Science.gov

Sample records for flux measurement sites

  1. Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. O.

    1983-03-01

    This report recommends instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two month measurement methodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

  2. Footprint prediction of scalar fluxes - Reliability and implications for airborne flux measurements over the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuepp, P. H.; Desjardins, R. L.; Macpherson, J. I.; Leclerc, M. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of the location and extension of the upwind ground area that affects flux observations most directly are examined to determine the reliability of airborne versus near-ground flux measurements. The theoretical issues regarding the 'footprint' are examined, and specific observations are analyzed by studying the data over a grid regarding sensible heat, latent heat, CO2, and greenness. The grid is footprint-corrected to correlate better with independently observed surface characteristics, and an optimized footprint is developed that satisfies the relationships between the observed variables. Optimized mapping of the surface flux is given which demonstrates the importance of considering local advection to correlate airborne and ground-based flux observations. The technique is particularly applicable to situations in which significant variations in the surface flux density exist.

  3. Comparison of surface fluxes and boundary-layer measurements at Arctic terrestrial sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Stone, Robert; Crepinsek, Sara; Albee, Robert; Makshtas, Alexander; Kustov, Vasily; Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy

    2014-05-01

    Observational evidence suggests that atmospheric energy fluxes are a major contributor to the decrease of the Arctic pack ice, seasonal land snow cover and the warming of the surrounding land areas and permafrost layers. To better understand the atmosphere-surface exchange mechanisms, improve models, and to diagnose climate variability in the Arctic, accurate measurements are required of all components of the net surface energy budget and the carbon dioxide cycle over representative areas and over multiple years. This study analyzes and discusses variability of surface fluxes and basic meteorological parameters based on measurements made at several long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in USA (Barrow), Canada (Eureka), and Russia (Tiksi). Tower-based eddy covariance and solar radiation measurements provide a long-term near continuous temporal record of hourly average mass and energy fluxes respectively. The turbulent fluxes of the momentum, sensible heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are supported by additional atmospheric and surface/snow/permafrost measurements (mean wind speed, air temperature and humidity, upwelling and downwelling short-wave and long-wave atmospheric and surface radiation, snow depth, surface albedo, soil heat flux, active layer temperature profiles etc.) In this study we compare annual cycles of surface fluxes including solar radiation and other ancillary data to describe four seasons in the Arctic including spring onset of melt and fall onset of snow accumulation. Particular interest is a transition through freezing point, i.e. during transition from winter to spring and from summer to fall, when the carbon dioxide and/or water vapor turbulent fluxes change their direction. According to our data, in a summer period observed temporal variability of the carbon dioxide flux was generally in anti-phase with water vapor flux (downward CO2 flux and upward H2O flux). On average the turbulent flux of carbon

  4. Measuring and modeling near surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Starks, Patrick; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted during the four Intensive Field Campaigns (IFC) of the FIFE project in 1987. The research was done on a tall grass prairie with specific measurement sites on and near the Konza Prairie in Kansas. Measurements were made to help meet the following objectives: determination of the variability in reflected and emitted radiation fluxes in selected spectral wavebands as a function of topography and vegetative community; development of techniques to account for slope and sun angle effects on the radiation fluxes; estimation of shortwave albedo and net radiation fluxes using the reflected and emitted spectral measurements described; estimation of leaf and canopy spectral properties from calculated normalized differences coupled with off-nadir measurements using inversion techniques; estimation of plant water status at several locations with indices utilizing plant temperature and other environmental parameters; and determination of relationships between estimated plant water status and measured soil water content. Results are discussed.

  5. Measurement of the fast neutron flux in the MNSR inner irradiation site.

    PubMed

    Khattab, K

    2007-01-01

    The WIMSD4 code was used to calculate the fast neutron flux spectrum and the fast neutron fission cross-sections for (238)U, using six energy groups ranging from 0.5 to 10 MeV. These results, with the measured radioactivities of the (140)Ba, (131)I, (103)Ru, (95)Zr and (97)Zr fission products emerging from the fission of the (238)U foil covered with a cadmium filter, were used to measure the fast neutron flux in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor inner irradiation site.

  6. A Carbon Flux Super Site. New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2014-11-17

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  7. Integration of Flux-Based Methods and Triad Principles for DNAPL Site Management, Part II: Review of Flux Measurement Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Managing dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminated sites continues to be among the most pressing environmental problems currently faced. One approach that has recently been investigated for use in DNAPL site characterization and remediation is mass flux (mass per unit ar...

  8. Lead precipitation fluxes at tropical oceanic sites determined from /sup 210/Pb measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Settle, D.M.; Patterson, C.C.; Turekian, K.K.; Cochran, J.K.

    1982-02-20

    Concentrations of lead, /sup 210/Pb, and /sup 210/Po were measured in rain selected for least influence by local sources of contamination at several tropical and subtropical islands (Enewetak; Pigeon Key, Florida; and American Samoa) and shipboard stations (near Bermuda and Tahiti). Ratios expressed as ng Pb/dpm /sup 210/Pb in rain were 250--900 for Pigeon Key (assuming 12% adsorption for /sup 210/Pb and no adsorption for lead), depending on whether the air masses containing the analyzed rain came from the Caribbean or from the continent, respectively; about 390 for the northern Sargasso Sea downwind from emissions of industrial lead in North America; 65 for Enewetak, remote from continental emissions of industrial lead in the northern hemisphere; and 14 near Tahiti, a remote location in the southern hemisphere where industrial lead emissions to the atmosphere are much less than in the northern hemisphere. (The American Samoa sample yielded a higher ratio than Tahiti; the reason for this is not clear but may be due to local Pb sources). The corresponding fluxes of lead to the oceans, based on measured or modeled /sup 210/Pb precipitation fluxes, are about 4 ng Pb/cm/sup 2/y for Tahiti, 10 for Enewetak, and 270 for the Sargasso Sea site, and between 110 to 390 at Pigeon Key.

  9. Enhancing the precision and accuracy within and among AmeriFlux site measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Bev

    2013-11-25

    This is the final report for AmeriFlux QA/QC at Oregon State University. The major objective of this project is to contribute to the AmeriFlux network by continuing to build consistency in AmeriFlux measurements by addressing objectives stated in the AmeriFlux strategic plan and self evaluation, the North American Carbon Program, and the US Carbon Cycle Science Program. The project directly contributes to NACP and CCSP goals to establish an integrated, near-real time network of observations to inform climate change science.

  10. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data

    PubMed Central

    Keijsers, Joep G.S.; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M.

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface. PMID:25071984

  11. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  12. A New Tool for Automated Data Collection and Complete On-site Flux Data Processing for Eddy Covariance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begashaw, I. G.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Li, J.; Beaty, K.; Ediger, K.; Forgione, A.; Fratini, G.; Johnson, D.; Velgersdyk, M.; Hupp, J. R.; Xu, L.; Burba, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The eddy covariance method is widely used for direct measurements of turbulent exchange of gases and energy between the surface and atmosphere. In the past, raw data were collected first in the field and then processed back in the laboratory to achieve fully corrected publication-ready flux results. This post-processing consumed significant amount of time and resources, and precluded researchers from accessing near real-time final flux results. A new automated measurement system with novel hardware and software designs was developed, tested, and deployed starting late 2013. The major advancements with this automated flux system include: 1) Enabling logging high-frequency, three-dimensional wind speeds and multiple gas densities (CO2, H2O and CH4), low-frequency meteorological data, and site metadata simultaneously through a specially designed file format 2) Conducting fully corrected, real-time on-site flux computations using conventional as well as user-specified methods, by implementing EddyPro Software on a small low-power microprocessor 3) Providing precision clock control and coordinate information for data synchronization and inter-site data comparison by incorporating a GPS and Precision Time Protocol. Along with these innovations, a data management server application was also developed to chart fully corrected real-time fluxes to assist remote system monitoring, to send e-mail alerts, and to automate data QA/QC, transfer and archiving at individual stations or on a network level. Combination of all of these functions was designed to help save substantial amount of time and costs associated with managing a research site by eliminating the post-field data processing, reducing user errors and facilitating real-time access to fully corrected flux results. The design, functionality, and test results from this new eddy covariance measurement tool will be presented.

  13. Ground-Based Optical Measurements at European Flux Sites: A Review of Methods, Instruments and Current Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Balzarolo, Manuela; Anderson, Karen; Nichol, Caroline; Rossini, Micol; Vescovo, Loris; Arriga, Nicola; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Carrara, Arnaud; Cerasoli, Sofia; Cogliati, Sergio; Daumard, Fabrice; Eklundh, Lars; Elbers, Jan A.; Evrendilek, Fatih; Handcock, Rebecca N.; Kaduk, Joerg; Klumpp, Katja; Longdoz, Bernard; Matteucci, Giorgio; Meroni, Michele; Montagnani, Lenoardo; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Pontailler, Jean-Yves; Juszczak, Radoslaw; Scholes, Bob; Martín, M. Pilar

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the currently available optical sensors, their limitations and opportunities for deployment at Eddy Covariance (EC) sites in Europe. This review is based on the results obtained from an online survey designed and disseminated by the Co-cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action ESO903—“Spectral Sampling Tools for Vegetation Biophysical Parameters and Flux Measurements in Europe” that provided a complete view on spectral sampling activities carried out within the different research teams in European countries. The results have highlighted that a wide variety of optical sensors are in use at flux sites across Europe, and responses further demonstrated that users were not always fully aware of the key issues underpinning repeatability and the reproducibility of their spectral measurements. The key findings of this survey point towards the need for greater awareness of the need for standardisation and development of a common protocol of optical sampling at the European EC sites. PMID:22164055

  14. Use of Temperature and Surface Gas Flux as Novel Measures of Microbial Activity at a Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Warren, E.; Sihota, N. J.; Hostettler, F. D.

    2012-12-01

    Degradation of crude oil in the subsurface has been studied for over 30 years at a spill site located near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA. The well-characterized site is being used to experiment with the use of surface gas flux and temperature measurements as novel methods for quantifying microbial activity. In the largest subsurface oil body, a 2-m-thick smear zone spans the water table 6-8 m below the surface. Methane produced from degradation of the oil diffuses upward and mixes with oxygen from the surface supporting aerobic methanotrophy at 2-4 m depth. The methane oxidation produces CO2 and heat at rates which are hypothetically proportional to other measures of subsurface microbial activity. To test this hypothesis, vertical profiles of temperature and microbial populations, surface CO2 flux, and oil degradation state were measured at three sites in the oil body and one background site. Temperature increases in the oil zone near the water table were 1-4°C above the background site. The site with the highest temperature increase at the water table also had the highest concentrations of gene copy numbers for methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) along with the most degraded oil. Surface CO2 flux over the oil sites averaged more than twice that at the background site but was not consistently highest over the site with the highest activity by other measures. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is variation in the effective diffusion coefficient of the vadose zone between the methanotrophic zone and the surface. At the level of the methanotrophic zone, temperatures were elevated 2-6°C over the background values but again the site with greatest average annual temperature increase was not at the most active site. This may be due to enhanced recharge at the most active site, which lies at the center of a local topographic depression where focused recharge occurs. Overall, the temperature and flux data showed significant increases at the oil sites compared

  15. Measuring and modeling near-surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Starks, Patrick J.; Vining, Roel C.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information is presented pertaining to the measurement and estimation of reflected and emitted components of the radiation balance. Information is included about reflectance and transmittance of solar radiation from and through the leaves of some grass and forb prairie species, bidirectional reflectance from a prairie canopy is discussed and measured and estimated fluxes are described of incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Results of the study showed only very small differences in reflectances and transmittances for the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of grass species in the visible and infrared wavebands, but some differences in the infrared wavebands were noted for the forbs. Reflectance from the prairie canopy changed as a function of solar and view zenith angles in the solar principal plane with definite asymmetry about nadir. The surface temperature of prairie canopies was found to vary by as much as 5 C depending on view zenith and azimuth position and on the solar azimuth. Aerodynamic temperature calculated from measured sensible heat fluxes ranged from 0 to 3 C higher than nadir-viewed temperatures. Models were developed to estimate incoming and reflected shortwave radiation from data collected with a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Several algorithms for estimating incoming longwave radiation were evaluated and compared to actual measures of that parameter. Net radiation was calculated using the estimated components of the shortwave radiation streams, determined from the algorithms developed, and from the longwave radiation streams provided by the Brunt, modified Deacon, and the Stefan-Boltzmann models. Estimates of net radiation were compared to measured values and found to be within the measurement error of the net radiometers used in the study.

  16. Controls on the seasonality of photosynthesis across the Amazon basin -A cross-site analysis of eddy flux tower measurements from the Brasil flux network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Saleska, S. R.; Da Rocha, H. R.

    2009-04-01

    The Amazon Basin is categorized as a terrestrial biogeochemical "hotspot" where climate change and deforestation can trigger substantial changes on atmospheric CO. However, model skill at predicting seasonality of photosynthetic metabolism and ecosystem productivity in the Amazon is limited. To enhance our understanding of these processes, we investigated the seasonal and spatial patterns of Amazonian forest photosynthetic activity by integrating data from a network of ground-based eddy flux towers in Brazil established as part of the ‘Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia' project. We present the results of a simple model of leaf-flush for two central Amazon BrasilFlux sites, based on the eddy covariance estimates of canopy photosynthetic capacity (Pc) and measured canopy structure parameters. We found that in contrast to studies of Amazon evapotranspiration, which is highly correlated with available energy, Amazon ecosystem photosynthetic flux surprisingly showed no simple relationship with measures of available energy. We hypothesize that the seasonality of Amazon photosynthesis is controlled by the interaction of adaptive mechanisms (which biologically determine photosynthetic capacity through leaf flush and litter fall seasonality) and sunlight availability (which determines the fraction of photosynthetic capacity utilized). Equatorial climates advantage vegetation that can grow leaves in the dry season, when surface solar radiation peaks, but southerly sites may not because of reduced seasonality in surface radiation.

  17. Measuring the flux at the interface of coal-tar impacted sediment and river water near a former MGP site.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seunghun; Jafvert, Chad T; Jenkinson, Byron; Enfield, Carl; Johnson, Brian

    2007-06-01

    Determining water movement through contaminated sediment is critical for characterizing transport of chemicals from the sediment to the overlying water. Field studies to characterize the water flow across the sediment-water interface within a river adjacent to a former manufactured gas plant site were conducted. For this purpose, a new design of an interfacial flow meter was developed and tested. The in situ components of the system consisted of: a cylinder with an interfacial area of 2342 cm2; a dome attached to the cylinder; and a flow tube that allows water to flow from inside the dome to the river at the rate equal to the specific discharge across the sediment-water boundary. A 'heat-pulse' method was used to measure flow by heating the center of the flow tube for a brief time period and measuring the temperature profile within the tube over time. The system was calibrated to measure volumetric flux in the range 1.5-4.0 cm d(-1), however using a flow-addition method, the measurement of lower velocities also was accomplished, and calibration at higher fluxes is possible. From the groundwater flow at the interface of the coal-tar impacted sediment and information on the sediment pore water concentrations of several PAHs (poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), the mass flux of these PAHs to the river were estimated. Information on PAH mass flux at the sediment-water interface is useful for site assessment, including the evaluation of remediation alternatives and longer term site characterization.

  18. BOREAS RSS-17 Xylem Flux Density Measurements at the SSA-OBS Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea; McDonald, Kyle; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As part of its efforts to determine environmental and phenological states from radar imagery, the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-17 team collected in situ tree xylem flow measurements for one growing season on five Picea mariana (black spruce) trees. The data were collected to obtain information on the temporal and spatial variability in water uptake by trees in the Southern Study Area-Old Black Spruce (SSA-OBS) stand in the BOREAS SSA. Temporally, the data were collected in 30-minute intervals for 120 days from 31 May 1994 until 27 September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The xylem flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. Eddy Covariance Measurements of Methane Flux at Remote Sites with New Low-Power Lightweight Fast Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liukang; Burba, George; Schedlbauer, Jessica; Zona, Donatella; McDermitt, Dayle K.; Anderson, Tyler; Oberbauer, Steven; Oechel, Walter; Komissarov, Anatoly; Riensche, Brad

    2010-05-01

    Majority of natural methane production happens at remote unpopulated areas in ecosystems with little or no infrastructure or easily available grid power, such as arctic and boreal wetlands, tropical mangroves, etc. Present approaches for direct measurements of CH4 fluxes rely on fast closed-path analyzers, which have to work under significantly reduced pressures, and require powerful pumps and grid power. Power and labor demands may be reasons why CH4 flux is often measured at locations with good infrastructure and grid power, and not with high CH4 production. An instrument was developed to allow Eddy Covariance measurements of CH4 flux with power consumption 30-150 times below presently available technologies. This instrument, LI-7700, uses <10W of power, and can easily be run on solar panel, or with small portable generator, while present technologies require 300-1500 Watts of the grid power. The proposed extremely low-power technology would allows placing methane Eddy Covariance stations in the middle of the source (wetland, rice paddy, forest, etc.) in the absence of the grid power. This could significantly expand the Eddy Covariance CH4 flux measurements coverage, and possibly, significantly improve the budget estimates of world CH4 emissions and budget. Various prototypes of the LI-7700 were field-tested for three seasons at the remote site in middle of Everglades National Park (Florida, USA) using solar panels, at three stationary and several mobile sites during three seasons at remote Arctic wetlands near Barrow (Alaska, USA), in the tropical mangroves near La Paz (Mexico) using portable generator, and in bare agricultural field near Mead (Nebraska, USA) during 2005 through 2010. Latest data on CH4 concentration, co-spectra and fluxes, and latest details of instrumental design are examined in this presentation. Overall, hourly methane fluxes ranged from near-zero at night to about 4 mg m-2 h-1 in midday in arctic tundra. Observed fluxes were within the

  20. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  1. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  2. Eddy correlation measurements of methane fluxes using a tunable diode laser at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, G. C.; Neumann, H. H.; Den Hartog, G.; Thurtell, G. W.; Kidd, G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) measurements of methane flux were made at the Kinosheo Lake tower site for a 1-month period during the 1990 summer intensive. The measurements were made with a diode-laser-based methane sensor using the eddy correlation technique. Measurements of the methane fluxes were made at two levels, 5 or 18 m. Approximately 900 half-hour average methane flux measurements were obtained. Weak temporal and diurnal trends were observed in the data. Fluxes averaged over the study period showed an overall methane emission of 16 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d with a daytime average of 20 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d and a nighttime average of 9 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d. The effect of emission footprint was evident in the data. A strong relationship between the daily average methane flux and wet bog temperature at 20-cm depth was observed.

  3. Comparison between theoretical footprint models and experimental measurements of intra-field spatial variability scalar fluxes over different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseroni, D.; Corbari, C.; Ceppi, A.; Milleo, G.; Mancini, M.

    2012-04-01

    Not many experimental data about intra-field spatial variability of scalar flux densities are presented in literature. In this work theoretical footprint models and experimental intra-field turbulent fluxes of latent, sensible heat and CO2 were compared. The experimental data were obtained using a mobile eddy covariance station moving it from a discontinuity point, represented by the field edge, to the centre of the field where a fixed eddy covariance station was placed. The experimental fields were in Landriano (PV) in the Po Valley, Italy and Barrax (Albacete) in Spain. Simple analytical footprint models that describe the representative source area for turbulent fluxes were compared with the experimental data. Mathematical relationship between footprint models and gamma function was explained. Energy balance closure was calculated starting from fixed tower measurements. Aerodynamic roughness and gamma distribution parameters were estimated for these specific fields.

  4. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; Wang, Guiling; Goulden, Michael L.; Scott, Russell L.; Bible, Kenneth; Cardon, Zoe G.

    2016-05-01

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating HR into land surface models, few (if any) have done cross-site comparisons for contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types via the integration of measurement and modeling. Here, we incorporated the HR scheme of Ryel et al. (2002) into the NCAR Community Land Model Version 4.5 (CLM4.5), and examined the ability of the resulting hybrid model to capture the magnitude of HR flux and/or soil moisture dynamics from which HR can be directly inferred, to assess the impact of HR on land surface water and energy budgets, and to explore how the impact may depend on climate regimes and vegetation conditions. Eight AmeriFlux sites with contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types were studied, including the Wind River Crane site in Washington State, the Santa Rita Mesquite savanna site in southern Arizona, and six sites along the Southern California Climate Gradient. HR flux, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture were properly simulated in the present study, even in the face of various uncertainties. Our cross-ecosystem comparison showed that the timing, magnitude, and direction (upward or downward) of HR vary across ecosystems, and incorporation of HR into CLM4.5 improved the model-measurement matches of evapotranspiration, Bowen ratio, and soil moisture particularly during dry seasons. Our results also reveal that HR has important hydrological impact in ecosystems that have a pronounced dry season but are not overall so dry that sparse vegetation and very low soil moisture limit HR.

  5. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Congsheng; Wang, Guiling; Goulden, Michael L.; Scott, Russell L.; Bible, Kenneth; G. Cardon, Zoe

    2016-05-17

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating HR into land surface models, few (if any) have done cross-site comparisons for contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types via the integration of measurement and modeling. Here, we incorporated the HR scheme of Ryel et al. (2002) into the NCAR Community Land Model Version 4.5 (CLM4.5), and examined the ability of the resulting hybrid model to capture themore » magnitude of HR flux and/or soil moisture dynamics from which HR can be directly inferred, to assess the impact of HR on land surface water and energy budgets, and to explore how the impact may depend on climate regimes and vegetation conditions. Eight AmeriFlux sites with contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types were studied, including the Wind River Crane site in Washington State, the Santa Rita Mesquite savanna site in southern Arizona, and six sites along the Southern California Climate Gradient. HR flux, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture were properly simulated in the present study, even in the face of various uncertainties. Our cross-ecosystem comparison showed that the timing, magnitude, and direction (upward or downward) of HR vary across ecosystems, and incorporation of HR into CLM4.5 improved the model-measurement matches of evapotranspiration, Bowen ratio, and soil moisture particularly during dry seasons. Lastly, our results also reveal that HR has important hydrological impact in ecosystems that have a pronounced dry season but are not overall so dry that sparse vegetation and very low soil moisture limit HR.« less

  6. Heat-Flux-Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus simulates conditions in turbine engines. Automated facility generates and measures transient and steady-state heat fluxes at flux densities from 0.3 to 6 MW/m(Sup2) and temperatures from 100 to 1,200 K. Positioning arm holds heat-flux gauge at focal point of arc lamp. Arm previously chilled gauge in liquid nitrogen in Dewar flask. Cooling water flows through lamp to heat exchanger. Used to develop heat-flux gauges for turbine blades and to test materials for durability under rapidly changing temperatures.

  7. Errors in airborne flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Lenschow, Donald H.

    1994-07-01

    We present a general approach for estimating systematic and random errors in eddy correlation fluxes and flux gradients measured by aircraft in the convective boundary layer as a function of the length of the flight leg, or of the cutoff wavelength of a highpass filter. The estimates are obtained from empirical expressions for various length scales in the convective boundary layer and they are experimentally verified using data from the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Experiment) Field Experiment (FIFE), the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX), and the Electra Radome Experiment (ELDOME). We show that the systematic flux and flux gradient errors can be important if fluxes are calculated from a set of several short flight legs or if the vertical velocity and scalar time series are high-pass filtered. While the systematic error of the flux is usually negative, that of the flux gradient can change sign. For example, for temperature flux divergence the systematic error changes from negative to positive about a quarter of the way up in the convective boundary layer.

  8. Flux-Based Site Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Managing DNAPL contaminated sites continues to be among the most pressing environmental problems currently faced. In particular, the benefits of partial DNAPL mass depletion due to remedial activity are unclear. Recent work conducted by an inter-agency research team has been in...

  9. Radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Blad, Blaine L.; Zara, Pedro; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) has been stated as 'the development of techniques that may be applied to satellite observations of the radiation reflected and emitted from the Earth to yield quantitative information concerning land surface climatological conditions'. The major field study, FIFE (the First ISLSCP Field Experiment), was conducted in 1987-89 to accomplish this objective. Four intensive field campaigns (IFC's) were carried out in 1987 and one in 1989. Factors contributing to observed reflected radiation from the FIFE site must be understood before the radiation observed by satellites can be used to quantify surface processes. Our last report (Walter-Shea et al., 1992b) focused on slope effects on incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation and net radiation from data collected in 1989. We report here on the final analysis of the slope data as well as results from thermal radiation studies conducted during the FIFE experiment. The specific areas reported are the following: (1) analysis of slope effects on measured reflectance values and estimates of surface albedo; (2) using remotely-measured surface temperatures as a means of estimating sensible heat flux from the Konza Prairie; (3) extracting canopy temperatures from remotely-measured composite surface temperatures; (4) modeling the measured composite temperature of partially vegetated surfaces; and (5) estimating gap distribution in partially vegetated surfaces from reflectance measurements.

  10. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Impink, Jr., Albert J.; Goldstein, Norman P.

    1990-01-01

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  11. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  12. Regional airborne flux measurements in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioli, B.; Miglietta, F.; Vaccari, F. P.; Zaldei, A.; Hutjes, R. W. A.

    2003-04-01

    The problem of identifying the spatial and temporal distribution of sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 is the subject of considerable scientific and political debate. Even if it is now possible to estimate within reasonable accuracy the sink strength of European forests at the local scale, difficulties still exist in determining the partitioning of the sinks at the global and regional scales. The aim of the EU-project RECAB (Regional Assessment of the Carbon Balance in Europe) that is coordinated by Alterra, Wageningen (NL), is to bridge the gap between local scale flux measurements and continental scale inversion models by a generic modelling effort and measurement program, focussing on a limited number of selected regions in Europe for which previous measurements exists. This required the establishment of a European facility for airborne measurement of surface fluxes of CO2 at very low altitude, and a research aircraft capable of performing airborne eddy covariance measurements has been acquired by this project and used on several occasions at the different RECAB sites. The aircraft is the italian Sky Arrows ERA (Environmental Research Aircraft) equipped with the NOAA/ARA Mobile Flux Platform (MFP), and a commercial open-path infrared gas analyser. Airborne eddy covariance measurements were made from June 2001 onwards in Southern Spain near Valencia (June and December 2001), in Central Germany near Jena (July 2001), in Sweden near Uppsala (August 2001), in The Netherlands near Wageningen (January and July 2002) and in Italy near Rome (June 2002). Flux towers were present at each site to provide a validation of airborne eddy covariance measurements. This contribution reports some validation results based on the comparison between airborne and ground based flux measurements and some regional scale results for different locations and different seasons, in a wide range of meteorological and ecological settings.

  13. Shortwave flux profile analysis at the Cabauw BSRN site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Baltink, H. Klein; Knap, W. H.; Stammes, P.

    2013-05-01

    The vertical distribution of the shortwave flux in the atmosphere is important for understanding the energy budget and the validation of climate models. We calculated shortwave flux profiles for cloudy cases by using the Doubling-Adding KNMI radiative transfer model with water vapour and cloud liquid water profiles derived from the Integrated Profiling Technique (IPT). As an example, we will show the approach for 3 March 2012. The calculated downward flux at the surface for this day compares well with measurements made at the Cabauw Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) site (51.97°N, 4.93°E), the Netherlands.

  14. Using model analyses and surface-atmosphere exchange measurements from the Howland AmeriFlux Site in Maine, USA, to improve understanding of forest ecosystem C cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, David Y.; Davidson, Eric A.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Dail, D. B.; Scott, N.

    2013-03-25

    Summary of research carried out under Interagency Agreement DE-AI02-07ER64355 with the USDA Forest Service at the Howland Forest AmeriFlux site in central Maine. Includes a list of publications resulting in part or whole from this support.

  15. Measurements of OVOC fluxes by eddy covariance using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer - method development at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Beale, R.; Smyth, T.; Blomquist, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present here vertical fluxes of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) measured with eddy covariance (EC) during the period of March to July 2012 near the southwest coast of the United Kingdom. The performance of the proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) for flux measurement is characterized, with additional considerations given to the homogeneity and stationarity assumptions required by EC. Observed mixing ratios and fluxes of OVOCs (specifically methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) vary significantly with time of day and wind direction. Higher mixing ratios and fluxes of acetaldehyde and acetone are found in the daytime and from the direction of a forested park, most likely due to light-driven emissions from terrestrial plants. Methanol mixing ratio and flux do not demonstrate consistent diel variability, suggesting sources in addition to plants. We estimate air-sea exchange and photochemical rates of these compounds, which are compared to measured vertical fluxes. For acetaldehyde, the mean (1σ) mixing ratio of 0.13 (0.02) ppb at night may be maintained by oceanic emission, while photochemical destruction outpaces production during the day. Air-sea exchange and photochemistry are probably net sinks of methanol and acetone in this region. Their nighttime mixing ratios of 0.46 (0.20) and 0.39 (0.08) ppb appear to be affected more by terrestrial emissions and long-distance transport, respectively.

  16. Cosmic Ray Neutron Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayananda, Mathes

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic rays are high-energetic particles originating from outer space that bombard the upper atmosphere of the Earth. Almost 90% of cosmic ray particles consist of protons, electrons and heavy ions. When these particles hit the Earth's atmosphere, cascade of secondary particles are formed. The most abundant particles reach to the surface of the Earth are muons, electrons and neutrons. In recent years many research groups are looking into potential applications of the effects of cosmic ray radiation at the surface of the Earth [1, 2]. At Georgia State University we are working on a long-term measurement of cosmic ray flux distribution. This study includes the simultaneous measurement of cosmic ray muons, neutrons and gamma particles at the Earth surface in downtown Atlanta. The initial effort is focusing on the correlation studies of the cosmic ray particle flux distribution and the atmospheric weather conditions. In this presentation, I will talk about the development of a cosmic ray detector using liquid scintillator and the preliminary results. [4pt] [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, ``Radiographic imaging with cosmic-ray muons'', Nature, Vol.422, p.277, Mar.2003[0pt] [2] Svensmark Henrik, Physical Review 81, 3, (1998)

  17. BOREAS TGB-1 CH4 Concentration and Flux Data from NSA Tower Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Crill, Patrick; Varner, Ruth K.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-1 team made numerous measurements of trace gas concentrations and fluxes at various NSA sites. This data set contains half-hourly averages of ambient methane (CH4) measurements and calculated fluxes for the NSA-Fen in 1996 and the NSA-BP and NSA-OJP tower sites in 1994. The purpose of this study was to determine the CH4 flux from the study area by measuring ambient CH 4 concentrations. This flux can then be compared to the chamber flux measurements taken at the same sites. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  18. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  20. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  1. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  2. AmeriFlux US-Bo2 Bondville (companion site)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacchi, Carl

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bo2 Bondville (companion site). Site Description - Located 400m north of Tilden Meyer's site and planted with opposite crop in corn/soybean rotation

  3. Eddy covariance measurements of methane fluxes over grazed native and improved prairies in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although several studies have reported eddy covariance (EC) measurements at several tallgrass prairie sites to investigate the dynamics of carbon and water vapor fluxes, the EC measurements of methane (CH4) fluxes over grazed tallgrass prairie sites are lacking. CH4 fluxes were measured during the 2...

  4. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  5. Diamagnetic flux measurement in Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sameer; Jha, Ratneshwar; Lal, Praveen; Hansaliya, Chandresh; Gopalkrishna, M. V.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mishra, Kishore

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of diamagnetic flux in Aditya tokamak for different discharge conditions are reported for the first time. The measured diamagnetic flux in a typical discharge is less than 0.6 mWb and therefore it has required careful compensation for various kinds of pick-ups. The hardware and software compensations employed in this measurement are described. We introduce compensation of a pick-up due to plasma current of less than 20 kA in short duration discharges, in which plasma pressure gradient is supposed to be negligible. The flux measurement during radio frequency heating is also presented in order to validate compensation.

  6. MEASUREMENT AND INTERPRETATION OF ISOPRENE FLUXES AND ISOPRENE, METHACROLEIN, AND METHYL VINYL KETONE MIXING RATIOS AT THE PROPHET SITE DURING THE 1998 INTENSIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixing ratios of isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), and methacrolein (MACR) were determined continuously during an 8-day period in the summer of 1998 at a rural forested site located within the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). The measurements were obtained as ...

  7. Uncertainties Associated with Flux Measurements Due to Heterogeneous Contaminant Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass flux and mass discharge measurements at contaminated sites have been applied to assist with remedial management, and can be divided into two broad categories: point-scale measurement techniques and pumping methods. Extrapolation across un-sampled space is necessary when usi...

  8. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  9. Measuring flux of soil fumigants using the aerodynamic and dynamic flux chamber methods.

    PubMed

    van Wesenbeeck, I J; Knuteson, J A; Barnekow, D E; Phillips, A M

    2007-01-01

    Methods for measuring and estimating flux density of soil fumigants under field conditions are important for the purpose of providing inputs to air dispersion models and for comparing the effects of management practices on emission reduction. The objective of this study was to measure the flux of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin at a site in Georgia (GA) using the aerodynamic method and the dynamic flux chamber (FC) method. A secondary objective was to compare the effects of high density polyethylene (HDPE), and virtually impermeable film (VIF) tarps on fumigant flux at a site in Florida (FL). Chloropicrin and 1,3-D were applied by surface drip application of In-Line soil fumigant on vegetable beds covered by low density polyethylene (LDPE), HDPE, or VIF. The surface drip fumigation using In-Line and LDPE tarp employed in this study resulted in volatilization of 26.5% of applied 1,3-D and 11.2% of the applied chloropicrin at the GA site, as determined using the aerodynamic method. Estimates of mass loss obtained from dynamic FCs were 23.6% for 1,3-D and 18.0% for chloropicrin at the GA site. Flux chamber trials at the FL site indicate significant additional reduction in flux density, and cumulative mass loss when VIF tarp is used. This study supports the use of dynamic FCs as a valuable tool for estimating gas flux density from agricultural soils, and evaluating best management practices for reducing fumigant emissions to the atmosphere.

  10. FLUXNET. Database of fluxes, site characteristics, and flux-community information

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. J.; Holladay, S. K.; Cook, R. B.; Falge, E.; Baldocchi, D.; Gu, L.

    2004-02-28

    FLUXNET is a “network of regional networks” created by international scientists to coordinate regional and global analysis of observations from micrometeorological tower sites. The flux tower sites use eddy covariance methods to measure the exchanges of carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor, and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. FLUXNET’S goals are to aid in understanding the mechanisms controlling the exchanges of CO2, water vapor, and energy across a range of time (0.5 hours to annual periods) and space scales. FLUXNET provides an infrastructure for the synthesis and analysis of world-wide, long-term flux data compiled from various regional flux networks. Information compiled by the FLUXNET project is being used to validate remote sensing products associated with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites. FLUXNET provides access to ground information for validating estimates of net primary productivity, and energy absorption that are being generated by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors. In addition, this information is also used to develop and validate ecosystem models.

  11. AmeriFlux Measurement Component (AMC) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Reichl, K.; Biraud, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    An AMC system was installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s North Slope Alaska (NSA) Barrow site, also known as NSA C1 at the ARM Data Archive, in August 2012. A second AMC system was installed at the third ARM Mobile Facility deployment at Oliktok Point, also known as NSA M1. This in situ system consists of 12 combination soil temperature and volumetric water content (VWC) reflectometers and one set of upwelling and downwelling PAR sensors, all deployed within the fetch of the Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System. Soil temperature and VWC sensors placed at two depths (10 and 30 cm below the vegetation layer) at six locations (or microsites) allow soil property inhomogeneity to be monitored across a landscape. The soil VWC and temperature sensors used at NSA C1 are the Campbell Scientific CS650L and the sensors at NSA M1 use the Campbell Scientific CS655. The two sensors are nearly identical in function, and vendor specifications are based on the CS650 unless otherwise stated.

  12. AmeriFlux US-MOz Missouri Ozark Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-MOz Missouri Ozark Site. Site Description - The site is located in the University of Missouri Baskett Wildlife Research area, situated in the Ozark region of central Missouri. The site is uniquely located in the ecologically important transitional zone between the central hardwood region and the central grassland region of the US. The land has been publically owned since the 1930s, and is on a land tract that was forested with the same dominant species before settlement in the early 1800s.

  13. Gas flux estimates at the LUSI eruption site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Mazzini, Adriano; Husein, Alwii; Hadi J., Soffian; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Indonesian Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the island of Java (Mazzini et al., 2007). Previous studies investigated the mechanisms of reactivation of the Watukosek fault system that crosses Lusi locality (Mazzini et al., 2009) and continues to the NE of Java. Results show that the quake triggered lateral movement of this strike-slip system resulting in several aligned eruptions sites including Lusi. Geochemical studies of the erupted fluids reveal a mantle signature and point to a connection with the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex (Mazzini et al., 2012) indicating that Lusi is a sedimentary hosted geothermal system. In order to estimate the amount of gas that is being released around the Lusi crater (~7 km2), we recently conducted a survey of over 300 stations (CO2 and CH4 flux measurements) using a closed-chamber flux-meter system and collected gas samples to analyze the composition of the seeps. In addition 20 soil gas concentrations were collected using a steel probe driven into the ground to a depth of 0.7-0.8 m to avoid the major influence of meteorological variables. Results show that the highest CO2 flux is present along the NE-SW oriented Watukosek fault (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and along the ~E-W oriented Siring antithetic fault (with peaks up to 110 g/m2day). The pools have overall a CH4-dominated composition, while the dry fault-related fractures are CO2-dominated which is in agreement with higher recorded temperatures at these sites. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that CO2 flux is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fault zones, and two order of magnitude for CH4 flux. C02 and CH4 microseepage is occurring in significant amount throughput the mud-covered area with average values of 297 and 95 g/m2day, respectively. CH4 flux shows the highest values in the W and NW sector of the Lusi area, while CO2 flux highlights the presence of three

  14. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  15. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  16. Subcanopy Flux Measurements in Forest Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Paul-Limoges, E.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Eddy-covariance measurements of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy provide direct evidence for the biosphere-atmosphere exchange at the ecosystem scale. Such continuous measurements are typically performed in the atmospheric surface layer above the canopy and integrate fluxes over the entire ecosystem within the footprint. Forest ecosystems, however, have complex vertical structures composed of several layers with different functional properties that are represented to a limited extend by above canopy measurements. Concurrent eddy-covariance measurements below canopy (subcanopy) can provide valuable insights on (1) understory processes, (2) their contributions to total ecosystem fluxes, and (3) the partitioning of component fluxes. Accordingly, there is a large potential for including standardized subcanopy forest measurements into large-scale measurement networks such as FLUXNET. However, our understanding of the performance and limitations for such measurements is still very limited. To gain a better understanding of subcanopy measurements, we conducted (I) a survey across FLUXNET on their availability, and (II) a literature review on published subcanopy measurements. Subsequently, we are preparing a standardized synthesis dataset on subcanopy measurements within FLUXNET. We will present the results from our survey, summarize the current process understanding, and discuss research priorities for concurrent below and above canopy eddy-covariance measurements.

  17. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  18. Measurement and modelling of methane fluxes from UK peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, P. E.; Gray, A.

    2012-12-01

    Nearly 5000 chamber measurements of CH4 flux were collated from 21 sites across the UK, covering a range of soil and vegetation types, to derive a parsimonious model that explains as much of the variability as possible, with the least input requirements. Less than half of the observed variability in instantaneous fluxes could be explained by the independent variables measured. Measurement error is one reason for this, and here we analyse several of the uncertainties inherent in these measurements, including the choice of model used to calculate the flux. Other reasons include the stochastic nature of some of the transport processes and the poor correspondence between the independent variables measured and the actual variables influencing the processes underlying methane production, transport and oxidation. Alternative measurement methods are considered which may circumvent some of these problems. When temporal variation was removed, and the fluxes averaged at larger spatial scales, simple models explained up to ~75 % of the variance in CH4 fluxes. Soil carbon, peat depth, soil moisture and pH together provided the best sub-set of explanatory variables. To estimate the impact of changes in peatland water table on CH4 emissions in the UK, an emission factor of +0.4 g CH4 m-2 y-1 per cm increase in water table was derived from the data. As an alternative approach, vegetation species composition provides a long-term integrator of environmental conditions, which may correlate with methane flux. Here, we used a "weighted averaging" approach to predict methane flux from plant species composition at a range of sites in the UK, continental Europe and Canada. Species were classified into functional groups, defined by a number of qualitative traits considered relevant to methane dynamics. We compared the results based on this functional classification with those based on the original species composition data with a purely taxonomic classification.

  19. Denoising surface renewal flux density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapland, T.; Paw U, K.; Snyder, R. L.; McElrone, A.; Calderon Orellana, A.; Williams, L.

    2012-12-01

    When combined with net radiation and ground heat flux density measurements, surface renewal sensible heat flux density measurements can be used to obtain latent heat flux density, and therefore evapotranspiration, via the energy balance residual. Surface renewal is based on analyzing the energy and mass budget of air parcels that interact with plant canopies. The air parcels are manifested as ramp-like shapes in turbulent scalar time series data, and the amplitude and period of the ramps are used to calculate the flux densities. The root mean square error between calibrated surface renewal and eddy covariance is generally twice the root mean square error between two eddy covariance systems. In this presentation, we evaluate the efficacy of various methods for reducing the random error in surface renewal sensible heat flux density measurements. These methods include signal de-spiking, conventional low-pass filtering, wavelet-based filtering, ramp signal to noise thresholds, ramp period scaling, novel rearrangements of the Van Atta procedure (Arch Mech 29:161-171, 1977) for resolving the ramp amplitude and ramp period, sensor replication, and optimization of sensor placement.

  20. AmeriFlux US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Law, Bev [Oregon State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site. Site Description - The Marys River Fir site is part of the "Synthesis of Remote Sensing and Field Observations to Model and Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of Oregon and Northern California (ORCA)". Located in the western region of Oregon the Marys River site represents the western extent of the climate gradient that spans eastward into the semi-arid basin of central Oregon. The sites that make up the eastern extent of the ORCA climate gradient is the Metolius site network (US-Me1, US-ME2, US-ME4, US-Me5) all of which are part of the TERRA PNW project at Oregon State University.

  1. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  2. Flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirig, C.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.; Dommen, J.; Grabmer, W.; Thielmann, A.; Schaub, A.; Beauchamp, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.

    2004-10-01

    Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. As a consequence, a considerable fraction of the measurements did not qualify for flux calculations by EC and had to be discarded. The validated results show light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average emissions (normalised to 30°C and 1000 µmoles m-2 s-1 PAR) of 1.5 and 0.39 µg m-2 s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087 µg m-2 s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. The observed fluxes are consistent with upscalings from leaf-level emission measurements of representative tree species in this forest and, in the case of MVK and MACR, can plausibly be explained by chemical production through oxidation of isoprene within the canopy. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.

  3. AmeriFlux US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bible, Ken [University of Washington; Wharton, Sonia [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site. Site Description - Wind River Field Station flux tower site is located in the T.T. Munger Research Area of the Wind River Ranger District in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Protected since 1926, the T.T. Munger Research Natural Area (RNA) is administered by the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station and Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The Douglas-fir/western hemlock dominant stand is approximately 500 years old and represents end points of several ecological gradients including age, biomass, structural complexity, and density of the dominant overstory species. A complete stand replacement fire, approximately 450-500 years ago, resulted in the initial establishment. No significant disturbances have occurred since the fire aside from those confined to small groups of single trees, such as overturn from high wind activity and mechanical damage from winter precipitation.

  4. Distributed Sensible Heat Flux Measurements for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwald, H.; Brauchli, T.; Lehning, M.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance is typically computed using eddy covariance or two point profile measurements while alternative approaches such as the flux variance method based on convective scaling has been much less explored and applied. Flux variance (FV) certainly has a few limitations and constraints but may be an interesting and competitive method in low-cost and power limited wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the advantage of providing spatio-temporal sensible heat flux over the domain of the network. In a first step, parameters such as sampling frequency, sensor response time, and averaging interval are investigated. Then we explore the applicability and the potential of the FV method for use in WSN in a field experiment. Low-cost sensor systems are tested and compared against reference instruments (3D sonic anemometers) to evaluate the performance and limitations of the sensors as well as the method with respect to the standard calculations. Comparison experiments were carried out at several sites to gauge the flux measurements over different surface types (gravel, grass, water) from the low-cost systems. This study should also serve as an example of spatially distributed sensible heat flux measurements.

  5. Interactive Database of Pulsar Flux Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewska, O.; Krzeszowski, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    The number of astronomical observations is steadily growing, giving rise to the need of cataloguing the obtained results. There are a lot of databases, created to store different types of data and serve a variety of purposes, e. g. databases providing basic data for astronomical objects (SIMBAD Astronomical Database), databases devoted to one type of astronomical object (ATNF Pulsar Database) or to a set of values of the specific parameter (Lorimer 1995 - database of flux density measurements for 280 pulsars on the frequencies up to 1606 MHz), etc. We found that creating an online database of pulsar flux measurements, provided with facilities for plotting diagrams and histograms, calculating mean values for a chosen set of data, filtering parameter values and adding new measurements by the registered users, could be useful in further studies on pulsar spectra.

  6. The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

    2003-05-20

    A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

  7. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) Arctic Campaign (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kohnert, K.; Sachs, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most pressing questions with regard to climate feedback processes in a warming Arctic is the regional-scale methane release from Arctic permafrost areas. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) campaign is designed to quantitatively and spatially explicitly address this question. Ground-based eddy covariance (EC) measurements provide continuous in-situ observations of the surface-atmosphere exchange of methane. However, these observations are rare in the Arctic permafrost zone and site selection is bound by logistical constraints among others. Consequently, these observations cover only small areas that are not necessarily representative of the region of interest. Airborne measurements can overcome this limitation by covering distances of hundreds of kilometers over time periods of a few hours. Here, we present the potential of environmental response functions (ERFs) for quantitatively linking methane flux observations in the atmospheric surface layer to meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. For this purpose thousands of kilometers of AIRMETH data across the Alaskan North Slope are utilized, with the aim to extrapolate the airborne EC methane flux observations to the entire North Slope. The data were collected aboard the research aircraft POLAR 5, using its turbulence nose boom and fast response methane and meteorological sensors. After thorough data pre-processing, Reynolds averaging is used to derive spatially integrated fluxes. To increase spatial resolution and to derive ERFs, we then use wavelet transforms of the original high-frequency data. This enables much improved spatial discretization of the flux observations, and the quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation. A machine learning technique is then employed to extract and quantify the functional relationships between the methane flux observations and the meteorological and

  8. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  9. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Stephen T.; Guillian, Eugene H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. PMID:18172211

  10. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Dye, Stephen T; Guillian, Eugene H

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. PMID:18172211

  11. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Dye, Stephen T; Guillian, Eugene H

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth.

  12. Field-scale evaluation of the passive flux meter for simultaneous measurement of groundwater and contaminant fluxes.

    PubMed

    Annable, Michael D; Hatfield, Kirk; Cho, Jaehyun; Klammler, Harald; Parker, Beth L; Cherry, John A; Rao, P Suresh C

    2005-09-15

    A new method, passive flux meter (PFM), has been developed and field-tested for simultaneously measuring contaminant and groundwater fluxes in the saturated zone at hazardous waste sites. The PFM approach uses a sorptive permeable medium placed in either a borehole or monitoring well to intercept contaminated groundwater and release "resident" tracers. The sorbent pack is placed in a groundwater flow field for a specified exposure time and then recovered for extraction and analysis. By quantifying the mass fraction of resident tracers lost and the mass of contaminant sorbed, groundwater and contaminant fluxes are calculated. Here, we assessed the performance of PFMs at the Canadian Forces Base Borden field site in Ontario, Canada. Two field tests were conducted under imposed groundwater flow fields: (1) radial flow to a well and (2) linear flow in a test channel confined by sheet pile walls on three sides. Both tests demonstrate that the local fluxes measured by PFM and averaged overthe screen interval were within 15% of imposed groundwaterflow and within 30% of measured contaminant mass flux. Patterns in depth variations in groundwater and contaminant fluxes, determined by the PFM approach, allow for site characterization at a higher spatial resolution. These results support the PMF method as a potential innovative alternative for measuring groundwater and contaminant fluxes in screened wells.

  13. Comparison of surface fluxes and conductances at two contrasting sites within the FIFE area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. B.; Verma, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Surface flux measurements from two contrasting sites within the FIFE study area are analyzed. The seasonal variation of midday latent heat fluxes and surface conductances at the two sites was found to be very similar even though the ratio of their average total leaf area indices was greater than two to one. Concurrent measurements made at another six flat sites within the FIFE area confirmed the independence of latent heat flux with respect to leaf area index. The surface conductance stress function related to specific humidity deficit was the same for the two sites, whereas the solar radiation stress function showed a difference of 30 percent at a solar radiation input of 300 W/sq m and the soil moisture stress function showed a difference of 16 percent when half the extractable soil moisture had been taken up. However, when the stress functions were combined to determine the surface conductance, these differences virtually canceled out.

  14. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Control site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots with identical towers, measurements at the US-ARc unburned plot are used as the experimental control. The second plot, US-Arb, was burned on 2005/03/08. Measurement comparisons between the control and burn plot are used to address questions regarding the effects of burning activities on carbon fluxes. The region evaded burning activities for at least 15 years. Current disturbances consist of only light grazing activities.

  15. Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Verma, Shashi B.; Starks, Patrick; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations to model fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation using routine weather data collected by automated weather stations was tested and the estimated fluxes were compared with fluxes measured over wheat. The model Cupid was used to model the fluxes. Two or more automated weather stations, interrogated by radio frequency and other means, were utilized to examine some of the climatic variability of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) site, to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams from various locations at the site and to compare modeled latent and sensible heat fluxes with measured values. Some bidirectional reflected and emitted radiation data were collected from 23 locations throughout the FIFE site. Analysis of these data along with analysis of the measured sensible and latent heat fluxes is just beginning.

  16. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  17. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  18. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  19. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; et al

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis ofmore » the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be

  20. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  1. Untangling Autophagy Measurements: All Fluxed Up

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Andres, Allen M.; Sin, Jon; Taylor, David

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important physiological process in the heart, and alterations in autophagic activity can exacerbate or mitigate injury during various pathological processes. Methods to assess autophagy have changed rapidly as the field of research has expanded. As with any new field, methods and standards for data analysis and interpretation evolve as investigators acquire experience and insight. The purpose of this review is to summarize current methods to measure autophagy, selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), and autophagic flux. We will examine several published studies where confusion arose in in data interpretation, in order to illustrate the challenges. Finally we will discuss methods to assess autophagy in vivo and in patients. PMID:25634973

  2. Measurement of Atomic-Oxygen Flux Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisashiba, Takuya; Kuroda, Kazutaka; Masui, Hirokazu; Iwata, Minoru; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Cho, Mengu

    Since material surfaces on the outside of spacecraft are exposed directly to the space environment, material having high tolerance to atomic oxygen, ultraviolet rays and radiation are preferred for long time spacecraft operation. In order to examine the influence of atomic oxygen (AO) on space grade materials, an atomic oxygen simulation chamber was developed. A system was developed that generates AO using a laser detonation method. A CO2 gas laser (5 J) irradiates the oxygen gas in a vacuum chamber (2 MPa) to dissociate the molecular oxygen into atomic. The velocity of AO can be controlled based on the timing between the laser and the gas pulse valve that injects oxygen gas into the chamber. The AO velocity generated by this system is measured using a QMASS (Quadruple Mass Spectrometer) and found to be 8 km/s. It was necessary to measure the AO flux distribution in the chamber at the location where the material samples are exposed to AO. The AO flux distribution was evaluated by measuring the mass gain on a QCM (QuartzCrystal Microbalance) coated with a silver film upon exposure to the AO.

  3. Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

    2010-02-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

  4. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  5. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  6. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  7. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  8. Evaluation of the Community Land Model simulated carbon and water fluxes against observations over ChinaFLUX sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Ricciuto, D. M.; He, H.; Thornton, P. E.; Yu, G.; Han, S.; Li, Y.; Yan, J.; Hao, Y.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) is an advanced process-based land surface model that simulates the complicated carbon, water vapor and energy exchanges between the terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere at various spatial-temporal scales. We for the first time use eddy-covariance observations of CO2 and water vapor exchange and soil respiration measurements at five representative Chinese Terrestrial Ecosystem Flux Observational Network (ChinaFLUX) tower sites to systematically evaluate the latest versions of CLM, the CLM4.0 and CLM4.5, and comprehensively examine the similarities and differences between the observational and simulated results. The CLM4.5 underestimates annual carbon sink at three forest sites and one alpine grassland site but overestimates the carbon sink at a semi-arid grassland site. The underestimation in annual carbon sink at a deciduous dominated forest site is resulted from underestimated daytime carbon sequestration in summer and overestimated nighttime carbon emission in spring and autumn. Compared with the CLM4.0, the bias of annual Gross Primary Production (GPP) is reduced by 24% and 28% in CLM4.5 at two subtropical forest sites. However, CLM4.5 still has a large positive bias in annual GPP. The improvement in NEE is limited, although the bias of soil respiration decreases by 16%-43% at three forest sites. The CLM4.5 has lower soil water content in dry season than this simulated by the CLM4.0 at two grassland sites. These lead to the significant drop in leaf area index and GPP, and the increase in respiration for the CLM4.5. The new fire parameterization in CLM4.5 causes incorrect fire estimation at Changbaishan forest site, which results in unexpected underestimation of NEE, vegetation carbon, and soil organic carbon by 46%, 95%, and 87%, respectively. Our study with the ChinaFLUX sites indicates a significant improvement of the CLM4.5 than the CLM4, and suggests further developments on the parameterization of seasonal GPP and

  9. Estimating CO(2) flux from snowpacks at three sites in the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Nate G.; Marshall, John D.; Hooker, Toby D.; Musselman, Robert

    2000-06-01

    Soil surface CO(2) flux (F(s)) is the dominant respiratory flux in many temperate forest ecosystems. Snowpacks increase this dominance by insulating the soil against the low temperature to which aboveground components are exposed. However, measurement of F(s) in winter may be impeded by snow cover. Likewise, developing annual F(s) models is complicated by seasonal variation in root and microbial metabolism. We compared three methods of measuring sub-snow F(s): (1) dynamic chamber measurements at the upper snowpack surface (F(snow)), (2) dynamic chamber measurements at the soil surface via snowpits (F(soil)), and (3) static estimates based on measured concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO(2)]) and conductance properties of the snowpack (F(diffusional)). Methods were compared at a mid-elevation forest in northeastern Washington, a mid-elevation forest in northern Idaho, and a high-elevation forest and neighboring meadow in Wyoming. The methods that minimized snowpack disturbance, F(diffusional) and F(snow), yielded similar estimates of F(s). In contrast, F(soil) yielded rates two to three times higher than F(snow) at the forested sites, and seven times higher at the subalpine meadow. The ratio F(soil)/F(snow) increased with increasing snow depth when compared across all sites. Snow removal appears to induce elevated soil flux as a result of lateral CO(2) diffusion into the pit. We chose F(snow) as our preferred method and used it to estimate annual CO(2) fluxes. The snowpack was present for 36% of the year at this site, during which time 132 g C m(-2), or 17% of the annual flux, occurred. We conclude that snowpack CO(2) flux is quantitatively important in annual carbon budgets for these forests and that the static and dynamic methods yield similar and reasonable estimates of the flux, as long as snowpack disturbance is minimized. PMID:12651510

  10. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  11. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  12. A highly portable, rapidly deployable system for eddy covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Billesbach, David P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Torn, Margaret S.; Berry, Joe A.

    2001-09-19

    To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed, built, and field-tested a highly portable, rapidly deployable, eddy covariance CO{sub 2} flux measurement system. The system is built from off-the-shelf parts and was assembled at a minimal cost. The unique combination of features of this system allow for a very rapid deployment with a minimal number of field personnel. The system is capable of making high precision, unattended measurements of turbulent CO{sub 2} fluxes, latent heat (LE) fluxes, sensible heat fluxes (H), and momentum transfer fluxes. In addition, many of the meteorological and ecosystem variables necessary for quality control of the fluxes and for running ecosystem models are measured. A side-by-side field comparison of the system at a pair of established AmeriFlux sites has verified that, for single measurements, the system is capable of CO{sub 2} flux accuracy of about {+-} 1.2 {micro}mole/m{sup 2}/sec, LE flux accuracy of about {+-} 15 Watts/m{sup 2}, H flux accuracy of about {+-} 7 Watts/m{sup 2}, and momentum transfer flux accuracy of about {+-} 11 gm-m/sec/sec. System deployment time is between 2 and 4 hours by a single person. The system was measured to draw between 30 and 35 Watts of power and may be run from available line power, storage batteries, or solar panels.

  13. Establishment of a New, Cooperative ARM and AmeriFlux Site on the Alaskan North Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billesbach, D. P.; Fischer, M. L.; Cook, D. R.; Torn, M. S.; Castanha, C.

    2011-12-01

    We report here on the establishment of a new research facility on the Alaskan North Slope. The experiment, located near Barrow, AK will be operated by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) as a permanent facility at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The instrumentation at the site as well as on-going vegetation and soil measurements will also constitute the core data set for a new AmeriFlux site. Data will be made available through both the ARM and the AmeriFlux data centers. The experiment will be centered around an eddy covariance flux tower that will generated measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, water vapor, and energy fluxes. Additionally, surface radiation, meteorological, and soil instruments will provide ancillary data needed for gap filling, quality control, and climate quantification. Destructive and non-destructive sampling, according to the AmeriFlux biometric sampling protocols will quantify plant biomass, species, leaf area and nitrogen, and soil carbon stocks. Our goal is to assess both the impact that the Arctic costal region might have on the carbon cycle as well as climatic feedbacks that could affect this vulnerable ecosystem.

  14. Measurement of local high-level, transient surface heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continuing investigation to develop methods for measuring local transient surface heat flux. A method is presented for simultaneous measurements of dual heat fluxes at a surface location by considering the heat flux as a separate function of heat stored and heat conducted within a heat flux gage. Surface heat flux information is obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gage. Heat flux was determined over a range of 4 to 22 MW/sq m. It was concluded that the method is feasible. Possible applications are for heat flux measurements on the turbine blade surfaces of space shuttle main engine turbopumps and on the component surfaces of rocket and advanced gas turbine engines and for testing sensors in heat flux gage calibrators.

  15. Productivity and carbon dioxide exchange of the leguminous crops: Estimates from flux tower measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net CO2 exchange data on legume crops at 17 flux tower sites in North America and 3 sites in Europe representing 29 site-years of measurements were partitioned into gross photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration using a light-response function method, resulting in new estimates of ecosystem-scale ec...

  16. Integrated Cropland and Grassland Flux Tower Observation Sites over Grazinglands for Quantifying Surface-Atmosphere Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, H. R.; Wagle, P.; Bajgain, R.; Zhou, Y.; Basara, J. B.; Xiao, X.; Duckles, J. M.; Steiner, J. L.; Starks, P. J.; Northup, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor fluxes between land surface and boundary layer using the eddy covariance method have many applicable uses across several disciplines. Three eddy flux towers have been established over no-till winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and native and improved pastures at the USDA ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory, El Reno, OK. An additional tower will be established in fall 2014 over till winter wheat. Each flux site is equipped with an eddy covariance system, PhenoCam, COSMOS, and in-situ observations of soil and atmospheric state variables. The objective of this research is to measure, compare, and model the land-atmosphere exchange of CO2, water vapor, and CH4 in different land cover types and management practices (till vs no-till, grazing vs no-grazing, native vs improved pasture). Models that focus on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), gross primary production (GPP), evapotranspiration (ET), and CH4 fluxes can be improved by the cross verification of these measurements. Another application will be to link the in-situ measurements with satellite remote sensing in order to scale-up flux measurements from small spatial scales to local and regional scales. Preliminary data analysis from the native grassland site revealed that CH4 concentration was negligible (~ 0), and it increased significantly when cattle were introduced into the site. In summer 2014, daily ET magnitude was about 4-5 mm day-1 and the NEE magnitude was 4-5 g C day-1 at the native grassland site. Further analysis of data for all the sites for longer temporal periods will enhance understanding of biotic and abiotic factors that govern carbon, water, and energy exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere under different land cover and management systems. The research findings will help predict the responses of these ecosystems to management practices and global environmental change in the future.

  17. Measurements of Continuum Flux in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Heinzel, P.; Procházka, O.

    2016-04-01

    A broad-band diagnostics of chromospheric flare plasma needs to analyze spectra covering many spectral lines and various continuum features. The flare spectra are well detected on the background of the solar disk, but the detection of flare line emission from the Sun-as-a-star in optical is much more difficult due to a strong background radiation. When the flare/background radiation contrast is strong enough to be detected, we need a device for measuring the flux from a selected part of the flaring region. Here we present technical demands for such an instrument and its brief description. This device denoted as Image Selector is a post-focus instrument installed at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov observatory, described by Kotrč (2009). Its core consists of a system of diaphragms, imaging Hα telescope and a fast spectrometer with dispersion of 3 px per Å but with cadency reaching up to 50 frames per second. The first solar flares observed recently by this novel technique provide quite interesting results. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares.

  18. Measurement of Integrated Low Frequency Flux Noise in Superconducting Flux/Phase Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Bo; Qiu Wei; Han Siyuan

    2008-11-07

    We measured the integrated low frequency flux noise ({approx}1 m{phi}{sub 0}) of an rf SQUID as a flux qubit by fitting the resonant peaks from photon assistant tunneling (PAT). The energy relaxation time Tl between the ground and first excited states in the same potential well, measured directly in time domain, is 3 ns. From these results we identified low frequency flux noise as the dominant source of decoherence. In addition, we found that the measured values of integrated flux noise in three qubits of various sizes differ more than an order of magnitude.

  19. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: II. Evaporation estimates from sensible heat flux measurements over beech woodland and grass on chalk sites in Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Rosier, P.; Smith, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    The impact on recharge to the Chalk aquifer of substitution of broadleaved woodland for pasture is a matter of concern in the UK. Hence, measurements of energy balance components were made above beech woodland and above pasture, both growing on shallow soils over chalk in Hampshire. Latent heat flux (evaporation) was calculated as the residual from these measurements of energy balances in which sensible heat flux was measured with an eddy correlation instrument that determined fast response vertical wind speeds and associated temperature changes. Assessment of wind turbulence statistics confirmed that the eddy correlation device performed satisfactorily in both wet and dry conditions. There was excellent agreement between forest transpiration measurements made by eddy correlation and stand level tree transpiration measured with sap flow devices. Over the period of the measurements, from March 1999 to late summer 2000, changes in soil water content were small and grassland evaporation and transpiration estimated from energy balance-eddy flux measurements were in excellent agreement with Penman estimates of potential evaporation. Over the 18-month measurement period, the cumulative difference between broadleaved woodland and grassland was small but evaporation from the grassland was 3% higher than that from the woodland. In the springs of 1999 and 2000, evaporation from the grassland was greater than that from the woodland. However, following leaf emergence in the woodland, the difference in cumulative evaporation diminished until the following spring.

  20. Anthropogenic and biogenic influence on VOC fluxes at an urban background site in Helsinki, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantala, Pekka; Järvi, Leena; Taipale, Risto; Laurila, Terhi K.; Patokoski, Johanna; Kajos, Maija K.; Kurppa, Mona; Haapanala, Sami; Siivola, Erkki; Petäjä, Tuukka; Ruuskanen, Taina M.; Rinne, Janne

    2016-07-01

    We measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) at an urban background site near the city centre of Helsinki, Finland, northern Europe. The VOC and CO2 measurements were obtained between January 2013 and September 2014 whereas for CO a shorter measurement campaign in April-May 2014 was conducted. Both anthropogenic and biogenic sources were identified for VOCs in the study. Strong correlations between VOC fluxes and CO fluxes and traffic rates indicated anthropogenic source of many VOCs. The VOC with the highest emission rate to the atmosphere was methanol, which originated mostly from traffic and other anthropogenic sources. The traffic was also a major source for aromatic compounds in all seasons whereas isoprene was mostly emitted from biogenic sources during summer. Some amount of traffic-related isoprene emissions were detected during other seasons but this might have also been an instrumental contamination from cycloalkane products. Generally, the observed VOC fluxes were found to be small in comparison with previous urban VOC flux studies. However, the differences were probably caused by lower anthropogenic activities as the CO2 fluxes were also relatively small at the site.

  1. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A.; Schade, G. W.; Holzinger, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2005-02-01

    Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC). Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) coupled with the eddy covariance (EC) technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID), coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA). Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger mixing ratio discrepancies between the two techniques at night than during the day. Two unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime mixing ratio difference to 20±2.9%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional terpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night.

  2. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A.; Schade, G. W.; Holzinger, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2004-12-01

    Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC). Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) coupled with the eddy covariance (EC) technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID), coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA). Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger differences at night than during the day. Four unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime difference to 19±3.4%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional monoterpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night, and that must have been oxidized during the day before they escaped the forest canopy.

  3. Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

  4. AmeriFlux US-Br3 Brooks Field Site 11- Ames

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, Tim; Prueger, John

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Br3 Brooks Field Site 11- Ames. Site Description - The Brooks Field Site 11 - Ames Site is one of three sites (Brooks Field Site 10 and Brooks Field Site 1011) located in a corn/soybean agricultural landscape of central Iowa. The farming systems, associated tillage, and nutrient management practices for soybean/corn production are typical of those throughout Upper Midwest Corn Belt. All three sites are members of the AmeriFlux network. Information for all three can be found in synchronous pages of this website.

  5. AmeriFlux US-Br1 Brooks Field Site 10- Ames

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, Tim; Prueger, John

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Br1 Brooks Field Site 10- Ames. Site Description - The Brooks Field Site 10 - Ames Site is one of three sites (Brooks Field Site 11 and Brooks Field Site 1011) located in a corn/soybean agricultural landscape of central Iowa. The farming systems, associated tillage, and nutrient management practices for soybean/corn production are typical of those throughout Upper Midwest Corn Belt. All three sites are members of the AmeriFlux network. Information for all three can be found in synchronous pages of this website.

  6. Bayesian hierarchical models for soil CO{sub 2} flux and leak detection at geologic sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J.; Junker, Brian; Bromhal, Grant S.; Strazisar, Brian; Wells, Arthur

    2011-10-01

    Proper characterizations of background soil CO{sub 2} respiration rates are critical for interpreting CO{sub 2} leakage monitoring results at geologic sequestration sites. In this paper, a method is developed for determining temperature-dependent critical values of soil CO{sub 2} flux for preliminary leak detection inference. The method is illustrated using surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements obtained from the AmeriFlux network fit with alternative models for the soil CO{sub 2} flux versus soil temperature relationship. The models are fit first to determine pooled parameter estimates across the sites, then using a Bayesian hierarchical method to obtain both global and site-specific parameter estimates. Model comparisons are made using the deviance information criterion (DIC), which considers both goodness of fit and model complexity. The hierarchical models consistently outperform the corresponding pooled models, demonstrating the need for site-specific data and estimates when determining relationships for background soil respiration. A hierarchical model that relates the square root of the CO{sub 2} flux to a quadratic function of soil temperature is found to provide the best fit for the AmeriFlux sites among the models tested. This model also yields effective prediction intervals, consistent with the upper envelope of the flux data across the modeled sites and temperature ranges. Calculation of upper prediction intervals using the proposed method can provide a basis for setting critical values in CO{sub 2} leak detection monitoring at sequestration sites.

  7. Measurement of Urban fluxes of CO2 and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmond, S.; Crawford, B.; Offerle, B.; Hom, J.

    2006-05-01

    Measurements of surface-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide (FCO2) and latent heat in urban environments are rare even though cities are a major source of atmospheric CO2 and users of water. In this paper, an overview of urban FCO2 measurements will be presented to illustrate how and where such measurements are being conducted and emerging results to date. Most of these studies have been conducted over short periods of time; few studies have considered annual sources/sinks. More investigations have been conducted, and are planned, in European cities than elsewhere, most commonly in areas of medium density urban development. The most dense urban sites are significant net sources of carbon. However, in areas where there is large amounts of vegetation present, there is a net sink of carbon during the summertime. In the second part of the presentation, more detailed attention will be directed to an ongoing measurement program in Baltimore, MD (part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study). Eddy covariance instrumentation mounted on a tall-tower at 41.2 m has continuously measured local-scale fluxes of carbon dioxide from a suburban environment since 2001. Several features make this particular study unique: 1) for an urban area, the study site is extensively vegetated, 2) the period of record (2001-2005) is among the longest available for urban FCO2 measurements, 3) both closed-path and open-path infrared gas analyzers are used for observations, and 4) several unique data quality control and gap-filling methods have been developed for use in an urban environment. Additionally, detailed surface datasets and GIS software are used to perform flux source area analysis. Results from Baltimore indicate that FCO2 is very dependent on source area land-cover characteristics, particularly the proportion of vegetated and built surfaces. Over the course of a year, the urban surface is a strong net source of CO2, though there is considerable inter-annual variability depending on

  8. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our

  9. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  10. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-11-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  11. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-01-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  12. Software used with the flux mapper at the solar parabolic dish test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazono, C.

    1984-01-01

    Software for data archiving and data display was developed for use on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-11/34A minicomputer for use with the JPL-designed flux mapper. The flux mapper is a two-dimensional, high radiant energy scanning device designed to measure radiant flux energies expected at the focal point of solar parabolic dish concentrators. Interfacing to the DEC equipment was accomplished by standard RS-232C serial lines. The design of the software was dicated by design constraints of the flux-mapper controller. Early attemps at data acquisition from the flux-mapper controller were not without difficulty. Time and personnel limitations result in an alternative method of data recording at the test site with subsequent analysis accomplished at a data evaluation location at some later time. Software for plotting was also written to better visualize the flux patterns. Recommendations for future alternative development are discussed. A listing of the programs used in the anaysis is included in an appendix.

  13. An intercomparison of surface energy flux measurement systems used during FIFE 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nie, D.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Fritschen, L. J.; Weaver, H. L.; Smith, E. A.; Verma, S. B.; Field, R. T.; Kustas, W. P.; Stewart, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    During FIFE 1987, surface energy fluxes were measured at 22 flux sites by nine groups of scientists using different measuring systems. A rover Bowen ratio station was taken to 20 of the flux stations to serve as a reference for estimating the instrument-related differences. The rover system was installed within a few meters from the host instrument of a site. Using linear regression analysis, net radiation, Bowen ratio, and latent heat fluxes were compared between the rover measurements and the host measurements. The average differences in net radiation, Bowen ratio, and latent heat flux from different types of instruments can be up to 10, 30, and 20 percent, respectively. The Didcot net radiometer gave higher net radiation while the Swissteco type showed lower values, as compared to the corrected radiation energy balance system (REBS) model. The four-way components method and the Thornthwaite type give similar values to the REBS. The surface energy radiation balance systems type Bowen ratio systems exhibit slightly lower Bowen ratios and thus higher latent heat fluxes, compared to the arid zone evapotranspiration systems. Eddy correlation systems showed slightly lower latent heat flux in comparison to the Bowen ratio systems. It is recommended that users of the flux data take these differences into account.

  14. Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirig, C.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.; Dommen, J.; Grabmer, W.; Thielmann, A.; Schaub, A.; Beauchamp, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.

    2005-02-01

    Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC) technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.

  15. Sand Flux Results for Aeolian Dunes at Current and Candidate Landing Sites on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnacki, M.; Urso, A.; Yingling, W.

    2015-12-01

    It is now known unambiguously that wind-driven bedform activity is occurring on Mars today. It has also been demonstrated the rapid aeolian abrasion of sedimentary deposits that potentially host ancient habitable environments may provide the best mechanism for exposing samples containing relatively undegraded organics (Farley et al. 2014). Thus, current processes operating on the surface of Mars are highly relevant to our understanding of the past. Here, we discuss new sand flux results of active dune across Mars, including several current and candidate landing sites with Meridiani Planum, Gale crater, Valles Marineris, and Mawrth Vallis. For this task, we have utilized multi-temporal images acquired annually by the HiRISE camera (25 cm/pixel) along with co-located HiRISE Digital Terrain Models. Falling dunes in Coprates Chasma (Mars 2020 candidate landing site) measuring 6-10 meters in height were detected migrating on average 0.5 m per Earth year, yielding crest fluxes of 3.1 m3 m-1 yr-1 (units hereafter assumed). Barchans near the MSL rover at Gale crater have slightly lower fluxes of 1.2, while earlier work in Endeavour crater, the current site of the Opportunity Rover, showed dome dunes with fluxes as high as 13 (average of 6.8; Chojnacki et al. 2015). New results of Mawrth Vallis (Mars 2020 candidate) dunes suggest these high rates are not uncommon, as barchans there possess average fluxes of 11.5. Assuming ripple reptation rates are 1/10th that of crest fluxes, total flux (saltation plus reptation) would range 3.2 to 12.7 m3 m-1 yr-1 for all sites studied herein. Active dunes and the abrasion susceptibility (Sa) of local rocks are relevant to assess how sand fluxes modify the landscape. Using the methodology and assumptions (Sa for basalt, mean trajectory height etc.) described in Bridges et al. (2012), we estimated abrasion rates of local basaltic bedrock. For example, sand blasting at Mawrth Vallis is estimated to produce 2-8 μm/yr for flat ground and 15

  16. Multi-year estimates of plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination at AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, X.; Lai, C.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bush, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Law, B. E.; Schauer, A. J.; Ehleringer, J.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination continuously at 8 AmeriFlux sites (Howland Forest, Harvard Forest, Wind River Forest, Rannells Prairie, Freeman Ranch, Chestnut Ridge, Metolius, and Marys River fir) over 8 years (2002-2009). We used an observation-based approach from weekly measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and their 13C/12C ratios to estimate photosynthetic 13C discrimination (△A) and respiration (δ13CR) on seasonal and interannual time scales. The coordinated, systematic flask sampling across the AmeriFlux subnetwork were used for cross-site synthesis of monthly flux estimates [Dang et al. Combining tower mixing ratio and community model data to estimate regional-scale net ecosystem carbon exchange by boundary layer inversion over 4 flux towers in the U.S.A., Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, in press]. Here, we evaluated environmental factors that also influenced temporal variability in △A and δ13CR from daily to interannual time scales, comparing atmospheric 13C/12C measurements, leaf and needle organic matter, and tree ring cellulose. Across these major biomes that dominate the continent, we show differential ecophysiological responses to environmental stresses, among which water availability appeared to be a dominant factor. Our decadal measurement period provided robust estimates of atmospheric 13C discrimination by terrestrial ecosystems, but also suggest regions where enhanced monitoring efforts are required (e.g., 13C/12C emission from fire and urban metabolism; increased temporal resolution of 13C measurements in stress-sensitive ecosystems) to make atmospheric 13C/12C measurements an effective constraint for continental-scale assessments of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  17. Evaluating Earth degassing in subduction zones by measuring helium fluxes from the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tefang F.; Sano, Yuji; Yang, Tsanyao F.; Takahata, Naoto; Shirai, Kotaro; Pinti, Daniele L.

    2010-10-01

    Volatiles are lost from the Earth's mantle to the atmosphere, hydrosphere and the crust through subaerial and submarine volcanism. Quantifying the volatile sources bears fundamental information on a number of issues in Earth sciences, from the evolution of the atmosphere and oceans to the nature of chemical heterogeneity of the Earth's mantle. The primordial noble gas isotope 3He provides an unambiguous measure of the volatile flux from the mantle, yet so far in the ocean region; it has been only measured at a mid-ocean ridge. Here, we present original measurements of the 3He flux at the Mid-Okinawa Trough back-arc basin. The 3He flux was estimated from 3He/ 20Ne vertical profiles measured in deep-sea sediment pore water. Diffusive 3He fluxes vary from 1.6 3He atoms cm -2 s -1 at the hydrothermally active Izena Cauldron to 0.57 3He atoms cm -2 s -1 at the background site, 13 km away. These values are about 20% of the 3He flux measured at the East Pacific Rise, supporting the never-proven hypothesis that 3He mantle flux from subduction zones is a quarter of that at MOR. Measured ocean-floor 4He flux ranges from 3.3 × 10 5 to 4.8 × 10 54He atoms cm -2 s -1, higher than that measured worldwide, suggesting that 4He flux at subduction zones might have been previously underestimated.

  18. The 3He flux gauge in the Sargasso Sea: a determination of physical nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone at the Bermuda Atlantic time series site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, R. H. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Doney, S. C.; Lott, D. E., III

    2015-03-01

    We provide a new determination of the annual mean physical supply of nitrate to the euphotic zone in the western subtropical North Atlantic based on a three year time-series of measurements of tritiugenic 3He from 2003 to 2006 in the surface ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site. We combine the 3He data with a sophisticated noble gas calibrated air-sea gas exchange model to constrain the 3He flux across the sea-air interface, which must closely balance the upward 3He flux into the euphotic zone. The product of the 3He flux and the observed subsurface nitrate-3He relationship provides an estimate of the minimum rate of new production in the BATS region. We also applied the gas model to an earlier time series of 3He measurements at BATS in order to recalculate new production fluxes for the 1985 to 1988 time period. The observations, despite an almost three-fold difference in the nitrate-3He relationship, yield a roughly consistent estimate of nitrate flux. In particular, the nitrate flux from 2003-2006 is estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.3 mol m-2 y-1, which is ~ 40% smaller than the calculated flux for the period from 1985 to 1988. The difference between the time periods, which is barely significant, may be due to a real difference in new production resulting from changes in subtropical mode water formation. Overall, the nitrate flux is larger than most estimates of export fluxes or net community production fluxes made locally for BATS site, which is likely a reflection of the larger spatial scale covered by the 3He technique and potentially also by decoupling of 3He and nitrate during obduction of water masses from the main thermocline into the upper ocean.

  19. Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Giannone, L; Geiger, B; Bilato, R; Maraschek, M; Odstrčil, T; Fischer, R; Fuchs, J C; McCarthy, P J; Mertens, V; Schuhbeck, K H

    2016-05-01

    Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements are now available on ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to the majority of diamagnetic flux measurements on other tokamaks, no analog summation of signals is necessary for measuring the change in toroidal flux or for removing contributions arising from unwanted coupling to the plasma and poloidal field coil currents. To achieve the highest possible sensitivity, the diamagnetic measurement and compensation coil integrators are triggered shortly before plasma initiation when the toroidal field coil current is close to its maximum. In this way, the integration time can be chosen to measure only the small changes in flux due to the presence of plasma. Two identical plasma discharges with positive and negative magnetic field have shown that the alignment error with respect to the plasma current is negligible. The measured diamagnetic flux is compared to that predicted by TRANSP simulations. The poloidal beta inferred from the diamagnetic flux measurement is compared to the values calculated from magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes. The diamagnetic flux measurement and TRANSP simulation can be used together to estimate the coupled power in discharges with dominant ion cyclotron resonance heating. PMID:27250425

  20. SkyLine and SkyGas: Novel automated technologies for automatic GHG flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ineson, Philip; Stockdale, James

    2014-05-01

    1. Concerns for the future of the Earth's climate centre around the anthropogenically-driven continuing increases in atmospheric concentrations of the major 'greenhouse gases' (GHGs) which include CO2, CH4 and N2O. A major component of the global budgets for all three of these gases is the flux between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems. 2. Currently, these fluxes are poorly quantified, largely due to technical limitations associated with making these flux measurements. Whilst eddy covariance systems have greatly improved such measurements at the ecosystem scale, flux measurements at the plot scale are commonly made using labour intensive traditional 'cover box' approaches; technical limitations have frequently been a bottle-neck in producing adequate and appropriate GHG flux data necessary for making land management decisions. For example, there are almost no night time flux data for N2O fluxes, and frequently such data are only measured over bare soil patches. 3. We have been addressing the design of novel field equipment for the automation of GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scale and will present here some of the technical solutions we have developed. These solutions include the development of the SkyLine and SkyGas approaches which resolve many of the common problems associated with making high frequency, sufficiently replicated GHG flux measurements under field conditions. 4. Unlike most other automated systems, these technologies 'fly' a single chamber to the measurement site, rather than have multiple replicated chambers and analysers. We will present data showing how such systems can deliver high time and spatial resolution flux data, with a minimum of operator intervention and, potentially, at relatively low per plot cost. We will also show how such measurements can be extended to monitoring fluxes from freshwater features in the landscape.

  1. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  2. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  3. Flux gradient measurements from a catamaran buoy in SEMAPHORE

    SciTech Connect

    Katsaros, K.B.; Drennan, W.M.; Donelan, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    During the SEMAPHORE Structure des Echanges Mer Atmosphere Proprietes des Heterogeneities de L`Ocean leur Repartition (Structure of Exchanges with the Marine Atmosphere, Properties of Heterogeneities of the Ocean and their Repartition) experiment in the fall of 1993, a large catamaran buoy, the MENTOR, was set adrift in the Azores region. The purpose of the buoy was to provide measurements for testing flux-profile relations over the sea, and to measure the influence of sea state on the turbulent fluxes and atmospheric profiles and the effects of atmospheric and radiative fluxes on near surface temperature structure in the ocean. In addition, the buoy measurements were to provide an anchor point for calibrating mesoscale bulk surface flux estimates over the SEMAPHORE domain and to provide intercomparison data for dissipation estimates of fluxes from the R/V Le Suroit.

  4. An inter-comparison of surface energy flux measurement systems used during FIFE, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nie, D.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Fritschen, L. J.; Weaver, H.; Smith, E. A.; Verma, S. B.; Field, R. T.; Kustas, W.; Stewart, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    During the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Program Field Experiment (FIFE-87), surface energy fluxes were measured at 22 flux sites by nine groups of scientists using different measuring systems. A rover Bowen ratio station was taken to nearly all the flux stations to serve as a reference for estimating the instrument related differences. The rover system was installed within a few meters from the host instrument of a site. Net radiation, Bowen ratio, and latent heat fluxes were compared between the rover and the host for the stations visited. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between rover measurements and host measurements. These inter-comparisons are needed to examine the influence of instrumentation on measurement uncertainty. Highly significant effects of instrument type were detected from these comparisons. Instruments of the same type showed average differences of less than 5 percent for net radiation, 10 percent for Bowen ratio, and 6 percent for latent heat flux. The corresponding average differences for different types of instruments can be up to 10, 30, and 20 percent respectively. The Didcot net radiometer gave higher net radiation while the Swissteco type showed lower values, as compared to the corrected REBS model. The 4-way components methed and the Thornswaite type give similar values to the REBS. The SERBS type Bowen ratio systems exhibit slightly lower Bowen ratios and thus higher latent heat fluxes, compared to the AZET systems. Eddy correlation systems showed slightly lower latent heat flux in comparison to the Bowen ratio systems.

  5. BOREAS TE-1 CO2 and CH4 Flux Data Over the SSA-OBS Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Darwin; Papagno, Andrea; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. Particular emphasis was placed on nutrient biochemistry, the stores and transfers of organic carbon, and how the characteristics were related to measured methane fluxes. The overall transect in the Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) included the major plant communities and related soils that occurred in that section of the boreal forest. Soil physical, chemical, and biological measurements along the transect were used to characterize the static environment, which allowed them to be related to methane fluxes. Chamber techniques were used to provide a measure of methane production/uptake. Chamber measurements coupled with flask sampling were used to determine the seasonality of methane fluxes. This particular data set contains carbon dioxide and methane flux values from the SSA-OBS site. The data were collected from 09-Jun to 04-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Anthropogenic and Biogenic Features of Long-Term Measured CO Flux in North Downtown Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhyoun; Schade, Gunnar W

    2016-01-01

    Long-term urban carbon cycle studies remain rare despite the importance of carbon for energy, air quality, and climate change. To study spatial and temporal variations of energy and carbon fluxes in a subtropical urban environment, eddy covariance flux measurements were conducted north of downtown Houston, TX, using a tall radio-tower installation. The results of the first 2 yr of measurements show that both concentrations and fluxes of CO display typical seasonal and diurnal variations in urban areas. The seasonal variation of net CO flux is driven by steady anthropogenic emissions dominated by car traffic and human respiration, moderated by the local deciduous tree foliage. Weekday-weekend differences were observed in carbon fluxes, but not concentrations, while diurnal changes were dominated by rush-hour peaks from traffic and vegetation influences. Interestingly, CO and CO concentrations, but not CO flux, exhibited long-term declines, especially comparing pre- and post-Hurricane Ike periods. A directional analysis of CO fluxes revealed that the highest fluxes typically occurred from northwest directions, most likely due to emissions from small industrial sources. Car traffic as carbon source was revealed via correlations of CO with CO during the morning rush hours, and of CO flux with traffic counts during winter time. The influence of urban vegetation on net CO fluxes was identified via correlations with daytime photosynthetically active radiation due to photosynthesis, and with nighttime temperatures due to ecosystem respiration. The study site is a net source of CO throughout all seasons.

  7. Soil air and soil flux measurements of 222Radon and CO2: A soil flux parametrization at Lutjewad (NL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, R. E. M.; Kettner, E.; Palstra, S. W. L.; Hoekman, S.; van der Graaf, E. R.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric 222Radon concentration measurements are used as a valuable transport tracer verifying the transport part of Carbon Cycle and Greenhouse Gas models. The production rate of the radioactive noble gas 222Radon (T1•2 = 3.8 days) by radioactive decay of 226Radium in the soil is constant, the absolute quantity depending on the local soil Radium concentration. The flux of 222Radon to the atmosphere (the soil exhalation, or effective atmospheric production rate), however, is not constant. It strongly depends on soil texture, soil humidity, precipitation and other parameters, but is nearly constant if these parameters stay unchanged. Recently, an effort has been done to predict this flux rate with widely available γ-dosimetry measurements (Szegvary et al., Predicting terrestrial 222Rn-flux using gamma dose rate as a proxy, ACP 7, 2789-2795, 2007), but real 222Radon-flux measurements are sparse. 222Radon undergoes the same transport processes on the way from soil to atmosphere as any other soil-derived (greenhouse) gas. This makes 222Radon an ideal tracer to separate variations in e.g. soil CO2-production from changes in the soil-atmosphere CO2-transport, both being reflected in the total soil-atmosphere CO2-flux. At the atmospheric measurement site Lutjewad in the north of the Netherlands (53N24'18", 6E21'13", www.rug.nl/ees/onderzoek/cio/projecten/atmosphericgases) we started in 2006 with the measurements of the soil 222Radon and CO2 concentration through soil probes as well as the Radon and CO2 soil fluxes by means of an automatic soil chamber. While there are up to eight soil air measurements per day, the soil chamber is automatically closed twice per day. The station is situated directly on the Waddensea dike at an elevation of 1 m a.s.l. on seaclay soil. The groundwater table shows variations between 0.5 m and 2 m below terrain. From our measurements we find that in the dryer summer season, from April to July, the mean 222Radon-flux can be up to 40

  8. FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

    2010-07-22

    The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

  9. BOREAS TGB-3 CH4 and CO2 Chamber Flux Data over NSA Upland Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Kathleen; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Moore, Tim R.

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-3) team collected methane and carbon dioxide (CH4, CO2) chamber flux measurements at the Northern Study Area (NSA) Fen, Old Black Spruce (OBS), Young Jack Pine (YJP), and auxiliary sites along Gillam Road and the 1989 burn site. Gas samples were extracted from chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility approximately every 7 days during May to September 1994 and June to October 1996. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  10. Validating CERES Radiative Fluxes in the Arctic with Airborne Radiative Flux Measurements from the ARISE Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, J.; Bucholtz, A.; Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Smith, W. L., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on board NASA's Terra, Aqua, and Soumi-NPP satellites provide the only measurements of reflected solar shortwave and emitted longwave radiative flux over the Arctic. Various methods have shown the uncertainty of CERES fluxes over sea ice to be higher than other scene types. However validation against an independent radiative flux measurement has never been attempted. We present here an attempt to better quantify the uncertainty of time-and-space averaged CERES flux measurements using airborne measurements from the Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea Ice Experiment (ARISE). The ARISE campaign took place during September of 2014 based out of Fairbanks, Alaska, with most of the measurements taken in the vicinity of the sea ice edge between 125°W and 150°W, and 71°N to 77°N. For six of the flights, measurements were taken in a lawnmower type pattern over either 100 x 200 km box regions at a constant altitude of >6 km, or 100 x 100 km box regions at an altitude of between 200 m to 500 m. They were designed to resemble the CERES Level 3 spatial averaging grids, and were located and timed to coincide with a high number of CERES overpasses. On board the aircraft were a set of upward and downward facing shortwave and longwave broadband radiometers (BBR), along with other instruments measuring meteorological conditions and cloud properties. We have compared the broadband radiative fluxes from BBR with those from CERES for the three days where the aircraft was flying the high altitude pattern. We use the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to account for differences in the measurement altitude between BBR and CERES. We will present results of the comparisons between the computed fluxes and the measured longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes.

  11. Measurements of EUV coronal holes and open magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, C.; Qiu, J.; Leamon, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-03-10

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images obtained by SOHO/EIT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5% and 17% of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between (2-5)× 10{sup 22} Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements is similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5%-10% of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measured much enhanced open magnetic flux in the range of (2-4)× 10{sup 22} Mx, which is about twice the flux measured by EIT, and matches with the PFSS calculated open flux, with discrepancies in the location and strength of coronal holes. A detailed comparison between the three measurements (by EIT, AIA-EUVI, and PFSS) indicates that coronal holes in low latitudes contribute significantly to the total open magnetic flux. These low-latitude coronal holes are not well measured with either the He I 10830 line in previous studies, or EIT EUV images; neither are they well captured by the static PFSS model. The enhanced observations from AIA/EUVI allow a more accurate measure of these low-latitude coronal holes and their contribution to open magnetic flux.

  12. Atmospheric Attenuation Of Total Solar Flux By Clouds At Six Amazonian Sites: 1999-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, J.; Holben, B.; Eck, T.; Artaxo, P.; Yamasoe, M.; Procopio, A.

    2002-12-01

    In Brazil, we now have a data set of pyranometer measurements at several sites distributed across the Amazon basin, with a record spanning more than 3 years at some locations. This network represents one of the few such long-term flux data bases available for this region, and provides an opportunity to characterize the nature of atmospheric effects on surface, broadband irradiance. Sufficient data are now available to assess trends in cloud attenuation on a range of timescales (diurnally, seasonally, and interannually). Cloud-induced fractional and absolute total flux reductions at the surface were evaluated for all years and sites. The fractional reduction, fB was computed as the ratio of received irradiance to the modeled clear-sky irradiance for background (low) aerosol conditions. A distinct difference was found between cloud attenuation in the wet and dry seasons, particularly in the southern Amazon. Histograms of fB for typical wet season months reveal a bi-modal distribution with a reduction peak (when the solar beam is obstructed) and an enhancement peak (produced by edge reflections from broken cloud cover). This phenomenon has been noted previously at the Abracos Hill sites during a 2 month study in 1999 (Gu et al., 2001). Our multi-year, multi-site data now suggest this is a fairly consistent feature of wet season months in the southern sites in Rondonia and northern Mato Grosso, and of most or all months at the equatorial sites (Balbina, Belterra) in Para and Amazonas.

  13. Estimation of surface heat and moisture fluxes over a prairie grassland. 2. Two-dimensional time filtering and site variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, William L.; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-11-01

    The behavior of in situ measurements of surface fluxes obtained during FIFE 1987 is examined by using correlative and spectral techniques in order to assess the significance of fluctuations on various time scales, from subdiurnal up to synoptic, intraseasonal, and annual scales. The objectives of this analysis are (1) to determine which temporal scales have a significant impact on areal averaged fluxes and (2) to design a procedure for filtering an extended flux time series that preserves the basic diurnal features and longer time scales while removing high frequency noise that cannot be attributed to site-induced variation. These objectives are accomplished through the use of a two-dimensional cross-time Fourier transform, which serves to separate processes inherently related to diurnal and subdiurnal variability from those which impact flux variations on the longer time scales. A filtering procedure is desirable before the measurements are utilized as input with an experimental biosphere model, to insure that model based intercomparisons at multiple sites are uncontaminated by input variance not related to true site behavior. Analysis of the spectral decomposition indicates that subdiurnal time scales having periods shorter than 6 hours have little site-to-site consistency and therefore little impact on areal integrated fluxes. The spectral filter has thus been designed to remove these modes. Application of the filter to the 143-day FIFE 1987 flux records results in time series that retain at least 90% of the original variance and preserve the slower diurnal and longer time scales.

  14. An analytical quantification of mass fluxes and natural attenuation rate constants at a former gasworks site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelmann, Alexander; Ptak, Thomas; Teutsch, Georg

    2001-12-01

    A new integral groundwater investigation approach was used for the first time to quantify natural attenuation rates at field scale. In this approach, pumping wells positioned along two control planes were operated at distances of 140 and 280 m downstream of a contaminant source zone at a former gasworks site polluted with BTEX- (benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, o-, p-xylene) and PAH- (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) compounds. Based on the quantified changes in total contaminant mass fluxes between the control planes, first-order natural attenuation rate constants could be estimated. For BTEX-compounds, these ranged from 1.4e-02 to 1.3e-01 day -1, whereas for PAH-compounds natural attenuation rate constants of 3.7e-04 to 3.1e-02 day -1 were observed. Microbial degradation activity at the site was indicated by an increase in dissolved iron mass flux and a reduction in sulphate mass flux between the two investigated control planes. In addition to information about total contaminant mass fluxes and average concentrations, an analysis of the concentration-time series measured at the control planes also allowed to semi-quantitatively delineate the aquifer regions most likely contaminated by the BTEX- and PAH-compounds.

  15. An analytical quantification of mass fluxes and natural attenuation rate constants at a former gasworks site.

    PubMed

    Bockelmann, A; Ptak, T; Teutsch, G

    2001-12-15

    A new integral groundwater investigation approach was used for the first time to quantify natural attenuation rates at field scale. In this approach, pumping wells positioned along two control planes were operated at distances of 140 and 280 m downstream of a contaminant source zone at a former gasworks site polluted with BTEX- (benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, o-, p-xylene) and PAH- (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) compounds. Based on the quantified changes in total contaminant mass fluxes between the control planes, first-order natural attenuation rate constants could be estimated. For BTEX-compounds, these ranged from 1.4e-02 to 1.3e-01 day(-1) whereas for PAH-compounds natural attenuation rate constants of 3.7e-04 to 3.1e-02 day(-1) were observed. Microbial degradation activity at the site was indicated by an increase in dissolved iron mass flux and a reduction in sulphate mass flux between the two investigated control planes. In addition to information about total contaminant mass fluxes and average concentrations, an analysis of the concentration-time series measured at the control planes also allowed to semi-quantitatively delineate the aquifer regions most likely contaminated by the BTEX- and PAH-compounds. PMID:11820481

  16. A Preliminary Study of CO2 Flux Measurements by Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibert, Fabien; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, T.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the global carbon cycle requires quantification of terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes at regional scales. In this paper, we analyze the potential of a Doppler DIAL system to make flux measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the eddy-covariance and boundary layer budget methods and present results from a ground based experiment. The goal of this study is to put CO2 flux point measurements in a mesoscale context. In June 2007, a field experiment combining a 2-m Doppler Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL) and in-situ sensors of a 447-m tall tower (WLEF) took place in Wisconsin. The HDIAL measures simultaneously: 1) CO2 mixing ratio, 2) atmosphere structure via aerosol backscatter and 3) radial velocity. We demonstrate how to synthesize these data into regional flux estimates. Lidar-inferred fluxes are compared with eddy-covariance fluxes obtained in-situ at 396m AGL from the tower. In cases where the lidar was not yet able to measure the fluxes with acceptable precision, we discuss possible modifications to improve system performance.

  17. Micro-scale modelling of energy fluxes over a small Fluxnet forest site in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogachev, A.; Dellwik, E.; Boegh, E.

    2012-12-01

    Most forests, especially in Europe, are too small to fulfil strict fetch requirements associated with idealized flux observations in undisturbed, homogeneous flow. As a consequence of limited fetch, the flux measured above the canopy will often deviate from the source strength underlying the measurements. Since representative measurements focused on heterogeneous effects are scarce because of demanding experimental arrangements the numerical modelling are often recruited for analysis of these deviations. During the last years the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model SCADIS (scalar distribution model; Sogachev et al., 2002, Tellus 54B, 784-819) has been successfully applied especially in the region adjacent to a forest edge in order to improve flux data interpretation. Most of the analyses were done for the neutral case and in two-dimensional mode. When analyzing the effect of a forest edge on both flow and passive scalar properties, numerical studies showed that sources located on a soil surface are major contributors to wave-like flux behavior downwind of the leading edge, and that it is important to distinguish the effects of ground sources from those of the foliage. In the present work, we apply the SCADIS model with enhanced turbulence closure including buoyancy for investigation of the daily course of energy fluxes over patchy forested terrain in Denmark, where the model is used in three-dimensional mode. The modelling results (with 50 m horizontal resolution) are in good qualitative agreement with high-resolution (60 m and 120 m) remote-sensing data of the effective surface temperature of the area near the site in focus: the forested areas are colder in daytime and warmer in night time than surrounding open areas. In contrast to the remote sensing approach, SCADIS provides the information about spatial distribution of latent and sensible heat vertical fluxes in the whole ABL. Topography and forest edge effects result in vertical turbulent fluxes that

  18. Determining Maximum Glycolytic Capacity Using Extracellular Flux Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity using extracellular flux analysis can give crucial information about cell status and phenotype during normal operation, development of pathology, differentiation, and malignant transformation. They are also of great use when assessing the effects of chemical or drug treatments. Here, we experimentally define maximum glycolytic capacity, demonstrate how it differs from glycolytic rate, and provide a protocol for determining the basal glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity in cells using extracellular flux measurements. The results illustrate the power of extracellular flux analysis to describe the energetics of adherent cells in culture in a fully quantitative way. PMID:27031845

  19. Determining Maximum Glycolytic Capacity Using Extracellular Flux Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity using extracellular flux analysis can give crucial information about cell status and phenotype during normal operation, development of pathology, differentiation, and malignant transformation. They are also of great use when assessing the effects of chemical or drug treatments. Here, we experimentally define maximum glycolytic capacity, demonstrate how it differs from glycolytic rate, and provide a protocol for determining the basal glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity in cells using extracellular flux measurements. The results illustrate the power of extracellular flux analysis to describe the energetics of adherent cells in culture in a fully quantitative way.

  20. Determining Maximum Glycolytic Capacity Using Extracellular Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mookerjee, Shona A.; Nicholls, David G.; Brand, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity using extracellular flux analysis can give crucial information about cell status and phenotype during normal operation, development of pathology, differentiation, and malignant transformation. They are also of great use when assessing the effects of chemical or drug treatments. Here, we experimentally define maximum glycolytic capacity, demonstrate how it differs from glycolytic rate, and provide a protocol for determining the basal glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity in cells using extracellular flux measurements. The results illustrate the power of extracellular flux analysis to describe the energetics of adherent cells in culture in a fully quantitative way. PMID:27031845

  1. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  2. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B.

    1995-03-15

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m{sup 2}-min to 9.69 x 10{sup 6} pCi/m{sup 2}-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m{sup 2}-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were < 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report.

  3. Measuring Underground Neutron Fluxes for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, Robert; Garrison, Lance; Thornton, Tyler; Steele, Ethan

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure the muon-induced neutron flux in lead at sea level using the SciBath neutral particle detector. The muon-induced neutron rate is not well known, is challenging to measure and simulate, and potentially an important background for underground experiments such as the EXO neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment. A mass of 45 kg of lead was placed on top of the detector, and muon/neutron-capture correlated events were measured. Events with accidental neutron-capture signals were subtracted as were muon/neutron-capture correlated events from spallation in the detector liquid scintillator. This procedure resulted in a neutron yield from lead at sea level of 1 . 4 (+/- 1 . 1) ×10-5n/μ (gcm-2)-1 with the typical muon energy at sea level Eμ ~ 4 GeV. We compare this to parameterizations created for underground experimental sites extrapolated up to sea level. NSF funded.

  4. The 3He flux gauge in the Sargasso Sea: a determination of physical nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, R. H. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Doney, S. C.; Lott, D. E., III

    2015-09-01

    Significant rates of primary production occur in the oligotrophic ocean, without any measurable nutrients present in the mixed layer, fueling a scientific paradox that has lasted for decades. Here, we provide a new determination of the annual mean physical supply of nitrate to the euphotic zone in the western subtropical North Atlantic. We combine a 3-year time series of measurements of tritiugenic 3He from 2003 to 2006 in the surface ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site with a sophisticated noble gas calibrated air-sea gas exchange model to constrain the 3He flux across the sea-air interface, which must closely mirror the upward 3He flux into the euphotic zone. The product of the 3He flux and the observed subsurface nitrate-3He relationship provides an estimate of the minimum rate of new production in the BATS region. We also apply the gas model to an earlier time series of 3He measurements at BATS in order to recalculate new production fluxes for the 1985 to 1988 time period. The observations, despite an almost 3-fold difference in the nitrate-3He relationship, yield a roughly consistent estimate of nitrate flux. In particular, the nitrate flux from 2003 to 2006 is estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.14 mol m-2 yr-1, which is ~40 % smaller than the calculated flux for the period from 1985 to 1988. The difference in nitrate flux between the time periods may be signifying a real difference in new production resulting from changes in subtropical mode water formation. Overall, the nitrate flux is larger than most estimates of export fluxes or net community production fluxes made locally for the BATS site, which is likely a reflection of the larger spatial scale covered by the 3He technique and potentially also by the decoupling of 3He and nitrate during the obduction of water masses from the main thermocline into the upper ocean. The upward nitrate flux is certainly large enough to support observed rates of primary production at BATS and more generally

  5. Uncertainty analysis of the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model at multiple flux tower sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingshi; Senay, Gabriel B.; Singh, Ramesh K.; Verdin, James P.

    2016-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the water cycle - ET from the land surface returns approximately 60% of the global precipitation back to the atmosphere. ET also plays an important role in energy transport among the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. Current regional to global and daily to annual ET estimation relies mainly on surface energy balance (SEB) ET models or statistical and empirical methods driven by remote sensing data and various climatological databases. These models have uncertainties due to inevitable input errors, poorly defined parameters, and inadequate model structures. The eddy covariance measurements on water, energy, and carbon fluxes at the AmeriFlux tower sites provide an opportunity to assess the ET modeling uncertainties. In this study, we focused on uncertainty analysis of the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for ET estimation at multiple AmeriFlux tower sites with diverse land cover characteristics and climatic conditions. The 8-day composite 1-km MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) was used as input land surface temperature for the SSEBop algorithms. The other input data were taken from the AmeriFlux database. Results of statistical analysis indicated that the SSEBop model performed well in estimating ET with an R2 of 0.86 between estimated ET and eddy covariance measurements at 42 AmeriFlux tower sites during 2001-2007. It was encouraging to see that the best performance was observed for croplands, where R2 was 0.92 with a root mean square error of 13 mm/month. The uncertainties or random errors from input variables and parameters of the SSEBop model led to monthly ET estimates with relative errors less than 20% across multiple flux tower sites distributed across different biomes. This uncertainty of the SSEBop model lies within the error range of other SEB models, suggesting systematic error or bias of the SSEBop model is within the

  6. Uncertainty analysis of the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model at multiple flux tower sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Mingshi; Senay, Gabriel B.; Singh, Ramesh K.; Verdin, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the water cycle – ET from the land surface returns approximately 60% of the global precipitation back to the atmosphere. ET also plays an important role in energy transport among the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. Current regional to global and daily to annual ET estimation relies mainly on surface energy balance (SEB) ET models or statistical and empirical methods driven by remote sensing data and various climatological databases. These models have uncertainties due to inevitable input errors, poorly defined parameters, and inadequate model structures. The eddy covariance measurements on water, energy, and carbon fluxes at the AmeriFlux tower sites provide an opportunity to assess the ET modeling uncertainties. In this study, we focused on uncertainty analysis of the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for ET estimation at multiple AmeriFlux tower sites with diverse land cover characteristics and climatic conditions. The 8-day composite 1-km MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) was used as input land surface temperature for the SSEBop algorithms. The other input data were taken from the AmeriFlux database. Results of statistical analysis indicated that the SSEBop model performed well in estimating ET with an R2 of 0.86 between estimated ET and eddy covariance measurements at 42 AmeriFlux tower sites during 2001–2007. It was encouraging to see that the best performance was observed for croplands, where R2 was 0.92 with a root mean square error of 13 mm/month. The uncertainties or random errors from input variables and parameters of the SSEBop model led to monthly ET estimates with relative errors less than 20% across multiple flux tower sites distributed across different biomes. This uncertainty of the SSEBop model lies within the error range of other SEB models, suggesting systematic error or bias of the SSEBop model is within

  7. Error Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Aerodynamic Flux Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide volatilization fluxes were calculated for a tarped and a nontarped field using 2 and 4 hour sampling periods. These field measurements were averaged in 8, 12, and 24 hour increments to simulate longer sampling periods. The daily flux profiles were progressively smoothed and the cumulative volatility losses increased by 20 to 30% with each longer sampling period. Error associated with the original flux measurements was determined from linear regressions of measured wind speed and air concentration as a function of height, and averaged approximately 50%. The high errors resulted from long application times, which resulted in a nonuniform source strength; and variable tarp permeability, which is influenced by temperature, moisture, and thickness. The increase in cumulative volatilization losses that resulted from longer sampling periods were within the experimental error of the flux determination method.

  8. Radiant Flux of Near Field in Temperature Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez-Romero, J. G.; Resendiz Barron, A. J.; Farias Arguello, J. O.

    2008-04-15

    In this work we present a calculation of the radiant flux exiting from an object which is at a constant temperature. The flux calculation is based in the propagation model of irradiance and it permit to predict the small variations in measurements of infrared radiation sources when the pyrometer is going far from the source, this variation is known as distance effect. The classical radiometry defines the quantity radiance, which is used in temperature measurements of objects through the infrared radiation they emit. Unfortunately the radiance does not permit to take into account the variations of the radiant flux measured by the pyrometer due to the wave propagation of the radiation given that the radiance definition is based in ray propagation, the geometrical model. Due to the anterior in this work we present a radiant flux calculation using wave model and considering the approximation of the near field or Fresnel approximation. We show experimental results that confirm our proposal.

  9. A simple laboratory system for diffusive radon flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranrod, C.; Chanyotha, S.; Tonlublao, S.; Burnett, W. C.

    2015-05-01

    This study designed a simple, custom-made system to estimate the diffusive radon flux from solid materials (e.g., sediments, soils, building materials). Determination of the radon flux is based on the measurement of the radon activity in the air over time inside a closed loop system. For sediments, the system consists of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight flask connected in a closed loop to a drying system and a radon analyzer (Durridge RAD7). The flux is determined based on an initial slope method in which the slope of radon activities vs. time plot during the first 12 h is evaluated. The slope is then multiplied by the total air volume and divided by the exposed sediment area to obtain the radon flux. The minimal thickness or mass of wet sediment should be about 4 cm or (equivalent to approximately 150 g of wet sediment) to obtain a reliable radon diffusive flux in this study.

  10. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

  11. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  12. Application of an energy balance correction method for turbulent flux measurements based on buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, Wolfgang; Charuchittipan, Doojdao; Zhao, Peng; Biermann, Tobias; Gatzsche, Kathrin; Foken, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The energy imbalance in flux measurements between the atmosphere and the surface is a well-known problem, but unsolved due to the complexity of possible reasons and potential error sources. In order to provide unbiased budgets, however, eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat flux should be corrected according to the closure gap. Recent studies utilising turbulent flux data and LES models suggest that the transport of the missing turbulent flux is triggered by meso-scale circulations, not detected by eddy-covariance measurements within typical averaging intervals of 30 minutes. These motions on longer timescales are driven by buoyancy, suggesting that the missing turbulent flux is a missing buoyancy flux. Based on this assumption we present an energy balance closure correction method according to the buoyancy flux. The effects are compared with the results obtained by the commonly used correction according to the Bowen ratio (Twine et al., Agr. Forest Meteorol., 2000). We show that in general both correction methods could be applied to daytime fluxes and conditions with positive Bowen ratios. Finally the corrected turbulent fluxes are compared with different simulations of SVAT-type models for Tibetan grassland sites and a central European spruce forest site. The model performance with respect to the used data correction method is linked to the different mechanism of closing the energy balance within the model. Model validation requires energy balance closure correction in case the model relies on the energy balance equation. We conclude that mechanistic model development of turbulent flux parameterisations should recognize the recent hypotheses concerning the energy balance closure rather than fitting just to the uncorrected eddy-covariance data.

  13. Radiative flux measurements in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to determine how the stratospheric tropospheric exchange of water vapor is affected by the interaction of solar (visible) and planetary (infrared) radiation with tropical cumulonimbus anvils. This research involves field measurements from the ER-2 aircraft as well as radiative transfer modelling to determine heating and cooling rates and profiles that directly affect the exchange between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

  14. Analysis of actinic flux profiles measured from an ozonesonde balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Allaart, M.; Knap, W. H.; Stammes, P.

    2015-04-01

    A green light sensor has been developed at KNMI to measure actinic flux profiles using an ozonesonde balloon. In total, 63 launches with ascending and descending profiles were performed between 2006 and 2010. The measured uncalibrated actinic flux profiles are analysed using the Doubling-Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer model. Values of the cloud optical thickness (COT) along the flight track were taken from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) product. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux profile is evaluated on the basis of the cloud modification factor (CMF) at the cloud top and cloud base, which is the ratio between the actinic fluxes for cloudy and clear-sky scenes. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux is clearly detected: the largest enhancement occurs at the cloud top due to multiple scattering. The actinic flux decreases almost linearly from cloud top to cloud base. Above the cloud top the actinic flux also increases compared to clear-sky scenes. We find that clouds can increase the actinic flux to 2.3 times the clear-sky value at cloud top and decrease it to about 0.05 at cloud base. The relationship between CMF and COT agrees well with DAK simulations, except for a few outliers. Good agreement is found between the DAK-simulated actinic flux profiles and the observations for single-layer clouds in fully overcast scenes. The instrument is suitable for operational balloon measurements because of its simplicity and low cost. It is worth further developing the instrument and launching it together with atmospheric chemistry composition sensors.

  15. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  16. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  17. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  18. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  19. Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Verma, Shashi B.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Starks, Patrick; Hays, Cynthia; Norman, John M.; Waltershea, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    The primary objectives of the 1985 study were to test the feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations and to evaluate the use of the data collected by the automated weather stations for modeling the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation over wheat. The model Cupid was used to calculate these fluxes which were compared with fluxes of these entities measured using micrometeorological techniques. The primary objectives of the 1986 study were to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams at a few locations within the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) site and to compare modeled and measured latent heat and sensible heat fluxes from the prairie vegetation.

  20. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  1. Key to GHG fluxes from organic soils: site characteristics, agricultural practices or water table management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2015-04-01

    Drained peatlands are hotspots of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Agriculture is the major land use type for peatlands in Germany and other European countries, but strongly varies in its intensity regarding the groundwater level and the agricultural management. Although the mean annual water table depth is sometimes proposed as an overall predictor for GHG emissions, there is a strong variability of its effects on different peatlands. Furthermore, re-wetting measures generally decrease carbon dioxide emissions, but may strongly increase methane emissions. We synthesized 250 annual GHG budgets for 120 different sites in 13 German peatlands. Carbon dioxide (net ecosystem exchange and ecosystem respiration), nitrous oxide and methane fluxes were measured with transparent and opaque manual chambers. Land management ranged from very intensive use with arable land or grassland with up to five cuts per year to partially or completely re-wetted peatlands. Besides the GHG fluxes, biomass yield, fertilisation, groundwater level, climatic data, vegetation composition and soil properties were measured. Overall, we found a large variability of the total GHG budget ranging from small uptakes to extremely high emissions (> 70 t CO2-equivalents/(ha yr)). At nearly all sites, carbon dioxide was the major component of the GHG budget. Site conditions, especially the nitrogen content of the unsaturated zone and the intra-annual water level distribution, controlled the GHG emissions of the agricultural sites. Although these factors are influenced by natural conditions (peat type, regional hydrology), they could be modified by an improved water management. Agricultural management such as the number of cuts had only a minor influence on the GHG budgets. At the level of individual peatlands, higher water levels always decreased carbon dioxide emissions. In nearly all cases, the trade-off between reduced carbon dioxide and increased methane emissions turned out in favour of the re

  2. Estimation of surface heat and moisture fluxes over a prairie grassland. II - Two-dimensional time filtering and site variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosson, William L.; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of in situ measurements of surface fluxes obtained during FIFE 1987 is examined by using correlative and spectral techniques in order to assess the significance of fluctuations on various time scales, from subdiurnal up to synoptic, intraseasonal, and annual scales. The objectives of this analysis are: (1) to determine which temporal scales have a significant impact on areal averaged fluxes and (2) to design a procedure for filtering an extended flux time series that preserves the basic diurnal features and longer time scales while removing high frequency noise that cannot be attributed to site-induced variation. These objectives are accomplished through the use of a two-dimensional cross-time Fourier transform, which serves to separate processes inherently related to diurnal and subdiurnal variability from those which impact flux variations on the longer time scales. A filtering procedure is desirable before the measurements are utilized as input with an experimental biosphere model, to insure that model based intercomparisons at multiple sites are uncontaminated by input variance not related to true site behavior. Analysis of the spectral decomposition indicates that subdiurnal time scales having periods shorter than 6 hours have little site-to-site consistency and therefore little impact on areal integrated fluxes.

  3. Eddy Covariance Flux Measurements of Urban Aerosols During the MILAGRO Mexico City Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivicke, R.; Pressley, S.; Jimenez, J.; Nemitz, E.; Alexander, L.; Velasco, E.; Allwine, E.; Jobson, T.; Westberg, H.; Ramos, R.; Molina, L.; Lamb, B.

    2007-12-01

    Expansive urban development in the fast growing number of megacities around the world raises concerns regarding the pollution levels in such sites. The Mexico City MILAGRO 2006 (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign was a worldwide initiative aiming to understand sources, chemical nature and evolution of pollution in one of the largest urban developments. As part of the MILAGRO campaign, urban fluxes of aerosols and related trace gases were measured near the centre of Mexico City at 42 m above street level. Aerosol concentrations (1 min. averages) and aerosol fluxes (10 Hz, selected ion monitoring) were measured with an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer operated in an alternating 30 minute mode of ambient concentrations and fluxes. The fluxes were derived using eddy covariance calculations. The aerosol flux data were supported by additional flux measurements of CO2 and a number of gas phase VOC species using a combination of techniques, including Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry using a disjunct eddy covariance technique and GC-FID analysis of samples from a disjunct eddy accumulation sampler. Preliminary results of aerosol concentrations and flux measurements indicate that the urban landscape is a significant source of organic aerosols.

  4. Flux measurement and modeling in a typical mediterranean vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, Serena; Bellucco, Veronica; Pyles, David R.; Falk, Matthias; Sirca, Costantino; Duce, Pierpaolo; Snyder, Richard L.; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Vineyard ecosystems are typical in the Mediterranean area, since wine is one of the most important economic sectors. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the interactions between this kind of vegetation and the atmosphere. These information are important both to understand the behaviour of such ecosystems in different environmental conditions, and are crucial to parameterize crop and flux simulation models. Combining direct measurements and modelling can obtain reliable estimates of surface fluxes and crop evapotranspiration. This study would contribute both to (1) directly measure energy fluxes and evapotranspiration in a typical Mediterranean vineyard, located in the South of Sardinia (Italy), through the application of the Eddy Covariance micrometeorological technique and to (2) evaluate the land surface model ACASA (Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm) in simulating energy fluxes and evapotranspiration over vineyard. Independent datasets of direct measurements were used to calibrate and validate model results during the growing period. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate model performance and accuracy in predicting surface fluxes. Results will be showed as well as the model capability to be used for future studies to predict energy fluxes and crop water requirements under actual and future climate.

  5. Effects of vegetative heterogeneity and patch-scale harvest on energy balance closure and flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X. F.; Cai, X. H.; Kang, L.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, H. S.

    2009-05-01

    Based on the micrometeorological measurements at a heterogeneous farmland in South China, this work detects the effects of vegetative heterogeneity and patch-scale harvest on the energy balance closure and turbulent fluxes. As a quality control, the integral turbulent characteristics are analyzed in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Spatial representativeness of the measurements is studied in terms of footprint and source area. Firstly, in two wind sectors, the nondimensional standard deviations of turbulent quantities generally agree with some foregoing studies. Discrepancies exist in the other sectors due to the instrument-induced flow distortion. Secondly, energy balance closure is examined with two types of linear regression, which confirms that mismatching source areas between the available energy and turbulent fluxes have no preference to either energy “deficit” or “surplus”. Thirdly, turbulent fluxes exhibit greater variability when they represent smaller source areas. The patch-scale harvest adjacent to the flux mast causes notable increase and decrease in the sensible heat and latent heat fluxes, respectively, while the CO2 exchange almost vanishes after the harvest. Interestingly, energy balance closure is less influenced despite the notable effects on the turbulent fluxes and Bowen ratio, implying that the energy balance closure check may mask some variability in the turbulent fluxes. Thus, to adjust the heat fluxes with a single “closure factor” for a perfect closure is dangerous at a patchy site.

  6. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  7. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  8. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C; Tibbitts, T; Sager, J; Deitzer, G; Bubenheim, D; Koerner, G; Bugbee, B

    1993-12-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  9. Unsaturated zone carbon dioxide flux, mixing, and isotopic composition at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Haase, K.; Moreo, M. T.; Walvoord, M. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of tritium, radiocarbon, and volatile organic compounds at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site, adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, have stimulated research on factors affecting transport of these contaminants. This research includes an examination of unsaturated zone carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, mixing, and isotopic composition, which can help in understanding these factors. In late April 2015 we collected 76 soil-gas samples in multi-layer foil bags from existing 1.5-m deep tubes, both inside and outside the low-level waste area, as well as from two 110-m-deep multilevel gas-sampling boreholes and a distant background site. These samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide concentration and isotopic composition by direct injection into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Graphical analysis of results indicates mixing of CO2 characteristic of the root zone (δ13C -18 ‰ VPDB), deep soil gas of the capillary fringe (-20‰), and CO2 produced by microbial respiration of organic matter disposed in the waste area trenches (-28‰). Land-surface boundary conditions are being constrained by the application of a novel non-dispersive infrared sensor and traditional concentration and flux measurements, including discrete CO2 flux data using a gas chamber method to complement continuous data from surface- and tower-based CO2 sensors. These results shed light on radionuclide and VOC mobilization and transport mechanisms from this and similar waste disposal facilities.

  10. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Andrew T.; Mankoff, Kenneth D.; Tulaczyk, Slawek M.; Tyler, Scott W.; Foley, Neil

    2015-01-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m2, significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m2. The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region. PMID:26601210

  11. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew T; Mankoff, Kenneth D; Tulaczyk, Slawek M; Tyler, Scott W; Foley, Neil

    2015-07-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m(2), significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m(2). The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region.

  12. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Barr, Jamie L.; Shaw, Joseph A.

    2013-10-01

    We modified our multi-channel, steady-state flow-through (SSFT), soil-CO2 flux monitoring system to include an array of inexpensive pyroelectric non-dispersive infrared detectors for full-range (0-100%) coverage of CO2 concentrations without dilution, and a larger-diameter vent tube. We then conducted field testing of this system from late July through mid-September 2010 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project site located in Bozeman, MT, and subsequently, laboratory testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA using a flux bucket filled with dry sand. In the field, an array of twenty-five SSFT and three non-steady-state (NSS) flux chambers was installed in a 10x4 m area, the long boundary of which was directly above a shallow (2-m depth) horizontal injection well located 0.5 m below the water table. Two additional chambers (one SSFT and one NSS) were installed 10 m from the well for background measurements. Volumetric soil moisture sensors were installed at each SSFT chamber to measure mean levels in the top 0.15 m of soil. A total flux of 52 kg CO2 d-1 was injected into the well for 27 d and the efflux from the soil was monitored by the chambers before, during, and for 27 d after the injection. Overall, the results were consistent with those from previous years, showing a radial efflux pattern centered on a known “hot spot”, rapid responses to changes in injection rate and wind power, evidence for movement of the CO2 plume during the injection, and nominal flux levels from the SSFT chambers that were up to 6-fold higher than those measured by adjacent NSS chambers. Soil moisture levels varied during the experiment from moderate to near saturation with the highest levels occurring consistently at the hot spot. The effects of wind on measured flux were complex and decreased as soil moisture content increased. In the laboratory, flux bucket testing with the SSFT chamber showed large measured-flux enhancement

  13. Flux-based assessment at a manufacturing site contaminated with trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Basu, Nandita B; Rao, P S C; Poyer, Irene C; Annable, M D; Hatfield, K

    2006-06-30

    Groundwater and contaminant fluxes were measured, using the passive flux meter (PFM) technique, in wells along a longitudinal transect passing approximately through the centerline of a trichloroethylene (TCE) plume at a former manufacturing plant located in the Midwestern US. Two distinct zones of hydraulic conductivity were identified from the measured groundwater fluxes; a 6-m-thick upper zone ( approximately 7 m to 13 m below the ground surface or bgs) with a geometric mean Darcy flux (q(0)) of 2 cm/day, and a lower zone ( approximately 13 m to 16.5m bgs) with a q(0) approximately 15 cm/day; this important hydrogeologic feature significantly impacts any remediation technology used at the site. The flux-averaged TCE concentrations estimated from the PFM results compared well with existing groundwater monitoring data. It was estimated that at least 800 kg of TCE was present in the source zone. The TCE mass discharge across the source control plane (85 m x 38 m) was used to estimate the "source strength" ( approximately 365 g/day), while mass discharges across multiple down-gradient control planes were used to estimate the plume-averaged, TCE degradation rate constant (0.52 year(-1)). This is close to the rate estimated using the conventional centerline approach (0.78 year(-1)). The mass discharge approach provides a more robust and representative estimate than the centerline approach since the latter uses only data from wells along the plume centerline while the former uses all wells in the plume.

  14. Field Comparison of Methods for Measuring Soil CO2 Flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of techniques are available for measurement of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux in the field, and each method has inherent advantages and disadvantages. On five dates in October, 2005 we measured soil CO2 emissions in a central Iowa soybean field using: i)eddy covariance, ii)a commercially a...

  15. Estimation of water flux in urban area using eddy covariance measurements in Riverside, Southern California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micrometeorological methods can direct measure the sensible and latent heat flux in specific sites and provide robust estimates of the evaporative fraction (EF), which is the fraction of available surface energy contained in latent heat. Across a vegetation coverage gradient in urban area, an empir...

  16. Direct measurements of CO2 flux in the Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, Siv K.; McGillis, Wade R.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Fairall, C. W.; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Zappa, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    During summer 2006 eddy correlation CO2 fluxes were measured in the Greenland Sea using a novel system set-up with two shrouded LICOR-7500 detectors. One detector was used exclusively to determine, and allow the removal of, the bias on CO2 fluxes due to sensor motion. A recently published correction method for the CO2-H2O cross-correlation was applied to the data set. We show that even with shrouded sensors the data require significant correction due to this cross-correlation. This correction adjusts the average CO2 flux by an order of magnitude from -6.7 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1 to -0.61 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1, making the corrected fluxes comparable to those calculated using established parameterizations for transfer velocity.

  17. A True Eddy Accumulation - Eddy Covariance hybrid for measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is state-of-the-art in directly and continuously measuring turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapor. However, low signal-to-noise ratios, high flow rates and missing or complex gas analyzers limit it's application to few scalars. True eddy accumulation, based on conditional sampling ideas by Desjardins in 1972, requires no fast response analyzers and is therefore potentially applicable to a wider range of scalars. Recently we showed possibly the first successful implementation of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide of a grassland. However, most accumulation systems share the complexity of having to store discrete air samples in physical containers representing entire flux averaging intervals. The current study investigates merging principles of eddy accumulation and eddy covariance, which we here refer to as "true eddy accumulation in transient mode" (TEA-TM). This direct flux method TEA-TM combines true eddy accumulation with continuous sampling. The TEA-TM setup is simpler than discrete accumulation methods while avoiding the need for fast response gas analyzers and high flow rates required for EC. We implemented the proposed TEA-TM method and measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O) above a mixed beech forest at the Hainich Fluxnet and ICOS site, Germany, using a G2301 laser spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA). We further simulated a TEA-TM sampling system using measured high frequency CO2 time series from an open-path gas analyzer. We operated TEA-TM side-by-side with open-, enclosed- and closed-path EC flux systems for CO2, H2O and CH4 (LI-7500, LI-7200, LI-6262, LI-7700, Licor, USA, and FGGA LGR, USA). First results show that TEA-TM CO2 fluxes were similar to EC fluxes. Remaining differences were similar to those between the three eddy covariance setups (open-, enclosed- and closed-path gas analyzers). Measured TEA-TM CO2 fluxes from our physical

  18. Heat flux measurement in a high enthalpy plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Jullien, Pierre; van Ootegem, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    It is a widely used approach to measure heat flux in harsh environments like high enthalpy plasma flows, fusion plasma and rocket motor combustion chambers based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite environment. This approach strongly depends on model parameters and geometrical aspects of the sensor design. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using an identified system as a direct model. The identification of the system is performed using calibration measurements with modern laser technique and advanced data handling. The results of the identified thermo-physical system show that a non-integer model appears most adapted to this particular problem. It is concluded that the new method improves the heat flux sensor significantly and furthermore extend its application to very short measurement times.

  19. Continuous measurements of methane flux in two Japanese temperate forests based on the micrometeorological and chamber methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ueyama, M.; Takagi, K.; Kominami, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) budget in forest ecosystems have not been accurately quantified due to limited measurements and considerable spatiotemporal heterogeneity. In order to quantify CH4 fluxes at temperate forest at various spatiotemporal scales, we have continuously measured CH4 fluxes at two upland forests based on the micrometeorological hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) and automated dynamic closed chamber methods.The measurements have been conducted at Teshio experimental forest (TSE) since September 2013 and Yamashiro forest meteorology research site (YMS) since November 2014. Three automated chambers were installed on each site. Our system can measure CH4 flux by the micrometeorological HREA, vertical concentration profile at four heights, and chamber measurements by a laser-based gas analyzer (FGGA-24r-EP, Los Gatos Research Inc., USA).Seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes were different in each site. CH4 was consumed during the summer, but was emitted during the fall and winter in TSE; consequently, the site acted as a net annual CH4 source. CH4 was steadily consumed during the winter, but CH4 fluxes fluctuated between absorption and emission during the spring and summer in YMS. YMS acted as a net annual CH4 sink. CH4 uptake at the canopy scale generally decreased with rising soil temperature and increased with drying condition for both sites. CH4 flux measured by most of chambers showed the consistent sensitivity examined for the canopy scale to the environmental variables. CH4 fluxes from a few chambers located at a wet condition were independent of variations in soil temperature and moisture at both sites. Magnitude of soil CH4 uptake was higher than the canopy-scale CH4 uptake. Our results showed that the canopy-scale CH4 fluxes were totally different with the plot-scale CH4 fluxes by chambers, suggesting the considerable spatial heterogeneity in CH4 flux at the temperate forests.

  20. Annual and latitudinal variations of surface fluxes and meteorological variables at Arctic terrestrial sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Konopleva-Akish, Elena; Crepinsek, Sara; Cox, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Makshtas, Alexander; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzes and discusses seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface fluxes (turbulent, radiative, and soil ground heat) and other ancillary surface/snow/permafrost data based on in-situ measurements made at two long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in Canada and Russia. The hourly averaged data collected at Eureka (Canadian territory of Nunavut) and Tiksi (East Siberia) located at two quite different latitudes (80.0 N and 71.6 N respectively) are analyzed in details to describe the seasons in the Arctic. Although Eureka and Tiksi are located at the different continents and at the different latitudes, the annual course of the surface meteorology and the surface fluxes are qualitatively very similar. The air and soil temperatures display the familiar strong seasonal trend with maximum of measured temperatures in mid-summer and minimum during winter. According to our data, variation in incoming short-wave solar radiation led the seasonal pattern of the air and soil temperatures, and the turbulent fluxes. During the dark Polar nights, air and ground temperatures are strongly controlled by long-wave radiation associated generally with cloud cover. Due to the fact that in average the higher latitudes receive less solar radiation than lower latitudes, a length of the convective atmospheric boundary layer (warm season) is shorter and middle-summer amplitude of the turbulent fluxes is generally less in Eureka than in Tiksi. However, since solar elevation angle at local midnight in the middle of Arctic summer is higher for Eureka as compared to Tiksi, stable stratification and upward turbulent flux for carbon dioxide is generally did not observed at Eureka site during summer seasons. It was found a high correlation between the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide and the net solar radiation. A comprehensive evaluation of energy balance closure problem is performed based on the multi-year data sets

  1. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in arc jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes were developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes were constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies. The temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its time rate of change gives the steady-state absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. Design, construction, test, and performance data are presented.

  2. High heat flux measurements and experimental calibrations/characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in techniques employed in the measurement of very high heat-transfer rates in reentry-type facilities at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is described. These advances include thermal analyses applied to transducer concepts used to make these measurements; improved heat-flux sensor fabrication methods, equipment, and procedures for determining the experimental time response of individual sensors; performance of absolute heat-flux calibrations at levels above 2,000 Btu/cu ft-sec (2.27 kW/cu cm); and innovative methods of performing in-situ run-to-run characterizations of heat-flux probes installed in the test facility. Graphical illustrations of the results of extensive thermal analyses of the null-point calorimeter and coaxial surface thermocouple concepts with application to measurements in aerothermal test environments are presented. Results of time response experiments and absolute calibrations of null-point calorimeters and coaxial thermocouples performed in the laboratory at intermediate to high heat-flux levels are shown. Typical AEDC high-enthalpy arc heater heat-flux data recently obtained with a Calspan-fabricated null-point probe model are included.

  3. Aerosol flux measurements above a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K.

    2010-10-01

    Aerosol fluxes were measured above a mixed forest by Eddy Covariance (EC) with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) at the Borden Forest Research Station in Ontario, Canada between 13 July and 12 August 2009. The FMPS, mounted at a height of 33 m (approximately 10 m above the canopy top) and housed in a temperature controlled enclosure, measured size-resolved particle concentrations for 3 to 410 nm at a rate of 1 Hz. For the size range 20fluxes were upward. The exchange velocity is between -0.5 and 2.0 mm s-1, with median values near 0.5 mm s-1 for all sizes between 24 and 280 nm. The net production rate of particles is highest for 75 nm particles and is near 0.4×106 m-2 s-1. Results indicate a decoupling of the above and below canopy spaces, whereby particles are stored in the canopy space at night, and are then diluted with cleaner air above during the day. Chemically speciated flux measurements from a previous study at the same location using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS) demonstrate a tendency towards downward fluxes, which may be due to an organic particle component which can not be resolved by the flux mode of the Q-AMS.

  4. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  5. Seasonality of Overstory and Understory Fluxes in a Semi-Arid Oak Savanna: What can be Learned from Comparing Measured and Modeled Fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz-Yaseef, N.; Sonnentag, O.; Kobayashi, H.; Chen, J. M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Semi-arid climates experience large seasonal and inter-annual variability in radiation and precipitation, creating natural conditions adequate to study how year-to-year changes affect atmosphere-biosphere fluxes. Especially, savanna ecosystems, that combine tree and below-canopy components, create a unique environment in which phenology dramatically changes between seasons. We used a 10-year flux database in order to define seasonal and interannual variability of climatic inputs and fluxes, and evaluate model capability to reproduce observed variability. This is based on the perception that model capability to construct the deviation, and not the average, is important in order to correctly predict ecosystem sensitivity to climate change. Our research site is a low density and low LAI (0.8) semi-arid savanna, located at Tonzi Ranch, Northern California. In this system, trees are active during the warm season (Mar - Oct), and grasses are active during the wet season (Dec - May). Measurements of carbon and water fluxes above and below the tree canopy using eddy covariance and supplementary measurements have been made since 2001. Fluxes were simulated using bio-meteorological process-oriented ecosystem models: BEPS and 3D-CAONAK. Models were partly capable of reproducing fluxes on daily scales (R2=0.66). We then compared model outputs for different ecosystem components and seasons, and found distinct seasons with high correlations while other seasons were purely represented. Comparison was much higher for ET than for GPP. The understory was better simulated than the overstory. CANOAK overestimated spring understory fluxes, probably due to the capability to directly calculated 3D radiative transfer. BEPS underestimated spring understory fluxes, following the pre-description of grass die-off. Both models underestimated peak spring overstory fluxes. During winter tree dormant, modeled fluxes were null, but occasional high fluxes of both ET and GPP were measured following

  6. Identifying and Managing Data Validity Challenges with Automated Data Checks in the AmeriFlux Flux Measurement Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Pastorello, G.; Papale, D.; Trotta, C.; Ribeca, A.; Canfora, E.; Faybishenko, B.; Samak, T.; Gunter, D.; Hollowgrass, R.; Agarwal, D.

    2014-12-01

    AmeriFlux is a network of sites managed by independent investigators measuring carbon, water and heat fluxes. Individual investigators perform many data validity checks. Network-level data validity checks are also being applied to increase network-wide data consistency. A number of different types or errors occur in flux data, and while corrections have been developed to address some types of errors, other error types can be difficult to detect. To identify errors rapidly and consistently, we have developed automated data validity checks that rely on theoretical limits or relationships for specific measured variables. We present an example of a data validity check that is being developed for the friction velocity u*. The friction velocity is a crucial variable used to identify when low turbulent mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer invalidates eddy covariance measurements of fluxes. It is measured via sonic anemometer and is related to the wind speed WS, the measurement height relative to the canopy height, and the surface roughness, through the log law. Comparing independent measurements of WS and u* can help identify issues related to the sensor but doesn't take into consideration changes in the canopy (e.g. due to leaf emergence). The u* data check proposed relies on recent work comparing multiple methods for determining the aerodynamic roughness length z0 and zero plane displacement d (Graf, A., A. van de Boer, A. Moene & H. Vereecken, 2014, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 151, 373-387). These methods, each of which is most robust across a different atmospheric stability range, yield multiple estimates for z0 and d at daily resolution. We use these multiple estimates for z0 and d, as well as half-hourly wind speeds and Obukhov length scales and their uncertainties to generate a predicted u* and a tolerance around this predicted value. In testing, this check correctly identified as invalid u* data known to be erroneous but did not flag data that could look

  7. Thermal neutron flux measurements in the STAR experimental hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisyak, Yuri; Tsai, Oleg; Videbæk, Flemming; Xu, Zhangbu

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of thermal neutron fluxes at different locations in the STAR experimental hall during RHIC Run 13 with proton-proton collisions at √{s}=510 GeV. We compare these measurements to calculations based on PYTHIA as a minimum bias event generator, detailed GEANT3 simulation of the STAR detector and experimental hall, and with GCALOR as the neutron transport code. A fairly good agreement was found between simulation and measurements.

  8. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  9. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux frommore » 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  10. Testing the Need for Replication of Eddy Covariance Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over Agricultural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. M.; Amiro, B. D.; Gervais, M.

    2015-12-01

    The eddy covariance method directly measures carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes for long periods of time and with footprints up to hundreds of meters in size. Any ecosystem process that alters how gases and energy move between the atmosphere and soil/vegetation can affect these fluxes. Eddy covariance is vulnerable to systematic errors and uncertainy, particular through relying on assumptions about surface characteristics. Additionally, spatial variation within a site can cause more uncertainty in these measurements and lack of replication in many eddy covariance studies makes statistical analysis of carbon fluxes challenging. We tested if there are significant differences between co-located and simultaneous CO2 flux measurements over a uniform crop surface, and if the differences increase if we measure different flux footprint areas over the same field. During the summer of 2014, three matched instrumented 2.5-m high towers were co-located and then periodically separated by moving at 50 m intervals along a north-south transect on an alfalfa/trefoil field and a spring wheat field in Southern Manitoba, Canada to compare CO­2 fluxes. Georeferenced leaf area index measurements were taken in 50 m grid of each field to establish uniformity of the source/sink within a footprint. Diurnal differences of similar magnitude in the CO2 ­fluxes were found in both the co-located experiment and the spatially separated intervals. Despite rigorous calibration during the experiment, some differences were caused by the measurement systems rather than by variation within the field. Interpretation of the spatial variation in leaf area index is being used to determine the contribution caused by difference in source/sink contributions to the flux footprint areas when the towers were spatially separated.

  11. Evaluation of laser absorption spectroscopic techniques for eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, James D; Twigg, Marsailidh; Famulari, Daniela; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A; Gallagher, Martin W; Fowler, David

    2008-03-15

    An intercomparison was made between eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and a lead-salt tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The measurements took place in September 2004 and again in April 2005 over a managed grassland site in Southern Scotland, U.K. These were also compared with a flux estimate derived from an "Ammonia Measurement by ANnular Denuder with online Analysis" (AMANDA), using the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM). The concentration and flux measurements from the QCLAS correlated well with those of the TDLAS and the AGM systems when emissions were high, following slurry application to the field. Both the QCLAS and TDLAS, however, underestimated the flux when compared with the AMANDA system, by 64%. A flux loss of 41% due to chemical reaction of ammonia in the QCLAS (and 37% in the TDLAS) sample tube walls was identified and characterized using laboratory tests but did not fully accountforthis difference. Recognizing these uncertainties, the agreement between the systems was nevertheless very close (R2 = 0.95 between the QCLAS and the TDLAS; R2 = 0.84 between the QCLAS and the AMANDA) demonstrating the suitability of the laser absorption methods for quantifying the temporal dynamics of ammonia fluxes.

  12. CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.; Johnson, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

  13. AmeriFlux US-IB1 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Agricultural site)

    SciTech Connect

    Matamala, Roser

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-IB1 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Agricultural site). Site Description - Two eddy correlation systems are installed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory: one on a restored prairie (established October 2004) and one on a corn/soybean rotation agricultural field (established in July 2005). The prairie site had been farmed for more than 100 years, but was converted to prairie in 1989. The agricultural site has likely been farmed for more than 100 years, but the first documented instance of agricultural activity dates back to a picture taken in 1952.

  14. AmeriFlux US-Bn1 Bonanza Creek, 1920 Burn site near Delta Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Randerson, James

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bn1 Bonanza Creek, 1920 Burn site near Delta Junction. Site Description - The Delta Junction 1920 Control site is located near Delta Junction, just to the north of the Alaska Range in interior Alaska. All three Delta Junction sites are within a 15-km radius of one another. Composed of a combination of alluvial outwashes, floodplains, and low terraces dissected by glacial streams originating in the nearby Alaska Range. In 2001, total aboveground biomass consisted almost entirely of black spruce (Picea mariana).

  15. SO2 flux measurements at Mount Etna (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Caltabiano, T.; Romano, R.; Budetta, G.

    1994-06-01

    Since 1987, over 220 measurements of the SO2 flux at Mount Etna have been carried out using a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) with different measuring techniques (mainly with COSPEC mounted on ground-based vehicle). This paper reports and analyzes the data obtained between October 1987 and December 1991. During this period, three distinct time intervals characterized by particular SO2 emission patterns were identified. The first interval (A) showed a mean SO2 flux of 5500 t/d associated with relatively quiet summit crater eruptive activity. The second interval (B) included two eruptive periods, September-October 1989 and January-February 1990, associated with high fluxes reaching 10,000-25,000 t/d. The third interval (C) started in concert with a regional earthquake (December 13, 1990) and showed first a decrease and then an increase of SO2 emissions before the onset of the major 1991-1993 flank eruption. Analysis of the data reveals a cyclic pattern to the SO2 emissions over prolonged periods; a nearly constant supply of SO2 from the volcano`s main feeder system, especially evident in the long term; a two- to fivefold increase above mean flux values (from 10,000 to 25,000 t/d) when occurring with paroxysmal eruptive activity; and minimal flux values (approximately 1000 t/d) about 1 month prior to important eruptive events.

  16. Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

  17. Long-term micrometeorological measurements of nitrous oxide fluxes from agro-ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Riddle, C.; Brown, S.; Snider, D.

    2013-12-01

    Year-round measurements of nitrous oxide fluxes are needed in order to better characterize emissions from agro-ecosystems, and devise mitigation strategies for emission reduction. This is particularly the case for agroecosystems in cold regions where freezing and thawing of soil often results in enhanced fluxes. In addition, nitrogen fertilizer application at crop planting in the spring will also result in emission events with high temporal variability. Micrometeorological methods do not interfere with soil conditions and hence, can be used quasi-continuously (at hourly to half-hourly intervals) to capture the highly intermittent nature of N2O emission episodes. Simultaneous flux measurements on multiple plots is desirable so that the effect of soil management practices on N2O emissions can be characterized. We have conducted several studies deploying the flux-gradient technique to measure surface N2O fluxes at a long-term in Elora, ON, Canada, a site established in 2000 with the objective of improving our understanding of how management affects N2O emissions. The experimental area consists of four 1.5-4 ha plots within a level and aerodynamically homogeneous 30-ha area, and half-hourly flux is measured sequentially providing up to 12 values per plot per day. A total of 521 monthly N2O emission rates were measured over the 2000-2013 period for a range of crops (e.g. soybeans, corn, wheat) and management (e.g. no-tillage, conventional). The aggregated analysis shows that extreme flux events tend to be concentrated in February/March and May/Jun/Jul (Fig. 1). The main thaw events tend to occur in February and March, and they events contribute on average 30% to the annual nitrous oxide emission total. Timely rains after fertilizer application at crop planting in May provide high soil water content for denitrification to take place and also lead to high emission events. Sixty-six percent of the annual emission occurred from Jan to Jun on average at this site. Emissions

  18. BOREAS TE-6 NPP For The Tower Flux, Carbon Evaluation, and Auxiliary Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Gower, Stith T.; Vogel, Jason G.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-6 team collected several data sets to examine the influence of vegetation, climate, and their interactions on the major carbon fluxes for boreal forest species. This data set contains estimates of the biomass produced by the plant species at the TF, CEV, and AUX sites in the SSA and NSA for a given year. Temporally, the data cover the years of 1985 to 1995. The plant biomass production (i.e., aboveground, belowground, understory, litterfall), spatial coverage, and temporal nature of measurements varied between the TF, CEV, and AUX sites as deemed necessary by BOREAS principal investigators. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. Evapotranspiration: Mass balance measurements compared with flux estimation methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be measured by mass balance methods and estimated by flux sensing methods. The mass balance methods are typically restricted in terms of the area that can be represented (e.g., surface area of weighing lysimeter (LYS) or equivalent representative area of neutron probe (NP...

  20. Some Recent Secondary Production Measurements for Neutrino Flux Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Geoffrey B.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements of meson production in proton-nucleus interactions have made possible reliable neutrino flux determinations at modern neutrino experiments. This article discusses preliminary results from the HARP, MIP, and E910 are discussed along with some of their implications for the MINOS, K2K, and MiniBooNE neutrino experiments.

  1. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2013-06-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analyzers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and season-long performance were not assessed. The open-path gas analyzer is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, whereas for G1301-f methane measurements interference from water vapor is straightforward to correct since the instrument measures both gases simultaneously. In any case, if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyzer is needed.

  2. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  3. Combining two complementary micrometeorological methods to measure CH4 and N2O fluxes over pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Johannes; Barthel, Matti; Fraser, Anitra; Hunt, John E.; Griffith, David W. T.

    2016-03-01

    New Zealand's largest industrial sector is pastoral agriculture, giving rise to a large fraction of the country's emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). We designed a system to continuously measure CH4 and N2O fluxes at the field scale on two adjacent pastures that differed with respect to management. At the core of this system was a closed-cell Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, which measured the mole fractions of CH4, N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2) at two heights at each site. In parallel, CO2 fluxes were measured using eddy-covariance instrumentation. We applied two different micrometeorological ratio methods to infer the CH4 and N2O fluxes from their respective mole fractions and the CO2 fluxes. The first is a variant of the flux-gradient method, where it is assumed that the turbulent diffusivities of CH4 and N2O equal that of CO2. This method was reliable when the CO2 mole-fraction difference between heights was at least 4 times greater than the FTIR's resolution of differences. For the second method, the temporal increases of mole fractions in the stable nocturnal boundary layer, which are correlated for concurrently emitted gases, are used to infer the unknown fluxes of CH4 and N2O from the known flux of CO2. This method was sensitive to "contamination" from trace gas sources other than the pasture of interest and therefore required careful filtering. With both methods combined, estimates of mean daily CH4 and N2O fluxes were obtained for 56 % of days at one site and 73 % at the other. Both methods indicated both sites as net sources of CH4 and N2O. Mean emission rates for 1 year at the unfertilised, winter-grazed site were 8.9 (±0.79) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.38 (±0.018) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. During the same year, mean emission rates at the irrigated, fertilised and rotationally grazed site were 8.9 (±0.79) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.58 (±0.020) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. At this site, the N2O emissions amounted to 1.21 (±0.15) % of the nitrogen

  4. Combining two complementary micrometeorological methods to measure CH4 and N2O fluxes over pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, J.; Barthel, M.; Fraser, A.; Hunt, J. E.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    2015-09-01

    New Zealand's largest industrial sector is pastoral agriculture, giving rise to a large fraction of the country's emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). We designed a system to continuously measure CH4 and N2O fluxes at the field scale on two adjacent pastures that differed with respect to management. At the core of this system was a closed-cell Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), measuring the mole fractions of CH4, N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2) at two heights at each site. In parallel, CO2 fluxes were measured using eddy-covariance instrumentation. We applied two different micrometeorological ratio methods to infer the CH4 and N2O fluxes from their respective mole fractions and the CO2 fluxes. The first is a variant of the flux-gradient method, where it is assumed that the turbulent diffusivities of CH4 and N2O equal that of CO2. This method was reliable when the CO2 mole-fraction difference between heights was at least 4 times greater than the FTIR's resolution of differences. For the second method, the temporal increases of mole fractions in the stable nocturnal boundary layer, which are correlated for concurrently-emitted gases, are used to infer the unknown fluxes of CH4 and N2O from the known flux of CO2. This method was sensitive to "contamination" from trace gas sources other than the pasture of interest and therefore required careful filtering. With both methods combined, estimates of mean daily CH4 and N2O fluxes were obtained for 60 % of days at one site and 77 % at the other. Both methods indicated both sites as net sources of CH4 and N2O. Mean emission rates for one year at the unfertilised, winter-grazed site were 8.2 (± 0.91) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.40 (± 0.018) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. During the same year, mean emission rates at the irrigated, fertilised and rotationally-grazed site were 7.0 (± 0.89) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.57 (± 0.019) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. At this site, the N2O emissions amounted to 1.19 (± 0.15) % of the

  5. Infrared Camera Diagnostic for Heat Flux Measurements on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mastrovito; R. Maingi; H.W. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore

    2003-03-25

    An infrared imaging system has been installed on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure the surface temperatures on the lower divertor and center stack. The imaging system is based on an Indigo Alpha 160 x 128 microbolometer camera with 12 bits/pixel operating in the 7-13 {micro}m range with a 30 Hz frame rate and a dynamic temperature range of 0-700 degrees C. From these data and knowledge of graphite thermal properties, the heat flux is derived with a classic one-dimensional conduction model. Preliminary results of heat flux scaling are reported.

  6. Advances in Air-Sea Flux Measurement by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Edson, James B.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; McGillis, Wade R.

    2014-09-01

    Eddy-correlation measurements of the oceanic flux are useful for the development and validation of air-sea gas exchange models and for analysis of the marine carbon cycle. Results from more than a decade of published work and from two recent field programs illustrate the principal interferences from water vapour and motion, demonstrating experimental approaches for improving measurement precision and accuracy. Water vapour cross-sensitivity is the greatest source of error for flux measurements using infrared gas analyzers, often leading to a ten-fold bias in the measured flux. Much of this error is not related to optical contamination, as previously supposed. While various correction schemes have been demonstrated, the use of an air dryer and closed-path analyzer is the most effective way to eliminate this interference. This approach also obviates density corrections described by Webb et al. (Q J R Meteorol 106:85-100, 1980). Signal lag and frequency response are a concern with closed-path systems, but periodic gas pulses at the inlet tip provide for precise determination of lag time and frequency attenuation. Flux attenuation corrections are shown to be 5 % for a cavity ring-down analyzer (CRDS) and dryer with a 60-m inlet line. The estimated flux detection limit for the CRDS analyzer and dryer is a factor of ten better than for IRGAs sampling moist air. While ship-motion interference is apparent with all analyzers tested in this study, decorrelation or regression methods are effective in removing most of this bias from IRGA measurements and may also be applicable to the CRDS.

  7. Ultra High Precision Laser Monitor for Oxygen Eddy Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David; Herndon, Scott; McManus, Barry; Roscioli, Rob; Jervis, Dylan; Zahniser, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric oxygen provides one of the most powerful tracers to study the carbon cycle through its close interaction with carbon dioxide. Keeling and co-workers demonstrated this at the global scale by using small variations in atmospheric oxygen content to disentangle oceanic and terrestrial carbon sinks. It would be very exciting to apply similar ideas at the ecosystem level to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and our ability to predict the response of the biosphere and atmosphere to climate change. The eddy covariance technique is perhaps the most effective approach available to quantify the exchange of gases between these spheres. Therefore, eddy covariance flux measurements of oxygen would be extremely valuable. However, this requires a fast response (0.1 seconds), high relative precision (0.001% or 10 per meg) oxygen sensor. We report recent progress in developing such a sensor using a high resolution visible laser to probe the oxygen A-band electronic transition. We have demonstrated precision of 1 ppmv or 5 per meg for a 100 second measurement duration. This sensor will enable oxygen flux measurements using eddy covariance. In addition, we will incorporate a second laser in this instrument to simultaneously determine the fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor within the same sampling cell. This will provide a direct, real time measurement of the ratio of the flux of oxygen to that of carbon dioxide. This ratio is expected to vary on short time scales and small spatial scales due to the differing stoichiometry of processes producing and consuming carbon dioxide. Thus measuring the variations in the ratio of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluxes will provide mechanistic information to improve our understanding of the crucial exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere.

  8. CO2-flux measurements above the Baltic Sea at two heights: flux gradients in the surface layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, A.; Ament, F.

    2015-11-01

    The estimation of CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere is essential to understand the global carbon cycle. The eddy-covariance technique offers a very direct approach to observe these fluxes. The turbulent CO2 flux is measured, as well as the sensible and latent heat flux and the momentum flux, a few meters above the ocean in the atmosphere. Assuming a constant-flux layer in the near-surface part of the atmospheric boundary layer, this flux equals the exchange flux between ocean and atmosphere. The purpose of this paper is the comparison of long-term flux measurements at two different heights above the Baltic Sea to investigate this assumption. The results are based on a 1.5-year record of quality-controlled eddy-covariance measurements. Concerning the flux of momentum and of sensible and latent heat, the constant-flux layer theory can be confirmed because flux differences between the two heights are insignificantly small more than 95 % of the time. In contrast, significant differences, which are larger than the measurement error, occur in the CO2 flux about 35 % of the time. Data used for this paper are published at http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.808714.

  9. CO2-flux measurements above the Baltic Sea at two heights: flux gradients in the surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, A.; Ament, F.

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere is essential to understand the global carbon cycle. The eddy-covariance technique offers a very direct approach to observe these fluxes. The turbulent CO2 flux is measured as well as the sensible and latent heat flux and the momentum flux, a few meters above the ocean in the atmosphere. Assuming a constant-flux layer in the near surface part of the atmospheric boundary, this flux equals the exchange flux between ocean and atmosphere. The goal of this paper is the comparison of long-term flux measurements at two different heights above the Baltic Sea due to this assumption. The results are based on an one-and-a-half year record of quality controlled eddy covariance measurements. Concerning the flux of momentum and of sensible and latent heat, the constant-flux layer theory can be validated because flux gradients between the two heights are more than 95 % of the time insignificantly small. In contrast, significant gradients, which are larger than the measurement error, occur for the CO2 flux in nearly 35 % of the time. Data, used for this paper are published at http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.808714.

  10. High-Fidelity Measurements of Long-Lived Flux Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hover, David; Macklin, Chris; O'Brien, Kevin; Sears, Adam; Yoder, Jonilyn; Gudmundsen, Ted; Kerman, Jamie; Bolkhovsky, Vladimir; Tolpygo, Sergey; Fitch, George; Weir, Terry; Kamal, Archana; Gustavsson, Simon; Yan, Fei; Birenbaum, Jeff; Siddiqi, Irfan; Orlando, Terry; Clarke, John; Oliver, Will

    2015-03-01

    We report on high-fidelity dispersive measurements of a long-lived flux qubit using a Josephson superconducting traveling wave parametric amplifier (JTWPA). A capacitively shunted flux qubit that incorporates high-Q MBE aluminum will have longer relaxation and dephasing times when compared to a conventional flux qubit, while also maintaining the large anharmonicity necessary for complex gate operations. The JTWPA relies on a Josephson junction embedded transmission line to deliver broadband, nonreciprocal gain with large dynamic range. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA); and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. All statements of fact, opinion or conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as representing the official views or policies of

  11. Ecosystem photosynthesis inferred from measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaf, David; Rotenberg, Eyal; Tatarinov, Fyodor; Dicken, Uri; Montzka, Stephen A.; Yakir, Dan

    2013-03-01

    Limited understanding of carbon dioxide sinks and sources on land is often linked to the inability to distinguish between the carbon dioxide taken up by photosynthesis, and that released by respiration. Carbonyl sulphide, a sulphur-containing analogue of carbon dioxide, is also taken up by plants, and could potentially serve as a powerful proxy for photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake, which cannot be directly measured above the leaf scale. Indeed, variations in atmospheric concentrations of carbonyl sulphide are closely related to those of carbon dioxide at regional, local and leaf scales. Here, we use eddy covariance and laser spectroscopy to estimate the net exchange of carbon dioxide and carbonyl sulphide across three pine forests, a cotton field and a wheat field in Israel. We estimate gross primary productivity--a measure of ecosystem photosynthesis--directly from the carbonyl sulphide fluxes, and indirectly from carbon dioxide fluxes. The two estimates agree within an error of +/-15%. The ratio of carbonyl sulphide to carbon dioxide flux at the ecosystem scale was consistent with the variability in mixing ratios observed on seasonal timescales in the background atmosphere. We suggest that atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux could provide an independent constraint on estimates of gross primary productivity, key to projecting the response of the land biosphere to climate change.

  12. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within  ±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  13. Ultra High Precision Laser Monitor for Oxygen Eddy Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahniser, M. S.; Nelson, D. D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Herndon, S. C.; McManus, J. B.; Jervis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric oxygen provides one of the most powerful tracers to study the carbon cycle through its close interaction with carbon dioxide. Keeling and co-workers demonstrated this at the global scale by using small variations in atmospheric oxygen content to disentangle oceanic and terrestrial carbon sinks. It would be very exciting to apply similar ideas at the ecosystem level to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and our ability to predict the response of the biosphere and atmosphere to climate change. The eddy covariance technique is perhaps the most effective approach available to quantify the exchange of gases between these spheres. Therefore, eddy covariance flux measurements of oxygen would be extremely valuable. However, this requires a fast response (0.1 seconds), high relative precision (0.001% or 10 per meg) oxygen sensor. We report recent progress in developing such a sensor using a high resolution visible laser to probe the oxygen A-band electronic transition. This sensor will enable oxygen flux measurements using eddy covariance. In addition, we will incorporate a second laser in this instrument to simultaneously determine the fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor within the same sampling cell. This will provide a direct, real time measurement of the ratio of the flux of oxygen to that of carbon dioxide. This ratio is expected to vary on short time scales and small spatial scales due to the differing stoichiometry of processes producing and consuming carbon dioxide. Thus measuring the variations in the ratio of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluxes will provide mechanistic information to improve our understanding of the crucial exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere.

  14. Understanding the representativeness of FLUXNET for upscaling carbon flux from eddy covariance measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Hargrove, William W.; Collier, Nathan

    2016-08-23

    Eddy covariance data from regional flux networks are direct in situ measurement of carbon, water, and energy fluxes and are of vital importance for understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of the the global carbon cycle. FLUXNET links regional networks of eddy covariance sites across the globe to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of fluxes at regional to global scales and to detect emergent ecosystem properties. This study presents an assessment of the representativeness of FLUXNET based on the recently released FLUXNET2015 data set. We present a detailed high resolution analysis of the evolving representativeness of FLUXNET through time. Results providemore » quantitative insights into the extent that various biomes are sampled by the network of networks, the role of the spatial distribution of the sites on the network scale representativeness at any given time, and how that representativeness has changed through time due to changing operational status and data availability at sites in the network. To realize the full potential of FLUXNET observations for understanding emergent ecosystem properties at regional and global scales, we present an approach for upscaling eddy covariance measurements. Informed by the representativeness of observations at the flux sites in the network, the upscaled data reflects the spatio-temporal dynamics of the carbon cycle captured by the in situ measurements. In conclusion, this study presents a method for optimal use of the rich point measurements from FLUXNET to derive an understanding of upscaled carbon fluxes, which can be routinely updated as new data become available, and direct network expansion by identifying regions poorly sampled by the current network.« less

  15. A comparative study between the fluxes of trace elements in bulk atmospheric deposition at industrial, urban, traffic, and rural sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmo, I; Puente, M; Irabien, A

    2015-09-01

    The input of trace elements via atmospheric deposition towards industrial, urban, traffic, and rural areas is quite different and depends on the intensity of the anthropogenic activity. A comparative study between the element deposition fluxes in four sampling sites (industrial, urban, traffic, and rural) of the Cantabria region (northern Spain) has been performed. Sampling was carried out monthly using a bulk (funnel bottle) sampler. The trace elements, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti, Zn, and V, were determined in the water soluble and insoluble fractions of bulk deposition samples. The element deposition fluxes at the rural, urban, and traffic sites followed a similar order (Zn > Mn> > Cu ≈ Ti > Pb > V ≈ Cr > Ni> > As ≈ Mo > Cd). The most enriched elements were Cd, Zn, and Cu, while V, Ni, and Cr were less enriched. An extremely high deposition of Mn was found at the industrial site, leading to high enrichment factor values, resulting from the presence of a ferro-manganese/silico-manganese production plant in the vicinity of the sampling site. Important differences were found in the element solubilities in the studied sites; the element solubilities were higher at the traffic and rural sites, and lower at the urban and industrial sites. For all sites, Zn and Cd were the most soluble elements, whereas Cr and Ti were less soluble. The inter-site correlation coefficients for each element were calculated to assess the differences between the sites. The rural and traffic sites showed some similarities in the sources of trace elements; however, the sources of these elements at the industrial and rural sites were quite different. Additionally, the element fluxes measured in the insoluble fraction of the bulk atmospheric deposition exhibited a good correlation with the daily traffic volume at the traffic site.

  16. AmeriFlux US-IB2 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Prairie site)

    SciTech Connect

    Matamala, Roser

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-IB2 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Prairie site). Site Description - Two eddy correlation systems are installed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory: one on a restored prairie (established October 2004) and one on a corn/soybean rotation agricultural field (established in July 2005). The prairie site had been farmed for more than 100 years, but was converted to prairie in 1989. April annual to bi-annual prescribed burns have taken place from 1994 - 2007.

  17. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, the US-ARb plot was burned on 2005/03/08. The second plot, US-ARc, was left unburned as the control for experimental purposes. Aside from 2005, the region evaded burning activities for at least 15 years. Current disturbances consist of only light grazing activities.

  18. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analysers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2012-12-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analysers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and long-term performance were not assessed. Prototype-7700 is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, however if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyser is needed.

  19. Observed and modeled carbon and energy fluxes for agricultural sites under North American Carbon Program site-level interim synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokupitiya, E. Y.; Denning, A.

    2010-12-01

    Croplands are unique, man-made ecosystems with dynamics mostly dependent on human decisions. Crops uptake a significant amount of Carbon dioxide (CO2) during their short growing seasons. Reliability of the available models to predict the carbon exchanges by croplands is important in estimating the cropland contribution towards overall land-atmosphere carbon exchange and global carbon cycle. The energy exchanges from croplands include both sensible and latent heat fluxes. This study focuses on analyzing the performance of 19 land surface models across five agricultural sites under the site-level interim synthesis of North American Carbon Program (NACP). Model simulations were performed using a common simulation protocol and input data, including gap-filled meteorological data corresponding to each site. The net carbon fluxes (i.e. net ecosystem exchange; NEE) and energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat) predicted by 12 models with sub-hourly/hourly temporal resolution and 7 models with daily temporal resolution were compared against the site-specific gap-filled observed flux tower data. Comparisons were made by site and crop type (i.e. maize, soybean, and wheat), mainly focusing on the coefficient of determination, correlation, root mean square error, and standard deviation. Analyses also compared the diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variability of the modeled fluxes against the observed data and the mean modeled data.

  20. Assessing Tower Flux Footprint Climatology and Scaling Between Remotely Sensed and Eddy Covariance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baozhang; Black, T. Andrew; Coops, Nicholas C.; Hilker, Thomas; (Tony) Trofymow, J. A.; Morgenstern, Kai

    2009-02-01

    We describe pragmatic and reliable methods to examine the influence of patch-scale heterogeneities on the uncertainty in long-term eddy-covariance (EC) carbon flux data and to scale between the carbon flux estimates derived from land surface optical remote sensing and directly derived from EC flux measurements on the basis of the assessment of footprint climatology. Three different aged Douglas-fir stands with EC flux towers located on Vancouver Island and part of the Fluxnet Canada Research Network were selected. Monthly, annual and interannual footprint climatologies, unweighted or weighted by carbon fluxes, were produced by a simple model based on an analytical solution of the Eulerian advection-diffusion equation. The dimensions and orientation of the flux footprint depended on the height of the measurement, surface roughness length, wind speed and direction, and atmospheric stability. The weighted footprint climatology varied with the different carbon flux components and was asymmetrically distributed around the tower, and its size and spatial structure significantly varied monthly, seasonally and inter-annually. Gross primary productivity (GPP) maps at 10-m resolution were produced using a tower-mounted multi-angular spectroradiometer, combined with the canopy structural information derived from airborne laser scanning (Lidar) data. The horizontal arrays of footprint climatology were superimposed on the 10-m-resolution GPP maps. Monthly and annual uncertainties in EC flux caused by variations in footprint climatology of the 59-year-old Douglas-fir stand were estimated to be approximately 15-20% based on a comparison of GPP estimates derived from EC and remote sensing measurements, and on sensor location bias analysis. The footprint-variation-induced uncertainty in long-term EC flux measurements was mainly dependent on the site spatial heterogeneity. The bias in carbon flux estimates using spatially-explicit ecological models or tower-based remote sensing at

  1. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-02-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one third to global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analysers the instrumentation at many flux sites have been amended for these gases. However the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatial and temporal uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to two orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best guess of this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows to determine CH4 emissions of grazing cows if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  2. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-06-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one-third of global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analyzers, the instrumentation at many flux sites has been amended for these gases. However, the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatially and temporally uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best estimate from this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However, a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found, which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows one to determine CH4 emissions of cows on a pasture if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  3. Coastal pollution due to increasing nutrient flux in aquaculture sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C. P. C.; Sta. Maria, Y. Y.; Siringan, F. P.; Reotita, J. M.; Zamora, P. B.; Villanoy, C. L.; Sombrito, E. Z.; Azanza, R. V.

    2009-07-01

    The supply of nitrogen and phosphorus in coastal zones through time is reflected in the nutrients’ concentration in the sediment record. Five aquaculture sites in the Philippines were investigated in an effort to establish how long-term changes in land and coastal water use could have led to biogeochemical modifications affecting the coastal ecosystem. Samples from study sites show a narrow concentration range for nitrogen and did not reveal any significant trend through time. In contrast, phosphorus concentrations in most sites start at less than 20 ppm in sediments 30 years and older. The phosphorus value continuously increase in younger sediments, with each site having a different magnitude change as well as timing of when the major increase happened. The uppermost 10 cm, representing the last 15 years in sites with age control, typically show a 2- to 3-fold increase in P load values. Historical increase in nutrient load also coincides with harmful algal bloom events in each area; when effective P input exceeded 130 kg/km2 per year. Lastly, the observed increase may be attributed to several factors including physical attributes of the area, urbanization of coastal zones, but most importantly in the proliferation of aquaculture activities.

  4. A new frontier in CO2 flux measurements using a highly portable DIAL laser system

    PubMed Central

    Queiβer, Manuel; Granieri, Domenico; Burton, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic CO2 emissions play a key role in the geological carbon cycle, and monitoring of volcanic CO2 fluxes helps to forecast eruptions. The quantification of CO2 fluxes is challenging due to rapid dilution of magmatic CO2 in CO2-rich ambient air and the diffuse nature of many emissions, leading to large uncertainties in the global magmatic CO2 flux inventory. Here, we report measurements using a new DIAL laser remote sensing system for volcanic CO2 (CO2DIAL). Two sites in the volcanic zone of Campi Flegrei (Italy) were scanned, yielding CO2 path-amount profiles used to compute fluxes. Our results reveal a relatively high CO2 flux from Campi Flegrei, consistent with an increasing trend. Unlike previous methods, the CO2DIAL is able to measure integrated CO2 path-amounts at distances up to 2000 m using virtually any solid surface as a reflector, whilst also being highly portable. This opens a new frontier in quantification of geological and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes. PMID:27652775

  5. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic isoprene over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Biogenic isoprene fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene over 7400 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes of isoprene over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate instantaneous isoprene fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 m ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence determined in the racetrack-stacked profiles. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to basal emission factor (BEF) land-cover data sets used to drive BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. Even though the isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, observations at the Walnut Grove tower south of Sacramento demonstrate that isoprene oxidation products from the high emitting regions in the surrounding oak woodlands accumulate at night in

  6. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  7. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-04-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  8. Measurements of Mass, Momentum and Energy fluxes over an ice/snow covered lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Rui; Potes, Miguel; Mammarella, Ivan; Provenzale, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of the interactions between ice and snow and the atmosphere requires improved measurements of energy, mass and momentum fluxes, which continue to have a high degree of uncertainty. In this communication, observed near surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass (H2O and CO2) over a boreal lake during a freezing period (winter 2015/2016) will be analysed and compared with observations over ice free lakes. Continuously measurements of near surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass (H2O and CO2) are obtained with a new eddy covariance (EC) system, the Campbell Scientific's IRGASON Integrated Open-Path CO2/H2O Gas Analyzer and 3D Sonic Anemometer, over lake Vanajavesi in Finland. The measurement site is located in a tip of narrow peninsula on the lake (61.133935° N ; 24.259119° E), offering very good conditions for eddy covariance flux measurements. The EC system was installed at 2.5m height above the lake surface and was oriented against the prevailing wind direction in the site.

  9. Radon-222 activity flux measurement using activated charcoal canisters: revisiting the methodology.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Sami H; Akber, Riaz A

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of radon ((222)Rn) activity flux using activated charcoal canisters was examined to investigate the distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the relationship between (222)Rn activity flux and exposure time. The activity flux of (222)Rn from five sources of varying strengths was measured for exposure times of one, two, three, five, seven, 10, and 14 days. The distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed was obtained by dividing the bed into six layers and counting each layer separately after the exposure. (222)Rn activity decreased in the layers that were away from the exposed surface. Nevertheless, the results demonstrated that only a small correction might be required in the actual application of charcoal canisters for activity flux measurement, where calibration standards were often prepared by the uniform mixing of radium ((226)Ra) in the matrix. This was because the diffusion of (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the detection efficiency as a function of the charcoal depth tended to counterbalance each other. The influence of exposure time on the measured (222)Rn activity flux was observed in two situations of the canister exposure layout: (a) canister sealed to an open bed of the material and (b) canister sealed over a jar containing the material. The measured (222)Rn activity flux decreased as the exposure time increased. The change in the former situation was significant with an exponential decrease as the exposure time increased. In the latter case, lesser reduction was noticed in the observed activity flux with respect to exposure time. This reduction might have been related to certain factors, such as absorption site saturation or the back diffusion of (222)Rn gas occurring at the canister-soil interface.

  10. First flux surface measurements on W7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Otte, Matthias; Biedermann, Christoph; Bozhenkov, Sergey; Braeuer, Torsten; Lazerson, Samuel; W7-X Team

    2015-11-01

    Wendelstein 7-X is rapidly approaching first plasma operation. The full operational B-field of 2.5 T has been reached using the 70 superconducting coils. The first flux surface measurements have recently been successfully performed. This talk will describe the W7-X flux surface measurement system, and show and analyze the first results from this diagnostic, which, at the time of writing this abstract, can be summarized as follows: Confirmation of the existence of nested, closed flux surfaces, first measurements of iota, and detection of the expected internal 5/6 island chain of the OP1.1 configuration. The data obtained so far agree with expectations, and provide a first confirmation of the accuracy of the coil geometry and assembly, as well as diagnostic installation. They also confirm that, with respect to the magnetic topology, plasma operation can start. Plans for, and potentially first results of, measurements of any remnant field errors, will be reported separately at this meeting.

  11. Aerosol flux measurements above a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K.

    2011-07-01

    Aerosol fluxes were measured above a mixed forest by Eddy Covariance (EC) with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) at the Borden Forest Research Station in Ontario, Canada between 13 July and 12 August 2009. Chemically speciated flux measurements were made at a height of 29 m at the same location between 19 July and 2 August, 2006 using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS). The Q-AMS measured an average sulphate deposition velocity of 0.3 mm s-1 and an average nitrate deposition velocity of 4.8 mm s-1. The FMPS, mounted at a height of 33 m (approximately 10 m above the canopy top) and housed in a temperature controlled enclosure, measured size-resolved particle concentrations from 3 to 410 nm diameter at a rate of 1 Hz. For the size range 18 < D < 452 nm, 60 % of fluxes were upward. The exchange velocity was between -0.5 and 2.0 mm s-1, with median values near 0.5 mm s-1 for all sizes between 22 and 310 nm. The size distribution of the apparent production rate of particles at 33 m peaked at a diameter of 75 nm. Results indicate a decoupling of the above and below canopy spaces, whereby particles are stored in the canopy space at night, and are then diluted with cleaner air above during the day.

  12. Measurements of the thermal neutrons flux near the EAS core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhappuev, D. D.; Volchenko, V. I.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Mikhailova, O. I.; Petkov, V. B.; Stenkin, Yu V.; Tsyabuk, A. L.

    2013-02-01

    The characteristics of the thermal neutrons flux have been measured near the EAS core at the "Carpet-2" EAS array. The thermal neutron detectors were placed on the floor of the tunnel of the Muon Detector (MD) and showers with a core near the MD were selected. Thermal neutrons multiplicity spectrum has been obtained for these showers. Measurements of the lateral distribution function of thermal neutrons at distances of 1-16 m from the shower axis have been performed. The mean number of the recorded thermal neutrons as a function of the number of hadrons crossing the MD has been measured.

  13. Comparison of CO2 fluxes from eddy covariance and soil chambers measurements in a vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Meggio, Franco; Pitacco, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the processes involved in the carbon balance of a vineyard, we set up a long-term monitoring station of CO2, water vapour and energyfluxes. The experimental site is located in an extensive flat vineyard in the north-east of Italy. We measure the net ecosystem exchange with the eddy covariance (EC) technique using a Campbell Scientific closed-path IRGA and sonic anemometer, and the soil CO2 flux using a Li-Cor multiplexed system connected with six automatic dynamic chambers. Ancillary meteorological and soil variables are also measured. The vineyard is planted with north-south oriented rows spaced 2.2 m apart. Floor is grass covered, and a strip 0.6 m wide on the rows is chemically treated. To represent the different soil conditions existing in the EC footprint and to study the components of the CO2 soil flux, we placed dark soil chambers both on the vineyard rows and in the inter-row space. A well-known limit of the EC technique is the underestimation of fluxes during calm wind periods, mainly occurring at night. In the autumn/winter vine dormancy period, the EC and soil chambers CO2 fluxes should be similar. We compared the CO2 fluxes measured using the two methods to evaluate the reliability of EC measurements at different atmospheric turbulent mixing conditions and stability. The EC technique underestimates the ecosystem respiration during night time periods with friction velocity lower than 0.1 m/s. The present comparison could enable the assessment of a friction velocity threshold, representing the limit above which the EC fluxes can be considered representative of the vegetation-atmosphere exchanges at our specific site.

  14. Particle and heat flux measurements in PDX edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, R.; Manos, D.

    1984-05-01

    This paper describes the use of novel combined Langmuir-calorimeter probes to measure edge plasma conditions near the midplane in PDX. The probes consisted of up to five Langmuir probes and up to two calorimeters. Single and double probe characteristics yield ne and Tc which are compared with results derived from a triple probe analysis. The calorimeters measure heat flux in the electron and ion drift directions. This paper presents time-resolved radial profiles of ne, Te, VF (floating potential),and P (heat flux) during high power neutral beam-heated, single-null discharges and circular scoop limiter discharges. The temporal dependence of these quantities displays the previously observed behavior with respect to gross discharge characteristics; however, an additional dependence on confinement mode has been observed. During the H-mode of energy confinement, a transient depression of ne, Te, and P occur in the scrape-off plasma.

  15. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, Jonathan L.; Hall, Kevin A.

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  16. Fluxes through plant metabolic networks: measurements, predictions, insights and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George

    2015-01-01

    Although the flows of material through metabolic networks are central to cell function, they are not easy to measure other than at the level of inputs and outputs. This is particularly true in plant cells, where the network spans multiple subcellular compartments and where the network may function either heterotrophically or photoautotrophically. For many years, kinetic modelling of pathways provided the only method for describing the operation of fragments of the network. However, more recently, it has become possible to map the fluxes in central carbon metabolism using the stable isotope labelling techniques of metabolic flux analysis (MFA), and to predict intracellular fluxes using constraints-based modelling procedures such as flux balance analysis (FBA). These approaches were originally developed for the analysis of microbial metabolism, but over the last decade, they have been adapted for the more demanding analysis of plant metabolic networks. Here, the principal features of MFA and FBA as applied to plants are outlined, followed by a discussion of the insights that have been gained into plant metabolic networks through the application of these time-consuming and non-trivial methods. The discussion focuses on how a system-wide view of plant metabolism has increased our understanding of network structure, metabolic perturbations and the provision of reducing power and energy for cell function. Current methodological challenges that limit the scope of plant MFA are discussed and particular emphasis is placed on the importance of developing methods for cell-specific MFA.

  17. Direct measurement of heat flux from cooling lake thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Alfred J.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Kurzeja, Robert J.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.

    2008-03-01

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, σ, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm -2. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and σ exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm -2. The linear relationship between σ and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between σ and Q is improved if a correction to the measured σ is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between σ and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  18. Corrections of Heat Flux Measurements on Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Matson, Monique L.; Walls, Laurie K.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of aerothermally induced convective heat transfer is important in the design of thermal protection systems for launch vehicles. Aerothermal models are typically calibrated via the data from circular, in-flight, flush-mounted surface heat flux gauges exposed to the thermal and velocity boundary layers of the external flow. Typically, copper or aluminum Schmidt- Boelter gauges, which take advantage of the one-dimensional Fourier's law of heat conduction, are used to measure the incident heat flux. This instrumentation, when surrounded by low-conductivity insulation, has a wall temperature significantly lower than the insulation. As a result of this substantial disturbance to the thermal boundary layer, the heat flux incident on the gauge tends to be considerably higher than it would have been on the insulation had the calorimeter not been there. In addition, radial conductive heat transfer from the hotter insulation can cause the calorimeter to indicate heat fluxes higher than actual. An overview of an effort to develop and calibrate gauge correction techniques for both of these effects will be presented.

  19. Data assimilation tool to reconstruct particle flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdarie, Sebastien A.; Maget, Vincent; Lazaro, Didier; Sandberg, Ingmar

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the EU-FP7 MAARBLE project, the Salammbô code and an ensemble Kalman filter is being used to reproduce the electron radiation belt dynamics during storms: (1) The ONERA data assimilation tool has been improved to ingest count rates instead of flux when the instrument response function is available. As an example, the ESA/SREM radiation monitor has complex response functions (proton and electron events are mixed, and for a given specie the instrument responds to a broad range of energies with different efficiencies) which makes very challenging to get fluxes out of count rates. (2) INTEGRAL/SREM, GIOVE-B/SREM, XMM/ERMD and GOES/SEM data assimilation is performed to reproduce with high fidelity the electron belt dynamics during magnetic storms. (3) Because the outputs of the tool are phase space densities, it is then possible to reconstruct INTEGRAL/SREM and GIOVE-B/SREM fluxes time series. In the present talk, an overview of the data assimilation tool will be given. The advantage of using assimilation tool to reconstruct particle flux measurements will be discussed. MAARBLE has received fundings from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-.2010-1, SP1 Cooperation, Collaborative project) under grant agreement n284520. This paper reflects only the authors' views and the European Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  20. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-12-19

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  1. AmeriFlux US-Ne3 Mead - rainfed maize-soybean rotation site

    SciTech Connect

    Suyker, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ne3 Mead - rainfed maize-soybean rotation site. Site Description - The study site is one of three fields (all located within 1.6 km of each other) at the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead, Nebraska. While the other two sites are equipped with irrigation systems, this site relies on rainfall. A tillage operation (disking) was done just prior to the 2001 planting to homogenize the top 0.1 m of soil, incorporate P and K fertilizers, as well as previously accumulated surface residues. Since initiation of the study in 2001, this site has been under no-till management.

  2. AmeriFlux US-Ne2 Mead - irrigated maize-soybean rotation site

    SciTech Connect

    Suyker, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ne2 Mead - irrigated maize-soybean rotation site. Site Description - The study site is one of three fields (all located within 1.6 km of each other) at the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead, Nebraska. This site is irrigated with a center pivot system. Prior to the initiation of the study, the irrigated site had a 10-yr history of maize-soybean rotation under no-till. A tillage operation (disking) was done just prior to the 2001 planting to homogenize the top 0.1 m of soil, incorporate P and K fertilizers, as well as previously accumulated surface residues. Since this tillage operation, the site has been under no-till management.

  3. AmeriFlux CA-NS2 UCI-1930 burn site

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS2 UCI-1930 burn site. Site Description - The UCI-1930 site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  4. AmeriFlux CA-NS1 UCI-1850 burn site

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS1 UCI-1850 burn site. Site Description - The UCI-1850 site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  5. AmeriFlux CA-NS5 UCI-1981 burn site

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS5 UCI-1981 burn site. Site Description - The UCI-1981 site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  6. AmeriFlux CA-NS3 UCI-1964 burn site

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS3 UCI-1964 burn site. Site Description - The UCI-1964 site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  7. AmeriFlux CA-NS4 UCI-1964 burn site wet

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS4 UCI-1964 burn site wet. Site Description - The UCI-1964 wet site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  8. AmeriFlux CA-NS8 UCI-2003 burn site

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS8 UCI-2003 burn site. Site Description - The UCI-2003 site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  9. AmeriFlux CA-NS6 UCI-1989 burn site

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS6 UCI-1989 burn site. Site Description - The UCI-1989 site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  10. AmeriFlux CA-NS7 UCI-1998 burn site

    SciTech Connect

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-NS7 UCI-1998 burn site. Site Description - The UCI-1998 site is located in a continental boreal forest, dominated by black spruce trees, within the BOREAS northern study area in central Manitoba, Canada. The site is a member of a chronological series of sites that are representative secondary succession growth stages after large stand replacement fires. Black spruce trees undergo a slow growth process enabling the accurate determination of the chronosequence of stand age disturbance. Additionally, boreal forests make up approximately 25% of forest ecosystems on earth. With both of these in mind, the UCI sites provide an excellent location to study the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and boreal forest ecosystems as a function of sequential wildfires.

  11. Assessing and correcting spatial representativeness of tower eddy-covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Xu, K.; Desai, A. R.; Taylor, J. R.; Kljun, N.; Blanken, P.; Burns, S. P.; Scott, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Estimating the landscape-scale exchange of ecologically relevant trace gas and energy fluxes from tower eddy-covariance (EC) measurements is often complicated by surface heterogeneity. For example, a tower EC measurement may represent less than 1% of a grid cell resolved by mechanistic models (order 100-1000 km2). In particular for data assimilation or comparison with large-scale observations, it is hence critical to assess and correct the spatial representativeness of tower EC measurements. We present a procedure that determines from a single EC tower the spatio-temporally explicit flux field of its surrounding. The underlying principle is to extract the relationship between biophysical drivers and ecological responses from measurements under varying environmental conditions. For this purpose, high-frequency EC flux processing and source area calculations (≈60 h-1) are combined with remote sensing retrievals of land surface properties and subsequent machine learning. Methodological details are provided in our companion presentation "Towards the spatial rectification of tower-based eddy-covariance flux observations". We apply the procedure to one year of data from each of four AmeriFlux sites under different climate and ecological environments: Lost Creek shrub fen wetland, Niwot Ridge subalpine conifer, Park Falls mixed forest, and Santa Rita mesquite savanna. We find that heat fluxes from the Park Falls 122-m-high EC measurement and from a surrounding 100 km2 target area differ up to 100 W m-2, or 65%. Moreover, 85% and 24% of the EC flux observations are adequate surrogates of the mean surface-atmosphere exchange and its spatial variability across a 900 km2 target area, respectively, at 5% significance and 80% representativeness levels. Alternatively, the resulting flux grids can be summarized as probability density functions, and used to inform mechanistic models directly with the mean flux value and its spatial variability across a model grid cell. Lastly

  12. Estimation of rainfall interception in grassland using eddy flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, A.; Miyazawa, Y.; Inoue, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall interception plays an important role in the water cycle in natural ecosystems. Interception by the forest canopies have been widely observed or estimated over various ecosystems, such as tropical rainforest, evergreen forest and deciduous forest. However interception by the short canopies, e.g. shrubby plant, grassland and crop, has been rarely observed since it has been difficult to obtain reliable precipitation measurements under the canopy. In this study, we estimated monthly and annual rainfall interception in grassland using evapotranspiration data of eddy flux measurements. Experiments were conducted in grassland (Italian ryegrass) from 2010 to 2012 growing season in Kumamoto, Japan. Evapotranspiration (latent heat flux) were observed throughout the year based on the eddy covariance technique. A three dimensional sonic anemometer and an open path CO2/H2O analyzer were used to calculate 30 min flux. Other meteorological factors, such as air temperature, humidity and solar radiation, were also observed. Rainfall interception was estimated as follows. 1) Using evapotranspiration data during dry period, environmental response of surface conductance (gc) was inversely calculated based on the big-leaf model. 2) Evapotranspiration without interception during precipitation period was estimated using above model and environmental response of gc. 3) Assuming that evaporation of intercepted rainfall is equal to the difference in evapotranspiration between above estimation and actual measurements, rainfall interception was estimated over experimental period. The account of rainfall interception in grassland using this technique will be presented at the meeting.

  13. A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

  14. AmeriFlux US-Ho3 Howland Forest (harvest site)

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, David; Hollinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho3 Howland Forest (harvest site). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  15. CO2 uptake and ecophysiological parameters of the grain crops of midcontinent North America: estimates from flux tower measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present net CO2 exchange data from 13 flux tower sites with 27 site-years of measurements over maize and wheat fields across midcontinent North America. A numerically robust “light-soil temperature-VPD”-based method was used to partition the data into photosynthetic assimilation and ecosystem re...

  16. Flux measurements of energy and trace gases in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, I.; Schade, G. W.; Adams, S.; Park, C.

    2008-12-01

    We describe the setup and some first year results of a new flux measurements tower in an urban area. An existing radio communications tower 4 km north of downtown Houston was equipped with micrometeorological instrumentation and trace gas sampling lines in spring 2007. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity are recorded at five levels between 12 and 60 m above ground; 3-D wind speed measurements, solar and net radiances, and trace gas sampling are established from the 60 m level. A closed path IRGA is used for CO2 and water vapor fluxes, and independent instrumentation for criteria pollutant and VOC fluxes. Two CSI data loggers and software control the measurements, and EdiRe software is used to analyze turbulence data and compute fluxes. A project description is provided at http://atmo.tamu.edu/yellowcabtower. Surface properties as calculated from the gradient measurements show the site to be surprisingly uniform, with displacement heights between 5 and 9 m and roughness lengths between 0.4 and 0.7 m, despite urban heterogeneity. The latter is investigated through visible/near IR orthoimagery and LIDAR data, which are incorporated into a local GIS. Net radiation was also only marginally affected by surface heterogeneity. At this urban location it is balanced by roughly equal amounts of sensible heat, latent heat, and storage fluxes. Latent heat flux, however, is smaller outside the growing season, with an equivalent increase in winter storage fluxes, as expected. Significant differences are also observed with direction during summer, showing decreased Bowen ratios and lower CO2 emissions from sectors with a larger urban tree canopy cover in the footprint. The largely mature, dominantly oak urban canopy cover alleviates approximately 100 W m- 2 during typical summer days. On the other hand, anthropogenic CO2 emissions dominate over photosynthetic uptake all year round. Measured carbon fluxes peak during morning rush-hour traffic, especially when increasing

  17. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  18. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  19. Measuring and modeling disturbance-induced changes to flux dynamics in increasingly heterogeneous canopy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, K.; Bohrer, G.; He, L.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Vogel, C.; Curtis, P.

    2012-12-01

    Turbulent eddies control the flux of carbon, water and other gases between forested environments and the atmosphere. Inside the canopy, eddy correlation length is very small and surface heterogeneity due to tree-crown structures occurs at these scales. Computer simulations, particularly Large-Eddy Simulations (LES), provide the foundation to test the sensitivity of flux exchange and turbulent mixing to small scale processes, such as successional- or disturbance-driven changes to canopy structure. At the Forest Accelerated Succession ExperimenT (FASET), we disturbed 39 ha of forest by girdling all canopy-dominant early-successional aspen and birch trees, leading to a large mortality event, followed by a shift in forest structure that is typical of a more mature successional stage. Over the course of the study, we have found a divergence from pre-treatment biosphere-atmosphere gas-exchange trends between the control and disturbance sites due to changes in canopy structure and, as a consequence, biological response. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS)-based Forest Large-Eddy Simulation (RAFLES), and the more dynamic RAFLES-Ecosystem Demography (ED2) model, to investigate the consequences of increasingly heterogeneous forest environments to canopy-atmosphere exchange. RAFLES-ED2 resolves multi-layered light attenuation and vegetation and surface heat, vapor and CO2 fluxes and includes a multi-layered soil column under each atmosphere-vegetation column, as opposed to the single-layered soil-vegetation model in RAFLES. The model environment was determined by remote sensing of the actual forested area of interest using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements and eddy-flux gas exchange measurements at two neighboring AmeriFlux eddy-flux towers, the manipulated site (US-UMd) and its undisturbed control (US-UMB) both at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) cluster site. We find more accurate surface roughness estimates and

  20. Adjustment of footprint correction for airborne flux mapping over the FIFE site

    SciTech Connect

    Schuepp, P.H.; Macpherson, J.I.; Desjardins, R.L. Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa Agriculture Canada, Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research, Ottawa )

    1992-11-01

    ORA meaningful interpretation of airborne flux estimates over nonuniform terrain must consider local advection from nonhomogeneous source distributions (footprint correction). An empirical procedure for footprint correction of airborne flux data obtained in the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) 1989 is presented, based on simple analytical solutions of the diffusion equation which have been adjusted to approximate more realistic solutions. Optimized estimates of surface flux 'maps' derived from airborne observations are then constructed for maximum correlation between flux estimates and independently observed surface characteristics. This paper also includes an analysis of resolution for the given procedure, in terms of amplitude recovery of hypothetical square-wave distributions of surface flux density, and discusses its implications for the interpretation of the optimized estimates of FIFE surface flux maps. Results show that corrected spatial sink distributions are obtained by the current empirical procedure at the cost of considerable reduction in amplitude recovery of small-scale variations in surface flux density. The high spatial correlation observed between corrected flux maps and surface characteristics such as greenness or surface temperature excess is ascribed to the approximately correct positioning of the main flux gradients across the site, which can be expected to have been reproduced with amplitude recovery equal to or greater than 60 percent. 45 refs.

  1. Adjustment of footprint correction for airborne flux mapping over the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuepp, P. H.; Macpherson, J. I.; Desjardins, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A meaningful interpretation of airborne flux estimates over nonuniform terrain must consider local advection from nonhomogeneous source distributions (footprint correction). An empirical procedure for footprint correction of airborne flux data obtained in the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) 1989 is presented, based on simple analytical solutions of the diffusion equation which have been adjusted to approximate more realistic solutions. Optimized estimates of surface flux 'maps' derived from airborne observations are then constructed for maximum correlation between flux estimates and independently observed surface characteristics. This paper also includes an analysis of resolution for the given procedure, in terms of amplitude recovery of hypothetical square-wave distributions of surface flux density, and discusses its implications for the interpretation of the optimized estimates of FIFE surface flux maps. Results show that corrected spatial sink distributions are obtained by the current empirical procedure at the cost of considerable reduction in amplitude recovery of small-scale variations in surface flux density. The high spatial correlation observed between corrected flux maps and surface characteristics such as greenness or surface temperature excess is ascribed to the approximately correct positioning of the main flux gradients across the site, which can be expected to have been reproduced with amplitude recovery equal to or greater than 60 percent.

  2. Eddy covariance measurements in screenhouses: turbulence characteristics and flux gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, U.; Cohen, S.; Tanny, J.

    2012-04-01

    Shading banana and other orchard crops with screens is popular in arid and semi-arid regions for decreasing water use and increasing fruit quality. However, crop water use within this unique environment is much less studied than for canopies in the open. Previous studies of our research group have established the use of the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique for reliable evapotranspiration and sensible heat flux measurements within screenhouses. These studies focused on operating conditions of the system. The present paper is a comprehensive study which examined the performance of the EC system in different types of screenhouses (shading and insect-proof), different crops (banana and pepper) at different development stages (small and large plants) and different climatic regions in Israel. The main goal was to establish guidelines for optimal application of the EC technique in screenhouses. The research consisted of 6 field campaigns: in 3 campaigns two EC systems were simultaneously deployed either vertically or horizontally, and in 3 other campaigns a single EC system was deployed at one measurement height. EC systems were deployed at different normalized system heights, Zs, which define the relative measurement heights within the air gap between the canopy top and the horizontal screened roof. System performance was examined using quality tests like energy balance closure, flux variance similarity, friction velocity, footprint modeling, energy spectrum, turbulence intensity and vertical and horizontal flux gradient analyses. Resulting energy balance closure slopes averaged 0.81±0.08 and 0.91±0.08 for the smaller and larger plants, respectively. Turbulent flows were found to be marginally developed within the air gap between the top of the plants and the horizontal screened roof. Turbulence intensity, flux variance similarity test, energy spectrum decay rate and friction velocity were essentially independent of the measurement height and were within the common range

  3. Optimizing laboratory-based radon flux measurements for sediments.

    PubMed

    Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kranrod, Chutima; Kritsananuwat, Rawiwan; Lane-Smith, Derek; Burnett, William C

    2016-07-01

    Radon flux via diffusion from sediments and other materials may be determined in the laboratory by circulating air through the sample and a radon detector in a closed loop. However, this approach is complicated by the necessity of having to determine the total air volume in the system and accounting for any small air leaks that can arise if using extended measurement periods. We designed a simple open-loop configuration that includes a measured mass of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight reaction flask connected to a drying system and a radon-in-air analyzer. Ambient air flows through two charcoal columns before entering the reaction vessel to eliminate incoming radon. After traveling through the reaction flask, the air passes the drier and the radon analyzer and is then vented. After some time, the radon activity will reach a steady state depending upon the airflow rate. With this approach, the radon flux via diffusion is simply the product of the steady-state radon activity (Bq/m(3)) multiplied by the airflow rate (mL/min). We demonstrated that this setup could produce good results for materials that produce relatively high radon fluxes. We also show that a modified closed system approach, including radon removal of the incoming air by charcoal filtration in a bypass, can produce very good results including samples with very low emission rates. PMID:27064564

  4. PERFORMING QUALITY FLOW MEASUREMENTS AT MINE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate flow measurement data is vital to research, monitoring, and remediation efforts at mining sites. This guidebook has been prepared to provide a summary of information relating to the performance of low measurements, and how this information can be applied at mining sites....

  5. Mars heavy ion precipitating flux as measured by MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.

    2015-12-01

    Mars' atmospheric escape induced by heavy planetary ions accelerated by the solar wind and reimpacting Mars' atmosphere has been suggested to occur. The sputtering of Mars' atmosphere has been even suggested to lead to a significant cumulated loss along Mars' history. Up to now, only a limited number of observations have been possible. ASPERA-3/Mars Express observed such precipitation only during extreme solar conditions events suggesting that sputtering might be not as intense as theoretically predicted. Based on MAVEN first six months of observations, we here show that precipitation of heavy ions also occur during quiet solar conditions and that the average precipitating flux during this period is significant and globally in good agreement with predictions. From these measured precipitating flux, we propose a first estimate of the atmospheric escape induced by sputtering. Up to 8.8×105 O/cm2/s was lost by Mars' atmosphere between November 2014 and April 2015.

  6. Gap-filling of flux measurements over a heterogeneous urban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzer, O.; McFadden, J.

    2012-12-01

    A small, but growing, number of urban flux towers measure surface-atmospheric exchanges of energy, water, and greenhouse gases by the eddy covariance method. Imputation of gaps in these measurements caused by low turbulence conditions and system failures is essential for obtaining annual sums of CO2 exchange and evaporation. Yet most gap-filling methods were designed for natural measurement sites such as forests and grasslands. In the urban environment, however, the assumptions on which those approaches are based are violated and well known temperature or light response models are not applicable because of urban footprint heterogeneity and localized CO2 emissions. Observation-based methods of machine learning can reveal intrinsic mechanisms by using inputs such as wind direction, footprint size, and continuous traffic data, making gap-filling results more accurate. Here, we report preliminary gap-filling results using such empirical approaches for >3 years of flux measurements from the KUOM tall tower in a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. We also ran one of the most common gap-filling methods that has been used for natural systems as a baseline or null model. We found that CO2 and water vapor fluxes from the urban landscape showed higher variability than those from a nearby turfgrass lawn, in which fluxes closely followed environmental drivers of light and temperature. Higher variability was found in NEE measurements as compared to LE, due to the relatively greater heterogeneity of sources and sinks that influenced CO2 exchange in the urban landscape.

  7. Wet deposition of mercury at a remote site in the Tibetan Plateau: Concentrations, speciation, and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Yan, Haiyu; Guo, Junming; Jenkins, Matt G.; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Kang

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation samples collected at a remote high elevation site (i.e., Nam Co Station, 4730 m a.s.l.) in the southern Tibetan Plateau were analyzed for total mercury (HgT) between July 2009 and 2011, particulate-bound mercury (HgP) between July 2010 and 2011 and methylmercury (MeHg) from July through August of 2009. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentrations and wet deposition fluxes of HgT and MeHg in precipitation were 4.8 ng L-1 and 1.75 μg m-2 yr-1, 0.031 ng L-1 and 0.01 μg m-2 yr-1, respectively. VWM HgT concentration was approximately two times higher during the non-monsoon season than during the monsoon season, while 83% of the HgT wet deposition fluxes occurred during the monsoon season. The HgT and MeHg concentrations are comparable to the reported data for some of the most remote alpine and polar regions worldwide (e.g., Churchill), but the wet deposition fluxes of HgT and MeHg were among the lowest in the world. Analysis of Hg speciation has presented that HgP and MeHg concentrations are high, making up 71.2% and 1.82% of the HgT on average (VWM), respectively. The high HgP%, as well as a significantly positive between HgT and HgP (R2 = 0.91; n = 44; p < 0.001), confirmed that atmospheric deposition of Hg in the Tibetan Plateau was occurring in the form of HgP. A decreasing trend in HgT concentrations with increasing amount of precipitation (R2 = 0.08; N = 101; p < 0.005) was found at Nam Co Station, indicative that scavenging of HgP from the atmosphere was an important mechanism contributing Hg to precipitation. The precipitation amount, rather than HgT concentration, was found to be the governing factor affecting HgT wet deposition flux. Moreover, a comparison between measured wet deposition flux of Hg at Nam Co Station and the estimates from environmental records indicated that both snowpits and lake sediments appear to be reliable archives for estimating historical Hg accumulation rates over the Tibetan Plateau.

  8. Momentum Flux Measurements Using an Impact Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Breizman, Boris; Bengtson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force caused by a beam of charged and neutral particles impacting a target plate. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters, during early stages of development, to be quickly and easily exhausted and compared to other thrusters. Since some thruster concepts are tested using laboratory equipment that is heavy and cumbersome, measuring the momentum flux of the particles in the plume can be much simpler than placing the entire thruster on a thrust stand. Conservation of momentum requires the momentum flux measured in the plume to be related to the thrust produced by the thruster. The impact thrust stand was designed to be placed in the plume of an electric thruster and has been tested and compared to the thrust measured from a Hall thruster placed on a pendulum thrust stand. Force measurements taken at several axial locations in the magnetic nozzle region of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket will be presented.

  9. Predicting carbon dioxide and energy fluxes across global FLUXNET sites with regression algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, Gianluca; Jung, Martin; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Ichii, Kazuhito; Camps-Valls, Gustau; Ráduly, Botond; Reichstein, Markus; Altaf Arain, M.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Kiely, Gerard; Merbold, Lutz; Serrano-Ortiz, Penelope; Sickert, Sven; Wolf, Sebastian; Papale, Dario

    2016-07-01

    Spatio-temporal fields of land-atmosphere fluxes derived from data-driven models can complement simulations by process-based land surface models. While a number of strategies for empirical models with eddy-covariance flux data have been applied, a systematic intercomparison of these methods has been missing so far. In this study, we performed a cross-validation experiment for predicting carbon dioxide, latent heat, sensible heat and net radiation fluxes across different ecosystem types with 11 machine learning (ML) methods from four different classes (kernel methods, neural networks, tree methods, and regression splines). We applied two complementary setups: (1) 8-day average fluxes based on remotely sensed data and (2) daily mean fluxes based on meteorological data and a mean seasonal cycle of remotely sensed variables. The patterns of predictions from different ML and experimental setups were highly consistent. There were systematic differences in performance among the fluxes, with the following ascending order: net ecosystem exchange (R2 < 0.5), ecosystem respiration (R2 > 0.6), gross primary production (R2> 0.7), latent heat (R2 > 0.7), sensible heat (R2 > 0.7), and net radiation (R2 > 0.8). The ML methods predicted the across-site variability and the mean seasonal cycle of the observed fluxes very well (R2 > 0.7), while the 8-day deviations from the mean seasonal cycle were not well predicted (R2 < 0.5). Fluxes were better predicted at forested and temperate climate sites than at sites in extreme climates or less represented by training data (e.g., the tropics). The evaluated large ensemble of ML-based models will be the basis of new global flux products.

  10. Flux measurements in the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Aegean Sea, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulos, V E; Helmis, C G

    2014-10-01

    Micro-meteorological measurements within the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer took place at the shoreline of two islands at northern and south-eastern Aegean Sea of Greece. The primary goal of these experimental campaigns was to study the momentum, heat and humidity fluxes over this part of the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea, characterized by limited spatial and temporal scales which could affect these exchanges at the air-sea interface. The great majority of the obtained records from both sites gave higher values up to factor of two, compared with the estimations from the most widely used parametric formulas that came mostly from measurements over open seas and oceans. Friction velocity values from both campaigns varied within the same range and presented strong correlation with the wind speed at 10 m height while the calculated drag coefficient values at the same height for both sites were found to be constant in relation with the wind speed. Using eddy correlation analysis, the heat flux values were calculated (virtual heat fluxes varied from -60 to 40 W/m(2)) and it was found that they are affected by the limited spatial and temporal scales of the responding air-sea interaction mechanism. Similarly, the humidity fluxes appeared to be strongly influenced by the observed intense spatial heterogeneity of the sea surface temperature.

  11. Assessment of CO2 flux measurements in different soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Szlavecz, K.; Musaloiu, R.; Cupchup, J.; Pitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate measurements of soil CO2 efflux are extraordinarily challenging due to the very properties of CO2 transport in a porous medium of soil. The most commonly used method today is the chamber method, which provides direct measurements of CO2 efflux at the soil surface, but it can not measure the soil CO2 flux continuously. In order to develop new measurement methods in soil CO2 efflux, small solid-state CO2 sensors have been used to continuously to monitor soil CO2 profiles by burying these sensors at different soil depths. Using this method we compared soil CO2 efflux of four different soil types: forests soil, grassland soil (collected in Maryland) commercial potting soil and pure sand as control. CO2 concentration varied between 500 ppm in sand and 8000 ppm in forest soil at depth 12 cm. CO2 flux had the following order: Forest (0.3~0.4 mg CO2 m-2 s-1), potting soil (0.1~0.14 mg CO2 m-2 s-1 ), grassland (0.03~0.05 mg CO2 m-2 s-1), sand ( 0 mg CO2 m-2 s-1 ). Exponential relationship between temperature and CO2 flux was established for forest soil and potting soil only. Leaf litter, often thick layer in many terrestrial ecosystems and a significant source of CO2 production, is not part of the of the diffusivity models. We are currently conducting experiments which include the effect of leaf litter and soil invertebrates into soil respiration.

  12. Airflows and turbulent flux measurements in mountainous terrain: Part 2: Mesoscale effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, A.A.; Anderson, D.E.; Burns, S.; Blanken, P.D.; Monson, Russell K.

    2004-01-01

    The location of the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site within the rocky mountains subjects it to airflows which are common in mountainous terrain. In this study, we examine the effects of some of these mesoscale features on local turbulent flux measurements; most notably, the formation of valley/mountain flows and mountain lee-side waves. The valley/mountain flows created local non-stationarities in the wind flow caused by the passage of a lee-side convergence zone (LCZ) in which upslope and downslope flows met in the vicinity of the measurement tower. During June-August, 2001, possible lee-side convergences were flagged for ???26% of all half-hour daytime flux measurement periods. However, there was no apparent loss of flux during these periods. On some relatively stable, summer nights, turbulence (designated via ??w), and scalar fluctuations (temperature and CO2, for example) exhibited periodicities that appeared congruent with passage of low frequency gravity waves (?? ??? 20 min). Spectral peaks at 0.0008 Hz (20 min) in both vertical velocity and scalar spectra were observed and indicated that 25-50% of the total scalar covariances were accounted for by the low frequency waves. During some periods of strong westerly winds (predominantly in winter), large mountain gravity waves were observed to form. Typically, the flux tower resided within a region of downslope "shooting flow", which created high turbulence, but had no detrimental effect on local flux measurements based on valid turbulence statistics and nearly complete energy budget closure. Periodically, we found evidence for re-circulating, rotor winds in the simultaneous time series of wind data from the Ameriflux tower site and a second meteorological site situated 8 km upslope and to the West. Only 14% of the half-hour time periods that we examined for a 4 month period in the winter of 2000-2001 indicated the possible existence of rotor winds. On average, energy budget closure was ???20% less during periods with

  13. Spatial and temporal variations of the fluxes of carbon dioxide and sensible and latent heat over the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, R. L.; Schuepp, P. H.; Macpherson, J. I.; Buckley, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne measurements of flux densities of carbon dioxide CO2, sensible heat, and latent heat (H2O) obtained over the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) site during three intensive field campaigns in 1987 and one in 1989 are examined to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of CO2 and energy transfer processes. These data were collected by the National Research Council Twin Otter using low-level flight patterns, all flown at constant pressure altitude during relatively clear days. The spatial variations are larger in 1989 than in 1987 and a higher correlation is observed between the fluxes and the surface features. The temporal patterns are easier to characterize with the relatively homogeneous situation of 1987. Functional relationships obtained between fluxes of CO2 and latent heat, CO2 fluxes and greenness index, latent heat fluxes and greenness index, and between sensible heat fluxes and surface air temperature differences are presented for one day in 1987 and one in 1989 as an example of the kind of information that can be obtained from grid flights at constant pressure altitude.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations of the fluxes of carbon dioxide and sensible and latent heat over the FIFE site

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, R.L.; Schuepp, P.H.; Macpherson, J.I.; Buckley, D.J. McGill Univ., Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa Agriculture Canada, Centre for Food and Animal Research, Ottawa )

    1992-11-01

    Airborne measurements of flux densities of carbon dioxide CO2, sensible heat, and latent heat (H2O) obtained over the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) site during three intensive field campaigns in 1987 and one in 1989 are examined to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of CO2 and energy transfer processes. These data were collected by the National Research Council Twin Otter using low-level flight patterns, all flown at constant pressure altitude during relatively clear days. The spatial variations are larger in 1989 than in 1987 and a higher correlation is observed between the fluxes and the surface features. The temporal patterns are easier to characterize with the relatively homogeneous situation of 1987. Functional relationships obtained between fluxes of CO2 and latent heat, CO2 fluxes and greenness index, latent heat fluxes and greenness index, and between sensible heat fluxes and surface air temperature differences are presented for one day in 1987 and one in 1989 as an example of the kind of information that can be obtained from grid flights at constant pressure altitude. 20 refs.

  15. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  16. Development of a laser remote sensing instrument to measure sub-aerial volcanic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queisser, Manuel; Burton, Mike

    2016-04-01

    A thorough quantification of volcanic CO2 fluxes would lead to an enhanced understanding of the role of volcanoes in the geological carbon cycle. This would enable a more subtle understanding of human impact on that cycle. Furthermore, variations in volcanic CO2 emissions are a key to understanding volcanic processes such as eruption phenomenology. However, measuring fluxes of volcanic CO2 is challenging as volcanic CO2 concentrations are modest compared with the ambient CO2 concentration (~400 ppm) . Volcanic CO2 quickly dilutes with the background air. For Mt. Etna (Italy), for instance, 1000 m downwind from the crater, dispersion modelling yields a signal of ~4 ppm only. It is for this reason that many magmatic CO2 concentration measurements focus on in situ techniques, such as direct sampling Giggenbach bottles, chemical sensors, IR absorption spectrometers or mass spectrometers. However, emission rates are highly variable in time and space. Point measurements fail to account for this variability. Inferring 1-D or 2-D gas concentration profiles, necessary to estimate gas fluxes, from point measurements may thus lead to erroneous flux estimations. Moreover, in situ probing is time consuming and, since many volcanoes emit toxic gases and are dangerous as mountains, may raise safety concerns. In addition, degassing is often diffuse and spatially extended, which makes a measurement approach with spatial coverage desirable. There are techniques that allow to indirectly retrieve CO2 fluxes from correlated SO2 concentrations and fluxes. However, they still rely on point measurements of CO2 and are prone to errors of SO2 fluxes due to light dilution and depend on blue sky conditions. Here, we present a new remote sensing instrument, developed with the ERC project CO2Volc, which measures 1-D column amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere with sufficient sensitivity to reveal the contribution of magmatic CO2. Based on differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) the instrument measures

  17. Initiation of methane turbulent flux measurements over a grazed grassland in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumortier, Pierre; Aubinet, Marc; Chopin, Henri; Debacq, Alain; Jérome, Elisabeth; Beckers, Yves; Heinesch, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Methane fluxes emitted by a grazed meadow were measured continuously during the 2012 grazing season at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory (50° 18' 44" N; 4° 58' 07" E; 248 m asl.) in Belgium. Measurements were made with the eddy covariance technique, using a fast CH4 analyzer (Picarro G2311-f). Carbon dioxide fluxes (LI-7000) and various micro-meteorological and soil variables, biomass growth and stocking rate evolution were also measured at the site. The site is an intensively pastured meadow of 4.2 ha managed according to the regional usual practices where up to 30 cows are grazing simultaneously. N2O emissions are currently measured through dynamic closed chambers (Beekkerk van Ruth et al., Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 15, EGU2013-3211, 2013) and the carbon budget of the site has already been investigated (Jerome et al. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, EGU2013-6989, 2013). As no CH4 measurements were available, CH4 fluxes were estimated on the basis of dry matter intake by the cows and a conversion factor obtained from a literature review. We want to improve this estimation by measuring CH4 fluxes, identifying their main environmental drivers and understanding diurnal and annual exchange patterns. Methane emissions were found strongly related with cattle stocking rate with a slope of 7.34±0.78 mol CH4 day-1 LSU-1. Up to now, no methane absorption has been observed, the meadow behaving as a methane emitter, even in the absence of cows. In the absence of cows, no significant relation can be established up to now between methane emissions and environmental parameters. No clear diurnal evolution is observed, neither during grazing periods nor during cow free periods. During cow presence periods, fluxes are highly variable, probably due to cow movements in and out the measurement footprint and cow digestion rhythm. Further developments are ongoing in order to improve cattle geo-localization through individual home-made GPS devices and infra

  18. SIERRA-Flux: Measuring Regional Surface Fluxes of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Water Vapor from an Unmanned Aircraft System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland; Yates, Emma Louise; Bui, Thaopaul Van; Dean-Day, Jonathan; Kolyer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Eddy-Covariance Method for quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes is a foundational technique for measuring net ecosystem exchange and validating regional-to-global carbon cycle models. While towers or ships are the most frequent platform for measuring surface-atmosphere exchange, experiments using aircraft for flux measurements have yielded contributions to several large-scale studies including BOREAS, SMACEX, RECAB by providing local-to-regional coverage beyond towers. The low-altitude flight requirements make airborne flux measurements particularly dangerous and well suited for unmanned aircraft.

  19. 3D density imaging with muons flux measurements from underground galleries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Marteau, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric muons flux measurements provide information on sub-surface density distribution, giving insights on the medium structure. We measured the muons flux from the underground galleries of the Tournemire experimental platform to image the medium between the galleries and the surface. The experiment aimed at evaluating the capacity of the method to detect the presence of discontinuities produced either by secondary strike-slip faults that present small vertical displacements or by a karstic network may be present at the level of an upper aquifer. Measurements were performed from three different sites so the trajectories of detected muons paths intersect in the medium. Such a configuration provided complementary information on the density distribution, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. A specific calibration method was applied in order to interpolate the data acquired at different times with the same muons sensor. Muons flux measurements variations were then processed through a non-linear inversion, producing a 3D image of the density together with an evaluation of the different distinguished targets reliability. The density distribution showed the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, suggesting the presence of a karstic network hosting locally cavities. The trace of secondary strike-slip faults did not appear clearly on the image as the density contrast they produce might be too low compared to the signal to noise ratio present in the muons flux data. We propose different strategies to improve the density image accuracy.

  20. Modeling the impact of hydraulic redistribution on the carbon flux and storages using CLM4.5 at four AmeriFlux Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C.; Wang, G.; Cardon, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on the hydrological cycle and ecosystem dynamics have been demonstrated in the field, but few modeling studies have compared HR's influences on the carbon cycle in different ecosystems and climate regions. The soil moisture changes associated with HR could influence plant carbon gain via two mechanisms: (1) improved plant water status supporting stomatal opening, and/or (2) enhanced nutrient availability to plants caused by enhanced soil microbial activity. In this study, using a modified version of the Community Land Model with Century-based soil carbon pool kinetics that includes the "Ryel et al. 2002" scheme for hydraulic redistribution (HR), the influence of HR on the carbon flux and storage is investigated at four Ameriflux sites where HR was detected from soil moisture measurements. The study sites include a Douglas-fir site (US-Wrc) in Washington State with a mediterranean climate, a savanna site (US-SRM) in Arizona with a semi-arid climate, an oak/pine forest site (US-SCf) in Southern California with a mediterranean climate, and an evergreen broadleaf forest site (BR-Sa1) with tropical monsoon climate. Simulations revealed that HR tended to enhance plant growth at all four sites, and incorporating HR into CLM4.5 reduces the temporal fluctuation of soil carbon storage at all four sites. Simulations with HR can capture the net carbon exchange between ecosystem and the atmosphere (NEE) at the US-Wrc, US-SRM, and BR-Sa1 sites over the annual cycle. Incorporation of HR into CLM4.5 clearly improved the weekly and sub-daily NEE simulation during dry periods at US-SCf and BR-Sa1 site. HR-induced increase in Net Primary Productivity (NPP) at the US-Wrc and US-SRM sites was driven approximately equally by the two distinct mechanisms we investigated: increased stomatal conductance and increased nutrient availability to plants.

  1. Numerical modeling of cold magmatic CO2 flux measurements for the exploration of hidden geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Loïc.; Wanner, Christoph; Pan, Lehua

    2015-10-01

    The most accepted conceptual model to explain surface degassing of cold magmatic CO2 in volcanic-geothermal systems involves the presence of a gas reservoir. In this study, numerical simulations using the TOUGH2-ECO2N V2.0 package are performed to get quantitative insights into how cold CO2 soil flux measurements are related to reservoir and fluid properties. Although the modeling is based on flux data measured at a specific geothermal site, the Acoculco caldera (Mexico), some general insights have been gained. Both the CO2 fluxes at the surface and the depth at which CO2 exsolves are highly sensitive to the dissolved CO2 content of the deep fluid. If CO2 mainly exsolves above the reservoir within a fracture zone, the surface CO2 fluxes are not sensitive to the reservoir size but depend on the CO2 dissolved content and the rock permeability. For gas exsolution below the top of the reservoir, surface CO2 fluxes also depend on the gas saturation of the deep fluid as well as the reservoir size. The absence of thermal anomalies at the surface is mainly a consequence of the low enthalpy of CO2. The heat carried by CO2 is efficiently cooled down by heat conduction and to a certain extent by isoenthalpic volume expansion depending on the temperature gradient. Thermal anomalies occur at higher CO2 fluxes (>37,000 g m-2 d-1) when the heat flux of the rising CO2 is not balanced anymore. Finally, specific results are obtained for the Acoculco area (reservoir depth, CO2 dissolved content, and gas saturation state).

  2. AmeriFlux US-Bn2 Bonanza Creek, 1987 Burn site near Delta Junction

    DOE Data Explorer

    Randerson, James [University of California, Irvine

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bn2 Bonanza Creek, 1987 Burn site near Delta Junction. Site Description - The Delta Junction 1987 Burn site is located near Delta Junction, just to the north of the Alaska Range in interior Alaska. All three Delta Junction sites are within a 15-km radius of one another. Composed of a combination of alluvial outwashes, floodplains, and low terraces dissected by glacial streams originating in the nearby Alaska Range. The Granite Creek fire burned ~20,000 ha of black spruce (Picea mariana) during 1987. Approximately half of the dead boles remained upright in 2004, while the other half had fallen over or had become entangled with other boles.

  3. AmeriFlux US-Bn3 Bonanza Creek, 1999 Burn site near Delta Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Randerson, James

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bn3 Bonanza Creek, 1999 Burn site near Delta Junction. Site Description - The Delta Junction 1999 Burn site is located near Delta Junction, just to the north of the Alaska Range in interior Alaska. All three Delta Junction sites are within a 15-km radius of one another. Composed of a combination of alluvial outwashes, floodplains, and low terraces dissected by glacial streams originating in the nearby Alaska Range. The Donnelly Flats fire burned ~7,600 ha of black spruce (Picea mariana) during June 1999. The boles of the black spruce remained standing 3 years after the fire. 70% of the surface was not covered by vascular plants.

  4. A simple calculation algorithm to separate high-resolution CH4 flux measurements into ebullition and diffusion-derived components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Schulz-Hanke, Maximilian; Garcia Alba, Joana; Jurisch, Nicole; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sachs, Torsten; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Processes driving methane (CH4) emissions in wetland ecosystems are highly complex. Especially, the separation of CH4 emissions into ebullition and diffusion derived flux components, a perquisite for the mechanistic process understanding and identification of potential environmental driver is rather challenging. We present a simple calculation algorithm, based on an adaptive R-script, which separates open-water, closed chamber CH4 flux measurements into diffusion- and ebullition-derived components. Hence, flux component specific dynamics are revealed and potential environmental driver identified. Flux separation is based on a statistical approach, using ebullition related sudden concentration changes obtained during high resolution CH4 concentration measurements. By applying the lower and upper quartile ± the interquartile range (IQR) as a variable threshold, diffusion dominated periods of the flux measurement are filtered. Subsequently, flux calculation and separation is performed. The algorithm was verified in a laboratory experiment and tested under field conditions, using flux measurement data (July to September 2013) from a flooded, former fen grassland site. Erratic ebullition events contributed 46% to total CH4 emissions, which is comparable to values reported by literature. Additionally, a shift in the diurnal trend of diffusive fluxes throughout the measurement period, driven by the water temperature gradient, was revealed.

  5. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2006-08-15

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  6. Measurement of autophagy flux in the nervous system in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, K; Valenzuela, V; Matus, S; Nassif, M; Oñate, M; Fuentealba, Y; Encina, G; Irrazabal, T; Parsons, G; Court, F A; Schneider, B L; Armentano, D; Hetz, C

    2013-01-01

    Accurate methods to measure autophagic activity in vivo in neurons are not available, and most of the studies are based on correlative and static measurements of autophagy markers, leading to conflicting interpretations. Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process involved in the degradation of diverse cellular components including organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy impairment is emerging as a relevant factor driving neurodegeneration in many diseases. Moreover, strategies to modulate autophagy have been shown to provide protection against neurodegeneration. Here we describe a novel and simple strategy to express an autophagy flux reporter in the nervous system of adult animals by the intraventricular delivery of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) into newborn mice. Using this approach we efficiently expressed a monomeric tandem mCherry-GFP-LC3 construct in neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system, allowing the measurement of autophagy activity in pharmacological and disease settings. PMID:24232093

  7. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and inaccuracy caused by inappropriate air velocity or sweep air flow...

  8. Impact of hydrological variations on modeling of peatland CO2 fluxes: Results from the North American Carbon Program site synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, Benjamin N.; Desai, Ankur R.; Schroeder, Nicole M.; Ricciuto, Dan; Barr, Alan; Richardson, Andrew D.; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Lafleur, Peter M.; Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Grant, Robert F.; Poulter, Benjamin; Verbeeck, Hans; Ciais, Philippe; Ringeval, Bruno; Baker, Ian T.; Schaefer, Kevin; Luo, Yiqi; Weng, Ensheng

    2012-03-01

    Northern peatlands are likely to be important in future carbon cycle-climate feedbacks due to their large carbon pools and vulnerability to hydrological change. Use of non-peatland-specific models could lead to bias in modeling studies of peatland-rich regions. Here, seven ecosystem models were used to simulate CO2fluxes at three wetland sites in Canada and the northern United States, including two nutrient-rich fens and one nutrient-poor,sphagnum-dominated bog, over periods between 1999 and 2007. Models consistently overestimated mean annual gross ecosystem production (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) at all three sites. Monthly flux residuals (simulated - observed) were correlated with measured water table for GEP and ER at the two fen sites, but were not consistently correlated with water table at the bog site. Models that inhibited soil respiration under saturated conditions had less mean bias than models that did not. Modeled diurnal cycles agreed well with eddy covariance measurements at fen sites, but overestimated fluxes at the bog site. Eddy covariance GEP and ER at fens were higher during dry periods than during wet periods, while models predicted either the opposite relationship or no significant difference. At the bog site, eddy covariance GEP did not depend on water table, while simulated GEP was higher during wet periods. Carbon cycle modeling in peatland-rich regions could be improved by incorporating wetland-specific hydrology and by inhibiting GEP and ER under saturated conditions. Bogs and fens likely require distinct plant and soil parameterizations in ecosystem models due to differences in nutrients, peat properties, and plant communities.

  9. Signal-to-noise issues in measuring nitrous oxide fluxes by the eddy covariance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicholas; Levy, Peter; Langford, Ben; Skiba, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Recently-developed fast-response gas analysers capable of measuring atmospheric N2O with high precision (< 50 ppt) at a rate of 10 Hz are becoming more widely available. These instruments are capable of measuring N2O fluxes using the eddy covariance method, with significantly less effort and uncertainty than previous instruments have allowed. However, there are still many issues to overcome in order to obtain accurate and reliable flux data. The signal-to-noise ratio of N2O measured using these instruments is still two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of CO2. The low signal-to-noise ratio can lead to systematic uncertainties, in the eddy covariance method, the most significant being in the calculation of the time lag between gas analyser and anemometer by maximisation of covariance (Langford et al., 2015). When signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low, as it is with many N2O measurements, the maximisation of covariance method can systematically overestimate fluxes. However, if constant time lags are assumed, then fluxes will be underestimated. This presents a major issue for N2O eddy covariance measurements. In this presentation we will focus on the signal to noise ratio for an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL). Eddy covariance flux measurements from multiple agricultural sites across the UK were investigated for potential uncertainties. Our presentation highlights some of these uncertainties when analysing eddy covariance data and offers suggestions as to how these issues may be minimised. Langford, B., Acton, W., Ammann, C., Valach, A. and Nemitz, E.: Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection, Atmos Meas Tech, 8(10), 4197-4213, doi:10.5194/amt-8-4197-2015, 2015.

  10. Airborne boundary layer flux measurements of trace species over Canadian boreal forest and northern wetland regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, John A.; Barrick, John D. W.; Watson, Catherine E.; Sachse, Glen W.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Woerner, Mary A.; Collins, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Airborne heat, moisture, O3, CO, and CH4 flux measurements were obtained over the Hudson Bay lowlands (HBL) and northern boreal forest regions of Canada during July-August 1990. The airborne flux measurements were an integral part of the NASA/Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B field experiment executed in collaboration with the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). Airborne CH4 flux measurements were taken over a large portion of the HBL. The surface level flux of CH4 was obtained from downward extrapolations of multiple-level CH4 flux measurements. Methane source strengths ranged from -1 to 31 mg m2- d-1, with the higher values occurring in relatively small, isolated areas. Similar measurements of the CH4 source strength in the boreal forest region of Schefferville, Quebec, ranged from 6 to 27 mg m-2 d-1 and exhibited a diurnal dependence. The CH4 source strengths found during the ABLE 3B expedition were much lower than the seasonally averaged source strength of 51 mg m-2 d-1 found for the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta region of Alaska during the previous ABLE 3A study. Large positive CO fluxes (0.31 to 0.53 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) m s-1) were observed over the inland, forested regions of the HBL study area, although the mechanism for the generation of these fluxes was not identified. Repetitive measurements along the same ground track at various times of day near the Schefferville site also suggested a diurnal dependence for CO emissions. Measurements of surface resistance to the uptake of O3 (1.91 to 0.80 s cm-1) for the HBL areas investigated were comparable to those observed near the Schefferville site (3.40 to 1.10s cm-1). Surface resistance values for the ABLE 3B study area were somewhat less than those observed over the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta during the previous ABLE 3A study. The budgets for heat, moisture, O3, CO, and CH4 were evaluated. The residuals from these budget studies indicated, for the cases selected, a moderate net photochemical

  11. Airborne boundary layer flux measurements of trace species over Canadian boreal forest and northern wetland regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, John A.; Barrick, John D. W.; Watson, Catherine E.; Sachse, Glen W.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Woerner, Mary A.; Collins, James E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Airborne heat, moisture, O3, CO, and CH4 flux measurements were obtained over the Hudson Bay lowlands (HBL) and northern boreal forest regions of Canada during July - August 1990. The airborne flux measurements were an integral part of the NASA/Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B field experiment executed in collaboration with the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). Airborne CH4 flux measurements were taken over a large portion of the HBL. The surface level flux of CH4 was obtained from downward extrapolations of multiple-level CH4 flux measurements. Methane source strengths ranged from -1 to 31 mg m(exp -2)/d, with the higher values occurring in relatively small, isolated areas. Similar measurements of the CH4 source strength in the boreal forest region of Schefferville, Quebec, ranged from 6 to 27 mg m(exp -2)/d and exhibited a diurnal dependence. The CH4 source strengths found during the ABLE 3B expedition were much lower than the seasonally averaged source strength of 51 mg m(exp -2)/d found for the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta region of Alaska during the previous ABLE 3A study. Large positive CO fluxes (0.31 to 0.53 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) m/s) were observed over the inland, forested regions of the HBL study area, although the mechanism for the generation of these fluxes was not identified. Repetitive measurements along the same ground track at various times of day near the Schefferville site also suggested a diurnal dependence for CO emissions. Measurements of surface resistance to the uptake of O3 (1.91 to 0.80 s/cm) for the HBL areas investigated were comparable to those observed near the Schefferville site (3.40 to 1.10 s/cm). Surface resistance values for the ABLE 3B study area were somewhat less than those observed over the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta during the previous ABLE 3A study. The budgets for heat, moisture, O3, CO, and CH4 were evaluated. The residuals from these budget studies indicated, for the cases selected, a moderate net

  12. Why we need to estimate the sampling uncertainty of eddy covariance flux measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Seo, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Fruitful studies on exchanges of energy, water and carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem has been produced under a global network (http://fluxnet.ornl.gov). The exchange is defined by a flux, and in traditional the flux is estimated with eddy covariance (EC) method as a mean flux F for 30-min or 1-hr, because no techniques have been established for a direct measurement of a momentary flux itself. Therefore, the exchange analysis with F is to paid attention to estimations of spatial or temporal mean, because the exchange estimated by arithmetic mean Fa might be inappropriate in terms of the sample F used in this averaging having nonidentical inherent quality within one another in accordance with different micrometeorological and ecophysiological conditions while those are measured by the same instruments. To overcome this issue, we propose the weighted mean Fw using a relative sampling uncertainty ɛ estimated by a sampling F and its uncertainty, and introduce Fw performance tested with EC measurements for various sites.

  13. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research.

    PubMed

    Niedermann, R; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies.

  14. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, R.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies.

  15. Particle and heat flux measurements in PDX edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Manos, D.

    1983-12-01

    This paper describes the use of novel combined Langmuir-calorimeter probes to measure edge plasma conditions near the midplane in PDX. The probes consisted of up to five Langmuir probes and up to two calorimeters. Single and double probe characteristics yield n/sub e/ and T/sub e/ which are compared with that derived from a triple probe analysis. The calorimeters measure heat flux in the electron and ion drift directions. This paper presents time-resolved radial profiles of n/sub e/, T/sub e/, V/sub F/ (floating potential), and P (heat flux) during high power neutral beam-heated, single-null discharges and circular scoop limiter discharges. The temporal dependence of these quantities displays the previous observed behavior with respect to gross discharge characteristics; however, an additional dependence on confinement mode has been observed. During the H-mode of energy confinement, a transient depression of n/sub e/, T/sub e/, and P occurs in the scrape-off plasma.

  16. Influence of Different Environmental Variables on Energy and Carbon Fluxes in a Mediterranean Maquis Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucco, V.; Marras, S.; Sirca, C.; Duce, P.; Spano, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies show that, in the Mediterranean area, global climate changes are likely causing an increase in frequency and intensity of drought periods as well as in the number of warmer days and nights. Mediterranean maquis (schlerophyll species) is a typical evergreen ecosystem consisting of short shrubs with leathery leaves sparsely distributed. It is adapted to live in a semi-arid climate as that of Mediterranean coasts and can survive to these environmental stress condition, being able to recover after autumn rainfall. However, increased environmental stress condition may determine changes in vegetation behavior in the long period. The aim of this study is to show the seasonal variability of sensible and latent heat, and CO2 exchanges measured, with the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique, over a Mediterranean Maquis site. It is located, about 600 m far from the sea, in the Capo Caccia peninsula (municipal district of Alghero (SS), Italy) within a natural reserve called "Le Prigionette", also known as Arca di Noé, in the North-West Sardinia coast (40.61° N, 8.15° E, 74 m asl). Due to this proximity of the EC tower to the sea, the ecosystem vertical exchanges and their footprint may be differently affected by sea and land breeze during days and nights, respectively. A four-component net radiometer, a quantum sensor, and a meteorological station were also set up for ancillary measurements as well as four heat plates in four different positions to account for under canopy and bare soil conditions in the Maquis ecosystem. Therefore, the influence of different environmental variables, such as soil/air temperature, atmospheric conditions and soil moisture content, on energy and carbon fluxes will be investigated and their effect on the seasonal and inter-annual variability of surface fluxes will be analyzed.

  17. Potentials and challenges associated with automated closed dynamic chamber measurements of soil CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    the row width alternating between 1.50 m and 0.75 m, creating spatial differences in e.g. dry bulk density and soil organic carbon content. The soil CO2 flux data sets were split into four subsets each characterized by different environmental conditions, thus presenting different challenges for the measurement equipment, namely 1) daytime, calm conditions, 2) daytime, windy conditions, 3) nighttime, calm conditions, and 4) nighttime, windy conditions. In parallel to the chamber measurements, soil CO2 concentrations were manually measured in the topsoil. Soil CO2 fluxes calculated from this dataset were used as a reference range of soil CO2 fluxes at the field site. Funding support: ERC Advanced Grant agreement (# 233366) POPFULL under the EC 7th Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013), Flemish Hercules Foundation as Infrastructure contract # ZW09-06, and the Methusalem Program of the Flemish Government.

  18. AmeriFlux US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, William

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site. Site Description - The forest surrounding the Hemlock site has remained pristine with two exceptions. In the early to mid-1700s, European settlers cleared the majority of the forest for agricultural purposes. Selective harvesting of hemlock and chestnut trees occurred up until the early 1900s, when the chestnut blight killed all of the chestnut trees. In the current forest, about 83% of the total basal area of trees is hemlock. The remainder is equally divided between eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and deciduous species, including red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and black birch (Betula lenta). A very thick organic layer (10-20 cm or more) covers the soil surface, and highly decayed coarse woody debris is abundant.

  19. Comparison of buried soil sensors, surface chambers and above ground measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Accurate measurements of soil CO2 flux aids determinations of carbon budgets. In this study, we investigated soil CO2 fluxes with time and depth and above ground CO2 fluxes in a bare field. CO2 concentrations w...

  20. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  1. Measurement of geothermal flux through poorly consolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Munroe, R.J.; Lachenbruch, A.H.

    1968-01-01

    In many regions, crystalline rocks are covered by hundreds of meters of unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sediments. Estimates of heat flux within these sediments using standard continental techniques (temperature and conductivity measurements at intervals of 10 to 30 meters) are unreliable, mainly because of the difficulty in obtaining and preserving representative lengths of core. However, it is sometimes feasible to use what amounts to an oceanographic technique by making closely spaced temperature and conductivity measurements within short cored intervals. This is demonstrated in a borehole at Menlo Park, California (37??27???N, 122??10???W, elevation 16 meters), where heat flows determined over 12 separate 1-meter intervls al lie within 10% of their mean value; 2.2 ??cal/cm2 sec. ?? 1968.

  2. Sound power flux measurements in strongly exited ducts with flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Keith R.; Davies, Peter O. A. L.; van der Walt, Danie C.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution describes new robust procedures for the measurement of sound power flux at appropriate axial positions along a duct with flow, using pairs of flush wall mounted microphones, or pressure transducers. The technology includes the application of selective averaging, order tracking, and optimized sampling rate methods to identify the small fraction of the total fluctuating wave energy that is being propagated along the flow path in a reverberent, or highly reactive duct system. Such measurements can also be used to quantify the local acoustic characteristics that govern the generation, transfer, and propagation of wave energy in the system. Illustrative examples include the determination of the acoustic characteristics of individual silencing elements installed in IC engine intakes and exhausts both on the flow bench and during controlled acceleration or run down on a test bed, where the wave component spectral levels approached 170 dB.

  3. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Veselinović, N. Dragić, A. Maletić, D. Joković, D. Savić, M. Banjanac, R. Udovičić, V. Aničin, I.

    2015-02-24

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations.

  4. Measurement of momentum flux using two meteor radars in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Two nearly identical meteor radars were operated at Koto Tabang (0.20° S, 100.32° E), West Sumatra, and Biak (1.17° S, 136.10° E), West Papua, in Indonesia, separated by approximately 4000 km in longitude on the Equator. The zonal and meridional momentum flux, u'w' and v'w', where u, v, and w are the eastward, northward, and vertical wind velocity components, respectively, were estimated at 86 to 94 km altitudes using the meteor radar data by applying a method proposed by Hocking (2005). The observed u'w' at the two sites agreed reasonably well at 86, 90, and 94 km during the observation periods when the data acquisition rate was sufficiently large enough. Variations in v'w' were consistent between 86, 90, and 94 km altitudes at both sites. The climatological variation in the monthly averaged u'w' and v'w' was investigated using the long-term radar data at Koto Tabang from November 2002 to November 2013. The seasonal variations in u'w' and v'w' showed a repeatable semiannual and annual cycles, respectively. u'w' showed eastward values in February-April and July-September and v'w' was northward in June to August at 90-94 km, both of which were generally anti-phase with the mean zonal and meridional winds, having the same periodicity. Our results suggest the usefulness of the Hocking method.

  5. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mick Y.; Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen D.; Strauss, Josiah; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10 m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (∼1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  6. Post-disturbance dynamics in forest-atmosphere fluxes: Observations from a windthrow site in the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Bradley; Mayer, Mathias; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Schume, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Natural disturbances can cause abrupt and substantial changes in ecosystem properties regulating forest-atmosphere exchange. Although forest sites disturbed by e.g. wind, fire, and insects have become important targets of micrometeorological research, investigations of intact and disturbed forests in mountainous areas remain comparatively scarce. This discrepancy is likely explained by the additional methodological challenges posed by mountainous ecosystems, especially with respect to the eddy covariance technique. Nonetheless, the lack of such experiments constitutes a significant void in global and regional flux networks, particularly in the Central European context, where the Alps are forecasted as potential hotspots of intensifying windthrow and bark beetle disturbance regimes. We therefore began a micrometeorological investigation at a forest site in the Northern Calcareous Alps of Austria disturbed by windthrow and subsequent bark beetle infestation in 2009. The objectives of the study were to determine 1) whether the eddy covariance technique provides robust measurements of turbulent surface-atmosphere exchange at the site and 2) how net exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor, sensible heat and shortwave radiation develop over 3 subsequent growing seasons (2011 to 2013) following disturbance. According to a flux quality assessment looking at turbulence, stationarity, flux footprint and energy balance closure, eddy covariance provides defensible estimates of net turbulent exchange at the site, despite the non ideal conditions for its application. While the site remained a CO2 source in 2013, decreasing net CO2 release over the three subsequent growing seasons indicated that the ecosystem was in a state of recovery. Moreover, it appeared that this recovery also significantly influenced the net exchange of shortwave radiation and the partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes. Taking into account the varying climate over the three campaign

  7. Local Heat Flux Measurements with Single Element Coaxial Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregg; Protz, Christopher; Bullard, Brad; Hulka, James

    2006-01-01

    To support the mission for the NASA Vision for Space Exploration, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a program in 2005 to improve the capability to predict local thermal compatibility and heat transfer in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. The ultimate objective was to predict and hence reduce the local peak heat flux due to injector design, resulting in a significant improvement in overall engine reliability and durability. Such analyses are applicable to combustion devices in booster, upper stage, and in-space engines, as well as for small thrusters with few elements in the injector. In this program, single element and three-element injectors were hot-fire tested with liquid oxygen and ambient temperature gaseous hydrogen propellants at The Pennsylvania State University Cryogenic Combustor Laboratory from May to August 2005. Local heat fluxes were measured in a 1-inch internal diameter heat sink combustion chamber using Medtherm coaxial thermocouples and Gardon heat flux gauges. Injectors were tested with shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements, including recessed, flush and scarfed oxidizer post configurations, and concentric and non-concentric fuel annuli. This paper includes general descriptions of the experimental hardware, instrumentation, and results of the hot-fire testing for three of the single element injectors - recessed-post shear coaxial with concentric fuel, flush-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel, and scarfed-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel. Detailed geometry and test results will be published elsewhere to provide well-defined data sets for injector development and model validatation.

  8. Laboratory Measurement of Enthalpy Flux in High Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, D.; Haus, B. K.; Donelan, M. A.; Zhang, J.

    2006-12-01

    The intensity of tropical cyclones is sensitive to the rates at which enthalpy and momentum are transferred between sea and air in the high-wind core of the storm. Present models of the wind dependence of these transfer rates, does not allow for storms of greater than marginal hurricane intensity. Recent studies have shown that there is a saturation of the bulk drag coefficient in high winds, however more information on the enthalpy flux is required. In particular the role that sea spray plays in enhancing the enthalpy transfer at very high wind speeds is not known. The coefficients for sensible and latent heat transfer (Stanton and Dalton numbers) were measured in the 15-m wind-wave facility at the University of Miami's Air-Sea Interaction Saltwater Tank (ASIST). The wind speed (referred to 10m) was explored over a range of 0 to 45 m/s, covering a full range of aerodynamic conditions from smooth to fully rough. Experiments were designed with water temperatures set between 2 and 5° C above/below the air temperature, with precision thermistors (± 0.002° C) to monitor temperature and Li-Cor infra-red absorption devices to monitor specific humidity changes at upstream and downstream ends of the wave tank during the experiment. The calorimetric use of a wind-wave tank gave precise flux estimates, and experiments were repeated at different Bowen ratios to allow the separation of the heat and moisture parts of the transfer. The effect of spray on the moisture flux was reflected in the drop in temperature along the air path from upstream to downstream and this made it possible to estimate the total spray evaporated in the air column.

  9. Measurement of N{sub 2}O fluxes from fertilized grassland using a fast response tunable diode laser spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wienhold, F.G.; Frahm, H.; Harris, G.W.

    1994-08-20

    Measurements of nitrous oxide flux from fertilized agricultural grasslands is important in explaining and predicting the relationship of emissions of this gas to global warming. The nitrous oxide flux from agricultural grasslands was measured using micrometeorological techniques at a site near Stirling, Scotland. Emission levels were measured using a fast response tunable diode laser spectrometer. Measurements were made by both eddy correlation and concentration gradient techniques. This paper describes the results of this experiment and discusses information obtained that may be used for the characterization of the spatial variability in nitrous oxide emissions. 20 refs., 8 figs, 1 tab.

  10. A Novel Approach for Direct Measurement of Cumulative Water and Solute Mass Fluxes using a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padowski, J. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Cho, J.; Klammler, H.

    2005-12-01

    This work describes the development of a novel technique for passive measurement of pollutant loads in flowing surface water systems. Recent changes to the Clean Water Act have prompted a major initiative for the development of a national list of impaired surface waters. According to the law, every state is now responsible for defining the use of each water body and creating a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to regulate all pollutant loads entering these systems. Current methods for determining pollutant loads typically involve collecting separate instantaneous measurements of water velocities and solute concentrations at discrete points in space and time. The data must be combined, interpolated and integrated after collection to arrive at estimates of local cumulative solute flux and discharge. The frequency with which these parameters are measured typically rely upon the availability of resources (time, money, manpower, etc.) and are often undersampled. A method is presented here for direct measurement of cumulative surface water flux (discharge) and solute flux using a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). The PSFM is designed to directly measure local cumulative water and solute mass fluxes in surface water flow without any active components transmitting or logging data over time. This passive integration of water and solute mass fluxes eliminates the need for independent water flux and concentration measurements and any additional computations. Laboratory trials under steady state and transient conditions were used to test the appropriateness of the PSFM as a device for collecting water quality data. Results from steady state experiments verified the ability of PSFM to accurately measure cumulative water and solute mass flux. Preliminary results from investigations under transient flow conditions also showed promise for measuring pollutant loads in natural systems with this device.

  11. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  12. Estimation of water flux in urban area using eddy covariance measurements in Riverside, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenerette, D.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Micrometeorological methods can direct measure the sensible and latent heat flux in specific sites and provide robust estimates of the evaporative fraction (EF), which is the fraction of available surface energy contained in latent heat. Across a vegetation coverage gradient in urban area, an empirical relationship is expected between EF and vegetation coverage, which provides the opportunity to quantify regional water flux. Here we deployed three eddy covariance (EC) systems to quantify the relationship between EF and vegetation coverage. First, two continuous systems were deployed at an industrial area with very low vegetation cover and another located in the orange orchid in Riverside, CA, to quantify the temporal dynamic of EF for the endpoints. Second, a mobile EC system was deployed to quantify the spatial distribution of EF across a gradient of vegetation coverage, during the summer time in Riverside, CA. These data showed the EF in high vegetation cover is 31.16±3.99%, but at the lower vegetation cover site EF is only 16.48±5.40%, which about 2 times lower in EF than the area with high vegetation cover. These results derived from the EC measurements provide essential data to quantify the temporal and spatial water fluxes in urban area and are needed to better understand and manage urban water use in response to drought.

  13. Measurement of particulate matter emission fluxes from a beef cattle feedlot using Flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on air emissions from open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas using the flux-gradient technique, a widely-used micrometeorological method for gaseous emissions from open sources. V...

  14. Reentrant albedo proton fluxes measured by the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Donato, C. De; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-05-01

    We present a precise measurement of downward going albedo proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ˜70 MeV performed by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiment at an altitude between 350 and 610 km. On the basis of a trajectory tracing simulation, the analyzed protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and untrapped spreading over all latitudes, including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudotrapped) components. In addition, features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated in detail. PAMELA results significantly improve the characterization of the high-energy albedo proton populations at low-Earth orbits.

  15. Eddy Covariance Measurements Over a Maize Field: The Contribution of Minor Flux Terms to the Energy Balance Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, J.; Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lack of energy balance closure is a long-standing problem in eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The energy balance equation is defined as Rn - G = H + λE, where Rn is net radiation, G is the ground heat flux, H is the sensible heat flux and λE is the latent heat flux. In most cases of energy imbalance, either Rn is overestimated or the ground heat and turbulent fluxes are underestimated. Multiple studies have shown that calculations, incorrect instrument installation/calibration and measurement errors alone do not entirely account for this imbalance. Rather, research is now focused on previously neglected sources of heat storage in the soil, biomass and air beneath the EC station. This project examined the potential of five "minor flux terms" - soil heat storage, biomass heat storage, energy consumption by photosynthesis, air heat storage and atmospheric moisture change, to further close the energy balance gap. Eddy covariance measurements were conducted at a maize (Zea mays) field in southwest Germany during summer 2014. Soil heat storage was measured for six weeks at 11 sites around the field footprint. Biomass and air heat storage were measured for six subsequent weeks at seven sites around the field footprint. Energy consumption by photosynthesis was calculated using the CO2 flux data. Evapotranspiration was calculated using the water balance method and then compared to the flux data processed with three post-closure methods: the sensible heat flux, the latent heat flux and the Bowen ratio post-closure methods. An energy balance closure of 66% was achieved by the EC station measurements over the entire investigation period. During the soil heat flux campaign, EC station closure was 74.1%, and the field footprint soil heat storage contributed 3.3% additional closure. During the second minor flux term measurement period, closure with the EC station data was 91%. Biomass heat storage resulted in 1.1% additional closure, the photosynthesis flux closed the gap

  16. Comparative analysis of matter and energy fluxes determined by Bowen Ratio and Eddy Covariance techniques at a crop site in eastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, K.; Hehn, M.; Bernhofer, C.

    2012-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric fluxes is an important means to evaluate ecosystem exchanges. In 2009 and 2010, fluxes and gradients of heat, water vapour, and CO2 over winter barley and rapeseed were measured simultaneously at the Klingenberg cropland site in Germany. A Bowen Ratio (BR) system was employed alongside to an existing Eddy Covariance (EC) tower. The BR system is required to account for the longer response time of the chemiluminescence analysers measuring other trace gases, e.g. NOx. To test and evaluate the application of the NOx measurement setup, the two independent systems (BR/EC) are compared with respect to energy and CO2 fluxes. We show a regression and differences analysis, diurnal cycles of the obtained fluxes, and interpret their coherence to the growth stage of the crops. The regression analysis depicts that differences between the systems are largest for latent heat LE (BR detects apparently higher LE due to the forced closure of energy balance), whereby the matter fluxes of CO2 show fairly little differences. Both measurement systems are able to capture the fluctuations of fluxes adequately well. Additionally, a multiple linear regression revealed that differences between the obtained fluxes are not induced by atmospheric conditions. The results of the differences analysis for sensible and latent heat point out that the observed differences of fluxes between both systems are mainly due to deviations in the mean, while differences in variability and timing/shape are of smaller importance. The differences of CO2 fluxes between both measurement systems are particularly caused by deviations in timing and shape, which can be explained with the linear cross-correlation coefficient (R2=0.8). From the good results of the comparison of matter fluxes (CO2) we conclude that the use of the Bowen Ratio method is applicable to other matter fluxes (like NOx).

  17. Trends in long-term carbon and water fluxes - a case study from a temperate Norway spruce site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, Wolfgang; Lüers, Johannes; Hübner, Jörg; Serafimovich, Andrei; Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyse eddy-covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour from 18 years at Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen (DE-Bay), a Norway spruce forest site in the Fichtelgebirge, Germany. Standard flux partitioning algorithms have been applied for separation of net ecosystem exchange NEE into gross ecosystem uptake GEE and ecosystem respiration Reco, and gap-filling. The annual NEE shows a positive trend, which is related to a strong increase in GEE, while Reco enhances slightly. Annual evapotranspiration increases as well, while atmospheric demand, i.e. potential evapotranspiration, shows inter-annual variability, but no trend. Comparisons with studies from other warm temperate needle-leaved forests show, that NEE is at the upper range of the distribution, and evapotranspiration in Budyko space is in a similar range, but with a large inter-annual variability. While this trends are generally in agreement with findings from other locations and expectations to climate change, the specific history at this site clearly has a large impact on the results: The forest was in the first years very much affected due to forest decline and convalesced after a liming. In the last ten years the site was much affected by beetles and windthrow. Thus the more recent positive trends may be related to increased heterogeneity at the site. As FLUXNET stations, built 10-20 years ago, often started with "ideal forest sites", increasing heterogeneity might be a more general problem for trend analysis of long-term data sets.

  18. Passive flux sampler for measurement of formaldehyde emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Fujii, Minoru; Yamasaki, Akihiro; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    A new passive flux sampler (PFS) was developed to measure emission rates of formaldehyde and to determine emission sources in indoor environments. The sampler consisted of a glass Petri dish containing a 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine (DNPH)-impregnated sheet. At the start of sampling, the PFS was placed with the open face of the dish on each of the indoor materials under investigation, such as flooring, walls, doors, closets, desks, beds, etc. Formaldehyde emitted from a source material diffused through the inside of the PFS and was adsorbed onto the DNPH sheet. The formaldehyde emission rates could be determined from the quantities adsorbed. The lower determination limits were 9.2 and 2.3 μg m -2 h -1 for 2- and 8-h sampling periods. The recovery rate and the precision of the PFS were 82.9% and 8.26%, respectively. The emission rates measured by PFS were in good agreement with the emission rates measured by the chamber method ( R2=0.963). This shows that it is possible to take measurements of the formaldehyde emission rates from sources in a room and to compare them. In addition, the sampler can be used to elucidate the emission characteristics of a source by carrying out emission measurements with different air-layer thicknesses inside the PFS and at different temperatures. The dependency of the emission rate on the thickness of the air layer inside the PFS indicated whether the internal mass transfer inside the source material or the diffusion in the gas-phase boundary layer controlled the formaldehyde emission rate from a material. In addition, as a pilot study, the formaldehyde emission rates were measured, and the largest emission source of formaldehyde could be identified from among several suspected materials in a model house by using the PFS.

  19. AmeriFlux US-Ne1 Mead - irrigated continuous maize site

    SciTech Connect

    Suyker, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ne1 Mead - irrigated continuous maize site. Site Description - The study site is one of three fields (all located within 1.6 km of each other) at the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead, Nebraska. This site is irrigated with a center pivot system. Prior to the initiation of the study, the irrigated site had a 10-yr history of maize-soybean rotation under no-till. A tillage operation (disking) was done just prior to the 2001 planting to homogenize the top 0.1 m of soil, incorporate P and K fertilizers, as well as previously accumulated surface residues. Since the tillage operation, the site has been under no-till management until the harvest of 2005. Following harvest, a conservation-plow tillage operation was initiated where a small amount of N fertilizer is sprayed on the residue immediately prior to the plow operation. Approximately 1/3 of the crop residue is left on the surface. The post-harvest conservation-plow operation continues as the current practice.

  20. The Design of a Calorimeter to Measure Concentrated Solar Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, Elizabeth Anne Bennett

    A water-cooled, cavity calorimeter was designed to accurately measure concentrated solar thermal power produced by the University of Minnesota's solar simulator. The cavity is comprised of copper tubing bent into spiral and helical coils for the base and cylindrical walls, respectively. Insulation surrounds the cavity to reduce heat transfer to the ambient, and a water- cooled aperture cover is positioned at the open end of the cavity. The calorimeter measures the heat gain of water flowing through the system as radiant energy is passed through the aperture. Chilled water flows through the tubing, and the energy incident on the cavity surface is conducted through the wall and convected to the flowing water. The energy increase in the water can be observed by an increase in fluid temperature. A Monte Carlo ray tracing method is used to predict the incident flux distribution and corresponding power on the surfaces of the cavity. These values are used to estimate the thermal losses of the system, and it is found that they account for less that 1% of the total power passed through the aperture. The overall uncertainty of the calorimeter is found by summing the measured uncertainty and the estimated heat loss and is found to be +/-2.5% for 9.2 kW of power output and +/-3.4% for 3 kW.

  1. Eddy covariance flux measurements of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange from a lowland peatland flux tower network in England and Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Ross; Balzter, Heiko; Burden, Annette; Callaghan, Nathan; Cumming, Alenander; Dixon, Simon; Evans, Jonathan; Kaduk, Joerg; Page, Susan; Pan, Gong; Rayment, Mark; Ridley, Luke; Rylett, Daniel; Worrall, Fred; Evans, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands store disproportionately large amounts of soil carbon relative to other terrestrial ecosystems. Over recent decades, the large amount of carbon stored as peat has proved vulnerable to a range of land use pressures as well as the increasing impacts of climate change. In temperate Europe and elsewhere, large tracts of lowland peatland have been drained and converted to agricultural land use. Such changes have resulted in widespread losses of lowland peatland habitat, land subsidence across extensive areas and the transfer of historically accumulated soil carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (CO2). More recently, there has been growth in activities aiming to reduce these impacts through improved land management and peatland restoration. Despite a long history of productive land use and management, the magnitude and controls on greenhouse gas emissions from lowland peatland environments remain poorly quantified. Here, results of surface-atmosphere measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) from a network of seven eddy covariance (EC) flux towers located at a range of lowland peatland ecosystems across the United Kingdom (UK) are presented. This spatially-dense peatland flux tower network forms part of a wider observation programme aiming to quantify carbon, water and greenhouse gas balances for lowland peatlands across the UK. EC measurements totalling over seventeen site years were obtained at sites exhibiting large differences in vegetation cover, hydrological functioning and land management. The sites in the network show remarkable spatial and temporal variability in NEE. Across sites, annual NEE ranged from a net sink of -194 ±38 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 to a net source of 784±70 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1. The results suggest that semi-natural sites remain net sinks for atmospheric CO2. Sites that are drained for intensive agricultural production range from a small net sink to the largest observed source for atmospheric CO2 within the flux tower network

  2. Methane Flux Measurements from a Low Flying Aircraft: What they tell us about Regional Heterogeneity in Carbon Flux over the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayres, D. S.; Healy, C. E.; Munster, J. B.; Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Kochendorfer, J.; Wilkerson, J.; Baker, B.; Langford, J.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic contains a large reservoir of organic matter stored in permafrost and clathrates. Varying geology and hydrology across the Arctic, even on small scales, can cause large variability in surface carbon fluxes and partitioning between methane and carbon dioxide. In situ measurements are further complicated by the presence of gas and oil extraction, natural gas seeps, and biomass burning. Ground based measurements can yield high temporal resolution and detailed information about a specific location, but due to the inaccessibility of most of the Arctic to date in situ measurements have been made at very few sites. In August 2013, a small aircraft, flying low over the surface (5-30 m), and carrying an air turbulence probe and spectroscopic instruments to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and their isotopologues, flew over the North Slope of Alaska. During the ten flights multiple comparisons were made with a ground based Eddy Covariance tower as well as three region surveys of fluxes over three areas each approximately 2500 km2. We present analysis using the Flux Fragment Method and surface landscape classification maps to relate the fluxes to different surface land types.

  3. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  4. Measuring Total Flux of Organic Vapors From the Unsaturated Zone Under Natural Conditions: Design, Laboratory and Field Testing of a Flux Chamber Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, F. D.; Choi, J.; Smith, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    A simple, easy-to-use, and inexpensive device for measuring VOC flux under natural conditions was designed and tested both in a controlled laboratory environment and in a natural field setting. The chamber consists of a stainless-steel right circular cylinder open on one end with a flexible, impermeable membrane allowing for chamber expansion and contraction. Air is pumped from inside the chamber through activated carbon traps and returned to the chamber maintaining a net zero pressure gradient from the inside to the outside of the chamber. The traps are analyzed using thermal desorption/GC-FID and the mass of contaminant is divided by the product of the sampled area and sample time to give VOC flux measured by the chamber. Design parameters for the chamber were selected using continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR)-equation based modeling under step, sinusoidal and transport-model simulation flux inputs. Laboratory testing of the flux chamber under both diffusion and advection dominated conditions was performed in a device constructed to simulate unsaturated zone transport. Aqueous trichloroethene (TCE) solution was pumped through the bottom of a steel drum inside which 50-cm of fine sand was suspended. For diffusion-dominated transport experiments, the chamber was installed in the sand at the top of the simulator and operated in the same manner as would occur in the field. The flux measurement of the chamber was then compared to flux prediction based on measured linear concentration data from the simulator and Fick's law. Advective transport is initiated in the vadose zone simulator by flowing humidified, pressurized air into an input port in the bottom of the simulator below the suspended porous media. Soil-gas velocity is calculated by dividing the airflow input by the surface area of the simulator. Flux was measured with the chamber and compared to flux predicted using airflow and concentration data from the simulator. Results from both the diffusion-only and

  5. Centrifugal pump inlet pressure site affects measurement.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Simon; Horton, Alison; Butt, Warwick; Bennett, Martin; Horton, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    During extracorporeal life support (ECLS), blood is exposed to a myriad of unphysiological factors that can affect outcome. One aspect of this is the sub-atmospheric pressure generated by the ECLS pump and imparted to blood elements along the pump inlet line. This pressure can be measured on the inlet line close to the pump head by adding a connector, or at the venous cannula connection site. We compared the two measurement sites located at both points; between the venous cannula-inlet tubing and inlet tubing-pump, with a range of cannulae and flows. We also investigated the effects on inlet pressure from pump afterload and increasing inlet tubing length.

  6. Impact of vegetation cover and stand age on scaling carbon fluxes in the upper Midwest: a multiple eddy flux site study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, A. R.; Normeets, A.; Bolstad, P. V.; Chen, J.; Cook, B. D.; Curtis, P. S.; Davis, K. J.; Euskirchen, E.; Gough, C.; Martin, J.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Schmid, H. P.; Tang, J.; Su, H.; Vogel, C.; Wang, W.

    2004-12-01

    Eight permanent and three roving eddy flux towers were used to observe the exchange of carbon dioxide between the ecosystem and atmosphere at fourteen different sites in northern Wisconsin and Michigan (USA) during the growing seasons (May-Sept) of 2002 and 2003. These towers were part of the Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS), the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS), and the Michigan Technical University. The sites spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, hemlock-hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of forest stand age (young, intermediate, mature and old). All sites experienced roughly similar climate; thus, comparisons among the sites allow for an examination of the impact of heterogeneous vegetation cover and stand age across a regional landscape. Carbon fluxes at different sites generally reacted similarly in response to variability in climate. Results suggest that both cover type and stand age are important variables for modeling and predicting fluxes in this region. These results have implications for developing methods of scaling carbon dioxide fluxes from sites to regions. These results will be contrasted to a flux decomposition at the WLEF tall tower.

  7. The BESS-Polar Proton & Helium flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K.C.; Kumazawal, T.; Lee, M.H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Moiseev, A.A.; Meyers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J.F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E.S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) instrument pro-vides precise measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of the light Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) component. The ability to determine the charge sign of incident par-ticles enables the instrument to search for GCR antimatter, which is a major objective of the BESS program. Since 1993, the US-Japan BESS collaboration has conducted 11 successful balloon flights, nine northern-latitude flights of 1-day duration and most recently two long-duration balloon flights (8.5 days in 2004 & 24.5 days in 2007/2008), with the BESS-Polar instrument. The BESS-Polar instrument is the current effort of BESS program specifically designed for long-duration, low-geomagnetic cutoff Antarctic flights with significantly increased transparency for incident CR particle allowing to study anti/proton down to 100 MeV and a faster data acquisition enables processing of all CR events without event selection. The first BESS-Polar flight was launched on Dec 13, 2004 from Williams Field, near McMurdo Station in Antarctica. The instrument recorded data for 8.5 days, limited by the cryogenic life time of the superconducting magnet. During this flight the BESS-Polar instrument recorded 0.9 x 109 CR events. In this paper, we present the absolute proton and helium flux for the first BESS-Polar flight as well as the time variation of the fluxes due to solar activity.

  8. On the applicability of surrogate-based Markov chain Monte Carlo-Bayesian inversion to the Community Land Model: Case studies at flux tower sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Maoyi; Ray, Jaideep; Hou, Zhangshuan; Ren, Huiying; Liu, Ying; Swiler, Laura

    2016-07-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) has been widely used in climate and Earth system modeling. Accurate estimation of model parameters is needed for reliable model simulations and predictions under current and future conditions, respectively. In our previous work, a subset of hydrological parameters has been identified to have significant impact on surface energy fluxes at selected flux tower sites based on parameter screening and sensitivity analysis, which indicate that the parameters could potentially be estimated from surface flux observations at the towers. To date, such estimates do not exist. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of applying a Bayesian model calibration technique to estimate CLM parameters at selected flux tower sites under various site conditions. The parameters are estimated as a joint probability density function (PDF) that provides estimates of uncertainty of the parameters being inverted, conditional on climatologically average latent heat fluxes derived from observations. We find that the simulated mean latent heat fluxes from CLM using the calibrated parameters are generally improved at all sites when compared to those obtained with CLM simulations using default parameter sets. Further, our calibration method also results in credibility bounds around the simulated mean fluxes which bracket the measured data. The modes (or maximum a posteriori values) and 95% credibility intervals of the site-specific posterior PDFs are tabulated as suggested parameter values for each site. Analysis of relationships between the posterior PDFs and site conditions suggests that the parameter values are likely correlated with the plant functional type, which needs to be confirmed in future studies by extending the approach to more sites.

  9. On the applicability of surrogate-based MCMC-Bayesian inversion to the Community Land Model: Case studies at Flux tower sites

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Maoyi; Ray, Jaideep; Hou, Zhangshuan; Ren, Huiying; Liu, Ying; Swiler, Laura

    2016-06-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) has been widely used in climate and Earth system modeling. Accurate estimation of model parameters is needed for reliable model simulations and predictions under current and future conditions, respectively. In our previous work, a subset of hydrological parameters has been identified to have significant impact on surface energy fluxes at selected flux tower sites based on parameter screening and sensitivity analysis, which indicate that the parameters could potentially be estimated from surface flux observations at the towers. To date, such estimates do not exist. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of applying a Bayesianmore » model calibration technique to estimate CLM parameters at selected flux tower sites under various site conditions. The parameters are estimated as a joint probability density function (PDF) that provides estimates of uncertainty of the parameters being inverted, conditional on climatologically-average latent heat fluxes derived from observations. We find that the simulated mean latent heat fluxes from CLM using the calibrated parameters are generally improved at all sites when compared to those obtained with CLM simulations using default parameter sets. Further, our calibration method also results in credibility bounds around the simulated mean fluxes which bracket the measured data. The modes (or maximum a posteriori values) and 95% credibility intervals of the site-specific posterior PDFs are tabulated as suggested parameter values for each site. Lastly, analysis of relationships between the posterior PDFs and site conditions suggests that the parameter values are likely correlated with the plant functional type, which needs to be confirmed in future studies by extending the approach to more sites.« less

  10. Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

    1983-08-01

    The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

  11. Measurement of Flux Density of Cas A at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajinkya; Fisher, R.

    2012-01-01

    Cas A is used as a flux calibrator throughout the radio spectrum. Therefore it is important to know the spectral and secular variations in its flux density. Earlier observations by Scott et. al. (1969) and Baars et. al. (1972) suggested a secular decrease in flux density of Cas A at a rate of about 1% per year at all frequencies. However later observations by Erickson & Perley (1975) and Read (1977) indicated anomalously high flux from Cas A at 38 MHz. Also, these observations suggested that the original idea of faster decay of the flux density rate at low frequencies may be in error or that something more complex than simple decay is affecting the flux density at low frequencies. The source changes at 38 MHz still remains a mystery. We intend to present the results of follow up observations made from 1995 to 1998 with a three element interferometer in Green Bank operating in frequency range 30 to 120 MHz. We will discuss the problems at such low frequencies due to large beamwidth and unstable ionosphere. We will also discuss the strategies we have used so far to to find the flux density of Cas A by calculating the ratio of flux density of Cas A to that of Cyg A, assuming flux density of Cyg A to be constant. Above mentioned work was performed in summer student program sponsored by National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

  12. Comparison of three stationary tests for eddy covariance measurements of turbulent fluxes of different scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donateo, Antonio; Cava, Daniela; Contini, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    In atmospheric turbulent flows, variables describing the motion undergo random and stochastic fluctuations. In turbulence studies the hypotheses of stationarity and ergodicity of time series is required in order to obtain estimates of ensemble averages from the temporal averages obtained from single runs. In atmosphere, however, equivalence between the two averages is just approximated because of non stationarity often inherent to atmospheric time series. Typically non-stationary conditions are driven by weather or internal boundary layer changing, for example for the presence of gravity waves or simply for the slow diurnal evolution of the boundary layer. The individuation of non-stationary cases is important for measurements of turbulent fluxes using the eddy covariance method generally applied to 30 minutes averages. Moreover it is necessary to have an analytical/parametric stationarity test, which can be used in real time determination of turbulent fluxes, for example in Fluxnet network. Nowadays different stationarity tests are proposed in literature and they are substantially used by scientific community (Foken & Wichura, 1996; Mahrt, 1998; Affre et al., 2000). In this work several time series have been analysed with the three different stationarity tests and a comparison of their performances has been developed. The stationarity tests have been applied to different scalars (temperature, ultrafine particles number concentration, carbon dioxide and water vapour concentration). All the time series come from measurements in different sites and are collected over different canopies: iced surface (in Antarctica), urban or suburban surface (Italy) and vegetal canopy over forests (both in Italy and USA). In total 6 different sites have been analysed and the performances of the stationarity tests do not seem to be site dependent. The correlation of their performances as a function of local micro-meteorological conditions have been analysed. All the three tests show

  13. Measuring intracellular calcium fluxes in high throughput mode.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Chris; Smith, Fiona; Williams, Christine; Marcos, Sandra; Liu, Zhen Han; Hayter, Paul; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Keighley, Wilma; Gribbon, Phil; Sewing, Andreas

    2003-06-01

    The measurement of intracellular calcium fluxes in real time is widely applied within the pharmaceutical industry to measure the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRhyp;s), either for pharmacological characterisation or to screen for new surrogate ligands. Initially restricted to G(q) coupled GPCRs, the introduction of promiscuous and chimeric G-proteins has further widened the application of these assays. The development of new calcium sensitive dyes and assays has provided sensitive, homogeneous assays which can be readily applied to high throughput screening (HTS). In this paper we describe the full automation of this assay type using a fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR ) integrated into a Beckman/Sagian system to establish a simple robotic system that is well suited for the current medium throughput screening in this area of lead discovery. Using a recently completed HTS we discuss important determinants for FLIPR based screening, highlight some limitations of the current approach, and look at the requirements for future automated systems capable of keeping up with expanding compound files.

  14. Complementarities between Biomass and FluxNet data to optimize ORCHIDEE ecosystem model at European forest and grassland sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, T.; Peylin, P.; Granier, A.; Ibrom, A.; Linden, L.; Loustau, D.; Bacour, C.; Ciais, P.

    2010-12-01

    Assimilation of data from several measurements provides knowledge of the model's performance and uncertainties. In this work we investigate the complementary of Biomass data to net CO2 flux (NEE) and latent heat flux (LE) in optimising parameters of the biogeochemical model ORCHIDEE. Our optimisation method is a gradient based iterative method. We optimized the model at the French forest sites, European beech forest of Hesse (48 .67°N, 7.06°E) and maritime pine forest of Le Bray (44.72°N, 0.77°W). First we adapted the model to represent the past clearcut on these two sites in order to obtain a realistic age of the forest. The model-data improvement in terms of aboveground biomass will be discussed. We then used FluxNet and Biomass data, separately and altogether, in the optimization process to assess the potential and the complementarities of these two data stream. For biomass data optimization we added parameters linked to allocation to the optimization scheme. The results show a decrease in the uncertainty of the parameters after optimization and reveal some structural deficiencies in the model. In a second step, data from ecosystem manipulation experiment site Brandbjerg (55.88°N, 11.97°E), a Danish grassland site, were used for model optimisation. The different ecosystem experiments at this site include rain exclusion, warming, and increased CO2 concentration, and only biomass data were available and used in the optimization for the different treatments. We investigate the ability of the model to represent the biomass differences between manipulative experiments with a given set of parameters and highlight model deficiencies.

  15. Post processing of CO2 flux measurements from an urban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzer, O.; Meiring, W.; Kyriakidis, P. C.; McFadden, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Tower based measurements of CO2 fluxes by the eddy covariance method are subject to random error, systematic error, and missing data (gaps). In homogeneous ecosystems such as forests and grasslands, the post processing methods to address these problems are relatively well established. In the urban environment, however, the assumptions of most such methods are violated due to spatial heterogeneity in the tower footprint and localized CO2 sources such as traffic emission. For this reason, work is needed to develop and test methods appropriate to the urban setting. Here, we report comparisons of post processing methods for >3 years of flux measurements from the KUOM tall tower in a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Machine learning regression approaches including Artificial Neural Networks and Gaussian Processes were used to integrate observations from remote sensing, traffic and weather stations, and to extract complex underlying functional relationships, in order to improve gap-filling and minimize uncertainties. Specifically, we tested the sensitivity of the measurements to vehicle emissions by incorporating traffic counts from nearby roads and highways. Also, the selection of the friction velocity (u*) threshold was found to be sensitive to the wind direction but consistent between years. We calculated carbon flux sums for both residential and recreational land use types in the tower footprint, and assessed the random and systematic uncertainties caused by gap-filling and u*-filtering. While these post processing methods are essential for interpreting CO2 flux measurements in urban environments, they may also be useful for other inhomogeneous sites such as logged forests or ecosystems under disturbance from fire or pests.

  16. Background light measurements at the DUMAND site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, T.; Kitamura, T.; Matsuno, S.; Mitsui, K.; Ohashi, Y.; Okada, A.; Cady, D. R.; Learned, J. G.; Oconnor, D.; Mcmurdo, M.

    1985-01-01

    Ambient light intensities at the DUMAND site, west of the island of Hawaii were measured around the one photoelectron level. Throughout the water column between 1,500m and 4,700m, a substantial amount of stimulateable bioluminescence is observed with a ship suspended detector. But non-stimulated bioluminescence level is comparable, or less than, K sup 40 background, when measured with a bottom tethered detector typical of a DUMAND optical module.

  17. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites of a 37 GBq 241Am-Be isotopic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Haluk; Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yüksel, Alptuğ Özer

    2014-11-01

    For the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique, an irradiation unit with a 37 GBq 241Am-Be neutron source was installed at Institute of Nuclear Sciences of Ankara University. Design and configuration properties of the irradiation unit are described. It has two different sample irradiation positions, one is called site #1 having a pneumatic sample transfer system and the other is site #2 having a location for manual use. In order to characterize neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites, the measurement results were obtained for thermal (Фth) and epithermal neutron fluxes (Фepi), thermal to epithermal flux ratio (f) and epithermal spectrum shaping factors (α) by employing cadmium ratios of gold (Au) and molybdenum (Mo) monitors. The activities produced in these foils were measured by using a p-type, 44.8% relative efficiency HPGe well detector. For the measured γ-rays, self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects were taken into account. Additionally, thermal neutron self-shielding and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in the measured results. For characterization of site #1, the required parameters were found to be Фth = (2.11 ± 0.05) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (3.32 ± 0.17) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 63.6 ± 1.5, α = 0.045 ± 0.009, respectively. Similarly, those parameters were measured in site #2 as Фth = (1.49 ± 0.04) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (2.93 ± 0.15) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 50.9 ± 1.3 and α = 0.038 ± 0.008. The results for f-values indicate that good thermalization of fast neutrons on the order of 98% was achieved in both sample irradiation sites. This is because an optimum combination of water and paraffin moderator is used in the present configuration. In addition, the shielding requirements are met by using natural boron oxide powder (5.5 cm) and boron loaded paraffin layers against neutrons, and a 15 cm thick lead bricks against gamma-rays from source and its

  18. Using Carbonyl Sulfide Column Measurements and a Chemical Transport Model to Investigate Variability in Biospheric CO2 Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Baker, I. T.; Berry, J. A.; Suntharalingam, P.; Campbell, J. E.; Wolf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the CO2 processes on land is of great importance, because the terrestrial exchange drives the seasonal and interannual variability of CO2 in the atmosphere. Atmospheric inversions based on CO2 concentration measurements alone can only determine net biosphere fluxes, but not differentiate between photosynthesis (uptake) and respiration (production). Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) could provide an important additional constraint: it is also taken up by plants during photosynthesis but not emitted during respiration, and therefore is a potential means to differentiate between these processes. Solar absorption Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometry allows for the retrieval of the atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and OCS. Here, we investigate co-located and nearly simultaneous measurements of OCS and CO2 measured at 3 sites via FTIR spectrometers. These northern-hemispheric sites span a wide range of latitudes and all have multiple year time-series. The sites include Ny-Alesund (79°N), Bremen (53°N) and Paramaribo (6°N). We compare these measurements to simulations of OCS and CO2 using the GEOS-Chem model. The simulations are driven by different land biospheric fluxes of OCS and CO2 to match the seasonality of the measurements. The simple biosphere model (SiB-COS) are used in the study because it simultaneously calculates the biospheric fluxes of both OCS and CO2. The CO2 simulation with SiB fluxes agrees with the measurements better than a simulation using CASA. Comparison of the OCS simulations with different fluxes indicates that the latitudinal distribution of the OCS fluxes within SiB needs to be adjusted.

  19. Using Carbonyl Sulfide column measurements and a Chemical Transport Model to investigate variability in biospheric CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuting; Petri, Christof; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten; Baker, Ian; Berry, Joe; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Campbell, Elliott; Wolf, Adam; Deutscher, Nick; Notholt, Justus

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the CO2 processes on land is of great importance, because the terrestrial exchange drives the seasonal and interannual variability of CO2 in the atmosphere. Atmospheric inversions based on CO2 concentration measurements alone can only determine net biosphere fluxes, but not differentiate between photosynthesis (uptake) and respiration (production). Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) could provide an important additional constraint: it is also taken up by plants during photosynthesis but not emitted during respiration, and therefore is a potential means to differentiate between these processes. Solar absorption Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometry allows for the retrieval of the atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and OCS. Here, we investigate co-located and nearly simultaneous measurements of OCS and CO2 measured at 3 sites via FTIR spectrometers. These northern-hemispheric sites span a wide range of latitudes and all have multiple year time-series. The sites include Ny-Alesund (79°N), Bremen (53°N) and Paramaribo (6°N). We compare these measurements to simulations of OCS and CO2 using the GEOS-Chem model. The simulations are driven by different land biospheric fluxes of OCS and CO2 to match the seasonality of the measurements. The simple biosphere model (SiB-COS) are used in the study because it simultaneously calculates the biospheric fluxes of both OCS and CO2. The CO2 simulation with SiB fluxes agrees with the measurements better than a simulation using CASA. Comparison of the OCS simulations with different fluxes indicates that the latitudinal distribution of the OCS fluxes within SiB needs to be adjusted.

  20. Eddy covariance measurements of the net turbulent methane flux in the city centre - results of 2-year campaign in Łódź, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Włodzimierz; Fortuniak, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    To investigate temporal variability of methane (CH4) fluxes in an urban environment, air-surface exchange fluxes of CH4 were continuously measured using eddy covariance techniques at a city-centre site in Łódź, Poland, from July 2013 to August 2015. In the immediate vicinity of the measurement site, potential methane sources include vehicle traffic, dense sewerage infrastructure and natural gas networks. Sensible and latent heat fluxes have also been measured since 2000 and carbon dioxide fluxes since 2007 at this site. Upward CH4 fluxes dominated during the measurement period, indicating that the city centre is a net source of CH4 to the troposphere. The highest monthly fluxes were observed in winter (2.0 to 2.7 g m-2 month-1) and the lowest in summer (0.8 to 1.0 g m-2 month-1). Fluxes on working days were around 6 % higher than on weekends. The cumulative flux indicates that the city centre emitted a net quantity of nearly 18 g m-2 of CH4 in 2014. Stable values of the FCO2/ FCH4 ratio in months (minimum 2.41 × 10-3, maximum 5.3 × 10-3) and the lack of a clear annual course suggest comparable magnitude of both fluxes.

  1. LOW-POWER SOLUTION FOR EDDY COVARIANCE MEASUREMENTS OF METHANE FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T.; Burba, G. G.; Komissarov, A.; McDermitt, D. K.; Xu, L.; Zona, D.; Oechel, W. C.; Schedlbauer, J. L.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Riensche, B.; Allyn, D.

    2009-12-01

    Open-path analyzers offer a number of advantages for measuring methane fluxes, including undisturbed in-situ flux measurements, spatial integration using the Eddy Covariance approach, zero frequency response errors due to tube attenuation, confident water and thermal density terms from co-located fast measurements of water and sonic temperature, and possibility of remote and mobile solar-powered or small-generator-powered deployments due to lower power demands in the absence of a pump. The LI-7700 open-path methane analyzer is a VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser)-based instrument. It employs an open Herriott cell and measures levels of methane with RMS noise below 5 ppb at 10 Hz sampling in controlled laboratory conditions. The power consumption of the stand-alone LI-7700 in steady-state is about 8W, so it can be deployed in any methane-generating location of interest on a portable or mobile solar-powered tower, and it does not have to have grid power or permanent industrial generator. Eddy Covariance measurements of methane flux using the LI-7700 open-path methane analyzer were conducted in 2006-2009 in five ecosystems with contrasting weather and moisture conditions: (1) sawgrass wetland in the Florida Everglades; (2) coastal wetlands in an Arctic tundra; and (3) pacific mangroves in Mexico; (4) maize field and (5) ryegrass field in Nebraska. Methane co-spectra behaved in a manner similar to that of the co-spectra of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and air temperature, demonstrating that the LI-7700 adequately measured fluctuations in methane concentration across the whole spectrum of frequencies contributing to vertical atmospheric turbulent transport at the experimental sites. All co-spectra also closely followed the Kaimal model, and demonstrated good agreement with another methane co-spectrum obtained with a TDLS (Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscope; Unisearch Associates, Inc.) over a peatland. Overall, hourly methane fluxes ranged from near-zero at

  2. BOREAS RSS-8 BIOME-BGC Model Simulations at Tower Flux Sites in 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Kimball, John

    2000-01-01

    BIOME-BGC is a general ecosystem process model designed to simulate biogeochemical and hydrologic processes across multiple scales (Running and Hunt, 1993). In this investigation, BIOME-BGC was used to estimate daily water and carbon budgets for the BOREAS tower flux sites for 1994. Carbon variables estimated by the model include gross primary production (i.e., net photosynthesis), maintenance and heterotrophic respiration, net primary production, and net ecosystem carbon exchange. Hydrologic variables estimated by the model include snowcover, evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and outflow. The information provided by the investigation includes input initialization and model output files for various sites in tabular ASCII format.

  3. Eddy Covariance Flux Measurements of Pollutant Gases in the Mexico City Urban Area: a Useful Technique to Evaluate Emissions inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Grivicke, R.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, G.; Jobson, T.; Westberg, H.; Lamb, B.; Ramos, R.; Molina, L.

    2007-12-01

    Direct measurements of emissions of pollutant gases that include all major and minor emissions sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to improve and evaluate emissions inventories. The quality of an urban emissions inventory relies on the accuracy of the information of anthropogenic activities, which in many cases is not available, in particular in urban areas of developing countries. As part of the MCMA-2003 field campaign, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance (EC) techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO2 from a residential district of Mexico City. Those flux measurements demonstrated to be also a valuable tool to evaluate the emissions inventory used for air quality modeling. With the objective to confirm the representativeness of the 2003 flux measurements in terms of magnitude, composition and diurnal distribution, as well to evaluate the most recent emissions inventory, a second flux system was deployed in a different district of Mexico City during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign. This system was located in a busy district surrounded by congested avenues close to the center of the city. In 2003 and 2006 fluxes of olefins and CO2 were measured by the EC technique using a Fast Isoprene Sensor calibrated with a propylene standard and an open path Infrared Gas Analyzer (IRGA), respectively. Fluxes of aromatic and oxygenated VOCs were analyzed by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectroscopy (PTR-MS) and the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique. In 2006 the number of VOCs was extended using a disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA) system. This system collected whole air samples as function of the direction of the vertical wind component, and the samples were analyzed on site by gas chromatography / flame ionization detection (GC-FID). In both studies we found that the urban surface is a net source of CO2 and VOCs. The diurnal patterns were similar, but the 2006 fluxes

  4. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  5. International Photolysis Frequency Measurement and Model Intercomparison (IPMMI): Spectral actinic solar flux measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bais, A. F.; Madronich, S.; Crawford, J.; Hall, S. R.; Mayer, B.; van Weele, M.; Lenoble, J.; Calvert, J. G.; Cantrell, C. A.; Shetter, R. E.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Koepke, P.; Monks, P. S.; Frost, G.; McKenzie, R.; Krotkov, N.; Kylling, A.; Swartz, W. H.; Lloyd, S.; Pfister, G.; Martin, T. J.; Roeth, E.-P.; Griffioen, E.; Ruggaber, A.; Krol, M.; Kraus, A.; Edwards, G. D.; Mueller, M.; Lefer, B. L.; Johnston, P.; Schwander, H.; Flittner, D.; Gardiner, B. G.; Barrick, J.; Schmitt, R.

    2003-08-01

    The International Photolysis Frequency Measurement and Model Intercomparison (IPMMI) took place in Boulder, Colorado, from 15 to 19 June 1998, aiming to investigate the level of accuracy of photolysis frequency and spectral downwelling actinic flux measurements and to explore the ability of radiative transfer models to reproduce the measurements. During this period, 2 days were selected to compare model calculations with measurements, one cloud-free and one cloudy. A series of ancillary measurements were also performed and provided parameters required as input to the models. Both measurements and modeling were blind, in the sense that no exchanges of data or calculations were allowed among the participants, and the results were objectively analyzed and compared by two independent referees. The objective of this paper is, first, to present the results of comparisons made between measured and modeled downwelling actinic flux and irradiance spectra and, second, to investigate the reasons for which some of the models or measurements deviate from the others. For clear skies the relative agreement between the 16 models depends strongly on solar zenith angle (SZA) and wavelength as well as on the input parameters used, like the extraterrestrial (ET) solar flux and the absorption cross sections. The majority of the models (11) agreed to within about ±6% for solar zenith angles smaller than ˜60°. The agreement among the measured spectra depends on the optical characteristics of the instruments (e.g., slit function, stray light rejection, and sensitivity). After transforming the measurements to a common spectral resolution, two of the three participating spectroradiometers agree to within ˜10% for wavelengths longer than 310 nm and at all solar zenith angles, while their differences increase when moving to shorter wavelengths. Most models agree well with the measurements (both downwelling actinic flux and global irradiance), especially at local noon, where the agreement

  6. Improving surface energy balance closure by reducing errors in soil heat flux measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flux plate method is the most commonly employed method for measuring soil heat flux (G) in surface energy balance studies. Although relatively simple to use, the flux plate method is susceptible to significant errors. Two of the most common errors are heat flow divergence around the plate and fa...

  7. Measurements of NO(x) and NO(y) concentrations and fluxes over Arctic tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakwin, Peter S.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Fan, Song-Miao; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric concentrations of NO, NO2, total NO(y), and O3 were made during the NASA Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) at a remote location in a tundra bog ecosystem in southeastern Alaska during the growing season (July-August 1988). Concentrations of NO(x) and NO(y) were found to be very low compared to other remote continental sites, indicating that anthropogenic influences were small at this site during this time of year. The NO(y) emission rate from the soil were 0.13 +/- 0.05 x 10 exp 9 molecules/sq cm/s. Direct measurements of the flux of total NO(y) were made for the first time, indicating downward flux of NO(y) at all times of day, with maximum deposition of 2.5 +/- 0.9 x 10 exp 9 molecules/sq cm/s in the afternoon. Deposition of HNO3 appears to dominate the atmosphere/surface exchange of NO(y). The mean dry deposition rate of NO(y) to the tundra was 1.8 +/- 1.0 x 10 exp 9 molecules/sq cm/s.

  8. Measurements of NO(x) and NO(y) concentrations and fluxes over Arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Bakwin, P.S.; Wofsy, S.C.; Fan, Songmiao; Fitzjarrald, D.R. New York State Univ., Albany )

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric concentrations of NO, NO[sub 2], total NO(y), and O[sub 3] were made during the NASA Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) at a remote location in a tundra bog ecosystem in southeastern Alaska during the growing season (July-August 1988). Concentrations of NO(x) and NO(y) were found to be very low compared to other remote continental sites, indicating that anthropogenic influences were small at this site during this time of year. The NO(y) emission rate from the soil were 0.13 +/- 0.05 x 10 exp 9 molecules/sq cm/s. Direct measurements of the flux of total NO(y) were made for the first time, indicating downward flux of NO(y) at all times of day, with maximum deposition of 2.5 +/- 0.9 x 10 exp 9 molecules/sq cm/s in the afternoon. Deposition of HNO3 appears to dominate the atmosphere/surface exchange of NO(y). The mean dry deposition rate of NO(y) to the tundra was 1.8 +/- 1.0 x 10 exp 9 molecules/sq cm/s. 58 refs.

  9. Mass Flux Measurements of Arsenic in Groundwater (Battelle Conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentration trends of arsenic are typically used to evaluate the performance of remediation efforts designed to mitigate arsenic contamination in groundwater. A complementary approach would be to track changes in mass flux of the contaminant through the subsurface, for exampl...

  10. Calculations of automatic chamber flux measurements of methane and carbon dioxide using short time series of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirk, N.; Mastepanov, M.; Parmentier, F.-J. W.; Lund, M.; Crill, P.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-09-01

    The closed chamber technique is widely used to measure the exchange of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from terrestrial ecosystems. There is, however, large uncertainty about which model should be used to calculate the gas flux from the measured gas concentrations. Due to experimental uncertainties the robust linear regression model (first order polynomial) is often applied, even though theoretical considerations of the technique suggest the application of other, curvilinear models. High-resolution automatic chamber systems which sample gas concentrations several hundred times per flux measurement make it possible to resolve the curvilinear behavior and study the information imposed by the natural variability of the temporal concentration changes. We used more than 50 000 such flux measurements of CH4 and CO2 from five field sites located in peat forming wetlands to calculate fluxes with different models. The flux differences from independent linear estimates are generally found to be smaller than the local flux variability on the plot scale. The curvilinear behavior of the gas concentrations within the chamber is strongly influenced by wind driven chamber leakage, and less so by changing gas concentration gradients in the soil during chamber closure. Such physical processes affect both gas species equally, which makes it possible to isolate biochemical processes affecting the gases differently, such as photosynthesis limitation by chamber headspace CO2 concentrations under high levels of incoming solar radiation. We assess the possibility to exploit this effect for a partitioning of the net CO2 flux into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration and argue that high-resolution automatic chamber measurements could be used for purposes beyond the estimation of the net gas flux.

  11. On Using CO2 Concentration Measurements at Mountain top and Valley Locations in Regional Flux Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wekker, S. F.; Song, G.; Stephens, B. B.

    2007-12-01

    Data from the Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network in the Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON) are used to investigate atmospheric controls on temporal and spatial variability of CO2 in mountainous terrain and the usefulness of mountain top and valley measurement for the estimation of regional CO2 fluxes. Rocky RACCOON consists of four sites installed in fall of 2005 and spring of 2006: Niwot Ridge, near Ward, Colorado; Storm Peak Laboratory near Steamboat Springs, Colorado; Fraser Experimental Forest, near Fraser Colorado; and Hidden Peak, near Snowbird, Utah. The network uses the NCAR-developed Autonomous Inexpensive Robust CO2 Analyzer. These units measure CO2 concentrations at three levels on a tower, producing individual measurements every 2.5 minutes precise to 0.1 ppm CO2 and closely tied to the WMO CO2 scale. Three of the sites are located on a mountain top while one site is located in a valley. Initial analyses show interesting relationships between CO2 concentration and atmospheric parameters, such as wind speed and direction, temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The nature of these relationships is further investigated with an atmospheric mesoscale model. Idealized and realistic simulations are able to capture the observed behavior of spatial and temporal CO2 variability and reveal the responsible physical processes. The implications of the results and the value of the measurements for providing information on local to regional scale respiration and photosynthesis rates in the Rockies are discussed.

  12. Assessment of CO2 fluxes and forest productivity (NPP/GPP) estimates from eddy covariance measurement and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anić, Mislav; Marjanović, Hrvoje; Zorana Ostrogović Sever, Maša; Barcza, Zoltán; Večenaj, Željko

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) measurements were carried out at the Jastrebarsko site, Croatia, in lowland forest dominated by pedunculate oak. For validation of CO2 fluxes measured with EC method bi-weekly field measurements of increment of 640 trees in 24 plots set in a 100m x 100m grid, height increment and litterfall have been used. In our work we compared annual productivity (GPP and NPP) assessments from EC measurements with field measurements. The comparison was made on a seven year dataset of measurements, spanning from 2008 to 2014. Also, flux dependence on groundwater level has been investigated. Results are showing that forest productivity estimates with EC method are in good agreement with the estimates from field measurements in the dry years. Agreement is slightly lower for years with high precipitation.

  13. Direct measurements of transport properties are essential for site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    Direct measurements of transport parameters on subsurface sediments using, the UFA method provided detailed hydrostratigraphic mapping, and subsurface flux distributions at a mixed-waste disposal site at Hanford. Seven hundred unsaturated conductivity measurements on fifty samples were obtained in only six months total of UFA run time. These data are used to provide realistic information to conceptual models, predictive models and restoration strategies. The UFA instrument consists of an ultracentrifuge with a constant, ultralow flow pump that provides fluid to the sample surface through a rotating seal assembly and microdispersal system. Effluent from the sample is collected in a transparent, volumetrically-calibrated chamber at the bottom of the sample assembly. Using a strobe light, an observer can check the chamber while the sample is being centrifuged. Materials can be run in the UFA as recomposited samples or in situ samples can be subcored directly into the sample UFA chamber.

  14. Flux estimation of fugitive particulate matter emissions from loose Calcisols at construction sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hala A.; Kumar, Prashant; Kakosimos, Konstantinos E.

    2016-09-01

    A major source of airborne pollution in arid and semi-arid environments (i.e. North Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, and Australia) is the fugitive particulate matter (fPM), which is a frequent product of wind erosion. However, accurate determination of fPM is an ongoing scientific challenge. The objective of this study is to examine fPM emissions from the loose Calcisols (i.e. soils with a substantial accumulation of secondary carbonates), owing to construction activities that can be frequently seen nowadays in arid urbanizing regions such as the Middle East. A two months field campaign was conducted at a construction site, at rest, within the city of Doha (Qatar) to measure number concentrations of PM over a size range of 0.25-32 μm using light scattering based monitoring stations. The fPM emission fluxes were calculated using the Fugitive Dust Model (FDM) in an iterative manner and were fitted to a power function, which expresses the wind velocity dependence. The power factors were estimated as 1.87, 1.65, 2.70 and 2.06 for the four different size classes of particles ≤2.5, 2.5-6, 6-10 and ≤10 μm, respectively. Fitted power function was considered acceptable given that adjusted R2 values varied from 0.13 for the smaller particles and up to 0.69 for the larger ones. These power factors are in the same range of those reported in the literature for similar sources. The outcome of this study is expected to contribute to the improvement of PM emission inventories by focusing on an overlooked but significant pollution source, especially in dry and arid regions, and often located very close to residential areas and sensitive population groups. Further campaigns are recommended to reduce the uncertainty and include more fPM sources (e.g. earthworks) and other types of soil.

  15. Intercomparison of fast response commercial gas analysers for nitrous oxide flux measurements under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannik, Ü.; Haapanala, S.; Shurpali, N. J.; Mammarella, I.; Lind, S.; Hyvönen, N.; Peltola, O.; Zahniser, M.; Martikainen, P. J.; Vesala, T.

    2015-01-01

    of the same magnitude as the fluxes when N2O exchange was small at the measurement site. Both instruments based on continuous-wave quantum cascade laser, CW-TILDAS-CS and N2O / CO-23d, were able to determine the same sample of low N2O fluxes with a high mutual coefficient of determination at the 30 min averaging level and with minor systematic difference over the observation period of several months. This enables us to conclude that the new-generation instrumentation is capable of measuring small N2O exchange with high precision and accuracy at sites with low fluxes.

  16. Partitioning a decade of evapotranspiration and carbon dioxide fluxes at a forested Ameriflux eddy-covariance site in southern Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, B. N.; Scanlon, T. M.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) technique measures fluxes of water vapor and carbon dioxide between ecosystems and the atmosphere. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) is the balance between ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross primary production (GPP), and evapotranspiration (ET) is the sum of transpiration and evaporation. In order to relate these measurements to physical and ecological processes, it is often necessary to partition the fluxes into their components. While established techniques for partitioning NEE are widely used in the EC community, partitioning of ET remains a challenge. A recently developed partitioning procedure uses assumed correlations between stomatal (photosynthesis and transpiration) and non-stomatal (respiration and evaporation) sources of water vapor and CO2 to simultaneously partition NEE and ET into their respective components. Because the technique uses the same high-frequency measurements as EC, it is easily applicable to existing EC datasets, provided ecosystem-scale water use efficiency can be specified. We applied the method to a ten-year record of EC fluxes at the Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) Ameriflux site, using estimates of water use efficiency from recent leaf-level gas exchange measurements. The technique has been tested in agricultural systems, but has not previously been evaluated in forests. ER and GPP from the correlation-based procedure qualitatively matched estimates from a more traditional partitioning method based on fitting nighttime NEE to a function of temperature and calculating GPP as the residual during the day, although the magnitudes of GPP and ER from the correlation-based technique were higher than those from the traditional technique. Partitioned respiration and evaporation were also consistent with sub-canopy flux measurements. Transpiration accounted for the majority of ET during the growing season, but had a strong seasonal cycle. Both evaporation and transpiration declined during periods of low soil

  17. Comparison of eddy covariance and modified Bowen ratio methods for measuring gas fluxes and implications for measuring fluxes of persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinius, Damien Johann; Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants (POPs) cycle between the atmosphere and terrestrial surfaces; however measuring fluxes of POPs between the atmosphere and other media is challenging. Sampling times of hours to days are required to accurately measure trace concentrations of POPs in the atmosphere, which rules out the use of eddy covariance techniques that are used to measure gas fluxes of major air pollutants. An alternative, the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, has been used instead. In this study we used data from FLUXNET for CO2 and water vapor (H2O) to compare fluxes measured by eddy covariance to fluxes measured with the MBR method using vertical concentration gradients in air derived from averaged data that simulate the long sampling times typically required to measure POPs. When concentration gradients are strong and fluxes are unidirectional, the MBR method and the eddy covariance method agree within a factor of 3 for CO2, and within a factor of 10 for H2O. To remain within the range of applicability of the MBR method, field studies should be carried out under conditions such that the direction of net flux does not change during the sampling period. If that condition is met, then the performance of the MBR method is neither strongly affected by the length of sample duration nor the use of a fixed value for the transfer coefficient.

  18. Mercury Surface-Atmosphere Flux and Speciation Measurements in Barrow, Alaska, USA during the BROMEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C.; Steffen, A.; Obrist, D.; Staebler, R.; Douglas, T.; Nghiem, S.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric Mercury Depletion Events (AMDEs) during which gaseous elemental mercury is oxidized to gaseous oxidized mercury and then readily deposits to underlying snow and ice surfaces are an important concern for polar mercury loads. There are many unknown factors surrounding the causes and controls of AMDEs in the polar atmosphere, including the fate of the mercury once deposited, the degree to which AMDEs relate to bromine chemistry, and how sea ice dynamics and changes thereof may affect future Hg cycling. We show an experimental set-up and provide results from a portion of a new study, the Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) in Barrow, Alaska, located 515 km north of the Arctic Circle along the coast of the Arctic Ocean. Our instrumentation is designed to characterize AMDEs and quantify atmospheric mercury and ozone emissions and depositions over seasonal sea ice near open ice leads. These areas, that are known to cause intensive halogen chemistry, are expected to increase as the expanse of perennial sea ice decreases. Our unique, portable, cold-weather tested experimental set-up, called the Out On The Ice (OOTI) system, allows for the quantification of atmospheric speciated mercury concentrations, along with gaseous elemental mercury and ozone surface fluxes. These fluxes are measured with a micrometeorological surface-flux tower over the seasonal sea ice. The systems are housed in well-insulated aluminum boxes that can be deployed and retrieved readily with snow machines. A second, equivalent set of instruments is deployed near the coast at an inland location. This second site allows us to quantify the atmospheric chemical gradients from the seasonal sea ice site close to the open ice lead to the coast. Auxiliary measurements of mercury and halogen concentrations in surface snow, ice, and diamond dust along a transect from the sea ice site to the inland site and daily samplings at each site are also included. This unique campaign will be provide

  19. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  20. A comparison of direct measurement and model simulation of total flux of volatile organic compounds from the subsurface to the atmosphere under natural field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, Fred D.; Choi, Jee-Won; Smith, James A.

    2003-10-01

    Accurate quantification of natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater requires an accounting of all VOC mass-loss processes, including volatilization into soil gas with ultimate transport to land surface and the atmosphere. This paper compares two methods of estimating VOC flux to the atmosphere. The first method measures VOC flux at land surface using a vertical flux chamber (VFC). The VFC has been shown in a previous laboratory study to reliably measure organic vapor fluxes from soil to the atmosphere that are caused by either gas phase diffusion or a combination of advection plus diffusion [, 2003]. The second method simulates VOC flux using a transient, one-dimensional gas flow and transport model incorporating the effects of gas phase diffusion, equilibrium air-water partitioning of organic vapors, and unsaturated zone airflow caused by atmospheric pressure changes (i.e., barometric pumping). Flux chamber measurements were made concurrently with field data measurements required for the flow and transport model at a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated field site. The two methods of VOC flux estimation provided comparable results in nine sets of field comparisons with the flux chamber estimating a lower flux during most of the time periods. Sensitivity analyses of model input parameters produce upper and lower bounds on best estimate flux simulations. Average VFC measurements fall within these upper and lower bounds of combined parameter values for all nine comparison events. The ease of use, lack of a priori site knowledge and accuracy of the VFC compared with the data-intensive flow and transport model suggests that direct measurement of VOC flux from the subsurface to the atmosphere at contaminated sites could become routine practice, providing important information to decision makers about the progress of monitored natural attenuation.

  1. Significance of multidimensional radiative transfer effects measured in surface fluxes at an Antarctic coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Ricchiazzi, Paul; Payton, Allison; Gautier, Catherine

    2002-10-01

    At a coastal high-latitude site, multiple reflection of photons between the high albedo surface and an overlying cloud can enhance the downwelling shortwave flux out over the adjacent open water to a distance of several kilometers. This coastal albedo effect has been predicted by theoretical radiative transfer studies and has also been measured under ideal conditions. In this study, three multispectral solar ultraviolet radiometers were deployed in the vicinity of Palmer Station, Antarctica (64° 46'S, 64° 04'W) to determine the prevalence of the coastal albedo effect under the region's natural variability in cloud cover. One radiometer was deployed near the base of a glacier, and the other two radiometers were deployed on Janus Island and Outcast Island, islets ˜2.8 km (1.5 nautical miles) and 5.6 km (3 nautical miles) distant from Palmer Station, respectively. The radiometers were operated simultaneously for 16 days during late December 1999 and January 2000. Under all cloudy sky conditions sampled by this experiment the coastal albedo effect is seen in the data 60% of the time, in the form of a decreasing gradient in surface flux from Palmer Station through Janus and Outcast Islands. During the other 40% of the cloudy sky measurements, local cloud inhomogeneity obscured the coastal albedo effect. The effect is more apparent under overcast layers that appear spatially uniform and occurs 86% of the time under the low overcast decks sampled. The presence of stratus fractus of bad weather, under higher overcast layers, obscures the coastal albedo effect such that it occurs only 43% of the time. A wavelength dependence is noted in the data under optically thin cloud cover: the ratio of a flux measured at an islet to that measured at the station increases with wavelength. This wavelength dependence can be explained by plane-parallel radiative transfer theory.

  2. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance and static chamber techniques at a temperate forest in central ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Geddes, J. A.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Thomas, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate forest (Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve) in central Ontario (45°17´11´´ N, 78°32´19´´ W) from June-October, 2011. Continuous measurements were made by an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA) from Los Gatos Research Inc. that measures methane (CH4) at 10 Hz sampling rates. Fluxes were calculated from the gas measurements in conjunction with wind data collected by a 3-D sonic anemometer using the eddy covariance (EC) method. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7 ± 0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. Methane fluxes showed a seasonal progression with average rates of uptake increasing from June through September and remaining high in October. This pattern was consistent with a decreasing trend in soil moisture content at the monthly time scale. On the diurnal timescale, there was evidence of increased uptake during the day, when the mid-canopy wind speed was at a maximum. These patterns suggest that substrate supply of CH4 and oxygen to methanotrophs, and in certain cases hypoxic soil conditions supporting methanogenesis in low-slope areas, drive the observed variability in fluxes. A network of soil static chambers used at the tower site showed close agreement with the eddy covariance flux measurements. This suggests that soil-level microbial processes, and not abiological leaf-level CH4 production, drive overall CH4 dynamics in temperate forest ecosystems such as Haliburton Forest.

  3. Field comparison of disjunct and conventional eddy covariance techniques for trace gas flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Rinne, J; Douffet, T; Prigent, Y; Durand, P

    2008-04-01

    A field intercomparison experiment of the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) and the conventional eddy covariance (EC) techniques was conducted over a grass field. The half-hourly water vapor fluxes measured by the DEC were within the estimated uncertainty from the fluxes measured by the EC. On the average there was a slight overestimation (<10%) of the fluxes measured by the DEC during the day and underestimation during the night as compared to the fluxes measured by the EC. As this bias does not appear in the simulated DEC measurements it is likely to be due to instrumental problems. The insensitivity of the quality of the fluxes measured by the DEC method to the deficiencies in the gas analysis shows the robustness of this new approach for measuring the surface-atmosphere exchange of trace gases.

  4. New technique of the local heat flux measurement in combustion chambers of steam boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, Jan; Taler, Dawid; Sobota, Tomasz; Dzierwa, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    A new method for measurement of local heat flux to water-walls of steam boilers was developed. A flux meter tube was made from an eccentric tube of short length to which two longitudinal fins were attached. These two fins prevent the boiler setting from heating by a thermal radiation from the combustion chamber. The fins are not welded to the adjacent water-wall tubes, so that the temperature distribution in the heat flux meter is not influenced by neighbouring water-wall tubes. The thickness of the heat flux tube wall is larger on the fireside to obtain a greater distance between the thermocouples located inside the wall which increases the accuracy of heat flux determination. Based on the temperature measurements at selected points inside the heat flux meter, the heat flux absorbed by the water-wall, heat transfer coefficient on the inner tube surface and temperature of the water-steam mixture was determined.

  5. Improving the spatial representativeness and temporal consistency of tower-based eddy-covariance flux measurements using environmental response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Metzger, S.; Kljun, N.; Taylor, J. R.; Desai, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Tower-based eddy-covariance (EC) measurements are suited to continuously monitor the exchange of heat, water vapor, CO2 and other surface fluxes above selected sites. However, these results represent only the immediate surrounding of a measurement location, unless all areas around the flux tower are biophysically identical. This is hardly the case for research sites in somewhat heterogeneous and structured terrain, as typical for most EC measurement locations. For remote sensing and numerical model applications, it is desirable to improve the spatial representativeness of tower flux measurements. The objective of this study is to provide a consistent flux time-series for a selected region, rather than for a spatio-temporally variable patch of surface close to the measurement location. Environmental response functions (ERFs) are capable of explicitly relating flux observations (responses) to meteorological forcing and biophysical surface properties (drivers). However, thus far ERF have been developed with and utilized for aircraft-based measurements in the spatial domain (Metzger et al., 2013). The present study explores the potential for applying ERF to ';rectify' the spatial representativeness of tower-based EC measurements to pre-defined regions. The underlying principle is to extract the relationship between biophysical drivers and ecological responses from measurements in the time-domain under varying environmental conditions. Provided sufficiently good calibration, the resulting ERF can then be used for extrapolating the surface-atmosphere exchange into areas adjacent to the immediate airshed of the tower measurement. The subsequent steps of the ERF methodology are: (i) time-frequency decomposition of 10Hz tower EC data, providing high temporal resolution of the flux observations without neglecting long-wavelength contributions, (ii) quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation, (iii

  6. Scaling up of Carbon Exchange Dynamics from AmeriFlux Sites to a Super-Region in the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Peter Schmid; Craig Wayson

    2009-05-05

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate carbon exchange dynamics across a region of North America between the Great Plains and the East Coast. This region contains about 40 active carbon cycle research (AmeriFlux) sites in a variety of climatic and landuse settings, from upland forest to urban development. The core research involved a scaling strategy that uses measured fluxes of CO{sub 2}, energy, water, and other biophysical and biometric parameters to train and calibrate surface-vegetation-atmosphere models, in conjunction with satellite (MODIS) derived drivers. To achieve matching of measured and modeled fluxes, the ecosystem parameters of the models will be adjusted to the dynamically variable flux-tower footprints following Schmid (1997). High-resolution vegetation index variations around the flux sites have been derived from Landsat data for this purpose. The calibrated models are being used in conjunction with MODIS data, atmospheric re-analysis data, and digital land-cover databases to derive ecosystem exchange fluxes over the study domain.

  7. Uncertainties in Eddy Covariance fluxes due to post-field data processing: a multi-site, full factorial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, S.; Fratini, G.; Arriga, N.; Papale, D.

    2012-04-01

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is the only technologically available direct method to measure carbon and energy fluxes between ecosystems and atmosphere. However, uncertainties related to this method have not been exhaustively assessed yet, including those deriving from post-field data processing. The latter arise because there is no exact processing sequence established for any given situation, and the sequence itself is long and complex, with many processing steps and options available. However, the consistency and inter-comparability of flux estimates may be largely affected by the adoption of different processing sequences. The goal of our work is to quantify the uncertainty introduced in each processing step by the fact that different options are available, and to study how the overall uncertainty propagates throughout the processing sequence. We propose an easy-to-use methodology to assign a confidence level to the calculated fluxes of energy and mass, based on the adopted processing sequence, and on available information such as the EC system type (e.g. open vs. closed path), the climate and the ecosystem type. The proposed methodology synthesizes the results of a massive full-factorial experiment. We use one year of raw data from 15 European flux stations and process them so as to cover all possible combinations of the available options across a selection of the most relevant processing steps. The 15 sites have been selected to be representative of different ecosystems (forests, croplands and grasslands), climates (mediterranean, nordic, arid and humid) and instrumental setup (e.g. open vs. closed path). The software used for this analysis is EddyPro™ 3.0 (www.licor.com/eddypro). The critical processing steps, selected on the basis of the different options commonly used in the FLUXNET community, are: angle of attack correction; coordinate rotation; trend removal; time lag compensation; low- and high- frequency spectral correction; correction for air density

  8. So close, so different: geothermal flux shapes divergent soil microbial communities at neighbouring sites.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, A L; Tagliavia, M; D'Alessandro, W; Franzetti, A; Parello, F; Quatrini, P

    2016-03-01

    This study is focused on the (micro)biogeochemical features of two close geothermal sites (FAV1 and FAV2), both selected at the main exhalative area of Pantelleria Island, Italy. A previous biogeochemical survey revealed high CH4 consumption and the presence of a diverse community of methanotrophs at FAV2 site, whereas the close site FAV1 was apparently devoid of methanotrophs and recorded no CH4 consumption. Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques were applied to describe the bacterial and archaeal communities which have been linked to the physicochemical conditions and the geothermal sources of energy available at the two sites. Both sites are dominated by Bacteria and host a negligible component of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (phylum Thaumarchaeota). The FAV2 bacterial community is characterized by an extraordinary diversity of methanotrophs, with 40% of the sequences assigned to Methylocaldum, Methylobacter (Gammaproteobacteria) and Bejerickia (Alphaproteobacteria); conversely, a community of thermo-acidophilic chemolithotrophs (Acidithiobacillus, Nitrosococcus) or putative chemolithotrophs (Ktedonobacter) dominates the FAV1 community, in the absence of methanotrophs. Since physical andchemical factors of FAV1, such as temperature and pH, cannot be considered limiting for methanotrophy, it is hypothesized that the main limiting factor for methanotrophs could be high NH4(+) concentration. At the same time, abundant availability of NH4(+) and other high energy electron donors and acceptors determined by the hydrothermal flux in this site create more energetically favourable conditions for chemolithotrophs that outcompete methanotrophs in non-nitrogen-limited soils.

  9. So close, so different: geothermal flux shapes divergent soil microbial communities at neighbouring sites.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, A L; Tagliavia, M; D'Alessandro, W; Franzetti, A; Parello, F; Quatrini, P

    2016-03-01

    This study is focused on the (micro)biogeochemical features of two close geothermal sites (FAV1 and FAV2), both selected at the main exhalative area of Pantelleria Island, Italy. A previous biogeochemical survey revealed high CH4 consumption and the presence of a diverse community of methanotrophs at FAV2 site, whereas the close site FAV1 was apparently devoid of methanotrophs and recorded no CH4 consumption. Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques were applied to describe the bacterial and archaeal communities which have been linked to the physicochemical conditions and the geothermal sources of energy available at the two sites. Both sites are dominated by Bacteria and host a negligible component of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (phylum Thaumarchaeota). The FAV2 bacterial community is characterized by an extraordinary diversity of methanotrophs, with 40% of the sequences assigned to Methylocaldum, Methylobacter (Gammaproteobacteria) and Bejerickia (Alphaproteobacteria); conversely, a community of thermo-acidophilic chemolithotrophs (Acidithiobacillus, Nitrosococcus) or putative chemolithotrophs (Ktedonobacter) dominates the FAV1 community, in the absence of methanotrophs. Since physical andchemical factors of FAV1, such as temperature and pH, cannot be considered limiting for methanotrophy, it is hypothesized that the main limiting factor for methanotrophs could be high NH4(+) concentration. At the same time, abundant availability of NH4(+) and other high energy electron donors and acceptors determined by the hydrothermal flux in this site create more energetically favourable conditions for chemolithotrophs that outcompete methanotrophs in non-nitrogen-limited soils. PMID:26560641

  10. SIGNAL : Water vapour flux variability and local wind field investigations within five differently managed agroforestry sites across Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, Christian; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Optimising soil water uptake and ground water consumption in mono-specific agricultural systems plays an important role for sustainable land management. By including tree alleys into the agricultural landscape, called agroforestry (AF), the wind flow is modified leading to a presumably favourable microclimate behind the tree alleys. We expect that this zone is characterized by increased air temperature and atmospheric water vapour content, compared to mono-specific fields. This would extend the growing season and increase the yield production behind the tree alleys. Within the SIGNAL (Sustainable Intensification of Agriculture through Agroforestry) project the evapotranspiration (ET) variability and the local wind field of agroforestry sites compared to mono-specific agricultural systems is investigated. Our study is based on the comparison of five differently managed agroforestry sites across Germany. All site feature one agroforestry plot and one reference plot, which represents a mono-specific cropped system. Each plot is equipped with an eddy-covariance tower, including a high frequency 3D SONIC anemometer and instruments gathering standard meteorological parameter as pressure, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, ground heat flux, net- and global radiation. The Surface Energy Budget (SEB) method will be used to calculate evapotranspiration QE as QE = - QN - QH - QG - Res by measuring the sensible heat flux, QH, with the eddy covariance method, the radiation balance, QN and the ground heat flux, QG. QH and QN will be measured continuously long-term. We will quantify site specific energy balance non-closure, Res, by temporarily measuring QE, using eddy covariance and a roving tower and then solving the SEB equation for Res. The short term Res will be used to then continuously derive QE from the SEB method. We will compare measured evapotranspiration rates from the SEB method to modelled evapotranspiration of the agroforestry systems through upscaling

  11. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  12. Eddy correlation measurements of CO{sub 2} flux at the sea surface in ASGASEX

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.D.; Anderson, R.J.; Hertzman, O.; Bourque, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Most estimates of CO{sub 2} exchange at the sea surface have been based on tracer experiments with other gases, long-term radiocarbon balances, or laboratory experiments. In the 1993 ASGASEX experiment, the first direct determinations of the CO{sub 2} exchange coefficient at an offshore site have been obtained. A key element of the plan was using redundant sensors and analysis systems so as to be able to test the consistency of the results. The authors have computed eddy fluxes using winds from a sonic anemometer and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O signals from IR sensors. Differences in mean CO{sub 2} between air equilibrated with seawater and ambient air were measured using an equilibrator and a LiCor IR analyzer. Similar measurements were made using a gas chromatograph instead of the IR analyzer.

  13. Air-sea flux of methane from selected marine hydrate/seep sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico during HYFLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.; MacDonald, I.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is one of the most important greenhouse gases, playing a significant role in global climate change and atmospheric chemistry. In spite of tremendous efforts made to constrain the strength of its sources and sinks, large uncertainties remain for some individual sources. Based on the previous observations and modeling studies, the flux of CH4 from marine hydrates and seeps to the atmosphere comprises a significant fraction of the entire methane flux from the global ocean. However, most of the estimates are based on the seafloor methane flux or discrete water column concentrations of methane and the averaged atmospheric methane ratios. In this study, we investigated three marine hydrate/seep sites in northern Gulf of Mexico in July of 2009 during the HYFLUX cruise. Continuous saturation-anomaly (deviation from equilibrium) measurements of methane, ethane and propane were made by alternately sampling the air or the headspace of Weiss-type equilibrator and analyzing it in a GC-FID system. Some 13CH4 measurements were also made continuously using a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). During this cruise, the maximum concentrations observed at the 3 marine hydrate/seep sites MC118, GC600, and GC185 were 14.5, 5.1, and 2.2 nmol/L, respectively. The air-sea fluxes, calculated from saturation anomalies, are used to create extremely high resolution flux maps for the three marine hydrate/seeps sites.

  14. Long-term elemental dry deposition fluxes measured around Lake Michigan with an automated dry deposition sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, U. Yi, S.M.; Paode, R.D.; Holsen, T.M.

    2000-05-15

    Long-term measurements of mass and elemental dry deposition (MG, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb) were made with an automated dry deposition sampler (Eagle II) containing knife-edge surrogate surfaces during the Lake Michigan Mass Balance/Mass Budget Study. Measurements were made over a roughly 700-day period in Chicago, IL; in South Haven and Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI; and over Lake Michigan on the 68th Street drinking water intake cribs from December 1993 to October 1995. Average mass fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 65, 10, 3.6, and 12 mg m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Primarily crustal elemental fluxes were significantly smaller than the mass fluxes but higher than primarily anthropogenic elemental fluxes. For example, the average elemental flux of Al in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 1.0, 0.34, 0.074, and 0.34 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The average Pb fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 0.038, 0.023, 0.035, and 0.032 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The measured fluxes at the various sites were used to calculate the dry deposition loadings to the lake. These estimated fluxes were highest for Mg and lowest for Cd.

  15. Confronting model predictions of carbon fluxes with measurements of Amazon forests subjected to experimental drought.

    PubMed

    Powell, Thomas L; Galbraith, David R; Christoffersen, Bradley O; Harper, Anna; Imbuzeiro, Hewlley M A; Rowland, Lucy; Almeida, Samuel; Brando, Paulo M; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Costa, Marcos Heil; Levine, Naomi M; Malhi, Yadvinder; Saleska, Scott R; Sotta, Eleneide; Williams, Mathew; Meir, Patrick; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2013-10-01

    Considerable uncertainty surrounds the fate of Amazon rainforests in response to climate change. Here, carbon (C) flux predictions of five terrestrial biosphere models (Community Land Model version 3.5 (CLM3.5), Ecosystem Demography model version 2.1 (ED2), Integrated BIosphere Simulator version 2.6.4 (IBIS), Joint UK Land Environment Simulator version 2.1 (JULES) and Simple Biosphere model version 3 (SiB3)) and a hydrodynamic terrestrial ecosystem model (the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) model) were evaluated against measurements from two large-scale Amazon drought experiments. Model predictions agreed with the observed C fluxes in the control plots of both experiments, but poorly replicated the responses to the drought treatments. Most notably, with the exception of ED2, the models predicted negligible reductions in aboveground biomass in response to the drought treatments, which was in contrast to an observed c. 20% reduction at both sites. For ED2, the timing of the decline in aboveground biomass was accurate, but the magnitude was too high for one site and too low for the other. Three key findings indicate critical areas for future research and model development. First, the models predicted declines in autotrophic respiration under prolonged drought in contrast to measured increases at one of the sites. Secondly, models lacking a phenological response to drought introduced bias in the sensitivity of canopy productivity and respiration to drought. Thirdly, the phenomenological water-stress functions used by the terrestrial biosphere models to represent the effects of soil moisture on stomatal conductance yielded unrealistic diurnal and seasonal responses to drought.

  16. The altitude variation of the ionospheric photoelectron flux A comparison of theory and measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The 145 to 300-km altitude variation of the measured photoelectron flux in the 13 to 18 eV, 28 to 34 eV, and 50 to 55 eV energy regions are compared with the variations expected from theory. There is a strong linear relationship between the measured photoelectron flux and the attenuation of the solar EUV flux at these energies. Therefore, the photoelectron flux is sensitive to changes in the solar zenith angle, neutral density scale height, and total neutral density. However, contrary to previous assertions, the photoelectron flux at most energies is not sensitive to the relative densities of the neutral constituents. In addition, good agreement between theory and measurement is obtained. By using the concept of photoelectron production frequencies, the usually complex evaluation of the local equilibrium photoelectron flux is reduced to a trivial calculation so that the steps in the calculation can be readily verified.

  17. LEAF, BRANCH, STAND & LANDSCAPE SCALE MEASUREMENTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXES FROM U.S. WOODLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural volatile organic compounds (VOC) fluxes were measured in three U.S. woodlands in summer 1993. Fluxes from individual leaves and branches were estimated with enclosure techniques and used to initialize and evaluate VOC emission model estimates. Ambient measurements were us...

  18. Assessing the Influence of Fossil Fuel Emissions on CO2 Flux Measurements Above a Suburban Ecosystem Using Continuous Traffic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, R. V.; Wu, J.; McFadden, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Cities are a major source of CO2, the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Land use within cities is highly heterogeneous and a significant area can be occupied by vegetated surfaces where CO2 is taken up by photosynthesis and released by ecosystem respiration. Recent remote sensing and modeling studies have estimated that turfgrass lawns cover a surface area of perhaps 163,800~km2 in the continental United States with significant CO2 exchange (Milesi et al. 2005). However, direct measurements of land-atmosphere fluxes above lawn ecosystems have been difficult due to the typically small dimensions of lawns and the heterogeneity of land uses that surround them in an urbanized landscape. We made 2~years of continuous CO2 exchange measurements using a mobile eddy covariance tower over a <1~ha lawn, which was within the footprint of the KUOM 170-m tall flux tower in a suburban residential neighborhood of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. A satellite-derived land-cover map was analyzed to assess the characteristic patch dimensions of lawns in the region in comparison to the selected mobile tower site. An important consequence of urban landscape heterogeneity is that CO2 fluxes measured above vegetated patches may be influenced by fossil fuel CO2 sources nearby. In this poster, we use high time resolution, continuously monitored traffic data from the roads surrounding the flux site to quantify the influence of fossil fuel emissions on the net ecosystem CO2 exchange measurements. Using a flux source area model, we assess the relative influence of fossil fuel emissions in relation to variations of wind field, atmospheric stability, and temporal patterns of traffic volume. The results will be useful for validating emissions models and for scaling up the CO2 flux from vegetation in developed land. This study is a contribution to the Mid-Continent Intensive Field Campaign of the North American Carbon Program (NACP).

  19. Effective monitoring of landfills: flux measurements and thermography enhance efficiency and reduce environmental impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglini, Raffaele; Raco, Brunella; Scozzari, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Despite the various positions towards the impact of methane on global warming, there is a general agreement about the fact that methane from landfill represents about 23% of the total anthropogenic CH4 released to the atmosphere. Despite the importance of this topic, no internationally accepted protocol exists to quantify the leakage of biogas from the landfill cover. To achieve this goal, this paper presents a field method based on accumulation chamber flux measurements. In addition, the results obtained from a nine-year-long monitoring activity on an Italian municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill are presented. The connection between such flux measurements of biogas release and thermal anomalies detected by infrared radiometry is also discussed. The main overall benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase in the recovered energy from the landfill site by means of an optimal collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of waste.

  20. Impact of surrounding environment evolution on long-term gas flux measurements in a temperate mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdebise, Quentin; Rixen, Toma; De Ligne, Anne; Vincke, Caroline; Heinesch, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    With the development of eddy covariance networks like Fluxnet, ICOS or NEON, long-term data series of carbon dioxide, water vapor and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere will become more and more numerous. However, long-term analyses of such exchanges require a good understanding of measurement conditions during the investigated period. Independently of climate drivers, measurements may indeed be influenced by measurement conditions themselves subjected to long-term variability due to vegetation growth or set-up changes. The present research refers to the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) where fluxes of momentum, carbon dioxide, latent and sensible heat have been continuously measured by eddy covariance during twenty years. VTO is an ICOS site installed in a mixed forest (beech, silver fir, Douglas fir, Norway spruce) in the Belgian Ardennes. A multidisciplinary approach was developed in order to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of several site characteristics: -displacement height (d) and relative measurement height (z-d) were determined using a spectral approach that compared observed and theoretical cospectra; -turbulence statistics were analyzed in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; -tree height during the measurement period was obtained by combining tree height inventories, a LIDAR survey and tree growth models; -measurement footprint was determined by using a footprint model. A good agreement was found between the three first approaches. Results show notably that z-d was subjected to both temporal and spatial evolution. Temporal evolution resulted from continuous tree growth as well as from a tower raise, achieved in 2009. Spatial evolution, due to canopy heterogeneity, was also observed. The impacts of these changes on measurements are investigated. In particular, it was shown that they affect measurement footprint, flux spectral corrections and flux quality. All these effects must be taken into

  1. Measuring sand flux on Mars using HiRISE Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, F.; Bridges, N. T.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.; Lucas, A.; Mattson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As wind is the major agent of sediment transport on Mars, a quantitative estimate of aeolian processes is therefore essential to assess recent geological evolution and current climate. We adapted the Co-registration of Optically Sensed Image and Correlation (COSI-Corr) toolbox to the MRO HiRISE imager specifications to produce a dense map of the ripples migration on the surface of the Martian dunes on the Nili Patera area. The ripple migration rate, along with an estimate of the ripple height, were used to derive the sand flux, a key quantity that controls the style and rate of landscape evolution. Using the dunes shape, size, and height, which were extracted from a DEM of the dune field, we show that the dunes are near steady state, and we observe that dune migration rate varies inversely with size and position within the dune field. The time scale associated with the formation and evolution of the Nili Patera dune field, estimated from comparing the sand volume with the sand flux and the dunes migration rates with the length scale of the dune field, is on the order of 10s to 100s of thousands Earth years. However, sand fluxes at the dune crests are 0.7 - 4.8 m3 m-1 per Earth year, which is comparable to that of dunes in Victoria Valley, Antarctica. This implies that rates of landscape modification from aeolian abrasion on Mars may be comparable to that on Earth.

  2. Disjunct eddy accumulation flux measurements of individual VOCs from an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Erik; Pressley, Shelley; Grivicke, Rasa; Allwine, Eugene; Jobson, B. Tom; Westberg, Hal; Molina, Luisa T.; Lamb, Brian

    2010-05-01

    As part of the MILAGRO-2006 study a flux tower was deployed at urban Mexico City to measure turbulent fluxes of trace gases. Fluxes of individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA) sampler with ionization detector/gas chromatography (GC-FID) analysis. The DEA method partitions the air into two reservoirs based on the magnitude and direction of the vertical wind speed. The VOCs concentrations in both reservoirs are analyzed and used to determine the fluxes with the vertical wind velocities. Although this method is not as precise as other micrometeorological techniques, such as the eddy covariance method, it provides the ability to directly measure the fluxes of an extended number of individual species using off-line sensors without relying on similarity scaling or empirical parameters. According to our knowledge these measurements constitute the first time that the DEA method was applied in an urban environment. A comparison of the DEA fluxes of selected aromatic and olefinic species measured in parallel by the more accurate eddy covariance and disjunct eddy covariance techniques coupled with fast-response analytical sensors evidenced a flux under-prediction by the DEA method. However, this under-prediction was consistent and constant for the species compared, allowing an analysis of the DEA fluxes in terms of relative magnitudes and ratios. It was found that fluxes of alkane species were the dominant VOCs fluxes, which is consistent with ambient concentration measurements and the local emissions inventory. Among the top 20 mean VOCs fluxes measured during daytime, 11 corresponded to alkanes, followed by 5 aromatics, 2 olefins, 1 alkyne and 1 oxygenated.

  3. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, R.V.

    1993-03-16

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

  4. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

  5. Measurement of DDT fluxes from a historically treated agricultural soil in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Karakus, Perihan Binnur; Bidleman, Terry F; Staebler, Ralf M; Jones, Kevin C

    2006-08-01

    Organocohlorine pesticide (OCP) residues in agricultural soils are of concern due to the uptake of these compounds by crops, accumulation in the foodchain, and reemission from soils to the atmosphere. Although it has been about three decades since DDT was banned for agricultural uses in Canada, residues persist in soils of some agricultural areas. Emission of DDT compounds to the atmosphere from a historically treated field in southern Ontario was determined in fall 2004 and spring 2005. The sigmaDDTs concentration in the high organic matter (71%) soil was 19 +/- 4 microg g(-1) dry weight. Concentration gradients in the air were measured at 5, 20, 72, and 200 cm above soil using glass fiber filter-polyurethane foam cartridges. Air concentrations of sigmaDDTs averaged 5.7 +/- 5.1 ng m(-3) at 5 cm and decreased to 1.3 +/- 0.8 ng m(-3) at 200 cm and were 60-300 times higher than levels measured at a background site 30 km away. Soil-air fugacity fractions, fs/(fs + fa), of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, and p,p'-DDT ranged from 0.42 to 0.91 using air concentrations measured above the soil and > or = 0.99 using background air concentrations, indicating that the soil was a net source to the background air. Fractionation of DDT compounds during volatilization was predicted using either liquid-phase vapor pressures (PL) or octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA). Relative emissions of p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDT were better described by PL than KOA, whereas either PL or KOA successfully accounted for the fractionation of p,p'-DDT and o,p'-DDT. Soil-to-air fluxes were calculated from air concentration gradients and turbulent exchange coefficients determined from micrometeorological measurements. Average fluxes of sigmaDDTs were 90 +/- 24 ng m(-2) h(-1) in fall and 660 +/- 370 ng m(-2) h(-1) in spring. Higher soil temperatures in spring accounted for the higher fluxes. A volatilization half-life of approximately 200 y was estimated for sigmaDDT in the upper 5 cm of the soil column, assuming

  6. Assessing the spatial representativeness of eddy-covariance measurements of AmeriFlux network based on remote sensing and footprint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Zhang, L.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    The eddy-covariance towers of AmeriFlux network are important for the analysis of terrestrial ecosystem-atmosphere interactions, and they have been used to improve our understanding of the mechanism behind terrestrial carbon cycle and upscaling from site to landscape and regional scales. However, the spatial representativeness of AmeriFlux network has not been assessed, especially accounting for the effects of land cover change on it using high spatial resolution data. Here we demonstrated an approach for evaluating the spatial representativeness of flux tower measurements based on footprint climatology analyses, land cover change data and remotely sensed vegetation indices. This method was applied to 79 flux towers of AmeriFlux network located in the continental United States, covering evergreen forest, deciduous forest, mixed forest, grass, cropland, shrub, and wetland biomes. For each site, monthly and annual footprint climatologies (i.e. monthly or annual accumulative footprints) were calculated using the Simple Analytical Footprint model on Eulerian coordinates (SAFE-f). The footprint climatologies were then overlaid on the images of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and National Land Cover Database (NLCD) for the years (2001, 2006 and 2011), which were used as surrogates of land surface fluxes to assess the spatial representativeness. For most sites of AmeriFlux network, the results show that (i) the percentages of the target vegetation functional type (dominant land cover) observed by the AmeriFlux towers were higher than 60%; (ii) to some extent, most of the AmeriFlux sites presented anisotropically distributed patterns of NDVI within the 90% annual footprint climatology area; (iii) the land surface heterogeneity within the flux footprint area differed among sites; and (iv) the land cover types had changed higher than 10% within 6 km*6 km area centered at the flux tower for 5 AmeriFlux sites. We conclude that the footprint modeling based on high

  7. Modeling the Impact of Hydraulic Redistribution on Carbon Cycles Using CLM4.5 at Eight AmeriFlux Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C.; Wang, G.; Cardon, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has significant impacts on the terrestrial hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes. Accurate modeling of HR and its impact on vegetation growth and ecosystem carbon dynamics is important for accurate simulation of regional and global carbon cycles. However, how HR influences plant, soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics remains poorly understood. In this study, we incorporate a simple HR scheme into the Community Land Model Version 4.5 (CLM4.5) including the biogeochemical model BGC. We use the modified CLM4.5-BGC model to investigate the impact of HR on the terrestrial carbon cycle at eight AmeriFlux sites where HR was detected from soil moisture measurements: a Douglas-fir site (US-Wrc) in Washington State with a Mediterranean climate, a savanna site (US-SRM) in Arizona with a semi-arid climate, and six sites along the Southern California Climate Gradient with a Mediterranean climate, with coverage of coastal sage (US-SCs), grassland (US-SCg), oak/pine forest (US-SCf), pinyon and juniper woodland (US-SCw), desert chaparral (US-SCc), and desert perennials and annuals (US-SCd). Monitored net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) at the US-Wrc, US-SRM, and US-SCf sites, is used in model calibration and HR sensitivity analysis. Preliminary results from the model indicate that HR tends to increase net primary production (NPP) during dry periods and increase leaf area index (LAI) throughout the year at the US-Wrc site, while HR increased NPP and LAI during growing season and reduced NPP and LAI during dry periods at the US-SCs and US-SCg sites, with corresponding modifications to carbon storage in soil layers and in plant leaf, stem, and root carbon pools. The biogeochemical processes leading to these effects will be analyzed and presented.

  8. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    SciTech Connect

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31

    , respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Flux estimation of fugitive particulate matter emissions from loose Calcisols at construction sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hala A.; Kumar, Prashant; Kakosimos, Konstantinos E.

    2016-09-01

    A major source of airborne pollution in arid and semi-arid environments (i.e. North Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, and Australia) is the fugitive particulate matter (fPM), which is a frequent product of wind erosion. However, accurate determination of fPM is an ongoing scientific challenge. The objective of this study is to examine fPM emissions from the loose Calcisols (i.e. soils with a substantial accumulation of secondary carbonates), owing to construction activities that can be frequently seen nowadays in arid urbanizing regions such as the Middle East. A two months field campaign was conducted at a construction site, at rest, within the city of Doha (Qatar) to measure number concentrations of PM over a size range of 0.25-32 μm using light scattering based monitoring stations. The fPM emission fluxes were calculated using the Fugitive Dust Model (FDM) in an iterative manner and were fitted to a power function, which expresses the wind velocity dependence. The power factors were estimated as 1.87, 1.65, 2.70 and 2.06 for the four different size classes of particles ≤2.5, 2.5-6, 6-10 and ≤10 μm, respectively. Fitted power function was considered acceptable given that adjusted R2 values varied from 0.13 for the smaller particles and up to 0.69 for the larger ones. These power factors are in the same range of those reported in the literature for similar sources. The outcome of this study is expected to contribute to the improvement of PM emission inventories by focusing on an overlooked but significant pollution source, especially in dry and arid regions, and often located very close to residential areas and sensitive population groups. Further campaigns are recommended to reduce the uncertainty and include more fPM sources (e.g. earthworks) and other types of soil.

  10. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  11. Demonstration of a Mobile Flux Laboratory for the Atmospheric Measurement of Emissions (FLAME) to Assess Emission Inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. O.; Doughty, D. C.; Marr, L. C.

    2008-12-01

    As a critical input to climate and air quality models, emission inventories enable the advancement of atmospheric science and the development of effective policies to improve environmental quality. Independent verification of emissions is needed to ensure their accuracy and to identify uncertainties in them. In response to the need for new approaches to quantifying emissions, we have designed a mobile Flux Lab for the Atmospheric Measurement of Emissions (FLAME) that uses eddy covariance for the direct measurement of anthropogenic emissions at the neighborhood scale. To demonstrate the FLAME's capabilities, we have deployed it in both urban and rural settings in ozone nonattainment areas of the southeastern US. Experiments focused on carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Fluxes measured at three sites in a small Appalachian town dominated by coal transport were mainly positive. Compared to the state's official inventory, the measured CO2 fluxes were 1.25-50 times higher, and PM2.5 fluxes were 5-60 times higher. The FLAME can also be used to measure emission factors from specific sources. Spikes in CO2 and NOx concentrations were correlated with the passage of trains and barges through the FLAME's footprint. Calculated barge emission factors ranged from 49 to 76 kg NOx per tonne of fuel and agreed well with previously published values. In a field campaign during July 2008, we measured fluxes at 16 sites across a 12 km square in Norfolk, Virginia. The results will show the typical magnitude of greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant fluxes, their temporal and spatial variability, and relationships among different pollutants. We also compare the measurements against a 12 km gridded emission inventory developed for air quality modeling of the southeastern US. This research demonstrates that a mobile eddy covariance system can be used successfully to measure fluxes of multiple pollutants in a variety of settings. This

  12. Net drainage effects on CO2 fluxes of a permafrost ecosystem through eddy-covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Fanny; Burjack, Ina; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergey; Heimann, Martin; Göckede, Mathias

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost landscapes in the Northern high latitudes with their massive organic carbon stocks are critically important for the global carbon cycle, yet feedback processes with the atmosphere under future climate conditions are uncertain. To improve the understanding of mechanisms and drivers dominating permafrost carbon cycling, we established a continuous observation program in moist tussock tundra ecosystem near Cherskiy in North-eastern Siberia (68.75°N, 161.33°E). The experiment has been designed to monitor carbon cycle fluxes at different scales with different approaches, including e.g. the eddy-covariance technique, and their environmental drivers. Recent observations started mid July 2013 and are still ongoing, while 'historic' measurements are available for the period 2002-2005. Since 2004 part of the observation area has been disturbed by a drainage ditch ring, altering the soil water conditions in the surrounding area in a way that is expected for degrading ice-rich permafrost under a warming climate. With parallel observations over the disturbed (drained) area and a reference area nearby, respectively, we aim to evaluate the disturbance effect on the carbon cycle budgets and the dominating biogeochemical mechanisms. Here, findings based on over 1.5 years of continuous eddy-covariance CO2 flux measurements (July 2013 - March 2015) for both observation areas are presented. Results show systematic shifts in the tundra ecosystem as a result of 10 years of disturbance in the drained area, with significant effects on biotic and abiotic site conditions as well as on the carbon cycle dynamics. Comparing the net budget fluxes between both observations areas indicates a reduction of the net sink strength for CO2 of the drained ecosystem during the summer season in comparison to natural conditions, mostly caused by reduced CO2 uptake with low water levels in late summer. Regarding the long-term CO2 uptake dynamics of the disturbance regime (2005 vs. 2013/14) the

  13. Short-term eddy-covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes at Itaipu Lake, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, N. L.; Crivellaro, B. L.; Armani, F. S.; Chor, T. L.; Gobbi, M. F.; Santos, A. L.; Lemma/UFPR Scientific Team

    2013-05-01

    lake or the whole land), and more research is needed to extend their representativeness in time and space. The sign of the CO2 fluxes showed qualitative agreement with 30-min. mean CO2 measurements, with most runs displaying the same sign for the fluxes and (minus) the mean CO2 concentration difference between the 1.77 and 3.66-m levels, suggesting that CO2 flux estimates with mass-transfer theory may be feasible at the site.

  14. Calculations of automatic chamber flux measurements of methane and carbon dioxide using short time series of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirk, Norbert; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Lund, Magnus; Crill, Patrick; Christensen, Torben R.

    2016-02-01

    The closed chamber technique is widely used to measure the exchange of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from terrestrial ecosystems. There is, however, large uncertainty about which model should be used to calculate the gas flux from the measured gas concentrations. Due to experimental uncertainties the simple linear regression model (first-order polynomial) is often applied, even though theoretical considerations of the technique suggest the application of other, curvilinear models. High-resolution automatic chamber systems which sample gas concentrations several hundred times per flux measurement make it possible to resolve the curvilinear behavior and study the information imposed by the natural variability of the temporal concentration changes. We used more than 50 000 such flux measurements of CH4 and CO2 from five field sites located in peat-forming wetlands ranging from 56 to 78° N to quantify the typical differences between flux estimates of different models. In addition, we aimed to assess the curvilinearity of the concentration time series and test the general applicability of curvilinear models. Despite significant episodic differences between the calculated flux estimates, the overall differences are generally found to be smaller than the local flux variability on the plot scale. The curvilinear behavior of the gas concentrations within the chamber is strongly influenced by wind-driven chamber leakage, and less so by changing gas concentration gradients in the soil during chamber closure. Such physical processes affect both gas species equally, which makes it possible to isolate biochemical processes affecting the gases differently, such as photosynthesis limitation by chamber headspace CO2 concentrations under high levels of incoming solar radiation. We assess the possibility to exploit this effect for a partitioning of the net CO2 flux into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration as an example of how high-resolution automatic chamber

  15. Four-year measurement of methane flux over a temperate forest with a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakabe, A.; Kosugi, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Hamotani, K.; Takahashi, K.; Iwata, H.; Itoh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are generally assumed to be an atmospheric methane (CH4) sink (Le Mer and Roger, 2001). However, under Asian monsoon climate, forests are subject to wide spatiotemporal range in soil water status, where forest soils often became water-saturated condition heterogeneously. In such warm and humid conditions, forests may act as a CH4 source and/or sink with considerable spatiotemporal variations. Micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) method continuously measure spatially-representative flux at a canopy scale without artificial disturbance. In this study, we measured CH4 fluxes over a temperate forest during four-year period using a CH4 analyzer based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy detection with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method (Hamotani et al., 1996, 2001). We revealed the amplitude and seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes. The REA method is the attractive alternative to the EC method to measure trace-gas flux because it allows the use of analyzers with an optimal integration time. We also conducted continuous chamber measurements on forest floor to reveal spatial variations in soil CH4 fluxes and its controlling processes. The observations were made in an evergreen coniferous forest in central Japan. The site has a warm temperate monsoon climate with wet summer. Some wetlands were located in riparian zones along streams within the flux footprint area. For the REA method, the sonic anemometer (SAT-550, Kaijo) was mounted on top of the 29-m-tall tower and air was sampled from just below the sonic anemometer to reservoirs according to the direction of vertical wind velocity (w). After accumulating air for 30 minutes, the air in the reservoirs was pulled into a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-840, Li-Cor) and a CH4 analyzer (FMA-200, Los Gatos Research). Before entering the analyzers, the sampled air was dried using a gas dryer (PD-50 T-48; Perma Pure Inc.). The REA flux is obtained from the difference in the mean concentrations

  16. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-02-16

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Andersen, T. C.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M. C.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox-Mobrand, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Grant, D. R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Harvey, P. J.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J. C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A. J.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-07-10

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  18. A comparison of six methods for measuring soil-surface carbon dioxide fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, J.M.; Kucharik, C.J.; Gower, S.T.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Crill, P.M.; Rayment, M.; Savage, K.; Striegl, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of soil-surface CO2 fluxes are important for characterizing the carbon budget of boreal forests because these fluxes can be the second largest component of the budget. Several methods for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes are available: (1) closed-dynamic-chamber systems, (2) closed-static-chamber systems, (3) open-chamber systems, and (4) eddy covariance systems. This paper presents a field comparison of six individual systems for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes with each of the four basic system types represented. A single system is used as a reference and compared to each of the other systems individually in black spruce (Picea mariana), jack pine (Pinus banksiana), or aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests. Fluxes vary from 1 to 10 ??mol CO2 m-2 s-1. Adjustment factors to bring all of the systems into agreement vary from 0.93 to 1.45 with an uncertainty of about 10-15%.

  19. Observed and Modeled Isoprene Fluxes at a Remote Michigan Forest Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, M.; Pressley, S. N.; Gu, D.; Yu, H.; Guenther, A. B.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) constitute a major part of global VOC emissions and can affect regional or global climate by influencing tropospheric chemistry and forming secondary organic aerosols. Isoprene is the most abundant species in global BVOC budget. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) 2.1 (Guenther et al., 2006, 2012) is a state-of-art emission model that simulates BVOC emissions by considering major environmental activity factors (e.g. temperature, solar radiation). Here we compare measurements of isoprene emissions in a mixed hardwood forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) during 1999-2005 growing seasons (Pressley et al., 2004, 2005) with MEGAN model simulations. We investigated the seasonal variations of isoprene emissions by considering the impacts from meteorological conditions, as well as correlations between sensible heat flux, latent heat flux and isoprene flux for a model uncertainty analysis. Model simulations are in good agreement with observations during leaf full expansion periods, but the values are 3-4 times higher than observations before full leaf development and after leaf senescence periods. There are significant correlations between the variations of isoprene emissions and precipitation.

  20. Continuous atmospheric monitoring of the injected CO2 behavior over geological storage sites using flux stations: latest technologies and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; Madsen, Rodney; Feese, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    Flux stations have been widely used to monitor emission rates of CO2 from various ecosystems for climate research for over 30 years [1]. The stations provide accurate and continuous measurements of CO2 emissions with high temporal resolution. Time scales range from 20 times per second for gas concentrations, to 15-minute, hourly, daily, and multi-year periods. The emissions are measured from the upwind area ranging from thousands of square meters to multiple square kilometers, depending on the measurement height. The stations can nearly instantaneously detect rapid changes in emissions due to weather events, as well as changes caused by variations in human-triggered events (pressure leaks, control releases, etc.). Stations can also detect any slow changes related to seasonal dynamics and human-triggered low-frequency processes (leakage diffusion, etc.). In the past, station configuration, data collection and processing were highly-customized, site-specific and greatly dependent on "school-of-thought" practiced by a particular research group. In the last 3-5 years, due to significant efforts of global and regional CO2 monitoring networks (e.g., FluxNet, Ameriflux, Carbo-Europe, ICOS, etc.) and technological developments, the flux station methodology became fairly standardized and processing protocols became quite uniform [1]. A majority of current stations compute CO2 emission rates using the eddy covariance method, one of the most direct and defensible micrometeorological techniques [1]. Presently, over 600 such flux stations are in operation in over 120 countries, using permanent and mobile towers or moving platforms (e.g., automobiles, helicopters, and airplanes). Atmospheric monitoring of emission rates using such stations is now recognized as an effective method in regulatory and industrial applications, including carbon storage [2-8]. Emerging projects utilize flux stations to continuously monitor large areas before and after the injections, to locate and

  1. Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lidia, S.M.; Welch, J.

    2011-04-01

    We report on an alternative way to measure the absolute beam flux at the NDCX-I, LBNL linear accelerator. Up to date, the beam flux is determined from the analysis of the beam-induced optical emission from a ceramic scintilator (Al-Si). The new approach is based on calorimetric technique, where energy flux is deduced from the melting dynamics of a gold foil. We estimate an average 260 kW/cm2 beam flux over 5 {micro}s, which is consistent with values provided by the other methods. Described technique can be applied to various ion species and energies.

  2. Balloon-borne measurements of the ultraviolet flux in the Arctic stratosphere during winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Cornelius; Mueller, Martin; Klein, Erich; Schmidt, Ulrich; Roeth, Ernst-Peter

    1994-01-01

    Filter radiometers sensitive from 280 to 320 nm and from 280 to 400 nm, respectively, were used for measurements of the actinic flux in the stratosphere. Since the instruments are calibrated for absolute spectral sensitivity the data can be compared with model calculations of the actinic flux. Data were obtained during seven balloon flights during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE).

  3. Effects of biased CO2 flux measurements by open-path sensors on the interpretation of CO2 flux dynamics at contrasting ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Manuel; Humphreys, Elyn; Bogoev, Ivan; Quinton, William L.; Wischnweski, Karoline; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Long-term measurements of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) are conducted across a global network of flux tower sites. These sites are characterised by varying climatic and vegetation conditions, but also differ in the type of CO2/H2O gas analyser used to obtain NEE. Several studies have observed a systematic bias in measured NEE when comparing open-path (OP) and closed-path (CP) sensors with consistently more negative daytime NEE measurements when using OP sensors, both during the growing and non-growing season. A surface heating correction has been proposed in the literature, but seems not to be universally applicable. Systematic biases in NEE measurements are particularly problematic for synthesis papers and inter-comparison studies between sites where the 'true' NEE is small compared to the potential instrument bias. For example, NEE estimates for boreal forest sites derived from OP sensors show large, ecologically unreasonable winter CO2 uptake. To better understand the causes and the magnitude of this potential bias, we conducted a sensor inter-comparison study at the Mer Bleue peatland near Ottawa, ON, Canada. An eddy covariance system with a CP (LI7000 & GILL R3-50) and an OP sensor (EC150 & CSAT3A) was used. Measurements were made between September 2012 and January 2013 and covered late summer, fall, and winter conditions. Flux calculations were made as consistently as possible to minimise differences due to differing processing procedures (e.g. spectral corrections). The latent (LE, slope of orthogonal linear regression of LEOP on LECP: 1.02 ± 0.01 & intercept: -0.2 ± 0.6 W m-2 and sensible heat fluxes (H, slope of HCSAT3A on HGILL: 0.96 ± 0.01 & intercept: 0.1 ± 0.03 W m-2) did not show any significant bias. However, a significant bias was apparent in the NEE measurements (slope of NEEOP on NEECP: 1.36 ± 0.02 & intercept: -0.1 ± 0.05). The differences between NEEOP and NEECP were linearly related to the magnitude of HCSAT3A with a slope of -0

  4. Nitrogen Dynamics of the Savanna Flux Site at Skukuza, Kruger National Park.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woghiren, A. J.; Scholes, M.

    2001-12-01

    The SAFARI 2000 campaign aims at validating satellite-based estimates of photosynthesis and net primary productivity (NPP). The Skukuza site has two vegetation types, a Combretum (broad-leafed) savanna and an Acacia (fine-leafed) savanna. Since it is expected that these two vegetation types may have markedly different responses to global climate change, it is an ideal site for the Earth observing systems (EOS) validation experiment. NPP estimates need to be explained and supported using corresponding data on the N (nitrogen) budgets for the site. Plants capable of nitrogen fixation usually had higher % N and lower \\delta15N signatures than their non-nitrogen-fixing counterparts. Most species had isotopically enriched signatures relative to the standard, which was air. The mean enrichments for the legumes varied from -1.76 to 3.32%, while that of the non-legumes ranged from 3.02 to 7.08%. In the herbaceous layer, Stylosanthes fruticosa and Macrotyloma maranguense had the highest fixation rates, with 84% and 41% being contributed by each species respectively (4.9 - 6.8 kg N ha-1 yr-1 is fixed in this layer). Since these species occurred in dense patches at the broad-leafed site, it was assumed that this was the contribution of N2 fixation to this savanna. The dominant N2 fixing tree was Acacia nilotica, with 50 % of its N being fixed. Trees at the fine-leafed site fixed between 2.9 - 5.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, while herbaceous legumes contributed 4.9 - 6.8 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Nitrogen mineralisation is seasonal, with particularly high rates of mineralisation in spring. In winter, NH4+ dominates at the fine-leafed site, when it is scarcely detectable at the broad-leafed site. On the other hand, nitrate prevails in summer at the fine-leafed site, while it is being immobilised at the broad-leafed site. In contrast to another South African savanna, NH4+ is detected in large quantities (0.85 μ g N g-1 dry soil day-1) at both sites during summer. The nitrification rates are

  5. Natural Gas Seepage Along the Edge of the Aquitaine Shelf (France): Origin and Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Battani, A.; Bignon, L.; Croguennec, C.; Caprais, J. C.; Birot, D.; Bayon, G.; Lantéri, N.; Levaché, D.; Dupré, S.

    2014-12-01

    A newly discovered and highly active seepage area has been acoustically mapped at the western edge of the Aquitaine Shelf in the Bay of Biscay [Dupré et al., 2014]. Three selected seeping sites have been investigated with a Remotely Operated Vehicle. All sites were characterized by vigorous gas emissions, and the occurrence of massive carbonate crusts and bacterial mats at the seafloor. Nine seeps have been sampled with the PEGAZ sampler. The latter allowed gas-bubble sampling and preservation at in situpressure, together with gas-flux measurement through its graduated transparent cone. The C2+ fraction of the gas samples accounts for less than 0.06 %-mol of the total composition. Both the abundance of methane and dD and d13C isotopic analyses of the hydrocarbons indicate a biogenic source generated by microbial reduction of carbon dioxide [Whiticar et al., 1986]. The analyses of the associated noble gases also provide further support for a shallow-depth generation. While sharing the same origin, the collected samples are different in other respects, such as the measured d13C values for carbon dioxide and the hydrocarbons. This is the case in particular for methane, with displays values in between -66.1 and -72.7 ‰. We hypothesized that such variations are the result of multiple gas-transport processes along with the occurrence of hydrocarbon oxidation at different rates within the sedimentary column. The measured gas fluxes are extremely heterogeneous from one seep to another, ranging from 18 to 193 m3.yr-1. These values will be discussed in detail by comparing them with values obtained from different measurement techniques at other gas-seeping sites. The GAZCOGNE study is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project. References:Dupré, S., L. Berger, N. Le Bouffant, C. Scalabrin, and J. F. Bourillet (2014), Fluid emissions at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): a biogenic origin or

  6. Carbon fluxes and export in the northern and middle Atlantic Sea measured with drifting sediment traps

    SciTech Connect

    Miquel, J-C; Fowler, S; Hamilton, T; Heilmann, J P; LaRosa, J; Carroll, M

    2000-07-26

    In July 1993 and June 1995 drifting sediment traps were deployed near the Po outflow, in the coastal zone and in the Jabuka Pit in order to obtain quantitative information on the vertical flux of particulate material and export of organic carbon in the Northern and Middle Adriatic Sea. During these periods and in July 1994, the standing stock of carbon and nitrogen in the water column were also estimated. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations were higher in the north with a mean of 266 {micro}g C l{sup -1} in surface waters as compared to 92 {micro}g C l{sup -1} in Middle Adriatic; maximum concentrations were associated to the less-saline surface-subsurface waters in the north and to the chlorophyll a maximum in the Middle Adriatic. Organic carbon flux was roughly five times higher near the Po than in the more oligotrophic waters of the central region, with overall values (0.8 to 11.5 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) being low compared to the open Northwestern Mediterranean. Comparison with primary production measurements yielded estimates of carbon export (f-ratio) of 4.7 and 3.4% in the Po and Pit stations, respectively, in 1993 and of 1.6 and 3.6% in the central part of the Adriatic in 1995. These consistently low values suggest enhanced carbon recycling in the upper water column, even in regions characterized by different production and organic flux regimes. Zooplankton fecal pellets were important conveyors of organic carbon in this region; particularly those produced by fishes in the North and coastal sites.

  7. Measuring eddy covariance fluxes of ozone with a slow-response analyser

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Hammerle, Albin; Graus, Martin; Hansel, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) fluxes above a temperate mountain grassland were measured by means of the eddy covariance (EC) method using a slow-response O3 analyser. The resultant flux loss was corrected for by a series of transfer functions which model the various sources of high- and, in particular, low-pass filtering. The resulting correction factors varied on average between 1.7 and 3.5 during night and day time, respectively. A cospectral analysis confirmed the accuracy of this approach. O3 fluxes were characterised by a comparatively large random uncertainty, which during daytime typically amounted to 60 %. EC O3 fluxes were compared against O3 flux measurements made concurrently with the flux-gradient (FG) method. The two methods generally agreed well, except for a period between sun rise and early afternoon, when the FG method was suspected of being affected by the presence of photochemical sources/sinks. O3 flux magnitudes and deposition velocities determined with the EC method compared nicely with the available literature from grassland studies. We conclude that our understanding of the causes and consequences of various sources of flux loss (associated with any EC system) has sufficiently matured so that also less-than-ideal instrumentation may be used in EC flux applications, albeit at the cost of relatively large empirical corrections. PMID:24348085

  8. A 3-year dataset of sensible and latent heat fluxes from the Tibetan Plateau, derived using eddy covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Babel, Wolfgang; Chen, Xuelong; Zhang, Lang; Sun, Fanglin; Wang, Binbin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong; Foken, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) has become a focus of strong scientific interest due to its role in the global water cycle and its reaction to climate change. Regional flux estimates of sensible and latent heat are important variables for linking the energy and hydrological cycles at the TP's surface. Within this framework, a 3-year dataset (2008-2010) of eddy covariance measured turbulent fluxes was compiled from four stations on the TP into a standardised workflow: corrections and quality tests were applied using an internationally comparable software package. Second, the energy balance closure ( C EB) was determined and two different closure corrections applied. The four stations (Qomolangma, Linzhi, NamCo and Nagqu) represent different locations and typical land surface types on the TP (high altitude alpine steppe with sparse vegetation, a densely vegetated alpine meadow, and bare soil/gravel, respectively). We show that the C EB differs between each surface and undergoes seasonal changes. Typical differences in the turbulent energy fluxes occur between the stations at Qomolangma, Linzhi and NamCo, while Nagqu is quite similar to NamCo. Specific investigation of the pre-monsoon, the Tibetan Plateau summer monsoon, post-monsoon and winter periods within the annual cycle reinforces these findings. The energy flux of the four sites is clearly influenced by the Tibetan Plateau monsoon. In the pre-monsoon period, sensible heat flux is the major energy source delivering heat to the atmosphere, whereas latent heat flux is greater than sensible heat flux during the monsoon season. Other factors affecting surface energy flux are topography and location. Land cover type also affects surface energy flux. The energy balance residuum indicates a typically observed overall non-closure in winter, while closure (or `turbulent over-closure') is achieved during the Tibetan Plateau summer monsoon at the Nagqu site. The latter seems to depend on ground heat flux, which is higher in the

  9. Using vapor phase tomography to measure the spatial distribution of vapor concentrations and flux for vadose-zone VOC sources.

    PubMed

    Mainhagu, J; Morrison, C; Brusseau, M L

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of the four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were used along with pressure and the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site.

  10. Using Vapor Phase Tomography to Measure the Spatial Distribution of Vapor Concentrations and Flux for Vadose-Zone VOC Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainhagu, J.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Morrison, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of the four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were used along with pressure and the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site.

  11. Using vapor phase tomography to measure the spatial distribution of vapor concentrations and flux for vadose-zone VOC sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of the four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were used along with pressure and the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site.

  12. Using Vapor Phase Tomography to Measure the Spatial Distribution of Vapor Concentrations and Flux for Vadose-zone VOC Sources

    PubMed Central

    Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; Brusseau, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were combined with the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site. PMID:25835545

  13. A framework to utilize turbulent flux measurements for mesoscale models and remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, W.; Huneke, S.; Foken, T.

    2011-05-01

    Meteorologically measured fluxes of energy and matter between the surface and the atmosphere originate from a source area of certain extent, located in the upwind sector of the device. The spatial representativeness of such measurements is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the landscape. The footprint concept is capable of linking observed data with spatial heterogeneity. This study aims at upscaling eddy covariance derived fluxes to a grid size of 1 km edge length, which is typical for mesoscale models or low resolution remote sensing data. Here an upscaling strategy is presented, utilizing footprint modelling and SVAT modelling as well as observations from a target land-use area. The general idea of this scheme is to model fluxes from adjacent land-use types and combine them with the measured flux data to yield a grid representative flux according to the land-use distribution within the grid cell. The performance of the upscaling routine is evaluated with real datasets, which are considered to be land-use specific fluxes in a grid cell. The measurements above rye and maize fields stem from the LITFASS experiment 2003 in Lindenberg, Germany and the respective modelled timeseries were derived by the SVAT model SEWAB. Contributions from each land-use type to the observations are estimated using a forward lagrangian stochastic model. A representation error is defined as the error in flux estimates made when accepting the measurements unchanged as grid representative flux and ignoring flux contributions from other land-use types within the respective grid cell. Results show that this representation error can be reduced up to 56 % when applying the spatial integration. This shows the potential for further application of this strategy, although the absolute differences between flux observations from rye and maize were so small, that the spatial integration would be rejected in a real situation. Corresponding thresholds for this decision have been estimated as

  14. The Niwot Ridge Subalpine Forest US-NR1 AmeriFlux site – Part 1: Data acquisition and site record-keeping

    DOE PAGES

    Burns, Sean P.; Maclean, Gordon D.; Blanken, Peter D.; Oncley, Steven P.; Semmer, Steven R.; Monson, Russell K.

    2016-09-29

    The Niwot Ridge Subalpine Forest AmeriFlux site (US-NR1) has been measuring eddy-covariance ecosystem fluxes of carbon dioxide, heat, and water vapor since 1 November 1998. Throughout this 17-year period there have been changes to the instrumentation and improvements to the data acquisition system. Here, in Part 1 of this three-part series of papers, we describe the hardware and software used for data-collection and metadata documentation. We made changes to the data acquisition system that aimed to reduce the system complexity, increase redundancy, and be as independent as possible from any network outages. Changes to facilitate these improvements were (1) switching to a PC/104-based computer runningmore » the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) In-Situ Data Acquisition Software (NIDAS) that saves the high-frequency data locally and over the network, and (2) time-tagging individual 10 Hz serial data samples using network time protocol (NTP) coupled to a GPS-based clock, providing a network-independent, accurate time base. Since making these improvements almost 2 years ago, the successful capture of high-rate data has been better than 99.98 %. We also provide philosophical concepts that shaped our design of the data system and are applicable to many different types of environmental data collection.« less

  15. The Niwot Ridge Subalpine Forest US-NR1 AmeriFlux site - Part 1: Data acquisition and site record-keeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Sean P.; Maclean, Gordon D.; Blanken, Peter D.; Oncley, Steven P.; Semmer, Steven R.; Monson, Russell K.

    2016-09-01

    The Niwot Ridge Subalpine Forest AmeriFlux site (US-NR1) has been measuring eddy-covariance ecosystem fluxes of carbon dioxide, heat, and water vapor since 1 November 1998. Throughout this 17-year period there have been changes to the instrumentation and improvements to the data acquisition system. Here, in Part 1 of this three-part series of papers, we describe the hardware and software used for data-collection and metadata documentation. We made changes to the data acquisition system that aimed to reduce the system complexity, increase redundancy, and be as independent as possible from any network outages. Changes to facilitate these improvements were (1) switching to a PC/104-based computer running the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) In-Situ Data Acquisition Software (NIDAS) that saves the high-frequency data locally and over the network, and (2) time-tagging individual 10 Hz serial data samples using network time protocol (NTP) coupled to a GPS-based clock, providing a network-independent, accurate time base. Since making these improvements almost 2 years ago, the successful capture of high-rate data has been better than 99.98 %. We also provide philosophical concepts that shaped our design of the data system and are applicable to many different types of environmental data collection.

  16. Deuterium flux measurements in the edge plasmas of PLT and PDX during auxiliary heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Magee, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The flux of deuterium in the plasma edge several centimeters outside the limiter has been measured using collector probes during neutral beam heating experiments on the PDX tokamak and RF heating experiments on the PLT tokamak. The dependence of the flux on the distance from the plasma was determined, and the time dependence of the flux was measured with a time resolution of 90 ms. In PDX the deuterium flux decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the plasma. The deuterium flux increased strongly when the beams came on and decreased when they turned off. The depth distribution of the deuterium in the samples, measured using SIMS, shows that when the beams are on about 30% of the deuterium incident on the probe is superthermal deuterium from the beams. In PLT the deuterium flux decreased only slightly with increasing distance from the plasma. The ICRH heating in PLT caused an increase of about 30% in the flux of deuterium to the samples and in the plasma density. In both machines the deuterium fluxes were fairly low (less than or equal to 10/sup 16/D/cm/sup 2/s) at the positions sampled.

  17. Deuterium flux measurements in the edge plasmas of PLT and PDX during auxiliary heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Magee, C.W.

    1982-04-01

    The flux of deuterium in the plasma edge several centimeters outside the limiter has been measured using collector probes during neutral beam heating experiments on the PDX tokamak and rf heating experiments on the PLT tokamak. The dependence of the flux on the distance from the plasma was determined, and the time dependence of the flux was measured with a time resolution of 90 ms. In PDX the deuterium flux decreases rapidly with increasing distance from the plasma. The deuterium flux increased strongly when the beams came on and decreased when they turned off. The depth distribution of the deuterium in the samples, measured using SIMS, shows that when the beams are on, about 30% of the deuterium incident on the probe is superthermal deuterium from the beams. In PLT the deuterium flux decreased only slightly with increasing distance from the plasma. The ICRH heating in PLT caused an increase of about 30% in the flux of deuterium to the samples and in the plasma density. In both machines the deuterium fluxes were fairly low (< or approx. =10/sup 16/ D/cm/sup 2/s) at the positions sampled.

  18. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix M.; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. Since a few years, quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS) are commercially available with the precision, sensitivity and time response suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. While there exist a handful of published reports on EC flux measurements in the recent literature, no rigorous investigation of the applicability of QCLAS for EC COS flux measurements has been carried out so far, nor have been EC processing and QA/QC steps developed for carbon dioxide and water vapor flux measurements within FLUXNET been assessed for COS. The aim of this study is to close this knowledge gap, to discuss critical steps in the post-processing chain of COS EC flux measurements and to devise best-practice guidelines for COS EC flux data processing. To this end we collected EC COS (and CO2, H2O and CO) flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland in Austria over the vegetation period 2015 with a commercially available QCLAS. We discuss various aspects of EC data post-processing, in particular issues with the time-lag estimation between sonic anemometer and QCLAS signals and QCLAS time series detrending, as well as QA/QC, in particular flux detection limits, random flux uncertainty, the interaction of various processing steps with common EC QA/QC filters (e.g. detrending and stationarity tests), u*-filtering, etc.

  19. Progress in the measurement of SSME turbine heat flux with plug-type sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1991-01-01

    Data reduction was completed for tests of plug-type heat flux sensors (gauges) in a turbine blade thermal cycling tester (TBT) that is located at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, and a typical gauge is illustrated. This is the first time that heat flux has been measured in a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbopump Turbine environment. The development of the concept for the gauge was performed in a heat flux measurement facility at Lewis. In this facility, transient and steady state absorbed surface heat flux information was obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gauge. A schematic of the TBT is presented, and plots of the absorbed surface heat flux measured on the three blades tested in the TBT are presented. High quality heat flux values were measured on all three blades. The experiments demonstrated that reliable and durable gauges can be repeatedly fabricated into the airfoils. The experiment heat flux data are being used for verification of SSME analytical stress, boundary layer, and heat transfer design models. Other experimental results and future plans are also presented.

  20. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  1. Neutral hydrogen flux measured at 100- to 200-km altitude in an electron aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Anderson, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen fluxes were measured at altitudes of 120-200 km by a rocket payload that also measured electron and proton fluxes and vector magnetic fields. An intense electron arc was crossed, while an upper limit to the flux of 0.5- to 20-keV protons was 1,000,000 per sq cm s sr keV. A neutral flux of 50,000,000 per sq cm s sr was observed, assuming hydrogen with greater than 1-keV energy, with greater north-south extent than the electron flux. Its pitch angle distribution was peaked toward 90 deg, tending toward isotropy in the center. This is fitted to a model describing spreading of an initial proton arc above 500 km.

  2. Time and Space Resolved Heat Transfer Measurements Under Nucleate Bubbles with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2003-01-01

    Investigations into single bubble pool boiling phenomena are often complicated by the difficulties in obtaining time and space resolved information in the bubble region. This usually occurs because the heaters and diagnostics used to measure heat transfer data are often on the order of, or larger than, the bubble characteristic length or region of influence. This has contributed to the development of many different and sometimes contradictory models of pool boiling phenomena and dominant heat transfer mechanisms. Recent investigations by Yaddanapyddi and Kim and Demiray and Kim have obtained time and space resolved heat transfer information at the bubble/heater interface under constant temperature conditions using a novel micro-heater array (10x10 array, each heater 100 microns on a side) that is semi-transparent and doubles as a measurement sensor. By using active feedback to maintain a state of constant temperature at the heater surface, they showed that the area of influence of bubbles generated in FC-72 was much smaller than predicted by standard models and that micro-conduction/micro-convection due to re-wetting dominated heat transfer effects. This study seeks to expand on the previous work by making time and space resolved measurements under bubbles nucleating on a micro-heater array operated under constant heat flux conditions. In the planned investigation, wall temperature measurements made under a single bubble nucleation site will be synchronized with high-speed video to allow analysis of the bubble energy removal from the wall.

  3. A preliminary evaluation of an O2/CO2 based eddy covariance theory at Missouri AmeriFlux site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, B.; Gu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) technique has been widely used at flux sites on every continent, across most ecosystem types and climates to monitor exchanges of momentum, mass and energy between land surface and atmosphere. In an attempt to develop a self-consistent theory for the EC technique, Gu et al. (2012) reformulated the fundamental equations for EC by introducing the concept of constraining gas that has no net ecosystem sink/source. Gu (2013) expanded the theory of Gu et al. (2012) to include paired gases whose ecosystem exchange ratios are stable over an averaging period (e.g. 30 min) and therefore can be used to constrain EC flux measurements of any gases. He proposed that O2 and CO2 are an ideal pair of gases as their biological processes are coupled and their ecosystem exchange ratio (also known as oxidative ratio) is close to 1. Advantages of this new O2/CO2 based EC theory include: 1) avoidance of covariance loss in calculating dry air density induced by spatial separation of measuring instruments and use of multiple indirectly derived variables, 2) the minimum number of assumptions adopted for the derivation of the equation, and 3) avoidance of errors related to linearization of ideal gas law. In this study, we conducted a preliminary evaluation for the basic principle of Gu (2013) EC theory. We crosschecked net ecosystem exchange (NEE) estimations from different, independent methods by using CO2 and H2O as paired constraining gases. Using CO2 and H2O instead of CO2 and O2 as paired constraining gases is not ideal in the framework of Gu (2013); however, no fast response O2 analyzer is currently available. CO2 and H2O are both transported between the inside of plants and canopy air through stomata on leaves in the processes of photosynthesis and transpiration which are known to be closely coupled. However, this close coupling is contaminated by other ecosystem sinks/sources, e.g. respiration of plants and soil for CO2 and evaporation of intercepted and soil

  4. Eddy covariance measurements of ozone fluxes at 4 levels above and within a forest canopy in the Po valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Giacomo; Finco, Angelo; Marzuoli, Riccardo; Coyle, Mhairi; Nemitz, Eiko

    2015-04-01

    In June and July 2012, during the intensive field campaign of the ECLAIRE project, ozone fluxes as well as sensible heat and momentum fluxes were measured at four different levels at the Bosco Fontana site, a 26 m tall mixed oak-hornbeam forest in the Po valley (I). Each measuring level (41 m, 32 m, 24 m and 16 m) was equipped with a sonic anemometer and a fast ozone analyser, absolute ozone concentrations were measured by means of a UV photometer. Additional meteorological parameters were measured on the top and at each level and ozone concentrantions were measured at ground level (0.15 m) by another UV photometer. In order to compare measurements collected with different instruments, data were preliminary processed and the following methodology were applied: despiking, instantaneous rotations, WPL corrections, frequency loss corrections and calculation of the random error. The main aims of this field campaign were the description of the deposition processes within and above canopy and the test of the constant flux hypothesis. About this latter interesting features emerged: the conservation of the flux was valid for the momentum only outside the canopy and no conservation was observed for the sensible heat. On the contrary ozone fluxes showed a much more irregular behaviour: for the three upper levels, ozone fluxes were nearly constant in the first hours of the day while an enhancement of the fluxes was observed at 24 m. This latter fact was strictly linked with the in-canopy dynamics: a greater heating of the canopy was observed in the afternoon, leading to the formation of an inversion at this level. This inversion divided the in-canopy air volume into two layers: the lower one with a stable stratification and the upper one with a turbulent regime; as a consequence of this inversion a remarkable reduction of the ozone concentration was observed for the two lowest levels in the afternoon, when in the lowest layers ozone is consumed by NO emissions from soil. The

  5. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  6. Joint assimilation of eddy covariance flux measurements and FAPAR products over temperate forests within a process-oriented biosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacour, C.; Peylin, P.; MacBean, N.; Rayner, P. J.; Delage, F.; Chevallier, F.; Weiss, M.; Demarty, J.; Santaren, D.; Baret, F.; Berveiller, D.; Dufrêne, E.; Prunet, P.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the benefits of assimilating in situ and satellite data of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) relative to eddy covariance flux measurements for the optimization of parameters of the ORCHIDEE (Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystem) biosphere model. We focus on model parameters related to carbon fixation, respiration, and phenology. The study relies on two sites—Fontainebleau (deciduous broadleaf forest) and Puechabon (Mediterranean broadleaf evergreen forest)—where measurements of net carbon exchange (NEE) and latent heat (LE) fluxes are available at the same time as FAPAR products derived from ground measurements or derived from spaceborne observations at high (SPOT (Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre)) and medium (MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer)) spatial resolutions. We compare the different FAPAR products, analyze their consistency with the in situ fluxes, and then evaluate the potential benefits of jointly assimilating flux and FAPAR data. The assimilation of FAPAR data leads to a degradation of the model-data agreement with respect to NEE at the two sites. It is caused by the change in leaf area required to fit the magnitude of the various FAPAR products. Assimilating daily NEE and LE fluxes, however, has a marginal impact on the simulated FAPAR. The results suggest that the main advantage of including FAPAR data is the ability to constrain the timing of leaf onset and senescence for deciduous ecosystems, which is best achieved by normalizing FAPAR time series. The joint assimilation of flux and FAPAR data leads to a model-data improvement across all variables similar to when each data stream is used independently, corresponding, however, to different and likely improved parameter values.

  7. Direct Measurement of CO2 Fluxes in Marine Whitings

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa L. Robbins; Kimberly K. Yates

    2001-07-05

    Clean, affordable energy is a requisite for the United States in the 21st Century Scientists continue to debate over whether increases in CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources, including electricity generation, transportation and building systems may be altering the Earth's climate. While global climate change continues to be debated, it is likely that significant cuts in net CO{sub 2} emissions will be mandated over the next 50-100 years. To this end, a number of viable means of CO{sub 2} sequestration need to be identified and implemented. One potential mechanism for CO{sub 2} sequestration is the use of naturally-occurring biological processes. Biosequestration of CO{sub 2} remains one of the most poorly understood processes, yet environmentally safe means for trapping and storing CO{sub 2}. Our investigation focused on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in microbial precipitations of CaCO{sub 3}. Specifically, we investigated modern whitings (microbially-induced precipitates of the stable mineral calcium carbonate) as a potential, natural mechanism for CO{sub 2} abatement. This process is driven by photosynthetic metabolism of cyanobacteria and microalgae. We analyzed net air: sea CO{sub 2} fluxes, net calcification and photosynthetic rates in whitings. Both field and laboratory investigations have demonstrated that atmospheric CO{sub 2}decreases during the process of microbial calcification.

  8. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    DOE PAGES

    Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2016-02-16

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of –170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 1012 cm–2 s–1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggestsmore » that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. Furthermore, a simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beamanalysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.« less

  9. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespillo, M. L.; Graham, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Weber, W. J.

    2016-02-01

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of -170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 1012 cm-2 s-1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggests that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. A simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beam analysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.

  10. Eddy flux and leaf-level measurements of biogenic VOC emissions from mopane woodland of Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Veenendaal, E. M.; Hewitt, C. N.; James, A. E.; Owen, S. M.

    2003-07-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions were measured in a mopane woodland near Maun, Botswana in January-February 2001 as part of SAFARI 2000. This landscape is comprised of more than 95% of one woody plant species, Colophospermum mopane (Caesalpinaceae). Mopane woodlands extend over a broad area of southern Africa. A leaf cuvette technique was used to determine the emission capacities of the major vegetation and the temperature and light dependence of the emissions. In addition, relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) measurements of BVOC fluxes were made on a flux tower, where net CO2 emissions were also measured simultaneously. Large light-dependent emissions of terpenes (mostly α-pinene and D-limonene) were observed from the mopane woodland. The diurnal BVOC emissions were integrated and compared with the CO2 flux. Monoterpene flux exceeded 3000 μg C m-2 h-1 during the daytime period, comparable to isoprene fluxes and much higher than terpene fluxes measured in most areas. The terpene flux constituted approximately 25% of the diurnal net carbon exchange (CO2) during the experimental period. Other BVOC emissions may also contribute to the carbon exchange.

  11. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Metzger, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    In order to measure the planetary neutron albedo fluxes, a neutron-absorbing shield which emits gamma rays of characteristic energy and serves as a neutron detector, is added to a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). The gamma rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic gamma rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and gamma rays arising from the interaction of cosmic rays with the GRS and the spacecraft. The uncertainty and minimum detection limits in neutron albedo fluxes are calculated for two missions, a lunar orbiter and a comet nucleus rendezvous. A GRS on a lunar orbiter at 100 km altitude detects a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.6/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.001/sq cm/s, for a 100 h observation period. For the comet nucleus, again in a 100 h observing period, a thermal neutron albedo flux is detected at a level of 0.006/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.4/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.004/sq cm/s. The expanded geological capabilities made possible by this technique include improvements in H sensitivity, spatial resolution, and measurement depth; and an improved model of induced gamma-ray emission.

  12. Annual sediment flux estimates in a tidal strait using surrogate measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Annual suspended-sediment flux estimates through Carquinez Strait (the seaward boundary of Suisun Bay, California) are provided based on surrogate measurements for advective, dispersive, and Stokes drift flux. The surrogates are landward watershed discharge, suspended-sediment concentration at one location in the Strait, and the longitudinal salinity gradient. The first two surrogates substitute for tidally averaged discharge and velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration in the Strait, thereby providing advective flux estimates, while Stokes drift is estimated with suspended-sediment concentration alone. Dispersive flux is estimated using the product of longitudinal salinity gradient and the root-mean-square value of velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration as an added surrogate variable. Cross-sectional measurements validated the use of surrogates during the monitoring period. During high freshwater flow advective and dispersive flux were in the seaward direction, while landward dispersive flux dominated and advective flux approached zero during low freshwater flow. Stokes drift flux was consistently in the landward direction. Wetter than average years led to net export from Suisun Bay, while dry years led to net sediment import. Relatively low watershed sediment fluxes to Suisun Bay contribute to net export during the wet season, while gravitational circulation in Carquinez Strait and higher suspended-sediment concentrations in San Pablo Bay (seaward end of Carquinez Strait) are responsible for the net import of sediment during the dry season. Annual predictions of suspended-sediment fluxes, using these methods, will allow for a sediment budget for Suisun Bay, which has implications for marsh restoration and nutrient/contaminant transport. These methods also provide a general framework for estimating sediment fluxes in estuarine environments, where temporal and spatial variability of transport are large. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. Nightside electron flux measurements at Mars by the Phobos-2 HARP instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shutte, N.; Gringauz, K.; Kiraly, P.; Kotova, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Rosenbauer, H.; Szego, K.; Verigin, M.

    1995-01-01

    All the available nightside electron data obtained during circular orbits at Mars from the Phobos-2 Hyperbolic Retarded Potential Analyzer (HARP) instrument have been examined in detail and are summarized in this paper. An electron flux component with energies exceeding that of the unperturbed solar wind was observed inside the magnetosheath, indicating the presence of acceleration mechanism(s). The character of the electron fluxes measured in the magnetotail cannot be classified in any simple manner, however, there is a correlation between the electron fluxes measured well inside this region and the unperturbed solar wind ram pressure.

  14. Validation of two innovative methods to measure contaminant mass flux in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Goltz, Mark N; Close, Murray E; Yoon, Hyouk; Huang, Junqi; Flintoft, Mark J; Kim, Sehjong; Enfield, Carl

    2009-04-15

    The ability to quantify the mass flux of a groundwater contaminant that is leaching from a source area is critical to enable us to: (1) evaluate the risk posed by the contamination source and prioritize cleanup, (2) evaluate the effectiveness of source remediation technologies or natural attenuation processes, and (3) quantify a source term for use in models that may be applied to predict maximum contaminant concentrations in downstream wells. Recently, a number of new methods have been developed and subsequently applied to measure contaminant mass flux in groundwater in the field. However, none of these methods has been validated at larger than the laboratory-scale through a comparison of measured mass flux and a known flux that has been introduced into flowing groundwater. A couple of innovative flux measurement methods, the tandem circulation well (TCW) and modified integral pumping test (MIPT) methods, have recently been proposed. The TCW method can measure mass flux integrated over a large subsurface volume without extracting water. The TCW method may be implemented using two different techniques. One technique, the multi-dipole technique, is relatively simple and inexpensive, only requiring measurement of heads, while the second technique requires conducting a tracer test. The MIPT method is an easily implemented method of obtaining volume-integrated flux measurements. In the current study, flux measurements obtained using these two methods are compared with known mass fluxes in a three-dimensional, artificial aquifer. Experiments in the artificial aquifer show that the TCW multi-dipole and tracer test techniques accurately estimated flux, within 2% and 16%, respectively; although the good results obtained using the multi-dipole technique may be fortuitous. The MIPT method was not as accurate as the TCW method, underestimating flux by as much as 70%. MIPT method inaccuracies may be due to the fact that the method assumptions (two-dimensional steady

  15. What the towers don't see at night: nocturnal sap flow in trees and shrubs at two AmeriFlux sites in California.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joshua B; Baldocchi, Dennis D; Misson, Laurent; Dawson, Todd E; Goldstein, Allen H

    2007-04-01

    At the leaf scale, it is a long-held assumption that stomata close at night in the absence of light, causing transpiration to decrease to zero. Energy balance models and evapotranspiration equations often rely on net radiation as an upper bound, and some models reduce evapotranspiration to zero at night when there is no solar radiation. Emerging research is showing, however, that transpiration can occur throughout the night in a variety of vegetation types and biomes. At the ecosystem scale, eddy covariance measurements have provided extensive data on latent heat flux for a multitude of ecosystem types globally. Nighttime eddy covariance measurements, however, are generally unreliable because of low turbulence. If significant nighttime water loss occurs, eddy flux towers may be missing key information on latent heat flux. We installed and measured rates of sap flow by the heat ratio method (Burgess et al. 2001) at two AmeriFlux (part of FLUXNET) sites in California. The heat ratio method allows measurement and quantification of low rates of sap flow, including negative rates (i.e., hydraulic lift). We measured sap flow in five Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. trees and three Arctostaphylos manzanita Parry and two Ceanothus cordulatus A. Kellog shrubs in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and in five Quercus douglasii Hook and Arn. trees at an oak savanna in the Central Valley of California. Nocturnal sap flow was observed in all species, and significant nighttime water loss was observed in both species of trees. Vapor pressure deficit and air temperature were both well correlated with nighttime transpiration; the influence of wind speed on nighttime transpiration was insignificant at both sites. We distinguished between storage-tissue refilling and water loss based on data from Year 2005, and calculated the percentage by which nighttime transpiration was underestimated by eddy covariance measurements at both sites.

  16. What the towers don't see at night: nocturnal sap flow in trees and shrubs at two AmeriFlux sites in California.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joshua B; Baldocchi, Dennis D; Misson, Laurent; Dawson, Todd E; Goldstein, Allen H

    2007-04-01

    At the leaf scale, it is a long-held assumption that stomata close at night in the absence of light, causing transpiration to decrease to zero. Energy balance models and evapotranspiration equations often rely on net radiation as an upper bound, and some models reduce evapotranspiration to zero at night when there is no solar radiation. Emerging research is showing, however, that transpiration can occur throughout the night in a variety of vegetation types and biomes. At the ecosystem scale, eddy covariance measurements have provided extensive data on latent heat flux for a multitude of ecosystem types globally. Nighttime eddy covariance measurements, however, are generally unreliable because of low turbulence. If significant nighttime water loss occurs, eddy flux towers may be missing key information on latent heat flux. We installed and measured rates of sap flow by the heat ratio method (Burgess et al. 2001) at two AmeriFlux (part of FLUXNET) sites in California. The heat ratio method allows measurement and quantification of low rates of sap flow, including negative rates (i.e., hydraulic lift). We measured sap flow in five Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. trees and three Arctostaphylos manzanita Parry and two Ceanothus cordulatus A. Kellog shrubs in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and in five Quercus douglasii Hook and Arn. trees at an oak savanna in the Central Valley of California. Nocturnal sap flow was observed in all species, and significant nighttime water loss was observed in both species of trees. Vapor pressure deficit and air temperature were both well correlated with nighttime transpiration; the influence of wind speed on nighttime transpiration was insignificant at both sites. We distinguished between storage-tissue refilling and water loss based on data from Year 2005, and calculated the percentage by which nighttime transpiration was underestimated by eddy covariance measurements at both sites. PMID:17242001

  17. Uncertainty Analysis on an Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance algorithm for Estimation of Evapotranspiration at Multiple Flux Tower Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Senay, G. B.; Verdin, J. P.; Rowland, J.

    2014-12-01

    Current regional to global and daily to annual Evapotranspiration ( ET) estimation mainly relies on surface energy balance (SEB) ET models or statistical empirical methods driven by remote sensing data and various meteorology databases. However, these ET models face challenging issues—large uncertainties from inevitable input errors, poorly defined parameters, and inadequate model structures. The eddy covariance measurements on water, energy, and carbon fluxes at globally available FLUXNET tower sites provide a feasible opportunity to assess the ET modelling uncertainties. In this study, we focused on uncertainty analysis on an operational simplified surface energy balance (SSEBop) algorithm for ET estimation at multiple Ameriflux tower sites with diverse land cover characteristics and climatic conditions. The input land surface temperature (LST) data of the algorithm were adopted from the 8-day composite1-km Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature. The other input data were taken from the Ameriflux database. Results of statistical analysis indicated that uncertainties or random errors from input variables and parameters of SSEBop led to daily and seasonal ET estimates with relative errors around 20% across multiple flux tower sites distributed across different biomes. This uncertainty of SSEBop lies in the error range of 20-30% of similar SEB-based ET algorithms, such as, Surface Energy Balance System and Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land. The R2 between daily and seasonal ET estimates by SSEBop and ET eddy covariance measurements at multiple Ameriflux tower sites exceed 0.7, and even up to 0.9 for croplands, grasslands, and forests, suggesting systematic error or bias of the SSEBop is acceptable. In summary, the uncertainty assessment verifies that the SSEBop is a reliable method for wide-area ET calculation and especially useful for detecting drought years and relative drought severity for agricultural production

  18. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Greenhouse gas flux measurements in a forestry-drained peatland indicate a large carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohila, A.; Minkkinen, K.; Aurela, M.; Tuovinen, J.-P.; Penttilä, T.; Ojanen, P.; Laurila, T.

    2011-11-01

    Drainage for forestry purposes increases the depth of the oxic peat layer and leads to increased growth of shrubs and trees. Concurrently, the production and uptake of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) change: due to the accelerated decomposition of peat in the presence of oxygen, drained peatlands are generally considered to lose peat carbon (C). We measured CO2 exchange with the eddy covariance (EC) method above a drained nutrient-poor peatland forest in southern Finland for 16 months in 2004-2005. The site, classified as a dwarf-shrub pine bog, had been ditched about 35 years earlier. CH4 and N2O fluxes were measured at 2-5-week intervals with the chamber technique. Drainage had resulted in a relatively little change in the water table level, being on average 40 cm below the ground in 2005. The annual net ecosystem exchange was -870 ± 100 g CO2 m-2 yr-1 in the calendar year 2005, indicating net CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. The site was a small sink of CH4 (-0.12 g CH4 m-2 yr-1) and a small source of N2O (0.10 g N2O m-2 yr-1). Photosynthesis was detected throughout the year when the air temperature exceeded -3 °C. As the annual accumulation of C in the above and below ground tree biomass (175 ± 35 g C m-2) was significantly lower than the accumulation observed by the flux measurement (240 ± 30 g C m-2), about 65 g C m-2 yr-1 was likely to have accumulated as organic matter into the peat soil. This is a higher average accumulation rate than previously reported for natural northern peatlands, and the first time C accumulation has been shown by EC measurements to occur in a forestry-drained peatland. Our results suggest that forestry-drainage may significantly increase the CO2 uptake rate of nutrient-poor peatland ecosystems.

  20. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  1. Comparison of calculated and measured foliar O3 flux in crop and forest species.

    PubMed

    Grulke, N E; Paoletti, E; Heath, R L

    2007-04-01

    We designed a new gas exchange system that concurrently measures foliar H2O, O3, and CO2 flux (HOC flux system) while delivering known O3 concentrations. Stomatal responses of three species were tested: snapbean, and seedlings of California black oak (deciduous broadleaf) and blue oak (evergreen broadleaf). Acute O3 exposure (120-250 ppb over an hour) was applied under moderate light and low vapor pressure deficits during near steady state conditions. The rate of stomatal closure was measured when the whole plant was placed in the dark. An adjacent leaf on each plant was also concurrently measured in an O3-free cuvette. Under some conditions, direct measurements and calculated foliar O3 flux were within the same order of magnitude; however, endogenously low gs or O3 exposure-induced depression of gs resulted in an overestimation of calculated O3 fluxes compared with measured O3 fluxes. Sluggish stomata in response to light extinction with concurrent O3 exposure, and incomplete stomatal closure likewise underestimated measured O3 flux.

  2. Diamagnetic flux measurement using the PDX TF coils

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.

    1983-02-01

    The diamagnetism of plasmas in PDX has been measured using the toroidal field coils as the equivalent of the conventional diamagnetic loop. The extremely low inductive coupling between the toroidal and poloidal coil systems makes the measurement feasible. The main difficulty arises from the change in the TF coil resistance due to Joule heating, compounded by the nonlinearity and sharp temperature dependence of the resistance of the joints in the TF coils. The measurement method, details of the experimental system, and illustrative results are presented.

  3. Measurements of net radiation, ground heat flux and surface temperature in an urban canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Gouveia, F J; Leach, M J; Shinn, J H

    2003-11-06

    The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect data to increase our knowledge of dispersion in urban areas. Air motions in and around urban areas are very complicated due to the influence of urban structures on both mechanical and thermal forcing. During JU2003, meteorological instruments were deployed at various locations throughout the urban area to characterize the processes that influence dispersion. Some of the instruments were deployed to characterize urban phenomena, such as boundary layer development. In addition, particular sites were chosen for more concentrated measurements to investigate physical processes in more detail. One such site was an urban street canyon on Park Avenue between Broadway and Robinson Avenues in downtown Oklahoma City. The urban canyon study was designed to examine the processes that control dispersion within, into and out of the urban canyon. Several towers were deployed in the Park Avenue block, with multiple levels on each tower for observing the wind using sonic anemometers. Infrared thermometers, net radiometers and ground heat flux plates were deployed on two of the towers midway in the canyon to study the thermodynamic effects and to estimate the surface energy balance. We present results from the surface energy balance observations.

  4. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Canfield, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme UV photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 A. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 x 10 to the 10th photons/sq cm per s. Based on a nominal probable error of 7 percent for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-A region (5 percent on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 A), and based on experimental errors associated with the present rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of about 14 percent is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  5. Analysis of field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Shashi B.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes is discussed. These data were examined in conjunction with reflectance obtained from helicopter mounted Modular Multiband Radiometer. These measurements are representative of the canopy scale (10 to 100 m)(exp 2) and provide a good basis for investigating the hypotheses/relationship potentially useful in remote sensing applications. All the micrometeorological data collected during FIFE-89 were processed and fluxes of CO2, water vapor, and sensible heat were calculated. Soil CO2 fluxes were also estimated. Employing these soil CO2 flux values, in conjunction with micrometeorological measurements, canopy photosynthesis is being estimated. A biochemical model of leaf photosynthesis was adapted to the prairie vegetation. The modeled leaf photosynthesis rates were scaled up to the canopy level. This model and a multiplicative stomatal conductance model are also used to calculate canopy conductance.

  6. Inverse estimation of radon flux distribution for East Asia using measured atmospheric radon concentration.

    PubMed

    Hirao, S; Hayashi, R; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Tohjima, Y; Mukai, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the (222)Rn flux density distribution at surface was estimated in East Asia with the Bayesian synthesis inversion using measurement data and a long-range atmospheric (222)Rn transport model. Surface atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at Hateruma Island in January 2008 were used. The estimated (222)Rn flux densities were generally higher than the prior ones. The area-weighted mean (222)Rn flux density for East Asia in January 2008 was estimated to be 44.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The use of the estimated (222)Rn flux density improved the discrepancy of the model-calculated concentrations with the measurements at Hateruma Island.

  7. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  8. Atmospheric dry deposition fluxes of trace elements measured in Bursa, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Yücel; Kural, Can

    2005-12-01

    Trace element dry deposition fluxes were measured using a smooth, greased, knife-edge surrogate surface (KSS) holding greased Mylar strips in Bursa, Turkey. Sampling program was conducted between October 2002 and June 2003 and 46 dry deposition samples were collected. The average fluxes of crustal metals (Mg, Ca, and Fe) were one to four orders of magnitude higher than the fluxes of anthropogenic metals. Trace element fluxes ranged from 3 (Cd) to 24,230 (Ca) microg m(-2) d(-1). The average trace element dry deposition fluxes measured in this study were similar to those measured in other urban areas. In addition, ambient air samples were also collected simultaneously with flux samples and concentrations of trace elements, collected with a TSP sampler, were between 0.7 and 4900 ng m(-3) for Cd and Ca, respectively. The overall trace element dry deposition velocities, calculated by dividing the fluxes to the particle phase concentrations ranged from 2.3+/-1.7 cm s(-1) (Pb) to 11.1+/-6.4 cm s(-1) (Ni). These values are in good agreement with the values calculated using similar techniques. The anthropogenic and crustal contributions were estimated by employing enrichment factors (EFs) calculated relative to the average crustal composition. Low EFs for dry deposition samples were calculated. This is probably due to contamination of local dust and its important contribution to the collected samples.

  9. A flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O fluxes at a lake-air interface.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Li, Hanchao; Xiao, Qitao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenghua; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Yunqiu; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mi; Lee, Xuhui

    2014-12-16

    Inland lakes play important roles in water and greenhouse gas cycling in the environment. This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake-air interface. The concentration gradients over the water surface were measured with an analyzer based on the wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology, and the eddy diffusivity was measured with a sonic anemometer. Results of a zero-gradient test indicate a flux measurement precision of 4.8 W m(-2) for water vapor, 0.010 mg m(-2) s(-1) for CO2, and 0.029 μg m(-2) s(-1) for CH4. During the 620 day measurement period, 97%, 69%, and 67% of H2O, CO2, and CH4 hourly fluxes were higher in magnitude than the measurement precision, which confirms that the flux-gradient system had adequate precision for the measurement of the lake-air exchanges. This study illustrates four strengths of the flux-gradient method: (1) the ability to simultaneously measure the flux of H2O, CO2, and CH4; (2) negligibly small density corrections; (3) the ability to resolve small CH4 gradient and flux; and (4) continuous and noninvasive operation. The annual mean CH4 flux (1.8 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)) at this hypereutrophic lake was close to the median value for inland lakes in the world (1.6 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)). The system has adequate precision for CH4 flux for broad applications but requires further improvement to resolve small CO2 flux in many lakes.

  10. Using a Regional Cluster of AmeriFlux Sites in Central California to Advance Our Knowledge on Decadal-Scale Ecosystem-Atmosphere Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Baldocchi, Dennis

    2015-03-24

    Continuous eddy convariance measurements of carbon dioxide, water vapor and heat were measured continuously between an oak savanna and an annual grassland in California over a 4 year period. These systems serve as representative sites for biomes in Mediterranean climates and experience much seasonal and inter-annual variability in temperature and precipitation. These sites hence serve as natural laboratories for how whole ecosystem will respond to warmer and drier conditions. The savanna proved to be a moderate sink of carbon, taking up about 150 gC m-2y-1 compared to the annual grassland, which tended to be carbon neutral and often a source during drier years. But this carbon sink by the savanna came at a cost. This ecosystem used about 100 mm more water per year than the grassland. And because the savanna was darker and rougher its air temperature was about 0.5 C warmer. In addition to our flux measurements, we collected vast amounts of ancillary data to interpret the site and fluxes, making this site a key site for model validation and parameterization. Datasets consist of terrestrial and airborne lidar for determining canopy structure, ground penetrating radar data on root distribution, phenology cameras monitoring leaf area index and its seasonality, predawn water potential, soil moisture, stem diameter and physiological capacity of photosynthesis.

  11. Micrometeorological measurement and source region analysis of nitrous oxide fluxes from an agricultural soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienhold, F. G.; Welling, M.; Harris, G. W.

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) fluxes were measured by eddy correlation during a field experiment in August 1993. The measurements took place on a harvested wheat field located in northwest Sealand (Denmark). A. tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) was used for N 2O detection. The N 2O mixing ratio was sampled at a rate of 10 Hz synchronously with the three-dimensional wind data, air temperature, water vapour and carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentrations. Fast Fourier transform methods were applied to analyse spectral and co-spectral power distributions and to compute the fluxes from the covariance functions. Balance of the energy budget indicated adequate frequency coverage of the flux contributions. Continuous measurements were carried out in half hour intervals during daytime and fluxes in the range of 40-120 ng N m -2 s -1 were obtained. The footprint regions for the individual measurements were estimated by Markovian trajectory simulations taking into account the atmospheric stability conditions and wind distributions inferred from the micrometeorological measurements. The influence of adjoining fields with different crops was evident in the Bowen ratio and CO 2 flux, but not noticeable in the N 2O flux. This observation is consistent with supporting analysis of the soil depth dependence of the nitrous oxide production, which indicates that the major contributions arise from levels below 0.9 m.

  12. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS (BVOCS) II. LANDSCAPE FLUX POTENTIALS FROM THREE CONTINENTAL SITES IN THE U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landscape flux potentials for biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were derived for three ecosystems in the continental U. S. (Fernbank Forest, Atlanta, GA; Willow Creek, Rhinelander, WI; Temple Ridge, CO). Analytical data from branch enclosure measurements reported in a ...

  13. Diel and seasonal variation of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes at site Guojiaba, the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Yuchun; Liu, Defu; Yang, Zhengjian; Lei, Dan; Zhang, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    In order to investigate the CH4 and CO2 fluxes across the water-gas interface and identify their controlling factors, four diel field campaigns and one monthly sampling campaign during June 2010-May 2011 were carried out at a site near the Three Gorges Dam, China. The averaged CH4 and CO2 fluxes across the air-water interface from the site were much less than those reported from reservoirs in tropic and temperate regions, and from the natural river channels of the Yangtze River. CH4 Fluxes at the site were very low compared to most other reservoirs or natural lakes. One of the most important reasons may be due to the oxidation of CH4 in the water column owing to the great water depth and high DO in water in the Three Gorges Reservoir. The averaged monthly CH4 and CO2 fluxes at the site during the observation year were 0.05 mg/(m2 x hr) and 104.43 mg/(m2 x hr) respectively with the maximum occurred in July 2010. The monthly CO2 fluxes during the observation year were positively correlated to the surface water temperature, and negatively correlated to the air pressure and the surface water pH. The CO2 flux showed a positive correlation with DOC to some extent, although not significantly, which indicated that allochthonous organic C was a major source of CO2 and biogeochemical processes in this reservoir were C-limited. The significantly positive correlation between the reservoir outflow and the seasonal gas flux indicate the disturbance condition of the water body dominated the seasonal gas emission.

  14. Diel and seasonal variation of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes at site Guojiaba, the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Yuchun; Liu, Defu; Yang, Zhengjian; Lei, Dan; Zhang, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    In order to investigate the CH4 and CO2 fluxes across the water-gas interface and identify their controlling factors, four diel field campaigns and one monthly sampling campaign during June 2010-May 2011 were carried out at a site near the Three Gorges Dam, China. The averaged CH4 and CO2 fluxes across the air-water interface from the site were much less than those reported from reservoirs in tropic and temperate regions, and from the natural river channels of the Yangtze River. CH4 Fluxes at the site were very low compared to most other reservoirs or natural lakes. One of the most important reasons may be due to the oxidation of CH4 in the water column owing to the great water depth and high DO in water in the Three Gorges Reservoir. The averaged monthly CH4 and CO2 fluxes at the site during the observation year were 0.05 mg/(m2 x hr) and 104.43 mg/(m2 x hr) respectively with the maximum occurred in July 2010. The monthly CO2 fluxes during the observation year were positively correlated to the surface water temperature, and negatively correlated to the air pressure and the surface water pH. The CO2 flux showed a positive correlation with DOC to some extent, although not significantly, which indicated that allochthonous organic C was a major source of CO2 and biogeochemical processes in this reservoir were C-limited. The significantly positive correlation between the reservoir outflow and the seasonal gas flux indicate the disturbance condition of the water body dominated the seasonal gas emission. PMID:24494493

  15. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: Energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Orii, A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Wendell, R. A.; Akutsu, R.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Gustafson, J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Nantais, C. M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Park, R. G.; Himmel, A.; Li, Z.; O'Sullivan, E.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Friend, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yano, T.; Cao, S. V.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Mijakowski, P.; Frankiewicz, K.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Li, X.; Palomino, J. L.; Wilking, M. J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Fukuda, D.; Ishino, H.; Kayano, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Xu, C.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Suda, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Bronner, C.; Hartz, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Suzuki, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra, and variation over time, of the atmospheric νe+ν¯ e and νμ+ν¯μ fluxes are measured. The energy spectra are obtained using an iterative unfolding method by combining various event topologies with differing energy responses. The azimuthal spectra depending on energy and zenith angle, and their modulation by geomagnetic effects, are also studied. A predicted east-west asymmetry is observed in both the νe and νμ samples at 8.0 σ and 6.0 σ significance, respectively, and an indication that the asymmetry dipole angle changes depending on the zenith angle was seen at the 2.2 σ level. The measured energy and azimuthal spectra are consistent with the current flux models within the estimated systematic uncertainties. A study of the long-term correlation between the atmospheric neutrino flux and the solar magnetic activity cycle is performed, and a weak preference for a correlation was seen at the 1.1 σ level, using SK-I-SK-IV data spanning a 20-year period. For several particularly strong solar activity periods, corresponding to Forbush decrease events, no theoretical prediction is available but a deviation below the typical neutrino event rate is seen at the 2.4 σ level. The seasonal modulation of the neutrino flux is also examined, but the change in flux at the SK site is predicted to be negligible, and, as expected, no evidence for a seasonal correlation is seen.

  16. The truth is out there: measured, calculated and modelled benthic fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2016-04-01

    In a modern Earth science there is a great importance of understanding the processes, forming the benthic fluxes as one of element sources or sinks to or from the water body, which affects the elements balance in the water system. There are several ways to assess benthic fluxes and here we try to compare the results obtained by chamber experiments, calculated from porewater distributions and simulated with model. Benthic fluxes of dissolved elements (oxygen, nitrogen species, phosphate, silicate, alkalinity, iron and manganese species) were studied in the Baltic and Black Seas from 2000 to 2005. Fluxes were measured in situ using chamber incubations (Jch) and at the same time sediment cores were collected to assess the porewater distribution at different depths to calculate diffusive fluxes (Jpw). Model study was carried out with benthic-pelagic biogeochemical model BROM (O-N-P-Si-C-S-Mn-Fe redox model). It was applied to simulate biogeochemical structure of the water column and upper sediment and to assess the vertical fluxes (Jmd). By the behaviour at the water-sediment interface all studied elements can be divided into three groups: (1) elements which benthic fluxes are determined by the concentrations gradient only (Si, Mn), (2) elements which fluxes depend on redox conditions in the bottom water (Fe, PO4, NH4), and (3) elements which fluxes are strongly connected with organic matter fate (O2, Alk, NH4). For the first group it was found that measured fluxes are always higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (1.5flux. In this case bioturbation, bioirrigation and advection should be taken into account. For the second group measured fluxes can be both much lower (practically absent) and much higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (0.01

  17. Diagnostic extrapolation of gross primary production from flux tower sites to the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Christian; Reichstein, Markus; Tomelleri, Enrico; Ciais, Philippe; Jung, Martin; Carvalhais, Nuno; Rödenbeck, Christian; Baldocchi, Dennis; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Papale, Dario

    2010-05-01

    The uptake of atmospheric CO2 by plant photosynthesis is the largest global carbon flux and is thought of driving most terrestrial carbon cycle processes. While the photosynthesis processes at the leaf and canopy levels are quite well understood, so far only very crude estimates of its global integral, the Gross Primary Production (GPP) can be found in the literature. Existing estimates have been lacking sound empirical basis. Reasons for such limitations lie in the absence of direct estimates of ecosystem-level GPP and methodological difficulties in scaling local carbon flux measurements to global scale a