species that owners most frequently seek assistance with potential poisonings, accounting 95–98% of all reported animal cases. Exposures occur more commonly in the summer and in December that is associated with the holiday season. The majority (>90%) of animal poisonings are accidental and acute in nature and occur near or at the animal owner's home. Feeding human foodstuff to pets may also prove dangerous for their health. The aim of this review was to present common food items that should not be fed (intentionally or unintentionally) to dogs, i.e. chocolate, caffeine, and other methylxanthines, grapes, raisins, onion, garlic, avocado, alcohol, nuts, xylitol contained in chewing gum and candies, etc. Onion and avocado are toxic for cats, too. The clinical effects of individual toxicants and possible therapy are also mentioned. Knowing what human food has the potential to be involved in serious toxicoses should allow veterinarians to better educate their clients on means of preventing pet poisonings. It can be concluded that the best advice must surely be to give animal fodder or treats specifically developed for their diets. PMID:21217849

  15. 24 CFR 5.318 - Discretionary pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discretionary pet rules. 5.318... Disabilities General Requirements § 5.318 Discretionary pet rules. Pet rules promulgated by project owners and... “common household pet”—(1) For Public Housing programs. The pet rules established by a PHA may contain...

  16. Myths and misperceptions about ingredients used in commercial pet foods.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Dottie; Izquierdo, Oscar; Eirmann, Laura; Binder, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Information and misinformation about pet nutrition and pet foods, including ingredients used in pet foods, is widely available through various sources. Often, this "information" raises questions or concerns among pet owners. Many pet owners will turn to their veterinarian for answers to these questions. One of the challenges that veterinarians have is keeping up with the volume of misinformation about pet foods and sorting out fact from fiction. The goal of this article is to provide facts regarding some common myths about ingredients used in commercial pet foods so as to better prepare veterinarians to address their client's questions. PMID:24951341

  17. Early interim PET scans in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: can there be consensus about standardized reporting, and can PET scans guide therapy choices?

    PubMed

    Casasnovas, Rene-Olivier; Meignan, Michel; Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Itti, Emmanuel; Huglo, Damien; Haioun, Corinne; Morschhauser, Franck

    2012-09-01

    The prognosis value of interim positron emission tomography (PET) remains controversial in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients because of the absence of consensus on criteria able to early identify good and bad responders to treatment. Visual interpretation using the International Harmonization Project (IHP) criteria, primarily established for end of treatment evaluation, was related to a low positive predictive value of treatment failure. The 5-point scale (5PS) that refers the residual uptake to the liver as background tissue was shown to slightly reduce false-positive interim PET interpretations compared to IHP criteria. Semiquantification of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake using standardized uptake value (SUV) and assessment of reduction of maximum SUV (SUVmax) between baseline and interim PET drastically improves both the interpretation accuracy and the interobserver reproducibility, and better predicts patient outcome than visual analysis. This latter approach is feasible in a multicenter setting and allows clinicians to design a risk-adapted therapeutic strategy based on early PET response assessment. PMID:22723050

  18. Postapplication Fipronil Exposure Following Use on Pets.

    PubMed

    Cochran, R C; Yu, Liu; Krieger, R I; Ross, J H

    2015-01-01

    Fipronil is a pyrazole acaricide and insecticide that may be used for insect, tick, lice, and mite control on pets. Residents' short-term and long-term postapplication exposures to fipronil, including secondary environmental exposures, were estimated using data from chemical-specific studies. Estimations of acute (24-h) absorbed doses for residents were based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) 2012 standard operating procedures (SOPs) for postapplication exposure. Chronic exposures were not estimated for residential use, as continuous, long-term application activities were unlikely to occur. Estimated acute postapplication absorbed doses were as high as 0.56 μg/kg-d for toddlers (1-2 yr) in households with treated pets based on current U.S. EPA SOPs. Acute toddler exposures estimated here were fivefold larger in comparison to adults. Secondary exposure from the household environment in which a treated pet lives that is not from contacting the pet, but from contacting the house interior to which pet residues were transferred, was estimated based on monitoring socks worn by pet owners. These secondary exposures were more than an order of magnitude lower than those estimated from contacting the pet and thus may be considered negligible.

  19. FDG PET/CT response in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Reader variability and association with clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Ji; O, Joo Hyun; Yoon, Hyukjin; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Byung Ock; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-09-01

    F-18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is essential for monitoring response to treatment in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and qualitative interpretation is commonly applied in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate the interobserver agreements of qualitative PET/CT response in patients with DLBCL and the predictive value of PET/CT results for clinical outcome.PET/CT images were obtained for patients with DLBCL 3 times: at baseline, after 3 cycles of first-line chemotherapy (interim), and after completion of chemotherapy. Two nuclear medicine physicians (with 3 and 8 years of experience with PET/CT) retrospectively assessed response to chemotherapy blinded to the clinical outcome using International Harmonization Project (IHP) criteria and Deauville 5-point score. The associations between PET/CT results and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed using Cox regression analysis.A total of 112 PET/CT images were included from 59 patients with DLBCL (36 male, 23 female; mean age 53 ± 14 years). Using the IHP criteria, interobserver agreement was substantial (Cohen κ = 0.76) with absolute agreement consistency of 89%. Using the Deauville score, interobserver agreement was moderate (Cohen weighted κ = 0.54) and absolute consistency was 62%. The most common cause of disagreements was discordant interpretation of residual tumor uptake. With median follow-up period of 60 months, estimated 5-year PFS and OS were 81% and 92%, respectively. Neither interim nor posttreatment PET/CT results by both readers were significantly associated with PFS. Interim PET/CT result by the more experienced reader using Deauville score was a significant factor for OS (P = 0.019).Moderate-to-substantial interobserver agreement was observed for response assessments according to qualitative PET/CT criteria, and interim PET/CT result could predict OS in patients with DLBCL. Further

  20. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  1. SU-D-9A-03: STAMP: Simulator for Texture Analysis in MRI/PET

    SciTech Connect

    Laberge, S; Vallieres, M; Levesque, I R.; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a convenient simulation platform to facilitate PET/MR image analysis with the prospect of gaining a better understanding of the influence of acquisition parameters on PET/MRI textural features. The simulation platform is demonstrated by showing textural variations of a representative case study using different image acquisition parameters. Methods: The simulation platform is composed of MRI simulators JEMRIS and SIMRI to achieve simulations of customized MRI sequences on sample tumor models. The PET simulator GATE is used to get 2D and 3D Monte Carlo acquisitions of voxelized PET sources using a phantom geometry and a customized scanner architecture. The platform incorporates a series of graphical user interfaces written in Matlab. Two GUIs are used to facilitate communication with the simulation executables installed on a computer cluster. A third GUI is used to collect and display the clinical and simulated images, as well as fused PET/MRI images, and perform computation of textural features.To illustrate the capabilities of this platform, one FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) digitized tumor models were generated from clinical images of a soft-tissue sarcoma patient. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using 3 different echo times (TE) and 5 different repetition times (TR). PET 2D images were simulated using an OSEM algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. Results: STAMP was successfully used to produce numerically simulated FDG-PET and MRI images, and to calculate their corresponding textures. Three typical textures (GLCM-Contrast, GLSZM-ZSV and NGTDM-Coarseness) were found to vary by a range of 45% on average compared to reference scanning conditions in the case of FDG-PET, and by a range of 40% in the case of T1w MRI. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a Matlab-based simulation platform to facilitate PET/MRI texture image analysis for outcome prediction.

  2. Symposium on research advances in clinical PET. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael McGehee

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Clinical PET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) co-sponsored a symposium entitled 'Research in PET: International and Institutional Perspectives' that highlighted the activities of many leading investigators in the U.S. and throughout the world. Research programs at the DOE were discussed as were potential directions of PET research. International as well as institutional perspectives on PET research were presented. This symposium was successful in reaching those interested in research advances of clinical PET.

  3. First-in-human uPAR PET: Imaging of Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Christensen, Camilla; Madsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Thurison, Tine; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Holm, Søren; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Ploug, Michael; Pappot, Helle; Brasso, Klaus; Kroman, Niels; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with 64Cu for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment with laboratory blood screening tests was performed before and after PET ligand injection. In a subgroup of the patients, the in vivo stability of our targeted PET ligand was determined in collected blood and urine. No adverse or clinically detectable side effects in any of the 10 patients were found. The ligand exhibited good in vivo stability and fast clearance from plasma and tissue compartments by renal excretion. In addition, high uptake in both primary tumor lesions and lymph node metastases was seen and paralleled high uPAR expression in excised tumor tissue. Overall, this first-in-human study therefore provides promising evidence for safe use of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 for uPAR PET imaging in cancer patients. PMID:26516369

  4. First-in-human uPAR PET: Imaging of Cancer Aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Christensen, Camilla; Madsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Carsten H; Thurison, Tine; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Holm, Søren; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Ploug, Michael; Pappot, Helle; Brasso, Klaus; Kroman, Niels; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with (64)Cu for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment with laboratory blood screening tests was performed before and after PET ligand injection. In a subgroup of the patients, the in vivo stability of our targeted PET ligand was determined in collected blood and urine. No adverse or clinically detectable side effects in any of the 10 patients were found. The ligand exhibited good in vivo stability and fast clearance from plasma and tissue compartments by renal excretion. In addition, high uptake in both primary tumor lesions and lymph node metastases was seen and paralleled high uPAR expression in excised tumor tissue. Overall, this first-in-human study therefore provides promising evidence for safe use of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 for uPAR PET imaging in cancer patients.

  5. First-in-human uPAR PET: Imaging of Cancer Aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Christensen, Camilla; Madsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Carsten H; Thurison, Tine; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Holm, Søren; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Ploug, Michael; Pappot, Helle; Brasso, Klaus; Kroman, Niels; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with (64)Cu for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment with laboratory blood screening tests was performed before and after PET ligand injection. In a subgroup of the patients, the in vivo stability of our targeted PET ligand was determined in collected blood and urine. No adverse or clinically detectable side effects in any of the 10 patients were found. The ligand exhibited good in vivo stability and fast clearance from plasma and tissue compartments by renal excretion. In addition, high uptake in both primary tumor lesions and lymph node metastases was seen and paralleled high uPAR expression in excised tumor tissue. Overall, this first-in-human study therefore provides promising evidence for safe use of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 for uPAR PET imaging in cancer patients. PMID:26516369

  6. The Heritage of Radiotracers for PET

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fowler, J. S.; Wolf, A. P.

    1988-05-01

    The history of PET research clearly demonstrates that it is advances in chemistry coupled with a detailed examination of the biochemistry of new radiotracers which has allowed the PET method to be applied to new areas of biology and medicine. Radiotracers whose regional distribution reflects glucose metabolism, neutrotransmitter activity and enzyme activity have all required the development of rapid synthetic methods for the radiotracers themselves and the characterization of their biochemical behavior. This article traces some of the advances in the production of labeled precursors and in radiotracer synthesis and evaluation which have shaped the rapidly expanding application of PET to problems in the neurosciences, in cardiology and in oncology.

  7. [New pets, allergens and allergic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Brajon, D; Waton, J; Schmutz, J-L; Barbaud, A

    2014-10-01

    The number of household pets increased greatly during the twentieth century, with the numbers of new pets (NP, i.e. any pet other than cats and dogs) rising especially sharply over the last decade. Contact with such animals, whose owners do not always know how to look after them properly, expose the population to new risks such as trauma, infection and allergy. While the most common allergies are respiratory, allergic skin reactions, both immediate and delayed, may also result from contact with these new allergens. The animal itself or its environment may be the cause. Herein, we review NPs and reports of allergic dermatitis associated with them.

  8. The heritage of radiotracers for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1988-05-01

    The history of PET research clearly demonstrates that it is advances in chemistry coupled with a detailed examination of the biochemistry of new radiotracers which has allowed the PET method to be applied to new areas of biology and medicine. Radiotracers whose regional distribution reflects glucose metabolism, neutrotransmitter activity and enzyme activity have all required the development of rapid synthetic methods for the radiotracers themselves and the characterization of their biochemical behavior. This article traces some of the advances in the production of labeled precursors and in radiotracer synthesis and evaluation which have shaped the rapidly expanding application of PET to problems in the neurosciences, in cardiology and in oncology. 54 refs.

  9. The role of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of residual disease in paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhojwani, Deepa; McCarville, Mary B; Choi, John K; Sawyer, Jennifer; Metzger, Monika L; Inaba, Hiroto; Davidoff, Andrew M; Gold, Robert; Shulkin, Barry L; Sandlund, John T

    2015-03-01

    (18) F-labelled-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings are challenging to interpret for residual disease versus complete response in paediatric patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). A biopsy is often warranted to confirm the presence or absence of viable tumour if there is clinical or radiographic evidence of residual disease. In this study, we compared conventional imaging and FDG-PET/computerized tomography (CT) findings with biopsy results in 18 children with NHL. Our goal was to provide additional data to establish more reliable criteria for response evaluation. Residual disease was suspected after conventional imaging alone in eight patients, after FDG-PET/CT alone in three and after both modalities in seven patients. Biopsy confirmed the presence of viable tumour in two patients. Two additional patients experienced progressive disease or relapse. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FDG-PET/CT using the London criteria to indicate residual tumour detectable by biopsy were 100%, but specificity was low (60%), as was the positive predictive value (25%). Thus, in this study, a negative FDG-PET/CT finding was a good indicator of complete remission. However, because false-positive FDG-PET/CT findings are common, biopsy and close monitoring are required for accurate determination of residual disease in individual patients.

  10. Theoretical Analysis of Penalized Maximum-Likelihood Patlak Parametric Image Reconstruction in Dynamic PET for Lesion Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-04-01

    Detecting cancerous lesions is a major clinical application of emission tomography. In a previous work, we studied penalized maximum-likelihood (PML) image reconstruction for lesion detection in static PET. Here we extend our theoretical analysis of static PET reconstruction to dynamic PET. We study both the conventional indirect reconstruction and direct reconstruction for Patlak parametric image estimation. In indirect reconstruction, Patlak parametric images are generated by first reconstructing a sequence of dynamic PET images, and then performing Patlak analysis on the time activity curves (TACs) pixel-by-pixel. In direct reconstruction, Patlak parametric images are estimated directly from raw sinogram data by incorporating the Patlak model into the image reconstruction procedure. PML reconstruction is used in both the indirect and direct reconstruction methods. We use a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to assess lesion detectability in Patlak parametric images. Simplified expressions for evaluating the lesion detectability have been derived and applied to the selection of the regularization parameter value to maximize detection performance. The proposed method is validated using computer-based Monte Carlo simulations. Good agreements between the theoretical predictions and the Monte Carlo results are observed. Both theoretical predictions and Monte Carlo simulation results show the benefit of the indirect and direct methods under optimized regularization parameters in dynamic PET reconstruction for lesion detection, when compared with the conventional static PET reconstruction.

  11. Changes in nutritional and sensory properties of orange juice packed in PET bottles: an experimental and modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupi, Celine; Lemaistre, Marie Hélène; Boutroy, Naima; Bunel, Christophe; Peyron, Stéphane; Guillard, Valérie; Chalier, Pascale

    2013-12-15

    Sensitivity to oxidation of an orange juice was investigated through packaging in standard PET or active PET with oxygen scavenger bottles. The evolution of dissolved oxygen was found to be similar in all bottles, whereas ascorbic acid degradation was related to the oxygen transfer with higher losses in standard PET (53%) against active PET (31%). Moreover, when juice was exposed to high intensity light, a fold faster degradation of ascorbic acid was observed compared to total darkness. Depending also on the light intensity and regardless of the package permeability, changes in the aromatic profile of the juice were observed due to the degradation of limonene and the formation of α-terpineol, an off-flavour. A mechanistic model was developed to predict the shelf life of orange juice. This model, coupling O2 transfer and ascorbic acid oxidation reaction in the bottled juice, confirmed that oxygen permeation through packaging material could not be neglected.

  12. Novel PET/SPECT Probes for Imaging of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    As the world's population ages, the number of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is predicted to increase rapidly. The presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, is one of the neuropathological hallmarks of AD brain. Since the presence of NFTs is well correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in AD, imaging of tau using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful for presymptomatic diagnosis and monitoring of the progression of AD. Therefore, novel PET/SPECT probes for the imaging of tau have been developed. More recently, several probes were tested clinically and evaluated for their utility. This paper reviews the current state of research on the development and evaluation of PET/SPECT probes for the imaging of tau in AD brain. PMID:25879047

  13. Is non-attenuation-corrected PET inferior to body attenuation-corrected PET or PET/CT in lung cancer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maintas, Dimitris; Houzard, Claire; Ksyar, Rachid; Mognetti, Thomas; Maintas, Catherine; Scheiber, Christian; Itti, Roland

    2006-12-01

    It is considered that one of the great strengths of PET imaging is the ability to correct for body attenuation. This enables better lesion uptake quantification and quality of PET images. The aim of this work is to compare the sensitivity of non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) PET images, the gamma photons (GPAC) and CT attenuation-corrected (CTAC) images in detecting and staging of lung cancer. We have studied 66 patients undergoing PET/CT examinations for detecting and staging NSC lung cancer. The patients were injected with 18-FDG; 5 MBq/kg under fasting conditions and examination was started 60 min later. Transmission data were acquired by a spiral CT X-ray tube and by gamma photons emitting Cs-137l source and were used for the patient body attenuation correction without correction for respiratory motion. In 55 of 66 patients we performed both attenuation correction procedures and in 11 patients only CT attenuation correction. In seven patients with solitary nodules PET was negative and in 59 patients with lung cancer PET/CT was positive for pulmonary or other localization. In the group of 55 patients we found 165 areas of focal increased 18-FDG uptake in NAC, 165 in CTAC and 164 in GPAC PET images.In the patients with only CTAC we found 58 areas of increased 18-FDG uptake on NAC and 58 areas lesions on CTAC. In the patients with positive PET we found 223 areas of focal increased uptake in NAC and 223 areas in CTAC images. The sensitivity of NAC was equal to the sensitivity of CTAC and GPAC images. The visualization of peripheral lesions was better in NAC images and the lesions were better localized in attenuation-corrected images. In three lesions of the thorax the localization was better in GPAC and fused images than in CTAC images.

  14. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  15. APD-based PET detector for simultaneous PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioso, Ronald; Zhang, Nan; Corbeil, James; Schmand, Matthias; Ladebeck, Ralf; Vester, Markus; Schnur, Günter; Renz, Wolfgang; Fischer, Hubertus

    2006-12-01

    Two, APD-based, PET modules have been evaluated for use in combined PET/MR imaging. Each module consists of 4 independent, optically isolated detectors. Each detector consists of an 8×8 array of 2×2×20 mm LSO crystals read out by a 2×2 array of 5×5 mm Hamamatsu S8664-55 APDs. The average crystal energy resolution and time resolution (against a plastic scintillator on a PMT) of the detectors was 17% and 1.8 ns, respectively. The modules were positioned in the tunnel of a 1.5 T Siemens Symphony MR scanner. The presence of the PET modules decreased the MR signal-to-noise ratio by about 15% but no image interference was observed. The gradient and RF pulse sequences of the MR produced adverse effects on the PET event signals. These high-frequency pulses did not affect the true PET events but did increase the dead time of the PET system. Simultaneous, artifact-free, images were acquired with the PET and MR system using a small Derenzo phantom. These results show that APD-based PET detectors can be used for a high-resolution and cost-effective integrated PET/MR system.

  16. [Indications for the use of PET or PET/CT in patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Bernsdorf, Mogens; Graff, Jesper

    2011-10-17

    PET and PET/CT, using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, are not suited for primary diagnostics of small tumours or lymph node metastases to the axilla. In return, the method has a high sensitivity and specificity regarding the detection of loco-regional recurrence and metastases to mediastinal lymph nodes, bones, liver and lungs. Whether the method can replace the conventional evaluation or be a supplement if conventional evaluation is non-conclusive, remains unresolved. PET/CT has a clear advantage compared to PET alone and will probably find increasing use in the treatment planning and evaluation of patients with breast cancer.

  17. Thermal characterization of polymer blends prepared by reactive blending of PC and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorini, M.; Marchese, P.; Pilati, F.

    1996-12-31

    Several Poly(ethylene terephthalate)-Bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC/PET) blends were prepared by reactive blending poly(ethylene terephthalate) and Bisphenol A polycarbonate in a batch mixer in the presence of ester exchange catalysts with different catalytic activity, such as Titanium, Terbium, Cerium, Samarium, Europium and Calcium/Antimony compounds. The catalytic activity and mixing time have been correlated with the extent of ester-carbonate exchange reactions and hence the influence of the PET/PC block copolymers formed during the blending on miscibility has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The results of the thermal characterization showed that blends with a single glass transition temperature can be prepared at different mixing time determined by the ester-carbonate exchange reaction activity of the different catalysts employed. In addition, the Tg`s values for the miscible blends were lower than those predicted by the widely used Flory-Fox equation, except from the blends prepared with the Titanium catalyst. Crystallization of PET in PC/PET blends was also investigated. Thermal analysis is a powerful technique that can be applied to the determination of miscibility in polymer blends. In this communication, the results of a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study on blends prepared by reactive blending PC and PET are reported.

  18. MRI compatibility of position-sensitive photomultiplier depth-of-interaction PET detectors modules for in-line multimodality preclinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquero, J. J.; Sánchez, J. J.; Udías, J. M.; Cal-González, J.; Desco, M.

    2013-02-01

    This work addresses the feasibility of a small-animal, in-line PET/MR system based on Position-Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tubes (PS-PMTs). To this end, we measured the effects of static magnetic fields on the PS-PMTs performance in order to explore the minimal tandem separation between the PET and MR subsystems to preserve their respective performances. We concluded that it is possible to achieve minimal degradation of the PET scanner performance (after a system recalibration) if the magnetic field strength influencing the PET detectors is less than 1 mT and if it is oriented perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the tube. Therefore, we predict that it will be possible to maintain the PET image quality if it is placed outside the 1 mT line.

  19. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Kayako; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Kato, Hiroki; Fukushima, Kentaro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Hatazawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    .001). None of the serum parameters differed significantly between recurrent and non-recurrent cases. Conclusion: Post-treatment PET evaluations were well correlated with the outcomes of patients with ML, exhibiting FDG uptake. Among patients with HL or DLBCL, a post-treatment complete remission on PET was predictive of a relatively long PFS. For predicting the prognosis of patients with other histological types, a combination of CT/MRI and PET, rather than PET alone, is recommended. PMID:27408888

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Matthew R.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Schultz, Christopher J.; Michel, Michelle A.; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang Dian

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence.

  1. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek, S.; Svensson, R.; Jonsson, C.; Brahme, A.

    2006-11-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  2. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... eczema should probably avoid aquariums. continue Dogs and Cats Dogs and cats are popular pets but can carry infections such ... be in the intestinal tract of infected dogs, cats, hamsters, birds, and certain farm animals. A person ...

  3. Don't Just Pet Your Chia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents ways to use ChiaPets to link biology-related topics such as taxonomy, morphology, ethnobotany, economic botany, hydroponics, salinity, photomorphogenesis, and phototropism with food and fertilizer chemistry, mathematics, art, and history. (MKR)

  4. Pet Turtles Continue to Spread Salmonella

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159393.html Pet Turtles Continue to Spread Salmonella 15 outbreaks in U.S. ... WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Kissing a turtle may be more than just yucky -- sometimes it ...

  5. Cardiovascular physiology and diseases of pet birds.

    PubMed

    Pees, Michael; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Avian cardiac disease in pet birds occurs more often than previously assumed. The article focuses on anatomic peculiarities of the avian cardiovascular system and common diseases. Diagnostic possibilities are demonstrated, and therapeutic measures are discussed.

  6. 36 CFR 13.1310 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (a) Pets are prohibited— (1) In the Exit Glacier Developed Area except in the parking lot, on the Exit Glacier road, or other areas designated by the superintendent; (2) Along the coast within the...

  7. 36 CFR 13.1310 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Pets are prohibited— (1) In the Exit Glacier Developed Area except in the parking lot, on the Exit Glacier road, or other areas designated by the superintendent; (2) Along the coast within the...

  8. 36 CFR 13.1310 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (a) Pets are prohibited— (1) In the Exit Glacier Developed Area except in the parking lot, on the Exit Glacier road, or other areas designated by the superintendent; (2) Along the coast within the...

  9. 36 CFR 13.1310 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (a) Pets are prohibited— (1) In the Exit Glacier Developed Area except in the parking lot, on the Exit Glacier road, or other areas designated by the superintendent; (2) Along the coast within the...

  10. 36 CFR 13.1310 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (a) Pets are prohibited— (1) In the Exit Glacier Developed Area except in the parking lot, on the Exit Glacier road, or other areas designated by the superintendent; (2) Along the coast within the...

  11. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  12. The dynamics of physics in PET.

    PubMed

    Watson, Charles C

    2014-12-01

    From a technical perspective, there are fundamentally two forces driving the evolution of instrumentation in positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear medicine generally: clinical needs and technical innovation. This essay considers some of the dynamics of these forces as they act on physics-related developments in PET and suggests that progress will be greatest if these differing motivations are kept in balance as the field evolves.

  13. Sea otter health: challenging a pet hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission.

  14. The history of cerebral PET scanning

    PubMed Central

    Portnow, Leah H.; Vaillancourt, David E.; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the discoveries underpinning the introduction of cerebral PET scanning and highlight its modern applications. Background: Important discoveries in neurophysiology, brain metabolism, and radiotracer development in the post–World War II period provided the necessary infrastructure for the first cerebral PET scan. Methods: A complete review of the literature was undertaken to search for primary and secondary sources on the history of PET imaging. Searches were performed in PubMed, Google Scholar, and select individual journal Web sites. Written autobiographies were obtained through the Society for Neuroscience Web site at www.sfn.org. A reference book on the history of radiology, Naked to the Bone, was reviewed to corroborate facts and to locate references. The references listed in all the articles and books obtained were reviewed. Results: The neurophysiologic sciences required to build cerebral PET imaging date back to 1878. The last 60 years have produced an evolution of technological advancements in brain metabolism and radiotracer development. These advancements facilitated the development of modern cerebral PET imaging. Several key scientists were involved in critical discoveries and among them were Angelo Mosso, Charles Roy, Charles Sherrington, John Fulton, Seymour Kety, Louis Sokoloff, David E. Kuhl, Gordon L. Brownell, Michael Ter-Pogossian, Michael Phelps, and Edward Hoffman. Conclusions: Neurophysiology, metabolism, and radiotracer development in the postwar era synergized the development of the technology necessary for cerebral PET scanning. Continued use of PET in clinical trials and current developments in PET-CT/MRI hybrids has led to advancement in diagnosis, management, and treatment of neurologic disorders. PMID:23460618

  15. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, Progress and Promise

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wolf, A. P.; Fowler, J. S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, progress and promise

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters. 7 refs.

  18. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Kevin D

    2015-12-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  19. Reproducibility of 18F-FDG PET uptake measurements in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma on both PET/CT and PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, B M; Aznar, M C; Hansen, A E; Vogelius, I R; Löfgren, J; Andersen, F L; Loft, A; Kjaer, A; Højgaard, L; Specht, L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate reproducibility of fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake on 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MR scans in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods: 30 patients with HNSCC were included in this prospective study. The patients were scanned twice before radiotherapy treatment with both PET/CT and PET/MR. Patients were scanned on the same scanners, 3 days apart and according to the same protocol. Metabolic tumour activity was measured by the maximum and peak standardized uptake value (SUVmax and SUVpeak, respectively), and total lesion glycolysis from the metabolic tumour volume defined from ≥50% SUVmax. Bland–Altman analysis with limits of agreement, coefficient of variation (CV) from the two modalities were performed in order to test the reproducibility. Furthermore, CVs from SUVmax and SUVpeak were compared. The area under the curve from cumulative SUV–volume histograms were measured and tested for reproducibility of the distribution of 18F-FDG uptake. Results: 24 patients had two pre-treatment PET/CT scans and 21 patients had two pre-treatment PET/MR scans available for further analyses. Mean difference for SUVmax, peak and mean was approximately 4% for PET/CT and 3% for PET/MR, with 95% limits of agreement less than ±20%. CV was small (5–7%) for both modalities. There was no significant difference in CVs between PET/CT and PET/MR (p = 0.31). SUVmax was not more reproducible than SUVpeak (p = 0.09). Conclusion: 18F-FDG uptake in PET/CT and PET/MR is highly reproducible and we found no difference in reproducibility between PET/CT and PET/MR. Advances in knowledge: This is the first report to test reproducibility of PET/CT and PET/MR. PMID:25634069

  20. Detection of Primary Malignancy and Metastases with FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cholangiocarcinomas: Lesion-based Comparison with Contrast Enhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Youssef; Mariano, Aladin T.; Lu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines consider the role of 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as "uncertain," and have recommended contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) but not FDG PET/CT as a routine imaging test for CCA workup. We set out to compare the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT and CECT in patients with CCA. The retrospective study included patients with CCA who underwent FDG PET/CT and CECT within 2-month interval between 2011 and 2013 in our hospital. Lesion-based comparison was conducted. Final diagnoses were made based on the composite clinical and imaging data with minimal 6-month follow-up. A total of 18 patients with 28-paired tests were included. There is a total of 142 true malignant lesions as revealed by the 6-paired pre-treatment and 22-paired post-treatment tests. On a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracies of PET/CT and CECT for detection of CCA were 96.5%, 55.5%, 97.2%, 50.0%, 94.1% and 62.2%, 66.7%, 96.7%, 10.0%, 62.5%, respectively. FDG PET/CT detected more intrahepatic malignant and extrahepatic metastases; and had significant higher sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy than CECT, while similar in specificity and PPV. No true positive lesion detected on CECT that was missed on PET/CT, and none of the false negative lesions on PET/CT were detected on CECT. Six patients had paired pretreatment tests, and FDG PET/CT results changed planned management in three patients. Our data suggest that FDG PET/CT detect more primary and metastatic lesions and lead to considerable changes in treatment plan in comparison with CECT. PMID:27651736

  1. Detection of Primary Malignancy and Metastases with FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cholangiocarcinomas: Lesion-based Comparison with Contrast Enhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Youssef; Mariano, Aladin T.; Lu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines consider the role of 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as "uncertain," and have recommended contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) but not FDG PET/CT as a routine imaging test for CCA workup. We set out to compare the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT and CECT in patients with CCA. The retrospective study included patients with CCA who underwent FDG PET/CT and CECT within 2-month interval between 2011 and 2013 in our hospital. Lesion-based comparison was conducted. Final diagnoses were made based on the composite clinical and imaging data with minimal 6-month follow-up. A total of 18 patients with 28-paired tests were included. There is a total of 142 true malignant lesions as revealed by the 6-paired pre-treatment and 22-paired post-treatment tests. On a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracies of PET/CT and CECT for detection of CCA were 96.5%, 55.5%, 97.2%, 50.0%, 94.1% and 62.2%, 66.7%, 96.7%, 10.0%, 62.5%, respectively. FDG PET/CT detected more intrahepatic malignant and extrahepatic metastases; and had significant higher sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy than CECT, while similar in specificity and PPV. No true positive lesion detected on CECT that was missed on PET/CT, and none of the false negative lesions on PET/CT were detected on CECT. Six patients had paired pretreatment tests, and FDG PET/CT results changed planned management in three patients. Our data suggest that FDG PET/CT detect more primary and metastatic lesions and lead to considerable changes in treatment plan in comparison with CECT.

  2. Detection of Primary Malignancy and Metastases with FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cholangiocarcinomas: Lesion-based Comparison with Contrast Enhanced CT.

    PubMed

    Elias, Youssef; Mariano, Aladin T; Lu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    The current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines consider the role of 2-deoxy-2-(18)F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as "uncertain," and have recommended contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) but not FDG PET/CT as a routine imaging test for CCA workup. We set out to compare the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT and CECT in patients with CCA. The retrospective study included patients with CCA who underwent FDG PET/CT and CECT within 2-month interval between 2011 and 2013 in our hospital. Lesion-based comparison was conducted. Final diagnoses were made based on the composite clinical and imaging data with minimal 6-month follow-up. A total of 18 patients with 28-paired tests were included. There is a total of 142 true malignant lesions as revealed by the 6-paired pre-treatment and 22-paired post-treatment tests. On a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracies of PET/CT and CECT for detection of CCA were 96.5%, 55.5%, 97.2%, 50.0%, 94.1% and 62.2%, 66.7%, 96.7%, 10.0%, 62.5%, respectively. FDG PET/CT detected more intrahepatic malignant and extrahepatic metastases; and had significant higher sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy than CECT, while similar in specificity and PPV. No true positive lesion detected on CECT that was missed on PET/CT, and none of the false negative lesions on PET/CT were detected on CECT. Six patients had paired pretreatment tests, and FDG PET/CT results changed planned management in three patients. Our data suggest that FDG PET/CT detect more primary and metastatic lesions and lead to considerable changes in treatment plan in comparison with CECT. PMID:27651736

  3. Nutritional Sustainability of Pet Foods12

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Kelly S.; Carter, Rebecca A.; Yount, Tracy P.; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system. PMID:23493530

  4. Pet fur color and texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jonathan; Mukherjee, Debarghar; Lim, SukHwan; Tretter, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Object segmentation is important in image analysis for imaging tasks such as image rendering and image retrieval. Pet owners have been known to be quite vocal about how important it is to render their pets perfectly. We present here an algorithm for pet (mammal) fur color classification and an algorithm for pet (animal) fur texture classification. Per fur color classification can be applied as a necessary condition for identifying the regions in an image that may contain pets much like the skin tone classification for human flesh detection. As a result of the evolution, fur coloration of all mammals is caused by a natural organic pigment called Melanin and Melanin has only very limited color ranges. We have conducted a statistical analysis and concluded that mammal fur colors can be only in levels of gray or in two colors after the proper color quantization. This pet fur color classification algorithm has been applied for peteye detection. We also present here an algorithm for animal fur texture classification using the recently developed multi-resolution directional sub-band Contourlet transform. The experimental results are very promising as these transforms can identify regions of an image that may contain fur of mammals, scale of reptiles and feather of birds, etc. Combining the color and texture classification, one can have a set of strong classifiers for identifying possible animals in an image.

  5. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  6. Attenuation correction for small animal PET tomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Patrick L.; Rannou, Fernando R.; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2005-04-01

    Attenuation correction is one of the important corrections required for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). This work will compare the quantitative accuracy of attenuation correction using a simple global scale factor with traditional transmission-based methods acquired either with a small animal PET or a small animal x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. Two phantoms (one mouse-sized and one rat-sized) and two animal subjects (one mouse and one rat) were scanned in CTI Concorde Microsystem's microPET® Focus™ for emission and transmission data and in ImTek's MicroCAT™ II for transmission data. PET emission image values were calibrated against a scintillation well counter. Results indicate that the scale factor method of attenuation correction places the average measured activity concentration about the expected value, without correcting for the cupping artefact from attenuation. Noise analysis in the phantom studies with the PET-based method shows that noise in the transmission data increases the noise in the corrected emission data. The CT-based method was accurate and delivered low-noise images suitable for both PET data correction and PET tracer localization.

  7. Radioembolization and the Dynamic Role of 90Y PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bourgeois, Austin C.; McKinney, J. Mark; Chang, Ted T.; Osborne, Dustin R.; Acuff, Shelley N.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2014-01-01

    Before the advent of tomographic imaging, it was postulated that decay of 90 Y to the 0+ excited state of 90Zr may result in emission of a positron–electron pair. While the branching ratio for pair-production is small (~32 × 10−6), PET has been successfully used to image 90 Y in numerous recent patients and phantom studies. 90 Y PET imaging has been performed on a variety of PET/CT systems, with and without time-of-flight (TOF) and/or resolution recovery capabilities as well as on both bismuth-germanate and lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO)-based scanners. On all systems, resolution and contrast superior to bremsstrahlung SPECT has been reported. The intrinsic radioactivity present in LYSO-based PET scanners is a potential limitation associated with accurate quantification of 90 Y. However, intrinsic radioactivity has been shown to have a negligible effect at the high activity concentrations common in 90 Y radioembolization. Accurate quantification is possible on a variety of PET scanner models, with or without TOF, although TOF improves accuracy at lower activity concentrations. Quantitative 90 Y PET images can be transformed into 3-dimensional (3D) maps of absorbed dose based on the premise that the 90 Y activity distribution does not change after infusion. This transformation has been accomplished in several ways, although the most common is with the use of 3D dose-point-kernel convolution. From a clinical standpoint, 90 Y PET provides a superior post-infusion evaluation of treatment technical success owing to its improved resolution. Absorbed dose maps generated from quantitative PET data can be used to predict treatment efficacy and manage patient follow-up. For patients who receive multiple treatments, this information can also be used to provide patient-specific treatment-planning for successive therapies, potentially improving response. The broad utilization of 90 Y PET has the potential to provide a wealth of dose

  8. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  9. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  10. Hybrid registration of PET/CT in thoracic region with pre-filtering PET sinogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokri, S. S.; Saripan, M. I.; Marhaban, M. H.; Nordin, A. J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-11-01

    The integration of physiological (PET) and anatomical (CT) images in cancer delineation requires an accurate spatial registration technique. Although hybrid PET/CT scanner is used to co-register these images, significant misregistrations exist due to patient and respiratory/cardiac motions. This paper proposes a hybrid feature-intensity based registration technique for hybrid PET/CT scanner. First, simulated PET sinogram was filtered with a 3D hybrid mean-median before reconstructing the image. The features were then derived from the segmented structures (lung, heart and tumor) from both images. The registration was performed based on modified multi-modality demon registration with multiresolution scheme. Apart from visual observations improvements, the proposed registration technique increased the normalized mutual information index (NMI) between the PET/CT images after registration. All nine tested datasets show marked improvements in mutual information (MI) index than free form deformation (FFD) registration technique with the highest MI increase is 25%.

  11. PET/CT with Fluorodeoxyglucose During Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Travaini, Laura L; Zampino, Maria G; Colandrea, Marzia; Ferrari, Mahila E; Gilardi, Laura; Leonardi, Maria C; Santoro, Luigi; Orecchia, Roberto; Grana, Chiara M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study is to evaluate the accuracy of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) with Fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) to predict treatment response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Patients and methods Forty-one LARC patients performed [18F]FDG-PET/CT at baseline (PET0). All patients received continuous capecitabine concomitant to radiotherapy on the pelvis, followed by intermittent capecitabine until two weeks before curative surgery. [18F]FDG-PET/CT was also carried out at 40 Gy-time (PET1) and at the end of neoadjuvant therapy (PET2). PET imaging was analysed semi-quantitatively through the measurement of maximal standardised uptake value (SUVmax) and the tumour volume (TV). Histology was expressed through pTNM and Dworak tumor regression grading. Patients were categorised into responder (downstaging or downsizing) and non-responder (stable or progressive disease by comparison pretreatment parameters with clinical/pathological characteristics posttreatment/after surgery). Logistic regression was used to evaluate SUVmax and TV absolute and percent reduction as predictors of response rate using gender, age, and CEA as covariates. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Survivals were compared by the Log-Rank test. Results Twenty-three responders (9 ypCR, 14 with downstaged disease) and 18 non-responders showed differences in terms of both early and posttreatment SUVmax percent reduction (median comparison: responder = 63.2%, non-responder = 44.2%, p = 0.04 and responder = 76.9%, non-responder = 61.6%, p = 0.06 respectively). The best predictive cut-offs of treatment response for early and posttreatment SUVmax percent reduction were ≥57% and ≥66% from baseline (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01 respectively). Conclusions [18F]FDG-PET/CT is a reliable technique for evaluating therapy response during neoadjuvant

  12. [F-18] FDG-PET/CT parameters as predictors of outcome in inoperable NSCLC patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Antonio; Gallicchio, Rosj; Simeon, Vittorio; Nardelli, Anna; Pelagalli, Alessandra; Zupa, Angela; Vita, Giulia; Venetucci, Angela; Di Cosola, Michele; Barbato, Francesco; Storto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the prognostic significance of standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) in [F-18] FDG PET/CT findings in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods. One hundred and three patients (mean age, 65.6 ± 16 years) underwent [F-18] FDG PET/CT before the chemotherapy. The SUVmax value, the MTV (cm3; 42% threshold) and the TLG (g) were registered. The patients were followed up to 18 months thereafter (range 12–55 months). Failure to respond without progression, progression and/or disease-related death constituted surrogate end-points. The optimal SUVmax, MTV and TLG cut-off to predict the patients’ outcome were estimated. PET/CT results were then related to disease outcome (progression free survival; PFS). Results The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for SUVmax showed a significant shorter PFS in patients presenting with lower values as compared to those with higher (p < 0.05, log-rank test). MTV and TLG were not suitable for predicting PFS apart from the subset of patients with mediastinal nodal involvement. Conclusions Despite the availability of new tools for the quantitative assessment of disease activity on PET/CT, the SUVmax rather than MTV and TLG remains the only predictor for PFS in NSCLC patients. MTV holds a value only when concomitant nodal involvement occurs. PMID:26834517

  13. FDG-PET in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Lu; Qin, Xin-Gan; Huang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis predicting of pancreatic carcinoma (PC). METHODS: A systematic review of relevant literatures in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library was performed. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic and staging studies, and HRs for prognosis predicting studies were pooled. The bivariate model was used for diagnostic studies and the random-effect model for prognostic studies. Heterogeneity between included studies was tested using χ2 test, and subgroup analysis was performed to explain the heterogeneities. All of the calculations were performed using Stata version 11.0. RESULTS: A total of 39 studies were included. The pooled sensitivity of PET in diagnosing PC (30 studies, 1582 patients), evaluating N stating (4 studies, 101 patients) and liver metastasis (7 studies, 316 patients) were 0.91 (95%CI: 0.88-0.93), 0.64 (95%CI: 0.50-0.76), and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively; and the corresponding specificity was 0.81 (95%CI: 0.75-0.85), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.25-0.85), and 0.96 (95%CI: 0.89-0.98), respectively. In prognosis analysis (6 studies, 198 patients), significant difference of overall survival was observed between high and low standardized uptake value groups (HR = 2.39, 95%CI: 1.57-3.63). Subgroup analysis showed that PET/CT was more sensitive than PET alone in evaluating liver metastasis of PC, 0.82 (95%CI: 0.48-0.98) and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively. CONCLUSION: PET can be used as a valuable diagnostic and predictive tool for PC, but its effect in the staging of PC remains indeterminate. PMID:23922481

  14. FDG-PET/CT in pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Franzius, C

    2010-08-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become an important imaging modality in the non-invasive evaluation and monitoring of children with known or suspected malignant diseases. In sarcoma patients, [18F]FDG (FDG) PET and FDG PET/CT is useful in staging, therapy monitoring, and detection of relapse. However, FDG PET has been proven to be less sensitive than chest CT in the detection of pulmonary metastases derived from sarcoma. This disadvantage has been overcome using a PET/CT scanner. In neuroblastoma patients, PET using FDG is indicated in MIBG-negative cases. Furthermore, there are specific PET tracers for tumors of the sympathetic nervous system, such as [11C]Hydroxyephedrine (HED) and [18F]-labeled dihydrophenylalanine (F-DOPA), which can be used for PET/CT imaging for detection of disease, staging and monitoring therapy. However, there are only few studies using specific PET tracers in neuroblastoma patients. In other pediatric malignancies including germ cell tumors and hepatoblastoma PET and PET/CT may be helpful in individual cases, but the literature in these entities is limited so far. Although publications on the additional value of the combined PET/CT compared to both stand-alone modalities are still limited in pediatrics, it can already be anticipated that the combination of morphological and functional information obtained by integrated PET/CT will improve the accuracy of staging and will change patient management in a significant number of pediatric patients.

  15. Is There a Role for PET/CT Parameters to Characterize Benign, Malignant, and Metastatic Parotid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karagulle; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Corey, Amanda; Galt, James R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Wadsworth, J. Trad; El-Deiry, Mark W.; Schuster, David M.; Saba, Nabil F.; Hudgins, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of benign and malignant lesions of the parotid gland, including metastatic lesions, is challenging with current imaging methods. Fluorine-18 FDG PET/CT is a noninvasive imaging modality that provides both anatomic and metabolic information. Semiquantitative data obtained from PET/CT, also known as PET/CT parameters, are maximum, mean, or peak standardized uptake values (SUVs); metabolic tumor volume; total lesion glycolysis; standardized added metabolic activity; and normalized standardized added metabolic activity. Our aim was to determine whether FDG PET/CT parameters can differentiate benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-four patients with parotid neoplasms underwent PET/CT before parotidectomy; maximum SUV, mean SUV, peak SUV, total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity were calculated on a dedicated workstation. Univariate analyses were performed. A ROC analysis was used to determine the ability of PET/CT parameters to predict pathologically proven benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid gland neoplasms. RESULTS Fourteen patients had a benign or malignant primary parotid tumor. Twenty had metastases to the parotid gland. When the specificity was set to at least 85% for each parameter to identify cut points, the corresponding sensitivities ranged from 15% to 40%. Assessment of benign versus malignant lesions of parotid tumors, as well as metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma versus other metastatic causes, revealed that none of the PET/CT parameters has enough power to differentiate among these groups. CONCLUSION PET/CT parameters, including total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity, are not able to differentiate benign from malignant parotid tumors, primary parotid tumors from metastasis, or metastasis

  16. The evolving role of response-adapted PET imaging in Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Michael; Kostakoglu, Lale; Evens, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with (FDG-PET) has a well-established role in the pre- and post-treatment staging of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), however its use as a predictive therapeutic tool via responded-adapted therapy continues to evolve. There have been a multitude of retrospective and noncontrolled clinical studies showing that early (or interim) FDG-PET is highly prognostic in HL, particularly in the advanced-stage setting. Response-adapted treatment approaches in HL are attempting to diminish toxicity for low-risk patients by minimizing therapy, and conversely, intensify treatment for high-risk patients. Results from phase III noninferiority studies in early-stage HL with negative interim FDG-PET that randomized patients to chemotherapy alone versus combined modality therapy showed a continued small improvement in progression-free survival for patients who did not receive radiation. Preliminary reports of data escalating therapy for positive interim FDG-PET in early-stage HL and for de-escalation of therapy [i.e. bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine and prednisone (BEACOPP)] for negative interim FDG-PET in advanced stage HL (i.e. deletion of bleomycin) have demonstrated improved outcomes. Maturation of these studies and continued follow up of all response-adapted studies are needed. Altogether, the treatment of HL remains an individualized clinical management choice for physicians and patients. Continued refinement and optimization of FDG-PET is needed, including within the context of targeted therapeutic agents. In addition, a number of new and novel techniques of functional imaging, including metabolic tumor volume and tumor proliferation, are being explored in order to enhance staging, characterization, prognostication and ultimately patient outcome. PMID:27054026

  17. High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-01-08

    There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 {micro}m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 {micro}m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

  18. Infectious threats from exotic pets: dermatological implications.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ted; Jablon, Jennifer

    2003-04-01

    Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. More than 250 distinct zoonoses have been described in the literature. It is estimated that 56% of United States households contain at least one pet, and although considerable research has been performed regarding the more common household animals including dogs, cats, small birds, and rodents, surprisingly little is known about the zoonotic hazards of owning the more exotic pets. According to the 1997 USPHS/IDSA Report on the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the immunocompromised patient should avoid contact with feces-laden soil, litter boxes, reptiles, most pet birds, and any animal less than 6 months old . It has also been documented that because of their inquisitive nature, children are at even higher risk for infection from animals than adolescents or immunocompetent adults. In this article the authors have reviewed the available data regarding hazards associated with the hedgehog, flying squirrel, iguana, chinchilla, and cockatoo. With the growing popularity of such exotic pets, further observation and research is warranted. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of zoonotic disease related to exotic pet ownership, and they should address this issue when obtaining a history and formulating a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions suggestive of such illnesses. PMID:12757244

  19. PET Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlbom, Magnus

    Positron Emission Tomography or PET is a noninvasive molecular imaging method used both in research to study biology and disease, and clinically as a routine diagnostic imaging tool. In PET imaging, the subject is injected with a tracer labeled with a positron-emitting isotope and is then placed in a scanner to localize the radioactive tracer in the body. The localization of the tracer utilizes the unique decay characteristics of isotopes decaying by positron emission. In the PET scanner, a large number of scintillation detectors use coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation that is emitted as a result of the positron decay. By collecting a large number of these coincidence events, together with tomographic image reconstruction methods, the 3-D distribution of the radioactive tracer in the body can be reconstructed. Depending on the type of tracer used, the distribution will reflect a particular biological process, such as glucose metabolism when fluoro-deoxyglucose is used. PET has evolved from a relatively inefficient single-slice imaging system with relatively poor spatial resolution to an efficient, high-resolution imaging modality which can acquire a whole-body scan in a few minutes. This chapter will describe the basic physics and instrumentation used in PET. The various corrections that are necessary to apply to the acquired data in order to produce quantitative images are also described. Finally, some of the latest trends in instrumentation development are also discussed.

  20. Novel Developments in Instrumentation for PET Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Advances in medical imaging, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), have been based on technical developments in physics and instrumentation that have common foundations with detection systems used in other fields of physics. New detector materials are used in PET systems that maximize efficiency, timing characteristics and robustness, and which lead to improved image quality and quantitative accuracy for clinical imaging. Time of flight (TOF) techniques are now routinely used in commercial PET scanners that combine physiological imaging with anatomical imaging provided by x-ray computed tomography. Using new solid-state photo-sensors instead of traditional photo-multiplier tubes makes it possible to combine PET with magnetic resonance imaging which is a significant technical challenge, but one that is creating new opportunities for both research and clinical applications. An overview of recent advances in instrumentation, such as TOF and PET/MR will be presented, along with examples of imaging studies to demonstrate the impact on patient care and basic research of diseases.

  1. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  2. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients. PMID:22843648

  3. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-01-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosis is once again being recognized as a resurgent disease. From 1993 to 1995, there were more than 20,000 laboratory-confirmed human cases of salmonellosis in Canada. The major source of Salmonella infection is food; however, an estimated 3 to 5% of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets. Among the isolates from these patients with salmonellosis, a variety of Salmonella serotypes were also associated with exotic pets and included the following: S. java, S. stanley, S. poona, S. jangwani, S. tilene, S. litchfield, S. manhattan, S. pomona, S. miami, S. rubislaw, S. marina subsp. IV, and S. wassenaar subsp. IV. PMID:9350734

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gallamini, Andrea; Zwarthoed, Colette; Borra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after treatment end and radiotherapy planning. Moreover, the continuous technological progress of image generation and the introduction of sophisticated software to use PET scan as a biomarker paved the way to calculate new prognostic markers such as the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total amount of tumor glycolysis (TLG). FDG-PET/CT proved more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT scan in staging of several type of lymphoma or in detecting widespread tumor dissemination in several solid cancers, such as breast, lung, colon, ovary and head and neck carcinoma. As a consequence the stage of patients was upgraded, with a change of treatment in 10%–15% of them. One of the most evident advantages of FDG-PET was its ability to detect, very early during treatment, significant changes in glucose metabolism or even complete shutoff of the neoplastic cell metabolism as a surrogate of tumor chemosensitivity assessment. This could enable clinicians to detect much earlier the effectiveness of a given antineoplastic treatment, as compared to the traditional radiological detection of tumor shrinkage, which usually takes time and occurs much later. PMID:25268160

  5. PET Image Reconstruction Using Kernel Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    Image reconstruction from low-count PET projection data is challenging because the inverse problem is ill-posed. Prior information can be used to improve image quality. Inspired by the kernel methods in machine learning, this paper proposes a kernel based method that models PET image intensity in each pixel as a function of a set of features obtained from prior information. The kernel-based image model is incorporated into the forward model of PET projection data and the coefficients can be readily estimated by the maximum likelihood (ML) or penalized likelihood image reconstruction. A kernelized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is presented to obtain the ML estimate. Computer simulations show that the proposed approach can achieve better bias versus variance trade-off and higher contrast recovery for dynamic PET image reconstruction than the conventional maximum likelihood method with and without post-reconstruction denoising. Compared with other regularization-based methods, the kernel method is easier to implement and provides better image quality for low-count data. Application of the proposed kernel method to a 4D dynamic PET patient dataset showed promising results. PMID:25095249

  6. [Microbiological conservation medicine and exotic pets].

    PubMed

    Hassl, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The keeping and the breeding of exotic pets in privacy is a hobby with increasing popularity in industrialised countries. The growing demand for animals usually imported from the tropics, the growing demand for unprofessionally bred feeder organisms, and the increasing number of cases of faulty caring behaviour lead to the creation of new infectiological niches in the interface between exotic pet--nurse--feed--vivarium. These niches are filled preferably by ubiquitous, facultative pathogenic, stress- and age-deduced opportunists with a broad host spectrum. On the one hand these extraordinary germ faunas, relating to their compositions, may generate broad relevance in human medicine, lead to bizarre clinical pictures in specific cases, and may contribute to a reduction of the mean span of life of exotic pets kept in human care. On the other hand the quantitative composition of the fauna may also be a direct measure of the degree of stress the pets are suffering in captivity. Thus, a professional designation of the germ fauna of an exotic pet may contribute to an optimisation of the captivity conditions. PMID:15683044

  7. High time-resolution photodetectors for PET applications

    DOE PAGES

    Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes recent developments aiming at the improvement of the time resolution of photodetectors used in positron emission tomography (PET). Promising photodetector candidates for future PET-time-of-flight (TOF) applications are also discussed.

  8. Strikingly high false positivity of surveillance FDG-PET/CT scanning among patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Zilberlicht, Ariel; Dann, Eldad J; Leiba, Ronit; Faibish, Tal; Rowe, Jacob M; Bar-Shalom, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    Predictive value (PV) of surveillance fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with chemotherapy-rituximab (R) versus chemotherapy only, remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to compare the performance of surveillance PET in DLBCL patients receiving CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine, and prednisone) alone versus CHOP-R. Institutional database was retrospectively searched for adults with newly diagnosed DLBCL, receiving CHOP or CHOP-R, who achieved complete remission and underwent surveillance PETs. Follow-up (FU) PET was considered positive for recurrence in case of an uptake unrelated to physiological or known benign process. Results were confirmed by biopsy, imaging and clinical FU. One hundred nineteen patients, 35 receiving CHOP and 84 CHOP-R, who underwent 422 FU-PETs, were analyzed. At a median PET-FU of 3.4 years, 31 patients relapsed (17 vs. 14, respectively; P = 0.02). PET detected all relapses, with no false-negative studies. Specificity and positive PV (PPV) were significantly lower for patients receiving CHOP-R vs. CHOP (84% vs. 87%, P = 0.023; 23% vs. 74%, P < 0.0001), reflecting a higher false-positive (FP) rate in subjects receiving CHOP-R (77% vs. 26%, P < 0.001). In the latter group, FP-rate remained persistently high up to 3 years post-therapy. Multivariate analysis confirmed rituximab to be the most significant predictor for FP-PET. In conclusion, routine surveillance FDG-PET is not recommended in DLBCL treated with rituximab; strict criteria identifying patients in whom FU-PET is beneficial are required. PMID:23423884

  9. Molecular PET and PET/CT imaging of tumour cell proliferation using F-18 fluoro-L-thymidine: a comprehensive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Tara; Bencherif, Badreddine; Mountz, James M; Avril, Norbert

    2009-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluoro-3'-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT) offers noninvasive assessment of cell proliferation in vivo. The most important application refers to the evaluation of tumour proliferative activity, representing a key feature of malignancy. Most data to date suggest that FLT is not a suitable biomarker for staging of cancers. This is because of the rather low fraction of tumour cells that undergo replication at a given time with subsequently relatively low tumour FLT uptake. In addition, generally, the high FLT uptake in liver and bone marrow limits the diagnostic use. We describe the current status on preclinical and clinical applications of FLT-PET including our own experience in brain tumours. The future of FLT-PET probably lies in the evaluation of tumour response to therapy and more importantly, in the prediction of early response in the course of treatment. The level of FLT accumulation in tumours depends on thymidine kinase 1 activity and on the therapy-induced activation of the salvage pathway and expression of nucleoside transporters. Therefore, cytostatic agents that cause arrest of the cell cycle in the S-phase may initially increase FLT uptake rather than reducing the tumour cell accumulation. In addition, agents that block the endogenous thymidine pathway may lead to overactivity of the salvage pathway and increase tumour FLT uptake. In contrast, many therapeutic agents inhibit both pathways and subsequently reduce tumour FLT uptake. Further studies comparing FLT with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-PET will be important to determine the complementary advantage of FLT-PET in early cancer therapy response assessment. Further research should be facilitated by simplified synthesis of FLT with improved yields and an increasing commercial availability.

  10. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation. PMID:25824018

  11. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation.

  12. Effectiveness of FDG-PET/CT for evaluating early response to induction chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    dos Anjos, Renata Fockink; dos Anjos, Dalton Alexandre; Vieira, Danielle Leal; Leite, André Ferreira; Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu de Souza; de Melo, Nilce Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: 18F-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography with Computed Tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) may be a powerful tool to predict treatment outcome. We aimed to review the effectiveness of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the assessment of early response to induction chemotherapy (IC) in patients with advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer (HNSCC) without previous treatment. Methods: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Science Direct and Web of Science were searched to May 2016. Reference lists of the included articles and additional studies identified by one nuclear medicine expert were screened for potential relevant studies that investigated the effectiveness of 18F-FDG PET/CT performed before and after IC. Three authors independently screened all retrieved articles, selected studies that met inclusion criteria and extracted data. The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated by using the risk of bias checklist of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Results: Seven out of 170 eligible studies met our inclusion criteria. A total of 207 advanced HNSCC patients were evaluated with 18F-FDG PET/CT at baseline and after IC in the selected articles. Six from seven studies concluded that 18F-FDG PET/CT allowed early evaluation response to IC and predicted survival outcomes. Conclusion: The present systematic review confirms the potential value of 18F-FDG PET/CT as a diagnostic tool for early IV response assessment in HNSCC patients. However, the lack of standard definitions for response criteria and heterogeneous IC protocols indicate the need to further studies in order to better define the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these patients. PMID:27512861

  13. Do 18F-FDG PET/CT parameters in oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas indicate HPV status?

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, AT; Magliocca, K; Corey, A; Nickleach, DC; Galt, J; Higgins, K; Beitler, JJ; El-Deiry, MW; Wadsworth, JT; Hudgins, PA; Saba, NF; Schuster, DM

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship of PET/CT parameters with HPV status of oropharyngeal (OP) and oral cavity (OC) squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with OC and OP SCC who underwent staging 18F-FDG PET/CT. PET/CT parameters were measured for the primary tumor and the hottest involved node, including maximum, mean, peak standardized uptake values (SUV max, SUV mean, SUV peak), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), standardized added metabolic activity (SAM), normalized standardized added metabolic activity (N SAM). Patient characteristics compared between HPV positive (HPV+) and negative (HPV−) groups. ROC analysis was used to dichotomize PET/CT parameters into high and low. Logistic regression models predicting HPV status were fit for each PET/CT parameter. Results The HPV+ group was comprised of 18 patients all with OP SCC; the HPV− group consisted of 21 patients, 4 OP cancer patients and 17 OC cancer patients. The HPV+ group had a higher proportion of N2 stage (94% vs 43%; p<0.001). Nodal PET/CT parameters were higher in the HPV+ group (p<0.01), this difference was not present for the primary lesion. After adjusting for sex and age, the association of higher nodal SUV max (OR 9.67), SUV mean (OR 10.48), SUV peak (OR 9.67), MTV (OR 14.52), TLG (OR 11.84) and SAM, N SAM (OR 16.21) with HPV+ status remained statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion Nodal PET/CT parameters predict HPV status. High nodal FDG uptake should raise suspicion for positive HPV status in the evaluation of the primary lesion. PMID:25608156

  14. Temporal lobe deficits in murderers: EEG findings undetected by PET.

    PubMed

    Gatzke-Kopp, L M; Raine, A; Buchsbaum, M; LaCasse, L

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates electroencephalography (EEG) and positron emission tomography (PET) in the same subjects. Fourteen murderers were assessed by using both PET (while they were performing the continuous performance task) and EEG during a resting state. EEG revealed significant increases in slow-wave activity in the temporal, but not frontal, lobe in murderers, in contrast to prior PET findings that showed reduced prefrontal, but not temporal, glucose metabolism. Results suggest that resting EEG shows empirical utility distinct from PET activation findings.

  15. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as...

  16. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as...

  17. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as...

  18. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as...

  19. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as...

  20. A versatile scalable PET processing system

    SciTech Connect

    H. Dong, A. Weisenberger, J. McKisson, Xi Wenze, C. Cuevas, J. Wilson, L. Zukerman

    2011-06-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) historically has major clinical and preclinical applications in cancerous oncology, neurology, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, in a new direction, an application specific PET system is being developed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in collaboration with Duke University, University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB), and West Virginia University (WVU) targeted for plant eco-physiology research. The new plant imaging PET system is versatile and scalable such that it could adapt to several plant imaging needs - imaging many important plant organs including leaves, roots, and stems. The mechanical arrangement of the detectors is designed to accommodate the unpredictable and random distribution in space of the plant organs without requiring the plant be disturbed. Prototyping such a system requires a new data acquisition system (DAQ) and data processing system which are adaptable to the requirements of these unique and versatile detectors.

  1. Wildlife, Exotic Pets, and Emerging Zoonoses1

    PubMed Central

    Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented. PMID:17370509

  2. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, R. E.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; White, R. D.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the ‘gas-phase’ assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations.

  3. Psychiatric investigation of 18 bereaved pet owners.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuya; Kawabata, Hidenobu; Maezawa, Masaji

    2011-08-01

    This survey explores the grief associated with the loss of a pet, and was carried out using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires were handed out to 50 bereaved pet owners attending a public animal cremation service, and we received 18 responses. Participants responded within 0 to 44 (median 4) days of the death of their pet. Although most mental health problems immediately following mourning are presumed to be normal grief reactions, on the basis of several psychiatric scales, 8 of the 16 valid responses indicated depression and/or neurosis. Statistical analyses showed that the following factors were significantly associated with grief reactions: age of owner, other stressful life events, family size, age of deceased animal, rearing place, and preliminary veterinary consultation. PMID:21483181

  4. Pet Care Teaching Unit: 1st-3rd Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Activities in this unit are designed to familiarize primary grade students with the responsibilities involved in pet ownership. Teaching plans are provided for a total of 12 lessons involving social studies, language arts, math, and health sciences. Activities adaptable for readers and non-readers focus on pet overpopulation, care of pets when…

  5. The Psychological Effect of Pet-Ownership on Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamtil, Rosemary

    A study examined the possible influence that pets may have on children's reading achievement. Subjects, 61 students from three third-grade classes in an urban school, completed a questionnaire about pet ownership. Responses were compiled and score values established to recognize the length of time the child had owned the pet and how much…

  6. Profound Encounters: Classroom Animals--More Than Responsible Pet Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naherniak, Craig

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of a classroom pet. Presents guidelines to determine whether a classroom pet is really needed and some suggestions for improving existing conditions for animals you may already have. Includes chart for choosing the right pet, which compares the life span, size, diet, and pros and cons for guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits,…

  7. Deformation field correction for spatial normalization of PET images

    PubMed Central

    Bilgel, Murat; Carass, Aaron; Resnick, Susan M.; Wong, Dean F.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images is essential for population studies, yet the current state of the art in PET-to-PET registration is limited to the application of conventional deformable registration methods that were developed for structural images. A method is presented for the spatial normalization of PET images that improves their anatomical alignment over the state of the art. The approach works by correcting the deformable registration result using a model that is learned from training data having both PET and structural images. In particular, viewing the structural registration of training data as ground truth, correction factors are learned by using a generalized ridge regression at each voxel given the PET intensities and voxel locations in a population-based PET template. The trained model can then be used to obtain more accurate registration of PET images to the PET template without the use of a structural image. A cross validation evaluation on 79 subjects shows that the proposed method yields more accurate alignment of the PET images compared to deformable PET-to-PET registration as revealed by 1) a visual examination of the deformed images, 2) a smaller error in the deformation fields, and 3) a greater overlap of the deformed anatomical labels with ground truth segmentations. PMID:26142272

  8. 50 CFR 36.36 - Sled dogs and household pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Sled dogs and household pets. The general trespass provisions of 50 CFR 26.21 shall not apply to household pets and sled, work, or pack dogs under the direct control of their owners or handlers, but such... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sled dogs and household pets....

  9. 50 CFR 36.36 - Sled dogs and household pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Sled dogs and household pets. The general trespass provisions of 50 CFR 26.21 shall not apply to household pets and sled, work, or pack dogs under the direct control of their owners or handlers, but such... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sled dogs and household pets....

  10. 50 CFR 36.36 - Sled dogs and household pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Sled dogs and household pets. The general trespass provisions of 50 CFR 26.21 shall not apply to household pets and sled, work, or pack dogs under the direct control of their owners or handlers, but such... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sled dogs and household pets....

  11. 50 CFR 36.36 - Sled dogs and household pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Sled dogs and household pets. The general trespass provisions of 50 CFR 26.21 shall not apply to household pets and sled, work, or pack dogs under the direct control of their owners or handlers, but such... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sled dogs and household pets....

  12. 50 CFR 36.36 - Sled dogs and household pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Sled dogs and household pets. The general trespass provisions of 50 CFR 26.21 shall not apply to household pets and sled, work, or pack dogs under the direct control of their owners or handlers, but such... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sled dogs and household pets....

  13. PET-Specific Parameters and Radiotracers in Theoretical Tumour Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Bezak, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The innovation of computational techniques serves as an important step toward optimized, patient-specific management of cancer. In particular, in silico simulation of tumour growth and treatment response may eventually yield accurate information on disease progression, enhance the quality of cancer treatment, and explain why certain therapies are effective where others are not. In silico modelling is demonstrated to considerably benefit from information obtainable with PET and PET/CT. In particular, models have successfully integrated tumour glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and cell oxygenation from multiple tracers in order to simulate tumour behaviour. With the development of novel radiotracers to image additional tumour phenomena, such as pH and gene expression, the value of PET and PET/CT data for use in tumour models will continue to grow. In this work, the use of PET and PET/CT information in in silico tumour models is reviewed. The various parameters that can be obtained using PET and PET/CT are detailed, as well as the radiotracers that may be used for this purpose, their utility, and limitations. The biophysical measures used to quantify PET and PET/CT data are also described. Finally, a list of in silico models that incorporate PET and/or PET/CT data is provided and reviewed. PMID:25788973

  14. 76 FR 8770 - Polyethylene Terephthalate (Pet) Film From Korea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... COMMISSION Polyethylene Terephthalate (Pet) Film From Korea AGENCY: United States International Trade... full five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film... whether revocation of the antidumping order on PET film from Korea would be likely to lead to...

  15. 75 FR 53711 - Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Film From Korea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Department of Commerce (Commerce) issued an antidumping duty order on imports of PET film from Korea (56 FR..., Commerce issued a continuation of the antidumping duty order on imports of PET film from Korea (65 FR 11984... issued a continuation of the antidumping duty order on imports of PET film from Korea (70 FR 61118)....

  16. Couples' Perception of Stressfulness of Death of the Family Pet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, M. Geraldine; Holcomb, Ralph

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 242 couples whose pet had died during 3 years prior to survey. About one-half of wives and over one-quarter of husbands reported being "quite" or "extremely" disturbed by pet death. Husbands rated pet loss about as stressful as loss of close friendship; wives rated it about as stressful as losing touch with married children. (Author/NB)

  17. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port designated under, and in accordance with, 9 CFR part 92. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17...

  18. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port designated under, and in accordance with, 9 CFR part 92. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17...

  19. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port designated under, and in accordance with, 9 CFR part 92. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17...

  20. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port designated under, and in accordance with, 9 CFR part 92. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17...

  1. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port designated under, and in accordance with, 9 CFR part 92. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17...

  2. PET Imaging in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roussakis, Andreas-Antonios; Piccini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To date, little is known about how neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation propagate in Huntington’s disease (HD). Unfortunately, no treatment is available to cure or reverse the progressive decline of function caused by the disease, thus considering HD a fatal disease. Mutation gene carriers typically remain asymptomatic for many years although alterations in the basal ganglia and cortex occur early on in mutant HD gene–carriers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique of nuclear medicine which enables in vivo visualization of numerous biological molecules expressed in several human tissues. Brain PET is most powerful to study in vivo neuronal and glial cells function as well as cerebral blood flow in a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and HD. In absence of HD–specific biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, previous PET studies in HD were merely focused on the study of dopaminergic terminals, cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in manifest and premanifest HD–gene carriers. More recently, research interest has been exploring novel PET targets in HD including the state of phosphodiesterse expression and the role of activated microglia. Hence, a better understanding of the HD pathogenesis mechanisms may lead to the development of targeted therapies. PET imaging follow–up studies with novel selective PET radiotracers such as 11C-IMA–107 and 11C-PBR28 may provide insight on disease progression and identify prognostic biomarkers, elucidate the underlying HD pathology and assess novel pharmaceutical agents and over time. PMID:26683130

  3. Positron range estimations with PeneloPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cal-González, J.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Corzo, P. M. G.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.; Udias, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Technical advances towards high resolution PET imaging try to overcome the inherent physical limitations to spatial resolution. Positrons travel in tissue until they annihilate into the two gamma photons detected. This range is the main detector-independent contribution to PET imaging blurring. To a large extent, it can be remedied during image reconstruction if accurate estimates of positron range are available. However, the existing estimates differ, and the comparison with the scarce experimental data available is not conclusive. In this work we present positron annihilation distributions obtained from Monte Carlo simulations with the PeneloPET simulation toolkit, for several common PET isotopes (18F, 11C, 13N, 15O, 68Ga and 82Rb) in different biological media (cortical bone, soft bone, skin, muscle striated, brain, water, adipose tissue and lung). We compare PeneloPET simulations against experimental data and other simulation results available in the literature. To this end the different positron range representations employed in the literature are related to each other by means of a new parameterization for positron range profiles. Our results are generally consistent with experiments and with most simulations previously reported with differences of less than 20% in the mean and maximum range values. From these results, we conclude that better experimental measurements are needed, especially to disentangle the effect of positronium formation in positron range. Finally, with the aid of PeneloPET, we confirm that scaling approaches can be used to obtain universal, material and isotope independent, positron range profiles, which would considerably simplify range correction.

  4. PRODUCTION CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CLASSICAL PET NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    FINN,R.; SCHLYER,D.

    2001-06-25

    Nuclear Medicine is the specialty of medical imaging, which utilizes a variety of radionuclides incorporated into specific compounds for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. During recent years, research efforts associated with this discipline have concentrated on the decay characteristics of particular radionuclides and the design of unique radiolabeled tracers necessary to achieve time-dependent molecular images. The specialty is expanding with specific Positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals allowing for an extension from functional process imaging in tissue to pathologic processes and nuclide directed treatments. PET is an example of a technique that has been shown to yield the physiologic information necessary for clinical oncology diagnoses based upon altered tissue metabolism. Most PET drugs are currently produced using a cyclotron at locations that are in close proximity to the hospital or academic center at which the radiopharmaceutical will be administered. In November 1997, a law was enacted called the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 which directed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to establish appropriate procedures for the approval of PET drugs in accordance with section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and to establish current good manufacturing practice requirements for such drugs. At this time the FDA is considering adopting special approval procedures and cGMP requirements for PET drugs. The evolution of PET radiopharmaceuticals has introduced a new class of ''drugs'' requiring production facilities and product formulations that must be closely aligned with the scheduled clinical utilization. The production of the radionuclide in the appropriate synthetic form is but one critical component in the manufacture of the finished radiopharmaceutical.

  5. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm3 uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm)3 to (2 mm)3 in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm)3 to (9 mm)3. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm)3 even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm)3 cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial resolution with 0.5×0.5×1.0 mm3 crystals

  6. FDG-PET/CT can rule out malignancy in patients with vocal cord palsy.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Anders; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Lauridsen, Jeppe Kiilerich; Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Hess, Søren; Petersen, Henrik; Johansen, Allan; Asmussen, Jon Thor; Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Johansen, Jørgen; Godballe, Christian; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the performance of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT to rule out malignancy in patients with confirmed vocal cord palsy (VCP). Between January 2011 and June 2013, we retrospectively included consecutive patients referred to PET/CT with paresis or paralysis of one or both vocal cords. PET/CT results were compared to clinical workup and histopathology. The study comprised 65 patients (32 females) with a mean age of 66±12 years (range 37-89). Eleven patients (17%) had antecedent cancer. Twenty-seven (42%) were diagnosed with cancer during follow-up. The palsy was right-sided in 24 patients, left-sided in 37, and bilateral in 4. Median follow-up was 7 months (interquartile range 4-11 months). Patients without cancer were followed for at least three months. PET/CT suggested a malignancy in 35 patients (27 true positives, 8 false positives) and showed none in 30 (30 true negatives, 0 false negatives). Thus, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were (95% confidence intervals in parenthesis): 100% (88%-100%), 79% (64%-89%), 77% (61%-88%), 100% (89%-100%), and 88% (78%-94%), respectively. Sixteen patients had palliative treatment, while 11 were treated with curative intent, emphasising the severity of VCP and the need for a rapid and accurate diagnostic work-up. In this retrospective survey, biopsy proven malignancy (whether newly diagnosed or relapsed) was the cause of VCP in almost half of patients (42%). PET/CT had a high sensitivity (100%) with a relatively high false positive rate, but was excellent in ruling out malignancy (negative predictive value 100%). PMID:24753985

  7. FDG-PET/CT can rule out malignancy in patients with vocal cord palsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Anders; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Lauridsen, Jeppe Kiilerich; Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Hess, Søren; Petersen, Henrik; Johansen, Allan; Asmussen, Jon Thor; Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Johansen, Jørgen; Godballe, Christian; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT to rule out malignancy in patients with confirmed vocal cord palsy (VCP). Between January 2011 and June 2013, we retrospectively included consecutive patients referred to PET/CT with paresis or paralysis of one or both vocal cords. PET/CT results were compared to clinical workup and histopathology. The study comprised 65 patients (32 females) with a mean age of 66±12 years (range 37-89). Eleven patients (17%) had antecedent cancer. Twenty-seven (42%) were diagnosed with cancer during follow-up. The palsy was right-sided in 24 patients, left-sided in 37, and bilateral in 4. Median follow-up was 7 months (interquartile range 4-11 months). Patients without cancer were followed for at least three months. PET/CT suggested a malignancy in 35 patients (27 true positives, 8 false positives) and showed none in 30 (30 true negatives, 0 false negatives). Thus, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were (95% confidence intervals in parenthesis): 100% (88%-100%), 79% (64%-89%), 77% (61%-88%), 100% (89%-100%), and 88% (78%-94%), respectively. Sixteen patients had palliative treatment, while 11 were treated with curative intent, emphasising the severity of VCP and the need for a rapid and accurate diagnostic work-up. In this retrospective survey, biopsy proven malignancy (whether newly diagnosed or relapsed) was the cause of VCP in almost half of patients (42%). PET/CT had a high sensitivity (100%) with a relatively high false positive rate, but was excellent in ruling out malignancy (negative predictive value 100%). PMID:24753985

  8. Use of FDG-PET in differentiating benign from malignant compression fractures

    PubMed Central

    Essary, Brendan; Torriani, Martin; Ouellette, Hugue A.; Palmer, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The objective was to evaluate the use of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in differentiating benign from malignant compression fractures. Patients and methods In a retrospective analysis, we identified 33 patients with 43 compression fractures who underwent FDG-PET. On FDG-PET the uptake pattern was recorded qualitatively and semiquantitatively and fractures were categorized as benign or malignant. Standardized uptake values (SUV) were obtained. MRI, CT, and biopsy results as well as clinical follow-up for 1–3 years served as standards of reference. The Student’s t test was used to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the SUV for benign and malignant compression fractures. Results There were 14 malignant and 29 benign compression fractures, including 5 acute benign fractures. On FDG-PET, 5 benign fractures were falsely classified as malignant (false-positive). Three of these patients underwent prior treatment with bone marrow-stimulating agents. There were two false-negative results. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of FDG-PET in differentiating benign from malignant compression fractures were 86%, 83%, 84%, 71%, and 92% respectively. The difference between SUV values of benign and malignant fractures was statistically significant (1.9 ± 0.97 for benign and 3.9 ± 1.52 for malignant fractures, p < 0.001). SUV of benign acute and chronic fractures were not statistically significant. Conclusion Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is useful in differentiating benign from malignant compression fractures. Therapy with bone marrow-stimulating agents can mimic malignant involvement. PMID:18278491

  9. Robust experiment design for estimating myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor concentration using PET

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, Cristian; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr.; Ernsberger, Paul; Saidel, Gerald M.

    2007-01-15

    Myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor ({beta}-AR) concentration can substantially decrease in congestive heart failure and significantly increase in chronic volume overload, such as in severe aortic valve regurgitation. Positron emission tomography (PET) with an appropriate ligand-receptor model can be used for noninvasive estimation of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in vivo. An optimal design of the experiment protocol, however, is needed for sufficiently precise estimates of {beta}-AR concentration in a heterogeneous population. Standard methods of optimal design do not account for a heterogeneous population with a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations and other physiological parameters and consequently are inadequate. To address this, we have developed a methodology to design a robust two-injection protocol that provides reliable estimates of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in normal and pathologic states. A two-injection protocol of the high affinity {beta}-AR antagonist [{sup 18}F]-(S)-fluorocarazolol was designed based on a computer-generated (or synthetic) population incorporating a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations. Timing and dosage of the ligand injections were optimally designed with minimax criterion to provide the least bad {beta}-AR estimates for the worst case in the synthetic population. This robust experiment design for PET was applied to experiments with pigs before and after {beta}-AR upregulation by chemical sympathectomy. Estimates of {beta}-AR concentration were found by minimizing the difference between the model-predicted and experimental PET data. With this robust protocol, estimates of {beta}-AR concentration showed high precision in both normal and pathologic states. The increase in {beta}-AR concentration after sympathectomy predicted noninvasively with PET is consistent with the increase shown by in vitro assays in pig myocardium. A robust experiment protocol was designed for PET that yields reliable estimates of {beta

  10. Bias in iterative reconstruction of low-statistics PET data: benefits of a resolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. D.; Asselin, M.-C.; Julyan, P. J.; Feldmann, M.; Talbot, P. S.; Jones, T.; Matthews, J. C.

    2011-02-01

    Iterative image reconstruction methods such as ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) are widely used in PET. Reconstructions via OSEM are however reported to be biased for low-count data. We investigated this and considered the impact for dynamic PET. Patient listmode data were acquired in [11C]DASB and [15O]H2O scans on the HRRT brain PET scanner. These data were subsampled to create many independent, low-count replicates. The data were reconstructed and the images from low-count data were compared to the high-count originals (from the same reconstruction method). This comparison enabled low-statistics bias to be calculated for the given reconstruction, as a function of the noise-equivalent counts (NEC). Two iterative reconstruction methods were tested, one with and one without an image-based resolution model (RM). Significant bias was observed when reconstructing data of low statistical quality, for both subsampled human and simulated data. For human data, this bias was substantially reduced by including a RM. For [11C]DASB the low-statistics bias in the caudate head at 1.7 M NEC (approx. 30 s) was -5.5% and -13% with and without RM, respectively. We predicted biases in the binding potential of -4% and -10%. For quantification of cerebral blood flow for the whole-brain grey- or white-matter, using [15O]H2O and the PET autoradiographic method, a low-statistics bias of <2.5% and <4% was predicted for reconstruction with and without the RM. The use of a resolution model reduces low-statistics bias and can hence be beneficial for quantitative dynamic PET.

  11. Detection of Mycobacterium avium in pet birds

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Silvia Neri; Sakamoto, Sidnei Miyoshi; de Paula, Cátia Dejuste; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Matushima, Eliana Reiko

    2009-01-01

    The present study is a report on the presence of Mycobacterium avium in four birds of the psittaciform order kept as pets. Anatomopathological diagnosis showed lesions suggestive of the agent and presence of alcohol-acid resistant bacilli (AARB) shown by the Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The identification of Mycobacterium avium was performed by means of PRA (PCR Restriction Analysis). DNA was directly extracted from tissue of the lesions and blocked in paraffin. The role of this agent in pet bird infection is discussed, as well as its zoonotic potential. PMID:24031356

  12. Modular Strategies for PET Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging. PMID:19880343

  13. Fundamental Limits of Spatial Resolution in PET

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental limits of spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) have been understood for many years. The physical size of the detector element usually plays the dominant role in determining resolution, but the combined contributions from acollinearity, positron range, penetration into the detector ring, and decoding errors in the detector modules often combine to be of similar size. In addition, the sampling geometry and statistical noise further degrade the effective resolution. This paper describes quantitatively describes these effects, discusses potential methods for reducing the magnitude of these effects, and computes the ultimately achievable spatial resolution for clinical and pre-clinical PET cameras. PMID:21804677

  14. Similarities between obesity in pets and children: the addiction model.

    PubMed

    Pretlow, Robert A; Corbee, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Obesity in pets is a frustrating, major health problem. Obesity in human children is similar. Prevailing theories accounting for the rising obesity rates - for example, poor nutrition and sedentary activity - are being challenged. Obesity interventions in both pets and children have produced modest short-term but poor long-term results. New strategies are needed. A novel theory posits that obesity in pets and children is due to 'treats' and excessive meal amounts given by the 'pet-parent' and child-parent to obtain affection from the pet/child, which enables 'eating addiction' in the pet/child and results in parental 'co-dependence'. Pet-parents and child-parents may even become hostage to the treats/food to avoid the ire of the pet/child. Eating addiction in the pet/child also may be brought about by emotional factors such as stress, independent of parental co-dependence. An applicable treatment for child obesity has been trialled using classic addiction withdrawal/abstinence techniques, as well as behavioural addiction methods, with significant results. Both the child and the parent progress through withdrawal from specific 'problem foods', next from snacking (non-specific foods) and finally from excessive portions at meals (gradual reductions). This approach should adapt well for pets and pet-parents. Pet obesity is more 'pure' than child obesity, in that contributing factors and treatment points are essentially under the control of the pet-parent. Pet obesity might thus serve as an ideal test bed for the treatment and prevention of child obesity, with focus primarily on parental behaviours. Sharing information between the fields of pet and child obesity would be mutually beneficial. PMID:27469280

  15. PETs: A Stable and Accurate Predictor of Protein-Protein Interacting Sites Based on Extremely-Randomized Trees.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Li, Qianmu; Li, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays crucial roles in the performance of various biological processes. A variety of methods are dedicated to identify whether proteins have interaction residues, but it is often more crucial to recognize each amino acid. In practical applications, the stability of a prediction model is as important as its accuracy. However, random sampling, which is widely used in previous prediction models, often brings large difference between each training model. In this paper, a Predictor of protein-protein interaction sites based on Extremely-randomized Trees (PETs) is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy while maintaining the prediction stability. In PETs, a cluster-based sampling strategy is proposed to ensure the model stability: first, the training dataset is divided into subsets using specific features; second, the subsets are clustered using K-means; and finally the samples are selected from each cluster. Using the proposed sampling strategy, samples which have different types of significant features could be selected independently from different clusters. The evaluation shows that PETs is able to achieve better accuracy while maintaining a good stability. The source code and toolkit are available at https://github.com/BinXia/PETs.

  16. Lexical learning of the English language: a PET study in healthy French subjects.

    PubMed

    Raboyeau, Gaëlle; Marie, Nathalie; Balduyck, Sébastien; Gros, Hélène; Démonet, Jean-François; Cardebat, Dominique

    2004-08-01

    To investigate the neural correlates of word learning in adults, 10 right-handed French subjects who had learned English without mastering it performed an English and a French naming task during two PET sessions, one before (PET1) and the second after (PET2) a 4-week lexical training in English. Behavioral performance was collected during the two PET exams and 2 months after (T3). At T2, performance on English naming increased in all subjects; this improvement persisted at T3, with no correlation between English performance at T2 and T3. Cerebral activation during French naming mainly showed a left frontal temporal network. The pattern specifically associated with English lexical learning included, in addition to the anterior cingulate cortex involved in attentional processing and BAs 4/6 reflecting speech output, the right cerebellum and the left insular cortex that are linked to speech gesture learning, and the right medial temporal regions, likely to reflect the involvement of episodic memory during verbal learning. Correlations between English T2/T1 performance and English T2/T1 rCBF changes reinforced the hypothesis of intervention of episodic memory since they interested right frontal, hippocampal, and lateral temporal regions. 'Predictive' correlations between English T3/T2 performance and English T2/T1 rCBF changes showed, in good reminders, increased activities in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus and middle temporal cortex probably related to efficient semantic storage of learned words.

  17. Multimodality Brain Tumor Imaging: MR Imaging, PET, and PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fink, James R; Muzi, Mark; Peck, Melinda; Krohn, Kenneth A

    2015-10-01

    Standard MR imaging and CT are routinely used for anatomic diagnosis in brain tumors. Pretherapy planning and posttreatment response assessments rely heavily on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Advanced MR imaging techniques and PET imaging offer physiologic, metabolic, or functional information about tumor biology that goes beyond the diagnostic yield of standard anatomic imaging. With the advent of combined PET/MR imaging scanners, we are entering an era wherein the relationships among different elements of tumor metabolism can be simultaneously explored through multimodality MR imaging and PET imaging. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical and clinically relevant overview of current anatomic and physiologic imaging of brain tumors as a foundation for further investigations, with a primary focus on MR imaging and PET techniques that have demonstrated utility in the current care of brain tumor patients.

  18. MR Imaging-Guided Attenuation Correction of PET Data in PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-04-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined PET/magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view. MR-AC methods can be divided into 3 categories: segmentation, atlas, and PET based. This review provides a comprehensive list of the state-of-the-art MR-AC approaches and their pros and cons. The main sources of artifacts are presented. Finally, this review discusses the current status of MR-AC approaches for clinical applications. PMID:26952727

  19. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology: Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A

    2016-10-01

    In 2011, the first fully integrated commercially available clinical PET/MR imaging systems became available, and the imaging community thought that these scanners would replace PET/CT systems. However, today a disappointing number of less than 100 scanners have been installed worldwide. The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest that such areas include combined molecular and functional imaging, multimodality radiomics, and hyperPET. PMID:27593252

  20. Brain PET in the Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Charles; Mena, Esther; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this article was to review the current role of brain PET in the diagnosis of Alzheimer dementia. The characteristic patterns of glucose metabolism on brain FDG-PET can help in differentiating Alzheimer’s disease from other causes of dementia such as frontotemporal dementia and dementia of Lewy body. Amyloid brain PET may exclude significant amyloid deposition and thus Alzheimer’s disease in appropriate clinical setting. Conclusions FDG-PET and amyloid PET imaging are valuable in the assessment of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25199063

  1. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy.

  2. Flying starlings, PET and the evolution of volant dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Gold, Maria Eugenia Leone; Schulz, Daniela; Budassi, Michael; Gignac, Paul M; Vaska, Paul; Norell, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Birds have evolved behavioral and morphological adaptations for powered flight. Many aspects of this transition are unknown, including the neuroanatomical changes that made flight possible [1]. To understand how the avian brain drives this complex behavior, we utilized positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and the tracer (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to document regional metabolic activity in the brain associated with a variety of locomotor behaviors. FDG studies are typically employed in rats [2] though the technology has been applied to birds [3]. We examined whole-brain function in European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), trained to fly in a wind tunnel while metabolizing the tracer. Drawing on predictions from early anatomical studies [4], we hypothesized increased metabolic activity in the Wulst and functionally related visual brain regions during flight. We found that flight behaviors correlated positively with entopallia and Wulst activity, but negatively with thalamic activity. PMID:27046806

  3. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:26753391

  4. Hybrid PET/MR imaging: physics and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shetal N; Huang, Steve S

    2015-08-01

    In just over a decade, hybrid imaging with FDG PET/CT has become a standard bearer in the management of cancer patients. An exquisitely sensitive whole-body imaging modality, it combines the ability to detect subtle biologic changes with FDG PET and the anatomic information offered by CT scans. With advances in MR technology and advent of novel targeted PET radiotracers, hybrid PET/MRI is an evolutionary technique that is poised to revolutionize hybrid imaging. It offers unparalleled spatial resolution and functional multi-parametric data combined with biologic information in the non-invasive detection and characterization of diseases, without the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. This article reviews the basic principles of FDG PET and MR imaging, discusses the salient technical developments of hybrid PET/MR systems, and provides an introduction to FDG PET/MR image acquisition.

  5. Supplemental transmission method for improved PET attenuation correction on an integrated MR/PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Although MR image segmentation, combined with information from the PET emission data, has achieved a clinically usable PET attenuation correction (AC) on whole-body MR/PET systems, more accurate PET AC remains one of the main instrumental challenges for quantitative imaging. Incorporating a full conventional PET transmission system in these machines would be difficult, but even a small amount of transmission data might usefully complement the MR-based estimate of the PET attenuation image. In this paper we explore one possible configuration for such a system that uses a small number of fixed line sources placed around the periphery of the patient tunnel. These line sources are implemented using targeted positron beams. The sparse transmission (sTX) data are collected simultaneously with the emission (EM) acquisition. These data, plus a blank scan, are combined with a partially known attenuation image estimate in a modified version of the maximum likelihood for attenuation and activity (MLAA) algorithm, to estimate values of the linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) in unknown regions of the image. This algorithm was tested in two simple phantom experiments. We find that the use of supplemental transmission data can significantly improve the accuracy of the estimated LAC in a truncated region, as well as the estimate of the emitter concentration within the phantom. In the experiments, the bias in the EM+sTX estimate of emitter concentrations was 3-5%, compared to 15-20% with the use of EM-only data.

  6. AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT shielding requirements.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mark T; Anderson, Jon A; Halama, James R; Kleck, Jeff; Simpkin, Douglas J; Votaw, John R; Wendt, Richard E; Williams, Lawrence E; Yester, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards. PMID:16485403

  7. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Vaska

    2016-07-12

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  8. PET Tracers Based on Zirconium-89

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies has always been a dynamic area in molecular imaging. With decay half-life (3.3 d) well matched to the circulation half-lives of antibodies (usually on the order of days), 89Zr has been extensively studied over the last decade. This review article will give a brief overview on 89Zr isotope production, the radiochemistry generally used for 89Zr-labeling, and the PET tracers that have been developed using 89Zr. To date, 89Zr-based PET imaging has been investigated for a wide variety of cancer-related targets, which include human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, epidermal growth factor receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, splice variant v6 of CD44, vascular endothelial growth factor, carbonic anhydrase IX, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, among others. With well-developed radiochemistry, commercial availability of chelating agents for 89Zr labeling, increasingly widely available isotope supply, as well as successful proof-of-principle in pilot human studies, it is expected that PET imaging with 89Zr-based tracers will be a constantly evolving and highly vibrant field in the near future. PMID:22191652

  9. 36 CFR 13.978 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pets. 13.978 Section 13.978 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Frontcountry Developed...

  10. 36 CFR 13.978 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 13.978 Section 13.978 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Frontcountry Developed...

  11. 36 CFR 13.978 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pets. 13.978 Section 13.978 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Frontcountry Developed...

  12. 36 CFR 13.978 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pets. 13.978 Section 13.978 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Frontcountry Developed...

  13. Methods Needed to Curb Rising Pet Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses socioeconomic problems of pet population explosion and recommends the conduct of educational programs and the implementation of surgical sterilization as a short-term answer to dog and cat control. Also considered are problems of using chemical contraceptives in human population control. (CC)

  14. Probing neurodegeneration and aging: A PET approach

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, H.F.

    1995-12-31

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging has received wide application to the study of the aging brain and its diseases, most notably Parkinson`s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer`s Disease (AD). Basic neurological processes such as blood flow and glucose metabolism have been most often measured. Radioligands developed for specific neurochemical systems have amplified the flow and metabolism studies by more precisely defining the changes associated with degenerative processes. Our present research focuses on two additional applications of radiopharmaceutical development and PET imaging - (1) investigating the fundamental mechanisms of neurodegeneration and aging, and (2) assessing novel therapeutic intervention for PD with PET imaging. We have synthesized fluorine-18 labeled analogs of rotenone, a natural product that possesses high affinity to Complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and evaluated their potential to study changes in neuronal mitochondrial density and function. A large body evidence points to mitochondrial dysfunction as a key factor in aging and neurodegeneration. We are also currently evaluating the use of genetically transfected cells to treat PD. Primates are being imaged with [{sup 18}F]flouro-m-L-tyrosine before and after MPTP Parkinsonian type lesioning and following implantation of genetically altered cells capable of secreting tyrosine hydroxylase into the lesioned area. The ability to develop and apply PET probes has significantly enhanced the understanding of normal, aging, and degenerative processes of the brain.

  15. Uterine disorders in 50 pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Grinninger, Petra; Shibly, Sarina; Hassan, Jasmin; Tichy, Alexander; Berghold, Petra; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of uterine disorders in pet rabbits is high there are only a few retrospective studies and case reports on genital tract disease in female rabbits. Uterine disorders were assessed in 50 pet rabbits. In 31 pet rabbits with suspected clinical uterine disease, medical records were further reviewed regarding clinical signs, diagnostic workup, treatment as well as the outcome itself. Uterine adenocarcinoma (54%) was most frequently diagnosed, followed by endometrial hyperplasia (26%). Serosanguineous vaginal discharge was the predominant clinical sign observed by the rabbit owners. In approximately 50% of the rabbits with suspected uterine disorders, abdominal palpation revealed enlarged and/or irregular masses in the caudoventral abdomen indicating uterine lesions. Out of 23 rabbits undergoing ovariohysterectomy, four were either euthanized or died shortly after surgery because they were clinically unstable. Overall, 80% of the ovariohysterectomized animals were still alive 6 mo after surgery. In female pet rabbits that are not breeding, either ovariohysterectomy should be performed at an early age or routine checks including ultrasonography of the abdomen are recommended on a regular basis.

  16. 36 CFR 2.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 2.15 Section 2.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC... destroyed if necessary for public safety or protection of wildlife, livestock, or other park resources....

  17. 36 CFR 2.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pets. 2.15 Section 2.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC... destroyed if necessary for public safety or protection of wildlife, livestock, or other park resources....

  18. 36 CFR 2.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pets. 2.15 Section 2.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC... destroyed if necessary for public safety or protection of wildlife, livestock, or other park resources....

  19. 36 CFR 2.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pets. 2.15 Section 2.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC... destroyed if necessary for public safety or protection of wildlife, livestock, or other park resources....

  20. 36 CFR 2.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 2.15 Section 2.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC... destroyed if necessary for public safety or protection of wildlife, livestock, or other park resources....

  1. Captive Conditions of Pet Lemurs in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kim E; Schaefer, Melissa S

    2016-01-01

    Live extraction of wildlife is a threat to biodiversity and can compromise animal welfare standards. Studies of the captive environments and welfare of pet primates are known, but none has focused on Madagascar. We aimed to expand knowledge about the captive conditions of pet lemurs in Madagascar. We hypothesized that captive lemurs would often be kept in restrictive settings, including small cages, would be fed foods inconsistent with their natural diets and, as a result, would be in bad physical or psychological health. Data were collected via a web-based survey (n = 253 reports) and from the websites and social media pages of 25 hotels. Most lemurs seen by respondents were either kept on a rope/leash/chain or in a cage (67%), though some lemurs were habituated and were not restrained (28%). Most of the time (72%) cages were considered small, and lemurs were rarely kept in captivity together with other lemurs (81% of lemurs were caged alone). Pet lemurs were often fed foods inconsistent with their natural diets, and most (53%) were described as being in bad health. These findings point to a need to undertake outreach to pet lemur owners in Madagascar about the captivity requirements of primates. PMID:27092548

  2. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Vaska

    2011-03-09

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  3. 36 CFR 13.978 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 13.978 Section 13.978 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Frontcountry Developed...

  4. Efficient visual-search model observers for PET

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Scanning model observers have been efficiently applied as a research tool to predict human-observer performance in F-18 positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated whether a visual-search (VS) observer could provide more reliable predictions with comparable efficiency. Methods: Simulated two-dimensional images of a digital phantom featuring tumours in the liver, lungs and background soft tissue were prepared in coronal, sagittal and transverse display formats. A localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) study quantified tumour detectability as a function of organ and format for two human observers, a channelized non-prewhitening (CNPW) scanning observer and two versions of a basic VS observer. The VS observers compared watershed (WS) and gradient-based search processes that identified focal uptake points for subsequent analysis with the CNPW observer. The model observers treated “background-known-exactly” (BKE) and “background-assumed-homogeneous” assumptions, either searching the entire organ of interest (Task A) or a reduced area that helped limit false positives (Task B). Performance was indicated by area under the LROC curve. Concordance in the localizations between observers was also analysed. Results: With the BKE assumption, both VS observers demonstrated consistent Pearson correlation with humans (Task A: 0.92 and Task B: 0.93) compared with the scanning observer (Task A: 0.77 and Task B: 0.92). The WS VS observer read 624 study test images in 2.0 min. The scanning observer required 0.7 min. Conclusion: Computationally efficient VS can enhance the stability of statistical model observers with regard to uncertainties in PET tumour detection tasks. Advances in knowledge: VS models improve concordance with human observers. PMID:24837105

  5. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the Carcinoma of the Uterus: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alessandra; Grassetto, Gaia; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rampin, Lucia; Fuster, David; Giammarile, Francesco; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present review we reported the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in face of uterine cancer, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Moreover, we made a comparison with the other imaging techniques currently used to evacuate these tumors including contrast-enhanced CT, contrast enhanced-MRI and transvaginal ultrasonography. FDG PET/CT has been reported to be of particular value in detecting occult metastatic lesions, in prediction of response to treatment and as a pro-gnostic factor. PMID:25323881

  6. TPS(PET)-A TPS-based approach for in vivo dose verification with PET in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Frey, K; Bauer, J; Unholtz, D; Kurz, C; Krämer, M; Bortfeld, T; Parodi, K

    2014-01-01

    Since the interest in ion-irradiation for tumour therapy has significantly increased over the last few decades, intensive investigations are performed to improve the accuracy of this form of patient treatment. One major goal is the development of methods for in vivo dose verification. In proton therapy, a PET (positron emission tomography)-based approach measuring the irradiation-induced tissue activation inside the patient has been already clinically implemented. The acquired PET images can be compared to an expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment application, to validate the particle range and the lateral field position in vivo. In the context of this work, TPSPET is introduced as a new approach to predict proton-irradiation induced three-dimensional positron emitter distributions by means of the same algorithms of the clinical treatment planning system (TPS). In order to perform additional activity calculations, reaction-channel-dependent input positron emitter depth distributions are necessary, which are determined from the application of a modified filtering approach to the TPS reference depth dose profiles in water. This paper presents the implementation of TPSPET on the basis of the research treatment planning software treatment planning for particles. The results are validated in phantom and patient studies against Monte Carlo simulations, and compared to β(+)-emitter distributions obtained from a slightly modified version of the originally proposed one-dimensional filtering approach applied to three-dimensional dose distributions. In contrast to previously introduced methods, TPSPET provides a faster implementation, the results show no sensitivity to lateral field extension and the predicted β(+)-emitter densities are fully consistent to the planned treatment dose as they are calculated by the same pencil beam algorithms. These findings suggest a large potential of the application of TPSPET for in vivo dose verification in the

  7. Risk-Adapted Dose-Dense Immunochemotherapy Determined by Interim FDG-PET in Advanced-Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Craig H.; Schöder, Heiko; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Sima, Camelia; Iasonos, Alexia; Portlock, Carol S.; Straus, David; Noy, Ariela; Palomba, Maria L.; O'Connor, Owen A.; Horwitz, Steven; Weaver, Sarah A.; Meikle, Jessica L.; Filippa, Daniel A.; Caravelli, James F.; Hamlin, Paul A.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In studies of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) performed after two to four cycles of chemotherapy has demonstrated prognostic significance. However, some patients treated with immunochemotherapy experience a favorable long-term outcome despite a positive interim FDG-PET scan. To clarify the significance of interim FDG-PET scans, we prospectively studied interim FDG-positive disease within a risk-adapted sequential immunochemotherapy program. Patients and Methods From March 2002 to November 2006, 98 patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center received induction therapy with four cycles of accelerated R-CHOP (rituximab + cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) followed by an interim FDG-PET scan. If the FDG-PET scan was negative, patients received three cycles of ICE (ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide) consolidation therapy. If residual FDG-positive disease was seen, patients underwent biopsy; if the biopsy was negative, they also received three cycles of ICE. Patients with a positive biopsy received ICE followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation. Results At a median follow-up of 44 months, overall and progression-free survival were 90% and 79%, respectively. Ninety-seven patients underwent interim FDG-PET scans; 59 had a negative scan, 51 of whom are progression free. Thirty-eight patients with FDG-PET–positive disease underwent repeat biopsy; 33 were negative, and 26 remain progression free after ICE consolidation therapy. Progression-free survival of interim FDG-PET–positive/biopsy-negative patients was identical to that in patients with a negative interim FDG-PET scan (P = .27). Conclusion Interim or post-treatment FDG-PET evaluation did not predict outcome with this dose-dense, sequential immunochemotherapy program. Outside of a clinical trial, we recommend biopsy confirmation of an abnormal interim FDG-PET scan before changing therapy. PMID

  8. Prognostic Value and Clinical Impact of 18FDG-PET in the Management of Children with Burkitt Lymphoma after Induction Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Clément; Eugène, Thomas; Couec, Marie-Laure; Strullu, Marion; Frampas, Eric; Campion, Loïc; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Bodet-Milin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a rare and aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is curable using intensive chemotherapy. Obtaining a complete response (CR) at the end of induction chemotherapy is a major prognostic factor. This study retrospectively evaluates the potential impact of 18FDG-PET in the management of children with BL after induction chemotherapy, and the prognostic performance of the Deauville criteria. Methods: Nineteen children with BL treated according to the French LMB2001 protocol between 2005 and 2012 were included. 18FDG-PET and conventional imaging (CI) were performed after induction chemotherapy to confirm CR. 18FDG-PET was interpreted according to Deauville criteria with follow-up and/or histology as the gold standard. Results: 18FDG-PET was negative in 15 cases, in agreement with CI in 9/15 cases. The six discordant cases confirmed to be negative by histology, were considered as true negative for 18FDG-PET. Negative predictive value (NPV) of CI and 18FDG-PET were 73 and 93%, respectively. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly higher in patients with negative 18FDG-PET than those with positive 18FDG-PET (p = 0.011). Conclusion: 18FDG-PET interpreted using Deauville criteria can help confirm CR at the end of induction chemotherapy, with a prognostic impact on 5-year PFS. Its high NPV could limit the use of residual mass biopsy. Given the small size of our population, these results need to be confirmed by future prospective studies on a larger population. PMID:25593926

  9. Pet ownership among homeless youth: associations with mental health, service utilization and housing status.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey; Rice, Eric

    2015-04-01

    As many as 25 % of homeless persons have pets. To our knowledge, pet ownership has not been studied quantitatively with homeless youth. This study examined pet ownership among 398 homeless youth utilizing two Los Angeles drop-in centers. Twenty-three percent of homeless youth had a pet. The majority of pet owners reported that their pets kept them company and made them feel loved; nearly half reported that their pets made it more difficult to stay in a shelter. Pet owners reported fewer symptoms of depression and loneliness than their non-pet owning peers. Pet ownership was associated with decreased utilization of housing and job-finding services, and decreased likelihood of currently staying in a shelter. These findings elucidate many of the positive benefits of pet ownership for homeless youth, but importantly highlight that pet ownership may negatively impact housing options. Housing and other services must be sensitive to the needs of homeless youth with pets. PMID:24728815

  10. Pet ownership among homeless youth: associations with mental health, service utilization and housing status.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey; Rice, Eric

    2015-04-01

    As many as 25 % of homeless persons have pets. To our knowledge, pet ownership has not been studied quantitatively with homeless youth. This study examined pet ownership among 398 homeless youth utilizing two Los Angeles drop-in centers. Twenty-three percent of homeless youth had a pet. The majority of pet owners reported that their pets kept them company and made them feel loved; nearly half reported that their pets made it more difficult to stay in a shelter. Pet owners reported fewer symptoms of depression and loneliness than their non-pet owning peers. Pet ownership was associated with decreased utilization of housing and job-finding services, and decreased likelihood of currently staying in a shelter. These findings elucidate many of the positive benefits of pet ownership for homeless youth, but importantly highlight that pet ownership may negatively impact housing options. Housing and other services must be sensitive to the needs of homeless youth with pets.

  11. α-[11C]-Methyl-l-tryptophan–PET in 191 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Luat, Aimee F.; Kumar, Ajay; Govindan, Rajkumar; Pawlik, Kathy; Asano, Eishi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This was an observational study done on a large cohort of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to determine whether i) the presence of α-[11C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT) hotspots is related to the duration of seizure intractability, ii) the presence of AMT hotspots is related to specific TSC gene mutations, and iii) there is concordance between areas with an AMT hotspot and seizure lateralization/localization on scalp EEG. Methods: One hundred ninety-one patients (mean age: 6.7 years; median: 5 years; range: 3 months to 37 years) with TSC and intractable epilepsy were included. All patients underwent AMT-PET scan. AMT uptake in each tuber and normal-appearing cortex was measured and correlated with clinical, scalp EEG, and, if available, electrocorticographic data. Results: The longer the duration of seizure intractability, the greater the number of AMT hotspots (r = 0.2; p = 0.03). AMT hotspots were seen in both TSC1 and TSC2. There was excellent agreement in seizure focus lateralization between ictal scalp EEG and AMT-PET (Cohen κ 0.94) in 68 of 95 patients in whom both ictal video-EEG and AMT-PET showed lateralizing findings; in 28 of 68 patients (41%), AMT was more localizing. Furthermore, AMT-PET was localizing in 10 of 17 patients (58%) with nonlateralized ictal EEG. Conclusion: AMT-PET, when used together with video-EEG, provides additional lateralization/localization data, regardless of TSC mutation. The duration of seizure intractability may predict the multiplicity of areas with AMT hotspots. PMID:23851963

  12. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and (18)F-NaF-PET/CT in men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Kim, Chun K; Gerbaudo, Victor H; Hainer, Jon; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Kantoff, Philip; den Abbeele, Annick D Van; Seltzer, Steven; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate (18)F-labeled-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG-) and (18)F-labeled-sodium fluoride ((18)F-NaF-) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as biomarkers in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Nine men (53-75 years) in a phase 1 trial of abiraterone and cabozantinib had (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, (18)F-NaF-PET/CT and standard imaging ((99m)Tc-labeled-methylene-diphosphonate ((99m)Tc-MDP) bone scan and abdominal/pelvic CT) at baseline and after 8 weeks of therapy. Baseline disease was classified as widespread (18)F-FDG-avid, oligometastatic (18)F-FDG-avid (1 site), or non-(18)F-FDG-avid. Metabolic response was classified using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. Treatment response using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 (PCWG2) guidelines and days on trial (DOT) were recorded. All men were followed for 1 year or until progression. Four men had (18)F-FDG-avid disease: two with widespread (DOT 53 and 76) and two with oligometastatic disease (DOT 231 and still on trial after 742+ days). Five men had non-(18)F-FDG-avid disease; three remained stable or improved (2 still on trial while one discontinued for non-oncologic reasons; DOT 225-563+), and 2 progressed (DOT 285 and 532). Despite the small sample size, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant difference in progression free survival (PFS) between men with widespread (18)F-FDG-avid, oligometastatic (18)F-FDG-avid and non-(18)F-FDG-avid disease (p < 0.01). All men had (18)F-NaF-avid disease. Neither (18)F-NaF-avid disease extent nor intensity was predictive of treatment response. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT may be superior to (18)F-NaF-PET/CT and standard imaging in men with mCRPC on abiraterone and cabozantinib. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT may have potential to stratify men into 3 groups (widespread vs. oligometastatic (18)F-FDG-avid vs. non-(18)F-FDG-avid mCRPC) to tailor therapy. Further evaluation is

  13. SU-D-201-05: Phantom Study to Determine Optimal PET Reconstruction Parameters for PET/MR Imaging of Y-90 Microspheres Following Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, N; Conti, M; Parikh, P; Faul, D; Laforest, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Imaging Y-90 microspheres with PET/MRI following hepatic radioembolization has the potential for predicting treatment outcome and, in turn, improving patient care. The positron decay branching ratio, however, is very small (32 ppm), yielding images with poor statistics even when therapy doses are used. Our purpose is to find PET reconstruction parameters that maximize the PET recovery coefficients and minimize noise. Methods: An initial 7.5 GBq of Y-90 chloride solution was used to fill an ACR phantom for measurements with a PET/MRI scanner (Siemens Biograph mMR). Four hot cylinders and a warm background activity volume of the phantom were filled with a 10:1 ratio. Phantom attenuation maps were derived from scaled CT images of the phantom and included the MR phased array coil. The phantom was imaged at six time points between 7.5–1.0 GBq total activity over a period of eight days. PET images were reconstructed via OP-OSEM with 21 subsets and varying iteration number (1–5), post-reconstruction filter size (5–10 mm), and either absolute or relative scatter correction. Recovery coefficients, SNR, and noise were measured as well as total activity in the phantom. Results: For the 120 different reconstructions, recovery coefficients ranged from 0.1–0.6 and improved with increasing iteration number and reduced post-reconstruction filter size. SNR, however, improved substantially with lower iteration numbers and larger post-reconstruction filters. From the phantom data, we found that performing 2 iterations, 21 subsets, and applying a 5 mm Gaussian post-reconstruction filter provided optimal recovery coefficients at a moderate noise level for a wide range of activity levels. Conclusion: The choice of reconstruction parameters for Y-90 PET images greatly influences both the accuracy of measurements and image quality. We have found reconstruction parameters that provide optimal recovery coefficients with minimized noise. Future work will include the effects

  14. 18F-FLT and 18F-FDOPA PET Kinetics in Recurrent Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wardak, Mirwais; Schiepers, Christiaan; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Dahlbom, Magnus; Phelps, Michael E.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study, kinetic parameters of the cellular proliferation tracer 18F-3′-deoxy-3′-fluoro-L-thymidine (FLT) and the amino acid probe 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phenylalanine (FDOPA) were measured before and early after the start of therapy, and were used to predict the overall survival (OS) of patients with recurrent malignant glioma using multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. Methods High-grade recurrent brain tumors were investigated in 21 patients (11 male and 10 female; ages 26–76 years). For both probes, each patient had 3 dynamic PET studies: at baseline and after 2 and 6 weeks from the start of treatment. Treatment consisted of biweekly cycles of bevacizumab (an angiogenesis inhibitor) and irinotecan (a chemotherapeutic agent). At each study, ~3.5 mCi of FLT (or FDOPA) was administered intravenously and dynamic PET images were acquired for 1 hr (or 35 min for FDOPA). A total of 126 PET scans were analyzed. A three-compartment, two-tissue model was applied to estimate tumor FLT and FDOPA kinetic rate constants using a metabolite- and partial volume-corrected input function. MLR analysis was used to model OS as a function of FLT and FDOPA kinetic parameters at each of the 3 studies as well as their relative changes between studies. An exhaustive search of MLR models using three or fewer predictor variables was performed to find the best models. Results Kinetic parameters from FLT were more predictive of OS than those from FDOPA. Using information from both probes resulted in a better three-predictor MLR model (adjusted R2 = 0.83) than using information from FDOPA alone (adjusted R2 = 0.41), and only marginally different from using information from FLT alone (adjusted R2 = 0.82). Standardized uptake values (either from FLT alone, FDOPA alone, or both together) gave inferior predictive results (best adjusted R2 = 0.25). Conclusions For recurrent malignant glioma treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan, FLT kinetic parameters taken early

  15. SU-E-J-249: Characterization of Gynecological Tumor Heterogeneity Using Texture Analysis in the Context of An 18F-FDG PET Adaptive Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, J; Chino, J; Craciunescu, O; Das, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a method to examine gynecological tumor heterogeneity using texture analysis in the context of an adaptive PET protocol in order to establish if texture metrics from baseline PET-CT predict tumor response better than SUV metrics alone as well as determine texture features correlating with tumor response during radiation therapy. Methods: This IRB approved protocol included 29 women with node positive gynecological cancers visible on FDG-PET treated with EBRT to the PET positive nodes. A baseline and intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained. Tumor outcome was determined based on RECIST on posttreatment PET-CT. Primary GTVs were segmented using 40% threshold and a semi-automatic gradient-based contouring tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). SUV histogram features, Metabolic Volume (MV), and Total Lesion Glycolysis (TLG) were calculated. Four 3D texture matrices describing local and regional relationships between voxel intensities in the GTV were generated: co-occurrence, run length, size zone, and neighborhood difference. From these, 39 texture features were calculated. Prognostic power of baseline features derived from gradientbased and threshold GTVs were determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Receiver Operating Characteristics and logistic regression was performed using JMP (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) to find probabilities of predicting response. Changes in features during treatment were determined using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Of the 29 patients, there were 16 complete responders, 7 partial responders, and 6 non-responders. Comparing CR/PR vs. NR for gradient-based GTVs, 7 texture values, TLG, and SUV kurtosis had a p < 0.05. Threshold GTVs yielded 4 texture features and TLG with p < 0.05. From baseline to intra-treatment, 14 texture features, SUVmean, SUVmax, MV, and TLG changed with p < 0.05. Conclusion: Texture analysis of PET imaged gynecological tumors is an effective method for early prognosis and should

  16. Change of SUVmax Slope in Dynamic Triphasic FDG-PET/CT Distinguishes Malignancy from Post-Radiation Inflammation in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma - a Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Carryn M; Chang, Tangel; Graham, Michael; Marquardt, Michael D; Button, Anna; Smith, Brian J; Menda, Yusuf; Sun, Wenqing; Pagedar, Nitin A; Buatti, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s) The positive predictive value (PPV) of post-radiation (RT) 3-month FDG-PET/CT imaging in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is limited. Dynamic data acquisition and analysis was evaluated for PPV improvement, utilizing a triphasic PET/CT technique. Methods and Materials We prospectively enrolled HNSCC patients who completed RT, with scheduled 3-month post-RT FDG-PET/CT. Patients underwent our standard whole-body PET/CT scan at 90 minutes, with the addition of head and neck PET/CTs at 60 and 120 minutes. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of regions of interest (ROI) were measured at 60, 90, and 120 minutes. SUVmax slope between 60 and 120 minutes, and change of SUVmax slope before and after 90 minutes were calculated. Data were analyzed by primary site and nodal site disease status using the Cox regression model and Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test. Outcomes were based on pathologic and clinical follow-up. Results 84 patients enrolled, with 79 primary and 43 nodal evaluable sites. Twenty-eight sites were interpreted positive or equivocal (18 primary, 8 nodal, 2 distant) on 3-month 90-minute FDG-PET/CT. Median follow-up was 13.3 months. All measured SUV endpoints predicted recurrence. Change of SUVmax slope after 90 minutes more accurately identified non-recurrence in positive or equivocal sites than our current standard of SUVmax ≥ 2.5 (p=0.02). Conclusions The PPV of post-RT FDG-PET/CT may significantly improve using novel second derivative analysis of dynamic triphasic FDG-PET/CT SUVmax slope, accurately distinguishing tumor from inflammation on positive and equivocal scans. PMID:25680593

  17. Screening for occult malignancy with FDG-PET/CT in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Ana; Redondo, Margarita; Rubio, Tomás; Del Olmo, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Wilhelmi, Pablo; García-Velloso, María J; Richter, José A; Páramo, José A; Lecumberri, Ramón

    2013-11-01

    Extensive screening strategies to detect occult cancer in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) are complex and no benefit in terms of survival has been reported. FDG-PET/CT (2-[F-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography), a noninvasive technique for the diagnosis and staging of malignancies, could be useful in this setting. Consecutive patients ≥ 50 years with a first unprovoked VTE episode were prospectively included. Screening with FDG-PET/CT was performed 3-4 weeks after the index event. If positive, appropriate diagnostic work-up was programmed. Clinical follow-up continued for 2 years. Blood samples were collected to assess coagulation biomarkers. FDG-PET/CT was negative in 68/99 patients (68.7%), while suspicious FDG uptake was detected in 31/99 patients (31.3%). Additional diagnostic work-up confirmed a malignancy in 7/31 patients (22.6%), with six of them at early stage. During follow-up, two patients with negative FDG-PET/CT were diagnosed with cancer. Sensitivity (S), positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of FDG-PET/CT as single tool for the detection of occult malignancy were 77.8% (95% CI: 0.51-1), 22.6% (95% CI: 0.08-0.37) and 97.1% (95% CI: 0.93-1), respectively. Median tissue factor (TF) activity in patients with occult cancer was 5.38 pM vs. 2.40 pM in those without cancer (p = 0.03). Limitation of FDG-PET/CT screening to patients with TF activity > 2.8 pM would improve the PPV to 37.5% and reduce the costs of a single cancer diagnosis from 20,711€ to 11,670€. FDG-PET/CT is feasible for the screening of occult cancer in patients with unprovoked VTE, showing high S and NPV. The addition of TF activity determination may be useful for patient selection. PMID:23616232

  18. Atlas construction for dynamic (4D) PET using diffeomorphic transformations.

    PubMed

    Bieth, Marie; Lombaert, Hervé; Reader, Andrew J; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    A novel dynamic (4D) PET to PET image registration procedure is proposed and applied to multiple PET scans acquired with the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the highest resolution human brain PET scanner available in the world. By extending the recent diffeomorphic log-demons (DLD) method and applying it to multiple dynamic [11C]raclopride scans from the HRRT, an important step towards construction of a PET atlas of unprecedented quality for [11C]raclopride imaging of the human brain has been achieved. Accounting for the temporal dimension in PET data improves registration accuracy when compared to registration of 3D to 3D time-averaged PET images. The DLD approach was chosen for its ease in providing both an intensity and shape template, through iterative sequential pair-wise registrations with fast convergence. The proposed method is applicable to any PET radiotracer, providing 4D atlases with useful applications in high accuracy PET data simulations and automated PET image analysis. PMID:24579121

  19. A survey of attitudes toward responsible pet ownership.

    PubMed

    Selby, L A; Rhoades, J D; Hewett, J E; Irvin, J A

    1979-01-01

    The concerns of medical and community officials about responsible pet ownership have increased. Before a practical solution can be found for irresponsible ownership and community health problems associated with pet populations, the public's attitudes on issues related to responsible pet ownership must be determined. Such issues include attitudes on dog and cat overpopulation, potential public health problems associated with pet populations, and methods of controlling pet populations and stray animals. Responses to a questionnaire were used to evaluate the attitudes of 910 pet owners and nonowners toward factors comprising responsible pet ownership. The median age of the respondents was 33 years; 414 (45 percent) were men, and 496 (55 percent) were women. At the time of the study, 18 percent owned a cat and a dog, 35 percent owned only a dog, 11 percent showed only a cat, and 36 percent were nonowners. Not only the sex of the respondent but also the category of pet ownership affected opinions on overpopulation of dogs and cats, nuisance and pollution problems associated with these animals, and methods of controlling pet populations in the community. For example, owners agreed strongly on family planning for pets, but a majority of male owners stated that they would not have their dogs neutered.

  20. A meaty matter. Pet diet and the vegetarian's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Rothgerber, Hank

    2013-09-01

    The present research examined pet ownership, current pet diet, and guilt associated with pet diet among a fairly large sample of non-meat-eaters (n=515). It specifically focused on the conflict that pits feeding one's pet an animal-based diet that may be perceived as best promoting their well-being with concerns over animal welfare and environmental degradation threatened by such diets, here labeled the vegetarian's dilemma. Questionnaire responses indicated that ethically motivated meat abstainers were more likely to own pets and owned more of them than those motivated by health concerns or a combination of ethical and health concerns. Vegans and those resisting meat on ethical grounds were more likely to feed their pet a vegetarian diet and expressed the greatest concerns over feeding their pet an animal-based diet. For vegans and ethical meat abstainers, it is suggested that questions concerning what to feed their pet approaches a tragic tradeoff contrasting two sacred values: protecting the well-being of their pets and protecting the well-being of other animals and the environment. For meat abstainers motivated by health concerns, this constitutes a relatively easy moral problem because the primary concern for such individuals is the health of their pet with less or no regard for other ramifications of the decision, i.e., harming other animals or the environment. PMID:23619313

  1. A survey of attitudes toward responsible pet ownership.

    PubMed Central

    Selby, L A; Rhoades, J D; Hewett, J E; Irvin, J A

    1979-01-01

    The concerns of medical and community officials about responsible pet ownership have increased. Before a practical solution can be found for irresponsible ownership and community health problems associated with pet populations, the public's attitudes on issues related to responsible pet ownership must be determined. Such issues include attitudes on dog and cat overpopulation, potential public health problems associated with pet populations, and methods of controlling pet populations and stray animals. Responses to a questionnaire were used to evaluate the attitudes of 910 pet owners and nonowners toward factors comprising responsible pet ownership. The median age of the respondents was 33 years; 414 (45 percent) were men, and 496 (55 percent) were women. At the time of the study, 18 percent owned a cat and a dog, 35 percent owned only a dog, 11 percent showed only a cat, and 36 percent were nonowners. Not only the sex of the respondent but also the category of pet ownership affected opinions on overpopulation of dogs and cats, nuisance and pollution problems associated with these animals, and methods of controlling pet populations in the community. For example, owners agreed strongly on family planning for pets, but a majority of male owners stated that they would not have their dogs neutered. PMID:572978

  2. Recent Advances and Future Progress in PET Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Piotr J; Pan, Tinsu; Germano, Guido

    2016-01-01

    PET is an important and growing imaging modality. PET instrumentation has undergone a steady evolution improving various aspects of imaging. In this review, we discuss recent and future software and hardware technologies for PET/CT. The improvements include new hardware, incorporating designs with digital photomultipliers, and fast electronics, allowing implementation of time-of-flight reconstruction. Manufacturers also improved PET sensitivity with a larger axial field of view and 3D imaging. On the CT side, faster scanners and multislice detectors allow implementation of advanced acquisition protocols such as 4D CT and coronary CT angiography. Significant advances have been also made in the reconstruction software, now integrating resolution recovery with advanced iterative techniques. New PET acquisition protocols have been enabled to include continuous bed motion. Efforts have been undertaken to compensate PET scans for respiratory and also for cardiac patient motion (for cardiac imaging) during PET imaging, which significantly improves overall image quality and resolution. Finally, simultaneous PET/MR systems have been recently deployed clinically and now offer even greater potential of image quality and enhanced clinical utility. PET/MR imaging allows for perfectly registered attenuation maps, clinically important complementary MR information, and potentially superior motion correction. These recent multifaceted advances allow PET to remain as one of the most exciting and relevant imaging technologies. PMID:26687853

  3. Recent Advances and Future Progress in PET Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Piotr J; Pan, Tinsu; Germano, Guido

    2016-01-01

    PET is an important and growing imaging modality. PET instrumentation has undergone a steady evolution improving various aspects of imaging. In this review, we discuss recent and future software and hardware technologies for PET/CT. The improvements include new hardware, incorporating designs with digital photomultipliers, and fast electronics, allowing implementation of time-of-flight reconstruction. Manufacturers also improved PET sensitivity with a larger axial field of view and 3D imaging. On the CT side, faster scanners and multislice detectors allow implementation of advanced acquisition protocols such as 4D CT and coronary CT angiography. Significant advances have been also made in the reconstruction software, now integrating resolution recovery with advanced iterative techniques. New PET acquisition protocols have been enabled to include continuous bed motion. Efforts have been undertaken to compensate PET scans for respiratory and also for cardiac patient motion (for cardiac imaging) during PET imaging, which significantly improves overall image quality and resolution. Finally, simultaneous PET/MR systems have been recently deployed clinically and now offer even greater potential of image quality and enhanced clinical utility. PET/MR imaging allows for perfectly registered attenuation maps, clinically important complementary MR information, and potentially superior motion correction. These recent multifaceted advances allow PET to remain as one of the most exciting and relevant imaging technologies.

  4. The role of FDG-PET in defining prognosis of Hodgkin lymphoma for early-stage disease

    PubMed Central

    Kostakoglu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    Given the excellent survival rates for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), the young age of many patients, and concerns regarding acute and late treatment-related toxicities, there is a desire to have a predictive tool that enables therapy to be tailored toward the individual patient. Early (or interim) 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (FDG-PET/CT), as a test of tumor sensitivity to ongoing/planned therapy, has been shown to be prognostic for survival in HL. Based on results of interim FDG-PET/CT, therapy may be subsequently modified through minimization or via intensification for low- and high-risk patient populations, respectively (ie, response-adapted therapy). Important data have been generated to standardize the interpretability and reproducibility of interim FDG-PET/CT (eg, the Deauville 5-point system), and observational and noncontrolled prospective studies have produced evidence supporting the hypothesis that response-adapted therapy may potentially serve as a predictive tool. Furthermore, results from noninferiority phase 3 clinical trials randomizing early-stage HL patients with negative interim FDG-PET/CT to combined modality therapy versus chemotherapy alone have been reported. The current collective findings from these randomized early-stage HL studies have shown that acute relapse rates are lower with combined modality therapy, even in patients with negative interim FDG-PET/CT. Additional randomized response-adapted studies are ongoing and novel FDG-PET/CT applications involving quantitative techniques and innovative imaging modalities are being investigated to identify more robust imaging biomarkers. Treatment of early-stage HL remains a clinical management choice for physicians and patients to make with consideration of acute and long-term outcomes. PMID:25428223

  5. Utilization of 18F-FDG PET/CT as a staging tool in patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chin-Chuan; Liu, Yi-Chang; Chang, Chao-Sung; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Liu, Ta-Chih; Huang, Chiung-Tang; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of 2-fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging and prediction of bone marrow involvement in patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma. A total of 185 patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma were enrolled. All patients received PET/CT and bone marrow biopsy as part of a staging work-up. At the initial staging, 17 patients (9.2%) with occult nodal or extranodal lesions were upstaged after a review of the PET/CT studies. PET/CT was found to be useful in the differentiation of aggressive lymphoma subtypes from the indolent subtype based on higher standardized uptake value (SUV) (16.67 vs. 7.98, p < 0.001). The results of bone marrow biopsy and PET/CT in the detection of bone marrow involvement were concordant in 152 patients (82.1%); positive concordance was observed in 21 patients, and negative concordance was observed in 131 patients. A high concordance rate was found between aggressive B cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma (88.1% and 93.8%, respectively). High negative predictive values (NPVs) for excluding bone marrow involvement were observed in aggressive B-cell lymphoma (93.2%) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (100%). Diffuse bone marrow FDG uptake accurately predicted bone marrow in aggressive B-cell lymphoma with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100%. The concordance rate was lower in indolent B-cell lymphoma (66.0%). In conclusion, PET/CT resulted in the upstaging of patients with occult extranodal or nodal lesions. A high SUV level can predict aggressive subtype of lymphoma and detect aggressive components in indolent lymphoma. PET/CT had a high PPV for aggressive B-cell lymphoma with diffuse bone marrow FDG uptake and high NPVs for excluding bone marrow involvement in aggressive B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Bone marrow biopsy may be omitted for the above subgroups of patients with medical conditions not suitable for

  6. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  7. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-01

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  8. Foreign Body Reaction Associated with PET and PET/Chitosan Electrospun Nanofibrous Abdominal Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Veleirinho, Beatriz; Coelho, Daniela S.; Dias, Paulo F.; Maraschin, Marcelo; Pinto, Rúbia; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Peixoto, Ana; Souza, José A.; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa M.; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospun materials have been widely explored for biomedical applications because of their advantageous characteristics, i.e., tridimensional nanofibrous structure with high surface-to-volume ratio, high porosity, and pore interconnectivity. Furthermore, considering the similarities between the nanofiber networks and the extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as the accepted role of changes in ECM for hernia repair, electrospun polymer fiber assemblies have emerged as potential materials for incisional hernia repair. In this work, we describe the application of electrospun non-absorbable mats based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) in the repair of abdominal defects, comparing the performance of these meshes with that of a commercial polypropylene mesh and a multifilament PET mesh. PET and PET/chitosan electrospun meshes revealed good performance during incisional hernia surgery, post-operative period, and no evidence of intestinal adhesion was found. The electrospun meshes were flexible with high suture retention, showing tensile strengths of 3 MPa and breaking strains of 8–33%. Nevertheless, a significant foreign body reaction (FBR) was observed in animals treated with the nanofibrous materials. Animals implanted with PET and PET/chitosan electrospun meshes (fiber diameter of 0.71±0.28 µm and 3.01±0.72 µm, respectively) showed, respectively, foreign body granuloma formation, averaging 4.2-fold and 7.4-fold greater than the control commercial mesh group (Marlex). Many foreign body giant cells (FBGC) involving nanofiber pieces were also found in the PET and PET/chitosan groups (11.9 and 19.3 times more FBGC than control, respectively). In contrast, no important FBR was observed for PET microfibers (fiber diameter = 18.9±0.21 µm). Therefore, we suggest that the reduced dimension and the high surface-to-volume ratio of the electrospun fibers caused the FBR reaction, pointing out the need for further studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying

  9. The role of new PET tracers for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Szyszko, Teresa A; Yip, Connie; Szlosarek, Peter; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J R

    2016-04-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is established for characterising indeterminate pulmonary nodules and staging lung cancer where there is curative intent. Whilst a sensitive technique, specificity for characterising lung cancer is limited. There is recognition that evaluation of other aspects of abnormal cancer biology in addition to glucose metabolism may be more helpful in characterising tumours and predicting response to novel targeted cancer therapeutics. Therefore, efforts have been made to develop and evaluate new radiopharmaceuticals in order to improve the sensitivity and specificity of PET imaging in lung cancer with regards to characterisation, treatment stratification and therapeutic monitoring. 18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) is a marker of cellular proliferation. It shows a lower accumulation in tumours than 18F-FDG as it only accumulates in the cells that are in the S phase of growth and demonstrates a low sensitivity for nodal staging. Its main role is in evaluating treatment response. Methionine is an essential amino acid. 11C-methionine is more specific and sensitive than 18F-FDG in differentiating benign and malignant thoracic nodules. 18Ffluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) is used for imaging tumour hypoxia. Tumour response to treatment is significantly related to the level of tumour oxygenation. Angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels are formed in tumours and is involved in tumour growth and metastatic tumour spread and is a therapeutic target. Most clinical studies have focused on targeted integrin PET imaging of which αvβ3 integrin is the most extensively investigated. It is upregulated on activated endothelial cells in association with tumour angiogenesis. Neuroendocrine tumour tracers, particularly 68Ga-DOTA-peptides, have an established role in imaging of carcinoid tumours. Whilst most of these tracers have predominantly been used in the research environment, they offer

  10. Simultaneous imaging using Si-PM-based PET and MRI for development of an integrated PET/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photo-detector for PET for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems because it has high gain and is insensitive to static magnetic fields. Recently we developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction PET system for small animals and performed simultaneous measurements by combining the Si-PM-based PET and the 0.15 T permanent MRI to test the interferences between the Si-PM-based PET and an MRI. When the Si-PM was inside the MRI and installed around the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI, significant noise from the RF sequence of the MRI was observed in the analog signals of the PET detectors. However, we did not observe any artifacts in the PET images; fluctuation increased in the count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system. On the MRI side, there was significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the MRI images compared with those without PET. By applying noise reduction procedures, the degradation of the S/N was reduced. With this condition, simultaneous measurements of a rat brain using a Si-PM-based PET and an MRI were made with some degradation in the MRI images. We conclude that simultaneous measurements are possible using Si-PM-based PET and MRI.

  11. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with 18F-DOPA PET and PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Grasso, Cristina; Schillaci, Orazio

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to give an overview of the potential clinical utility of [18F]-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET and PET/CT for imaging of brain tumors. Review articles and reference lists were used to supplement the search findings. 18F-DOPA has been investigated as a PET tracer for primary brain tumors, metastases of somatic cancer, and evaluation of relapse of pathology in patients with brain tumor after surgery and/or radiotherapy on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation. Available studies have provided encouraging preliminary results for diagnosis of brain tumors and relapse after surgery/radiotherapy. In the brain, excellent discrimination between tumor and normal tissue can be achieved because of the low physiological uptake of 18F-DOPA and the high ratio between tumor and normal hemispheric tissue. Information on evaluation of brain metastases is limited but encouraging. PET and PET/CT with 18F-DOPA are useful in diagnosing primary brain tumors and should be recommended in the diagnosis of relapse of disease after surgical treatment and/or radiotherapy. Semiquantitative analysis could improve diagnosis while correlative imaging with MRI is essential. Limits are due to low knowledge of potential pitfalls.

  12. SmartPET: Applying HPGe and pulse shape analysis to small-animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Grint, A. N.; Mather, A. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Scraggs, D. P.; Turk, G.; Hall, C. J.; Lazarus, I.; Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R. A.

    2007-08-01

    The SmartPET project is the development of a prototype small-animal imaging system based on the use of Hyperpure Germanium (HPGe) detectors. The use of digital electronics and application of Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques provide fine spatial resolution, while the excellent intrinsic energy resolution of HPGe detectors makes the system ideal for multi-nuclide imaging. As a result, the SmartPET system has the potential to function as a dual modality imager, operating as a dual-head Positron Emission Tomography (PET) camera or in a Compton Camera configuration for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. In this paper, we discuss how the use of simple PSA techniques greatly improves the position sensitivity of the detector yielding improved spatial resolution in reconstructed images. The PSA methods presented have been validated by comparison to data from high-precision scanning of the detectors. Results from this analysis are presented along with initial images from the SmartPET system, which demonstrates the impact of these techniques on PET images.

  13. 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT Versus Histopathology in Primary Localized Prostate Cancer: A Voxel-Wise Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Schiller, Florian; Fechter, Tobias; Wieser, Gesche; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Chirindel, Alin; Salman, Nasr; Drendel, Vanessa; Werner, Martin; Mix, Michael; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Grosu, Anca Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a voxel-wise comparison of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT with prostate histopathology to evaluate the performance of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA for the detection and delineation of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Methodology: Nine patients with histopathological proven primary PCa underwent 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT followed by radical prostatectomy. Resected prostates were scanned by ex-vivo CT in a special localizer and histopathologically prepared. Histopathological information was matched to ex-vivo CT. PCa volume (PCa-histo) and non-PCa tissue in the prostate (NPCa-histo) were processed to obtain a PCa-model, which was adjusted to PET-resolution (histo-PET). Each histo-PET was coregistered to in-vivo PSMA-PET/CT data. Results: Analysis of spatial overlap between histo-PET and PSMA PET revealed highly significant correlations (p < 10-5) in nine patients and moderate to high coefficients of determination (R²) from 42 to 82 % with an average of 60 ± 14 % in eight patients (in one patient R2 = 7 %). Mean SUVmean in PCa-histo and NPCa-histo was 5.6 ± 6.1 and 3.3 ± 2.5 (p = 0.012). Voxel-wise receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses comparing the prediction by PSMA-PET with the non-smoothed tumor distribution from histopathology yielded an average area under the curve of 0.83 ± 0.12. Absolute and relative SUV (normalized to SUVmax) thresholds for achieving at least 90 % sensitivity were 3.19 ± 3.35 and 0.28 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusions: Voxel-wise analyses revealed good correlations of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT and histopathology in eight out of nine patients. Thus, PSMA-PET allows a reliable detection and delineation of PCa as basis for PET-guided focal therapies. PMID:27446496

  14. Guiding of electrons through insulating PET nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthisinghe, D.; Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Ayyad, A.; Tanis, J. A.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Stolterfoht, N.

    2013-05-01

    Electron transmission through insulating capillaries has been actively studied following the discovery of the guiding of 3 keV highly charged ions (HCI) transmitting through such media. Previously results were obtained for electrons incident on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) capillaries and for straight and tapered glass capillaries. New interest has focused on electron energy loss and the temporal charge deposition dependence for incident energies 500 and 800 eV. In the present work a PET sample with a diameter of 100 nm and thickness of 12 μm was bombarded by 300, 500 and 800 eV electrons for several small tilt angles. The angular profiles of the transmitted electron spectra for each sample tilt angle were fit with Gaussian functions that were related to the corresponding observation angle. The results show strong evidence for guiding and for the time dependence of the charge deposition.

  15. Imaging Tobacco Smoking with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Kelly P; Esterlis, Irina; Sandiego, Christine; Petrulli, Ryan; Morris, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    Receptor imaging, including positron emission computed tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), provides a way to measure chemicals of interest, such as receptors, and neurotransmitter fluctuations, in the living human brain. Imaging the neurochemical mechanisms involved in the maintenance and recovery from tobacco smoking has provided insights into critical smoking related brain adaptations. Nicotine, the primary addictive chemical in tobacco smoke, enters the brain, activates beta2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs) and, like most drugs of abuse, elicits dopamine (DA) release in the ventral striatum. Both β2*-nAChRs and DA signaling are critical neurosubstrates underlying tobacco smoking behaviors and dependence and have been studied extensively with PET and SPECT brain imaging. We review the imaging literature on these topics and describe how brain imaging has helped inform the treatment of tobacco smoking.

  16. Simplification of Methods for PET Radiopharmaceutical Syntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, Michael, R.

    2011-12-27

    In an attempt to develop simplified methods for radiochemical synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals useful in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), current commercially available automated synthesis apparati were evaluated for use with solid phase synthesis, thin-film techniques, microwave-accelerated chemistry, and click chemistry approaches. Using combinations of these techniques, it was shown that these automated synthesis systems can be simply and effectively used to support the synthesis of a wide variety of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled compounds, representing all of the major types of compounds synthesized and using all of the common radiochemical precursors available. These techniques are available for use to deliver clinically useful amounts of PET radiopharmaceuticals with chemical and radiochemical purities and high specific activities, suitable for human administration.

  17. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  18. Dopamine receptors in pituitary adenomas: PET visualization with 11C-N-methylspiperone

    SciTech Connect

    Muhr, C.; Bergstroem, M.L.; Lundberg, P.O.; Bergstroem, K.H.; Hartvig, P.; Lundqvist, H.; Antoni, G.; Langstroem B2

    1986-03-01

    Two patients with pituitary tumors were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) after intravenous administration of 11C-N-methylspiperone. In repeat studies the patients were given 1 mg of intravenous haloperidol prior to the administration of the radioligand to block the dopamine receptors. High uptakes of the radiolabeled ligand were seen in one of the tumors. With haloperidol pretreatment the uptake was lower, probably mainly showing the remaining unspecific binding. The most marked uptake and the largest effect of haloperidol pretreatment was seen in a patient with a hormonally active prolactinoma. Dopamine receptor binding in pituitary tumors can be demonstrated in vivo with PET, and quantification of this binding is possible using a compartmental model. This technique may be useful in improving our understanding of the variable response to medical treatment of prolactinomas with dopamine agonists as well as in the prediction of the effect of such treatment.

  19. High-precision position estimation in PET using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, F.; Aliaga, R. J.; Ferrando, N.; Martínez, J. D.; Herrero, V.; Lerche, Ch. W.; Colom, R. J.; Monzó, J. M.; Sebastiá, A.; Gadea, R.

    2009-06-01

    Traditionally, the most popular technique to predict the impact position of gamma photons on a PET detector has been Anger's logic. However, it introduces nonlinearities that compress the light distribution, reducing the useful field of view and the spatial resolution, especially at the edges of the scintillator crystal. In this work, we make use of neural networks to address a bias-corrected position estimation from real stimulus obtained from a 2D PET system setup. The preprocessing and data acquisition were performed by separate custom boards, especially designed for this application. The results show that neural networks yield a more uniform field of view while improving the systematic error and the spatial resolution. Therefore, they stand as a better performing and readily available alternative to classic positioning methods.

  20. Cardiac PET Perfusion: Prognosis, Risk Stratification, Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Dorbala, Sharmila; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with positron emission tomography (PET) has expanded significantly over the past decade. With the wider availability of PET scanners and the routine use of quantitative blood flow imaging, the clinical use of PET MPI is expected to increase further. PET MPI is a powerful tool to identify risk, to quantify risk, and to guide therapy in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). A large body of evidence supports the prognostic value of PET MPI and ejection fraction in intermediate to high risk subjects, in women, in obese individuals and in post coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) individuals. A normal perfusion study indicates low risk (< 1% annualized rate of cardiac events of cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction), while an abnormal study indicates high risk. With accurate risk stratification, high quality images, and quantitation PET MPI may transform the management of patients with known or suspected CAD. PMID:25234079

  1. Microfluidics for synthesis of peptide-based PET tracers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful noninvasive tool for acquisition of the physiological parameters in human and animals with the help of PET tracers. Among all the PET tracers, radiolabeled peptides have been widely explored for cancer-related receptor imaging due to their high affinity and specificity to receptors. But radiochemistry procedures for production of peptide-based PET tracers are usually complex, which makes large-scale clinical studies relatively challenging. New radiolabeling technologies which could simplify synthesis and purification procedures, are extremely needed. Over the last decade, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology have boomed as powerful tools in the field of organic chemistry, which potentially provide significant help to the PET chemistry. In this minireview, microfluidic radiolabeling technology is described and its application for synthesis of peptide-based PET tracers is summarized and discussed.

  2. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  3. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  4. Lossless compression for 3D PET

    SciTech Connect

    Macq, B.; Sibomana, M.; Coppens, A.; Bol, A.; Michel, C. ); Baker, K.; Jones, B. )

    1994-12-01

    A new adaptive scheme is proposed for the lossless compression of positron emission tomography (PET) sinogram data. The algorithm uses an adaptive differential pulse code modulator (ADPCM) followed by a universal variable length coder (UVLC). Contrasting with Lempel-Ziv (LZ), which operates on a whole sinogram, UVLC operates very efficiently on short data blocks. This is a major advantage for real-time implementation. The algorithms is adaptive and codes data after some on-line estimations of the statistics inside each block. Its efficiency is tested when coding dynamic and static scans from two PET scanners and reaches asymptotically the entropy limit for long frames. For very short 3D frames, the new algorithm is twice more efficient than LZ. Since an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) implementing a similar UVLC scheme is available today, a similar one should be able to sustain PET data lossless compression and decompression at a rate of 27 MBytes/sec. This algorithm is consequently a good candidate for the next generation of lossless compression engine.

  5. Lossless compression for 3D PET

    SciTech Connect

    Macq, B.; Sibomana, M.; Coppens, A.; Bol, A.; Michel, C. . Telecommunication Lab.); Baker, K.; Jones, B. )

    1994-08-01

    A new adaptive scheme is proposed for the lossless compression of positron emission tomography (PET) sinogram data. The algorithm uses an adaptive differential pulse code modulator (ADPCM) followed by a universal variable length coder (UVLC). Contrasting with Lempel-Ziv (LZ), which operates on a whole sinogram, UVLC operates very efficiently on short data blocks. This is a major advantage for real-time implementation. The algorithm is adaptive and codes data after some on-line estimations of the statistics inside each block. Its efficiency is tested when coding dynamic and static scans from two PET scanners and reaches asymptotically the entropy limit for long frames. For very short 3D frames, the new algorithm is twice more efficient than LZ. Since an ASIC implementing a similar UVLC scheme is available today, a similar one should be able to sustain PET data lossless compression and decompression at a rate of 27 MBytes/sec. This algorithm is consequently a good candidate for the next generation of lossless compression engine.

  6. [Pets as permanent excretors of zoonoses pathogens].

    PubMed

    Mayr, B

    1993-02-01

    When scrutinizing zoonoses with regard to risks for human beings, the spectrum of pathogens with dogs, cats and birds leading to persistent infections and consequently to the fact that the animals become carriers and permanent excretors is relatively small. Most of the zoonoses cause clinical symptoms and will be taken care of correspondingly. With regard to dogs there is a multitude of persistent infections that are transferred from the pet to the human being and vice versa. In reality, however, the importance of the dog as permanent excretor of zoonosis pathogens endangering human health is minimal, except for some parasitoses. As far as cats are concerned, the situation is totally different. Cats are carriers and permanent excretors of pasteurella, the pathogens of the so-called cat-scratch disease, trichophyton and microsporum species, toxoplasmosis and orthopox viruses. The new zoonosis feline pox serves as an example of the necessity of a permanent observation of persistently infected pets. Healthy, but persistently infected birds form a source of infection not to be underestimated. Through the beat of their wings they constantly stir up dried infectious excrements and dust and thus favour the airborn infection of human beings. Chlamydia psittaci, the Newcastle disease virus and Mycobacterium avium are of major importance in this context. The risk of transferring zoonosis pathogens from persistently infected pets to human beings can be minimized through prophylactic diagnosis, strict measures of hygiene, observation of the schedule of vaccinations for the respective species and regular use of anthelmintica.

  7. Prognostic value of interim FDG-PET in R-CHOP-treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hugo J A; Kwee, Thomas C

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze the prognostic value of interim (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP). MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for suitable studies. Included studies were methodologically appraised, and results were summarized both descriptively and meta-analytically. Nine studies, comprising a total of 996 R-CHOP-treated DLBCL patients, were included. Overall, studies were of moderate methodological quality. The area under the summary receiver operating curve (AUC) of interim FDG-PET in predicting treatment failure and death were 0.651 and 0.817, respectively. There was no heterogeneity in diagnostic odds ratios across available studies (I(2)=0.0%). At multivariable analysis, 2 studies reported interim FDG-PET to have independent prognostic value in addition to the International Prognostic Index (IPI) in predicting treatment failure, whereas 3 studies reported that this was not the case. One study reported interim FDG-PET to have independent prognostic value in addition to the IPI in predicting death, whereas 2 studies reported that this was not the case. In conclusion, interim FDG-PET in R-CHOP-treated DLBCL has some correlation with outcome, but its prognostic value is homogeneously suboptimal across studies and it has not consistently proven to surpass the prognostic potential of the IPI. Moreover, there is a lack of studies that compared interim FDG-PET to the recently developed and superior National Comprehensive Cancer Network-IPI. Therefore, at present there is no scientific base to support the clinical use of interim FDG-PET in R-CHOP-treated DLBCL. PMID:27637352

  8. Monitoring of anti-cancer treatment with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT PET: a comprehensive review of pre-clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of solid tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is an evolving field with continuous development of new PET tracers and discovery of new applications for already implemented PET tracers. During treatment of cancer patients, a general challenge is to measure treatment effect early in a treatment course and by that to stratify patients into responders and non-responders. With 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) and 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluorothymidine((18)F-FLT) two of the cancer hallmarks, altered energy metabolism and increased cell proliferation, can be visualized and quantified non-invasively by PET. With (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT PET changes in energy metabolism and cell proliferation can thereby be determined after initiation of cancer treatment in both clinical and pre-clinical studies in order to predict, at an early time-point, treatment response. It is hypothesized that decreases in glycolysis and cell proliferation may occur in tumors that are sensitive to the applied cancer therapeutics and that tumors that are resistant to treatment will show unchanged glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Whether (18)F-FDG and/or (18)F-FLT PET can be used for prediction of treatment response has been analyzed in many studies both following treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents but also following treatment with different targeted therapies, e.g. monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors. The results from these studies have been most variable; in some studies early changes in (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT uptake predicted later tumor regression whereas in other studies no change in tracer uptake was observed despite the treatment being effective. The present review gives an overview of pre-clinical studies that have used (18)F-FDG and/or (18)F-FLT PET for response monitoring of cancer therapeutics.

  9. Prognostic value of interim FDG-PET in R-CHOP-treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hugo J A; Kwee, Thomas C

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze the prognostic value of interim (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP). MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for suitable studies. Included studies were methodologically appraised, and results were summarized both descriptively and meta-analytically. Nine studies, comprising a total of 996 R-CHOP-treated DLBCL patients, were included. Overall, studies were of moderate methodological quality. The area under the summary receiver operating curve (AUC) of interim FDG-PET in predicting treatment failure and death were 0.651 and 0.817, respectively. There was no heterogeneity in diagnostic odds ratios across available studies (I(2)=0.0%). At multivariable analysis, 2 studies reported interim FDG-PET to have independent prognostic value in addition to the International Prognostic Index (IPI) in predicting treatment failure, whereas 3 studies reported that this was not the case. One study reported interim FDG-PET to have independent prognostic value in addition to the IPI in predicting death, whereas 2 studies reported that this was not the case. In conclusion, interim FDG-PET in R-CHOP-treated DLBCL has some correlation with outcome, but its prognostic value is homogeneously suboptimal across studies and it has not consistently proven to surpass the prognostic potential of the IPI. Moreover, there is a lack of studies that compared interim FDG-PET to the recently developed and superior National Comprehensive Cancer Network-IPI. Therefore, at present there is no scientific base to support the clinical use of interim FDG-PET in R-CHOP-treated DLBCL.

  10. Monitoring of anti-cancer treatment with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET: a comprehensive review of pre-clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of solid tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is an evolving field with continuous development of new PET tracers and discovery of new applications for already implemented PET tracers. During treatment of cancer patients, a general challenge is to measure treatment effect early in a treatment course and by that to stratify patients into responders and non-responders. With 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and 3’-deoxy-3’-[18F]fluorothymidine(18F-FLT) two of the cancer hallmarks, altered energy metabolism and increased cell proliferation, can be visualized and quantified non-invasively by PET. With 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET changes in energy metabolism and cell proliferation can thereby be determined after initiation of cancer treatment in both clinical and pre-clinical studies in order to predict, at an early time-point, treatment response. It is hypothesized that decreases in glycolysis and cell proliferation may occur in tumors that are sensitive to the applied cancer therapeutics and that tumors that are resistant to treatment will show unchanged glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Whether 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET can be used for prediction of treatment response has been analyzed in many studies both following treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents but also following treatment with different targeted therapies, e.g. monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors. The results from these studies have been most variable; in some studies early changes in 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT uptake predicted later tumor regression whereas in other studies no change in tracer uptake was observed despite the treatment being effective. The present review gives an overview of pre-clinical studies that have used 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET for response monitoring of cancer therapeutics. PMID:26550536

  11. Assessment of outcomes with delayed 18F-FDG PET-CT response assessment in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, F; Subesinghe, M; Ramasamy, S; Sen, M; Scarsbrook, A F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the accuracy of a 4-month post-(chemo)radiotherapy 18-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-CT for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods: 105 patients who underwent a baseline and response assessment 18F-FDG PET-CT scan between 2008 and April 2013 were identified. 18F-FDG PET-CT outcomes were analysed with reference to clinicopathological outcomes. Results: 79 of 105 (75%) 18F-FDG PET-CT scans demonstrated a complete metabolic response; 19 of 101 (19%) for assessable primary tumours were positive; and 19 of 93 (20%) for patients with nodal disease were equivocal (n = 10) or positive (n = 9). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for primary and nodal disease were 90%, 89%, 47%, 99% and 91%, 89%, 53% and 99%, respectively. Eight of nine patients with a positive nodal response scan had clinicopathological evidence of residual nodal disease (PPV, 89%). 2 of 10 patients with equivocal nodal responses had clinicopathological evidence of residual nodal disease (PPV, 20%). Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET-CT 4 months post treatment has a very high NPV. A positive 18F-FDG PET-CT has a high PPV for residual nodal disease. By contrast, patients who have an equivocal nodal response have a low PPV. Advances in knowledge: Response assessment 18F-FDG PET-CT is a valuable tool in guiding the selective use of neck dissection following (chemo)radiotherapy for HNSCC. An equivocal lymph node response has a limited predictive value for persistent disease, and optimal management remains a clinical challenge. PMID:26081447

  12. The application of PET imaging in psychoneuroimmunology research.

    PubMed

    Hannestad, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a research tool that allows in vivo measurements of brain metabolism and specific target molecules. PET imaging can be used to measure these brain variables in a variety of species, including human and non-human primates, and rodents. PET imaging can therefore be combined with various experimental and clinical model systems that are commonly used in psychoneuroimmunology research.

  13. Does Pet Arrival Trigger Prosocial Behaviors in Individuals with Autism?

    PubMed Central

    Grandgeorge, Marine; Tordjman, Sylvie; Lazartigues, Alain; Lemonnier, Eric; Deleau, Michel; Hausberger, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of social interactions especially prosocial behaviors – an important aspect of development – is one of the characteristics of autistic disorders. Numerous strategies or therapies are used to improve communication skills or at least to reduce social impairments. Animal-assisted therapies are used widely but their relevant benefits have never been scientifically evaluated. In the present study, we evaluated the association between the presence or the arrival of pets in families with an individual with autism and the changes in his or her prosocial behaviors. Of 260 individuals with autism - on the basis of presence or absence of pets - two groups of 12 individuals and two groups of 8 individuals were assigned to: study 1 (pet arrival after age of 5 versus no pet) and study 2 (pet versus no pet), respectively. Evaluation of social impairment was assessed at two time periods using the 36-items ADI-R algorithm and a parental questionnaire about their child-pet relationships. The results showed that 2 of the 36 items changed positively between the age of 4 to 5 (t0) and time of assessment (t1) in the pet arrival group (study 1): “offering to share” and “offering comfort”. Interestingly, these two items reflect prosocial behaviors. There seemed to be no significant changes in any item for the three other groups. The interactions between individuals with autism and their pets were more – qualitatively and quantitatively - reported in the situation of pet arrival than pet presence since birth. These findings open further lines of research on the impact of pet’s presence or arrival in families with an individual with autism. Given the potential ability of individuals with autism to develop prosocial behaviors, related studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of such child-pet relationship. PMID:22870246

  14. Appropriateness criteria of FDG PET/CT in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    18Fluorine-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) is a well-established functional imaging method widely used in oncology. In this article, we have incorporated the various indications for 18FDG PET/CT in oncology based on available evidence and current guidelines. Growing body of evidence for use of 18FDG PET/CT in select tumors is also discussed. This article attempts to give the reader an overview of the appropriateness of using 18F-FDG PET/CT in various malignancies. PMID:25969632

  15. Recycling policies and programmes for PET drink bottles in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schwanse, Elvira

    2011-09-01

    Transition and emerging economies confront a steadily increasing generation of municipal solid waste in the form of disposable packaging. The following article reports the situation of soft drink bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in Mexico. Since 2002 schemes following the European Green Dot principle have been partly implemented to place responsibility on the producer, mainly soft drink bottlers. Private stakeholders are responsible for national recovery activities. Meanwhile Government presence to promote recovery is absent. Of post-consumer PET 75% is exported, and the newly created bottle-to-bottle (BTB) PET industry is confronted with bottlenecks in their post-consumer PET supply.

  16. Friends with benefits: on the positive consequences of pet ownership.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Allen R; Brown, Christina M; Shoda, Tonya M; Stayton, Laura E; Martin, Colleen E

    2011-12-01

    Social support is critical for psychological and physical well-being, reflecting the centrality of belongingness in our lives. Human interactions often provide people with considerable social support, but can pets also fulfill one's social needs? Although there is correlational evidence that pets may help individuals facing significant life stressors, little is known about the well-being benefits of pets for everyday people. Study 1 found in a community sample that pet owners fared better on several well-being (e.g., greater self-esteem, more exercise) and individual-difference (e.g., greater conscientiousness, less fearful attachment) measures. Study 2 assessed a different community sample and found that owners enjoyed better well-being when their pets fulfilled social needs better, and the support that pets provided complemented rather than competed with human sources. Finally, Study 3 brought pet owners into the laboratory and experimentally demonstrated the ability of pets to stave off negativity caused by social rejection. In summary, pets can serve as important sources of social support, providing many positive psychological and physical benefits for their owners. PMID:21728449

  17. Non-Isothermal Crystallization of PET/PLA Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huipeng; Pyda, Marek; Cebe, Peggy

    2011-03-01

    Binary blends of poly(ethylene terephthalate) with poly(lactic acid), PET/PLA, were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The solution cast blends were miscible in the melt over the entire composition range. We report the non-isothermal crystallization of: a.) PET, with and without presence of PLA crystals, and b.) PLA, with and without presence of PET crystals. PET can crystallize in all blends, regardless of whether PLA is amorphous or crystalline, and crystallinity of PET decreases as PLA content increases. PLA crystallization is strongly affected by the mobility of the PET. When PET is wholly amorphous, PLA can crystallize weakly even in 70/30 blends. When PET is crystalline, PLA cannot crystallize when its own content is below 0.90. The different behaviors may be related to the tendency of each polymer to form constrained chains, i.e., to form rigid amorphous fraction, RAF. PET is capable of forming a large amount of RAF, whereas relatively smaller amount of RAF forms in PLA. Like the crystals, rigid amorphous fraction of one component may inhibit growth of crystals of the other blend partner. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Polymers Program of the Division of Materials Research under DMR-0602473 and the MRI Program under DMR-0520655.

  18. Friends with benefits: on the positive consequences of pet ownership.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Allen R; Brown, Christina M; Shoda, Tonya M; Stayton, Laura E; Martin, Colleen E

    2011-12-01

    Social support is critical for psychological and physical well-being, reflecting the centrality of belongingness in our lives. Human interactions often provide people with considerable social support, but can pets also fulfill one's social needs? Although there is correlational evidence that pets may help individuals facing significant life stressors, little is known about the well-being benefits of pets for everyday people. Study 1 found in a community sample that pet owners fared better on several well-being (e.g., greater self-esteem, more exercise) and individual-difference (e.g., greater conscientiousness, less fearful attachment) measures. Study 2 assessed a different community sample and found that owners enjoyed better well-being when their pets fulfilled social needs better, and the support that pets provided complemented rather than competed with human sources. Finally, Study 3 brought pet owners into the laboratory and experimentally demonstrated the ability of pets to stave off negativity caused by social rejection. In summary, pets can serve as important sources of social support, providing many positive psychological and physical benefits for their owners.

  19. PET/CT scanner instrumentation, challenges, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E; Cheng, Phillip M; Vesselle, Hubert; Karp, Joel S

    2004-11-01

    PET/CT scanners offer a hardware solution for aligning and viewing functional and anatomic images that is immune to many of the errors in strictly software registration techniques. Moreover, PET attenuation-corrected emission scans benefit from the use of the onboard CT for fast, low-noise attenuation correction. Along with the significant improved localization and reduced acquisition time, PET/CT scanners also introduce new instrumentation challenges ranging from patient movement to quantitative attenuation correction. This article provides an overview of current PET/CT scanner technology, a discussion of challenges faced by these systems, and pending solutions.

  20. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    de Galiza Barbosa, F; Delso, G; Ter Voert, E E G W; Huellner, M W; Herrmann, K; Veit-Haibach, P

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies.

  1. Additional value of F-18 FDG PET/CT for initial staging in breast cancer with clinically negative axillary nodes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do-Young; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Son, Hye Joo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of the preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the initial workup of breast cancer with clinically negative axillary nodes. Whether the status of the clinical axillary nodal involvement can be considered a parameter for making a decision to omit the preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the situation reported herein was also determined. A total of 178 patients who had newly diagnosed breast cancer and for whom the conventional diagnostic modalities showed no sign of axillary node metastasis were retrospectively enrolled in this study. All the patients underwent preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT. The images and histologic results that were obtained were analyzed. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT detected primary lesions in 156 of the 178 patients, with an overall sensitivity of 87.6 %, and false negative results were obtained for 22 patients (12.4 %). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of axillary nodes were 20.8, 86.9, 37.0, 74.8, and 69.1 %, respectively. Extra-axillary node metastasis was identified in two patients (1.1 %) who had internal mammary nodes. There was no distant metastasis, but coexisting primary tumor was detected in five patients (2.8 %). In total, the therapeutic plan was changed based on ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in seven (3.9 %) of the 178 patients, but considering only the cases confined to breast cancer, the change occurred in only two patients (1.1 %). ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT almost did not affect the initial staging and treatment plan in breast cancer with clinically negative axillary node. If the axillary node is clinically negative in the preoperative workup of breast cancer, then ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT can be omitted.

  2. Combining PET biodistribution and equilibrium dialysis assays to assess the free brain concentration and BBB transport of CNS drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Roger N; Summerfield, Scott G; Salinas, Cristian A; Read, Kevin D; Guo, Qi; Searle, Graham E; Parker, Christine A; Jeffrey, Phil; Laruelle, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The passage of drugs in and out of the brain is controlled by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), typically, using either passive diffusion across a concentration gradient or active transport via a protein carrier. In-vitro and preclinical measurements of BBB penetration do not always accurately predict the in-vivo situation in humans. Thus, the ability to assay the concentration of novel drug candidates in the human brain in vivo provides valuable information for derisking of candidate molecules early in drug development. Here, positron emission tomography (PET) measurements are combined with in-vitro equilibrium dialysis assays to enable assessment of transport and estimation of the free brain concentration in vivo. The PET and equilibrium dialysis data were obtained for 36 compounds in the pig. Predicted P-glycoprotein (P-gp) status of the compounds was consistent with the PET/equilibrium dialysis results. In particular, Loperamide, a well-known P-gp substrate, exhibited a significant concentration gradient consistent with active efflux and after inhibition of the P-gp process the gradient was removed. The ability to measure the free brain concentration and assess transport of novel compounds in the human brain with combined PET and equilibrium dialysis assays can be a useful tool in central nervous system (CNS) drug development. PMID:22274741

  3. Simulation for CZT Compton PET (Maximization of the efficiency for PET using Compton event)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    Multiple interactions in positron emission tomography (PET) using scintillators are generally treated as noise events because each interacted position and energy of the multiple interactions cannot be obtained individually and the sequence of multiple scattering is not fully known. Therefore, the first interaction position, which is the crucial information for a PET image reconstruction, cannot be determined correctly. However, in the case of a pixelized semiconductor detector, such as CdZnTe, each specific position and energy information of multiple interactions can be obtained. Moreover, for the emission of two 511 keV radiations in PET, if one radiation deposits all the energy in one position (photoelectric effect) and the other radiation undergoes Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect, the sequence of Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect can be determined using the Compton scattering formula. Hence, the correct position of Compton scattering can be determined, and the Compton scattering effect, which is discarded in conventional PET systems can be recovered in the new system reported in this study. The PET system in this study, which was simulated using GATE 5.0 code, was composed of 20 mm×10 mm×10 mm CdZnTe detectors consisting of 1 mm×0.5 mm×2.5 mm pixels. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening, pixelization effect and energy broadening were estimated and compared. The pixelized effect was the main factor in increasing the angular uncertainty and was strongly dependent on the distance between the 1st and 2nd interaction positions. The effect of energy broadening to an angular resolution less than expected and that of Doppler broadening was minimal. The number of Compton events was double that of the photoelectric effect assuming full energy absorption. Therefore, the detection efficiency of this new PET system can be improved greatly because both the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are

  4. Prognostic value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhitao; Wang, Xuejuan; Song, Yuqin; Zheng, Wen; Wang, Xiaopei; Xie, Yan; Lin, Ningjing; Tu, Meifeng; Ping, Lingyan; Liu, Weiping; Deng, Lijuan; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous disease. The prognostic factor currently used is not accurate enough to predict the outcomes of patients with DLBCL. The prognostic significance of interim PET/CT in DLBCL remains controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the predictive value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT after first-line treatment in patients with DLBCL. Methods Thirty-two patients with DLBCL underwent baseline, interim and post-treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. Imaging results were analyzed for the survival of patients via software SPSS 13.0, retrospectively. Results Thirty-one of the 32 patients were treated with R-CHOP regimen, and interim 18F-FDG PET/CT of 24 patients was performed after 2 cycles of treatment. After a median follow-up period of 16.7 months, the 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were significantly different between the groups above and below SUVmax cut-off value of 2.5 (P=0.039). No significant differences were found in the 2-year PFS rates if SUVmax cut-off values were set as 2.0 and 3.0, respectively (P=0.360; P=0.113). Conclusions Interim PET/CT could predict the prognosis of DLBCL patients with the SUVmax cut-off value of 2.5, but more clinical data should be concluded to confirm this conclusion. Key Words Fludeoxyglucose F18; lymphoma; large cell; diffuse; prognosis; standard utility value PMID:23372347

  5. Characterisation of Ni + implanted PEEK, PET and PI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackova, A.; Bocan, J.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Slepicka, P.; Sajdl, P.; Svorcik, V.

    2009-05-01

    Polyimide (PI), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) were implanted with 40 keV Ni+ ions at room temperature at fluences ranging from 1.0 × 1016 to 1.5 × 1017 ions cm-2 and with ion current density varying between 4 and 10 μA cm-2. The depth profiles of the implanted Ni atoms determined by the RBS technique were compared with those predicted by the SRIM and TRIDYN codes. Hydrogen depletion as a function of the ion fluence was determined by the ERDA technique, and the compositional and structural changes of the polymers were characterised by the UV-vis and XPS methods. The implanted profiles differed significantly from those predicted by the SRIM code while the lower fluences were satisfactorily described by the TRIDYN simulation. A significant hydrogen release from the polymer surface layer was observed along with significant changes in the surface layer composition. The UV-vis results indicated an increase in the concentration and conjugation of double bonds.

  6. Demography of the pet dog and cat population on the island of Ireland and human factors influencing pet ownership.

    PubMed

    Downes, Martin; Canty, Mary J; More, Simon J

    2009-11-01

    Published data on aspects of domestic pet demographics are available in many countries. Several of these studies have linked household demographics, such as the presence of children in the household, to pet ownership. There is very little published information about the demography of domestic pets on the island of Ireland (the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland). This study was conducted to describe the demography of the pet dog and cat populations on the island of Ireland and to identify human factors influencing pet ownership. A questionnaire was designed and administered to households to collect data about the demographics of households and their dogs and cats. The questions related to location, building structure, social class, nationality and family structure of the household, and the sex, age and source of each pet dog and/or cat. The survey was administered by a commercial company, using computer-assisted telephone interview techniques to 1250 households selected using random digit dialling and quota controls. In this study, a pet dog was defined as a dog that was been fed by a household and considered a pet by the participant of the study. A pet cat was defined as a cat that was both fed by the household and allowed into the house. The results show that 35.6% of households in Ireland have one or more pet dogs and 10.4% of households have one or more pet cats. In total, 47.3% of pet dogs and 76.1% of pet cats were neutered. Females of both species are more likely to be neutered than males. Factors associated with dog ownership included location, house type, household social class, household composition, the presence of school children in the house, and the presence of a cat in the house. Factors associated with pet cat ownership included the type of house structure, the presence of a dog in the house and the gender and age of the participant. Cats tend to stray into households. This study was the first to provide detailed information about the

  7. Pet ownership, dog types and attachment to pets in 9–10 year old children in Liverpool, UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic differences in childhood ownership and attitudes to pets. The objective of this study was to describe the factors associated with living with different pet types, as well as factors that may influence the intensity of relationship or ‘attachment’ that children have to their pet. Data were collected using a survey of 1021 9–10 year old primary school children in a deprived area of the city of Liverpool, UK. Results Dogs were the most common pet owned, most common ‘favourite’ pet, and species most attached to. Twenty-seven percent of dog-owning children (10% of all children surveyed) reported living with a ‘Bull Breed’ dog (which includes Pit Bulls and Staffordshire Bull Terriers), and the most popular dog breed owned was the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Multivariable regression modelling identified a number of variables associated with ownership of different pets and the strength of attachment to the child’s favourite pet. Girls were more likely to own most pet types, but were no more or less attached to their favourite pet than boys. Children of white ethnicity were more likely to own dogs, rodents and ‘other’ pets but were no more or less attached to their pets than children of non-white ethnicity. Single and youngest children were no more or less likely to own pets than those with younger brothers and sisters, but they showed greater attachment to their pets. Children that owned dogs lived in more deprived areas than those without dogs, and deprivation increased with number of dogs owned. ‘Pit Bull or cross’ and ‘Bull Breed’ dogs were more likely to be found in more deprived areas than other dog types. Non-whites were also more likely to report owning a ‘Pit Bull or cross’ than Whites. Conclusions Gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status were associated with pet ownership, and sibling status with level of attachment to the pet. These are important to consider when

  8. Cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx: FDG PET with contrast-enhanced CT in the posttreatment setting.

    PubMed

    King, Kevin G; Kositwattanarerk, Arpakorn; Genden, Eric; Kao, Johnny; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for posttreatment monitoring of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx has steadily increased in recent years. FDG PET/CT offers many advantages for evaluating the effects of therapy, determining whether residual or recurrent disease is present, and assessing the extent of nodal disease. Because of the high negative predictive value of this imaging test, some have advocated the deferral of neck dissection in patients with negative findings at FDG PET/CT after chemotherapy and radiation therapy; positive findings may have a similarly heavy influence on the future course of treatment. Thus, the accuracy of image interpretation is crucial. However, the interpretation of posttreatment FDG PET images is challenging, with multiple potential pitfalls and limitations that could lead to an incorrect analysis. Accuracy depends on a detailed knowledge of the patient's treatment history and a thorough understanding of the kinds of changes that might result from treatment. Awareness of the principles underlying the selection of the optimal interval between the completion of treatment and the first follow-up FDG PET/CT examination is especially important, since an interval that is too short could lead to false-positive or false-negative findings. A period of 12 weeks or more is generally recommended, but the optimal waiting period depends on the extent of therapy and other factors. If recurrence or progression is suspected during the waiting period, contrast-enhanced CT or magnetic resonance imaging should be performed without FDG PET. PMID:21415184

  9. Doxorubicin, vinblastine, and gemcitabine (CALGB 50203) for stage I/II nonbulky Hodgkin lymphoma: pretreatment prognostic factors and interim PET

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey L.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Kostakoglu, Lale; Hsi, Eric D.; Schöder, Heiko; Hall, Nathan C.; Jung, Sin-Ho; Canellos, George P.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Takvorian, Ronald W.; Juweid, Malik E.; Cheson, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    To reduce doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine toxicity, the Cancer and Leukemia Group B conducted a phase 2 trial of doxorubicin, vinblastine, and gemcitabine for newly diagnosed, nonbulky stages I and II Hodgkin lymphoma. Ninety-nine assessable patients received 6 cycles of doxorubicin 25 mg/m2, vinblastine 6 mg/m2, and gemcitabine 800 mg/m2 (1000 mg/m2 in first 6) on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. Computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) were performed before and after 2 and 6 cycles. Complete remission (CR)/CR unconfirmed was achieved in 72 of 99 patients (72.7%) and partial remission in 24 of 99 patients (24.2%). The CR rate was 81% when using PET criteria. Two patients have died of Hodgkin lymphoma progression. Median follow-up for nonprogressing patients is 3.3 years. The progression-free survival (PFS) at 3 years was 77% (95% confidence interval, 68%-84%). The relapse rate was less than 10% for patients with favorable prognostic factors. The 2-year PFS for cycle 2 PET-negative and -positive patients was 88% and 54%, respectively (P = .0009), compared with 89% and 27% for cycle 6 PET-negative and -positive patients (P = .0001). Although the CR rate and PFS were lower than anticipated, patients with favorable prognostic features had a low rate of relapse. Cycle 2 PET and cycle 6 PET were predictive of PFS. This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00086801. PMID:21355087

  10. The Pet309 pentatricopeptide repeat motifs mediate efficient binding to the mitochondrial COX1 transcript in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio-Ochoa, Angélica; Camacho-Villasana, Yolanda; García-Guerrero, Aldo E; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial synthesis of Cox1, the largest subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, is controlled by Mss51 and Pet309, two mRNA-specific translational activators that act via the COX1 mRNA 5′-UTR through an unknown mechanism. Pet309 belongs to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family, which is involved in RNA metabolism in mitochondria and chloroplasts, and its sequence predicts at least 12 PPR motifs in the central portion of the protein. Deletion of these motifs selectively disrupted translation but not accumulation of the COX1 mRNA. We used RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays to show that Pet309 interacts with the COX1 mRNA in vivo and that this association is present before processing of the COX1 mRNA from the ATP8/6 polycistronic mRNA. This association was not affected by deletion of 8 of the PPR motifs but was undetectable after deletion of the entire 12-PPR region. However, interaction of the Pet309 protein lacking 12 PPR motifs with the COX1 mRNA was detected after overexpression of the mutated form of the protein, suggesting that deletion of this region decreased the binding affinity for the COX1 mRNA without abolishing it entirely. Moreover, binding of Pet309 to the COX1 mRNA was affected by deletion of Mss51. This work demonstrates an in vivo physical interaction between a yeast mitochondrial translational activator and its target mRNA and shows the cooperativity of the PPR domains of Pet309 in interaction with the COX1 mRNA. PMID:25181249

  11. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  12. Predicting Outcome in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: Role of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Fox, Josef J.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Schoder, Heiko; Price, Alison N.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy predicts outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: After excluding those with initial tumor resection, 107 patients who underwent FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2002 to 2013 were reviewed. Local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to FDG-PET response and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at baseline (PET1/SUV1), after induction chemotherapy (PET2/SUV2), and after local therapy (PET3/SUV3). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cutoff for dichotomization of SUV1 and SUV2 values. Results: The SUV1 (<9.5 vs ≥9.5) was predictive of PFS (P=.02) and OS (P=.02), but not LC. After 12 weeks (median) of induction chemotherapy, 45 patients had negative PET2 scans and 62 had positive scans: 3-year PFS was 72% versus 44%, respectively (P=.01). The SUV2 (<1.5 vs ≥1.5) was similarly predictive of PFS (P=.005) and was associated with LC (P=.02) and OS (P=.03). A positive PET3 scan was predictive of worse PFS (P=.0009), LC (P=.05), and OS (P=.03). Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is an early indicator of outcomes in patients with RMS. Future prospective trials may incorporate FDG-PET response data for risk-adapted therapy and early assessment of new treatment regimens.

  13. TU-C-12A-12: Differentiating Bone Lesions and Degenerative Joint Disease in NaF PET/CT Scans Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Muzahir, S; Jeraj, R; Meyer, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: [F-18]NaF PET can be used to image bone metastases; however, tracer uptake in degenerative joint disease (DJD) often appears similar to metastases. This study aims to develop and compare different machine learning algorithms to automatically identify regions of [F-18]NaF scans that correspond to DJD. Methods: 10 metastatic prostate cancer patients received whole body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans prior to treatment. Image segmentation resulted in 852 ROIs, 69 of which were identified by a nuclear medicine physician as DJD. For all ROIs, various PET and CT textural features were computed. ROIs were divided into training and testing sets used to train eight different machine learning classifiers. Classifiers were evaluated based on receiver operating characteristics area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV). We also assessed the added value of including CT features in addition to PET features for training classifiers. Results: The training set consisted of 37 DJD ROIs with 475 non-DJD ROIs, and the testing set consisted of 32 DJD ROIs with 308 non-DJD ROIs. Of all classifiers, generalized linear models (GLM), decision forests (DF), and support vector machines (SVM) had the best performance. AUCs of GLM (0.929), DF (0.921), and SVM (0.889) were significantly higher than the other models (p<0.001). GLM and DF, overall, had the best sensitivity, specificity, and PPV, and gave a significantly better performance (p<0.01) than all other models. PET/CT GLM classifiers had higher AUC than just PET or just CT. GLMs built using PET/CT information had superior or comparable sensitivities, specificities and PPVs to just PET or just CT. Conclusion: Machine learning algorithms trained with PET/CT features were able to identify some cases of DJD. GLM outperformed the other classification algorithms. Using PET and CT information together was shown to be superior to using PET or CT features alone. Research supported by the Prostate

  14. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity. PMID:26080302

  15. A Comparison of Hyperelastic Warping of PET Images with Tagged MRI for the Analysis of Cardiac Deformation

    DOE PAGES

    Veress, Alexander I.; Klein, Gregory; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Tmore » he objectives of the following research were to evaluate the utility of a deformable image registration technique known as hyperelastic warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle through the analysis of clinical, gated PET image datasets.wo normal human male subjects were sequentially imaged with PET and tagged MRI imaging. Strain predictions were made for systolic contraction using warping analyses of the PET images and HARP based strain analyses of the MRI images. Coefficient of determination R 2 values were computed for the comparison of circumferential and radial strain predictions produced by each methodology.here was good correspondence between the methodologies, with R 2 values of 0.78 for the radial strains of both hearts and from an R 2 = 0.81 and R 2 = 0.83 for the circumferential strains.he strain predictions were not statistically different ( P ≤ 0.01 ) . A series of sensitivity results indicated that the methodology was relatively insensitive to alterations in image intensity, random image noise, and alterations in fiber structure.his study demonstrated that warping was able to provide strain predictions of systolic contraction of the LV consistent with those provided by tagged MRI Warping.« less

  16. Quantitative evaluation of correlation of dose and FDG-PET uptake value with clinical chest wall complications in patients with lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Algan, O; Confer, M; Algan, S; Matthiesen, C; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate quantitatively the dosimetric factors that increase the risk of clinical complications of rib fractures or chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. The correlations of clinical complications with standard-uptake values (SUV) and FDG-PET activity distributions from post-treatment PET-imaging were studied. Mean and maximum doses from treatment plans, FDG-PET activity values on post-SBRT PET scans and the presence of clinical complications were determined in fifteen patients undergoing 16 SBRT treatments for lung cancer. SBRT treatments were delivered in 3 to 5 fractions using 5 to 7 fields to prescription doses in the range from 39.0 to 60.0 Gy. The dose and FDG-PET activity values were extracted from regions of interest in the chest wall that matched anatomically. Quantitative evaluation of the correlation between dose deposition and FDG-PET activity was performed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient using pixel-by-pixel analysis of dose and FDG-PET activity maps in selected regions of interest associated with clinical complications. Overall, three of fifteen patients developed rib fractures with chest wall pain, and two patients developed pain symptoms without fracture. The mean dose to the rib cage in patients with fractures was 37.53 Gy compared to 33.35 Gy in patients without fractures. Increased chest wall activity as determined by FDG-uptake was noted in patients who developed rib fractures. Enhanced activity from PET-images correlated strongly with high doses deposited to the chest wall which could be predicted by a linear relationship. The local enhanced activity was associated with the development of clinical complications such as chest wall inflammation and rib fracture. This study demonstrates that rib fractures and chest wall pain can occur after SBRT treatments to the lung and is associated with increased activity on subsequent PET scans. The FDG-PET activity

  17. A comparison of the psychological burden of PET/MRI and PET/CT scans and association to initial state anxiety and previous imaging experiences

    PubMed Central

    Neriman, D; Hoath, J; Millner, L; Endozo, R; Azzopardi, G; O'Meara, C; Bomanji, J; Groves, A M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the level of psychological burden experienced by patients undergoing positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI scanning compared with PET/CT. Methods: 100 adult patients referred for PET/CT and underwent PET/MRI scanning were eligible. Initial state, psychological burden of PET/CT and PET/MRI, scan satisfaction and preference were assessed using a purpose-designed questionnaire, comprising 61 five-point Likert scale questions and a three-point tick box question indicating preference between PET/CT and PET/MRI. State anxiety was assessed using the state portion of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared psychological burden experienced by participants following PET/CT and PET/MRI scan. Results: A greater level of psychological burden was experienced by patients during PET/MRI than PET/CT p ≤ 0.001, consistent with patients' preference for PET/CT over PET/MRI (p = 0.013). There was a significant relationship between PET/CT psychological burden and initial state (r = 0.386, p ≤ 0.001). No significant relationship was identified between Initial state and psychological burden of PET MRI (r = −0.089; p = 217). There was a significant relationship between psychological burden of PET/CT and PET/MRI (r = 0.354; p = 0.001). Conclusion: Patients' experience increased psychological burden during PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. Previous scanning experiences and patients' interactions prior to and during PET/MRI improved patient satisfaction. Interventions could be implemented to improve imaging outcome. Advances in knowledge: This study provides evidence for the increased psychological burden of PET/MRI compared with PET/CT, and that people prefer the PET/CT procedure. We have shown that the patients who expressed a preference for PET/MRI demonstrated significantly lower psychological burden for that procedure than those that preferred PET/CT, which indicates that the benefit of reduced

  18. Post-therapy ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for predicting outcome in patients with peripheral T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Naoto; Hattori, Yukako; Fujisawa, Shin; Hashimoto, Chizuko; Taguchi, Jun; Takasaki, Hirotaka; Sakai, Rika; Tateishi, Ukihide; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2015-03-01

    The International Harmonization Project on Lymphoma recommends (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) for the routine assessment of treatment efficacy in patients with FDG-avid lymphomas such as Hodgkin's and diffuse large B cell lymphomas. The utility of FDG-PET in predicting outcomes in patients with peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) has not been fully elucidated. We retrospectively determined the predictive value of FDG-PET after first-line treatment (post-PET) for outcome in PTCL. Of the 36 patients enrolled, 16 were histologically diagnosed with PTCL not otherwise specified and 20 were diagnosed with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma. All patients received curative-intent anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens. Post-PET images were visually evaluated by local nuclear medicine physicians. The median observation period for the surviving patients was 44 months. Positive and negative post-PET results were obtained in 31 % (11/36) and 69 % (25/36) of patients, respectively. The 3-year progression-free survival rates in the positive and negative post-PET result groups were 18 % and 62 %, respectively (P < 0.001). Nine of the 11 patients in the positive post-PET result group experienced progressive disease (PD) (positive predictive value, 82 %), whereas 16 of the 25 patients in the negative post-PET result group did not experience PD (negative predictive value, 64 %). The 3-year overall survival rates in the positive and negative post-PET result groups were 44 % and 84 %, respectively (P = 0.03). Our findings indicate that post-PET is predictive of outcome in patients with PTCL.

  19. The imaging performance of a LaBr3-based PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daube-Witherspoon, M. E.; Surti, S.; Perkins, A.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Wiener, R.; Werner, M. E.; Kulp, R.; Karp, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner based on cerium-doped lanthanum bromide [LaBr3 (5% Ce)] has been developed. LaBr3 has a high light output, excellent energy resolution and fast timing properties that have been predicted to lead to good image quality. Intrinsic performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity and scatter fraction demonstrate good conventional PET performance; the results agree with previous simulation studies. Phantom measurements show the excellent image quality achievable with the prototype system. Phantom measurements and corresponding simulations show a faster and more uniform convergence rate, as well as more uniform quantification, for TOF reconstruction of the data, which have 375 ps intrinsic timing resolution, compared to non-TOF images. Measurements and simulations of a hot and cold sphere phantom show that the 7% energy resolution helps to mitigate residual errors in the scatter estimate because a high energy threshold (>480 keV) can be used to restrict the amount of scatter accepted without a loss of true events. Preliminary results with incorporation of a model of detector blurring in the iterative reconstruction algorithm not only show improved contrast recovery but also point out the importance of an accurate resolution model of the tails of LaBr3's point spread function. The LaBr3 TOF-PET scanner demonstrated the impact of superior timing and energy resolutions on image quality.

  20. PET Imaging in Prostate Cancer: Focus on Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with emerging radiopharmaceuticals promises accurate staging of primary disease, restaging of recurrent disease, detection of metastatic lesions and, ultimately, for predicting the aggressiveness of disease. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-characterized imaging biomarker of PCa. Because PSMA levels are directly related to androgen independence, metastasis and progression, PSMA could prove an important target for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for PET. Preclinical data for new PSMA-based radiotracers are discussed and include new 89Zr- and 64Cu-labeled anti-PSMA antibodies and antibody fragments, 64Cu-labeled aptamers, and 11C-, 18F-, 68Ga-, 64Cu-, and 86Y-labeled low molecular weight inhibitors of PSMA. Several of these agents, namely 68Ga-HBED-CC conjugate 15, 18F-DCFBC 8, and BAY1075553 are particularly promising, each having detected sites of PCa in initial clinical studies. These early clinical results suggest that PET/CT using PSMA-targeted agents, especially with compounds of low molecular weight, will make valuable contributions to the management of PCa. PMID:23590171

  1. Imaging performance of a LaBr3-based PET scanner

    PubMed Central

    Daube-Witherspoon, M E; Surti, S; Perkins, A; Kyba, C C M; Wiener, R; Werner, M E; Kulp, R; Karp, J S

    2010-01-01

    A prototype time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner based on cerium-doped lanthanum bromide [LaBr3 (5% Ce)] has been developed. LaBr3 has high light output, excellent energy resolution, and fast timing properties that have been predicted to lead to good image quality. Intrinsic performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity, and scatter fraction demonstrate good conventional PET performance; the results agree with previous simulation studies. Phantom measurements show the excellent image quality achievable with the prototype system. Phantom measurements and corresponding simulations show a faster and more uniform convergence rate, as well as more uniform quantification, for TOF reconstruction of the data, which have 375-ps intrinsic timing resolution, compared to non-TOF images. Measurements and simulations of a hot and cold sphere phantom show that the 7% energy resolution helps to mitigate residual errors in the scatter estimate because a high energy threshold (>480 keV) can be used to restrict the amount of scatter accepted without a loss of true events. Preliminary results with incorporation of a model of detector blurring in the iterative reconstruction algorithm show improved contrast recovery but also point out the importance of an accurate resolution model of the tails of LaBr3’s point spread function. The LaBr3 TOF-PET scanner has demonstrated the impact of superior timing and energy resolutions on image quality. PMID:19949259

  2. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Guastella, Anthony R.; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Klinger, Neil V.; Kupsky, William J.; Polin, Lisa A.; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway’s (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[11C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. PMID:27151136

  3. Assessing changes in the UK pet cat and dog populations: numbers and household ownership.

    PubMed

    Murray, J K; Gruffydd-Jones, T J; Roberts, M A; Browne, W J

    2015-09-12

    The main aim of this study was to replicate methodology used to estimate the size of the UK pet cat and dog populations in 2006 and the proportion of households owning cats/dogs in 2007, to produce updated data to compare trends in ownership and population sizes. A cross-sectional study design was used to collect telephone interview data from 3155 households in the UK. 2011 UK human census data were used to predict the size of the cat and dog populations owned by households in the UK in 2011. Of the households, 23 per cent (714/3155) owned one or more cats and 30 per cent (940/3155) owned one or more dogs. There was some overlap in pet ownership with 7 per cent (210/3155) of households owning both one or more cats and one or more dogs. There was a small but significant decrease in the proportion of households that owned one or more cats in 2011 compared with 2007, with no change in the proportion owning dogs. However, overall, the total number of cats and dogs that were estimated to be owned by UK households did not change significantly between 2006 and 2011. The estimated size (and 95% CIs) of the pet cat and dog populations in the UK in 2011 was 10,114,764 cats (9,138,603-11,090,924) and 11,599,824 dogs (10,708,070-12,491,578).

  4. Risk-Adapted Treatment of Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma With PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Ryan C; Advani, Ranjana H

    2016-01-01

    Although patients with advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma have excellent outcomes with contemporary therapy, the outcomes of patients with refractory disease is suboptimal. Identification of these high-risk patients at diagnosis is challenging as the differences in outcomes using clinical criteria are less marked using current modern therapy. Data suggest that an interim PET-CT may be a powerful tool in risk-stratifying patients. Retrospective studies show that a negative interim PET-CT after two to four cycles of ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) is predictive of favorable outcome independent of IPS score. Currently, there are several ongoing trials that aim to determine whether early-response assessment can be used to select patients who might benefit from modifications of subsequent therapy, either by intensifying or abbreviating regimens and/or omitting radiotherapy with promising early results. Longer follow-up is required to assess whether this strategy impacts overall survival (OS). Herein, we review the results of recent trials using interim PET-CT-based adaptive design in the treatment of advanced HL. PMID:27249744

  5. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Anthony R; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Klinger, Neil V; Kupsky, William J; Polin, Lisa A; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway's (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[(11)C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM.

  6. Pet Rest Memorial: Is Eternity Running Out of Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegelman, Vivian; Kastenbaum, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Briefly explores the needs served by pet cemeteries, the difficulties that confront many of these facilities, and the larger implications for memorialization and the sense of loss. Includes photographic tour of Pet Rest Memorial Mortuary and Cemetery in Tempe, Arizona. (Author/NB)

  7. Virtual hybrid bronchoscopy using PET/CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Seemann, Marcus D.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Eight consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ((18)F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy.

  8. Update on time-of-flight PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Surti, Suleman

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) PET was initially introduced in the early days of PET. TOF PET scanners developed in the 1980s had limited sensitivity and spatial resolution, operated in 2D mode with septa, and used analytic image reconstruction methods. Current generation of TOF PET scanners have the highest sensitivity and spatial resolution ever achieved in commercial whole-body PET, operate in fully-3D mode, and use iterative reconstruction with full system modeling. Previously, it was shown that TOF provides a gain in image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) that is proportional to the square root of the object size divided by the system timing resolution. With oncologic studies being the primary application of PET, more recent work has shown that in modern TOF PET scanners there is an improved trade-off between lesion contrast, image noise, and total imaging time, leading to a combination of improved lesion detectability, reduced scan time or injected dose, and more accurate and precise lesion uptake measurement. The benefit of TOF PET is also higher for heavier patients, which leads to a more uniform clinical performance over all patient sizes. PMID:25525181

  9. Role of Attachment in Response to Pet Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Nigel P.; Orsini, Lisa; Gavish, Roni; Packman, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of attachment on grief severity following the death of a pet. Seventy-one participants who had lost a dog or cat within the past year completed a set of measures that included an attachment measure assessing individual differences in attachment anxiety and avoidance, strength of the past attachment to the pet, the…

  10. PET-directed, 3D Ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Nieh, Peter T; Schuster, David M; Master, Viraj A

    2013-01-01

    Multimodatity imaging is a promising approach for improving prostate cancer detection and diagnosis. This article describes various concepts in PET-directed, ultrasound-guided biopsies and highlights a new PET/ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy system for prostate cancer detection. PMID:25392702

  11. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment.

  12. Comparing PETS and GEPT in China and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Mei

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares the Public English Test System (PETS) administered in mainland, China and the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT) administered in Taiwan, from the aspects of test levels, test contents and scoring weight. Compared with the PETS, the GEPT is found to value the English productive skills more, and have a greater ability to…

  13. Influence of Elevated Temperatures on Pet-Concrete Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, C.; Camacho, N.; Hernández, M.; Matheus, A.; Gutiérrez, A.

    2008-08-01

    Lightweight aggregate is an important material in reducing the unit weight of concrete complying with special concrete structures of large high-rise buildings. Besides, the use of recycled PET bottles as lightweight aggregate in concrete is an effective contribution for environment preservation. So, the objective of the present work was to study experimentally the flexural strength of the PET -concrete blends and the thermal degradation of the PET in the concrete, when the blends with 10 and 20% in volume of PET were exposed to different temperatures (200, 400, 600 °C). The flexural strength of concrete-PET exposed to a heat source is strongly dependent on the temperature, water/cement ratio, as well as the content and particle size of PET. However, the activation energy is affected by the temperature, location of the PET particles on the slabs and the water/cement ratio. Higher water content originates thermal and hydrolytic degradation on the PET, while on the concrete, a higher vapor pressure which causes an increase in crack formation. The values of the activation energy are higher on the center of the slabs than on the surface, since concrete is a poor heat conductor.

  14. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. PMID:27593246

  15. Pets: Your Plan Should Include All Family Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... to transport pets safely and ensure that your animals can't escape. Current photos of your pets in case they get lost. Food, drinkable water, bowls, cat litter/pan, and manual can opener. Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, behavior problems, and the name and number of your ...

  16. After the Bell: Developing an Awareness of Pet Stewardship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Ness, Daniel; Hutchinson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Given the commonness of pets in communities throughout the United States, Canada, and Australia, among other countries, pet stewardship should be a natural topic of study for the integration of science, mathematics, and technology. Therefore, the term "stewardship" will be examined by applying observation and research to shape our behaviors and…

  17. PET image reconstruction with anatomical edge guided level set prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Qi, Jinyi

    2011-11-01

    Acquiring both anatomical and functional images during one scan, PET/CT systems improve the ability to detect and localize abnormal uptakes. In addition, CT images provide anatomical boundary information that can be used to regularize positron emission tomography (PET) images. Here we propose a new approach to maximum a posteriori reconstruction of PET images with a level set prior guided by anatomical edges. The image prior models both the smoothness of PET images and the similarity between functional boundaries in PET and anatomical boundaries in CT. Level set functions (LSFs) are used to represent smooth and closed functional boundaries. The proposed method does not assume an exact match between PET and CT boundaries. Instead, it encourages similarity between the two boundaries, while allowing different region definition in PET images to accommodate possible signal and position mismatch between functional and anatomical images. While the functional boundaries are guaranteed to be closed by the LSFs, the proposed method does not require closed anatomical boundaries and can utilize incomplete edges obtained from an automatic edge detection algorithm. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Two digital phantoms were constructed based on the Digimouse data and a human CT image, respectively. Anatomical edges were extracted automatically from the CT images. Tumors were simulated in the PET phantoms with different mismatched anatomical boundaries. Compared with existing methods, the new method achieved better bias-variance performance. The proposed method was also applied to real mouse data and achieved higher contrast than other methods.

  18. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of PET image using event information bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hankyeol; Kwak, Shin Hye; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Woo, Sang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the effect in the PET image quality according to event bootstrap of small animal PET data. In order to investigate the time difference condition, realigned sinograms were generated from randomly sampled data set using bootstrap. List-mode data was obtained from small animal PET scanner for Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 20 min and Y-90 60 min. PET image was reconstructed by Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization(OSEM) 2D with the list-mode format. Image analysis was investigated by Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) of Ge-68 and Y-90 image. Non-parametric resampled PET image SNR percent change for the Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 60 min, and Y-90 20 min was 1.69 %, 7.03 %, and 4.78 %, respectively. SNR percent change of non-parametric resampled PET image with time difference condition was 1.08 % for the Ge-68 30 sec, 6.74 % for the Y-90 60 min and 10.94 % for the Y-90 29 min. The result indicated that the bootstrap with time difference condition had a potential to improve a noisy Y-90 PET image quality. This method should be expected to reduce Y-90 PET measurement time and to enhance its accuracy.

  20. 76 FR 54791 - Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Film From Korea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... COMMISSION Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Film From Korea Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty order on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film from Korea would not be likely to lead to... Procedure (19 CFR 207.2(f)). Background The Commission instituted this review on September 1, 2010 (75...