Science.gov

Sample records for flux sensor development

  1. Development of heat flux sensors for turbine airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, William H.; Cyr, Marcia A.; Strange, Richard R.

    1985-10-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop heat flux sensors suitable for installation in hot section airfoils of advanced aircraft turbine engines and to experimentally verify the operation of these heat flux sensors in a cylinder in a cross flow experiment. Embedded thermocouple and Gardon gauge sensors were developed and fabricated into both blades and vanes. These were then calibrated using a quartz lamp bank heat source and finally subjected to thermal cycle and thermal soak testing. These sensors were also fabricated into cylindrical test pieces and tested in a burner exhaust to verify heat flux measurements produced by these sensors. The results of the cylinder in cross flow tests are given.

  2. Development of heat flux sensors in turbine airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    The objective is to develop heat flux sensors suitable for use on turbine airfoils and to verify the operation of the heat flux measurement techniques through laboratory experiments. The requirements for a program to investigate the measurement of heat flux on airfoils in areas of strong non-one-dimensional flow were also identified.

  3. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1984-08-01

    Heat flux sensors available for installation in the hot section airfoils of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines were developed. Two heat flux sensors were designed, fabricated, calibrated, and tested. Measurement techniques are compared in an atmospheric pressure combustor rig test. Sensors, embedded thermocouple and the Gordon gauge, were fabricated that met the geometric and fabricability requirements and could withstand the hot section environmental conditions. Calibration data indicate that these sensors yielded repeatable results and have the potential to meet the accuracy goal of measuring local heat flux to within 5%. Thermal cycle tests and thermal soak tests indicated that the sensors are capable of surviving extended periods of exposure to the environment conditions in the turbine. Problems in calibration of the sensors caused by severe non-one dimensional heat flow were encountered. Modifications to the calibration techniques are needed to minimize this problem and proof testing of the sensors in an engine is needed to verify the designs.

  4. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Heat flux sensors available for installation in the hot section airfoils of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines were developed. Two heat flux sensors were designed, fabricated, calibrated, and tested. Measurement techniques are compared in an atmospheric pressure combustor rig test. Sensors, embedded thermocouple and the Gordon gauge, were fabricated that met the geometric and fabricability requirements and could withstand the hot section environmental conditions. Calibration data indicate that these sensors yielded repeatable results and have the potential to meet the accuracy goal of measuring local heat flux to within 5%. Thermal cycle tests and thermal soak tests indicated that the sensors are capable of surviving extended periods of exposure to the environment conditions in the turbine. Problems in calibration of the sensors caused by severe non-one dimensional heat flow were encountered. Modifications to the calibration techniques are needed to minimize this problem and proof testing of the sensors in an engine is needed to verify the designs.

  5. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of heat flux sensors for gas turbine blades and vanes and the demonstration of heat transfer measurement methods are reported. The performance of the heat flux sensors was evaluated in a cylinder in cross flow experiment and compared with two other heat flux measurement methods, the slug calorimeter and a dynamic method based on fluctuating gas and surface temperature. Two cylinders, each instrumented with an embedded thermocouple sensor, a Gardon gauge, and a slug calorimeter, were fabricated. Each sensor type was calibrated using a quartz lamp bank facility. The instrumented cylinders were then tested in an atmospheric pressure combustor rig at conditions up to gas stream temperatures of 1700K and velocities to Mach 0.74. The test data are compared to other measurements and analytical prediction.

  6. Development of advanced high-temperature heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Various configurations of high temperature, heat flux sensors were studied to determine their suitability for use in experimental combustor liners of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. It was determined that embedded thermocouple sensors, laminated sensors, and Gardon gauge sensors, were the most viable candidates. Sensors of all three types were fabricated, calibrated, and endurance tested. All three types of sensors met the fabricability survivability, and accuracy requirements established for their application.

  7. Development of advanced high-temperature heat flux sensors. Phase 2: Verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A two-phase program is conducted to develop heat flux sensors capable of making heat flux measurements throughout the hot section of gas turbine engines. In Phase 1, three types of heat flux sensors are selected; embedded thermocouple, laminated, and Gardon gauge sensors. A demonstration of the ability of these sensors to operate in an actual engine environment is reported. A segmented liner of each of two combustors being used in the Broad Specification Fuels Combustor program is instrumented with the three types of heat flux sensors then tested in a high pressure combustor rig. Radiometer probes are also used to measure the radiant heat loads to more fully characterize the combustor environment. Test results show the heat flux sensors to be in good agreement with radiometer probes and the predicted data trends. In general, heat flux sensors have strong potential for use in combustor development programs.

  8. Heat Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A heat flux microsensor developed under a NASP Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) has a wide range of potential commercial applications. Vatell Corporation originally designed microsensors for use in very high temperatures. The company then used the technology to develop heat flux sensors to measure the rate of heat energy flowing in and out of a surface as well as readings on the surface temperature. Additional major advantages include response to heat flux in less than 10 microseconds and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 1,200 degrees centigrade. Commercial applications are used in high speed aerodynamics, supersonic combustion, blade cooling, and mass flow measurements, etc.

  9. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zhu, Dongming; Laster, Kimala L.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has an on-going effort for developing high temperature thin film sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed. To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC system posed a significant challenge for patterning the fine features required. The status of the effort to develop thin film heat flux sensors specifically for use on silicon carbide (SiC) CMC systems with these new technologies is described.

  10. Heat Flux Sensor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the following objectives: Developing secondary calibration capabilities for MSFC's (Marshall Space Flight Center) Hot Gas Facility (HGF), a Mach 4 Aerothermal Wind Tunnel; Evaluating ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) slug/ thinskin calorimeters against current HGF heat flux sensors; Providing verification of baselined AEDC (Arnold Engineering Development Center) / Medtherm gage calibrations; Addressing future calibration issues involving NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) certified radiant gages.

  11. Heat flux sensor research and development: The cool film calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, A.; Dean, P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal was to meet the measurement requirement of the NASP program for a gauge capable of measuring heat flux into a 'typical' structure in a 'typical' hypersonic flight environment. A device is conceptually described that has fast response times and is small enough to fit in leading edge or cowl lip structures. The device relies heavily on thin film technology. The main conclusion is the description of the limitations of thin film technology both in the art of fabrication and in the assumption that thin films have the same material properties as the original bulk material. Three gauges were designed and fabricated. Thin film deposition processes were evaluated. The effect of different thin film materials on the performance and fabrication of the gauge was studied. The gauges were tested in an arcjet facility. Survivability and accuracy were determined under various hostile environment conditions.

  12. Development of a fluorescence based flux sensor for thin film growth and nanoparticle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Rajala, Markku; Miller, Toni; Guillon, Herve; Seo, Jin Won; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    An optical flux sensor, based on the fluorescence properties of materials and nanoparticles, has been developed to control the deposition rate in thin film deposition systems. Using a simple diode laser and a photomultiplier tube with a light filter, we report the detection of gallium atoms and CdSe-ZnS quantum dots. This setup has a high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  13. Development of a fluorescence based flux sensor for thin film growth and nanoparticle deposition.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Rajala, Markku; Miller, Toni; Guillon, Herve; Seo, Jin Won; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    An optical flux sensor, based on the fluorescence properties of materials and nanoparticles, has been developed to control the deposition rate in thin film deposition systems. Using a simple diode laser and a photomultiplier tube with a light filter, we report the detection of gallium atoms and CdSe-ZnS quantum dots. This setup has a high sensitivity and reproducibility. PMID:27475600

  14. Development of heat flux sensors for turbine airfoils and combustor liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, W. H.

    1983-10-01

    The design of durable turbine airfoils that use a minimum amount of cooling air requires knowledge of the heat loads on the airfoils during engine operation. Measurement of these heat loads will permit the verification or modification of the analytical models used in the design process and will improve the ability to predict and confirm the thermal performance of turbine airfoil designs. Heat flux sensors for turbine blades and vanes must be compatible with the cast nickel-base and cobalt-base materials used in their fabrication and will need to operate in a hostile environment with regard to temperature, pressure and thermal cycling. There is also a need to miniaturize the sensors to obtain measurements without perturbing the heat flows that are to be measured.

  15. Development of heat flux sensors for turbine airfoils and combustor liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The design of durable turbine airfoils that use a minimum amount of cooling air requires knowledge of the heat loads on the airfoils during engine operation. Measurement of these heat loads will permit the verification or modification of the analytical models used in the design process and will improve the ability to predict and confirm the thermal performance of turbine airfoil designs. Heat flux sensors for turbine blades and vanes must be compatible with the cast nickel-base and cobalt-base materials used in their fabrication and will need to operate in a hostile environment with regard to temperature, pressure and thermal cycling. There is also a need to miniaturize the sensors to obtain measurements without perturbing the heat flows that are to be measured.

  16. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  17. Fabrication of Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype thin film heat flux sensors have been constructed and tested. The sensors can be applied to propulsion system materials and components. The sensors can provide steady state and fast transient heat flux information. Fabrication of the sensor does not require any matching of the mounting surface. Heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surfaces of an insulation material. The sensor consists of an array of thermocouples on the upper and lower surfaces of a thin insulating layer. The thermocouples for the sensor are connected in a thermopile arrangement. A 100 thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on silicon wafers. The sensor produced an output voltage of 200-400 microvolts when exposed to a hot air heat gun. A 20 element thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on aluminum oxide sheet. Thermocouples are Pt-Pt/Rh with silicon dioxide as the insulating material. This sensor produced an output of 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a furnace operating at 1000 C. Work is also underway to put this type of heat flux sensor on metal surfaces.

  18. Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications

    DOEpatents

    Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

    2013-06-11

    Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

  19. Heat flux sensors for burner liners and turbine blades and vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwang, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    The technology of heat flux measurement is addressed. The development of total heat flux sensors for burner liners and also the demonstration of total and radiant heat flux sensors in a combustor test is covered. A thorough review of potential approaches is conducted including both transient and steady state measurements. Measurement of total heat flux was emphasized, consequently configurations are sought which produce minimum disturbance to the heat flux which would be present without the sensor in place. Approaches to the turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor program are discussed.

  20. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  1. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C; Tibbitts, T; Sager, J; Deitzer, G; Bubenheim, D; Koerner, G; Bugbee, B

    1993-12-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  2. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  3. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  4. Development of a low noise induction magnetic sensor using magnetic flux negative feedback in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X G; Shang, X L; Lin, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic system can implement great depth detection. As for the electromagnetic system, the receiver utilized an air coil sensor, and the matching mode of the sensor employed the resistance matching method. By using the resistance matching method, the vibration of the coil in the time domain can be effectively controlled. However, the noise of the sensor, especially the noise at the resonance frequency, will be increased as well. In this paper, a novel design of a low noise induction coil sensor is proposed, and the experimental data and noise characteristics are provided. The sensor is designed based on the principle that the amplified voltage will be converted to current under the influence of the feedback resistance of the coil. The feedback loop around the induction coil exerts a magnetic field and sends the negative feedback signal to the sensor. The paper analyses the influence of the closed magnetic feedback loop on both the bandwidth and the noise of the sensor. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved dramatically.

  5. Development of a low noise induction magnetic sensor using magnetic flux negative feedback in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X G; Shang, X L; Lin, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic system can implement great depth detection. As for the electromagnetic system, the receiver utilized an air coil sensor, and the matching mode of the sensor employed the resistance matching method. By using the resistance matching method, the vibration of the coil in the time domain can be effectively controlled. However, the noise of the sensor, especially the noise at the resonance frequency, will be increased as well. In this paper, a novel design of a low noise induction coil sensor is proposed, and the experimental data and noise characteristics are provided. The sensor is designed based on the principle that the amplified voltage will be converted to current under the influence of the feedback resistance of the coil. The feedback loop around the induction coil exerts a magnetic field and sends the negative feedback signal to the sensor. The paper analyses the influence of the closed magnetic feedback loop on both the bandwidth and the noise of the sensor. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved dramatically. PMID:27250444

  6. Flux qubit as a sensor of magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ichev, E.; Greenberg, Ya. S.

    2007-03-01

    A magnetometer based on the quantum properties of a superconducting flux qubit is proposed. The main advantage of this device is that its sensitivity can be below the so-called "standard quantum limit" (for an oscillator this is half of the Plank constant). Moreover its transfer functions relative to the measured flux can be made to be about 10 mV/Φ0, which is an order of magnitude more than the best value for a conventional DC SQUIDs with a direct readout. We analyze here the voltage-to-flux, the phase-to-flux transfer functions and the main noise sources. We show that the experimental characteristics of a flux qubit, obtained in recent experiments, allow the use of a flux qubit as magnetometer with energy resolution close to the Planck constant.

  7. Thin-Film Resistance Heat-Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film heat-flux sensors of a proposed type would offer advantages over currently available thin-film heat flux sensors. Like a currently available thin-film heat-flux sensor, a sensor according to the proposal would be based on measurement of voltages related to the temperatures of thin metal films on the hotter and colder faces of a layer of an electrically insulating and moderately thermally conductive material. The heat flux through such a device is proportional to the difference between the temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the layer. The advantages of the proposed sensors over the commercial ones would arise from the manner in which the temperature-related voltages would be generated and measured.

  8. Diamond thin film temperature and heat-flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Yang, G. S.; Masood, A.; Fredricks, R.

    1995-01-01

    Diamond film temperature and heat-flux sensors are developed using a technology compatible with silicon integrated circuit processing. The technology involves diamond nucleation, patterning, doping, and metallization. Multi-sensor test chips were designed and fabricated to study the thermistor behavior. The minimum feature size (device width) for 1st and 2nd generation chips are 160 and 5 micron, respectively. The p-type diamond thermistors on the 1st generation test chip show temperature and response time ranges of 80-1270 K and 0.29-25 microseconds, respectively. An array of diamond thermistors, acting as heat flux sensors, was successfully fabricated on an oxidized Si rod with a diameter of 1 cm. Some problems were encountered in the patterning of the Pt/Ti ohmic contacts on the rod, due mainly to the surface roughness of the diamond film. The use of thermistors with a minimum width of 5 micron (to improve the spatial resolution of measurement) resulted in lithographic problems related to surface roughness of diamond films. We improved the mean surface roughness from 124 nm to 30 nm by using an ultra high nucleation density of 10(exp 11)/sq cm. To deposit thermistors with such small dimensions on a curved surface, a new 3-D diamond patterning technique is currently under development. This involves writing a diamond seed pattern directly on the curved surface by a computer-controlled nozzle.

  9. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: Survey and evaluation of measurement techniques for temperature, strain and heat flux for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    The report presents the final results of Tasks 1 and 2, Development of Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems (NASA program NAS3-25141). During Task 1, an extensive survey was conducted of sensor concepts which have the potential for measuring surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. Each sensor concept was analyzed and evaluated under Task 2; sensor concepts were then recommended for further development. For temperature measurement, both pyrometry and thermographic phosphors are recommended for measurements up to and beyond the melting point of ceramic materials. For lower temperature test programs, the thin-film techniques offer advantages in the installation of temperature sensors. Optical strain measurement techniques are recommended because they offer the possibility of being useful at very high temperature levels. Techniques for the measurement of heat flux are recommended for development based on both a surface mounted sensor and the measurement of the temperature differential across a portion of a ceramic component or metallic substrate.

  10. Development of a small radiation flux monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Leysen, W.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a miniaturized radiation flux monitor by means of Cherenkov light. The idea is to use the intensity of Cherenkov light as a measurement for the radiation flux. An initial test is performed with an extrinsic dielectric object which is coupled with an optical fibre. These test show that the Cherenkov radiation in the fibre itself was too high compared with the captured extrinsic light. Further test to use intrinsic Cherenkov fibre optic sensors are planned in the near future and the envisaged measurement set up is explained. (authors)

  11. Aerospace Sensor Systems: From Sensor Development To Vehicle Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of years of sensor system development and application for aerospace systems. The emphasis of this work is on developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion and crew vehicle systems as well as monitoring the safety of those systems. Specific areas of work include chemical species sensors, thin film thermocouples and strain gages, heat flux gages, fuel gages, SiC based electronic devices and sensors, space qualified electronics, and MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) as well as integrated and multifunctional sensor systems. Each sensor type has its own technical challenges related to integration and reliability in a given application. The general approach has been to develop base sensor technology using microfabrication techniques, integrate sensors with "smart" hardware and software, and demonstrate those systems in a range of aerospace applications. Descriptions of the sensor elements, their integration into sensors systems, and examples of sensor system applications will be discussed. Finally, suggestions related to the future of sensor technology will be given. It is concluded that smart micro/nano sensor technology can revolutionize aerospace applications, but significant challenges exist in maturing the technology and demonstrating its value in real-life applications.

  12. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor of Improved Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gus; Wrbanek, John; Blaha, Charles

    2002-01-01

    A new design for a thin film heat flux sensor is presented. It is easier to fabricate than previous designs, for a given heat flux has an order of magnitude larger signal, and is more easily scalable than previous designs. Transient and steady state data are also presented.

  13. FLUX SENSOR EVALUATIONS AT THE ATR CRITICAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; David Nigg; George Imel; Jason Harris; Eric Bonebrake

    2010-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the ATR Critical (ATRC) facilities lack real-time methods for detecting thermal neutron flux and fission reaction rates for irradiation capsules. Direct measurements of the actual power deposited into a test are now possible without resorting to complicated correction factors. In addition, it is possible to directly measure minor actinide fission reaction rates and to provide time-dependent monitoring of the fission reaction rate or fast/thermal flux during transient testing. A joint Idaho State University /Idaho National Laboratory ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project was recently initiated to evaluate new real-time state-of-the-art in-pile flux detection sensors. Initially, the project is comparing the accuracy, response time, and long duration performance of French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)-developed miniature fission chambers, specialized self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) by the Argentinean National Energy Commission (CNEA), specially developed commercial SPNDs, and back-to-back fission (BTB) chambers developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). As discussed in this paper, specialized fixturing and software was developed by INL to facilitate these joint ISU/INL evaluations. Calculations were performed by ISU to assess the performance of and reduce uncertainties in flux detection sensors and compare data obtained from these sensors with existing integral methods employed at the ATRC. Ultimately, project results will be used to select the detector that can provide the best online regional ATRC power measurement. It is anticipated that project results may offer the potential to increase the ATRC’s current power limit and its ability to perform low-level irradiation experiments. In addition, results from this effort will provide insights about the viability of using these detectors in the ATR. Hence, this effort complements current activities to improve ATR software tools, computational

  14. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology: (1) Heat flux is one of a number of parameters, together with pressure, temperature, flow, etc. of interest to engine designers and fluid dynamists, (2) The measurement of heat flux is of interest in directly determining the cooling requirements of hot section blades and vanes, and (3)In addition, if the surface and gas temperatures are known, the measurement of heat flux provides a value for the convective heat transfer coefficient that can be compared with the value provided by CFD codes.

  15. Distributed Sensible Heat Flux Measurements for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwald, H.; Brauchli, T.; Lehning, M.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance is typically computed using eddy covariance or two point profile measurements while alternative approaches such as the flux variance method based on convective scaling has been much less explored and applied. Flux variance (FV) certainly has a few limitations and constraints but may be an interesting and competitive method in low-cost and power limited wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the advantage of providing spatio-temporal sensible heat flux over the domain of the network. In a first step, parameters such as sampling frequency, sensor response time, and averaging interval are investigated. Then we explore the applicability and the potential of the FV method for use in WSN in a field experiment. Low-cost sensor systems are tested and compared against reference instruments (3D sonic anemometers) to evaluate the performance and limitations of the sensors as well as the method with respect to the standard calculations. Comparison experiments were carried out at several sites to gauge the flux measurements over different surface types (gravel, grass, water) from the low-cost systems. This study should also serve as an example of spatially distributed sensible heat flux measurements.

  16. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2010-11-01

    NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications

  17. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-11-07

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described.

  18. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  19. Comparative Calibration of Heat Flux Sensors in Two Blackbody Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, A. V.; Tsai, B. K.; Saunders, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of heat flux sensor calibrations in two blackbody facilities: the 25 mm variable temperature blackbody (VTBB) primary facility and a recently developed 51 mm aperture spherical blackbody (SPBB) facility. Three Schmidt-Boelter gages and a Gardon gage were calibrated with reference to an electrical substitution radiometer in the VTBB. One of the Schmidt-Boelter gages thus calibrated was used as a reference standard to calibrate other gages in the SPBB. Comparison of the Schmidt-Boelter gages calibrations in the SPBB and the VTBB agreed within the measurement uncertainties. For the Gardon gage, the measured responsivity in the SPBB showed a gradual decrease with increasing distance from the aperture. When the gage was located close to the aperture, a distance less than the aperture radius, the responsivity in the SPBB agreed with VTBB measurements. At a distance of about three times the aperture radius, the responsivity showed a decrease of about 4 %. This is probably due to higher convection loss from the Gardon gage surface compared to the Schmidt-Boelter sensor.

  20. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000ÀC showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  1. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2009-10-27

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

  2. Numerical study of the effects of boundary conditions on the measurement and calibration of gardon type heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krane, M.; Dybbs, A.

    1987-01-01

    To monitor the high-intensity heat flux conditions that occur in the space shuttle main engine (SSME), it is necessary to use specifically designed heat flux sensors. These sensors, which are of the Gardon-type, are exposed on the measuring face to high-intensity radiative and convective heat fluxes and on the other face to convective cooling. To improve the calibration and measurement accuracy of these gauges, researchers are studing the effect that the thermal boundary conditions have on gauge performance. In particular, they are studying how convective cooling effects the field inside the sensor and the measured heat flux. The first phase of this study involves a numerical study of these effects. Subsequent phases will involve experimental verification. A computer model of the heat transfer around a Garden-type heat flux sensor was developed. Two specific geometries are being considered are: (1) heat flux sensor mounted on a flat-plate; and (2) heat flux sensor mounted at the stagnation point of a circular cylinder. Both of these configurations are representative of the use of heat flux sensors in the components of the SSME. The purpose of the analysis is to obtain a temperature distribution as a function of the boundary conditions.

  3. Prototype thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor for a ceramic-insulated diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A platinum versus platinum-13 percent rhodium thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor was devised and tested in the harsh, high-temperature environment of a ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine. The sensor probe assembly was developed to provide experimental validation of heat transfer and thermal analysis methodologies applicable to the insulated diesel engine concept. The thin-film thermocouple configuration was chosen to approximate an uninterrupted chamber surface and provide a 1-D heat-flux path through the probe body. The engine test was conducted by Purdue University for Integral Technologies, Inc., under a DOE-funded contract managed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The thin-film sensor performed reliably during 6 to 10 hr of repeated engine runs at indicated mean surface temperatures up to 950 K. However, the sensor suffered partial loss of adhesion in the thin-film thermocouple junction area following maximum cyclic temperature excursions to greater than 1150 K.

  4. Development of 2.8-GHz Solar Flux Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Youngjoo; Park, Yong-Sun; Kim, Chang-Hee; Lee, Bangwon; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Yoo, Saeho; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Han, Jinwook; Kim, Young Yun

    2014-12-01

    We report the development of solar flux receivers operating at 2.8 GHz to monitor solar radio activity. Radio waves from the sun are amplified, filtered, and then transmitted to a power meter sensor without frequency down-conversion. To measure solar flux, a calibration scheme is designed with a noise source, an ambient load, and a hot load at 100° C. The receiver is attached to a 1.8 m parabolic antenna in Icheon, owned by National Radio Research Agency, and observation is being conducted during day time on a daily basis. We compare the solar fluxes measured for last seven months with solar fluxes obtained by DRAO in Penticton, Canada, and by the Hiraiso solar observatory in Japan, and finally establish equations to convert observed flux to the so-called Penticton flux with an accuracy better than 3.2 sfu.

  5. Ripeness sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 [times] 10[sup 12] BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on [sup 1]H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on [sup 1]H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  6. Development of Magnetostrictive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinke, Darrell Kenneth

    1995-11-01

    The behavior of Magnetostrictive sensors was investigated through experimentation and mathematical modeling. Two prototype sensors were designed, built and tested. A generalized design procedure is proposed and applied. The experimental data shows the viability of the magnetostrictive sensor as an alternative to conventional sensors. The experimental data was used to uncover the limitations of existing mathematical models, and to validate a new model. The prototype sensors demonstrate the ruggedness and cost effectiveness of the magnetostrictive sensor. The mathematical model accurately predicted the behavior of two different sensor configurations, thus illustrating the model's flexibility. The design procedure can be used by sensor designers as a general guideline. The application of the design procedure is a unique application of magnetostrictive sensors, illustrating the viability, practicality and flexibility of magnetostrictive sensor technology.

  7. Dispersion of Heat Flux Sensors Manufactured in Silicon Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ziouche, Katir; Lejeune, Pascale; Bougrioua, Zahia; Leclercq, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the dispersion performances related to the manufacturing process of heat flux sensors realized in CMOS (Complementary metal oxide semi-conductor) compatible 3-in technology. In particular, we have studied the performance dispersion of our sensors and linked these to the physical characteristics of dispersion of the materials used. This information is mandatory to ensure low-cost manufacturing and especially to reduce production rejects during the fabrication process. The results obtained show that the measured sensitivity of the sensors is in the range 3.15 to 6.56 μV/(W/m2), associated with measured resistances ranging from 485 to 675 kΩ. The dispersions correspond to a Gaussian-type distribution with more than 90% determined around average sensitivity Se¯ = 4.5 µV/(W/m2) and electrical resistance R¯ = 573.5 kΩ within the interval between the average and, more or less, twice the relative standard deviation. PMID:27294929

  8. Dispersion of Heat Flux Sensors Manufactured in Silicon Technology.

    PubMed

    Ziouche, Katir; Lejeune, Pascale; Bougrioua, Zahia; Leclercq, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the dispersion performances related to the manufacturing process of heat flux sensors realized in CMOS (Complementary metal oxide semi-conductor) compatible 3-in technology. In particular, we have studied the performance dispersion of our sensors and linked these to the physical characteristics of dispersion of the materials used. This information is mandatory to ensure low-cost manufacturing and especially to reduce production rejects during the fabrication process. The results obtained show that the measured sensitivity of the sensors is in the range 3.15 to 6.56 μV/(W/m²), associated with measured resistances ranging from 485 to 675 kΩ. The dispersions correspond to a Gaussian-type distribution with more than 90% determined around average sensitivity S e ¯ = 4.5 µV/(W/m²) and electrical resistance R ¯ = 573.5 kΩ within the interval between the average and, more or less, twice the relative standard deviation. PMID:27294929

  9. Feasibility study on 3 axis magnetic sensor for flux leakage method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasamoto, Akira

    2014-04-01

    Most of NDT system by magnetic field sensing has employed coil or semiconductor as sensor which has one axis sensitivity. Recent development of semiconductor technology can makes a chip that enable us to measure 3 axis magnetic field in a 1mm square. This vector information is expected to show a new insight in NDT testing. This presentation will show a basic experimental feasibility study for application of magnetic sensor to flux leakage and eddy current testing method by using a sensing system with the chip.

  10. Progress in the measurement of SSME turbine heat flux with plug-type sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1991-01-01

    Data reduction was completed for tests of plug-type heat flux sensors (gauges) in a turbine blade thermal cycling tester (TBT) that is located at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, and a typical gauge is illustrated. This is the first time that heat flux has been measured in a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbopump Turbine environment. The development of the concept for the gauge was performed in a heat flux measurement facility at Lewis. In this facility, transient and steady state absorbed surface heat flux information was obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gauge. A schematic of the TBT is presented, and plots of the absorbed surface heat flux measured on the three blades tested in the TBT are presented. High quality heat flux values were measured on all three blades. The experiments demonstrated that reliable and durable gauges can be repeatedly fabricated into the airfoils. The experiment heat flux data are being used for verification of SSME analytical stress, boundary layer, and heat transfer design models. Other experimental results and future plans are also presented.

  11. Performance of an Advanced Stirling Convertor Based on Heat Flux Sensor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower, Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center. The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot-end and cold-end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given heat input. It is difficult to measure heat input to Stirling convertors due to the complex geometries of the hot components, temperature limits of sensor materials, and invasive integration of sensors. A thin-film heat flux sensor was used to directly measure heat input to an ASC. The effort succeeded in designing and fabricating unique sensors, which were integrated into a Stirling convertor ground test and exposed to test temperatures exceeding 700 C in air for 10,000 hr. Sensor measurements were used to calculate thermal efficiency for ASC-E (Engineering Unit) #1 and #4. The post-disassembly condition of the sensors is also discussed.

  12. Performance of an Advanced Stirling Convertor Based on Heat Flux Sensor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Dcott D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two highefficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower, Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center. The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot-end and cold-end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given heat input. It is difficult to measure heat input to Stirling convertors due to the complex geometries of the hot components, temperature limits of sensor materials, and invasive integration of sensors. A thin-film heat flux sensor was used to directly measure heat input to an ASC. The effort succeeded in designing and fabricating unique sensors, which were integrated into a Stirling convertor ground test and exposed to test temperatures exceeding 700 C in air for 10,000 hr. Sensor measurements were used to calculate thermal efficiency for ASC-E (Engineering Unit) #1 and #4. The post-disassembly condition of the sensors is also discussed.

  13. Analysis of the transient calibration of heat flux sensors: One dimensional case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dybbs, A.; Ling, J. X.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of transient heat flux on heat flux sensor response and calibration is analyzed. A one dimensional case was studied in order to elucidate the key parameters and trends for the problem. It has the added advantage that the solutions to the governing equations can be obtained by analytic means. The analytical results obtained to date indicate that the transient response of a heat flux sensor depends on the thermal boundary conditions, the geometry and the thermal properties of the sensor. In particular it was shown that if the thermal diffusivity of the sensor is small, then the transient behavior must be taken into account.

  14. Characterizing storm-event nitrate fluxes in a fifth order suburbanizing watershed using in situ sensors.

    PubMed

    Carey, Richard O; Wollheim, Wilfred M; Mulukutla, Gopal K; Mineau, Madeleine M

    2014-07-15

    Land use influences the distribution of nonpoint nitrogen (N) sources in urbanizing watersheds and storm events interact with these heterogeneous sources to expedite N transport to aquatic systems. In situ sensors provide high frequency and continuous measurements that may reflect storm-event N variability more accurately compared to grab samples. We deployed sensors from April to December 2011 in a suburbanizing watershed (479 km2) to characterize storm-event nitrate-N (NO3-N) and conductivity variability. NO3-N concentrations exhibited complex patterns both within and across storms and shifted from overall dilution (source limitation) before summer baseflows to subsequent periods of flushing (transport limitation). In contrast, conductivity generally diluted with increasing runoff. Despite diluted NO3-N concentrations, NO3-N fluxes consistently increased with flow. Sensor flux estimates for the entire deployment period were similar to estimates derived from weekly and monthly grab samples. However, significant differences in flux occurred at monthly time scales, which may have important implications for understanding impacts to temporally sensitive receiving waters. Evidence of both supply (nutrient-poor) and transport (nutrient-rich) limitation patterns during storms is consistent with watersheds undergoing land use transitions. Tracking shifts in these patterns could indicate N accumulation in developing watersheds and help identify mitigation opportunities prior to N impairment.

  15. Thin film heat flux sensors fabricated on copper substrates for thermal measurements in microfluidic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasperson, Benjamin A.; Schmale, Joshua; Qu, Weilin; Pfefferkorn, Frank E.; Turner, Kevin T.

    2014-12-01

    Micro-scale heat flux sensors are fabricated on bulk copper surfaces using a combination of lithography-based microfabrication and micro end milling. The heat flux sensors are designed to enable heat transfer measurements on an individual pin in a copper micro pin fin heat sink. Direct fabrication of the sensors on copper substrates minimizes the thermal resistance between the sensor and pin. To fabricate the devices, copper wafers were polished to a flatness and roughness suitable for microfabrication and standard processes, including photolithography, polyimide deposition via spinning, and metal deposition through physical vapor deposition were tailored for use on the unique copper substrates. Micro end milling was then used to create 3D pin features and segment the devices from the copper substrate. Temperature calibrations of the sensors were performed using a tube furnace and the heat flux sensing performance was assessed through laser-based tests. This paper describes the design, fabrication and calibration of these integrated heat flux sensors.

  16. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  17. Thin film heat flux sensor for Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine environment stresses engine components to their design limits and beyond. The extremely high temperatures and rapid temperature cycling can easily cause parts to fail if they are not properly designed. Thin film heat flux sensors can provide heat loading information with almost no disturbance of gas flows or of the blade. These sensors can provide steady state and transient heat flux information. A thin film heat flux sensor is described which makes it easier to measure small temperature differences across very thin insulating layers.

  18. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Convenient method of measuring displacement currents with a heat flux sensor at the phase transition in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Yukio; Kojima, Akira; Yoshioka, Tadahiko; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Tozaki, Ken-ichi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2001-04-01

    A convenient method has been developed to measure displacement currents along three crystallographic directions with a heat flux sensor on a fine temperature scale at the phase transition in solids. An example of the measurements is shown for the cubic-tetragonal phase transition in BaTiO3, revealing a complicated feature of the current flow at the transition point.

  19. Multi-sensor fusion development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bish, Sheldon; Rohrer, Matthew; Scheffel, Peter; Bennett, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and McQ Inc. are developing a generic sensor fusion architecture that involves several diverse processes working in combination to create a dynamic task-oriented, real-time informational capability. Processes include sensor data collection, persistent and observational data storage, and multimodal and multisensor fusion that includes the flexibility to modify the fusion program rules for each mission. Such a fusion engine lends itself to a diverse set of sensing applications and architectures while using open-source software technologies. In this paper, we describe a fusion engine architecture that combines multimodal and multi-sensor fusion within an Open Standard for Unattended Sensors (OSUS) framework. The modular, plug-and-play architecture of OSUS allows future fusion plugin methodologies to have seamless integration into the fusion architecture at the conceptual and implementation level. Although beyond the scope of this paper, this architecture allows for data and information manipulation and filtering for an array of applications.

  20. Mobile Sensor Technologies Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing small mobile platforms for sensor placement, as well as methods for communicating between roving platforms and a central command location. The first part of this project is to use commercially available equipment to miniaturize an existing sensor platform. We developed a five-circuit-board suite, with an average board size of 1.5 by 3 cm. Shown in the preceding photograph, this suite provides all motor control, direction finding, and communications capabilities for a 27- by 21- by 40-mm prototype mobile platform. The second part of the project is to provide communications between mobile platforms, and also between multiple platforms and a central command location. This is accomplished with a low-power network labeled "SPAN," Sensor Platform Area Network, a local area network made up of proximity elements. In practice, these proximity elements are composed of fixed- and mobile-sensor-laden science packages that communicate to each other via radiofrequency links. Data in the network will be shared by a central command location that will pass information into and out of the network through its access to a backbone element. The result will be a protocol portable to general purpose microcontrollers satisfying a host of sensor networking tasks. This network will enter the gap somewhere between television remotes and Bluetooth but, unlike 802.15.4, will not specify a physical layer, thus allowing for many data rates over optical, acoustical, radiofrequency, hardwire, or other media. Since the protocol will exist as portable C-code, developers may be able to embed it in a host of microcontrollers from commercial to space grade and, of course, to design it into ASICs. Unlike in 802.15.4, the nodes will relate to each other as peers. A demonstration of this protocol using the two test bed platforms was recently held. Two NASA modified, commercially available, mobile platforms communicated and shared data with each other and a

  1. Hydrogen and oxygen sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, E. A.; Mahig, J.; Schaeper, H. R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A reliable and low cost gas sensor was investigated for instantaneously detecting H2 in N2, H2 in air, and O2 in N2. The major portion of the research was spent in developing a sensor which would instantaneously detect H2 to + or - 50 ppm even in the presence of trace amounts of other gases. The experimental procedures used to provide the performance characteristics for the various oscillators are discussed describing the equipment with help of schematics and photographs where applicable. The resulting performance is given in graphical form. In some cases both hydrogen and helium may be present and since both of them effect gas sensors similarly, a method was found to determine the concentration of each. The methods developed are grouped into the following four broad categories: pure metal response, variation in heat conductivity, reduction methods, and exotic processes. From the above it was decided for the present to use a copper oxide reduction process as this process was demonstrated to be capable of determining the concentrations of hydrogen and helium respectively in a gas mixture with air or nitrogen.

  2. Ripeness sensor development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 {times} 10{sup 12} BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on {sup 1}H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on {sup 1}H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  3. Nitrous Oxide Emission Flux Measurements for Ecological Systems with an Open-Path Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Cavigelli, M. A.; Gelfand, I.; Zenone, T.; Cui, M.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ambient concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O), the fourth most abundant greenhouse gas, is rapidly increasing with emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources [1]. Soil and aquatic areas are important sources and sinks for N2O due to complicated biogenic processes. However, N2O emissions are poorly constrained in space and time, despite its importance to global climate change and ozone depletion. We report our recent N2O emission measurements with an open-path quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based sensor for ecological systems. The newly emergent QCLs have been used to build compact, sensitive trace gas sensors in the mid-IR spectral region. A compact open-path QCL based sensor was developed to detect atmospheric N2O and CO at ~ 4.5 μm using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) to achieve a sensitivity of 0.26 ppbv of N2O and 0.24 ppbv of CO in 1 s with a power consumption of ~50 W [2]. This portable sensor system has been used to perform N2O emission flux measurement both with a static flux chamber and on an eddy covariance (EC) flux tower. In the flux chamber measurements, custom chambers were used to host the laser sensor, while gas samples for gas chromatograph (GC) were collected at the same time in the same chamber for validation and comparison. Different soil treatments have been applied in different chambers to study the relationship between N2O emission and the amount of fertilizer (and water) addition. Measurements from two methods agreed with each other (95% or higher confidence interval) for emission flux results, while laser sensor gave measurements with a much high temporal resolution. We have also performed the first open-path eddy covariance N2O flux measurement at Kellogg research station, Michigan State University for a month in June, 2012. Our sensor was placed on a 4-meter tower in a corn field and powered by batteries (connected with solar panels). We have observed the diurnal cycle of N2O flux. During this deployment, an inter

  4. New Method for Estimation of Aeolian Sand Transport Rate Using Ceramic Sand Flux Sensor (UD-101)

    PubMed Central

    Udo, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a new method for the estimation of aeolian sand transport rate was developed; the method employs a ceramic sand flux sensor (UD-101). UD-101 detects wind-blown sand impacting on its surface. The method was devised by considering the results of wind tunnel experiments that were performed using a vertical sediment trap and the UD-101. Field measurements to evaluate the estimation accuracy during the prevalence of unsteady winds were performed on a flat backshore. The results showed that aeolian sand transport rates estimated using the developed method were of the same order as those estimated using the existing method for high transport rates, i.e., for transport rates greater than 0.01 kg m−1 s−1. PMID:22291553

  5. Characterization of a heat flux sensor using short pulse laser calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Batsale, Jean-Christophe; Enouf, Olivier; Dubard, Jimmy; Filtz, Jean-Remy

    2007-05-01

    A method to calibrate classical heat flux sensors is presented. The classical approach to measure the temperature inside a known material by using a thermocouple fails when the measurement time is very short. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using a noninteger identified system as a direct model for the estimation process. Using short pulse laser calibration measurements the crucial design aspects of the sensor that play a significant role when assuming one-dimensional, semi-infinite heat transfer have been accounted for. The theoretical approach as well as the calibration results are presented and comparisons to the classical approach and results from finite element modeling are shown. It is concluded that the new method ameliorate the heat flux sensor significantly and extend its application to very short measurement times.

  6. In situ measurement of atomic oxygen flux using a silver film sensor onboard "TianTuo 1" nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yun; Chen, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Research into the measurement of atomic oxygen (AO) flux in a low Earth orbit (LEO) is highly significant for the development of spacecraft surface materials as well as for enhancing the reliability of space instruments. In the present study, we studied a silver film resistance method for AO flux measurement and we established a quantitative calculation model. Moreover, we designed a silver film sensor for space flight tests with a mass of about 100 g and a peak power consumption of less than 0.2 W. The effect of AO on the silver film was demonstrated in a ground-based simulation experiment and compared with the Kapton-mass-loss method. For the space flight test, the AO flux was estimated by monitoring the change in the resistance in the linear part of the silver/AO reaction regime. Finally, the sensor was carried onboard our nanosatellite "TianTuo 1" to obtain in situ measurements of the AO flux during a 476 km sun synchronous orbit. The result was critically compared with theoretical predictions, which validated the design of this sensor.

  7. Measuring electrically charged particle fluxes in space using a fiber optic loop sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to demonstrate the potential of a fiber optic loop sensor for the measurement of electrically charged particle fluxes in space. The key elements of the sensor are a multiple turn loop of low birefringence, single mode fiber, with a laser diode light source, and a low noise optical receiver. The optical receiver is designed to be shot noise limited, with this being the limiting sensitivity factor for the sensor. The sensing element is the fiber optic loop. Under a magnetic field from an electric current flowing along the axis of the loop, there is a non-vanishing line integral along the fiber optic loop. This causes a net birefringence producing two states of polarization whose phase difference is correlated to magnetic field strength and thus, current in the optical receiver electronic processing. The objectives in this program were to develop a prototype laser diode powered fiber optic sensor. The performance specification of a minimum detectable current density of 1 (mu)amp/sq m-(radical)Hz, should be at the shot noise limit of the detection electronics. OPTRA has successfully built and tested a 3.2 m diameter loop with 137 turns of low birefringence optical fiber and achieved a minimum detectable current density of 5.4 x 10(exp-5) amps/(radical)Hz. If laboratory space considerations were not an issue, with the length of optical fiber available to us, we would have achieved a minimum detectable current density of 4 x 10(exp -7) amps/(radical)Hz.

  8. Development of porous glass fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, P. B.; Barkatt, A.; Feng, X.; Finger, S. M.; Hojaji, H.

    1989-06-01

    Porous glass fiber optic sensors in which the porous sensor tip is an integral part of the fiber optic, have been developed and found to be rugged and reliable, due to their monolithic structure and large interior surface area for attachment of active species. The sensor portion of the fiber is made porous by selective leaching of a specially formulated borosilicate glass fiber, resulting in a strong, monolithic structure where the sensor portion of the fiber remains integrally attached to the rest of the fiber, essentially eliminating losses at the sensor-light pipe interface. The process for constructing porous glass fiber optic sensors involves fiber pulling, phase separation, selective leaching, attachment of the active reagent, and integration with other optical elements. A broad range of sensors based on this technology could be developed by using different active species, such as enzymes and other biochemicals, which could be bonded to the interior surface of the porous glass sensor.

  9. Aquatic eddy correlation: quantifying the artificial flux caused by stirring-sensitive O2 sensors.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Moritz; Noss, Christian; Hancke, Kasper; Cathalot, Cecile; McGinnis, Daniel F; Lorke, Andreas; Glud, Ronnie N

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the aquatic eddy correlation (EC) technique has proven to be a powerful approach for non-invasive measurements of oxygen fluxes across the sediment water interface. Fundamental to the EC approach is the correlation of turbulent velocity and oxygen concentration fluctuations measured with high frequencies in the same sampling volume. Oxygen concentrations are commonly measured with fast responding electrochemical microsensors. However, due to their own oxygen consumption, electrochemical microsensors are sensitive to changes of the diffusive boundary layer surrounding the probe and thus to changes in the ambient flow velocity. The so-called stirring sensitivity of microsensors constitutes an inherent correlation of flow velocity and oxygen sensing and thus an artificial flux which can confound the benthic flux determination. To assess the artificial flux we measured the correlation between the turbulent flow velocity and the signal of oxygen microsensors in a sealed annular flume without any oxygen sinks and sources. Experiments revealed significant correlations, even for sensors designed to have low stirring sensitivities of ~0.7%. The artificial fluxes depended on ambient flow conditions and, counter intuitively, increased at higher velocities because of the nonlinear contribution of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The measured artificial fluxes ranged from 2-70 mmol m(-2) d(-1) for weak and very strong turbulent flow, respectively. Further, the stirring sensitivity depended on the sensor orientation towards the flow. For a sensor orientation typically used in field studies, the artificial flux could be predicted using a simplified mathematical model. Optical microsensors (optodes) that should not exhibit a stirring sensitivity were tested in parallel and did not show any significant correlation between O2 signals and turbulent flow. In conclusion, EC data obtained with electrochemical sensors can be affected by artificial flux and we

  10. Development of inkjet printed strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, V.; Caparros, C.; Casellas, C.; Francesch, L.; Rocha, J. G.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.

    2013-10-01

    Strain sensors with different architectures, such as single sensors, sensor arrays and a sensor matrix have been developed by inkjet printing technology. Sensors with gauge factors up to 2.48, dimensions of 1.5 mm × 1.8 mm and interdigitated structures with a distance of 30 μm between the finger lines have been achieved based on PeDOT (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and conductive ink. Strain gauges based on silver ink have also been achieved with a gauge factor of 0.35. Performance tests including 1000 mechanical cycles have been successfully carried out for the development of smart prosthesis applications.

  11. [Development of Bluetooth wireless sensors].

    PubMed

    Moor, C; Schwaibold, M; Roth, H; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    Wireless communication could help to overcome current obstacles in medical devices and could enable medical services to offer completely new scenarios in health care. The Bluetooth technology which is the upcoming global market leader in wireless communication turned out to be perfectly suited not only for consumer market products but also in the medical environment [1]. It offers a low power, low cost connection in the medium range of 1-100 m with a bandwidth of currently 723.2 kbaud. This paper describes the development of a wireless ECG device and a Pulse Oximeter. Equipped with a Bluetooth port, the measurement devices are enabled to transmit data between the sensor and a Bluetooth-monitor. Therefore, CSR's Bluetooth protocol embedded two-processor and embedded single-processor architecture has been used.

  12. Photo sensor array technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossman, M. W.; Young, V. F.; Beall, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The development of an improved capability photo sensor array imager for use in a Viking '75 type facsimile camera is presented. This imager consists of silicon photodiodes and lead sulfide detectors to cover a spectral range from 0.4 to 2.7 microns. An optical design specifying filter configurations and convergence angles is described. Three electronics design approaches: AC-chopped light, DC-dual detector, and DC-single detector, are investigated. Experimental and calculated results are compared whenever possible using breadboard testing and tolerance analysis techniques. Results show that any design used must be forgiving of the relative instability of lead sulfide detectors. A final design using lead sulfide detectors and associated electronics is implemented by fabrication of a hybrid prototype device. Test results of this device show a good agreement with calculated values.

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  14. Development of Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems. Phase 2; Temperature Sensor Systems Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 'development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems' program is divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. The results of this effort were previously published in NASA CR-182111. As a result of Phase 1, three approaches were recommended for further development: pyrometry, thin-film sensors, and thermographic phosphors. The objective of Phase 2 were to fabricate and conduct laboratory demonstration tests of these systems. Six materials, mutually agreed upon by NASA and Pratt & Whitney, were investigated under this program. This report summarizes the Phase 2 effort and provides conclusions and recommendations for each of the categories evaluated.

  15. Development of optical diaphragm deflection sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghering, W. L.; Varshneya, D.; Jeffers, L. A.; Bailey, R. T.; Berthold, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop high-temperature pressure sensors using non-metallic components and optical sensing methods. The sensors are to operate over a temperature range from room temperature approx. 20C to 540C, to respond to internal pressure up to 690 kPa, to respond to external pressure up to 690 kPa, and to withstand external overpressure of 2070 kPa. Project tasks include evaluating sensing techniques and sensor systems. These efforts include materials and sensing method selection, sensor design, sensor fabrication, and sensor testing. Sensors are tested as a function of temperature, pressure, overpressure, and vibration. The project results show that high-temperature pressure sensors based on glass components and optical sensing methods are feasible. The microbend optical diaphragm deflection sensor exhibits the required sensitivity and stability for use as a pressure sensor with temperature compensation. for the microbend sensor, the 95% confidence level deviation of input pressure from the pressure calculated from the overall temperature-compensated calibration equation is 3.7% of full scale. The limitations of the sensors evaluated are primarily due to the restricted temperature range of suitable commercially available optical fibers and the problems associated with glass-to-metal pressure sealing over the entire testing temperature range.

  16. Design and demonstration of a distributed sensor array for predicting water flow and nitrate flux in the Santa Fe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. D.; Cohen, M.; Delfino, J.; Martin, J.; Slatton, K. C.; Thomas, R.

    2006-12-01

    Watershed characterization requires well-planned sampling to track simultaneous time-variable fluxes and flowpaths of water, nutrients, sediments, and energy. In this research project legacy hydrologic, meteorologic and water quality data from the Santa Fe basin in the Suwannee river watershed will be assembled into a web- accessible digital watershed. These data, together with predictions from physically-based hydrologic models, will be used to develop a probabilistic algorithm to predict surface water stage and flux throughout the Santa Fe river basin and evaluate the accuracy of these predictions. Information on prediction uncertainty will be used to design a spatial network of new conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensors to improve the predictions. The adequacy of the assembled data and the utility of the optimal estimation algorithm will be evaluated by comparing resulting predictions with observations of surface water stage and flux from the newly deployed CTD sondes. Field data collection will include evaluations of interferences and applicability of off-the-shelf optical and cadmium reduction continuous nitrate sensors. The best performing sensor will be identified and calibrated to conditions in the Santa Fe watershed. At least two nitrate sensors will be linked with the CTD sondes into sensor packages and deployed at selected locations in the Santa Fe watershed. The high frequency data collected by the sensors will be transmitted continuously via cell-phone technology to a central university computer. These new data will be used to improve local relationships among flow, stage, conductivity and nitrate. Information collected with the sensors will lay the groundwork for developing a general methodology to augment continuous measurement of nitrate with correlated surrogates (i.e., in this case flow and conductivity) to decrease the density of sensors needed to accurately predict the nitrate in the system over space and time. Furthermore, the data will

  17. Diode laser-based air mass flux sensor for subsonic aeropropulsion inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michael F.; Kessler, William J.; Allen, Mark G.

    1996-08-01

    An optical air mass flux sensor based on a compact, room-temperature diode laser in a fiber-coupled delivery system has been tested on a full-scale gas turbine engine. The sensor is based on simultaneous measurements of O 2 density and Doppler-shifted velocity along a line of sight across the inlet duct. Extensive tests spanning engine power levels from idle to full afterburner demonstrate accuracy and precision of the order of 1 2 of full scale in density, velocity, and mass flux. The precision-limited velocity at atmospheric pressure was as low as 40 cm s. Multiple data-reduction procedures are quantitatively compared to suggest optimal strategies for flight sensor packages.

  18. Micromachined pressure sensors: Review and recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.P.; Smith, J.H.

    1997-03-01

    Since the discovery of piezoresistivity in silicon in the mid 1950s, silicon-based pressure sensors have been widely produced. Micromachining technology has greatly benefited from the success of the integrated circuits industry, burrowing materials, processes, and toolsets. Because of this, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are now poised to capture large segments of existing sensor markets and to catalyze the development of new markets. Given the emerging importance of MEMS, it is instructive to review the history of micromachined pressure sensors, and to examine new developments in the field. Pressure sensors will be the focus of this paper, starting from metal diaphragm sensors with bonded silicon strain gauges, and moving to present developments of surface-micromachined, optical, resonant, and smart pressure sensors. Considerations for diaphragm design will be discussed in detail, as well as additional considerations for capacitive and piezoresistive devices.

  19. Design and characterization of a high resolution microfluidic heat flux sensor with thermal modulation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sung-Ki; Kim, Jung-Kyun; Cho, Sung-Cheon; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-frequency noise from the sensor output, and various amounts of fluidic heat were applied to the sensor to investigate its suitability for microfluidic applications. For sensor design and analysis of signal output, a method of modeling and simulating electro-thermal behavior in a microfluidic heat flux sensor with an integrated electronic circuit is presented and validated. The electro-thermal domain model was constructed by using system dynamics, particularly the bond graph. The electro-thermal domain system model in which the thermal and the electrical domains are coupled expresses the heat generation of samples and converts thermal input to electrical output. The proposed electro-thermal domain system model is in good agreement with the measured output voltage response in both the transient and the steady state. PMID:22163568

  20. Development Of Porous Glass Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, P. B.; Barkatt, Aa.; Feng, X.; Finger, S. M.; Hojaji, H.; Laberge, N.; Mohr, R.; Penafiel, M.; Saad, E.

    A method for producing rugged, continuous porous glass fiber optic sensors was developed. pH and temperature sensors based on this technology have been successfully produced. The sensor portion of the fiber is made porous by selective leaching of a specially formulated borosilicate glass fiber. This results in a strong, monolithic structure where the sensor portion of the fiber remains integrally attached to the rest of the fiber (which acts as a light pipe), essentially eliminating losses at the sensor-light pipe interface. Pore size in the sensor can be controllably varied by modifying heat treatment conditions, making these sensors suitable for chemical concentration measurements in liquids and gases. Appropriate dyes were chemically bonded by silanization to the large interior surface area of the porous sensors to produce the pH and temperature sensors. Cresol red and phenol red were used for pH and pinacyanol chloride was used for temperature sensing. The sensitivity of these devices can be controlled by varying the concentration of the chemically bonded dye and the length of the porous region. Optical absorbance measurements were made in the visible range. The tip of the sensors was coated with a thin, porous layer of gold to reflect the incident light, resulting in a double pass across the porous sensor. Experimental measurements were made over a pH range of 3 to 8 and a temperature range of 28-70 C. These porous glass fiber optic sensors were found to be rugged and reliable due to their monolithic structure and large interior surface area for attachment of active species. A broad range of sensors based on this technology could be developed by using different active species, such as enzymes and other biochemicals, which could be bonded to the interior surface of the porous glass sensor.

  1. Development of airborne eddy-correlation flux measurement capabilities for reactive oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John (Principal Investigator); Zheng, Xiaonan; Sandholm, Scott T.

    1996-01-01

    This research is aimed at producing a fundamental new research tool for characterizing the source strength of the most important compound controlling the hemispheric and global scale distribution of tropospheric ozone. Specifically, this effort seeks to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of a new general purpose laser-induced fluorescence based spectrometer for making airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen compounds. The new all solid-state laser technology being used in this advanced sensor will produce a forerunner of the type of sensor technology that should eventually result in highly compact operational systems. The proof-of-concept sensor being developed will have over two orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity than present-day instruments. In addition, this sensor will offer the possibility of eventual extension to airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and possibly other compounds, such as ammonia (NH3), peroxyradicals (HO2), nitrateradicals (NO3) and several iodine compounds (e.g., I and IO). Demonstration of the new sensor's ability to measure NO fluxes will occur through a series of laboratory and field tests. This proof-of-concept demonstration will show that not only can airborne fluxes of important ultra-trace compounds be made at the few parts-per-trillion level, but that the high accuracy/precision measurements currently needed for predictive models can also. These measurement capabilities will greatly enhance our current ability to quantify the fluxes of reactive nitrogen into the troposphere and significantly impact upon the accuracy of predictive capabilities to model O3's distribution within the remote troposphere. This development effort also offers a timely approach for producing the reactive nitrogen flux measurement capabilities that will be needed by future research programs such as NASA's planned 1999 Amazon Biogeochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry

  2. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  3. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, William H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 'Development of Sensors for Ceramics Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems' program was divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. The results of this effort were previously published in NASA CR-182111. As a result of Phase 1, three approaches were recommended for further development: pyrometry, thin-film sensors, and thermographic phosphors. The objectives of Phase 2 were to fabricate and conduct laboratory demonstration tests of these systems. A summary report of the Phase 2 effort, together with conclusions and recommendations for each of the categories evaluated, has been submitted to NASA. Emittance tests were performed on six materials furnished by NASA Lewis Research Center. Measurements were made of various surfaces at high temperature using a Thermogage emissometer. This report describes the emittance test program and presents a summary of the results.

  4. In-core flux sensor evaluations at the ATR critical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Joy Rempe; David Nigg; George Imel; Jason Harris; Todd Sherman; Jean-Francois Villard

    2014-09-01

    Flux detector evaluations were completed as part of a joint Idaho State University (ISU) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) / French Atomic Energy commission (CEA) ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to compare the accuracy, response time, and long duration performance of several flux detectors. Special fixturing developed by INL allows real-time flux detectors to be inserted into various ATRC core positions and perform lobe power measurements, axial flux profile measurements, and detector cross-calibrations. Detectors initially evaluated in this program include the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)-developed miniature fission chambers; specialized self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) developed by the Argentinean National Energy Commission (CNEA); specially developed commercial SPNDs from Argonne National Laboratory. As shown in this article, data obtained from this program provides important insights related to flux detector accuracy and resolution for subsequent ATR and CEA experiments and flux data required for bench-marking models in the ATR V&V Upgrade Initiative.

  5. Comparing Stream DOC Fluxes from Sensor- and Sample-Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Saraceno, J.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Mast, A.; Clow, D. W.; Hood, K.; Walker, J. F.; Murphy, S. F.; Torres-Sanchez, A.; Aiken, G.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    DOC transport by streamwater is a significant flux that does not consistently show up in ecosystem carbon budgets. In an effort to quantify stream DOC flux, we analyzed three to four years of high-frequency in situ fluorescing dissolved organic matter (FDOM) concentrations and turbidity measured by optical sensors at the five diverse forested and/or alpine headwater sites of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program. FDOM serves as a proxy for DOC. We also took discrete samples over a range of hydrologic conditions, using both manual weekly and automated event-based sampling. After compensating FDOM for temperature effects and turbidity interference - which was successful even at the high-turbidity Luquillo, PR site -- we evaluated the DOC-FDOM relation based on discrete sample DOC analyses matched to corrected FDOM at the time of sampling. FDOM was a moderately robust predictor of DOC, with r2 from 0.60 to more than 0.95 among sites. We then formed continuous DOC time series by two independent approaches: (1) DOC predicted from FDOM; and (2) the composite method, based on modeled DOC from regression on stream discharge, season, air temperature, and time, forcing the model to observations and adjusting modeled concentrations between observations by linearly-interpolated model residuals. DOC flux from each approach was then computed directly as concentration times discharge. DOC fluxes based on the sensor approach were consistently greater than the sample-based approach. At Loch Vale, CO (2.5 years) and Panola Mountain GA (1 year), the difference was 5-17%. At Sleepers River, VT (3 years), preliminary differences were greater than 20%. The difference is driven by the highest events, but we are investigating these results further. We will also present comparisons from Luquillo, PR, and Allequash Creek, WI. The higher sensor-based DOC fluxes could result from their accuracy during hysteresis, which is difficult to model

  6. Current Developments in Future Planetary Probe Sensors for TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Ed; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Oishu, Tomo

    2003-01-01

    In-situ Thermal Protection System (TPS) sensors are required to provide traceability of TPS performance and sizing tools. Traceability will lead to higher fidelity design tools, which in turn will lead to lower design safety margins, and decreased heatshield mass. Decreasing TPS mass will enable certain missions that are not otherwise feasible, and directly increase science payload. NASA Ames is currently developing two flight measurements as essential to advancing the state of TPS traceability for material modeling and aerothermal simulation: heat flux and surface recession (for ablators). The heat flux gage is applicable to both ablators and non-ablators and is therefore the more generalized sensor concept of the two with wider applicability to mission scenarios. This paper describes the development of a microsensor capable of surface and in-depth temperature and heat flux measurements for TPS materials appropriate to Titan, Neptune, and Mars aerocapture, and direct entry. The thermal sensor will be monolithic solid state devices composed of thick film platinum RTD on an alumina substrate. Choice of materials and critical dimensions are used to tailor gage response, determined during calibration activities, to specific (forebody vs. aftbody) heating environments. Current design has maximum operating temperature of 1500 K, and allowable constant heat flux of q=28.7 watts per square centimeter, and time constants between 0.05 and 0.2 seconds. The catalytic and radiative response of these heat flux gages can also be changed through the use of appropriate coatings. By using several co-located gages with various surface coatings, data can be obtained to isolate surface heat flux components due to radiation, catalycity and convection. Selectivity to radiative heat flux is a useful feature even for an in-depth gage, as radiative transport may be a significant heat transport mechanism for porous TPS materials in Titan aerocapture. This paper also reports on progress to

  7. Electrochemical Oxygen Sensor Development for Liquid Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollet, Billy K.

    Safe operation of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) requires in-depth understanding of the corrosion implications of liquid sodium coolant on reactor materials. Dissolved oxygen concentration is of particular importance in characterizing sodium attack, so an accurate means of measuring and controlling oxygen is crucial. There is significant room for improvement in current oxygen sensing technology, so extensive research has been conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to address this issue. Experimental facilities and electrochemical oxygen sensors have been developed, tested, and analyzed. This research is discussed in detail in this report. The oxygen sensors tested in this research were developed using a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte whereas many of the past research in this field was conducted with yttria doped thoria (YDT or YST) electrolytes. Thorium, an alpha emitter, is expensive and increasingly difficult to acquire, so motivation to switch to a new material exists. YSZ is commonly used as the electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells, and ample data is available for high temperature ionic conduction of this material. While some work has been done with YSZ in oxygen sensors (the automotive field, for example, uses YSZ O2 sensors), research on YSZ sensors in sodium is limited. A thorough study of YSZ-based electrochemical oxygen sensors must include detailed corrosion testing and analysis of YSZ in liquid sodium, careful oxygen sensor development and testing, and finally, a comprehensive analysis of the acquired sensor data. The research presented in this report describes the design and development of an electrochemical oxygen sensor for use in sodium using a YSZ electrolyte through the previously-mentioned steps. The designed sensors were subjected to a series of hypotheses which advance common understanding of oxygen sensor signal. These results were used in conjunction with past research to form reliable conclusions.

  8. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, D.C.; Pigoski, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  9. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    Low-cost, durable, and reliable Hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle, stationary, and infrastructure applications. A new zirconia, electrochemical-based sensor technology is being transitioned out of the laboratory and into an advanced testing phase for vehicular and stationary H{sub 2} safety applications. Mixed potential sensors are a class of electrochemical devices that develop an open-circuit electromotive force due to the difference in the kinetics of the redox reactions of various gaseous species at each electrode/electrolyte/gas interface, referred to as the triple phase boundary (TPB). Therefore, these sensors have been considered for the sensing of various reducible or oxidizable gas species in the presence of oxygen. Based on this principle, a unique sensor design was developed by LANL and LLNL. The uniqueness of this sensor derives from minimizing heterogeneous catalysis (detrimental to sensor response) by avoiding gas diffusion through a catalytically active material and minimizing diffusion path to the TPB. Unlike the conventional design of these devices that use a dense solid electrolyte and porous thin film electrodes (similar to the current state-of-the-art zirconia-based sensors and fuel cells), the design of this sensor uses dense electrodes and porous electrolytes. Such a sensor design facilitates a stable and reproducible device response, since dense electrode morphologies are easy to reproduce and are significantly more stable than the conventional porous morphologies. Moreover, these sensors develop higher mixed potentials since the gas diffusion is through the less catalytically active electrolyte than the electrode. Lastly, the choice of electrodes is primarily based on their O2 reduction kinetics and catalytic properties vis-a-vis the target gas of interest.

  10. Development of Sic Gas Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Okojie, R. S.; Beheim, G. M.; Thomas, V.; Chen, L.; Lukco, D.; Liu, C. C.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based gas sensors have significant potential to address the gas sensing needs of aerospace applications such as emission monitoring, fuel leak detection, and fire detection. However, in order to reach that potential, a range of technical challenges must be overcome. These challenges go beyond the development of the basic sensor itself and include the need for viable enabling technologies to make a complete gas sensor system: electrical contacts, packaging, and transfer of information from the sensor to the outside world. This paper reviews the status at NASA Glenn Research Center of SiC Schottky diode gas sensor development as well as that of enabling technologies supporting SiC gas sensor system implementation. A vision of a complete high temperature microfabricated SiC gas sensor system is proposed. In the long-term, it is believed that improvements in the SiC semiconductor material itself could have a dramatic effect on the performance of SiC gas sensor systems.

  11. Flux Leakage Measurements for Defect Characterization Using a High Precision 3-AXIAL Gmr Magnetic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelkner, M.; Blome, M.; Reimund, V.; Thomas, H.-M.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2011-06-01

    High-precision magnetic field sensors are of increasing interest in non destructive testing (NDT). In particular GMR-sensors (giant magneto resistance) are qualified because of their high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio and high spatial resolution. With a GMR-gradiometer and a 3D-GMR-magnetometer we performed magnetic flux leakage measurements of artificial cracks and cracks of a depth of ≤50 μm still could be dissolved with a sufficient high signal-to-noise ratio. A semi-analytic magnetic dipole model that allows realistic GMR sensor characteristics to be incorporated is used for swiftly predicting magnetic stray fields. The reliable reconstruction based on measurements of artificial rectangular-shaped defects is demonstrated.

  12. Proximity Operations and Docking Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Brewster, Linda L.; Lee, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) has been under development for the last three years as a long-range proximity operations and docking sensor for use in an Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) system. The first autonomous rendezvous and docking in the history of the U.S. Space Program was successfully accomplished by Orbital Express, using the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) as the primary docking sensor. That flight proved that the United States now has a mature and flight proven sensor technology for supporting Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV) and Commercial Orbital Transport Systems (COTS) Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). NASA video sensors have worked well in the past: the AVGS used on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission operated successfully in spot mode out to 2 km, and the first generation rendezvous and docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on Space Shuttle flights in 1997 and 1998. 12 Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of more AVGS units, and the next generation sensor was updated to allow it to support the CEV and COTS programs. The flight proven AR&D sensor has been redesigned to update parts and add additional capabilities for CEV and COTS with the development of the Next Generation AVGS at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The obsolete imager and processor are being replaced with new radiation tolerant parts. In addition, new capabilities include greater sensor range, auto ranging capability, and real-time video output. This paper presents some sensor hardware trades, use of highly integrated laser components, and addresses the needs of future vehicles that may rendezvous and dock with the International Space Station (ISS) and other Constellation vehicles. It also discusses approaches for upgrading AVGS to address parts obsolescence, and concepts for minimizing the sensor footprint, weight, and power requirements

  13. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  14. IN-CORE FLUX SENSOR EVALUATIONS AT THE ATR CRITICAL FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Joy Rempe; David Nigg; George Imel; Jason Harris; Todd Sherman; Jean-Francois VIllard

    2014-12-01

    As part of an Idaho State University (ISU)–led Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) collaborative project that includes Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), flux detector evaluations were completed to compare their accuracy, response time, and longduration performance. Special fixturing, developed by INL, allows real-time flux detectors to be inserted into various Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) core positions to perform lobe power measurements, axial flux profile measurements, and detector crosscalibrations. Detectors initially evaluated in this program included miniature fission chambers, specialized self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs), and specially developed commercial SPNDs. Results from this program provide important insights related to flux detector accuracy and resolution for subsequent ATR and CEA experiments and yield new flux data required for benchmarking models in the ATR Life Extension Program (LEP) Modeling Update Project.

  15. SiC-Based Gas Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Gray, M.; Androjna, D.; Chen, L.-Y.; Hoffman, R. W., Jr.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon carbide based Schottky diode gas sensors are being developed for applications such as emission measurements and leak detection. The effects of the geometry of the tin oxide film in a Pd/SnO2/SiC structure will be discussed as well as improvements in packaging SiC-based sensors. It is concluded that there is considerable versatility in the formation of SiC-based Schottky diode gas sensing structures which will potentially allow the fabrication of a SiC-based gas sensor array for a variety of gases and temperatures.

  16. Unobtrusive Monitoring of Neonatal Brain Temperature Using a Zero-Heat-Flux Sensor Matrix.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Louis; Bongers, Edwin; Lamichhane, Bishal; Bambang-Oetomo, Sidarto

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of preterm neonates must be maintained within a narrow window to ensure their survival. Continuously measuring their core temperature provides an optimal means of monitoring their thermoregulation and their response to environmental changes. However, existing methods of measuring core temperature can be very obtrusive, such as rectal probes, or inaccurate/lagging, such as skin temperature sensors and spot-checks using tympanic temperature sensors. This study investigates an unobtrusive method of measuring brain temperature continuously using an embedded zero-heat-flux (ZHF) sensor matrix placed under the head of the neonate. The measured temperature profile is used to segment areas of motion and incorrect positioning, where the neonate's head is not above the sensors. We compare our measurements during low motion/stable periods to esophageal temperatures for 12 preterm neonates, measured for an average of 5 h per neonate. The method we propose shows good correlation with the reference temperature for most of the neonates. The unobtrusive embedding of the matrix in the neonate's environment poses no harm or disturbance to the care work-flow, while measuring core temperature. To address the effect of motion on the ZHF measurements in the current embodiment, we recommend a more ergonomic embedding ensuring the sensors are continuously placed under the neonate's head.

  17. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  18. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B&W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  19. Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) Development Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Johnston, Albert S.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Book, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was the driving force behind the development of the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor, an active sensor system that provides near-range sensor data as part of an automatic rendezvous and docking system. The sensor determines the relative positions and attitudes between the active sensor and the passive target at ranges up to 300 meters. The AVGS uses laser diodes to illuminate retro-reflectors in the target, a solid-state camera to detect the return from the target, and image capture electronics and a digital signal processor to convert the video information into the relative positions and attitudes. The AVGS will fly as part of the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) in October, 2004. This development effort has required a great deal of testing of various sorts at every phase of development. Some of the test efforts included optical characterization of performance with the intended target, thermal vacuum testing, performance tests in long range vacuum facilities, EMI/EMC tests, and performance testing in dynamic situations. The sensor has been shown to track a target at ranges of up to 300 meters, both in vacuum and ambient conditions, to survive and operate during the thermal vacuum cycling specific to the DART mission, to handle EM1 well, and to perform well in dynamic situations.

  20. Fabrication and Testing of a Thin-Film Heat Flux Sensor for a Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Fralick, Gus c.; Wrbanek, John D.; Sayir, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing high-efficiency free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in radioisotope power systems since 1999. Stirling convertors are being operated for many years to demonstrate a radioisotope power system capable of providing reliable power for potential multiyear missions. Techniques used to monitor the convertors for change in performance include measurements of temperature, pressure, energy addition, and energy rejection. Micro-porous bulk insulation is used in the Stirling convertor test setup to minimize the loss of thermal energy from the electric heat source to the environment. The insulation is characterized before extended operation, enabling correlation of the net thermal energy addition to the convertor. Aging micro-porous bulk insulation changes insulation efficiency, introducing errors in the correlation for net thermal energy addition. A thin-film heat flux sensor was designed and fabricated to directly measure the net thermal energy addition to the Stirling convertor. The fabrication techniques include slipcasting and using Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD). One-micron-thick noble metal thermocouples measure temperature on the surface of an alumina ceramic disk and heat flux is calculated. Fabrication, integration, and test results of a thin-film heat flux sensor are presented.

  1. Fabrication and Testing of a Thin-Film Heat Flux Sensor for a Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Fralick, Gustave; Wrbanek, John; Sayir, Ali

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing high efficiency free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in radioisotope power systems since 1999. Stirling convertors are being operated for many years to demonstrate a radioisotope power system capable of providing reliable power for potential multi-year missions. Techniques used to monitor the convertors for change in performance include measurements of temperature, pressure, energy addition, and energy rejection. Micro-porous bulk insulation is used in the Stirling convertor test set up to minimize the loss of thermal energy from the electric heat source to the environment. The insulation is characterized before extended operation, enabling correlation of the net thermal energy addition to the convertor. Aging microporous bulk insulation changes insulation efficiency, introducing errors in the correlation for net thermal energy addition. A thin-mm heat flux sensor was designed and fabricated to directly measure the net thermal energy addition to the Stirling convertor. The fabrication techniques include slip casting and using Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD). One micron thick noble metal thermocouples measure temperature on the surface of an Alumina ceramic disc and heat flux is calculated. Fabrication, integration, and test results of a thin film heat flux sensor are presented.

  2. Progress Toward Measuring CO2 Isotopologue Fluxes in situ with the LLNL Miniature, Laser-based CO2 Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, J. L.; Bora, M.; Bond, T.

    2015-12-01

    One method to constrain photosynthesis and respiration independently at the ecosystem scale is to measure the fluxes of CO2­ isotopologues. Instrumentation is currently available to makes these measurements but they are generally costly, large, bench-top instruments. Here, we present progress toward developing a laser-based sensor that can be deployed directly to a canopy to passively measure CO2 isotopologue fluxes. In this study, we perform initial proof-of-concept and sensor characterization tests in the laboratory and in the field to demonstrate performance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) tunable diode laser flux sensor. The results shown herein demonstrate measurement of bulk CO2 as a first step toward achieving flux measurements of CO2 isotopologues. The sensor uses a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in the 2012 nm range. The laser is mounted in a multi-pass White Cell. In order to amplify the absorption signal of CO2 in this range we employ wave modulation spectroscopy, introducing an alternating current (AC) bias component where f is the frequency of modulation on the laser drive current in addition to the direct current (DC) emission scanning component. We observed a strong linear relationship (r2 = 0.998 and r2 = 0.978 at all and low CO2 concentrations, respectively) between the 2f signal and the CO2 concentration in the cell across the range of CO2 concentrations relevant for flux measurements. We use this calibration to interpret CO2 concentration of a gas flowing through the White cell in the laboratory and deployed over a grassy field. We will discuss sensor performance in the lab and in situ as well as address steps toward achieving canopy-deployed, passive measurements of CO2 isotopologue fluxes. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675788

  3. Advances in miniature spectrometer and sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Jouko; Rissanen, Anna; Saari, Heikki; Karioja, Pentti; Karppinen, Mikko; Aalto, Timo; Tukkiniemi, Kari

    2014-05-01

    Miniaturization and cost reduction of spectrometer and sensor technologies has great potential to open up new applications areas and business opportunities for analytical technology in hand held, mobile and on-line applications. Advances in microfabrication have resulted in high-performance MEMS and MOEMS devices for spectrometer applications. Many other enabling technologies are useful for miniature analytical solutions, such as silicon photonics, nanoimprint lithography (NIL), system-on-chip, system-on-package techniques for integration of electronics and photonics, 3D printing, powerful embedded computing platforms, networked solutions as well as advances in chemometrics modeling. This paper will summarize recent work on spectrometer and sensor miniaturization at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tunable filter technology has been developed in two technical versions: Piezoactuated FPIs have been applied in miniature hyperspectral imaging needs in light weight UAV and nanosatellite applications, chemical imaging as well as medical applications. Microfabricated MOEMS FPIs have been developed as cost-effective sensor platforms for visible, NIR and IR applications. Further examples of sensor miniaturization will be discussed, including system-on-package sensor head for mid-IR gas analyzer, roll-to-roll printed Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technology as well as UV imprinted waveguide sensor for formaldehyde detection.

  4. Secondary Emission Calorimeter Sensor Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, David R.; Onel, Yasar

    2012-12-01

    In a Secondary Emission electron(SEe) detector module, Secondary Emission electrons (SEe) are generated from an SE surface/cathode, when charged hadronic or electromagnetic particles, particularly shower particles, penetrate an SE sampling module placed between absorber materials (Fe, Cu, Pb, W etc) in calorimeters. The SE cathode is a thin (10-50 nm thick) film (simple metal-oxides, or other higher yield materials) on the surface of a metal plate, which serves as the entrance “window” to a compact vacuum vessel (metal or metal-ceramic); this SE film cathode is analogous to a photocathode, and the SEe are similar to p.e., which are then amplified by dynodes, also is in a PMT. SE sensor modules can make use of electrochemically etched/machined or laser-cut metal mesh dynode sheets, as large as ~30 cm square, to amplify the Secondary Emission Electrons (SEe), much like those that compact metal mesh or mesh dynode PMT's use to amplify p.e.'s. The construction requirements easier than a PMT, since the entire final assembly can be done in air; there are no critical controlled thin film depositions, cesiation or other oxygen-excluded processes or other required vacuum activation, and consequently bake-out can be a refractory temperatures; the module is sealed by normal vacuum techniques (welding or brazing or other high temperature joinings), with a simple final heated vacuum pump-out and tip-off. The modules envisioned are compact, high gain, high speed, exceptionally radiation damage resistant, rugged, and cost effective, and can be fabricated in arbitrary tileable shapes. The SE sensor module anodes can be segmented transversely to sizes appropriate to reconstruct electromagnetic cores with high precision. The GEANT4 and existing calorimeter data estimated calorimeter response performance is between 35-50 Secondary Emission electrons per GeV, in a 1 cm thick Cu absorber calorimeter, with a gain per SEe > 105 per SEe, and an e/pi<1.2. The calorimeter pulse width is

  5. Tunable magnetic flux sensor using a metallic Rashba ring with half-metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Jalil, M. B. A.; Tan, S. G.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a magnetic field sensor consisting of a square ring made of metal with a strong Rashba spin-orbital coupling (RSOC) and contacted to half-metal electrodes. Due to the Aharonov-Casher effect, the presence of the RSOC imparts a spin-dependent geometric phase to conduction electrons in the ring. The combination of the magnetic flux emanating from the magnetic sample placed below the ring, and the Aharonov-Casher effect due to RSOC results in spin interference, which modulates the spin transport in the ring nanostructure. By using the tight-binding nonequilibrium Green's function formalism to model the transport across the nanoring detector, we theoretically show that with proper optimization, the Rashba ring can function as a sensitive and tunable magnetic probe to detect magnetic flux.

  6. High heat flux sensor for infrared thermography determination of heat transfer coefficient of liquid metal cooled target's wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patorski, Jacek A.; Gindrat, Malko

    2009-05-01

    The proton beam passing through the wall area of a liquid metal (LM) target container, called entrance window, is causing deposition of maximum high heat flux amount 140 W/cm2.Previous experimental thermo-hydraulics investigations for the MEGAPIE LM-target at the SINQ facility of Heat- Transfer-Coefficient (HTC) using InfraRed-Thermography (IRT) have been presented at Thermosense 2006 and 2007 [1], [2] and references therein. During these investigations the IRT active sensors with applied heat fluxes of the small and low range from 2.5 to 15.2 W/cm2 are used. The heating shell foil of the sensor has been connected to steel dish enclosing LM target container by using electrical insulation ceramic glue. A higher, then achieved 15 W/cm2, heat flux has lead to delaminating of the heater. Because of interest to determinate the HTC-chart under real heat flux conditions and investigate some positive effect of heat flux buoyancy on cooling, the idea for the High Heat Flux (HHF) IRT Sensors, using of the Low Pressure Plasma Spraying - Thin Film (LPPS-TF) technology of the Sulzer Metco Company has been created. The paper presents the idea of multilayer thermal sprayed construction of HHF-IRT-Sensor, few realizations and some results of the first pre-test performed at the PSI LBE Double Pump Loop using the new sensor and the 2DD IRT methodology presented in [1].

  7. Production process monitoring by serial mapping of microbial carbon flux distributions using a novel Sensor Reactor approach: II--(13)C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis and L-lysine production.

    PubMed

    Drysch, A; El Massaoudi, M; Mack, C; Takors, R; de Graaf, A A; Sahm, H

    2003-04-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is intensively used for the industrial large-scale (fed-) batch production of amino acids, especially glutamate and lysine. However, metabolic flux analyses based on 13C-labeling experiments of this organism have hitherto been restricted to small-scale batch conditions and carbon-limited chemostat cultures, and are therefore of questionable relevance for industrial fermentations. To lever flux analysis to the industrial level, a novel Sensor Reactor approach was developed (El Massaoudi et al., Metab. Eng., submitted), in which a 300-L production reactor and a 1-L Sensor Reactor are run in parallel master/slave modus, thus enabling 13C-based metabolic flux analysis to generate a series of flux maps that document large-scale fermentation courses in detail. We describe the successful combination of this technology with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, metabolite balancing methods and a mathematical description of 13C-isotope labelings resulting in a powerful tool for quantitative pathway analysis during a batch fermentation. As a first application, 13C-based metabolic flux analysis was performed on exponentially growing, lysine-producing C. glutamicum MH20-22B during three phases of a pilot-scale batch fermentation. By studying the growth, (co-) substrate consumption and (by-) product formation, the similarity of the fermentations in production and Sensor Reactor was verified. Applying a generally applicable mathematical model, which included metabolite and carbon labeling balances for the analysis of proteinogenic amino acid 13C-isotopomer labeling data, the in vivo metabolic flux distribution was investigated during subsequent phases of exponential growth. It was shown for the first time that the in vivo reverse C(4)-decarboxylation flux at the anaplerotic node in C. glutamicum significantly decreased (70%) in parallel with threefold increased lysine formation during the investigated subsequent phases of exponential growth.

  8. Mobile mapping and eddy covariance flux measurements of NH3 emissions from cattle feedlots with a portable laser-based open-path sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Pan, D.; Golston, L.; Stanton, L. G.; Ham, J. M.; Shonkwiler, K. B.; Nash, C.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the dominant alkaline species in the atmosphere and an important compound in the global nitrogen cycle. There is a large uncertainty in NH3 emission inventory from agriculture, which is the largest source of NH3, including livestock farming and fertilizer applications. In recent years, a quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based open-path sensor has been developed to provide high-resolution, fast-response and high-sensitivity NH3 measurements. It has a detection limit of 150 pptv with a sample rate up to 20 Hz. This sensor has been integrated into a mobile platform mounted on the roof of a car to perform measurement of multiple trace gases. We have also used the sensor for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. The mobile sensing method provides high spatial resolution and fast mapping of measured gases. Meanwhile, the EC flux method offers accurate flux measurements and resolves the diurnal variability of NH3emissions. During the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPÉ field campaigns in 2014, this mobile platform was used to study NH3 emissions from cattle feedlot near Fort Morgan, Colorado. This specific feedlot was mapped multiple times in different days to study the variability of its plume characteristics. At the same time, we set up another open-path NH3 sensor with LICOR open-path sensors to perform EC flux measurements of NH3, CH4 and CO2 simultaneously in the same cattle feedlot as shown in Fig. 1. NH3/CH4 emission flux ratio show a strong temperature dependence from EC flux measurements. The median value of measured NH3 and CH4 emission flux ratio is 0.60 ppmv/ppmv. In contrast, the median value of ΔNH3/ΔCH4 ratios measured from mobile platform is 0.53 ppmv/ppmv for the same farm. The combination of mobile mapping and EC flux measurements with the same open-path sensors greatly improves understanding of NH3 emissions both spatially and temporally.

  9. Inertial Sensor Development for Active Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef C

    2003-05-21

    Future Linear Colliders require nanometer stability of the beams at the interaction point. One approach to stabilizing the beams is to use feedback based on inertial sensors (accelerometers / seismometers) to control the positions of the final focus magnets. Commercial seismometers developed for geo-science applications have sufficient noise performance (nanometer noise down to a fraction of a hertz), but due to their large size and magnetic sensitivity are unsuitable for use in a linear collider detector. We report on the development of a high sensitivity, compact, non-magnetic inertial sensor for this application. In addition to its use in linear colliders, the sensor is also expected to have application in vibration measurement and control in synchrotron light sources.

  10. Regional Mapping of Coupled Fluxes of Carbon and Water Using Multi-Sensor Fusion Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schull, M. A.; Anderson, M. C.; Semmens, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Gao, F.; Hain, C.; Houborg, R.

    2014-12-01

    In an ever-changing climate there is an increasing need to measure the fluxes of water, energy and carbon for decision makers to implement policies that will help mitigate the effects of climate change. In an effort to improve drought monitoring, water resource management and agriculture assessment capabilities, a multi-scale and multi-sensor framework for routine mapping of land-surface fluxes of water and energy at field to regional scales has been established. The framework uses the ALEXI (Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse)/DisALEXI (Disaggregated ALEXI) suite of land-surface models forced by remotely sensed data from Landsat, MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite). Land-surface temperature (LST) can be an effective substitute for in-situ surface moisture observations and a valuable metric for constraining land-surface fluxes at sub-field scales. The adopted multi-scale thermal-based land surface modeling framework facilitates regional to local downscaling of water and energy fluxes by using a combination of shortwave reflective and thermal infrared (TIR) imagery from GOES (4-10 km; hourly), MODIS (1 km; daily), and Landsat (30-100 m; bi-weekly). In this research the ALEXI/DisALEXI modeling suite is modified to incorporate carbon fluxes using a stomatal resistance module, which replaces the Priestley-Taylor latent heat approximation. In the module, canopy level nominal light-use-efficiency (βn) is the parameter that modulates the flux of water and carbon in and out of the canopy. Leaf chlorophyll (Chl) is a key parameter for quantifying variability in photosynthetic efficiency to facilitate the spatial distribution of coupled carbon and water retrievals. Spatial distribution of Chl are retrieved from Landsat (30 m) using a surface reflectance dataset as input to the REGularized canopy reFLECtance (REGFLEC) tool. The modified ALEXI/DisALEXI suite is applied to regions of rain fed and

  11. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding ”hot-spots”, and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations. PMID:19096530

  12. Serial 13C-based flux analysis of an L-phenylalanine-producing E. coli strain using the sensor reactor.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Aljoscha; El Massaoudi, Mohamed; Schipper, Dick; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Takors, Ralf

    2004-01-01

    With the aid of the recently developed Sensor reactor system, a series of three subsequent (13)C labeling experiments was performed mirroring the l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) production phase of a recombinant E. coli strain that was cultivated under industry-like conditions in a 300 L bioreactor. On the basis of the data from NMR labeling analysis, three subsequent flux patterns were successfully derived monitoring the l-Phe formation during an observation window from 14 to 23.3 h process time. Linear programming was performed to identify optimal flux patterns for l-Phe formation. Additionally, flux sensitivity analysis was used to identify the most promising metabolic engineering target. As a result, high rates of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate (PYR) conversion were identified as the most important reason for deterioration of the l-Phe/glucose yield from 20 to finally 11 mol %. Considering the characteristics of the enzyme kinetics involved, the working hypothesis was formulated that phosphoenolpyruvate synthase activity was increasingly hampered by rising oxaloacetate and 2-oxoglutarate concentrations, while at the same time pyruvate kinase activity arose due to activation by fructose 1,6-diphosphate. Hence, pps overexpression should be performed to optimize the existing production strain.

  13. Chemical sensors technology development planning workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A.

    1993-03-01

    The workshop participants were asked to: (1) Assess the current capabilities of chemical sensor technologies for addressing US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) needs; (2) Estimate potential near term (one to two years) and intermediate term (three to five years) capabilities for addressing those needs; and (3) Generate a ranked list of specific recommendations on what research and development (R&D) should be funded to provide the necessary capabilities. The needs were described in terms of two pervasive EM problems, the in situ determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and selected metals in various matrices at DOE sites. The R&D recommendations were to be ranked according to the estimated likelihood that the product technology will be ready for application within the time frame it is needed and the estimated return on investment. The principal conclusions and recommendations of the workshop are as follows: Chemical sensors capable of in situ determinations can significantly reduce analytical costs; Chemical sensors have been developed for certain VOCs in gases and water but none are currently capable of in situ determination of VOCs in soils; The DOE need for in situ determination of metals in soils cannot be addressed with existing chemical sensors and the prospects for their availability in three to five years are uncertain; Adaptation, if necessary, and field application of laboratory analytical instruments and those few chemical sensors that are already in field testing is the best approach for the near term; The chemical sensor technology development plan should include balanced support for near- and intermediate-term efforts.

  14. Influence of surface fluxes on polar low development: idealised simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terpstra, Annick; Spengler, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Polar lows develop during marine cold air outbreaks in regions with relative large sea surface temperature (SST) gradients. These conditions are favourable for large surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. Furthermore the differential heating resulting from SST gradients can provide a source for baroclinicity. We utilise an idealised numerical channel model to gain insight in the role of surface turbulence fluxes on the dynamical evolution of polar lows. The initial setup consists of a baroclinic jet in thermal wind balance with a meridional temperature gradient. To mimic cold air outbreaks we prescribe SST that is higher than the low level surface air temperature, where the SST features a meridional gradient similar to the SST gradient in the Nordic Seas during winter. This setup allows for a systematic investigation of the relative contributions from surface sensible and latent heat fluxes on polar low development by varying the intensity of the initial baroclinicity, moisture, and temperature difference between the SST and low level air temperature. In addition we investigate the relative role of sensible or latent heat fluxes with sensitivity experiments where the individual fluxes are switched off. As moisture is one of the main sources for polar low intensification, we analyse the moisture budget of the idealised simulations in greater detail. Identification of moisture sources and sinks, as well as diagnosing the moisture circulation rate shed further light on the role of surface fluxes on the intensification of polar lows.

  15. Advanced uncooled sensor product development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A.; Masini, P.; Lamb, M.; Hamers, J.; Kocian, T.; Gordon, E.; Parrish, W.; Williams, R.; LeBeau, T.

    2015-06-01

    The partnership between RVS, Seek Thermal and Freescale Semiconductor continues on the path to bring the latest technology and innovation to both military and commercial customers. The partnership has matured the 17μm pixel for volume production on the Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) program in efforts to bring advanced production capability to produce a low cost, high performance product. The partnership has developed the 12μm pixel and has demonstrated performance across a family of detector sizes ranging from formats as small as 206 x 156 to full high definition formats. Detector pixel sensitivities have been achieved using the RVS double level advanced pixel structure. Transition of the packaging of microbolometers from a traditional die level package to a wafer level package (WLP) in a high volume commercial environment is complete. Innovations in wafer fabrication techniques have been incorporated into this product line to assist in the high yield required for volume production. The WLP seal yield is currently > 95%. Simulated package vacuum lives >> 20 years have been demonstrated through accelerated life testing where the package has been shown to have no degradation after 2,500 hours at 150°C. Additionally the rugged assembly has shown no degradation after mechanical shock and vibration and thermal shock testing. The transition to production effort was successfully completed in 2014 and the WLP design has been integrated into multiple new production products including the TWS and the innovative Seek Thermal commercial product that interfaces directly to an iPhone or android device.

  16. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  17. Thin Film Physical Sensor Instrumentation Research and Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2006-01-01

    A range of thin film sensor technology has been demonstrated enabling measurement of multiple parameters either individually or in sensor arrays including temperature, strain, heat flux, and flow. Multiple techniques exist for refractory thin film fabrication, fabrication and integration on complex surfaces and multilayered thin film insulation. Leveraging expertise in thin films and high temperature materials, investigations for the applications of thin film ceramic sensors has begun. The current challenges of instrumentation technology are to further develop systems packaging and component testing of specialized sensors, further develop instrumentation techniques on complex surfaces, improve sensor durability, and to address needs for extreme temperature applications. The technology research and development ongoing at NASA Glenn for applications to future launch vehicles, space vehicles, and ground systems is outlined.

  18. Development of Sensors for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Advances in technology have led to the availability of smaller and more accurate sensors. Computer power to process large amounts of data is no longer the prevailing issue; thus multiple and redundant sensors can be used to obtain more accurate and comprehensive measurements in a space vehicle. The successful integration and commercialization of micro- and nanotechnology for aerospace applications require that a close and interactive relationship be developed between the technology provider and the end user early in the project. Close coordination between the developers and the end users is critical since qualification for flight is time-consuming and expensive. The successful integration of micro- and nanotechnology into space vehicles requires a coordinated effort throughout the design, development, installation, and integration processes

  19. Smart Sensor Systems for Aerospace Applications: From Sensor Development to Application Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Dungan, L. K.; Ward, B. J.; Rowe, S.; Williams, J.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Chang, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    The application of Smart Sensor Systems for aerospace applications is a multidisciplinary process consisting of sensor element development, element integration into Smart Sensor hardware, and testing of the resulting sensor systems in application environments. This paper provides a cross-section of these activities for multiple aerospace applications illustrating the technology challenges involved. The development and application testing topics discussed are: 1) The broadening of sensitivity and operational range of silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky gas sensor elements; 2) Integration of fire detection sensor technology into a "Lick and Stick" Smart Sensor hardware platform for Crew Exploration Vehicle applications; 3) Extended testing for zirconia based oxygen sensors in the basic "Lick and Stick" platform for environmental monitoring applications. It is concluded that that both core sensor platform technology and a basic hardware platform can enhance the viability of implementing smart sensor systems in aerospace applications.

  20. An oil fraction neural sensor developed using electrical capacitance tomography sensor data.

    PubMed

    Zainal-Mokhtar, Khursiah; Mohamad-Saleh, Junita

    2013-08-26

    This paper presents novel research on the development of a generic intelligent oil fraction sensor based on Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) data. An artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been employed as the intelligent system to sense and estimate oil fractions from the cross-sections of two-component flows comprising oil and gas in a pipeline. Previous works only focused on estimating the oil fraction in the pipeline based on fixed ECT sensor parameters. With fixed ECT design sensors, an oil fraction neural sensor can be trained to deal with ECT data based on the particular sensor parameters, hence the neural sensor is not generic. This work focuses on development of a generic neural oil fraction sensor based on training a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) ANN with various ECT sensor parameters. On average, the proposed oil fraction neural sensor has shown to be able to give a mean absolute error of 3.05% for various ECT sensor sizes.

  1. An Oil Fraction Neural Sensor Developed Using Electrical capacitance Tomography Sensor Data

    PubMed Central

    Zainal-Mokhtar, Khursiah; Mohamad-Saleh, Junita

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents novel research on the development of a generic intelligent oil fraction sensor based on Electrical capacitance Tomography (ECT) data. An artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been employed as the intelligent system to sense and estimate oil fractions from the cross-sections of two-component flows comprising oil and gas in a pipeline. Previous works only focused on estimating the oil fraction in the pipeline based on fixed ECT sensor parameters. With fixed ECT design sensors, an oil fraction neural sensor can be trained to deal with ECT data based on the particular sensor parameters, hence the neural sensor is not generic. This work focuses on development of a generic neural oil fraction sensor based on training a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) ANN with various ECT sensor parameters. On average, the proposed oil fraction neural sensor has shown to be able to give a mean absolute error of 3.05% for various ECT sensor sizes. PMID:24064598

  2. Intercomparison of six fast-response sensors for the eddy-covariance flux measurement of nitrous oxide over agricultural grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, Eiko; Famulari, Daniela; Ibrom, Andreas; Vermeulen, Alex; Hensen, Arjan; van den Bulk, Pim; Loubet, Benjamin; Laville, Patricia; Mammarella, Ivan; Haapanala, Sami; Lohila, Annalea; Laurila, Tuomas; Eva, Rabot; Laborde, Marie; Cowan, Nicholas; Anderson, Margaret; Helfter, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most important greenhouse gas and its terrestrial budget remains poorly constraint, with bottom up and top down estimates of country emissions often disagreeing by more than a factor of two. Whilst the measurements of the biosphere / atmosphere exchange of CO2 with micrometeorological methods is commonplace, emissions of CH4 and N2O are more commonly measured with enclosure techniques due to limitations in fast-response sensors with good signal-to-noise characteristics. Recent years have seen the development of a range of instruments based on optical spectroscopy. This started in the early 1990s with instruments based on lead salt lasers, which had temperamental long-term characteristics. More recent developments in quantum cascade lasers has lead to increasingly stable instruments, initially based on pulsed, later on continuous wave lasers. Within the context of the European FP7 Infrastructure Project InGOS ('Integrated non-CO2 Greenhouse gas Observing System'), we conducted an intercomparison of six fast response sensors for N2O: three more or less identical instruments based on off-axis Integrated Cavity Optical Spectrocopy (ICOS) (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and three instruments based on quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometry (Aerodyne Research Inc.): one older generation pulsed instrument (p-QCL) and two of the latest generation of compact continuous wave instruments (cw-QCL), operating at two different wavelengths. One of the ICOS instruments was operated with an inlet drier. In addition, the campaign was joined by a relaxed eddy-accumulation system linked to a FTIR spectrometer (Ecotech), a gradient system based on a home-built slower QCL (INRA Orleans) and a fast chamber system. Here we present the results of the study and a detailed examination of the various corrections and errors of the different instruments. Overall, with the exception of the older generation QCL, the average fluxes based on the different fast

  3. Fiber optic pressure sensor development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.F.

    1995-01-26

    The primary goal of this project is to develop fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensor technology for the monitoring of pressure in combustion chambers of large stationary natural-gas-fueled engines. Emphasis is on the engineering of a reliable sensor which can be commercialized in the near term. The Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FFPI), which consists of a very small (0.005 in. diameter) fused quartz optical fiber with two internal mirrors, is the sensing element in each of the tests carried out during the course of this project. Light from a tiny semiconductor laser is sent down a fiber to each FFPI, and the reflected light is converted to an electrical signal by a photodetector. A signal processor converts this raw data to a continuous plot of pressure vs. time for each cylinder. Under Project PR-219-9225, the transducers, optoelectronic subsystem, and signal processor developed under Project PR-219-9120 were completely redesigned to achieve improved performance and reliability. In the new transducer design, the stainless steel housing is completely sealed so that the aluminum element containing the FFPI is not directly exposed to the combustion chamber gases. The key to the new system design is the use of a high-quality telecommunications grade distributed feedback (DFB) laser as the light source to power all of the sensors in an engine. The new digital processor overcomes a nonlinearity in the relation between pressure and sensor output signal inherent in the earlier scheme, and interfaces directly with a host computer or network. This report describes the development carried out in five major task areas: (1) transducer development, (2) optical subsystem development, (3) signal processor development, (4) system assembly and laboratory testing, and (5) field testing at Colorado State University.

  4. Latest Sensors and Data Acquisition Development Efforts at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation summarizes the characteristics required on sensors by consumers desiring access to space, a long term plan developed at KSC (Kennedy Space Center) to identify promising technologies for NASA's own future sensor needs, and the characteristics of several smart sensors already developed. Also addressed are the computer hardware and architecture used to operate sensors, and generic testing capabilities. Consumers desire sensors which are lightweight, inexpensive, intelligent, and easy to use.

  5. Monitoring charge flux to quantify unusual ligand-induced ion channel activity for use in biological nanopore-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Macazo, Florika C; White, Ryan J

    2014-06-01

    The utility of biological nanopores for the development of sensors has become a growing area of interest in analytical chemistry. Their emerging use in chemical analysis is a result of several ideal characteristics. First, they provide reproducible control over nanoscale pore sizes with an atomic level of precision. Second, they are amenable to resistive-pulse type measurement systems when embedded into an artificial lipid bilayer. A single binding event causes a change in the flow of millions of ions across the membrane per second that is readily measured as a change in current with excellent signal-to-noise ratio. To date, ion channel-based biosensors have been limited to well-behaved proteins. Most demonstrations of using ion channels as sensors have been limited to proteins that remain in the open, conducting state, unless occupied by an analyte of interest. Furthermore, these proteins are nonspecific, requiring chemical, biochemical, or genetic manipulations to impart chemical specificity. Here, we report on the use of the pore-forming abilities of heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) to quantify a specific analyte. Hsc70 reconstitutes into phospholipid membranes and opens to form multiple conductance states specifically in the presence of ATP. We introduce the measurement of "charge flux" to characterize the ATP-regulated multiconductance nature of Hsc70, which enables sensitive quantification of ATP (100 μM-4 mM). We believe that monitoring protein-induced charge flux across a bilayer membrane represents a universal method for quantitatively monitoring ion-channel activity. This measurement has the potential to broaden the library of usable proteins in the development of nanopore-based biosensors.

  6. Lightweight Sun-Position Sensor Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    An orbiting spacecraft needs to be able to accurately locate the position of the Sun so that the solar arrays can be pointed toward the Sun. This not only maximizes the production of power, but it also helps the arrays find their orientation in space so that they can accurately point antennae at ground stations. As part of the work on the (now postponed) Mars-2001 Surveyor Lander, NASA Glenn Research Center engineers developed a new Sun sensor that is far lighter and simpler than earlier designs. This sensor uses the technology of a linear photodiode array to find the position of the Sun in one axis. Two of these sensors, used together, can locate the x and y coordinates of the Sun relative to the spacecraft. These sensors have a mass of only 18 g each, nearly an order of magnitude lighter than earlier designs. (This mass does not include the electronic circuit to read the photodiode output, which is on the experiment microcontroller.) Near the center of the field of view, the Sun position can be found to 0.15

  7. Flux-gate magnetic field sensor based on yttrium iron garnet films for magnetocardiography investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetoshko, P. M.; Gusev, N. A.; Chepurnova, D. A.; Samoilova, E. V.; Syvorotka, I. I.; Syvorotka, I. M.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Korotaeva, A. A.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    A new type of f lux-gate vector magnetometer based on epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films has been developed and constructed for magnetocardiography (MCG) investigations. The magnetic field sensor can operate at room temperature and measure MCG signals at a distance of about 1 mm from the thoracic cage. The high sensitivity of the sensor, better than 100 fT/Hz1/2, is demonstrated by the results of MCG measurements on rats. The main MCG pattern details and R-peak on a level of 10 pT are observed without temporal averaging, which allows heart rate anomalies to be studied. The proposed magnetic sensors can be effectively used in MCG investigations.

  8. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  9. Development of novel edible luminescent nanoparticle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalian, Sanaz

    This project has developed a novel class of edible hydrocolloid food nanosensors which are doped with luminescent chromophores and investigated whether they can be used to provide information about the local food matrix - temperature, oxygen concentration, and the presence of food-borne pathogens. The luminescence properties of the probes such as phosphorescence and fluorescence provide the sensor sensitivity to the food properties. Hydrocolloid nanoparticles were made from gelatin and starch with diameters ranging from 50 to ˜200 nm and labeled with food grade luminescent probes. The chromophore was covalently and non-covalently attached to the nanoparticle and the photophysical properties of the probe in the food system were studied. Temperature sensors were developed by using the phosphorescence sensitivity of a chromophore to temperature. Experiments with two different probes, namely erythrosine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles and phloxine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles have demonstrated that both probes can be effectively used as temperature sensors in liquid and solid food. The Van't Hoff plots of ln(IDF/IP) versus 1/T vary monotonically over a relatively wide temperature range and thus provide a basis for estimating temperature from measurements of phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence. The tests indicated that the presence of some ingredients such as tannin and anthocyanins in the composition of the food may prohibit the use of gelatin nanoparticle probes due to precipitation of gelatin nanoparticles. The luminescence quenching of the probe by oxygen was used to develop a nanoparticle sensor for oxygen. The results of experiments on liquid and solid food samples indicate that erythrosine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles can be used as a probe to detect the presence or absence of oxygen in some liquid foods. Precise control of oxygen concentration in solutions will pose a challenge as has been observed in this study. The probe did not work as an

  10. Development and validation of inexpensive, automated, dynamic flux chambers

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed and validated an automated, inexpensive, and continuous multiple-species gas-flux monitoring system that can provide data for a variety of relevant atmospheric pollutants, including O3, CO2, and NOx. Validation consisted of conducting concurrent gas-phase dry deposit...

  11. Development of a Robust Optical Glucose Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Gerard Laurence

    1990-01-01

    The long term objective of this research was the development of a noninvasive, optically-based, polarimetric sensor to monitor in vivo glucose concentrations. The goal of diabetes therapy is to approximate the 24-hour blood glucose profile of a normal individual. There have been major advances in the development of reliable, versatile, and accurate pumps for the delivery of insulin to diabetic patients and in the development of control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery, however, there remain major obstacles to the development of clinically useful, continuous glucose sensors. The development of an accurate noninvasive glucose sensor would have significant application in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitis both in conjunction with, and independent of, the glucose pump controller applications. The linear polarization vector of light routes when it interacts with an optically active material such as glucose. The amount of rotation of polarization is directly proportional to the glucose concentration and to the path length. The ability to quantitate blood glucose levels for the limited available path length in our primary sensing site, namely, the anterior chamber of the eye, therefore depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the polarization detector. Our primary research focused on the development and testing of a prototype optical polarimetry system using D + glucose solution in a test cell, as well as using an enucleated human eye to assess the sensitivity of the system to measure physiologic glucose levels for the approximate one centimeter path length present in the anterior chamber of the eye. Our research has led to the development of a true phase technique in which helium neon laser light was coupled through a rotating linear polarizer along with two stationary linear polarizers and two detectors to produce reference and signal outputs whose amplitudes varied sinusoidally and whose phase was proportional to the rotation of light caused by

  12. Development of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, W. H.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, fire detection, and environmental monitoring. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. However, due to issues of selectivity and cross-sensitivity, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. This paper discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, hydrazine, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  13. Development of polyimide flexible tactile sensor skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Jonathan; Chen, Jack; Liu, Chang

    2003-05-01

    We present the development of a polyimide-based two-dimensional tactile sensing array realized using a novel inverted fabrication technique. Thermal silicon oxide or Pyrex® substrates are treated such that their surfaces are OH group terminated, allowing good adhesion between such substrates and a spun-on polyimide film during processing through what are suspected to be hydrogen bonds that can be selectively broken when release is desired. The release of the continuous polyimide film is rapidly accomplished by breaking these bonds. This process results in robust, low-cost and continuous polymer-film devices. The developed sensor skin contains an array of membrane-based tactile sensors (taxels). Micromachined thin-film metal strain gauges are positioned on the edges of polyimide membranes. The change in resistance from each strain gauge resulting from normal forces applied to tactile bumps on the top of the membranes is used to image force distribution. Response of an individual taxel is characterized. The effective gauge factor of the taxels is found to be approximately 1.3. Sensor array output is experimentally obtained. The demonstrated devices are robust enough for direct contact with humans, everyday objects and contaminants without undue care.

  14. A study for hypergolic vapor sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetter, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of an electrochemical technique for MMH and N02 measurement was investigated. Specific MMH and N02 electrochemical sensors were developed. Experimental techniques for preparation, handling, and analysis of hydrazine's vapor mixtures at ppb and ppm levels were developed. Two approaches to N02 instrument design were evaluated including specific adsorption and specific electrochemical reduction. Two approaches to hydrazines monitoring were evaluated including catalytic conversion to N0 with subsequent N0 detection and direct specific electrochemical oxidation. Two engineering prototype MMH/N02 monitors were designed and constructed.

  15. CO2 flux monitoring using Continuous Timeseries-Forced Diffusion (CT-FD): Development, Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, G. S.; Risk, D. A.; Nickerson, N. R.; Creelman, C. A.; Beltrami, H.

    2009-12-01

    Land-based CO2 flux measurements are a key indicator of the biological, chemical and physical processes occurring in the soil. While highly dense temporal flux measurements can be acquired using Eddy Covariance towers, or flux chambers, the challenge of gathering data that is rich both temporally and spatially persists. Over the past two years we have developed a new technique for measuring soil CO2 fluxes, called continuous timeseries-forced diffusion (CT-FD) attempts to satisfy the need for spatially and temporally rich data. The CT-FD probe consists of a Vaisala CO2 sensor, embodied in a PVC casing, with tear/UV resistant Tyvek membranes at both the inlet and outlet. The probe delivers continuous flux data and can be inexpensively replicated across the landscape.The CT-FD technique works by forcing a known diffusive regime between the soil and the atmosphere, allowing the calculation of fluxes across the soil/atmosphere boundary to be made from; the internal concentration of a CT-FD probe placed at the soil surface; and a common reference probe designed to capture the atmospheric CO2. For every concentration measurement, the difference between the probe and the reference concentration is indicative of a unique flux value. Here we examine properties of the instrument and method, as documented by a long series of developmental studies involving numerical gas transport modeling, laboratory and field experiments. A suite of 1D and 3D modeling experiments were needed to optimize embodiment and geometries of the probe. These show that the probe should have a relatively long collar, with relatively high diffusivity made possible by having large, highly diffusive membranes, both of which help to induce 1D movement of gases into the probe and reduce the lateral diffusion around the probe. Modeling also shows that correction for lateral diffusion is feasible. As for error, sensor error transfers linearly to errors in the flux, and that the sensor can be used in non free

  16. Measuring Fast-Temporal Sediment Fluxes with an Analogue Acoustic Sensor: A Wind Tunnel Study

    PubMed Central

    Poortinga, Ate; van Minnen, Jan; Keijsers, Joep; Riksen, Michel; Goossens, Dirk; Seeger, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    In aeolian research, field measurements are important for studying complex wind-driven processes for land management evaluation and model validation. Consequently, there have been many devices developed, tested, and applied to investigate a range of aeolian-based phenomena. However, determining the most effective application and data analysis techniques is widely debated in the literature. Here we investigate the effectiveness of two different sediment traps (the BEST trap and the MWAC catcher) in measuring vertical sediment flux. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with sediment fluxes characterized using saltiphones. Contrary to most studies, we used the analogue output of five saltiphones mounted on top of each other to determine the total kinetic energy, which was then used to calculate aeolian sediment budgets. Absolute sediment losses during the experiments were determined using a balance located beneath the test tray. Test runs were conducted with different sand sizes and at different wind speeds. The efficiency of the two traps did not vary with the wind speed or sediment size but was affected by both the experimental setup (position of the lowest trap above the surface and number of traps in the saltation layer) and the technique used to calculate the sediment flux. Despite this, good agreement was found between sediment losses calculated from the saltiphone and those measured using the balance. The results of this study provide a framework for measuring sediment fluxes at small time resolution (seconds to milliseconds) in the field. PMID:24058512

  17. Challenges in the development of sensors for monitoring automobile emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.; Pham, A.Q.

    1997-02-20

    A new generation of on-board automotive sensors are needed for diagnosis and control of engines and catalytic converters. With regard to catalytic converters, the intent of these regulations is to ensure that the vehicle operator is informed when emission control system are no longer performing adequately. In order to be commercialized, sensors for emission control must meet certain criteria, including low cost, reliability, and manufacturability. We have been developing solid state electrochemical sensors for emission control. Most recently, our work has focused on the development of hydrocarbon sensors for monitoring catalytic converter performance. Previous work was concerned with the development of an oxygen sensor having appropriate sensitivity for lean-burn engines. Operational limits for oxygen sensors have been defined and new materials have been developed for hydrocarbon sensors. Technical results are presented here as well as challenges to be met in the development of materials and designs for new chemical sensors for monitoring automotive emissions.

  18. Dancing the tight rope on the nanoscale--Calibrating a heat flux sensor of a scanning thermal microscope.

    PubMed

    Kloppstech, K; Könne, N; Worbes, L; Hellmann, D; Kittel, A

    2015-11-01

    We report on a precise in situ procedure to calibrate the heat flux sensor of a near-field scanning thermal microscope. This sensitive thermal measurement is based on 1ω modulation technique and utilizes a hot wire method to build an accessible and controllable heat reservoir. This reservoir is coupled thermally by near-field interactions to our probe. Thus, the sensor's conversion relation V(th)(Q(GS)*) can be precisely determined. V(th) is the thermopower generated in the sensor's coaxial thermocouple and Q(GS)* is the thermal flux from reservoir through the sensor. We analyze our method with Gaussian error calculus with an error estimate on all involved quantities. The overall relative uncertainty of the calibration procedure is evaluated to be about 8% for the measured conversion constant, i.e., (2.40 ± 0.19) μV/μW. Furthermore, we determine the sensor's thermal resistance to be about 0.21 K/μW and find the thermal resistance of the near-field mediated coupling at a distance between calibration standard and sensor of about 250 pm to be 53 K/μW. PMID:26628160

  19. Dancing the tight rope on the nanoscale—Calibrating a heat flux sensor of a scanning thermal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppstech, K.; Könne, N.; Worbes, L.; Hellmann, D.; Kittel, A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on a precise in situ procedure to calibrate the heat flux sensor of a near-field scanning thermal microscope. This sensitive thermal measurement is based on 1ω modulation technique and utilizes a hot wire method to build an accessible and controllable heat reservoir. This reservoir is coupled thermally by near-field interactions to our probe. Thus, the sensor's conversion relation V th ( QGS ∗ ) can be precisely determined. Vth is the thermopower generated in the sensor's coaxial thermocouple and QGS ∗ is the thermal flux from reservoir through the sensor. We analyze our method with Gaussian error calculus with an error estimate on all involved quantities. The overall relative uncertainty of the calibration procedure is evaluated to be about 8% for the measured conversion constant, i.e., (2.40 ± 0.19) μV/μW. Furthermore, we determine the sensor's thermal resistance to be about 0.21 K/μW and find the thermal resistance of the near-field mediated coupling at a distance between calibration standard and sensor of about 250 pm to be 53 K/μW.

  20. Dancing the tight rope on the nanoscale--Calibrating a heat flux sensor of a scanning thermal microscope.

    PubMed

    Kloppstech, K; Könne, N; Worbes, L; Hellmann, D; Kittel, A

    2015-11-01

    We report on a precise in situ procedure to calibrate the heat flux sensor of a near-field scanning thermal microscope. This sensitive thermal measurement is based on 1ω modulation technique and utilizes a hot wire method to build an accessible and controllable heat reservoir. This reservoir is coupled thermally by near-field interactions to our probe. Thus, the sensor's conversion relation V(th)(Q(GS)*) can be precisely determined. V(th) is the thermopower generated in the sensor's coaxial thermocouple and Q(GS)* is the thermal flux from reservoir through the sensor. We analyze our method with Gaussian error calculus with an error estimate on all involved quantities. The overall relative uncertainty of the calibration procedure is evaluated to be about 8% for the measured conversion constant, i.e., (2.40 ± 0.19) μV/μW. Furthermore, we determine the sensor's thermal resistance to be about 0.21 K/μW and find the thermal resistance of the near-field mediated coupling at a distance between calibration standard and sensor of about 250 pm to be 53 K/μW.

  1. Field evaluation of polymer capacitive humidity sensors for Bowen ratio energy balance flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Savage, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10) dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50), or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C), could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the profile

  2. Field evaluation of polymer capacitive humidity sensors for Bowen ratio energy balance flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Savage, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10) dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50), or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C), could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the profile

  3. [The recent development of fiber-optic chemical sensor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wei, Jian-ping; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Li-wei; Yang, Xue-feng

    2014-08-01

    The present article provides a brief review of recent research on fiber-optic chemical sensor technology and the future development trends. Especially, fiber-optic pH chemical sensor, fiber-optic ion chemicl sensor, and fiber-optic gas chemical sensor are introduced respectively. Sensing film preparation methods such as chemical bonding method and sol-gel method were briefly reviewed. The emergence of new type fiber-microstructured optical fiber opened up a new development direction for fiber-optic chemical sensor. Because of its large inner surface area, flexible design of structure, having internal sensing places in fibers, it has rapidly become an important development direction and research focus of the fiber-optic chemical sensors. The fiber-optic chemical sensor derived from microstructured optical fiber is also discussed in detail. Finally, we look to the future of the fiber-optic chemical sensor.

  4. Development of compact slip detection sensor using dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-young; Hwang, Do-Yeon; Kim, Baek-chul; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a resistance tactile sensor that can detect a slip on the surface of sensor structure. The presented sensor device has fingerprint-like structures that are similar with the role of the humans finger print. The resistance slip sensor that the novel developed uses acrylo-nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) as a dielectric substrate and graphene as an electrode material. We can measure the slip as the structure of sensor makes a deformation and it changes the resistance through forming a new conductive route. To manufacture our sensor, we developed a new imprint process. By using this process, we can produce sensor with micro unit structure. To verify effectiveness of the proposed slip detection, experiment using prototype of resistance slip sensor is conducted with an algorithm to detect slip and slip is successfully detected. We will discuss the slip detection properties.

  5. Developing Improved Water Velocity and Flux Estimation from AUVs - Results From Recent ASTEP Field Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Yoerger, D. R.; Camilli, R.; German, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Water velocity measurements are crucial to quantifying fluxes and better understanding water as a fundamental transport mechanism for marine chemical and biological processes. The importance of flux to understanding these processes makes it a crucial component of astrobiological exploration to moons possessing large bodies of water, such as Europa. Present technology allows us to obtain submerged water velocity measurements from stationary platforms; rarer are measurements from submerged vehicles which possess the ability to autonomously survey tens of kilometers over extended periods. Improving this capability would also allow us to obtain co-registered water velocity and other sensor data (e.g., mass spectrometers, temperature, oxygen, etc) and significantly enhance our ability to estimate fluxes. We report results from 4 recent expeditions in which we measured water velocities from autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to help quantify flux in three different oceanographic contexts: hydrothermal vent plumes; an oil spill cruise responding to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout; and two expeditions investigating naturally occurring methane seeps. On all of these cruises, we directly measured the water velocities with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on the AUV. Vehicle motion was corrected for using bottom-lock Doppler tracks when available and, in the absence of bottom-lock, estimates of vehicle velocity based on dynamic models. In addition, on the methane seep cruises, we explored the potential of using acoustic mapping sonars, such as multi-beam and sub-bottom profiling systems, to localize plumes and indirectly quantify flux. Data obtained on these expeditions enhanced our scientific investigations and provides data for future development of algorithms for autonomously processing, identifying, and classifying water velocity and flux measurements. Such technology will be crucial in future astrobiology missions where highly constrained

  6. Final report on the PNL program to develop an alumina sensor. Sensors Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Brenden, B.B.; Koski, O.H.; Williford, R.E.

    1992-10-01

    An alumina concentration sensor was required to ensure safe operating conditions for cermet inert anodes that were under development at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(a) for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. The Sensors Development Program at PNL was conducted in response to this need for an alumina sensor. In all, eight different approaches to developing an alumina sensor were evaluated as part of this program. Each approach sought to correlate alumina concentration either to some spectral, physical, or electrical property of the molten electrolytic, or alternatively, to some operational characteristic of the reduction cell such as the integrity of the cermet anodes or the electrical noise generated by them during cell operation. The studies on electrical noise were performed using a large number of digital signal analysis (DSA) methods. There were two primary requirements for success for an alumina sensor to be used in conjunction with cermet anodes: (1) adequate sensitivity to alumina concentration at concentrations close to saturation, and (2) ease of use in an industrial setting. After numerous laboratory experiments as well as field studies in some cases, it was concluded that none of the approaches sufficiently satisfied the two criteria to serve as the basis for an alumina sensor. If further work is to continue in this area, it is recommended that the research focus on altemative DSA approaches, primarily because DSA methods would be so easy to use in an industrial environment. Due to the lack of correlation using DSA in the present work, however, it is recommended that altemative strategies for data collection and analysis be used in any further development activities.

  7. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  8. Comparison of buried soil sensors, surface chambers and above ground measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Accurate measurements of soil CO2 flux aids determinations of carbon budgets. In this study, we investigated soil CO2 fluxes with time and depth and above ground CO2 fluxes in a bare field. CO2 concentrations w...

  9. Sensor Development for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, Seun K.; Gorton, Susan A.; Mau, Johnney C.; Soto, Hector L.; Hernandez, Corey D.

    2001-01-01

    Presented are the developmental efforts for MEMS sensors for a closed-loop active flow control in a low-speed wind tunnel evaluation. The MEMS sensors are designed in-house and fabricated out of house, and the shear sensors are a thermal type that are collocated with temperature and pressure sensors on a flexible polyimide sheet, which conforms to surfaces of a simple curvature. A total of 6 sensors are located within a 1.5 by 3 mm area as a cluster with each sensor being 300 pm square. The thickness of this sensor cluster is 75 pm. Outputs from the shear sensors have been compared with respect to those of the Preston tube for evaluation of the sensors on a flat plate. Pressure sensors are the absolute type and have recorded pressure measurements within 0.05 percent of the tunnel ESP pressure sensor readings. The sensors and signal conditioning electronics have been tested on both a flat plate and a ramp in Langley s 15-Inch Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The system configuration and control PC is configured with LabView, where calibration constants are stored for desired compensation and correction. The preliminary test results are presented within.

  10. Monitoring Charge Flux to Quantify Unusual Ligand-Induced Ion Channel Activity for Use in Biological Nanopore-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The utility of biological nanopores for the development of sensors has become a growing area of interest in analytical chemistry. Their emerging use in chemical analysis is a result of several ideal characteristics. First, they provide reproducible control over nanoscale pore sizes with an atomic level of precision. Second, they are amenable to resistive-pulse type measurement systems when embedded into an artificial lipid bilayer. A single binding event causes a change in the flow of millions of ions across the membrane per second that is readily measured as a change in current with excellent signal-to-noise ratio. To date, ion channel-based biosensors have been limited to well-behaved proteins. Most demonstrations of using ion channels as sensors have been limited to proteins that remain in the open, conducting state, unless occupied by an analyte of interest. Furthermore, these proteins are nonspecific, requiring chemical, biochemical, or genetic manipulations to impart chemical specificity. Here, we report on the use of the pore-forming abilities of heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) to quantify a specific analyte. Hsc70 reconstitutes into phospholipid membranes and opens to form multiple conductance states specifically in the presence of ATP. We introduce the measurement of “charge flux” to characterize the ATP-regulated multiconductance nature of Hsc70, which enables sensitive quantification of ATP (100 μM–4 mM). We believe that monitoring protein-induced charge flux across a bilayer membrane represents a universal method for quantitatively monitoring ion-channel activity. This measurement has the potential to broaden the library of usable proteins in the development of nanopore-based biosensors. PMID:24794413

  11. Turbulent CO2 Flux Measurements by Lidar: Length Scales, Results and Comparison with In-Situ Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Fabien; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, Timothy W.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2009-01-01

    The vertical CO2 flux in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is investigated with a Doppler differential absorption lidar (DIAL). The instrument was operated next to the WLEF instrumented tall tower in Park Falls, Wisconsin during three days and nights in June 2007. Profiles of turbulent CO2 mixing ratio and vertical velocity fluctuations are measured by in-situ sensors and Doppler DIAL. Time and space scales of turbulence are precisely defined in the ABL. The eddy-covariance method is applied to calculate turbulent CO2 flux both by lidar and in-situ sensors. We show preliminary mean lidar CO2 flux measurements in the ABL with a time and space resolution of 6 h and 1500 m respectively. The flux instrumental errors decrease linearly with the standard deviation of the CO2 data, as expected. Although turbulent fluctuations of CO2 are negligible with respect to the mean (0.1 %), we show that the eddy-covariance method can provide 2-h, 150-m range resolved CO2 flux estimates as long as the CO2 mixing ratio instrumental error is no greater than 10 ppm and the vertical velocity error is lower than the natural fluctuations over a time resolution of 10 s.

  12. Multi Sensor Approach to Address Sustainable Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid

    2007-01-01

    The main objectives of Earth Science research are many folds: to understand how does this planet operates, can we model her operation and eventually develop the capability to predict such changes. However, the underlying goals of this work are to eventually serve the humanity in providing societal benefits. This requires continuous, and detailed observations from many sources in situ, airborne and space. By and large, the space observations are the way to comprehend the global phenomena across continental boundaries and provide credible boundary conditions for the mesoscale studies. This requires a multiple sensors, look angles and measurements over the same spot in accurately solving many problems that may be related to air quality, multi hazard disasters, public health, hydrology and more. Therefore, there are many ways to address these issues and develop joint implementation, data sharing and operating strategies for the benefit of the world community. This is because for large geographical areas or regions and a diverse population, some sound observations, scientific facts and analytical models must support the decision making. This is crucial for the sustainability of vital resources of the world and at the same time to protect the inhabitants, endangered species and the ecology. Needless to say, there is no single sensor, which can answer all such questions effectively. Due to multi sensor approach, it puts a tremendous burden on any single implementing entity in terms of information, knowledge, budget, technology readiness and computational power. And, more importantly, the health of planet Earth and its ability to sustain life is not governed by a single country, but in reality, is everyone's business on this planet. Therefore, with this notion, it is becoming an impractical problem by any single organization/country to bear this colossal responsibility. So far, each developed country within their means has proceeded along satisfactorily in implementing

  13. Development of Solid State Thermal Sensors for Aeroshell TPS Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Ed; Oishi, Tomo; Gorbonov, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    In-situ Thermal Protection System (TPS) sensors are required to provide verification by traceability of TPS performance and sizing tools. Traceability will lead to higher fidelity design tools, which in turn will lead to lower design safety margins, and decreased heatshield mass. Decreasing TPS mass will enable certain missions that are not otherwise feasible, and directly increase science payload. NASA Ames is currently developing two flight measurements as essential to advancing the state of TPS traceability for material modeling and aerothermal simulation: heat flux and surface recession (for ablators). The heat flux gage is applicable to both ablators and non-ablators and is therefore the more generalized sensor concept of the two with wider applicability to mission scenarios. This paper describes the continuing development of a thermal microsensor capable of surface and in-depth temperature and heat flux measurements for TPS materials appropriate to Titan, Neptune, and Mars aerocapture, and direct entry. The thermal sensor is a monolithic solid state device composed of thick film platinum RTD on an alumina substrate. Choice of materials and critical dimensions are used to tailor gage response, determined during calibration activities, to specific (forebody vs. aftbody) heating environments. Current design has maximum operating temperature of 1500K, and allowable constant heat flux of q=28.7 W/cm(sup 2), and time constants between 0.05 and 0.2 seconds. The catalytic and radiative response of these heat flux gages can also be changed through the use of appropriate coatings. By using several co-located gages with various surface coatings, data can be obtained to isolate surface heat flux components due to radiation, catalycity and convection. Selectivity to radiative heat flux is a useful feature even for an in-depth gage, as radiative transport may be a significant heat transport mechanism for porous TPS materials in Titan aerocapture.

  14. NASA's present and future sensor technology developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, B.

    1976-01-01

    NASA's overall sensing, data acquisition, and instrumentation programs are reviewed. The review shows that the trends in advanced sensor technology involve increased use of solid-state sensors, multiapplication sensors, standardized instrumentation, and miniaturized detectors. Examples are given of several new technologies, showing how improvements in sensor operational capability (such as enhanced sensitivity and spectral range) derived from these advances have resulted in relaxed spacecraft stability requirements, mission time savings, and savings in weight, size, and power. The introduction of multiapplication sensors and standardized instrumentation will result in measurement cost reduction and improved compatibility with standardized spacecraft.

  15. Nanorod Material Developed for Use as an Optical Sensor Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical sensors are becoming increasingly important in the development of new nonintrusive or embedded sensors. The use of light and material optical properties helps us measure unknown parameters such as temperature, pressure, flow, or chemical species. The focus of this work is to develop new nanostructure platforms upon which optical sensors can be constructed. These nanorods are synthesized oxides that form a base structure to which luminescent sensing dyes or dopants can be attached or embedded. The nanorod structure allows for a much greater open area than closed or polymer-based sensors do, enabling a much faster contact of the measured species with the luminescent sensor and, thus, a potentially faster measurement.

  16. Development of Low Cost Sensors for Hydrogen Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Holmes, W., Jr.; Lauf, R.J.; Maxey, L.C.; Salter, C.; Walker, D.

    1999-04-07

    We are developing rugged and reliable hydrogen safety sensors that can be easily manufactured. Potential applications also require an inexpensive sensor that can be easily deployed. Automotive applications demand low cost, while personnel safety applications emphasize light-weight, battery-operated, and wearable sensors. Our current efforts involve developing and optimizing sensor materials for stability and compatibility with typical thick-film manufacturing processes. We are also tailoring the sensor design and size along with various packaging and communication schemes for optimal acceptance by end users.

  17. Structural Health Monitoring Sensor Development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Wu, M. C.; Allison, S. G.; DeHaven, S. L.; Ghoshal, A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is applying considerable effort on the development of sensor technology for structural health monitoring (SHM). This research is targeted toward increasing the safety and reliability of aerospace vehicles, while reducing operating and maintenance costs. Research programs are focused on applications to both aircraft and space vehicles. Sensor technologies under development span a wide range including fiber-optic sensing, active and passive acoustic sensors, electromagnetic sensors, wireless sensing systems, MEMS, and nanosensors. Because of their numerous advantages for aerospace applications, fiber-optic sensors are one of the leading candidates and are the major focus of this presentation. In addition, recent advances in active and passive acoustic sensing will also be discussed.

  18. Development of a laser remote sensing instrument to measure sub-aerial volcanic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queisser, Manuel; Burton, Mike

    2016-04-01

    A thorough quantification of volcanic CO2 fluxes would lead to an enhanced understanding of the role of volcanoes in the geological carbon cycle. This would enable a more subtle understanding of human impact on that cycle. Furthermore, variations in volcanic CO2 emissions are a key to understanding volcanic processes such as eruption phenomenology. However, measuring fluxes of volcanic CO2 is challenging as volcanic CO2 concentrations are modest compared with the ambient CO2 concentration (~400 ppm) . Volcanic CO2 quickly dilutes with the background air. For Mt. Etna (Italy), for instance, 1000 m downwind from the crater, dispersion modelling yields a signal of ~4 ppm only. It is for this reason that many magmatic CO2 concentration measurements focus on in situ techniques, such as direct sampling Giggenbach bottles, chemical sensors, IR absorption spectrometers or mass spectrometers. However, emission rates are highly variable in time and space. Point measurements fail to account for this variability. Inferring 1-D or 2-D gas concentration profiles, necessary to estimate gas fluxes, from point measurements may thus lead to erroneous flux estimations. Moreover, in situ probing is time consuming and, since many volcanoes emit toxic gases and are dangerous as mountains, may raise safety concerns. In addition, degassing is often diffuse and spatially extended, which makes a measurement approach with spatial coverage desirable. There are techniques that allow to indirectly retrieve CO2 fluxes from correlated SO2 concentrations and fluxes. However, they still rely on point measurements of CO2 and are prone to errors of SO2 fluxes due to light dilution and depend on blue sky conditions. Here, we present a new remote sensing instrument, developed with the ERC project CO2Volc, which measures 1-D column amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere with sufficient sensitivity to reveal the contribution of magmatic CO2. Based on differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) the instrument measures

  19. Sapflow+: a four-needle heat-pulse sap flow sensor enabling nonempirical sap flux density and water content measurements.

    PubMed

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    • To our knowledge, to date, no nonempirical method exists to measure reverse, low or high sap flux density. Moreover, existing sap flow methods require destructive wood core measurements to determine sapwood water content, necessary to convert heat velocity to sap flux density, not only damaging the tree, but also neglecting seasonal variability in sapwood water content. • Here, we present a nonempirical heat-pulse-based method and coupled sensor which measure temperature changes around a linear heater in both axial and tangential directions after application of a heat pulse. By fitting the correct heat conduction-convection equation to the measured temperature profiles, the heat velocity and water content of the sapwood can be determined. • An identifiability analysis and validation tests on artificial and real stem segments of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) confirm the applicability of the method, leading to accurate determinations of heat velocity, water content and hence sap flux density. • The proposed method enables sap flux density measurements to be made across the entire natural occurring sap flux density range of woody plants. Moreover, the water content during low flows can be determined accurately, enabling a correct conversion from heat velocity to sap flux density without destructive core measurements.

  20. An advanced thin foil sensor concept for heat flux and heat transfer measurements in fully turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocikat, H.; Herwig, H.

    2007-02-01

    A double layer hot film with two 10 μm nickel foils, separated by a 25 μm polyimide foil is used as a multi-purpose sensor. Each foil can be operated as a (calibrated) temperature sensor in its passive mode by imposing an electric current small enough to avoid heating by dissipation of electrical energy. Alternatively, however, each foil can also serve as a heater in an active mode with electric currents high enough to cause Joule heating. This double foil sensor can be used as a conventional heat flux sensor in its passive mode when mounted on an externally heated surface. Together with the wall and free stream temperature this measured heat flux will provide the local heat transfer coefficient h = dot{q}w/left(Tw - T_{infty}right). In fully turbulent flows it alternatively can be operated in an active mode on a cold, i.e. not externally heated surface. Then, by heating the upper foil, a local heat transfer is initiated from which the local heat transfer coefficient h can be determined, once the lower foil is heated to the same temperature as the upper one, thus acting as a counter-heater. The overall concept behind this mode of measurement is based on the local character of heat transfer in fully turbulent flows which turns out to be almost independent of the upstream thermal events.

  1. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: Facile development of gas sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushi, Arti D.; Gaikwad, S.; Deshmukh, M.; Patil, H.; Bodkhe, G.; Shirsat, Mahendra D.

    2016-05-01

    In the present investigation, research efforts were directed towards the facile fabrication of sensor devices for the detection of gaseous analytes. Single Wall Carbon nanotubes, the highest prominent representative of functional nanomaterials, were employed for the sensor development. High surface to volume ratio of CNTs facilitate to improve overall sensor performance. To achieve enhanced sensing characteristics, CNTs were functionalized with tetraphenyl porphyrin. Fabricated sensor devices were subjected to the structural, electrical as well as sensing characteristics. Observed results infer that the fabricated sensor shows excellent sensing characteristics towards propanone below their PEL level.

  2. Effects of biased CO2 flux measurements by open-path sensors on the interpretation of CO2 flux dynamics at contrasting ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Manuel; Humphreys, Elyn; Bogoev, Ivan; Quinton, William L.; Wischnweski, Karoline; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Long-term measurements of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) are conducted across a global network of flux tower sites. These sites are characterised by varying climatic and vegetation conditions, but also differ in the type of CO2/H2O gas analyser used to obtain NEE. Several studies have observed a systematic bias in measured NEE when comparing open-path (OP) and closed-path (CP) sensors with consistently more negative daytime NEE measurements when using OP sensors, both during the growing and non-growing season. A surface heating correction has been proposed in the literature, but seems not to be universally applicable. Systematic biases in NEE measurements are particularly problematic for synthesis papers and inter-comparison studies between sites where the 'true' NEE is small compared to the potential instrument bias. For example, NEE estimates for boreal forest sites derived from OP sensors show large, ecologically unreasonable winter CO2 uptake. To better understand the causes and the magnitude of this potential bias, we conducted a sensor inter-comparison study at the Mer Bleue peatland near Ottawa, ON, Canada. An eddy covariance system with a CP (LI7000 & GILL R3-50) and an OP sensor (EC150 & CSAT3A) was used. Measurements were made between September 2012 and January 2013 and covered late summer, fall, and winter conditions. Flux calculations were made as consistently as possible to minimise differences due to differing processing procedures (e.g. spectral corrections). The latent (LE, slope of orthogonal linear regression of LEOP on LECP: 1.02 ± 0.01 & intercept: -0.2 ± 0.6 W m-2 and sensible heat fluxes (H, slope of HCSAT3A on HGILL: 0.96 ± 0.01 & intercept: 0.1 ± 0.03 W m-2) did not show any significant bias. However, a significant bias was apparent in the NEE measurements (slope of NEEOP on NEECP: 1.36 ± 0.02 & intercept: -0.1 ± 0.05). The differences between NEEOP and NEECP were linearly related to the magnitude of HCSAT3A with a slope of -0

  3. Linear air-fuel sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, F.; Miller, C.

    1996-12-14

    The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

  4. The development of climate models: tuning vs. flux corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-04-01

    Current state-of-the-art coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) have substantial errors in their main climate representations. In particular they have large uncertainties in the simulated climate sensitivity on regional and global scale to a doubling of CO2 that result from model errors. The current approach in developing CGCMs and dealing with the error in it involves substantial amount of tuning of uncertain parameters of sub-scale process that need to be parameterized. This tuning process is neither documented, nor reproducible nor is it clear if it indeed improves the model performance. Alternative methods such as flux correcting are not used nor is it clear if such methods would perform better. In the study presented here we will perform perturbed physics experiments with the simplified globally resolved energy balance (GREB) model to test the different ideas of dealing with model errors in the development of models. It will be illustrated that tuning of CGCM is very likely to fail given the complexity of the system, the limited resources and the limited observations to optimize parameters. While tuning will improve the models performance on the cost function (such as the observed past climate), it will not get closer to the 'true' physics nor will it improve future climate change projection. In turn, not tuning or flux correcting is not only much cheaper and simpler, but it will actually perform better in nearly all aspects. This, however, varies whether one is focussed on regional or global scales.

  5. Optical Sensor Technology Development and Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Parker

    2005-01-24

    The objectives of this ESP (Enhanced Surveillance) project are to evaluate sensor performance for future aging studies of materials, components and weapon systems. The goal of this project is to provide analysis capability to experimentally identify and characterize the aging mechanisms and kinetics of Core Stack Assembly (CSA) materials. The work on fiber optic light sources, hermetic sealing of fiber optics, fiber optic hydrogen sensors, and detection systems will be discussed.

  6. Development of GaN-based microchemical sensor nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopuk, Nicholas; Son, Kyung-Ah; George, Thomas; Moon, Jeong S.

    2005-01-01

    Sensors based III-N technology are gaining significant interest due to their potential for monolithic integration of RF transceivers and light sources and the capability of high temperature operations. We are developing a GaN-based micro chemical sensor node for remote detection of chemical toxins, and present electrical responses of AlGaN/GaN HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) sensors to chemical toxins as well as other common gases.

  7. Development of GaN-based micro chemical sensor nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-ah; Prokopuk, Nicholas; George, Thomas; Moon, Jeong S.

    2005-01-01

    Sensors based on III-N technology are gaining significant interest due to their potential for monolithic integration of RF transceivers and light sources and the capability of high temperature operations. We are developing a GaN-based micro chemical sensor node for remote detection of chemical toxins, and present electrical responses of AlGaN/GaN HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) sensors to chemical toxins as well as other common gases.

  8. Strategy Developed for Selecting Optimal Sensors for Monitoring Engine Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Sensor indications during rocket engine operation are the primary means of assessing engine performance and health. Effective selection and location of sensors in the operating engine environment enables accurate real-time condition monitoring and rapid engine controller response to mitigate critical fault conditions. These capabilities are crucial to ensure crew safety and mission success. Effective sensor selection also facilitates postflight condition assessment, which contributes to efficient engine maintenance and reduced operating costs. Under the Next Generation Launch Technology program, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, has developed a model-based procedure for systematically selecting an optimal sensor suite for assessing rocket engine system health. This optimization process is termed the systematic sensor selection strategy. Engine health management (EHM) systems generally employ multiple diagnostic procedures including data validation, anomaly detection, fault-isolation, and information fusion. The effectiveness of each diagnostic component is affected by the quality, availability, and compatibility of sensor data. Therefore systematic sensor selection is an enabling technology for EHM. Information in three categories is required by the systematic sensor selection strategy. The first category consists of targeted engine fault information; including the description and estimated risk-reduction factor for each identified fault. Risk-reduction factors are used to define and rank the potential merit of timely fault diagnoses. The second category is composed of candidate sensor information; including type, location, and estimated variance in normal operation. The final category includes the definition of fault scenarios characteristic of each targeted engine fault. These scenarios are defined in terms of engine model hardware parameters. Values of these parameters define engine simulations that generate

  9. Embedded Sensor Array Development for Composite Structure Integrity Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Bryan, W. L.; Clonts, L. G.; Franks, S.

    2007-06-26

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Accellent Technologies, Inc. (the "Participant") was for the development of an embedded ultrasonic sensor system for composite structure integrity monitoring.

  10. Development of a fiber optic high temperature strain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, E. O.; Murphy, K. E.; Brookshire, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    From 1 Apr. 1991 to 31 Aug. 1992, the Georgia Tech Research Institute conducted a research program to develop a high temperature fiber optic strain sensor as part of a measurement program for the space shuttle booster rocket motor. The major objectives of this program were divided into four tasks. Under Task 1, the literature on high-temperature fiber optic strain sensors was reviewed. Task 2 addressed the design and fabrication of the strain sensor. Tests and calibration were conducted under Task 3, and Task 4 was to generate recommendations for a follow-on study of a distributed strain sensor. Task 4 was submitted to NASA as a separate proposal.

  11. Development of sensors on the basis of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, E.; Vonkienlin, F.; Hwang, H. J.

    1985-07-01

    Properties of polycrystalline silicon layers that are important for sensor applications were investigated. Layers were deposited from the gaseous phase through atmospheric pressure and low pressure chemical vaccuum deposition onto thermally oxidized single crystalline silicon wasfers; doping was carried out by ion implantation. Electrical properties, temperature behavior, and strain sensitivity were investigated. It is found that the temperature coefficients of polysilicon resistors can be determined within broad limits (negative, positive, zero) through selection of the doping. The layers are characterized by a relatively high piezoresistive effect. Based on experimental results, polysilicon thin film sensors (temperature, pressure, flow) were developed. These sensors clearly demonstrate the advantages of polycrystalline silicon layers as a sensor material.

  12. Developing Multilayer Thin Film Strain Sensors With High Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III

    2006-01-01

    A multilayer thin film strain sensor for large temperature range use is under development using a reactively-sputtered process. The sensor is capable of being fabricated in fine line widths utilizing the sacrificial-layer lift-off process that is used for micro-fabricated noble-metal sensors. Tantalum nitride films were optimized using reactive sputtering with an unbalanced magnetron source. A first approximation model of multilayer resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance was used to set the film thicknesses in the multilayer film sensor. Two multifunctional sensors were fabricated using multilayered films of tantalum nitride and palladium chromium, and tested for low temperature resistivity, TCR and strain response. The low temperature coefficient of resistance of the films will result in improved stability in thin film sensors for low to high temperature use.

  13. Development of an endoscopic tactile sensor using PVDF films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Takeshi; Sone, Mikiko; Tanahashi, Yoshikatsu; Chonan, Seiji; Tanaka, Mami

    2007-12-01

    In this work, a prototype Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) tactile sensor for endoscopic application has been developed. The sensor aims to measure hardness, which is one of the information of tactile perceptions, of biomedical tissue. This sensor is composed of two PVDF films, a silicone cylindrical column, and an aluminum cylinder. And the classification of hardness is concerned with the ratio of these PVDF outputs. In this paper, two sensors are fabricated using two silicone cylindrical columns with different Young's modulus. The performance evaluation of each sensor is conducted using 6 silicone rubbers as measuring object. The experimental results correspond with the simplified theoretical analysis and the proposed sensor can distinguish a difference of elastic property.

  14. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Long term microparticle impact fluxes on LDEF determined from optical survey of Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Oliver, J. P.; Cooke, W. J.; Downey, K. I.; Kassel, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Many of the IDE metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-discharge impact sensors remained active during the entire Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission. An optical survey of impact sites on the active surfaces of these sensors has been extended to include all sensors from the low-flux sides of LDEF (i.e. the west or trailing side, the earth end, and the space end) and 5-7 active sensors from each LDEF's high-flux sides (i.e. the east or leading side, the south side, and the north side). This survey was facilitated by the presence of a relatively large (greater than 50 micron diameter) optical signature associated with each impact site on the active sensor surfaces. Of the approximately 4700 impacts in the optical survey data set, 84% were from particles in the 0.5 to 3 micron size range. An estimate of the total number of hypervelocity impacts on LDEF from particles greater than 0.5 micron diameter yields a value of approximately 7 x 10(exp 6). Impact feature dimensions for several dozen large craters on MOS sensors and germanium witness plates are also presented. Impact fluxes calculated from the IDE survey data closely matched surveys of similar size impacts (greater than or equal to 3 micron diameter craters in Al, or marginal penetrations of a 2.4 micron thick Al foil) by other LDEF investigators. Since the first year IDE data were electronically recorded, the flux data could be divided into three long term time periods: the first year, the entire 5.8 year mission, and the intervening 4.8 years (by difference). The IDE data show that there was an order of magnitude decrease in the long term microparticle impact flux on the trailing side of LDEF, from 1.01 to 0.098 x 10(exp -4) m(exp 2)/s, from the first year in orbit compared to years 2-6. The long term flux on the leading edge showed an increase from 8.6 to 11.2 x 10(exp -4) m(exp -2)/s over this same time period. (Short term flux increases up to 10,000 times the background rate were recorded on the

  17. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  18. Surface-mounted sensors for gas turbine research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loftus, Peter; Shepherd, Richard; Stringfellow, Keith

    1993-07-01

    In the development of gas turbine aeroengines, the high cost of development testing and market lead pressure to reduce program timescales has led to increasing use of advanced instrumentation. A growing interest has been the integration of sensors into the engine components, both to look outward at the behavior of the flow over the component, and to look inward at the temperature and strain of the component itself. This paper describes a range of pieso-resistive and thermal sensor applications developed by Rolls-Royce concluding with a view of this industry's future needs and sensor design challenges.

  19. Development of combined Opto-Acoustical sensor Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhöfer, A.; Anton, G.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Neff, M.; Richardt, C.

    2012-01-01

    The faint fluxes of cosmic neutrinos expected at very high energies require large instrumented detector volumes. The necessary volumes in combination with a sufficient shielding against background constitute forbidding and complex environments (e.g. the deep sea) as sites for neutrino telescopes. To withstand these environments and to assure the data quality, the sensors have to be reliable and their operation has to be as simple as possible. A compact sensor module design including all necessary components for data acquisition and module calibration would simplify the detector mechanics and ensures the long term operability of the detector. The compact design discussed here combines optical and acoustical sensors inside one module, therefore reducing electronics and additional external instruments for calibration purposes. In this design the acoustical sensor is primary used for acoustic positioning of the module. The module may also be used for acoustic particle detection and marine science if an appropriate acoustical sensor is chosen.First tests of this design are promising concerning the task of calibration. To expand the field of application also towards acoustic particle detection further improvements concerning electromagnetic shielding and adaptation of the single components are necessary.

  20. Development of a novel fiber optic sensor for humidity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Pascal; Culshaw, Brian; Pierce, S. Gareth

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes ongoing research into the development of a fiber optic sensor for humidity sensing. Particular attention is paid to the compatibility of this fiber optic sensor with an existing system which is already in use for structural deformation monitoring. In order to achieve this, a special transducing coating induces a length variation of the optical fiber as a function of the surrounding humidity levels. An advantage of this setup is that the sensor can not only be read by the same reading unit but can also easily be multiplexed with other sensor types to form a multi functional sensor network. This is of a particular interest for monitoring materials such as reinforced concrete, where structural health assessment criteria include deformation, depassivation and humidity. Several sensor configurations have been tested using dry-wet cycles at room temperature. Through this testing a prototype humidity sensor has been developed which responds consistently to humidity. Using pH sensitive coatings, the same design could be used for a fiber optic pH sensor.

  1. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today

  2. Development of Novel, Simple Multianalyte Sensors for Remote Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Sanford A. Asher

    2003-02-18

    Advancement of our polymerized crystalline colloidal array chemical sensing technology. They have dramatically advanced their polymerized crystalline colloidal array chemical sensing technology. They fabricated nonselective sensors for determining pH and ionic strength. They also developed selective sensors for glucose and organophosphorus mimics of nerve gas agents. They developed a trace sensor for cations in water which utilized a novel crosslinking sensing motif. In all of these cases they have been able to theoretically model their sensor response by extending hydrogel volume phase transition theory. They also developed transient sampling methods to allow their ion sensing methods to operate at high ionic strengths. They also developed a novel optrode to provide for simple sampling.

  3. Development of tools, technologies, and methodologies for imaging sensor testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, H.; Bynum, K.; Steely, S.; Nicholson, R.; Horne, H.

    2013-05-01

    Ground testing of space- and air-borne imaging sensor systems is supported by Vis-to-LWIR imaging sensor calibration and characterization, as well as hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation with high-fidelity complex scene projection to validate sensor mission performance. To accomplish this successfully, there must be the development of tools, technologies, and methodologies that are used in space simulation chambers for such testing. This paper provides an overview of such efforts being investigated and implemented at Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC).

  4. Nutrient fluxes from coastal California catchments with suburban development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Leydecker, A.; Beighley, E.; Robinson, T.; Coombs, S.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous streams originate in the mountains fringing California's coast and transport nutrients into coastal waters. In central California, these streams traverse catchments with land covers including chaparral, grazed grasslands, orchards, industrial agriculture and suburban and urban development. Fluvial nutrient concentrations and fluxes vary as a function of these land covers and as a function of considerable fluctuations in rainfall. As part of a long-term investigation of mobilization and fluvial transport of nutrients in catchments bordering the Santa Barbara Channel we have intensively sampled nutrient concentrations and measured discharge during storm and base flows in multiple catchments and subcatchments. Volume-weighted mean concentrations of nitrate generally ranged from 5 to 25 micromolar in undeveloped areas, increased to about 100 micromolar for suburban and most agricultural catchments, and were in excess of 1000 micromolar in catchments with greenhouse-based agriculture. Phosphate concentrations ranged from 2 to 20 micromolar among the catchments. These data are used to examine the premise that the suburbanized portion of the catchments is the primary source of nutrients to the streams.

  5. Novel Hall sensors developed for magnetic field imaging systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Cambel, V.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Bartolome, E.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Soltys, J.; Materials Science Division; Slovak Academy of Sciences; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona

    2007-09-01

    We report here on the fabrication and application of novel planar Hall sensors based on shallow InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) as an active layer. The sensors are developed for two kinds of experiments. In the first one, magnetic samples are placed directly on the Hall sensor. Room temperature experiments of permalloy objects evaporated onto the sensor are presented. In the second experiment, the sensor scans close over a multigranular superconducting sample prepared on a YBCO thin film. Large-area and high-resolution scanning experiments were performed at 4.2 K with the Hall probe scanning system in a liquid helium flow cryostat.

  6. Novel Hall sensors developed for magnetic field imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambel, Vladimír; Karapetrov, Goran; Novosad, Valentyn; Bartolomé, Elena; Gregušová, Dagmar; Fedor, Ján; Kúdela, Robert; Šoltýs, Ján

    2007-09-01

    We report here on the fabrication and application of novel planar Hall sensors based on shallow InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) as an active layer. The sensors are developed for two kinds of experiments. In the first one, magnetic samples are placed directly on the Hall sensor. Room temperature experiments of permalloy objects evaporated onto the sensor are presented. In the second experiment, the sensor scans close over a multigranular superconducting sample prepared on a YBCO thin film. Large-area and high-resolution scanning experiments were performed at 4.2 K with the Hall probe scanning system in a liquid helium flow cryostat.

  7. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling). PMID:26569263

  8. Development of a tactile sensor for evaluation of detergents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Mami

    2007-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a tactile sensor using PVDF (Polyvinylidene Fluoride) film as a receptor of the sensor to evaluate a detergent. Tactile sense is the most important sense in the sensation receptor of the human body along with eyesight. When the dish which washed cleanly is rubbed with a finger of human, good tactile sense and sound (vibration signal) like "Kyu-kyu" are obtained. From this tactile sense and sound, we judge that a dish becomes squeaky-clean. This tactile sense and sound are evaluation parameters when consumer selects a detergent. In this study, a tactile sensor using PVDF film as the receptor is fabricated. Sensory test of detergents was conducted. Measurement experiment by the sensor is carried out. Experiment results show that sensor output have good correlation with the result of human sensory test of detergent.

  9. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J. A.; Metaxas, M. G.; Royle, G. J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J. M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS).

  10. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-11-12

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling).

  11. The Application of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing miniature chemical sensors for a variety of applications including fire detection, emissions monitoring, fuel leak detection, and environmental monitoring. Smart Lick and Stick sensor technology which integrates a sensor array, electronics, telemetry, and power into one microsystem are being developed. These microsystems require low power consumption for long-term aerospace applications. One approach to decreasing power consumption is the use of nanotechnology. Nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO2) carbon monoxide (CO) sensors developed previously by this group have been successfully used for fire detection and emissions monitoring. This presentation will briefly review the overall NASA GRC chemical sensor program and discuss our further effort in nanotechnology applications. New carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing material using doped nanocrystalline SnO2 will be discussed. Nanocrystalline SnO2 coated solid electrolyte CO2 sensors and SnO2 nanorod and nanofiber hydrogen (H2) sensors operated at reduced or room temperatures will also be discussed.

  12. Latest Development in Advanced Sensors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.; Eckhoff, Anthony J.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inexpensive space transportation system must be developed in order to make spaceflight more affordable. To achieve this goal, there is a need to develop inexpensive smart sensors to allow autonomous checking of the health of the vehicle and associated ground support equipment, warn technicians or operators of an impending problem and facilitate rapid vehicle pre-launch operations. The Transducers and Data Acquisition group at Kennedy Space Center has initiated an effort to study, research, develop and prototype inexpensive smart sensors to accomplish these goals. Several technological challenges are being investigated and integrated in this project multi-discipline sensors; self-calibration, health self-diagnosis capabilities embedded in sensors; advanced data acquisition systems with failure prediction algorithms and failure correction (self-healing) capabilities.

  13. Computer-Aided Sensor Development Focused on Security Issues

    PubMed Central

    Bialas, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines intelligent sensor and sensor system development according to the Common Criteria methodology, which is the basic security assurance methodology for IT products and systems. The paper presents how the development process can be supported by software tools, design patterns and knowledge engineering. The automation of this process brings cost-, quality-, and time-related advantages, because the most difficult and most laborious activities are software-supported and the design reusability is growing. The paper includes a short introduction to the Common Criteria methodology and its sensor-related applications. In the experimental section the computer-supported and patterns-based IT security development process is presented using the example of an intelligent methane detection sensor. This process is supported by an ontology-based tool for security modeling and analyses. The verified and justified models are transferred straight to the security target specification representing security requirements for the IT product. The novelty of the paper is to provide a patterns-based and computer-aided methodology for the sensors development with a view to achieving their IT security assurance. The paper summarizes the validation experiment focused on this methodology adapted for the sensors system development, and presents directions of future research. PMID:27240360

  14. Computer-Aided Sensor Development Focused on Security Issues.

    PubMed

    Bialas, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines intelligent sensor and sensor system development according to the Common Criteria methodology, which is the basic security assurance methodology for IT products and systems. The paper presents how the development process can be supported by software tools, design patterns and knowledge engineering. The automation of this process brings cost-, quality-, and time-related advantages, because the most difficult and most laborious activities are software-supported and the design reusability is growing. The paper includes a short introduction to the Common Criteria methodology and its sensor-related applications. In the experimental section the computer-supported and patterns-based IT security development process is presented using the example of an intelligent methane detection sensor. This process is supported by an ontology-based tool for security modeling and analyses. The verified and justified models are transferred straight to the security target specification representing security requirements for the IT product. The novelty of the paper is to provide a patterns-based and computer-aided methodology for the sensors development with a view to achieving their IT security assurance. The paper summarizes the validation experiment focused on this methodology adapted for the sensors system development, and presents directions of future research. PMID:27240360

  15. Computer-Aided Sensor Development Focused on Security Issues.

    PubMed

    Bialas, Andrzej

    2016-05-26

    The paper examines intelligent sensor and sensor system development according to the Common Criteria methodology, which is the basic security assurance methodology for IT products and systems. The paper presents how the development process can be supported by software tools, design patterns and knowledge engineering. The automation of this process brings cost-, quality-, and time-related advantages, because the most difficult and most laborious activities are software-supported and the design reusability is growing. The paper includes a short introduction to the Common Criteria methodology and its sensor-related applications. In the experimental section the computer-supported and patterns-based IT security development process is presented using the example of an intelligent methane detection sensor. This process is supported by an ontology-based tool for security modeling and analyses. The verified and justified models are transferred straight to the security target specification representing security requirements for the IT product. The novelty of the paper is to provide a patterns-based and computer-aided methodology for the sensors development with a view to achieving their IT security assurance. The paper summarizes the validation experiment focused on this methodology adapted for the sensors system development, and presents directions of future research.

  16. Eddy covariance measurements of NH3 fluxes over a natural grass land with an open-path quantum cascade laser-based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, D.; Benedict, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Prenni, A. J.; Schichtel, B. A.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    NH3 is an important component of the bio-atmospheric N cycle with implications for regional air quality, human and ecosystem health degradation, and global climate change. However, measuring NH3 flux is challenging, requiring a sensor with high sensitivity (sub-ppbv), fast response time and the capability to account for NH3 adsorption effects. In this study, we address these issues with an open-path quantum-cascade-based sensor for eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Previously, our EC NH3 sensor was deployed over a feedlot in Colorado in 2013 and 2014, and the results showed the potential of the sensor to measure NH3 emissions from agricultural sources. In the summer of 2015, the sensor was installed at a remote monitoring site in Rocky Mountain National Park to measure NH3 flux over a natural grass land. During the deployment, the precision of the sensor was about 0.15 ppbv at 10 Hz, and the detection limit of the flux was estimated to be 0.7±0.5 ng NH3/s/m2. The cospectra of the NH3 flux closely resembled those of CO2 flux and sensible heat flux measured by a LI-7500 CO2 analyzer and a CSAT3 sonic anemometer. The ogive analyses indicated that the loss of NH3 fluxes due to various damping effects was about 15%. Examining initial results from a few days of measurement, the measured NH3 fluxes appear to have a strong diurnal pattern with local emissions during afternoon, a pattern not previously reported for remote grass land. The pattern is consistent with background NH3 concentration measured by PICARRO NH3 analyzer, although summertime afternoon concentration increases at the site have previously been associated with upslope transport from urban and agricultural regions to the east. The results demonstrate the sensor's capability to measure NH3 flux in low NH3 conditions and also show that more measurements are needed to investigate spatial and temporal variability of NH3 flux.

  17. Development of elasticity sensors for instrumented socks and wearable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Rajamani, Rajesh; Alexander, Lee; Sezen, Serdar A.

    2015-12-01

    Accumulation of fluid in the lower legs occurs due to acute decompensated heart failure, venous deficiency, lymphedema, and a number of other medical conditions. An instrumented sock using an elasticity sensor is developed for the purpose of monitoring lower leg fluid status. The design and sensing principles of the sock are introduced. Two generations of prototype elasticity sensors have been constructed to verify the sensing principles. Their performances are analyzed and compared. Both in vivo and in vitro tests using the fabricated sensor prototypes show promising results.

  18. Sensor development for the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Horisberger, R.; Kaufmann, R.; Rohe, T.; Roy, A.

    2002-06-01

    The CMS experiment which is currently under construction at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will contain a pixel detector which provides in its final configuration three space points per track close to the interaction point of the colliding beams. Because of the harsh radiation environment of the LHC, the technical realization of the pixel detector is extremely challenging. The readout chip as the most damageable part of the system is believed to survive a particle fluence of 6×10 14 neq/ cm2 (All fluences are normalized to 1 MeV neutrons and therefore all components of the hybrid pixel detector have to perform well up to at least this fluence. As this requires a partially depleted operation of the silicon sensors after irradiation-induced type inversion of the substrate, an "n in n" concept has been chosen. In order to perform IV-tests on wafer level and to hold accidentally unconnected pixels close to ground potential, a resistive path between the pixels has been implemented by the openings in the p-stop implants surrounding every pixel cell. A prototype of such sensors has been produced by two different companies and especially the properties of these resistors have extensively been tested before and after irradiation.

  19. Micromachined sensor and actuator research at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Smith, B.K.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical devices and control electronics for those devices. Surface micromachining is the predominant technology under development. Pressure sensors based on silicon nitride diaphragms have been developed. Hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing have been developed. Accelerometers based upon high-aspect ratio surface micromachining are under development. Actuation mechanisms employing either electrostatic or steam power are being combined with a three-level active (plus an additional passive level) polysilicon surface micromachining process to couple these actuators to external devices. Results of efforts toward integration of micromechanics with the driving electronics for actuators or the amplification/signal processing electronics for sensors is also described. This effort includes a tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing.

  20. Development of a sensor for polypropylene degradation products.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Hochrein, James Michael; Dirk, Shawn M.; Bernstein, Robert; Washburn, Cody M.; Graf, Darin C.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the development of a sensor to detect the oxidative and radiation induced degradation of polypropylene. Recently we have examined the use of crosslinked assemblies of nanoparticles as a chemiresistor-type sensor for the degradation products. We have developed a simple method that uses a siloxane matrix to fabricate a chemiresistor-type sensor that minimizes the swelling transduction mechanism while optimizing the change in dielectric response. These sensors were exposed with the use of a gas chromatography system to three previously identified polypropylene degradation products including 4-methyl-2-pentanone, acetone, and 2-pentanone. The limits of detection 210 ppb for 4-methy-2-pentanone, 575 ppb for 2-pentanone, and the LoD was unable to be determined for acetone due to incomplete separation from the carbon disulfide carrier.

  1. Developing movement recognition application with the use of Shimmer sensor and Microsoft Kinect sensor.

    PubMed

    Guzsvinecz, Tibor; Szucs, Veronika; Sik Lányi, Cecília

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the development of virtual reality-based application is one of the most dynamically growing areas. These applications have a wide user base, more and more devices which are providing several kinds of user interactions and are available on the market. In the applications where the not-handheld devices are not necessary, the potential is that these can be used in educational, entertainment and rehabilitation applications. The purpose of this paper is to examine the precision and the efficiency of the not-handheld devices with user interaction in the virtual reality-based applications. The first task of the developed application is to support the rehabilitation process of stroke patients in their homes. A newly developed application will be introduced in this paper, which uses the two popular devices, the Shimmer sensor and the Microsoft Kinect sensor. To identify and to validate the actions of the user these sensors are working together in parallel mode. For the problem solving, the application is available to record an educational pattern, and then the software compares this pattern to the action of the user. The goal of the current research is to examine the extent of the difference in the recognition of the gestures, how precisely the two sensors are identifying the predefined actions. This could affect the rehabilitation process of the stroke patients and influence the efficiency of the rehabilitation. This application was developed in C# programming language and uses the original Shimmer connecting application as a base. During the working of this application it is possible to teach five-five different movements with the use of the Shimmer and the Microsoft Kinect sensors. The application can recognize these actions at any later time. This application uses a file-based database and the runtime memory of the application to store the saved data in order to reach the actions easier. The conclusion is that much more precise data were collected from the

  2. Bioaerosol optical sensor model development and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Steven D.; Jeys, Thomas H.; Eapen, Xuan Le

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the development and initial validation of a bioaerosol optical sensor model. This model was used to help determine design parameters and estimate performance of a new low-cost optical sensor for detecting bioterrorism agents. In order to estimate sensor performance in detecting biowarfare simulants and rejecting environmental interferents, use was made of a previously reported catalog of EEM (excitation/emission matrix) fluorescence cross-section measurements and previously reported multiwavelength-excitation biosensor modeling work. In the present study, the biosensor modeled employs a single high-power 365 nm UV LED source plus an IR laser diode for particle size determination. The sensor has four output channels: IR size channel, UV elastic channel and two fluorescence channels. The sensor simulation was used to select the fluorescence channel wavelengths of 400-450 and 450-600 nm. Using these selected fluorescence channels, the performance of the sensor in detecting simulants and rejecting interferents was estimated. Preliminary measurements with the sensor are presented which compare favorably with the simulation results.

  3. Development of Light Powered Sensor Networks for Thermal Comfort Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dasheng

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological advances in wireless communications have enabled easy installation of sensor networks with air conditioning equipment control applications. However, the sensor node power supply, through either power lines or battery power, still presents obstacles to the distribution of the sensing systems. In this study, a novel sensor network, powered by the artificial light, was constructed to achieve wireless power transfer and wireless data communications for thermal comfort measurements. The sensing node integrates an IC-based temperature sensor, a radiation thermometer, a relative humidity sensor, a micro machined flow sensor and a microprocessor for predicting mean vote (PMV) calculation. The 935 MHz band RF module was employed for the wireless data communication with a specific protocol based on a special energy beacon enabled mode capable of achieving zero power consumption during the inactive periods of the nodes. A 5W spotlight, with a dual axis tilt platform, can power the distributed nodes over a distance of up to 5 meters. A special algorithm, the maximum entropy method, was developed to estimate the sensing quantity of climate parameters if the communication module did not receive any response from the distributed nodes within a certain time limit. The light-powered sensor networks were able to gather indoor comfort-sensing index levels in good agreement with the comfort-sensing vote (CSV) preferred by a human being and the experimental results within the environment suggested that the sensing system could be used in air conditioning systems to implement a comfort-optimal control strategy.

  4. Development of a directional sensitive pressure and shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Dee, Jeffrey; Ledoux, William; Sangeorzan, Bruce; Reinhall, Per G.

    2002-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disease that impacts the lives of millions of people around the world. Lower limb complications associated with diabetes include the development of plantar ulcers that can lead to infection and subsequent amputation. Shear stress is thought to be a major contributing factor to ulcer development, but due in part to technical difficulties with transducing shear stress, there is no widely used shear measurement sensor. As such, we are currently developing a directionally sensitive pressure/shear sensor based on fiber optic technology. The pressure/shear sensor consists of an array of optical fibers lying in perpendicular rows and columns separated by elastomeric pads. A map of pressure and shear stress is constructed based on observed macro bending through the intensity attenuation from the physical deformation of two adjacent perpendicular fibers. The sensor has been shown to have low noise and responded linearly to applied loads. The smallest detectable force on each sensor element based on the current setup is ~0.1 lbs. (0.4N). The smallest area we have resolved in our mesh sensor is currently ~1 cm2.

  5. Advanced moisture sensor research and development

    SciTech Connect

    De Los Santos, A.

    1992-10-31

    During this period, testing of the system continued at the American Fructose (AF) plant in Dimmitt, Texas. Testing at the first two sites (dryer output and dryer input) was completed. Following the testing at the second site, the sensor was returned to the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) laboratories for modifications and for fitting of the additional components required to allow sampling of the material to be measured at the third site. These modifications were completed during this reporting period, and the system is scheduled to be installed at the third site (Rotary Vacuum Filter output) early in the next period. Laboratory measurements of corn germ (to be measured at the fourth site) and a variety of fruits and vegetables (one of which will be measured at the fifth site) have also continued during this period.

  6. Rotational magnetic flux sensor with neural network for non-destructive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Enokizono, M.; Todaka, T.; Akita, M. . Faculty of Engineering); Nagata, S. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents a new non-destructive testing (NDT) method which utilizes rotational magnetic flux. In this system, the magnitude and phase value are measured and used to obtain information about defect. These values include the information about the shape or position of an unknown defect. The authors employ the neural network technique for estimation of a defect shape. The experimental results show the validity of the method.

  7. Design and Development of a New Hybrid Spectroelectrochemical Sensor; Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Technetium Applicable to the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R; Seliskar, Carl J.; Ridgway, Thomas H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hubler, Timothy L.

    2000-06-01

    The general objective is the design and implementation of a new sensor technology that offers the unprecedented levels of specificity needed for analysis of the complex chemical mixtures found at DOE sites nationwide. The specific objectives are threefold: demonstration of the general sensor concept on a variety of model systems; development of a sensor for ferrocyanide with testing on waste tank simulant; and development of a sensor for pertechnetate applicable to the Vadose Zone.

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Epidermal Heat Flux Sensors for Measurements of Core Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Webb, Richard Chad; Luo, Hongying; Xue, Yeguang; Kurniawan, Jonas; Cho, Nam Heon; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2016-01-01

    Long-term, continuous measurement of core body temperature is of high interest, due to the widespread use of this parameter as a key biomedical signal for clinical judgment and patient management. Traditional approaches rely on devices or instruments in rigid and planar forms, not readily amenable to intimate or conformable integration with soft, curvilinear, time-dynamic, surfaces of the skin. Here, materials and mechanics designs for differential temperature sensors are presented which can attach softly and reversibly onto the skin surface, and also sustain high levels of deformation (e.g., bending, twisting, and stretching). A theoretical approach, together with a modeling algorithm, yields core body temperature from multiple differential measurements from temperature sensors separated by different effective distances from the skin. The sensitivity, accuracy, and response time are analyzed by finite element analyses (FEA) to provide guidelines for relationships between sensor design and performance. Four sets of experiments on multiple devices with different dimensions and under different convection conditions illustrate the key features of the technology and the analysis approach. Finally, results indicate that thermally insulating materials with cellular structures offer advantages in reducing the response time and increasing the accuracy, while improving the mechanics and breathability.

  9. New Tendencies in Development of Carbonaceous Additives for Welding Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Kryukov, R. E.; Kozyreva, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper provides results of comparative analysis of the effect of carbonaceous components introduced into welding fluxes on molten metal - slag interaction. Thermodynamical calculations of dehydrogenization are presented for submerged arc welding. A positive influence of carbonaceous additives on gas content and mechanical properties of welds is demonstrated. Carbon and fluorine containing additives are emphasized to be promising for automatic submerged arc welding.

  10. High-{Tc} DC SQUID and flux transformer development

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, A.A.; Angus, V.; Betts, K.

    1994-12-31

    A description is presented of the fabrication and properties of high {Tc} DC SQUIDS and flux transformers fabricated by dry processing of pulsed laser ablated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) thin films. SQUIDs have been fabricated with either bicrystal substrate or step edge junctions. For all devices fabricated thus far, measurements indicate a similar character to the flux noise spectra with a significant 1/f noise component below 100--500 Hz. The transfer function and energy sensitivities as a function of SQUID inductances in the range 60--200 pH have been measured for bicrystal DC SQUIDs and compared with estimates. Various techniques have been employed to improve the magnetic field sensitivity of the uncoupled DC SQUID toward more practical levels including the use of large area washers, single layer magnetometers and 3-level flux transformers fabricated from trilayers of YBCO/SrTiO{sub 3}/YBCO. The properties of open input coils are presented as well as the performance of closed loop transformers coupled via flip chip geometry to the SQUID washer. A white magnetic noise level of {approx} 130 fT rms/{radical}Hz above 200 Hz has been reached with a flux transformer with a 15 turn input coil and pick-up loop area of 13 mm{sup 2}.

  11. Development of a Distributed Crack Sensor Using Coaxial Cable.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiao, Tong; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cracks, the important factor of structure failure, reflect structural damage directly. Thus, it is significant to realize distributed, real-time crack monitoring. To overcome the shortages of traditional crack detectors, such as the inconvenience of installation, vulnerability, and low measurement range, etc., an improved topology-based cable sensor with a shallow helical groove on the outside surface of a coaxial cable is proposed in this paper. The sensing mechanism, fabrication method, and performances are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Crack monitoring experiments of the reinforced beams are also presented in this paper, illustrating the utility of this sensor in practical applications. These studies show that the sensor can identify a minimum crack width of 0.02 mm and can measure multiple cracks with a spatial resolution of 3 mm. In addition, it is also proved that the sensor performs well to detect the initiation and development of cracks until structure failure. PMID:27483280

  12. Development of a Distributed Crack Sensor Using Coaxial Cable.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiao, Tong; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cracks, the important factor of structure failure, reflect structural damage directly. Thus, it is significant to realize distributed, real-time crack monitoring. To overcome the shortages of traditional crack detectors, such as the inconvenience of installation, vulnerability, and low measurement range, etc., an improved topology-based cable sensor with a shallow helical groove on the outside surface of a coaxial cable is proposed in this paper. The sensing mechanism, fabrication method, and performances are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Crack monitoring experiments of the reinforced beams are also presented in this paper, illustrating the utility of this sensor in practical applications. These studies show that the sensor can identify a minimum crack width of 0.02 mm and can measure multiple cracks with a spatial resolution of 3 mm. In addition, it is also proved that the sensor performs well to detect the initiation and development of cracks until structure failure.

  13. Development of a Distributed Crack Sensor Using Coaxial Cable

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiao, Tong; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cracks, the important factor of structure failure, reflect structural damage directly. Thus, it is significant to realize distributed, real-time crack monitoring. To overcome the shortages of traditional crack detectors, such as the inconvenience of installation, vulnerability, and low measurement range, etc., an improved topology-based cable sensor with a shallow helical groove on the outside surface of a coaxial cable is proposed in this paper. The sensing mechanism, fabrication method, and performances are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Crack monitoring experiments of the reinforced beams are also presented in this paper, illustrating the utility of this sensor in practical applications. These studies show that the sensor can identify a minimum crack width of 0.02 mm and can measure multiple cracks with a spatial resolution of 3 mm. In addition, it is also proved that the sensor performs well to detect the initiation and development of cracks until structure failure. PMID:27483280

  14. Development of highly sensitive sensor system for methane utilizing cataluminescence.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gu; Zhu, Hua

    2016-02-01

    A gaseous sensor system was developed for the detection of methane based on its cataluminescence emission. Cataluminescence characteristics and optimal conditions were studied in detail under optimized experimental conditions. Results showed that the methane cataluminescence sensor system could cover a linear detection range from 10 to 5800 ppm (R = 0.9963, n = 7) and the detection limit was about 7 ppm (S/N = 3), which was below the standard permitted concentration. Moreover, a linear discriminant analysis method was used to test the recognizable performance of the methane sensor. It was found that methane, ethane, propane and pentane could be distinguished clearly. Its methane sensing properties, including improved sensitivity, selectivity, stability and recognition demonstrated the TiO2/SnO2 materials to be promising candidates for constructing a cataluminescence-based gas sensor that could be used for detecting explosive gas contaminants.

  15. Recent Developments in Chemically Reactive Sensors for Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Mast, Dion J.; Baker, David L.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Propellant system leaks can pose a significant hazard in aerospace operations. For example, a leak in the hydrazine supply system of the shuttle auxiliary power unit (APU) has resulted in hydrazine ignition and fire in the aft compartment of the shuttle. Sensors indicating the location of a leak could provide valuable information required for operational decisions. WSTF has developed a small, single-use sensor for detection of propellant leaks. The sensor is composed of a thermistor bead coated with a substance which is chemically reactive with the propellant. The reactive thermistor is one of a pair of closely located thermistors, the other being a reference. On exposure to the propellant, the reactive coating responds exothermically to it and increases the temperature of the coated-thermistor by several degrees. The temperature rise is sensed by a resistive bridge circuit, and an alarm is registered by data acquisition software. The concept is general and has been applied to sensors for hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsym-dimethylhydrazine, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, and dinitrogen tetroxide. Responses of these sensors to humidity, propellant concentration, distance from the liquid leak, and ambient pressure levels arc presented. A multi-use sensor has also been developed for hydrazine based on its catalytic reactivity with noble metals.

  16. AMRDEC's HWIL synthetic environment development efforts for LADAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin J.; Cornell, Michael C.; Naumann, Charles B.

    2004-08-01

    Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing has been an integral part of the modeling and simulation efforts at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (AMRDEC). AMRDEC's history includes the development and implementation of several unique technologies for producing synthetic environments in the visible, infrared, MMW and RF regions. With the emerging sensor/electronics technology, LADAR sensors are becoming more viable option as an integral part of weapon systems, and AMRDEC has been expending efforts to develop the capabilities for testing LADAR sensors in a HWIL environment. There are several areas of challenges in LADAR HWIL testing, since the simulation requirements for the electronics and computation are stressing combinations of the passive image and active sensor HWIL testing. There have been several key areas where advancements have been made to address the challenges in developing a synthetic environment for the LADAR sensor testing. In this paper, we will present the latest results from the LADAR projector development and test efforts at AMRDEC's Advanced Simulation Center (ASC).

  17. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2002-01-01

    In response to recommendations from the National Aviation Weather Program Council, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with industry to develop an electronic pilot reporting capability for small aircraft. This paper describes the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) sensor development effort. NASA is working with industry to develop a sensor capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, magnetic heading, pressure, icing, and average turbulence energy dissipation. Users of the data include National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) forecast modelers, air traffic controllers, flight service stations, airline operation centers, and pilots. Preliminary results from flight tests are presented.

  18. Stop-and-Go Mode: Sensor Manipulation as Essential as Sensor Development in Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Hyyppä, Juha; Kukko, Antero

    2013-01-01

    This study was dedicated to illustrating the significance of sensor manipulation in the case of terrestrial laser scanning, which is a field now in quick development. In fact, this quickness was mainly rooted in the emergence of new sensors with better performance, while the implications of sensor manipulation have not been fully recognized by the whole community. For this technical gap, the stop-and-go mapping mode can be reckoned as one of the potential solution plans. Stop-and-go was first proposed to handle the low efficiency of traditional static terrestrial laser scanning, and then, it was re-emphasized to improve the stability of sample collections for the state-of-the-art technology of mobile laser scanning. This work reviewed the previous efforts of trying the stop-and-go mode for improving the performance of static and mobile terrestrial laser scanning and generalized their principles respectively. This work also analyzed its advantages compared to the fully-static and fully-kinematic terrestrial laser scanning, and suggested the plans with more automatic measures for raising the efficacy of terrestrial laser scanning. Overall, this literature review indicated that the stop-and-go mapping mode as a case with generic sense can verify the presumption of sensor manipulation as essential as sensor development. PMID:23799493

  19. Early results from the development of a miniature tunable diode laser gas cell for measuring CO2 isotopologue fluxes in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, J. L.; Bora, M.; Bond, T.; Wharton, S.

    2014-12-01

    In order to accurately predict how ecosystems will respond to climate change, it is necessary to separate the response of respiration and photosynthetic uptake individually to environmental conditions. Currently, the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 is measured continuously at various ecosystems around the world. Net CO­2 flux can be partitioned into the primary components using either models or measurements of 13C/12C in the CO2 flux. We introduce recent technological developments toward in situ, rapid, continuous measurements of fluxes of 13CO2 and 12CO2. We describe a unique approach to achieving 10Hz measurements of CO2 using tunable diode laser gas absorption spectroscopy in a multi-pass White cell capable of being deployed directly to a canopy. We will first discuss proof-of-concept characterization of the technique using wave modulation spectroscopy with a laser tuned to detect 12CO2 fluxes. We show the sensitivity of the 2w component of a wave-modulated signal to CO2 concentration, the precision, and the accuracy of the sensor as well as the stability of the sensor under normal ranges of ambient temperature and humidity in an environmental chamber. We then show preliminary results of sensor performance with a laser tuned to measure 13CO2 and 12CO2 fluxes. We discuss our approach to reliably measuring multiple peaks of gas absorption while maintaining the rapid sampling rates necessary for flux calculations. We will also discuss considerations for extending the sensor from the lab to being directly deployed into a canopy for in situ measurements. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS- 658355

  20. Development of new flux splitting schemes. [computational fluid dynamics algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Maximizing both accuracy and efficiency has been the primary objective in designing a numerical algorithm for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is especially important for solutions of complex three dimensional systems of Navier-Stokes equations which often include turbulence modeling and chemistry effects. Recently, upwind schemes have been well received for their capability in resolving discontinuities. With this in mind, presented are two new flux splitting techniques for upwind differencing. The first method is based on High-Order Polynomial Expansions (HOPE) of the mass flux vector. The second new flux splitting is based on the Advection Upwind Splitting Method (AUSM). The calculation of the hypersonic conical flow demonstrates the accuracy of the splitting in resolving the flow in the presence of strong gradients. A second series of tests involving the two dimensional inviscid flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil demonstrates the ability of the AUSM to resolve the shock discontinuity at transonic speed. A third case calculates a series of supersonic flows over a circular cylinder. Finally, the fourth case deals with tests of a two dimensional shock wave/boundary layer interaction.

  1. Assessing inter-sensor variability and sensible heat flux derivation accuracy for a large aperture scintillometer.

    PubMed

    Rambikur, Evan H; Chávez, José L

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy in determining sensible heat flux (H) of three Kipp and Zonen large aperture scintillometers (LAS) was evaluated with reference to an eddy covariance (EC) system over relatively flat and uniform grassland near Timpas (CO, USA). Other tests have revealed inherent variability between Kipp and Zonen LAS units and bias to overestimate H. Average H fluxes were compared between LAS units and between LAS and EC. Despite good correlation, inter-LAS biases in H were found between 6% and 13% in terms of the linear regression slope. Physical misalignment was observed to result in increased scatter and bias between H solutions of a well-aligned and poorly-aligned LAS unit. Comparison of LAS and EC H showed little bias for one LAS unit, while the other two units overestimated EC H by more than 10%. A detector alignment issue may have caused the inter-LAS variability, supported by the observation in this study of differing power requirements between LAS units. It is possible that the LAS physical misalignment may have caused edge-of-beam signal noise as well as vulnerability to signal noise from wind-induced vibrations, both having an impact on the solution of H. In addition, there were some uncertainties in the solutions of H from the LAS and EC instruments, including lack of energy balance closure with the EC unit. However, the results obtained do not show clear evidence of inherent bias for the Kipp and Zonen LAS to overestimate H as found in other studies.

  2. Development of Green Box sensor module technologies for rail applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.; Breeding, R.; Hogan, J.; Mitchell, J.; McKeen, R.G.; Brogan, J.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work, supported by the New Mexico State Transportation Authority, examines a family of smart sensor products that can be tailored to the specific needs of the user. The concept uses a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. Advances in sensor microelectronics and digital signal processing permit us to produce a class of smart sensors that interpret raw data and transmit inferred information. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and consequence of hazardous materials incidents. The system would be capable of numerous activities including: monitoring cargo integrity, controlling system braking and vehicle acceleration, recognizing component failure conditions, and logging sensor data. A cost-benefit analysis examines the loss of revenue resulting from theft, hazardous materials incidents, and accidents. Customer survey data are combined with the cost benefit analysis and used to guide the product requirements definition for a series of specific applications. A common electrical architecture is developed to support the product line and permit rapid product realization. Results of a concept validation, which used commercial hardware and was conducted on a revenue-generating train, are also reported.

  3. Simulation of response functions of fast neutron sensors and development of thin neutron silicon sensor.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Mikihiko; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2014-10-01

    On radiation detection using silicon sensor, signals are produced from collected charges in a depletion layer; however, for high-energy particles, this depletion layer is extended due to funnelling phenomenon. The lengths of charge collection were experimentally obtained from proton peak energies in measured pulse-heights. The length is extended with increasing proton energy of up to 6 MeV, and then, is constant over 6 MeV. The response functions of fast neutron sensors were simulated for 5- and 15-MeV monoenergetic and (252)Cf neutron sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. The simulation results agree well with the experimental ones, including the effect of funnelling phenomenon. In addition, a thin silicon sensor was developed for a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter. Photon sensitivity is vanishingly smaller than neutron one by a factor of 5×10(-4). PMID:24516186

  4. Simulation of response functions of fast neutron sensors and development of thin neutron silicon sensor.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Mikihiko; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2014-10-01

    On radiation detection using silicon sensor, signals are produced from collected charges in a depletion layer; however, for high-energy particles, this depletion layer is extended due to funnelling phenomenon. The lengths of charge collection were experimentally obtained from proton peak energies in measured pulse-heights. The length is extended with increasing proton energy of up to 6 MeV, and then, is constant over 6 MeV. The response functions of fast neutron sensors were simulated for 5- and 15-MeV monoenergetic and (252)Cf neutron sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. The simulation results agree well with the experimental ones, including the effect of funnelling phenomenon. In addition, a thin silicon sensor was developed for a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter. Photon sensitivity is vanishingly smaller than neutron one by a factor of 5×10(-4).

  5. Scene projection technology development for imaging sensor testing at AEDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, H.; Fedde, M.; Crider, D.; Horne, H.; Bynum, K.; Steely, S.; Labello, J.

    2012-06-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is tasked with visible-to-LWIR imaging sensor calibration and characterization, as well as hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing with high-fidelity complex scene projection to validate sensor mission performance. They are thus involved in the development of technologies and methodologies that are used in space simulation chambers for such testing. These activities support a variety of program needs such as space situational awareness (SSA). This paper provides an overview of pertinent technologies being investigated and implemented at AEDC.

  6. A study for hypergolic vapor sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetter, J. R.; Tellefsen, K.

    1977-01-01

    In summary, the following tasks were completed within the scope of this work: (1) a portable Monomethylhydrazine analyzer was developed, designed, fabricated and tested. (2) A portable NO2 analyzer was developed, designed, fabricated and tested. (3) Sampling probes and accessories were designed and fabricated for this instrumentation. (4) Improvements and modifications were made to the model 7630 Ecolyzer in preparation for field testing. (5) Instrument calibration procedures and hydrazine handling techniques necessary to the successful application of this hardware were developed.

  7. FY2011 Progress Report: Agreement 8697 - NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2011-11-01

    Objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) OBD II systems; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing methods that are compatible with mass fabrication; and (3) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization. Approach used is: (1) Use an ionic (O{sup 2-}) conducting ceramic as a solid electrolyte and metal or metal-oxide electrodes; (2) Correlate NO{sub x} concentration with changes in cell impedance; (3) Evaluate sensing mechanisms and aging effects on long-term performance using electrochemical techniques; and (4) Collaborate with Ford Research Center to optimize sensor performance and perform dynamometer and on-vehicle testing. Work in FY2011 focused on using an algorithm developed in FY2010 in a simplified strategy to demonstrate how data from controlled laboratory evaluation could be applied to data from real-world engine testing. The performance of a Au wire prototype sensor was evaluated in the laboratory with controlled gas compositions and in dynamometer testing with diesel exhaust. The laboratory evaluation indicated a nonlinear dependence of the NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} sensitivity with concentration. For both NO{sub x} and O{sub 2}, the prototype sensor had higher sensitivity at concentrations less than {approx}20 ppm and {approx}7%, respectively, compared to lower NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} sensitivity at concentrations greater than {approx}50 ppm and {approx}10.5%, respectively. Results in dynamometer diesel exhaust generally agreed with the laboratory results. Diesel exhaust after-treatment systems will likely require detection levels less than {approx}20 ppm in order to meet emission regulations. The relevant mathematical expressions for sensitivity in

  8. Assessing Inter-Sensor Variability and Sensible Heat Flux Derivation Accuracy for a Large Aperture Scintillometer

    PubMed Central

    Rambikur, Evan H.; Chávez, José L.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy in determining sensible heat flux (H) of three Kipp and Zonen large aperture scintillometers (LAS) was evaluated with reference to an eddy covariance (EC) system over relatively flat and uniform grassland near Timpas (CO, USA). Other tests have revealed inherent variability between Kipp and Zonen LAS units and bias to overestimate H. Average H fluxes were compared between LAS units and between LAS and EC. Despite good correlation, inter-LAS biases in H were found between 6% and 13% in terms of the linear regression slope. Physical misalignment was observed to result in increased scatter and bias between H solutions of a well-aligned and poorly-aligned LAS unit. Comparison of LAS and EC H showed little bias for one LAS unit, while the other two units overestimated EC H by more than 10%. A detector alignment issue may have caused the inter-LAS variability, supported by the observation in this study of differing power requirements between LAS units. It is possible that the LAS physical misalignment may have caused edge-of-beam signal noise as well as vulnerability to signal noise from wind-induced vibrations, both having an impact on the solution of H. In addition, there were some uncertainties in the solutions of H from the LAS and EC instruments, including lack of energy balance closure with the EC unit. However, the results obtained do not show clear evidence of inherent bias for the Kipp and Zonen LAS to overestimate H as found in other studies. PMID:24473285

  9. Development of sensors for monitoring oxygen and free radicals in plant physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Prachee

    Oxygen plays a critical role in the physiology of photosynthetic organisms, including bioenergetics, metabolism, development, and stress response. Oxygen levels affect photosynthesis, respiration, and alternative oxidase pathways. Likewise, the metabolic rate of spatially distinct plant cells (and therefore oxygen flux) is known to be affected by biotic stress (e.g., herbivory) and environmental stress (e.g., salt/nutrient stress). During aerobic metabolism, cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by product. Plants also produce ROS during adaptation to stress (e.g., abscisic acid (ABA) mediated stress responses). If stress conditions are prolonged, ROS levels surpass the capacity of detoxifying mechanisms within the cell, resulting in oxidative damage. While stress response pathways such as ABA-mediated mechanisms have been well characterized (e.g., water stress, inhibited shoot growth, synthesis of storage proteins in seeds), the connection between ROS production, oxygen metabolism and stress response remains unknown. In part, this is because details of oxygen transport at the interface of cell(s) and the surrounding microenvironment remains nebulous. The overall goal of this research was to develop oxygen and Free radical sensors for studying stress signaling in plants. Recent developments in nanomaterials and data acquisition systems were integrated to develop real-time, non-invasive oxygen and Free radical sensors. The availability of these sensors for plant physiologists is an exciting opportunity to probe the functional realm of cells and tissues in ways that were not previously possible.

  10. Development of a Pyramid Wave-front Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hadi, Kacem; Vignaux, Mael; Fusco, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Within the framework of the E-ELT studies, several laboratories are involved on some instruments: HARMONY with its ATLAS adaptive optics [AO] system, EAGLE or EPICS. Most of the AO systems will probably integrate one or several pyramidal wavefront sensors, PWFS (R. Ragazzoni [1]). The coupling in an AO loop and the control in laboratory (then on sky) of this type of sensor is fundamental for the continuation of the projects related to OA systems on the E-ELT. LAM (Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) is involved in particular in the VLT-SPHERE, ATLAS, EPICS projects. For the last few years, our laboratory has been carrying out different R&D activities in AO instrumentation for ELTs. An experimental AO bench is designed and being developed to allow the validation of new wave-front sensing and control concepts [2]. One the objectives of this bench, is the experimental validation of a pyramid WFS. Theoretical investigations on its behavior have been already made. The world's fastest and most sensitive camera system (OCAM2) has been recently developed at LAM (J.L Gach [3], First Light Imaging). Conjugating this advantage with the pyramid concept, we plan to demonstrate a home made Pyramid sensor for Adaptive Optics whose the speed and the precision are the key points. As a joint collaboration with ONERA and Shaktiware, our work aims at the optimization (measurement process, calibration and operation) in laboratory then on the sky of a pyramid sensor dedicated to the first generation instruments for ELTs. The sensor will be implemented on the ONERA ODISSEE AO bench combining thus a pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. What would give the possibility to compare strictly these two WFS types and make this bench unique in France and even in Europe. Experimental work on laboratory demonstration is undergoing. The status of our development will presented at the conference.

  11. High temperature static strain sensor development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C.; Lemkey, F.; Bailey, R.; Grant, H.

    1982-01-01

    The development of resistance strain gages which are useful for static strain measurements on nickel or cobalt superalloy parts inside a gas turbine engine on a test stand were examined. These measurements of a strain gage alloy development program which to be followed by an optional investigation of complete strain gage systems which will use the best of the alloys developed together with other system improvements is reviewed. The specific goal for the complete system is to make measurements to 2,000 micro epsilon with error of only + or - 10% over a 50 hour period. In addition to simple survival and stability, attaining a low thermal coefficient to resistivity, of order 100 ppm/K or less, is also a major goal. The first task was to select candidate alloys or alloy systems using a search of the literature and the available metallurgical theory. Alloy candidates were evaluated and compared by a grading system. Equipment and techniques were developed which are suitable for iterative studies of a variety of compositions. Many compositions were examined and significantly improved alloys were identified.

  12. Harsh environment sensor development for advanced energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanosky, Robert R.; Maley, Susan M.

    2013-05-01

    Highly efficient, low emission power systems have extreme conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and corrosivity that require monitoring. Sensing in these harsh environments can provide key information that directly impacts process control and system reliability. To achieve the goals and demands of clean energy, the conditions under which fossil fuels are converted into heat and power are harsh compared to traditional combustion/steam cycles. Temperatures can extend as high as 1600 Celsius (°C) in certain systems and pressures can reach as high as 5000 pounds per square inch (psi)/340 atmospheres (atm). The lack of suitable measurement technology serves as a driver for the innovations in harsh environment sensor development. Two major considerations in the development of harsh environments sensors are the materials used for sensing and the design of the sensing device. This paper will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy's, Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory's Program in advanced sensing concepts that are aimed at addressing the technology needs and drivers through the development of new sensor materials and designs capable of withstanding harsh environment conditions. Recent developments with harsh environment sensors will be highlighted and future directions towards in advanced sensing will be introduced.

  13. Development of a highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Ogino, H; Asakura, K

    1995-02-01

    A highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor was successfully developed for determining parts per billion of oxygen in high purity gases such as nitrogen, argon, etc. The response of this improved sensor was proportional in the range of oxygen concentrations from 10.0 ppm to the detection limit. The response speed in this study was improved to within 90 sec for a 90% response. The detection limit was tentatively found to be less than 0.4 ppb corresponding to S N = 2 .

  14. Developments in electrochemical sensors for occupational and environmental health applications.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Kevin

    2003-08-15

    This paper provides an overview of recent advances in electrochemical sensors for industrial hygiene monitoring applications. Currently available instrument technologies as well as new devices under development are both exemplified. Progress in ruggedization and miniaturization of electroanalytical devices has led to significant improvements for on-site monitoring applications, e.g. in harsh environments and in biological monitoring. Sensor arrays and modified electrodes offer considerable promise for improved electrochemical sensing, i.e. through multi-species detection and enhanced selectivity. On-site electroanalytical detection and measurement in the field may become more widely used for applications in occupational health monitoring.

  15. Application of bacteriophages in sensor development.

    PubMed

    Peltomaa, Riikka; López-Perolio, Irene; Benito-Peña, Elena; Barderas, Rodrigo; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage-based bioassays are a promising alternative to traditional antibody-based immunoassays. Bacteriophages, shortened to phages, can be easily conjugated or genetically engineered. Phages are robust, ubiquitous in nature, and harmless to humans. Notably, phages do not usually require inoculation and killing of animals; and thus, the production of phages is simple and economical. In recent years, phage-based biosensors have been developed featuring excellent robustness, sensitivity, and selectivity in combination with the ease of integration into transduction devices. This review provides a critical overview of phage-based bioassays and biosensors developed in the last few years using different interrogation methods such as colorimetric, enzymatic, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, magnetoelastic, Raman, or electrochemical techniques.

  16. Advanced high temperature static strain sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C. O.; Stetson, K. A.; Grant, H. P.; Jameikis, S. M.; Morey, W. W.; Raymondo, P.; Grudkowski, T. W.; Bailey, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    An examination was made into various techniques to be used to measure static strain in gas turbine liners at temperatures up to 1150 K (1600 F). The methods evaluated included thin film and wire resistive devices, optical fibers, surface acoustic waves, the laser speckle technique with a heterodyne readout, optical surface image and reflective approaches and capacitive devices. A preliminary experimental program to develop a thin film capacitive device was dropped because calculations showed that it would be too sensitive to thermal gradients. In a final evaluation program, the laser speckle technique appeared to work well up to 1150 K when it was used through a relatively stagnant air path. The surface guided acoustic wave approach appeared to be interesting but to require too much development effort for the funds available. Efforts to develop a FeCrAl resistive strain gage system were only partially successful and this part of the effort was finally reduced to a characterization study of the properties of the 25 micron diameter FeCrAl (Kanthal A-1) wire. It was concluded that this particular alloy was not suitable for use as the resistive element in a strain gage above about 1000 K.

  17. Development of a thermal neutron sensor for Humanitarian Demining.

    PubMed

    Cinausero, M; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Viesti, G; Filippini, V

    2004-07-01

    A thermal neutron sensor prototype for Humanitarian Demining has been developed, trying to minimize cost and complexity of the system as required in such application. A (252)Cf source or a sealed-tube neutron generator is employed to produce primary fast neutrons that are thermalized in a moderator designed to optimize the neutron capture reaction yield in buried samples. A description of the sensor, including the performances of the acquisition system based on a Flash ADC card and final tests with explosive simulants are reported. A comparison of the sensor performance when using a radioactive source to that when employing a sealed-tube neutron generator is presented. Limitations and possible applications of this technique are discussed. PMID:15145439

  18. Development of a Portable Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Multi-Sensing Points Based on the Linear CCD Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jie; Furui, Koji; Nakajima, Hizuru; Kaneki, Noriaki; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko; Hemmi, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    A portable-type surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor, composed from a new optical system for multi-sensing, has been developed to apply to environment analysis, clinical diagnosis etc., where many samples are desired to be analyzed at high throughput. The optical system of the sensor consists of a light-emitting diode, a pair of cylindrical lenses, a pair of collimator lenses, a correction lens, a prism, a polarizer and a linear CCD sensor with 2048 pixels. Reflected light from a sensor chip of the width of 6 mm at a certain incident angle was detected by ca. 618 pixels of the linear CCD sensor as an SPR sensor signal. An SPR sensor signal at a specified incident angle is controllable for optimization by adjusting the position of the CCD sensor. A sensor chip having a 30-stripe linear pattern (100 μm width/stripe) was prepared. The spatial resolution as well as the performance of the sensor were evaluated by using sucrose solutions. As a result, the acquisition of SPR sensor signals from 30 sensing points was successfully achieved with a spatial resolution of 100 μm (distance between 2 sensing points). A lower detection limit of ca. 3.2 - 5.5 × 10(-5) RIU with a standard deviation of ±4.5% was obtained by averaging the signals from 6 - 7 pixels of the CCD sensor per one sensing stripe.

  19. Development of a reliable, miniaturized hydrogen safety sensor prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, Praveen K; Brosha, Eric L; Rangachary, Mukundan; Garzon, Fernando H; Williamson, Todd L

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the development and long-term testing of a hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle and infrastructure applications is presented. The working device is demonstrated through application of commercial and reproducible manufacturing methods and rigorous life testing results guided by materials selection, and sensor design. Fabricated using Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as the sensing electrode, Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte and Platinum (Pt) as a pseudo-counter electrode, the device was subjected to interference studies, temperature cycling, and long-testing routine. The sensor responded in real time to varying concentrations of H{sub 2} (1000 to 20,000 ppm) monitored under a humidified condition. Among the interference gases tested such as nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), carbon monoxide (CO), and propylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}), the sensor showed cross-sensitivity to C{sub 3}H{sub 6}. Analyzing the overall device performance over 4000 hrs of testing for 5000 ppm of H{sub 2}, (a) the sensitivity varied {+-}21% compared to response recorded at 0 hrs, and (c) the response rise time fluctuated between 3 to 46 s. The salient features of the H{sub 2} sensor prototype designed and co-developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are (a) stable three phase interface (electrode/electrolyte/gas) leading to reliable sensor operation, (b) low power consumption, (b) compactness to fit into critical areas of application, (c) simple operation, (d) fast response, (e) a direct voltage read-out circumventing the need for any additional conditioning circuitry, and (f) conducive to commercialization.

  20. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Laster, Kimala L.

    2008-01-01

    The need for sensors to operate in harsh environments is illustrated by the need for measurements in the turbine engine hot section. The degradation and damage that develops over time in hot section components can lead to catastrophic failure. At present, the degradation processes that occur in the harsh hot section environment are poorly characterized, which hinders development of more durable components, and since it is so difficult to model turbine blade temperatures, strains, etc, actual measurements are needed. The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in harsh environments. The effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines is described, first in the fan and compressor modules, and then in the hot section. The near-term goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. A thorough literature search was conducted for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges chemically and physically compatible with the NASA GRCs microfabrication procedures and substrate materials. Test results are given for tantalum, titanium and zirconium-based nitride and oxynitride ceramic films.

  2. Development of Clinically Relevant Implantable Pressure Sensors: Perspectives and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Ingelin; Glott, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This review describes different aspects to consider when developing implantable pressure sensor systems. Measurement of pressure is in general highly important in clinical practice and medical research. Due to the small size, light weight and low energy consumption Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology represents new possibilities for monitoring of physiological parameters inside the human body. Development of clinical relevant sensors requires close collaboration between technological experts and medical clinicians. Site of operation, size restrictions, patient safety, and required measurement range and resolution, are only some conditions that must be taken into account. An implantable device has to operate under very hostile conditions. Long-term in vivo pressure measurements are particularly demanding because the pressure sensitive part of the sensor must be in direct or indirect physical contact with the medium for which we want to detect the pressure. New sensor packaging concepts are demanded and must be developed through combined effort between scientists in MEMS technology, material science, and biology. Before launching a new medical device on the market, clinical studies must be performed. Regulatory documents and international standards set the premises for how such studies shall be conducted and reported. PMID:25248071

  3. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  4. Development of three-axis inkjet printer for gear sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Rodriguez Lopez, Ricardo; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Morimasa; Miura, Nanako; Iizuka, Takashi; Masuda, Arata; Moriwaki, Ichiro; Sone, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The long-term objective of our research is to develop sensor systems for detection of gear failure signs. As a very first step, this paper proposes a new method to create sensors directly printed on gears by a printer and conductive ink, and shows the printing system configuration and the procedure of sensor development. The developing printer system is a laser sintering system consisting of a laser and CNC machinery. The laser is able to synthesize micro conductive patterns, and introduced to the CNC machinery as a tool. In order to synthesize sensors on gears, we first design the micro-circuit pattern on a gear through the use of 3D-CAD, and create a program (G-code) for the CNC machinery by CAM. This paper shows initial experiments with the laser sintering process in order to obtain the optimal parameters for the laser setting. This new method proposed here may provide a new manufacturing process for mechanical parts, which have an additional functionality to detect failure, and possible improvements include creating more economical and sustainable systems.

  5. Development of an automated microbial sensor system.

    PubMed

    Heim, S; Schnieder, I; Binz, D; Vogel, A; Bilitewski, U

    1999-02-01

    An automated whole cell biosensor system was developed by integration of immobilized microbial cells in a flow-through system with screen-printed flow-through electrodes as detectors. The detectors used were thick-film Pt-electrodes in a 3-electrode configuration constructed as sandwich flow-through cells with a volume of about 36 microliters polarized at -900 mV. The measuring principle was the determination of oxygen consumption due to the microbial metabolism. Fructose was used as model analyte. The microorganisms were immobilized on cellulose-acetate membranes and integrated into a newly created reaction chamber (membrane reactor). The microbial cells used were Rhodococcus erythropolis and Issatchenkia orientalis known to be suitable for the determination of biological oxygen demand.

  6. Various methods and developments for calibrating seismological sensors at EOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JUND, H.; Bès de Berc, M.; Thore, J.

    2013-12-01

    Calibrating seismic sensors is crucial for knowing the quality of the sensor and generating precise dataless files. We present here three calibration methods that we have developed for the short period and broad band sensors included in the temporary and permanent seismic networks in France. First, in the case of a short-period sensor with no electronics and calibration coil, we inject a sine wave signal into the signal coil. After locking the sensor mass, we first connect a voltage generator of signal waves and a series resistor to the coil. Then, a sinusoidal signal is sent to the sensor signal coil output. Both the voltage at the terminal of the resistor, which gives an image of the intensity entering the signal coil, and the voltage at the terminal of the signal coil are measured. The frequency of the generator then varies in order to find a phase shift between both signals of π/2. The output frequency of the generator corresponds to the image of the natural frequency of the sensor. Second, in the case of all types of sensors provided with a calibration coil, we inject different signals into the calibration coil. We usually apply two signals: a step signal and a sweep (or wobble) signal. A step signal into the calibration coil is equivalent to a Dirac excitation in derived acceleration. The response to this Dirac gives the transfer function of the signal coil, derived two times and without absolute gain. We developed a field-module allowing us to always apply the same excitation to various models of seismometers, in order to compare the results from several instruments previously installed on field. A wobble signal is a signal whose frequency varies. By varying the frequency of the input signal around the sensor's natural frequency, we obtain an immediate response of the sensor in acceleration. This method is particularly suitable in order to avoid any disturbances which may modify the signal of a permanent station. Finally, for the determination of absolute

  7. Development and installation of Picostrain sensors in structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sener, Joseph C.; Latta, Bernard M.; Ross, Jimmy D.

    2004-07-01

    The concept of the Picostrain sensor technology is based on a standard, commercially available, electrical cable assembly embedded in pavement or structural members. The concept has been developed through the 1990s and patented by the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) in 2003. The objective of this new technology is to build an inexpensive, easily installed and maintained sensor system for the purposes of vehicle classification (VC), vehicle identification (VI), weigh-in-motion (WIM), and vehicle tracking (VT) applications along with real-time monitoring and evaluation of structural performance under static and dynamic traffic loading. It is intended, in the future, that these sensors will be further developed to replace curently utilized expensive embedded pavement and structural sensors for ultimate improvement of transportation decision-making and planning. This will also help to document the movement of people and goods along with the evironmental, social, economic and financial parameters with an emphasis on tracking movements in social life for security based upon the use of this durable and reliable transducers. Approximately, 400 sensors have been installed on and in the reinforced concrete structural members of the West Park Center River Crossing Bridge (Bridge) and the Micron Engineering Center (MEC) building (Building) at Boise State University (BSU) in Boise, Idaho, USA, since 1998. These sensors were installed: in bridge pile caps, piers, girders and decks; bridge abutment embankments; building footings, columns, beams, floor slabs; and, have been linked to instrument cabinets on site. These sensors installed structures may now be called "smart" structures since they contain a resident sensing system capable of maintaining a constant watch over the integrity of the structure. These sensing systems will be able to evaluate the applied loads, as well as the static and dynamic response of the structure. This paper introduces and describes the new

  8. Developing a High-Flux Isolated Attosecond Pulse Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalov, Andrei; Ware, Matthew; Bucksbaum, Philip; Cryan, James

    2016-05-01

    High harmonic based light sources have proven to be valuable experimental tools that facilitate studies of electron dynamics at their natural timescale, the attosecond regime. The nature of driving laser sources used in high harmonic generation make it difficult to attain attosecond pulses that are both isolated in time and of a high intensity. We present our progress in commissioning a beamline designed to produce high-flux isolated attosecond pulses. A multistep amplification process provides us with 30 mJ, 25 fs pulses centered around 800 nm with 100 Hz repetition rate. These pulses are spatially split and focused into a gas cell. A non-collinear optical gating scheme is used to produce a lighthouse source of high harmonic radiation wherein each beamlet is an isolated attosecond pulse. A variable-depth grazing-incidence stepped mirror is fabricated to extend the optical path length of the older beamlets and thus overlap the beamlets in time. The combined beam is tightly focused and ensuing mechanics will be studied with an electron spectrometer as well as a xuv photon spectrometer. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  9. Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor With Dynamic Demodulation Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed in-house a method to detect pressure fluctuations using a fiber-optic sensor and dynamic signal processing. This work was in support of the Intelligent Systems Controls and Operations project under NASA's Information Technology Base Research Program. We constructed an optical pressure sensor by attaching a fiber-optic Bragg grating to a flexible membrane and then adhering the membrane to one end of a small cylinder. The other end of the cylinder was left open and exposed to pressure variations from a pulsed air jet. These pressure variations flexed the membrane, inducing a strain in the fiber-optic grating. This strain was read out optically with a dynamic spectrometer to record changes in the wavelength of light reflected from the grating. The dynamic spectrometer was built in-house to detect very small wavelength shifts induced by the pressure fluctuations. The spectrometer is an unbalanced interferometer specifically designed for maximum sensitivity to wavelength shifts. An optimum pathlength difference, which was determined empirically, resulted in a 14-percent sensitivity improvement over theoretically predicted path-length differences. This difference is suspected to be from uncertainty about the spectral power difference of the signal reflected from the Bragg grating. The figure shows the output of the dynamic spectrometer as the sensor was exposed to a nominally 2-kPa peak-to-peak square-wave pressure fluctuation. Good tracking, sensitivity, and signal-to-noise ratios are evident even though the sensor was constructed as a proof-of-concept and was not optimized in any way. Therefore the fiber-optic Bragg grating, which is normally considered a good candidate as a strain or temperature sensor, also has been shown to be a good candidate for a dynamic pressure sensor.

  10. Oil spill remote sensors: Review, trends and new developments

    SciTech Connect

    Fingas, M.F.; Brown, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Remote-sensors for application to oil spills are assessed, and new developments and trends highlighted. The most common sensor used at this time, is an infrared camera or an IR/UV system. This sensor class can detect oil under a variety of conditions, discriminate oil from some backgrounds and has the lowest cost of any sensor. The inherent weaknesses include the inability to discriminate oil on beaches, among weeds or debris and under certain lighting conditions, oil is not detected. Furthermore, water-in-oil emulsions are sometimes not detected in the infrared. New technology has made IR technology very cheap and practical, so despite its limitations, it will be a very important tool in the future. The laser fluorosensor is an instrument of the future because of its unique capability to identify oil on backgrounds that include water, soil, ice and snow. It is the only sensor that can positively discriminate oil on most backgrounds. Radar offers the only potential for large area searches and foul weather remote sensing. Radar is costly, requires a dedicated aircraft, and is prone to many interferences. False targets can be as high as 95%. Equipment operating in the visible spectrum, such as cameras and scanners, is useful for documentation or providing a basis for the overlay of other data. It is not useful beyond this because oil shows no spectral characteristics in the visible region. Less use will be made of visible equipment in future years. The use of satellite imagery is reviewed. Optical sensors offer only marginal capability to the oil spill worker. Radar satellite imagery may provide useful overviews on known spills and very large spills. One important new trend will be the use of radar satellite for wide-area searching.

  11. Development of a Miniature Laser Interferometric Seismic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, D. W.; Bogart, G.; Zhang, J.; Robinson, D.; Milburn, H.; Baldwin, P.

    2009-12-01

    This paper details the development and initial testing of a new seismic sensing platform that could have broad impact on geophysics. There has long been a general desire for miniaturized sensors that could still maintain very low noise performance for geophysics research, earthquake monitoring, and nuclear test ban treaty monitoring. Smaller size directly translates into simpler deployment, which could in turn make it economical to build higher density arrays over the surface of the earth. Our prototype sensor design integrates laser optics with micromechanical structures and electronic components in a compact sensor capsule. The use of optical sensing enables a mechanical design that is not tightly coupled to the sensing modality, which leads to a smaller and more robust sensor system when compared with sensors that have competitive performance. Our prototype sensor, shown in Figure 1, achieved a noise floor of -150 dB/Hz, relative to 1 m2/s4, over a bandwith from 2 Hz to 100 Hz. Refinements to this design are continuing, with a target to achieve Low Noise Model (LNM) performance of -168 dB/Hz from 0.1 Hz to 100 Hz. This can be achieved with a part that is more than 40 times smaller than the existing state of the art. In this paper we will also show how this design is extensible to much lower frequencies that may be of interest in geophysics research. Figure 1. An image of the Sympony Acoustics SA1210 prototype optical seismometer. Figure 2. Seismogram display of data acquired simultaneously from a Symphony Acoustics SA1210 prototype and a Sercel L4C geophone, of an earthquake off the Baja peninsula. Data was taken in our laboratory in Rio Rancho, NM.

  12. DNA module platform for developing colorimetric aptamer sensors.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yasuyuki; Morita, Yuji; Suga, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a DNA module platform for developing simple aptamer sensors based on a microarray format combined with secondary structure prediction in silico. The platform comprises four parts: (i) aptamer, (ii) joint module, (iii) terminal stem, and (iv) a DNAzyme that catalyzes a redox reaction controlled by a structural change induced by aptamer/target binding. First, we developed a joint module, capable of sensing a conformational change in the aptamer region, that was linked to the signal transmission activity of a DNAzyme as the reporter in a concentration-dependent manner with the AMP aptamer. This module design was then used to generate an arginine sensor simply by replacing the AMP aptamer region with a previously reported arginine aptamer. Using this DNA module platform, we were also able to customize a microarray containing >10,000 sequences designed by in silico secondary structure prediction and successfully identify a new aptamer against patulin. Our results show that the DNA module platform can be used to readily devise sensors based on known aptamers as well as create new aptamer sensors by array-based screening. PMID:27286805

  13. Aquatic carbon fluxes in HD: using in-situ sensors to obtain a high definition picture of carbon cycling in streams (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, D. W.; Dornblaser, M.; Saraceno, J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Mast, A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    In-situ sensors provide a means to collect water-quality data in streams at time resolutions ranging from minutes to days, weeks, or months. Instruments may be deployed individually to investigate specific constituents of interest or in sensor arrays to provide a more complete picture for a suite of related compounds. Data from the instruments can provide direct measurements of some constituents (e.g., nitrate or dissolved CO2), or may be used as surrogates for other parameters (e.g., FDOM as a surrogate for DOC). These data may be used to improve estimates of nutrient or carbon fluxes, and to investigate processes influencing high-frequency variability in constituent concentrations. In this study, we examine high-temporal-resolution data from a suite of sensor arrays installed in mountain streams in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. The sensor arrays include fluorescing dissolved organic matter (FDOM), turbidity, and CO2 sensors, which are being used to characterize variability in dissolved and particulate forms of carbon. We will (1) compare these data to concentrations obtained through manual grab sampling to document the utility of in-situ measurements as surrogates for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC), (2) compare stream-water fluxes of carbon calculated using a conventional sample-based approach to those computed using high-temporal resolution data from in-situ sensors, and (3) use ancillary data from co-located stream gages (e.g. streamflow) and meteorological stations (e.g., solar radiation) to investigate the influences of hydrology and climate on high-frequency variability in carbon fluxes in streams.

  14. Latest developments in advanced network management and cross-sharing of next-generation flux stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; Johnson, Dave; Velgersdyk, Michael; Begashaw, Israel; Allyn, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    be merged into a single quality-control file (v) Multiple flux stations can be linked into an automated time-synchronized network (vi) Flux network managers, or PI's, can see all stations in real-time, including fluxes, supporting data, automated reports, and email alerts (vii) PI's can assign rights, allow or restrict access to stations and data: selected stations can be shared via rights-managed access internally or with external institutions (viii) Researchers without stations could form "virtual networks" for specific projects by collaborating with PIs from different actual networks This presentation provides detailed examples of FluxSuite currently utilized to manage two large flux networks in China (National Academy of Sciences and Agricultural Academy of Sciences), and smaller networks with stations in the USA, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia and other locations around the globe. Very latest 2016 developments and expanded functionality are also discussed.

  15. Spacecraft technology. [development of satellites and remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Developments in spacecraft technology are discussed with emphasis on the Explorer satellite program. The subjects considered include the following: (1) nutational behavior of the Explorer-45 satellite, (2) panoramic sensor development, (3) onboard camera signal processor for Explorer satellites, and (4) microcircuit development. Information on the zero gravity testing of heat pipes is included. Procedures for cleaning heat treated aluminum heat pipes are explained. The development of a five-year magnetic tape, an accurate incremental angular encoder, and a blood freezing apparatus for leukemia research are also discussed.

  16. Development of thin edgeless silicon pixel sensors on epitaxial wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Contin, G.; Giacomini, G.; Manzari, V.; Orzan, G.; Rashevskaya, I.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2014-09-01

    The paper reports on the development of novel p-on-n thin edgeless planar pixel sensors, compatible with ALICE front-end electronics, fabricated by FBK on epitaxial material. The focus of the activity is the minimization of the material budget required for hybrid pixel detectors. This goal has been addressed in two different stages. In the first one, planar pixel detectors fabricated on epitaxial wafers have been thinned and bonded to the readout chips. The second stage is described by the present paper: the `active edge' concept has been studied for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the devices. An overview of the key technological steps and of the electrical characterization of the fabricated sensors is given. In addition, the preliminary results on the static behavior of test sensors after neutron irradiation at different fluences (up to 2.5 × 1015 1 MeV-neq/cm2) are reported. The results demonstrate that these kinds of devices are a viable solution for the reduction of the material budget while maintaining the typical electrical characteristics expected from radiation silicon sensors.

  17. Development of a soil detector based on an optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihua; Pan, Luan; Li, Minzan; An, Xiaofei

    2008-12-01

    An estimation model of the soil organic matter content has been built based on NIR spectroscopy and a portable soil organic matter detector based on optical sensor is developed. The detector uses a micro processor 89S52 as the Micro Controller Unit (MCU) and consists of an optical system and a control system. The optical system includes a 850nm near-infrared lamp-house, a lamp-house driving-circuit, a Y type optical fiber, a probe, and a photoelectric sensor. The control system includes an amplified circuit, an A/D circuit, a display circuit with LCD, and a storage circuit with USB interface. Firstly the single waveband optical signal from the near-infrared lamp-house is transferred to the surface of the target soil via the incidence fibers. Then the reflected optical signal is collected and transferred to photoelectric sensor, where the optical signal is conveyed to the electrical signal. Subsequently, the obtained electrical signal is processed by 89S52 MCU. Finally, the calculated soil organic matter content is displayed on the LCD and stored in the USB disk. The calibration experiment using the estimation model of the soil organic matter is conducted. The decision coefficient (R2) reaches 0.9839 between the measured data by the soil organic matter sensor and by the laboratory chemistry method.

  18. Current developments in fiber Bragg grating sensors and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamdas, Venu Gopal Madhav; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Hui

    2008-03-01

    Whatever may be the material used to build the engineering structures, they are bound to undergo damage at some point in their lifetime. The damage could develop because of continuous usage, degradation, environmental factors, earthquakes or man-made disasters. Structural health monitoring (SHM) has emerged as an important area that has attracted intensive research attention in the recent time. Smart materials like piezoceramics (e.g. lead zirconate titanate or PZT) and fibre optical sensors (FOSs) based effective SHM tools are rapidly developing. Especially, the FOSs offer great potential as monitoring sensors due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, robustness and survivability in harsh environment. Conventional FOSs use phase modulation techniques for sensing. In spite of the above advantages, they are dependent heavily on source intensity fluctuations and coupling loses. However the fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors developed from FOSs are immune to source intensity fluctuations, thus addressing some potential problems of the conventional FOSs. This paper presents a review on the current development of FBG based monitoring techniques and their applications.

  19. Development and Application of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, A.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Hall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring and control, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. This paper discusses the needs of space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (Nox, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. Demonstration and application these sensor technologies will be described. The demonstrations range from use of a microsystem based hydrogen sensor on the Shuttle to engine demonstration of a nanocrystalline based sensor for NO, detection. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  20. Advanced sensor development program for the pulp and paper industry. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A program is described for the development of measurement science and technology for on-line measurement of process variables in the pulp and paper industry. Four research projects are currently in progress; (1) combustion control sensor, (2) pulp consistency sensor, (3) steam flow sensor, and (4) lignin sensor.

  1. Preliminary development of a fiber optic sensor for measuring bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Babin, Steven M; Sova, Raymond M

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary development of a fiber optic bilirubin sensor is described, where an unclad sensing portion is used to provide evanescent wave interaction of the transmitted light with the chemical environment. By using a wavelength corresponding to a bilirubin absorption peak, the Beer-Lambert Law can be used to relate the concentration of bilirubin surrounding the sensing portion to the amount of absorbed light. Initial testing in vitro suggests that the sensor response is consistent with the results of bulk absorption measurements as well as the Beer-Lambert Law. In addition, it is found that conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin have different peak absorption wavelengths, so that two optical frequencies may potentially be used to measure both types of bilirubin. Future development of this device could provide a means of real-time, point-of-care monitoring of intravenous bilirubin in critical care neonates with hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:25057239

  2. Preliminary Development of a Fiber Optic Sensor for Measuring Bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Steven M; Sova, Raymond M

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary development of a fiber optic bilirubin sensor is described, where an unclad sensing portion is used to provide evanescent wave interaction of the transmitted light with the chemical environment. By using a wavelength corresponding to a bilirubin absorption peak, the Beer–Lambert Law can be used to relate the concentration of bilirubin surrounding the sensing portion to the amount of absorbed light. Initial testing in vitro suggests that the sensor response is consistent with the results of bulk absorption measurements as well as the Beer–Lambert Law. In addition, it is found that conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin have different peak absorption wavelengths, so that two optical frequencies may potentially be used to measure both types of bilirubin. Future development of this device could provide a means of real-time, point-of-care monitoring of intravenous bilirubin in critical care neonates with hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:25057239

  3. Ripeness sensor development. Final report of a Phase 2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Stroshine, R.

    1995-08-01

    This is a final report for the Phase II study entitled ``Ripeness Sensor Development.`` The overall objective of the study was the development of a prototype device capable of testing whole fruits for sugar content. Although ripeness and sugar content are not synonymous, they are closely related. Furthermore, the consumer`s acceptance of or preference for fruits is strongly influenced by sugar content. Therefore, the device was called a ripeness sensor. The principle behind the measurement is proton magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-MR). For several decades, chemists, pharmacists and other scientists have been using {sup 1}H-MR to investigate chemical structure and composition. More recently, the technique has been used in laboratories of the food industry for quality control. This effort represents one of the first attempts to adapt {sup 1}H-MR to use in a commercial facility. 28 refs., 36 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Development of a thin film solid state gaseous HCl sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The selection of materials to develop a thin film HCl sensor is discussed. Data were primarily concerned with chemical and physical properties of the film and with electrical properties which exhibit and enhance electrical response when HCl is absorbed on the film surface. Techniques investigated for enhancing electrical response include changing conditions for growing films, adding impurities to the film, changing ambient light intensity, and altering the ambient temperature of the sensing element.

  5. Monitoring of carbon dioxide fluxes in a subalpine grassland ecosystem of the Italian Alps using a multispectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakowska, K.; Vescovo, L.; Marcolla, B.; Juszczak, R.; Olejnik, J.; Gianelle, D.

    2014-09-01

    The study investigates the potential of a commercially available proximal sensing system - based on a 16-band multispectral sensor - for monitoring mean midday gross ecosystem production (GEPm) in a subalpine grassland of the Italian Alps equipped with an eddy covariance flux tower. Reflectance observations were collected for 5 consecutive years, characterized by different climatic conditions, together with turbulent carbon dioxide fluxes and their meteorological drivers. Different models based on linear regression (vegetation indices approach) and on multiple regression (reflectance approach) were tested to estimateGEPm from optical data. The overall performance of this relatively low-cost system was positive. Chlorophyll-related indices including the red-edge part of the spectrum in their formulation (red-edge normalized difference vegetation index, NDVIred-edge; chlorophyll index, CIred-edge) were the best predictors of GEPm, explaining most of its variability during the observation period. The use of the reflectance approach did not lead to considerably improved results in estimating GEPm: the adjusted R2 (adjR2) of the model based on linear regression - including all the 5 years - was 0.74, while the adjR2 for the multiple regression model was 0.79. Incorporating mean midday photosynthetically active radiation (PARm) into the model resulted in a general decrease in the accuracy of estimates, highlighting the complexity of the GEPm response to incident radiation. In fact, significantly higher photosynthesis rates were observed under diffuse as regards direct radiation conditions. The models which were observed to perform best were then used to test the potential of optical data for GEPm gap filling. Artificial gaps of three different lengths (1, 3 and 5 observation days) were introduced in the GEPm time series. The values of adjR2 for the three gap-filling scenarios showed that the accuracy of the gap filling slightly decreased with gap length. However, on

  6. Development of a balloon-borne stabilized platform for measuring radiative flux profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Shaw, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A stabilized platform has been developed to carry broadband short-wave and long-wave radiometric sensors on the tether line of a small tethered balloon that ascends through atmospheric depths of up to 1.5 km to obtain vertical profiles of radiative flux and flux divergence for evaluating atmospheric radiative transfer models. The Sky Platform was designed to keep the radiometers level despite unpredictable movements of the balloon and tether line occasioned by turbulence and wind shear. The automatic control loop drives motors, gears, and pulleys located on two of the vertices of the triangular frame to climb the harness lines to keep the platform level. Radiometric sensors, an electronic compass, and an on-board data acquisition system make up the remainder of the Sky Platform. Because knowledge of the dynamic response of the tether line-platform system is essential to properly close the automatic control loop on the Sky Platform, a Motion Sensing Platform (MSP) was developed to fly in place of the Sky Platform on the tether line to characterize the Sky Platform's operating environment. This unstabilized platform uses an array of nine solid-state linear accelerometers to measure the lateral and angular accelerations, velocities, and displacements that the Sky Platform will experience. This paper presents field performance tests of the Sky and Motion Sensing Platforms, as conducted at Richland, Washington, on February 17, 1993. The tests were performed primarily to characterize the stabilization system on the Sky Platform. Test flights were performed on this cold winter day from 1400 to 1800 Pacific Standard Time (PST). During this period, temperature profiles were near the dry adiabatic lapse rate. Flights were made through a jet wind speed profile having peak wind speeds of 7 m/s at a height of 100 m AGL. Wind directions were from the northwest. All flights were performed as continuous ascents, rather than ascending in discrete steps with halts at set altitudes.

  7. Development of a balloon-borne stabilized platform for measuring radiative flux profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Shaw, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A stabilized platform has been developed to carry broadband short-wave and long-wave radiometric sensors on the tether line of a small tethered balloon that ascends through atmospheric depths of up to 1.5 km to obtain vertical profiles of radiative flux and flux divergence for evaluating atmospheric radiative transfer models. The Sky Platform was designed to keep the radiometers level despite unpredictable movements of the balloon and tether line occasioned by turbulence and wind shear. The automatic control loop drives motors, gears, and pulleys located on two of the vertices of the triangular frame to climb the harness lines to keep the platform level. Radiometric sensors, an electronic compass, and an on-board data acquisition system make up the remainder of the Sky Platform. Because knowledge of the dynamic response of the tether line-platform system is essential to properly close the automatic control loop on the Sky Platform, a Motion Sensing Platform (MSP) was developed to fly in place of the Sky Platform on the tether line to characterize the Sky Platform`s operating environment. This unstabilized platform uses an array of nine solid-state linear accelerometers to measure the lateral and angular accelerations, velocities, and displacements that the Sky Platform will experience. This paper presents field performance tests of the Sky and Motion Sensing Platforms, as conducted at Richland, Washington, on February 17, 1993. The tests were performed primarily to characterize the stabilization system on the Sky Platform. Test flights were performed on this cold winter day from 1400 to 1800 Pacific Standard Time (PST). During this period, temperature profiles were near the dry adiabatic lapse rate. Flights were made through a jet wind speed profile having peak wind speeds of 7 m/s at a height of 100 m AGL. Wind directions were from the northwest. All flights were performed as continuous ascents, rather than ascending in discrete steps with halts at set altitudes.

  8. Tracking Sensor Developments For Optical Intersatellite Links - An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purll, David J.; Mathur, Rajul P.

    1990-04-01

    Optical communication between satellites in orbit requires highly accurate tracking of an incoming laser beam, to allow the generation of necessary control signals for the pointing mechanisms. For the SILEX system planned by ESA the tracking sensor is required to determine the position of the centre of the focused laser spot with a la noise error within 0.1,um on the CCD detector (equivalent to a mispointing of 0.07μrad), for the nominal bandwidth of 8kHz and the minimum optical power of 110pw. This implies the determination of the centre position to small sub-pixel accuracies, achieved via mathematical interpolation from the fractions of the optical signal falling in the centre 4 pixels. This paper updates a previous paper'. It discusses the development of the tracking sensor breadboards by BAe and Sira. The detector unit, which uses the new 14x14 pixel CCD developed by Thomson-CSF, provides for fine adjustments of the CCD position. It also houses the electronics for CCD output buffering and amplification. The electronics unit carries out the processing of the video signal, to determine the coarse position of the spot over the 14x14 pixel area, and a very accurate position over the central 2x2 pixel area via an algorithm executed in a microprocessor. The paper presents some performance results including new results from the second breadboard, and routes to the design of flight sensors.

  9. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m2 (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m2. PMID:27077862

  10. Development of compact cold-atom sensors for inertial navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battelier, B.; Barrett, B.; Fouché, L.; Chichet, L.; Antoni-Micollier, L.; Porte, H.; Napolitano, F.; Lautier, J.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-04-01

    Inertial sensors based on cold atom interferometry exhibit many interesting features for applications related to inertial navigation, particularly in terms of sensitivity and long-term stability. However, at present the typical atom interferometer is still very much an experiment—consisting of a bulky, static apparatus with a limited dynamic range and high sensitivity to environmental effects. To be compliant with mobile applications further development is needed. In this work, we present a compact and mobile experiment, which we recently used to achieve the first inertial measurements with an atomic accelerometer onboard an aircraft. By integrating classical inertial sensors into our apparatus, we are able to operate the atomic sensor well beyond its standard operating range, corresponding to half of an interference fringe. We report atom-based acceleration measurements along both the horizontal and vertical axes of the aircraft with one-shot sensitivities of 2.3 × 10-4 g over a range of ˜ 0.1 g. The same technology can be used to develop cold-atom gyroscopes, which could surpass the best optical gyroscopes in terms of long-term sensitivity. Our apparatus was also designed to study multi-axis atom interferometry with the goal of realizing a full inertial measurement unit comprised of the three axes of acceleration and rotation. Finally, we present a compact and tunable laser system, which constitutes an essential part of any cold-atom-based sensor. The architecture of the laser is based on phase modulating a single fiber-optic laser diode, and can be tuned over a range of 1 GHz in less than 200 μs.

  11. Development of compact cold-atom sensors for inertial navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battelier, B.; Barrett, B.; Fouché, L.; Chichet, L.; Antoni-Micollier, L.; Porte, H.; Napolitano, F.; Lautier, J.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-04-01

    Inertial sensors based on cold atom interferometry exhibit many interesting features for applications related to inertial navigation, particularly in terms of sensitivity and long-term stability. However, at present the typical atom interferometer is still very much an experiment—consisting of a bulky, static apparatus with a limited dynamic range and high sensitivity to environmental effects. To be compliant with mobile applications further development is needed. In this work, we present a compact and mobile experiment, which we recently used to achieve the first inertial measurements with an atomic accelerometer onboard an aircraft. By integrating classical inertial sensors into our apparatus, we are able to operate the atomic sensor well beyond its standard operating range, corresponding to half of an interference fringe. We report atom-based acceleration measurements along both the horizontal and vertical axes of the aircraft with one-shot sensitivities of 2.3 × 10-4 g over a range of ˜ 0.1 g. The same technology can be used to develop cold-atom gyroscopes, which could surpass the best optical gyroscopes in terms of long-term sensitivity. Our apparatus was also designed to study multi-axis atom interferometry with the goal of realizing a full inertial measurement unit comprised of the three axes of acceleration and rotation. Finally, we present a compact and tunable laser system, which constitutes an essential part of any cold-atom-based sensor. The architecture of the laser is based on phase modulating a single fiber-optic laser diode, and can be tuned over a range of 1 GHz in less than 200 μs.

  12. Flux of transcript patterns during soybean seed development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To understand gene expression networks leading to functional properties of the soybean seed, we have undertaken a detailed examination of soybean seed development during the stages of major accumulation of oils, proteins, and starches, as well as the desiccating and mature stages, using microarrays consisting of up to 27,000 soybean cDNAs. A subset of these genes on a highly-repetitive 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray was also used to support the results. Results It was discovered that genes related to cell growth and maintenance processes, as well as energy processes like photosynthesis, decreased in expression levels as the cotyledons approached the mature, dry stage. Genes involved with some storage proteins had their highest expression levels at the stage of highest fresh weight. However, genes encoding many transcription factors and DNA binding proteins showed higher expression levels in the desiccating and dry seeds than in most of the green stages. Conclusions Data on 27,000 cDNAs have been obtained over five stages of soybean development, including the stages of major accumulation of agronomically-important products, using two different types of microarrays. Of particular interest are the genes found to peak in expression at the desiccating and dry seed stages, such as those annotated as transcription factors, which may indicate the preparation of pathways that will be needed later in the early stages of imbibition and germination. PMID:20181280

  13. Development of dual sensor hand-held detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezgin, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    In this paper hand-held dual sensor detector development requirements are considered dedicated to buried object detection. Design characteristics of such a system are categorized and listed. Hardware and software structures, ergonomics, user interface, environmental and EMC/EMI tests to be applied and performance test issues are studied. Main properties of the developed system (SEZER) are presented, which contains Metal Detector (MD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). The realized system has ergonomic structure and can detect both metallic and non-metallic buried objects. Moreover classification of target is possible if it was defined to the signal processing software in learning phase.

  14. Development of technologies for imaging sensor testing at AEDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, H.; Fedde, M.; Crider, D.; Horne, H.; Gastineau, J.; Bynum, K.; Steely, S.; Labello, J.

    2011-06-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is involved in the development of technologies that enable hardwarein- the-loop (HWIL) testing with high-fidelity complex scene projection to validate sensor mission performance. Radiometric calibration with National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) radiometers has improved radiometric and temporal fidelity testing in this cold background environment. This paper provides an overview of pertinent technologies being investigated and implemented at AEDC to support a variety of program needs such as HWIIL testing and space situational awareness (SSA).

  15. On the development of boundary layer secondary circulations resulting from horizontally varying surface heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    During the last decade there has been a surge in efforts to understand the processes at work in the inhomogeneous atmospheric boundary layer. Much of the interest in the problem has been driven by increasingly urgent needs to develop accurate assessments of man`s Contribution to climate change. It has been argued that subgrid-scale secondary circulations in the boundary layer can cause significant errors in parameterized turbulent surface fluxes. Such circulations -- variously termed ``inland breezes``, ``lake breezes``, ``snow breezes``, or ``nonclassical mesoscale circulations`` are becoming widely discussed and modeled. Because surface fluxes are part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models, it is important to understand when these circulations occur and what their effects are on overall turbulent transfer. What are not yet clear are the combinations of the ambient wind and the horizontal scale and intensity of surface flux variability under which we may expect boundary layer secondary circulations to occur. Several authors have modeled the development of these circulations for ad hoc situations of alternating surface characteristics, and SA have developed one parameterization relating the scale of surface heat flux variability and the ambient wind to the evolution of NCMCs. In this paper we present observations, collected in a region of inhomogeneous surface fluxes, that suggest the development of a ``farm breeze``, and we develop an alternative scaling argument to that of SA that better represents our measurement conditions.

  16. Development of a Radial Pulse Tonometric (RPT) Sensor with a Temperature Compensation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seong-Ki; Shin, Ki-Young; Lee, Tae-Bum; Jin, Seung-Oh; Kim, Jaeuk U.

    2013-01-01

    Several RPT sensors have been developed to acquire objective and quantitative pulse waves. These sensors offer improved performance with respect to pressure calibration, size and sensor deployment, but not temperature. Since most pressure sensors are sensitive to temperature, various temperature compensation techniques have been developed, but these techniques are largely inapplicable to RPT sensors due to the size restrictions of the sensor, and incompatibility between the compensation techniques and the RPT sensor. Consequently, in this paper a new RPT sensor comprising six piezoresistive pressure sensors and one thermistor has been developed through finite element analysis and then a suitable temperature compensation technique has been proposed. This technique compensates for temperature variations by using the thermistor and simple compensation equations. As verification of the proposed compensation technique, pulse waves of all types were successfully compensated for temperature changes. PMID:23291577

  17. Recent development of electrochemiluminescence sensors for food analysis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Wang, Kun

    2016-10-01

    Food quality and safety are closely related to human health. In the face of unceasing food safety incidents, various analytical techniques, such as mass spectrometry, chromatography, spectroscopy, and electrochemistry, have been applied in food analysis. High sensitivity usually requires expensive instruments and complicated procedures. Although these modern analytical techniques are sensitive enough to ensure food safety, sometimes their applications are limited because of the cost, usability, and speed of analysis. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) is a powerful analytical technique that is attracting more and more attention because of its outstanding performance. In this review, the mechanisms of ECL and common ECL luminophores are briefly introduced. Then an overall review of the principles and applications of ECL sensors for food analysis is provided. ECL can be flexibly combined with various separation techniques. Novel materials (e.g., various nanomaterials) and strategies (e.g., immunoassay, aptasensors, and microfluidics) have been progressively introduced into the design of ECL sensors. By illustrating some selected representative works, we summarize the state of the art in the development of ECL sensors for toxins, heavy metals, pesticides, residual drugs, illegal additives, viruses, and bacterias. Compared with other methods, ECL can provide rapid, low-cost, and sensitive detection for various food contaminants in complex matrixes. However, there are also some limitations and challenges. Improvements suited to the characteristics of food analysis are still necessary. PMID:27086020

  18. Development of a Sensor Node for Precision Horticulture

    PubMed Central

    López, Juan A.; Soto, Fulgencio; Sánchez, Pedro; Iborra, Andrés; Suardiaz, Juan; Vera, Juan A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new wireless sensor node (GAIA Soil-Mote) for precision horticulture applications which permits the use of precision agricultural instruments based on the SDI-12 standard. Wireless communication is achieved with a transceiver compliant with the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The GAIA Soil-Mote software implementation is based on TinyOS. A two-phase methodology was devised to validate the design of this sensor node. The first phase consisted of laboratory validation of the proposed hardware and software solution, including a study on power consumption and autonomy. The second phase consisted of implementing a monitoring application in a real broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Marathon) crop in Campo de Cartagena in south-east Spain. In this way the sensor node was validated in real operating conditions. This type of application was chosen because there is a large potential market for it in the farming sector, especially for the development of precision agriculture applications. PMID:22412309

  19. Recent development of electrochemiluminescence sensors for food analysis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Wang, Kun

    2016-10-01

    Food quality and safety are closely related to human health. In the face of unceasing food safety incidents, various analytical techniques, such as mass spectrometry, chromatography, spectroscopy, and electrochemistry, have been applied in food analysis. High sensitivity usually requires expensive instruments and complicated procedures. Although these modern analytical techniques are sensitive enough to ensure food safety, sometimes their applications are limited because of the cost, usability, and speed of analysis. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) is a powerful analytical technique that is attracting more and more attention because of its outstanding performance. In this review, the mechanisms of ECL and common ECL luminophores are briefly introduced. Then an overall review of the principles and applications of ECL sensors for food analysis is provided. ECL can be flexibly combined with various separation techniques. Novel materials (e.g., various nanomaterials) and strategies (e.g., immunoassay, aptasensors, and microfluidics) have been progressively introduced into the design of ECL sensors. By illustrating some selected representative works, we summarize the state of the art in the development of ECL sensors for toxins, heavy metals, pesticides, residual drugs, illegal additives, viruses, and bacterias. Compared with other methods, ECL can provide rapid, low-cost, and sensitive detection for various food contaminants in complex matrixes. However, there are also some limitations and challenges. Improvements suited to the characteristics of food analysis are still necessary.

  20. Development of TDR distributed sensors for land subsidence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chih-Chung; Lin, Chih-Ping

    2016-04-01

    The influences subjected by land subsidence and notably inundation are raising in Taiwan recently. To efficiently access the problems, historical trends and the instant field measurement data (at least by days), including multi-depth subsidence leveling and water leveling, are essential and urgent. However, current multi-depth subsidence leveling with magnetic rings conducted by manual operating, for example, lacks high temporal and spatial resolution data, which cannot evaluate the consistency between the subsidence leveling and the limited underground water levels in the same aquifer layer appropriately. To improve the field measurements, this study is carried out based on the core technology of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). In the preliminary idea, TDR distributed sensors, as magnetic rings for land subsidence measurements in a borehole, are developed with the underground water level sensors embedded. The prototypes of TDR distributed sensors indicates the feasibility of measuring, but the influence of signal dissipating due to the long transmission line (>100 m) need to be brought attention to, as well as the corresponding measurement accuracy. Therefore, a laboratorial physical modeling is suggested for further evaluation, and this modeling is constructed now. All the measurement data are expected to be employed and fed back as the calibrators and indicators to propose the defense strategy for land subsidence and inundation.

  1. Recent developments in nanostructure based electrochemical glucose sensors.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Shabi Abbas; Shin, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem causing 4 million deaths each year and 171 million people suffering worldwide. Although there is no cure for diabetes, nevertheless, the blood glucose level of diabetic patients should be monitored tightly to avoid further complications. Thus, monitoring of glucose in blood has become an inevitable need leading to fabrication of accurate and sensitive advanced blood sugar detection devices for clinical diagnosis and personal care. It led to the development of enzymatic glucose sensing approach. Later on, various types of nanostructures have been utilized owing to their high surface area, great stability, and cost effectiveness for the fabrication of enzymatic as well as for nonenzymatic glucose sensing approach. This work reviews on both categories, however it is not intended to discuss all the research reports published regarding nanostructure based enzymatic and nonenzymatic approaches between mid-2010 and mid-2015. We, do, however, focused to describe the details of many substantial articles explaining the design of sensors, and utilities of the prepared sensors, so that readers might get the principles behind such devices and relevant detection strategies. This work also focuses on biocompatibility and toxicity of nanomaterials as well as provides a critical opinion and discussions about misconceptions in glucose sensors.

  2. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.

    2007-01-01

    The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in propulsion system applications. In order to have a more passive method of negating changes of resistance due to temperature, an effort is underway at NASA GRC to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines, specifically in the fan and compressor modules on blades. Other applications include on aircraft hot section structures and on thermal protection systems. The near-term interim goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials to test for viability and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. This goal was achieved by conducting a thorough literature search for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges chemically and physically compatible and selecting potential candidate materials for with NASA GRC's microfabrication procedures and substrates.

  3. Development of Refrigerant Change Indicator and Dirty Air Filter Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V.

    2003-06-24

    The most common problems affecting residential and light commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are slow refrigerant leaks and dirty air filters. Equipment users are usually not aware of a problem until most of the refrigerant has escaped or the air filter is clogged with dirt. While a dirty air filter can be detected with a technology based on the air pressure differential across the filter, such as a ''whistling'' indicator, it is not easy to incorporate this technology into existing HVAC diagnostic equipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a low-cost, nonintrusive refrigerant charge indicator and dirty air filter detection sensor. The sensors, based on temperature measurements, will be inexpensive and easy to incorporate into existing heat pumps and air conditioners. The refrigerant charge indicator is based on the fact that when refrigerant starts to leak, the evaporator coil temperature starts to drop and the level of liquid subcooling drops. When the coil temperature or liquid subcooling drops below a preset reading, a signal, such as a yellow warning light, can be activated to warn the equipment user that the system is undercharged. A further drop of coil temperature or liquid subcooling below another preset reading would trigger a second warning signal, such as a red warning light, to warn the equipment user that the unit now detects a leak and immediate action should be taken. The warning light cannot be turned off until it is re-set by a refrigeration repairman. To detect clogged air filters, two additional temperature sensors can be applied, one each across the evaporator. When the air filter is accumulating buildup, the temperature differential across the evaporator will increase because of the reduced airflow. When the temperature differential reaches a pre-set reading, a signal will be sent to the equipment user that the air filter needs to be changed. A traditional refrigerant charge indicator requires

  4. Development of a Low-Cost Attitude Sensor for Agricultural Vehicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop a low-cost attitude sensor for agricultural vehicles. The attitude sensor was composed of three vibratory gyroscopes and two inclinometers. A sensor fusion algorithm was developed to estimate tilt angles (roll and pitch) by least-squares method. In the a...

  5. FY04 LDRD Final Report Stroke Sensor Development Using Microdot Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J C; Wilson, T S; Alvis, R M; Paulson, C N; Setlur, U S; McBride, M T; Brown, S B; Bearinger, J P; Colston, B W

    2005-11-15

    major thrust area for the Medical Technology Program (M-division). Through MTP, LLNL has a sizable investment and recognizable expertise in stroke treatment research. The proposed microdot array sensor for stroke will complement this existing program in which mechanical devices are being designed for removing the thrombus. The following list of stroke projects and their relative status shows that MTP has a proven track record of taking ideas to industry: The goal of this LDRD funded project was to develop and demonstrate a minimally invasive optical fiber-based sensor for rapid and in-vivo measurements of multiple stroke biomarkers (e.g. pH and enzyme). The development of this sensor also required the development of a new fabrication technology for attaching indicator chemistries to optical fibers. A benefit of this work is to provide clinicians with a tool to assess vascular integrity of the region beyond the thrombus to determine whether or not it is safe to proceed with the removal of the clot. Such an assessment could extend the use of thrombolytic drug treatment to acute stroke victims outside the current rigid temporal limitation of 3 hours. Furthermore, this sensor would also provide a tool for use with emerging treatments involving the use of mechanical devices for removing the thrombus. The sensor effectively assesses the risk for reperfusion injury.

  6. NASA DC-8 Airborne Scanning Lidar Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Norman B.; Uthe, Edward E.; Kaiser, Robert D.; Tucker, Michael A.; Baloun, James E.; Gorordo, Javier G.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA DC-8 aircraft is used to support a variety of in-situ and remote sensors for conducting environmental measurements over global regions. As part of the atmospheric effects of aviation program (AEAP) the DC-8 is scheduled to conduct atmospheric aerosol and gas chemistry and radiation measurements of subsonic aircraft contrails and cirrus clouds. A scanning lidar system is being developed for installation on the DC-8 to support and extend the domain of the AEAP measurements. Design and objectives of the DC-8 scanning lidar are presented.

  7. NASA DC-8 airborne scanning LIDAR sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, N.B.; Uthe, E.E.; Kaiser, R.D.

    1996-11-01

    The NASA DC-8 aircraft is used to support a variety of in-situ and remote sensors for conducting environmental measurements over global regions. As part of the atmospheric effects of aviation program (AEAP) the DC-8 is scheduled to conduct atmospheric aerosol and gas chemistry and radiation measurements of subsonic aircraft contrails and cirrus clouds. A scanning lidar system is being developed for installation on the DC-8 to support and extend the domain of the AEAP measurements. Design and objectives of the DC-8 scanning lidar are presented. 4 figs.

  8. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  9. Impact of different eddy covariance sensors and set-up on the annual balance of CO2 and fluxes of CH4 and latent heat in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Zona, D.; Gioli, B.; Murphy, P.; Burba, G. G.; Oechel, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Expanding eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Arctic is critical for refining the global C budget. Continuous measurements are particularly challenging because of the remote locations, low power availability, and extreme weather conditions. The necessity for tailoring instrumentation at different sites further complicates the interpretation of results and may add uncertainty to estimates of annual CO2 budgets. We investigated the influence of different sensor combinations on FCO2, latent heat (LE), and FCH4, and assessed the differences in annual FCO2 estimated with different instrumentation at the same sites. Using data from four sites across the North Slope of Alaska, we resolved FCO2 and FCH4 to within 5% using different combinations of open- and closed-path gas analyzers and within 10% using heated and non-heated anemometers. A continuously heated anemometer increased data coverage relative to non-heated anemometers while resulting in comparable annual FCO2, despite over-estimating sensible heat fluxes by 15%. We also implemented an intermittent heating strategy whereby activation only when ice or snow blockage of the transducers was detected. This resulted in comparable data coverage (~ 60%) to the continuously heated anemometer, while avoiding potential over-estimation of sensible heat and gas fluxes. We found good agreement in FCO2 and FCH4 from two closed-path and one open-path gas analyzer, despite the need for large spectral corrections of closed-path fluxes and density and temperature corrections to open-path sensors. However, data coverage was generally greater when using closed-path, especially during cold seasons (36-40% vs 10-14% for the open path), when fluxes from Arctic regions are particularly uncertain and potentially critical to annual C budgets. Measurement of Arctic LE remains a challenge due to strong attenuation along sample tubes, even when heated, that could not be accounted for with spectral corrections.

  10. Development of a Selective Calixarene Sensor for Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Evans-Thompson, C.; Field, S. E.; Jones, A. H.; Kan, M. J.; Hall, C. W.; Nicholson, G. P.

    2002-02-26

    Traditionally, measurements of uranium in wastewater have been obtained by laboratory based instrumentation, such as inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, ion-chromatography and radiochemical methods. However, such methods and equipment, whilst offering excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, are far too large and heavy to be portable. Therefore, there has been a lot of interest in developing a portable sensor to carry out uranium measurements. This work describes how a class of molecule called calixarenes have been used to develop a sensing methodology for measuring uranium concentration at low levels. This has been achieved by taking the established coordinating properties of the calixarene molecule for uranium and then adding functionalities to the molecule to make it adhere to metal surfaces. This way, a layer of the uranophilic molecule has been prepared on electrode surfaces, one molecule thick. These electrodes have been shown to be sensitive to uranium between 5 and 300 parts per billion. Using these modified electrodes, a portable device has been developed, which potentially allows for measurement of uranium in the field. This sensor therefore presents a very significant advantage in that it allows for rapid determination of low levels of uranium in wastewater, whilst offering portability.

  11. Oxygen saturation in free-diving whales: optical sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Anderson, Rox; Zapol, Warren; Franco, Walfre

    2013-02-01

    Mass stranding of live whales has been explained by proposing many natural or human-related causes. Recent necropsy reports suggest a link between the mass stranding of beaked whales and the use of naval mid-frequency sonar. Surprisingly, whales have experienced symptoms similar to those caused by inert gas bubbles in human divers. Our goal is to develop a compact optical sensor to monitor the consumption of the oxygen stores in the muscle of freely diving whales. To this end we have proposed the use of a near-infrared phase-modulated frequency-domain spectrophotometer, in reflectance mode, to probe tissue oxygenation. Our probe consists of three main components: radiofrequency (RF) modulated light sources, a high-bandwidth avalanche photodiode with transimpedance amplifier, and a RF gain and phase detector. In this work, we concentrate on the design and performance of the light sensor, and its corresponding amplifier unit. We compare three state-of-the-art avalanche photodiodes: one through-hole device and two surface-mount detectors. We demonstrate that the gain due to the avalanche effect differs between sensors. The avalanche gain near maximum bias of the through-hole device exceeds by a factor of 2.5 and 8.3 that of the surface-mount detectors. We present the behavior of our assembled through-hole detector plus high-bandwidth transimpedance amplifier, and compare its performance to that of a commercially available module. The assembled unit enables variable gain, its phase noise is qualitatively lower, and the form factor is significantly smaller. Having a detecting unit that is compact, flexible, and functional is a milestone in the development of our tissue oxygenation tag.

  12. Oxyanion flux characterization using passive flux meters: development and field testing of surfactant-modified granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimi; Rao, P S C; Poyer, Irene C; Toole, Robyn M; Annable, M D; Hatfield, K

    2007-07-17

    We report here on the extension of Passive Flux Meter (PFM) applications for measuring fluxes of oxyanions in groundwater, and present results for laboratory and field studies. Granular activated carbon, with and without impregnated silver (GAC and SI-GAC, respectively), was modified with a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), to enhance the anion exchange capacity (AEC). Langmuir isotherm sorption maxima for oxyanions measured in batch experiments were in the following order: perchlorate>chromate>selenate, consistent with their selectivity. Linear sorption isotherms for several alcohols suggest that surfactant modification of GAC and SI-GAC reduced (approximately 30-45%) sorption of alcohols by GAC. Water and oxyanion fluxes (perchlorate and chromate) measured by deploying PFMs packed with surfactant-modified GAC (SM-GAC) or surfactant-modified, silver-impregnated GAC (SM-SI-GAC) in laboratory flow chambers were in close agreement with the imposed fluxes. The use of SM-SI-GAC as a PFM sorbent was evaluated at a field site with perchlorate contamination of a shallow unconfined aquifer. PFMs packed with SM-SI-GAC were deployed in three existing monitoring wells with a perchlorate concentration range of approximately 2.5 to 190 mg/L. PFM-measured, depth-averaged, groundwater fluxes ranged from 1.8 to 7.6 cm/day, while depth-averaged perchlorate fluxes varied from 0.22 to 1.7 g/m2/day. Groundwater and perchlorate flux distributions measured in two PFM deployments closely matched each other. Depth-averaged Darcy fluxes measured with PFMs were in line with an estimate from a borehole dilution test, but much smaller than those based on hydraulic conductivity and head gradients; this is likely due to flow divergence caused by well-screen clogging. Flux-averaged perchlorate concentrations measured with PFM deployments matched concentrations in groundwater samples taken from one well, but not in two other wells, pointing to the need for additional field

  13. Oxyanion flux characterization using passive flux meters: Development and field testing of surfactant-modified granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jimi; Rao, P. S. C.; Poyer, Irene C.; Toole, Robyn M.; Annable, M. D.; Hatfield, K.

    2007-07-01

    We report here on the extension of Passive Flux Meter (PFM) applications for measuring fluxes of oxyanions in groundwater, and present results for laboratory and field studies. Granular activated carbon, with and without impregnated silver (GAC and SI-GAC, respectively), was modified with a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), to enhance the anion exchange capacity (AEC). Langmuir isotherm sorption maxima for oxyanions measured in batch experiments were in the following order: perchlorate >> chromate > selenate, consistent with their selectivity. Linear sorption isotherms for several alcohols suggest that surfactant modification of GAC and SI-GAC reduced (˜ 30-45%) sorption of alcohols by GAC. Water and oxyanion fluxes (perchlorate and chromate) measured by deploying PFMs packed with surfactant-modified GAC (SM-GAC) or surfactant-modified, silver-impregnated GAC (SM-SI-GAC) in laboratory flow chambers were in close agreement with the imposed fluxes. The use of SM-SI-GAC as a PFM sorbent was evaluated at a field site with perchlorate contamination of a shallow unconfined aquifer. PFMs packed with SM-SI-GAC were deployed in three existing monitoring wells with a perchlorate concentration range of ˜ 2.5 to 190 mg/L. PFM-measured, depth-averaged, groundwater fluxes ranged from 1.8 to 7.6 cm/day, while depth-averaged perchlorate fluxes varied from 0.22 to 1.7 g/m 2/day. Groundwater and perchlorate flux distributions measured in two PFM deployments closely matched each other. Depth-averaged Darcy fluxes measured with PFMs were in line with an estimate from a borehole dilution test, but much smaller than those based on hydraulic conductivity and head gradients; this is likely due to flow divergence caused by well-screen clogging. Flux-averaged perchlorate concentrations measured with PFM deployments matched concentrations in groundwater samples taken from one well, but not in two other wells, pointing to the need for additional field testing. Use of

  14. Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

    1991-05-01

    This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

  15. Development of Daily Solar Maximum Flare Flux Forecast Models for Strong Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Chu, Hyoungseok

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a set of daily solar maximum flare flux forecast models for strong flares using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods. We consider input parameters as solar activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum flare flux and weighted total flux of the previous day, and mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classification. For a training data set, we use the same number of 61 events for each C-, M-, and X-class from Jan. 1996 to Dec. 2004, while other previous models use all flares. For a testing data set, we use all flares from Jan. 2005 to Nov. 2013. The statistical parameters from contingency tables show that the ANN models are better for maximum flare flux forecasting than the MLR models. A comparison between our maximum flare flux models and the previous ones based on Heidke Skill Score (HSS) shows that our all models for X-class flare are much better than the other models. According to the Hitting Fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux in logarithm scale are less than equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-third events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on daily basis for space weather service.

  16. Design and development of diaphragm-based EFPI pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish, P. P.; Linesh, J.; Libish, T. M.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2011-08-01

    An extrinsic fabry-perot interferometric pressure sensor is fabricated using a cavity formed by a metal diaphragm and a single mode optical fiber. The compact sensor probe has been tested for static pressure response using diaphragms of different metals.

  17. Design and development of diaphragm-based EFPI pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish, P. P.; Linesh, J.; Libish, T. M.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2010-12-01

    An extrinsic fabry-perot interferometric pressure sensor is fabricated using a cavity formed by a metal diaphragm and a single mode optical fiber. The compact sensor probe has been tested for static pressure response using diaphragms of different metals.

  18. A Wireless Sensor Network Field Study: Network Development, Installation, and Measurement Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. W.; Kuo, C.; van Hemmen, H.; Aouni, A.; Ferriss, E.; Liang, Y.; Liang, X.

    2010-12-01

    The sustainable condition of our freshwater resources partially depends on our understanding of the natural system in which it is cycled. Exploring the status and trends of soil moisture and transpiration can help improve estimates (including flux and storage components) of water budgets on a regional-scale. As a part of this effort, a multi-node wireless network measuring sap flow, soil water content and soil water potential has been deployed in a forested and hill-sloped region in western Pennsylvania. The results of this study are presented in three components. The first is comprised of the issues faced with the development of the node mesh and its evolution to a stable network through the dense vegetation and variable topography. This component includes a comparison of mote battery life, especially over network bottlenecks, and signal transmission statistics, including parenting analysis and data packet loss. The second component examines the design and installation of the sensor nodes. Due to the frequent occurrences of precipitation, water intrusion was a major concern. This is exemplified in the water-proofing techniques used in the box design which enclosed sensors and other vulnerable electronics. The final component reviews the data collected from the network and the different techniques used for processing the measurements. A power saving scheme is tested for removing low mote battery power attenuation in the transmitted data. The results for the soil moisture and sap flow measurements are compared with data collected by a local weather station.

  19. Development of Daily Maximum Flare-Flux Forecast Models for Strong Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Chu, Hyoungseok; Park, Jongyeob

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a set of daily maximum flare-flux forecast models for strong flares (M- and X-class) using multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) methods. Our input parameters are solar-activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum, and weighted total flare flux of the previous day, as well as mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classifications. For a training dataset, we used 61 events each of C-, M-, and X-class from January 1996 to December 2004. For a testing dataset, we used all events from January 2005 to November 2013. A comparison between our maximum flare-flux models and NOAA model based on true skill statistics (TSS) shows that the MLR model for X-class and the average of all flares (M{+}X-class) are much better than the NOAA model. According to the hitting fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying the condition that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux on a logarithm scale are smaller than or equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-thirds of the events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on a daily basis for space-weather services.

  20. Development of the fluid-type transport code on the flux coordinates in a tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Mitsuru; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2016-11-01

    The one-dimensional fluid-type transport code, TASK/TX, is developed compatible with the flux coordinates in a tokamak. Unlike diffusive transport equations usually adopted in conventional transport codes, the governing equations conform to a two-fluid model consisting of Maxwell's equations and the multiple fluid moment equations for each species.Quasi-neutrality and ambipolar flux conditions are not imposed, which are inherently satisfied as a consequence of the equation system solved. The neoclassical particle flux is not approximated by the flux-gradient relationship, and the total particle flux composed of the neoclassical and turbulent contributions is directly treated as the dependent variable. The quantities related to neoclassical transport are intrinsically calculated without external neoclassical transport modules. In other words, TASK/TX by itself has the function of a neoclassical transport solver based on the moment approach as well. Several numerical tests clearly reveal the unique features of TASK/TX not possessed by conventional transport codes.

  1. Development of Innovative and Inexpensive Optical Sensors in Wireless Ad-hoc Sensor Networks for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, Hannes; Schima, Robert; Assing, Martin; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Due to the heterogeneity and dynamic of ecosystems, the observation and monitoring of natural processes necessitate a high temporal and spatial resolution. This also requires inexpensive and adaptive measurements as well as innovative monitoring strategies. To this end, the application of ad-hoc wireless sensor networks holds the potential of creating an adequate monitoring platform. In order to achieve a comprehensive monitoring in space and time with affordability, it is necessary to reduce the sensor costs. Common investigation methods, especially with regard to vegetation processes, are based on optical measurements. In particular, different wavelengths correspond to specific properties of the plants and preserve the possibility to derive information about the ecosystem, e.g. photosynthetic performance or nutrient content. In this context, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensors and hyperspectral sensors are in major use. This work aims the development, evaluation and application of inexpensive but high performance optical sensors for the implementation in wireless sensor networks. Photosynthetically active radiation designates the spectral range from 400 to 700 nanometers that photosynthetic organisms are able to use in the process of photosynthesis. PAR sensors enable the detection of the reflected solar light of the vegetation in the whole PAR wave band. The amount of absorption indicates photosynthetic activity of the plant, with good approximation. Hyperspectral sensors observe specific parts or rather distinct wavelengths of the solar light spectrum and facilitate the determination of the main pigment classes, e.g. Chlorophyll, Carotenoid and Anthocyanin. Due to the specific absorption of certain pigments, a characteristic spectral signature can be seen in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, known as narrow-band peaks. In an analogous manner, also the presence and concentration of different nutrients cause a characteristic spectral

  2. Development of embedded sensor models in composite laminates for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heung S.; Ghoshal, Anindya; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Prosser, William H.

    2003-08-01

    A new improved nonlinear transient generalized layerwise theory for modeling embedded discrete and continuous sensor(s) outputs in laminated composite plates with acoustic emission from cracks and embedded delaminations is developed. The computational modeling involves development of a finite element scheme using an improved layerwise laminate theory for a composite laminate plate with embedded discrete and continuous sensors and embedded discrete delaminations. The simulated cases studied included cantilever plates with embedded sensors and embedded delamination under low frequency vibration and square plates with discrete embedded sensors and continuous embedded sensor architecture and embedded discrete delaminations under high frequency acoustic emission. The effect on sensor outputs due to scattering of the acoustic emission due to the presence of delamination is also investigated. It is expected that this analytical model would be a useful tool for numerical simulation of composite laminated structures with embedded delaminations and embedded sensor architecture, particularly since experimental investigation could often be prohibitive to simulate different conditions.

  3. Development and evaluation of a lightweight sensor system for aerial emission sampling from open area sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particula...

  4. Development and evaluation of a lightweight sensor system for aerial emission sampling from open area sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particulate matter wi...

  5. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  6. Development and evaluation of a lightweight sensor system for emission sampling from open area sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area sources, such as open burning. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, and black carbon, samplers for particulate matter with ...

  7. Development of a wireless air pollution sensor package for aerial-sampling of emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particulate matter wi...

  8. Development of handheld dual-sensor ALIS and its evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Motoyuki; Fujiwara, Jun; Feng, Xuan; Takahashi, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Takao

    2006-05-01

    We are developing a new landmine detection sensor (ALIS) which is equipped with a metal detector and a GPR. Although this is a hand-held system, we can record the metal detector and GPR signal with the sensor position information. Therefore, signal processing for 2-D signal image is possible. For the metal detector, we apply cross-correlation algorism for sharpening the image and estimation of the depth of the target. For GPR signal, we can apply migration algorithm, which drastically reduce the clutter and we can obtain 3-D image of the buried targets. At first, linear interpolation and cubic interpolation are used respectively to deal with the problem of random data position. Comparing results, we find the image quality of two kinds of interpolations is almost same. Then the migration is used to refocus the scattered signals and improve the image quality for reconstructed landmine image. ALIS demonstration were held in Afghanistan in December 2004 and other countries including Egypt and Croatia in 2005. After some demonstrations and evaluation, we received many useful suggestions. Using these advises, we have modified the ALIS and it is now more easy to use. In this paper, we describe the latest characteristics of the ALIS and summarize its operation.

  9. Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor Development and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Lee, Jimmy; Robertson, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) was the primary docking sensor for the Orbital Express mission. The sensor performed extremely well during the mission, and the technology has been proven on orbit in other flights too. Parts obsolescence issues prevented the construction of more AVGS units, so the next generation of sensor was designed with current parts and updated to support future programs. The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) has been tested as a breadboard, two different brassboard units, and a prototype. The testing revealed further improvements that could be made and demonstrated capability beyond that ever demonstrated by the sensor on orbit. This paper presents some of the sensor history, parts obsolescence issues, radiation concerns, and software improvements to the NGAVGS. In addition, some of the testing and test results are presented. The NGAVGS has shown that it will meet the general requirements for any space proximity operations or docking need.

  10. Development of semi-sphere field-of-view sun sensor integrated with multiple linear CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yao-kun; Li, Bin; Zhang, Fan

    2014-11-01

    Sun sensor is a key device in satellite's attitude determination system. It acquires satellite's attitude information by measuring sun light direction. Compared with area array CMOS sun sensor, the linear CMOS sun sensor has the advantages of low power consumption, light weight and relatively simple algorithm. Considering the pixel number, power consumption and efficiency of output, most sun sensors equipped with a single photosensitive unit usually have (+/-60)x(+/-60) field of view(FOV). Satellites usually use multiple sun sensors for semi-sphere field of view in total to meet the need of attitude measurement in all directions. Considering the need of large-scale FOV measurement and high integration level, this paper proposes a semi-sphere FOV sun sensor, of which coverage area can be (+/-90)x(+/-90) . A prototype has been made and the calibration of key component has been conducted. By integrating four photosensitive units, the semi-sphere FOV sun sensor is achieved, as a result, the demand of high integration can be realized for a micro-satellite device. The photosensitive unit consists of an N-shape slit mask and a linear CMOS image sensor. An N-shape slit model is established to acquire biaxial sun angles from analyzing the shift of 3 peak values from the image of the linear sensor. Embedded system has been designed and developed, in which the MCU control four photosensitive units. Calibration of one photosensitive unit, which is the key step in the process of the whole calibration of semi-sphere FOV sun sensor, has been conducted. As a result of the symmetry of N-shape slit, initial position of the linear image sensor can be fixed. Due to the installation error and machining deviation, centroid algorithm and data gridding technique is adopted to improve the accuracy. Experiments show that the single photosensitive unit can reach an angle accuracy of 0.1625°. Consequently, from the point of significant component in the sun sensor, initial calibration ensures

  11. DEVELOP Chesapeake Bay Watershed Hydrology - UAV Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, S. D.; Baruah, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, with a watershed extending through six states and the nation's capital. Urbanization and agriculture practices have led to an excess runoff of nutrients and sediment into the bay. Nutrients and sediment loading stimulate the growth of algal blooms associated with various problems including localized dissolved oxygen deficiencies, toxic algal blooms and death of marine life. The Chesapeake Bay Program, among other stakeholder organizations, contributes greatly to the restoration efforts of the Chesapeake Bay. These stakeholders contribute in many ways such as monitoring the water quality, leading clean-up projects, and actively restoring native habitats. The first stage of the DEVELOP Chesapeake Bay Coastal Management project, relating to water quality, contributed to the restoration efforts by introducing NASA satellite-based water quality data products to the stakeholders as a complement to their current monitoring methods. The second stage, to be initiated in the fall 2008 internship term, will focus on the impacts of land cover variability within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Multiple student led discussions with members of the Land Cover team at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office in the DEVELOP GSFC 2008 summer term uncovered the need for remote sensing data for hydrological mapping in the watershed. The Chesapeake Bay Program expressed in repeated discussions on Land Cover mapping that significant portions of upper river areas, streams, and the land directly interfacing those waters are not accurately depicted in the watershed model. Without such hydrological mapping correlated with land cover data the model will not be useful in depicting source areas of nutrient loading which has an ecological and economic impact in and around the Chesapeake Bay. The fall 2008 DEVELOP team will examine the use of UAV flown sensors in connection with in-situ and Earth Observation satellite data. To maximize the

  12. Development, installation, and initial results of fiber optic chloride sensors embedded into bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, Peter L.

    1999-01-01

    FIber optic sensors have repeatedly been shown to provide measurement capabilities of parameters within such reinforced concrete structures. Development of a fiber optic chloride sensor capable of being embedded within a roadway or bridge deck is reported. Once the specific chemistry of the fiber optic sensor was developed and tested, multiple iterations occurred in order to result in a sensor system capable of being embedded into roadway bridges. During the summer and fall of 1997, a total of 64 fiber optic sensors were then embedded into 3 roadway bridges which spanned rivers in northern Vermont. Installation details as well as results are presented.

  13. Development of a Sweetness Sensor for Aspartame, a Positively Charged High-Potency Sweetener

    PubMed Central

    Yasuura, Masato; Tahara, Yusuke; Ikezaki, Hidekazu; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame. PMID:24763213

  14. Development of a sweetness sensor for aspartame, a positively charged high-potency sweetener.

    PubMed

    Yasuura, Masato; Tahara, Yusuke; Ikezaki, Hidekazu; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-23

    Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame.

  15. Development and validation of a new return flux model for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Jean-Francois; Soares, Carlos E.; Schmidl, William D.

    2002-09-01

    This paper documents the development and validation of a new return flux model for the International Space Station (ISS). This model has been developed to augment current ISS external contamination modeling tool capabilities. The model is capable of characterizing return flux from ISS molecular emission sources. These sources include materials outgassing, vacuum venting, propellant purging and thruster firings. The BGK method (named after its authors: Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook1) was selected for modeling ambient scatter. This method was used to reduce computational times, as the ISS geometric models used for external contamination modeling may contain up to 40,000 surface elements. The model has been validated by comparison with analytical results and with results from the ESA COMOVA software. Validation with on-orbit flight experiment data will be conducted when adequate experimental data is available. Previously flown experiments (i.e., REFLEX) have not produced data with high enough fidelity to validate this model. The model has been applied to the ISS to characterize return flux from the European Columbus module onto its own payload locations. Analysis results indicate the return flux contribution to ESA payload surfaces will be small, but not negligible.

  16. Development of FET-type albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Yong; Sohn, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Hong-Seok; Bae, Young-Seuk; Choi, Sie-Young

    2008-07-15

    An albumin biosensor based on a potentiometric measurement using Biofield-effect-transistor (BioFET) has been designed and fabricated, and its characteristics were investigated. The BioFET was fabricated using semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) technology. The gate surface of the BioFET was chemically modified by newly developed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) synthesized by a thiazole benzo crown ether ethylamine (TBCEA)-thioctic acid to immobilize anti-albumin. SAM formation, antibody immobilization, and antigen-antibody interaction were verified using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The output voltage changes of the BioFET with respect to various albumin concentrations were obtained. Quasi-reference electrode (QRE) and reference FET (ReFET) has been integrated with the BioFET, and its output characteristic was investigated. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the BioFET as the albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

  17. Developing a Gel-Based Sensor Using Crystal Morphology Prediction.

    PubMed

    Veits, Gesine K; Carter, Kelsey K; Cox, Sarah J; McNeil, Anne J

    2016-09-21

    The stimuli-responsive nature of molecular gels makes them appealing platforms for sensing. The biggest challenge is in identifying an appropriate gelator for each specific chemical or biological target. Due to the similarities between crystallization and gel formation, we hypothesized that the tools used to predict crystal morphologies could be useful for identifying gelators. Herein, we demonstrate that new gelators can be discovered by focusing on scaffolds with predicted high aspect ratio crystals. Using this morphology prediction method, we identified two promising molecular scaffolds containing lead atoms. Because solvent is largely ignored in morphology prediction but can play a major role in gelation, each scaffold needed to be structurally modified before six new Pb-containing gelators were discovered. One of these new gelators was developed into a robust sensor capable of detecting lead at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limit for paint (5000 ppm). PMID:27598826

  18. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    1000 C. Concurrent with the materials study was an effort to define issues involved in the development of a microphone capable of operation at temperatures up to 1000 C; important since microphones capable of operation above 260 C are not generally available. The distinguishing feature of a microphone is its diaphragm which receives sound from the atmosphere: whereas, most other acoustic sensors receive sound through the solid structure on which they are installed. In order to gain an understanding of the potential problems involved in designing and testing a high temperature microphone, a prototype was constructed using a commercially available lithium niobate piezoelectric element in a stainless steel structure. The prototype showed excellent frequency response at room temperature, and responded to acoustic stimulation at 670 C, above which temperature the voltage output rapidly diminished because of decreased resistivity in the element. Samples of the PLS material were also evaluated in a simulated microphone configuration, but their voltage output was found to be a few mV compared to the 10 output of the prototype.

  19. Development of a millimeter-wave sensor for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    A millimeter-wave (mm-wave) sensor in the frequency range of 225-315 GHz is being developed for continuous emission monitoring of airborne effluents from industrial sites for environmental compliance monitoring and process control. Detection of chemical species is based on measuring the molecular rotational energy transitions at mm-wave frequencies. The mm-wave technique offers better transmission properties compared to optics in harsh industrial environments with smoke, dust, aerosols, and steam, as well as in adverse atmospheric conditions. The laboratory measurements indicate that polar molecules can be measured with a sensitivity of tens of parts-per-million-meter using this technology. Proof of principle of the open-path system was tested by releasing and detecting innocuous chemicals in the open air. It uses a monostatic radar configuration with transmitter and receiver on one side and a comer cube on tire other side of the plume to be measured. A wide-band swept frequency mm-wave signal is transmitted through the plume and return signal from the comer cube is detected by a hot-electron-bolometer. Absorption spectra of plume gases are measured by comparing the return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. Using signal processing based on deconvolution, high specificity of detection has been shown for resolving individual chemicals from a mixture. This technology is applicable for real-time measurement of a suite of airborne gases/vapors emitted from vents and stacks of process industries. A prototype sensor is being developed for wide-area monitoring of industrial sites and in-place monitoring of stack gases.

  20. Development of an accelerometer-based underwater acoustic intensity sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Gabrielson, Thomas B; Lauchle, Gerald C

    2004-12-01

    An underwater acoustic intensity sensor is described. This sensor derives acoustic intensity from simultaneous, co-located measurement of the acoustic pressure and one component of the acoustic particle acceleration vector. The sensor consists of a pressure transducer in the form of a hollow piezoceramic cylinder and a pair of miniature accelerometers mounted inside the cylinder. Since this sensor derives acoustic intensity from measurement of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle acceleration, it is called a p-a intensity probe. The sensor is ballasted to be nearly neutrally buoyant. It is desirable for the accelerometers to measure only the rigid body motion of the assembled probe and for the effective centers of the pressure sensor and accelerometer to be coincident. This is achieved by symmetric disposition of a pair of accelerometers inside the ceramic cylinder. The response of the intensity probe is determined by comparison with a reference hydrophone in a predominantly reactive acoustic field.

  1. Research and Development on In-Situ Measurement Sensors for Micro-Meteoroid and Small Space Debris at JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Okudaira, Osamu; Kimoto, Yugo; Hanada, Toshiya; Akahoshi, Yasuhiro; Pauline, Faure; Sakurai, Akira; Funakoshi, Kunihiro; Yasaka, Testuo

    2015-04-01

    The history of Japanese R&D into in-situ sensors for micro-meteoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) measurements is neither particularly long nor short. Research into active sensors started for the meteoroid observation experiment on the HITEN (MUSES-A) satellite of ISAS/JAXA launched in 1990, which had MDC (Munich Dust Counter) on-board sensors for micro meteoroid measurement. This was a collaboration between Technische Universität München and ISAS/JAXA. The main purpose behind the start of passive sensor research was SOCCOR, a late 80's Japan-US mission that planned to capture cometary dust and return to the Earth. Although this mission was canceled, the research outcomes were employed in a JAXA micro debris sample return mission using calibrated aerogel involving the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. There have been many other important activities apart from the above, and the knowledge generated from them has contributed to JAXA's development of a new type of active dust sensor. JAXA and its partners have been developing a simple in-situ active dust sensor of a new type to detect dust particles ranging from a hundred micrometers to several millimeters. The distribution and flux of the debris in the size range are not well understood and is difficult to measure using ground observations. However, it is important that the risk caused by such debris is assessed. In-situ measurement of debris in this size range is useful for 1) verifying meteoroid and debris environment models, 2) verifying meteoroid and debris environment evolution models, and 3) the real time detection of explosions, collisions and other unexpected orbital events. Multitudes of thin, conductive copper strips are formed at a fine pitch of 100 um on a film 12.5 um thick of nonconductive polyimide. An MMOD particle impact is detected when one or more strips are severed by being perforated by such an impact. This sensor is simple to produce and use and requires almost no calibration as

  2. Development of NTD Ge Sensors for Superconducting Bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, A.; Mathimalar, S.; Singh, V.; Dokania, N.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Shrivastava, A.; Jagadeesan, K. C.; Thakare, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    Neutron transmutation-doped (NTD) Ge sensors have been prepared by irradiating device-grade Ge with thermal neutrons at Dhruva reactor, BARC, Mumbai. These sensors are intended to be used for the study of neutrinoless double beta decay in ^{124}Sn with a superconducting Tin bolometer. Resistance measurements are performed on NTD Ge sensors in the temperature range 100-350 mK. The observed temperature dependence is found to be consistent with the variable-range hopping mechanism.

  3. New estimates of variations in atmospheric-terrestrial flux of water over Europe, based on regional reanalysis and multi-sensor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Springer, A.; Hartung, K.; Ohlwein, C.; Longuevergne, L.

    2013-12-01

    Precipitation minus evapotranspiration, the flux of water between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface, provides important information regarding the interaction of the atmosphere with the land surface. It links atmospheric and terrestrial water budgets and, thus, realizes an important boundary condition for both climate modeling and hydrological studies. Yet, due to a general lack of unbiased measurements, the atmospheric-terrestrial flux of water is poorly constrained by direct observations and rather, usually, reconstructed from data-assimilating atmospheric reanalyses. Via the terrestrial water budget equation, water storage derived from products of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission combined with runoff data, can be used to assess the realism of atmospheric-terrestrial flux of water in atmospheric models. A number of studies have applied this method to global reanalysis products, with good results only for large river basins. In this study, we first assess the closure of the terrestrial water budget over a number of European river basins from the new release 5 GRACE products, after careful postprocessing and in combination with GRDC and BfG discharge data, and from precipitation minus evapotranspiration obtained from the operational analysis of the regional high-resolution NWP models COSMO-DE and -EU, a new COSMO-based reanalysis for the European CORDEX domain, the global reanalyses ERA-INTERIM and MERRA, as well as few observation-based data sets (E-OBS, GPCC, upscaled FLUXNET observations from Jung et al., 2010). This allows us to identify biases of up to 20 mm/month in the different data products, at different spatial scales down to the Oder catchment (110.000 km2). Among the atmospheric (re-) analyses, we find COSMO-EU atmosphere-terrestrial flux of water almost unbiased over Central Europe. Finally, we assess bias-corrected flux and reconstructed multi-sensor water storage variations.

  4. Lead salt TE-cooled imaging sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Kenton; Yoo, Sung-Shik; Kauffman, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Progress on development of lead-salt thermoelectrically-cooled (TE-cooled) imaging sensors will be presented. The imaging sensor architecture has been integrated into field-ruggedized hardware, and supports the use of lead-salt based detector material, including lead selenide and lead sulfide. Images and video are from a lead selenide focal plane array on silicon ROIC at temperatures approaching room temperature, and at high frame rates. Lead-salt imagers uniquely possess three traits: (1) Sensitive operation at high temperatures above the typical `cooled' sensor maximum (2) Photonic response which enables high frame rates faster than the bolometric, thermal response time (3) Capability to reliably fabricate 2D arrays from solution-deposition directly, i. e. monolithically, on silicon. These lead-salt imagers are less expensive to produce and operate compared to other IR imagers based on II-VI HgCdTe and III-V InGaAsSb, because they do not require UHV epitaxial growth nor hybrid assembly, and no cryo-engine is needed to maintain low thermal noise. Historically, there have been challenges with lead-salt detector-to-detector non-uniformities and detector noise. Staring arrays of lead-salt imagers are promising today because of advances in ROIC technology and fabrication improvements. Non-uniformities have been addressed by on-FPA non-uniformity correction and 1/f noise has been mitigated with adjustable noise filtering without mechanical chopping. Finally, improved deposition process and measurement controls have enabled reliable fabrication of high-performance, lead-salt, large format staring arrays on the surface of large silicon ROIC wafers. The imaging array performance has achieved a Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of 30 mK at 2.5 millisecond integration time with an f/1 lens in the 3-5 μm wavelength band using a two-stage TE cooler to operate the FPA at 230 K. Operability of 99.6% is reproducible on 240 × 320 format arrays.

  5. Sulfur-based denitrification: Effect of biofilm development on denitrification fluxes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Bott, Charles; Nerenberg, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(o)) can serve as an electron donor for denitrification. However, the mechanisms and rates of S(o)-based denitrification, which depend on a biofilm development on a solid S(o) surface, are not well understood. We used completely-mixed reactors packed with S(o) chips to systematically explore the behavior of S(o)-based denitrification as a function of the bulk nitrate (NO3(-)) concentration and biofilm development. High-purity (99.5%) and agricultural-grade (90% purity) S(o) chips were tested to explore differences in performance. NO3(-) fluxes followed a Monod-type relationship with the bulk NO3(-) concentration. For high-purity S(o), the maximum NO3(-) flux increased from 0.4 gN/m(2)-d at 21 days to 0.9 g N/m(2)-d at around 100 days, but then decreased to 0.65 gN/m(2)-d at 161 days. The apparent (extant) half-saturation constant for NO3(-) KSapp, based on the bulk NO3(-) concentration and NO3(-) fluxes into the biofilm, increased from 0.1 mgN/L at 21 days to 0.8 mgN/L at 161 days, reflecting the increasing mass transfer resistance as the biofilm thickness increased. Nitrite (NO2(-)) accumulation became significant at bulk NO3(-) concentration above 0.2 mgN/L. The behavior of the agricultural-grade S(o) was very similar to the high-purity S(o). The kinetic behavior of S(o)-based denitrification was consistent with substrate counter-diffusion, where the soluble sulfur species diffuse from the S(o) particle into the base of the biofilm, while NO3(-) diffuses into the biofilm from the bulk. Initially, the fluxes were low due to biomass limitation (thin biofilms). As the biofilm thickness increased with time, the fluxes first increased, stabilized, and then decreased. The decrease was probably due to increasing diffusional resistance in the thick biofilm. Results suggest that fluxes comparable to heterotrophic biofilm processes can be achieved, but careful management of biofilm accumulation is important to maintain high fluxes. PMID:27187050

  6. Ion and Electron Sensor Observations on Photoelectrons and Coma Development at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, J. L.; Goldstein, R.; Mokashi, P.; Pollock, C. J.; Broiles, T. W.; Mandt, K.; Cravens, T.; Samara, M.; Eriksson, A. I.; Carr, C.; Lebreton, J. P.; Pierre, H.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Nilsson, H.; Koenders, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Ion and Electron Sensor (IES) on Rosetta measures 3D fluxes of electrons and total ions over an energy/charge range from 4 eV to 30 keV. The field of view is swept electrostatically over 2.8 pi steradians with energy resolution of 4% and angular resolution of 5 x 22.5 deg. for electrons and 5 x 45 deg. for ions except over the 45-deg. sector that typically views the solar wind, within which the resolution is 5 x 5 deg. As Rosetta approached to and within 100 km of the comet, enhanced fluxes of electrons were observed at energies below a few hundred eV. In one case on Aug. 2, 2014, the enhanced fluxes were observed during a time when the comet activity (gas and/or dust ejections) was observed by the multispectral imager (OSIRIS), suggesting the start of coma development. In another instance on Aug. 7, 2014, a large enhancement of electron fluxes was at energies in the tens of eV range, indicative of possible photoelectrons emitted from the nucleus. These, and expected subsequent observations, are described in this paper.

  7. Development of an Integrated Evaluation System for a Stretchable Strain Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungkook; Hong, Seong Kyung; Cho, Seong J.; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much research has been focused on stretchable or flexible electronic sensors for the measurement of strain or deformation on movable and variably shaped objects. In this research, to evaluate the performance of stretchable strain sensors, we have designed an integrated evaluation system capable of simultaneously measuring the change in stress and conductance of a strain sensor. Using the designed system, we have successfully evaluated the deformation characteristics, sensing range and sensing sensitivity of a stretchable strain sensor. We believe that the developed integrated evaluation system could be a useful tool for performance evaluation of stretchable strain sensors. PMID:27447639

  8. Development of a new flux map processing code for moveable detector system in PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Lu, H.; Li, J.; Dang, Z.; Zhang, X.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an introduction to the development of the flux map processing code MAPLE developed by China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute (CNPPJ), China Guangdong Nuclear Power Group (CGN). The method to get the three-dimensional 'measured' power distribution according to measurement signal has also been described. Three methods, namely, Weight Coefficient Method (WCM), Polynomial Expand Method (PEM) and Thin Plane Spline (TPS) method, have been applied to fit the deviation between measured and predicted results for two-dimensional radial plane. The measured flux map data of the LINGAO nuclear power plant (NPP) is processed using MAPLE as a test case to compare the effectiveness of the three methods, combined with a 3D neutronics code COCO. Assembly power distribution results show that MAPLE results are reasonable and satisfied. More verification and validation of the MAPLE code will be carried out in future. (authors)

  9. Development of on package indicator sensor for real-time monitoring of meat quality

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Vivek; Kandeepan, G.; Vishnuraj, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to develop an indicator sensor for real-time monitoring of meat quality and to compare the response of indicator sensor with meat quality parameters at ambient temperature. Materials and Methods: Indicator sensor was prepared using bromophenol blue (1% w/v) as indicator solution and filter paper as indicator carrier. Indicator sensor was fabricated by coating indicator solution onto carrier by centrifugation. To observe the response of indicator sensor buffalo meat was packed in polystyrene foam trays covered with PVC film and indicator sensor was attached to the inner side of packaging film. The pattern of color change in indicator sensor was monitored and compared with meat quality parameters viz. total volatile basic nitrogen, D-glucose, standard plate count and tyrosine value to correlate ability of indicator sensor for its suitability to predict the meat quality and storage life. Results: The indicator sensor changed its color from yellow to blue starting from margins during the storage period of 24 h at ambient temperature and this correlated well with changes in meat quality parameters. Conclusions: The indicator sensor can be used for real-time monitoring of meat quality as the color of indicator sensor changed from yellow to blue starting from margins when meat deteriorates with advancement of the storage period. Thus by observing the color of indicator sensor quality of meat and shelf life can be predicted. PMID:27047103

  10. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  11. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Provisions Alter the Metabolic Flux in Developing Soybean Embryos1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Doug K.; Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) seeds store significant amounts of their biomass as protein, levels of which reflect the carbon and nitrogen received by the developing embryo. The relationship between carbon and nitrogen supply during filling and seed composition was examined through a series of embryo-culturing experiments. Three distinct ratios of carbon to nitrogen supply were further explored through metabolic flux analysis. Labeling experiments utilizing [U-13C5]glutamine, [U-13C4]asparagine, and [1,2-13C2]glucose were performed to assess embryo metabolism under altered feeding conditions and to create corresponding flux maps. Additionally, [U-14C12]sucrose, [U-14C6]glucose, [U-14C5]glutamine, and [U-14C4]asparagine were used to monitor differences in carbon allocation. The analyses revealed that: (1) protein concentration as a percentage of total soybean embryo biomass coincided with the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio; (2) altered nitrogen supply did not dramatically impact relative amino acid or storage protein subunit profiles; and (3) glutamine supply contributed 10% to 23% of the carbon for biomass production, including 9% to 19% of carbon to fatty acid biosynthesis and 32% to 46% of carbon to amino acids. Seed metabolism accommodated different levels of protein biosynthesis while maintaining a consistent rate of dry weight accumulation. Flux through ATP-citrate lyase, combined with malic enzyme activity, contributed significantly to acetyl-coenzyme A production. These fluxes changed with plastidic pyruvate kinase to maintain a supply of pyruvate for amino and fatty acids. The flux maps were independently validated by nitrogen balancing and highlight the robustness of primary metabolism. PMID:23314943

  13. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

  14. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Tsoucalas, George; Anderson, Mark; Mulally, Daniel; Moninger, William; Mamrosh, Richard

    2004-01-01

    One of the recommendations of the National Aviation Weather Program Council was to expand and institutionalize the generation, dissemination, and use of automated pilot reports (PIREPS) to the full spectrum of the aviation community, including general aviation. In response to this and other similar recommendations, NASA initiated cooperative research into the development of an electronic pilot reporting capability (Daniels 2002). The ultimate goal is to develop a small low-cost sensor, collect useful meteorological observations below 25,000 ft., downlink the data in near real time, and use the data to improve weather forecasts. Primary users of the data include pilots, who are one targeted audience for the improved weather information that will result from the TAMDAR data. The weather data will be disseminated and used to improve aviation safety by providing pilots with enhanced weather situational awareness. In addition, the data will be used to improve the accuracy and timeliness of weather forecasts. Other users include air traffic controllers, flight service stations, and airline weather centers. Additionally, the meteorological data collected by TAMDAR is expected to have a significant positive impact on forecast accuracy for ground based applications.

  15. Development and application of a real-time capacitive sensor.

    PubMed

    Wongkittisuksa, Booncharoen; Limsakul, Chusak; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Limbut, Warakorn; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Dawan, Supaporn; Loyprasert, Suchera; Thavarungkul, Panote

    2011-01-15

    A real-time capacitive sensor based on a potentiostatic step method was developed. It can display in real-time the evoked current waveform, capacitance and the electrical resistance of elements serially connected to the insulation layer on the electrode as a function of time as well as the ohmic resistance of the insulation layer. These features enable the user to observe the association and dissociation of the affinity binding pairs and to evaluate the insulating property of the electrode surface during measurement. The system allows the setting of potential pulse height, pulse interval, gain, filter, and sampling frequency, enabling the system to be more flexible. The performance of the system was firstly evaluated with equivalent circuits. Under suitable parameter settings it provided good accuracy of both the capacitance and resistance. Using the affinity binding pair of human serum albumin (HSA) and anti human serum albumin (anti-HSA) the measured capacitance change was used for the direct detection of HSA. The developed system provided the same sensitivity as the commercially available potentiostat (P>0.05). The proposed system was then applied to analyse HSA in real urine samples and the results agreed well with the immunoturbidimetric assay (P>0.05). The proposed system can be applied for capacitance measurement to directly detect other target analytes using different affinity binding pairs. Other applications such as kinetics analysis of the interaction between affinity bindings, thickness analysis, and the study of the insulation property of the modified layer are also promising. PMID:21087852

  16. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L; Sekhar, Praveen K; Mukundan, Rangchary; Williamson, Todd L; Barzon, Fernando H; Woo, Leta Y; Glass, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  17. Development of a piezopolymer pressure sensor for a portable fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Pretlow, R. A.; Stoughton, J. W.; Baker, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    A piezopolymer pressure sensor has been developed for service in a portable fetal heart rate monitor, which will permit an expectant mother to perform the fetal nonstress test, a standard predelivery test, in her home. Several sensors are mounted in an array on a belt worn by the mother. The sensor design conforms to the distinctive features of the fetal heart tone, namely, the acoustic signature, frequency spectrum, signal amplitude, and localization. The components of a sensor serve to fulfill five functions: signal detection, acceleration cancellation, acoustical isolation, electrical shielding, and electrical isolation of the mother. A theoretical analysis of the sensor response yields a numerical value for the sensor sensitivity, which is compared to experiment in an in vitro sensor calibration. Finally, an in vivo test on patients within the last six weeks of term reveals that nonstress test recordings from the acoustic monitor compare well with those obtained from conventional ultrasound.

  18. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2015-03-01

    We have recently found that a long length of fiber of up to 1 km terminated with an in-fiber cavity structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 2 kHz. We want to determine whether the sensor (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to maintenance cost. The sensor may also help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that requires the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Acoustic vibration monitoring may need sensing at even higher frequencies (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed longgauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  19. Development of metamaterial based low cost passive wireless temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Hasanul; Shuvo, Mohammad Arif Ishtiaq; Delfin, Diego; Lin, Yirong; Choudhuri, Ahsan; Rumpf, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    Wireless passive temperature sensors are gaining increasing attention due to the ever-growing need of precise monitoring of temperature in high temperature energy conversion systems such as gas turbines and coal-based power plants. Unfortunately, the harsh environment such as high temperature and corrosive atmosphere present in these systems limits current solutions. In order to alleviate these issues, this paper presents the design, simulation, and manufacturing process of a low cost, passive, and wireless temperature sensor that can withstand high temperature and harsh environment. The temperature sensor was designed following the principle of metamaterials by utilizing Closed Ring Resonators (CRR) embedded in a dielectric matrix. The proposed wireless, passive temperature sensor behaves like an LC circuit that has a resonance frequency that depends on temperature. A full wave electromagnetic solver Ansys Ansoft HFSS was used to perform simulations to determine the optimum dimensions and geometry of the sensor unit. The sensor unit was prepared by conventional powder-binder compression method. Commercially available metal washers were used as CRR structures and Barium Titanate (BTO) was used as the dielectric materials. Response of the fabricated sensor at room temperature was analyzed using a pair of horn antenna connected with a network analyzer.

  20. Development of a Scale Model for High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The development of a comprehensive SCALE computational model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is documented and discussed in this report. The SCALE model has equivalent features and functionality as the reference MCNP model for Cycle 400 that has been used extensively for HFIR safety analyses and for HFIR experiment design and analyses. Numerical comparisons of the SCALE and MCNP models for the multiplication constant, power density distribution in the fuel, and neutron fluxes at several locations in HFIR indicate excellent agreement between the results predicted with the two models. The SCALE HFIR model is presented in sufficient detail to provide the users of the model with a tool that can be easily customized for various safety analysis or experiment design requirements.

  1. Development of an LSI for Tactile Sensor Systems on the Whole-Body of Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroyama, Masanori; Makihata, Mitsutoshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Matsuzaki, Sakae; Yamada, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ui; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nonomura, Yutaka; Fujiyoshi, Motohiro; Tanaka, Shuji; Esashi, Masayoshi

    We have developed a network type tactile sensor system, which realizes high-density tactile sensors on the whole-body of nursing and communication robots. The system consists of three kinds of nodes: host, relay and sensor nodes. Roles of the sensor node are to sense forces and, to encode the sensing data and to transmit the encoded data on serial channels by interruption handling. Relay nodes and host deal with a number of the encoded sensing data from the sensor nodes. A sensor node consists of a capacitive MEMS force sensor and a signal processing/transmission LSI. In this paper, details of an LSI for the sensor node are described. We designed experimental sensor node LSI chips by a commercial 0.18µm standard CMOS process. The 0.18µm LSIs were supplied in wafer level for MEMS post-process. The LSI chip area is 2.4mm × 2.4mm, which includes logic, CF converter and memory circuits. The maximum clock frequency of the chip with a large capacitive load is 10MHz. Measured power consumption at 10MHz clock is 2.23mW. Experimental results indicate that size, response time, sensor sensitivity and power consumption are all enough for practical tactile sensor systems.

  2. Development of a silicone ablator for high-heat-flux and high-shear-rate condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. A.; Ramseyer, J. A.; Huntress, A.

    1972-01-01

    A silicone material was developed which gives suitable ablative protection in the high heat flux, high shear environments encountered in severe reentry applications, such as nose cones for ballistic vehicles and protection of leading edges or other critical areas of a vehicle. In addition, the ease of handling, low application cost, and room temperature cure make such a silicon material suitable nozzles for the large rockets necessary for vehicle launching. The development of this product is traced from the selection of suitable polymers through the choice of fillers and the finalization of filler loadings.

  3. Evaluation of Hydrogen Sensors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-547

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, William

    2015-10-01

    In preparation for the projected 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, KPA has been contracted by Toyota Motors to develop a hydrogen safety system for vehicle repair facilities. Repair facility safety designs will include hydrogen sensors. KPA will identify critical sensor specifications for vehicle repair facilities. In collaboration with NREL, KPA will select and purchase commercial hydrogen sensors that meet or nearly meet requirements for deployment in vehicle repair facility. A two-phase field deployment plan to verify sensor performance has been developed.

  4. Development and Ground-Test Validation of Fiber Optic Sensor Attachment Techniques for Hot Structures Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazza, Anthony; Hudson, Larry D.; Richards, W. Lance

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Optic Strain Measurements: a) Successfully attached silica fiber optic sensors to both metallics and composites; b) Accomplished valid EFPI strain measurements to 1850 F; c) Successfully attached EFPI sensors to large scale hot-structures; and d) Attached and thermally validated FBG bond and epsilon(sub app). Future Development a) Improve characterization of sensors on C-C and C-SiC substrates; b) Apply application to other composites such as SiC-SiC; c) Assist development of interferometer based Sapphire sensor currently being conducted under a Phase II SBIR; and d) Complete combined thermal/mechanical testing of FBG on composite substrates in controlled laboratory environment.

  5. New directions in screen printed electroanalytical sensors: an overview of recent developments.

    PubMed

    Metters, Jonathan P; Kadara, Rashid O; Banks, Craig E

    2011-03-21

    Screen printing is widely used to fabricate disposable and economical electrochemical sensors and has helped us to establish the route from 'lab-to-market' for a plethora of sensors. We overview recent developments in the field where screen printed electrochemical sensors are utilised. Starting with their fundamental understanding, through to highlighting new developments in bulk metal and mediator modified electrodes, as well as novel advantageous electrode designs, we demonstrate the wide and diverse range of applications that sensors based on this fabrication approach have achieved.

  6. The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor: Flight Heritage and Current Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) is the latest in a line of sensors that have flown four times in the last 10 years. The NGAVGS has been under development for the last two years as a long-range proximity operations and docking sensor for use in an Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) system. The first autonomous rendezvous and docking in the history of the U.S. Space Program was successfully accomplished by Orbital Express, using the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) as the primary docking sensor. That flight proved that the United States now has a mature and flight proven sensor technology for supporting Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV) and Commercial Orbital Transport Systems (COTS) Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). NASA video sensors have worked well in the past: the AVGS used on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission operated successfully in "spot mode" out to 2 km, and the first generation rendezvous and docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on Space Shuttle flights in 1997 and 1998. This paper presents the flight heritage and results of the sensor technology, some hardware trades for the current sensor, and discusses the needs of future vehicles that may rendezvous and dock with the International Space Station (ISS) and other Constellation vehicles. It also discusses approaches for upgrading AVGS to address parts obsolescence, and concepts for minimizing the sensor footprint, weight, and power requirements. In addition, the testing of the various NGAVGS development units will be discussed along with the use of the NGAVGS as a proximity operations and docking sensor.

  7. Development of wireless sensor network for monitoring indoor air pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Shaharil Mad; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md; Saad, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Yusof @ Kamarudin, Azman Muhamad

    2015-05-01

    The air that we breathe with everyday contains variety of contaminants and particles. Some of these contaminants and particles are hazardous to human health. Most of the people don't realize that the content of air they being exposed to whether it was a good or bad air quality. The air quality whether in indoor or outdoor environment can be influenced by physical factors like dust particles, gaseous pollutants (including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds) and biological like molds and bacteria growth which largely depend on temperature and humidity condition of a room. These kinds of pollutants can affect human health, physical reaction, comfort or work performance. In this study, a wireless sensor network (WSN) monitoring system for monitor air pollutant in indoor environment was developed. The system was divided into three parts: web-based interface program, sensing module and a base station. The measured data was displayed on the web which is can be accessed by the user. The result shows that the overall measured parameters were meet the acceptable limit, requirement and criteria of indoor air pollution inside the building. The research can be used to improve the indoor air quality level in order to create a comfortable working and healthy environment for the occupants inside the building.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SIGNAL PROCESSING TOOLS AND HARDWARE FOR PIEZOELECTRIC SENSOR DIAGNOSTIC PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    OVERLY, TIMOTHY G.; PARK, GYUHAE; FARRAR, CHARLES R.

    2007-02-09

    This paper presents a piezoelectric sensor diagnostic and validation procedure that performs in -situ monitoring of the operational status of piezoelectric (PZT) sensor/actuator arrays used in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The validation of the proper function of a sensor/actuator array during operation, is a critical component to a complete and robust SHM system, especially with the large number of active sensors typically involved. The method of this technique used to obtain the health of the PZT transducers is to track their capacitive value, this value manifests in the imaginary part of measured electrical admittance. Degradation of the mechanical/electric properties of a PZT sensor/actuator as well as bonding defects between a PZT patch and a host structure can be identified with the proposed procedure. However, it was found that temperature variations and changes in sensor boundary conditions manifest themselves in similar ways in the measured electrical admittances. Therefore, they examined the effects of temperature variation and sensor boundary conditions on the sensor diagnostic process. The objective of this study is to quantify and classify several key characteristics of temperature change and to develop efficient signal processing techniques to account for those variations in the sensor diagnostis process. In addition, they developed hardware capable of making the necessary measurements to perform the sensor diagnostics and to make impedance-based SHM measurements. The paper concludes with experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  9. Towards the development of tamper-resistant, ground-based mobile sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-11-01

    Mobile sensor nodes hold great potential for collecting field data using fewer resources than human operators would require and potentially requiring fewer sensors than a fixed-position sensor array. It would be very beneficial to allow these mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended with a minimum of human intervention. In order to allow mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended in a field environment, it is imperative that they be capable of identifying and responding to external agents that may attempt to tamper with, damage or steal the mobile sensor nodes, while still performing their data collection mission. Potentially hostile external agents could include animals, other mobile sensor nodes, or humans. This work will focus on developing control policies to help enable a mobile sensor node to identify and avoid capture by a hostile un-mounted human. The work is developed in a simulation environment, and demonstrated using a non-holonomic, ground-based mobile sensor node. This work will be a preliminary step toward ensuring the cyber-physical security of ground-based mobile sensor nodes that operate unattended in potentially unfriendly environments.

  10. Development of Fall Detection System Using Ultrasound Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Takuya; Abe, Takehiko; Kimura, Haruhiko

    This paper proposes a sensing system for detecting bather's fall. The fall detection system uses ultrasound sensors installed on the ceiling of bathroom to measure the distance between sensor and a bather. The merits of utilizing ultrasound sensor are easy installation and easy use. Moreover the apparatus has an advantage of enhancing the privacy of bathers and having robustness against humidity. In order to detect bather's fall, the proposed system uses the following two methods: status detection and behavior detection. The function of status detection is to estimate bather's postures such as standing and sitting by monitoring the highest part of bather's body. Meanwhile, the function of behavior detection is to grasp the speed of bather's vertical movement by monitoring the change of distance between sensor and the bather. The system estimates the occurrence of bather's fall when the distance changes suddenly. As a result of experiment with some subjects, the system was possible to detect bather's falling behavior with high accuracy.

  11. Distributed fiber optic sensor development, testing, and evaluation for geotechnical monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iten, Michael; Hauswirth, Dominik; Puzrin, Alexander M.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, an overview of optical sensor development, testing and evaluation for several geotechnical monitoring applications is presented. Additionally, sensor integration and data interpretation are addressed as key influences to the overall success of the monitoring project. They should be taken into consideration already in the design stage. Particular focus is given on strain sensor development to minimize the slippage of the fiber inside the protection. For the first time, slippage progression monitoring by high spatially resolved Brillouin measurements is presented as a new tool for sensor testing and evaluation for geotechnical projects. The main findings of the study are that in a geotechnical monitoring project, special care has to be taken by choosing the sensor slippage properties, longitudinal stiffness and robustness, as well as in the design of the sensor system itself (fixation, gauge length and bond strength). With appropriate alignment of these factors, reasonable monitoring data can be obtained, as shown in the applications proposed in this manuscript.

  12. Design, development and calibration of HTS wire based LOX level sensor probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.; Nadig, D. S.; Prasad, M. V. N.; Gour, A. S.; Gowthaman, M.; Deekshith, P.; Shrivastava, V.

    2014-01-01

    For space applications, the weight of the liquid level sensors are of major concern as they affect the payload fraction and hence the cost. An attempt is made to design and test a light weight High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) wire based liquid level sensor for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank used in the cryostage of the spacecraft. The total resistance value measured of the HTS wire is inversely proportional to the liquid level. A HTS wire (SF12100) of 12mm width and 2.76m length without copper stabilizer has been used in the level sensor. The developed HTS wire based LOX level sensor is calibrated against a discrete diode array type level sensor. Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) and LOX has been used as cryogenic fluid for the calibration purpose. The automatic data logging for the system has been done using LabVIEW11. The net weight of the developed sensor is less than 1 kg.

  13. Computational analysis of storage synthesis in developing Brassica napus L. (oilseed rape) embryos: Flux variability analysis in relation to 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Plant oils are an important renewable resource, and seed oil content is a key agronomical trait that is in part controlled by the metabolic processes within developing seeds. A large-scale model of cellular metabolism in developing embryos of Brassica napus (bna572) was used to predict biomass formation and to analyze metabolic steady states by flux variability analysis under different physiological conditions. Predicted flux patterns are highly correlated with results from prior 13C metabolic flux analysis of B. napus developing embryos. Minor differences from the experimental results arose because bna572 always selected only one sugar and one nitrogen source from the available alternatives, and failed to predict the use of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Flux variability, indicative of alternative optimal solutions, revealed alternative pathways that can provide pyruvate and NADPH to plastidic fatty acid synthesis. The nutritional values of different medium substrates were compared based on the overall carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) for the biosynthesis of biomass. Although bna572 has a functional nitrogen assimilation pathway via glutamate synthase, the simulations predict an unexpected role of glycine decarboxylase operating in the direction of NH4+ assimilation. Analysis of the light-dependent improvement of carbon economy predicted two metabolic phases. At very low light levels small reductions in CO2 efflux can be attributed to enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase) and glycine decarboxylase. At higher light levels relevant to the 13C flux studies, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is predicted to account fully for the light-dependent changes in carbon balance.

  14. Development of capacitance-based and impedance-based wireless sensors and sensor nodes for structural health monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenas, David D. L.; Flynn, Eric B.; Todd, Michael D.; Overly, Timothy G.; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R.

    2010-06-01

    A field demonstration of a new and hybrid wireless sensing network paradigm for structural health monitoring (SHM) is presented. In this paradigm, both power and data interrogation commands are conveyed via a mobile agent that is sent to each sensor node to perform individual interrogations, which can alleviate several limitations of traditional sensing networks. This paper will discuss such prototype systems, which will be used to interrogate capacitive-based and impedance-based sensors for SHM applications. The capacitive-based wireless sensor node is specifically built to collect peak displacement measurements. In addition, a wireless sensor node for collecting electromechanical impedance data has also been developed. Both sensor nodes are specifically designed to accept various power sources and to be wirelessly triggered on an as-needed basis so that they can be used for the hybrid sensing network approach. The capabilities of these miniaturized and portable devices are demonstrated in the laboratory and the field, which was performed at the Alamosa Canyon Bridge in southern New Mexico.

  15. Development of Anodic Flux and Temperature Controlling System for Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. M.; Liu, C.; Liang, J. S.; Wu, C. B.; Xu, Z.

    2006-10-01

    Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (μDMFC) is a kind of newly developed power sources, which effective apparatus for its performance evaluation is still in urgent need at present. In this study, a testing system was established for the purpose of testing the continuous working performance such as micro flux and temperature of μDMFC. In view of the temperature controlling for micro-flux liquid fuel, a heating block with labyrinth-like single pass channel inside for heating up the methanol solution was fabricated. A semiconductorrefrigerating chip was utilized to heat and cool the liquid flow during testing procedures. On the other hand, the two channels of a high accuracy double-channel syringe pump that can suck and pump in turn so as to transport methanol solution continuously was adopted. Based on the requirements of wide-ranged temperature and micro flux controlling, the solenoid valves and the correlative component were used. A hydraulic circuit, which can circulate the fed methanol cold to hot in turn, has also been constructed to test the fatigue life of the μDMFC. The automatic control was actualized by software module written with Visual C++. Experimental results show that the system is perfect in stability and it may provide an important and advanced evaluation apparatus to satisfy the needs for real time performance testing of μDMFC.

  16. Development and application of a heat pulse sensor for in-situ measurement of hyporheic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, L.; Lewandowski, J.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Krause, S.; Nuetzmann, G.

    2011-12-01

    The riverine system represents a continuum of surface water (SW), shallow groundwater (GW) and the interconnecting hyporheic zone (HZ). Within this conceptual model, the HZ fulfills important ecological and biogeochemical functions caused by the high specific surface of sediment, the abundance of organic matter and steep and dynamic gradients in temperature, redox potential and oxygen content. These milieu conditions are controlled by the type and intensity of GW-SW interaction like GW-discharge, SW infiltration, alternating up- and downwelling or dominantly horizontal flow. Depending on flow regimes, the HZ either acts as mixing layer or transit zone with the respective end-member mixing ratios and residence times. Hyporheic exchange fluxes (HEF) at different scales potentially interact, superimpose and prevail each other. It is therefore crucial to understand the complex interactions of SW-GW exchange fluxes from patterns at stream reach scale down to shallow HEF in the top 20cm streambed. Field measurements of GW-SW exchange are technically challenging, especially at the decimeter scale and below. This study presents a novel heat pulse sensor (HPS) which was developed for measuring shallow HEF. The method is based on a short heat pulse which is emitted into the sediment in the depth of 5 to 10cm. Breakthrough curves of the heat propagating through the sediment are recorded by a 3D sensor array around the heat source and analyzed with an analytical solution of the advective-conductive heat transport equation in a cylindrical coordinate system. Theoretical breakthrough curves are calculated for every sensor and flow velocity and the position of the longitudinal axis, which is defined parallel to flow, are fitted. After validation in controlled lab environment, the method was applied in the streambed of 3 subsections of a 250m stream reach with heterogeneous patterns of mainly sandy sediments, representing characteristic streambed conditions of a meandering lowland

  17. Soft sensor control of metabolic fluxes in a recombinant Escherichia coli fed-batch cultivation producing green fluorescence protein.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Robert; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2013-10-01

    A soft sensor approach is described for controlling metabolic overflow from mixed-acid fermentation and glucose overflow metabolism in a fed-batch cultivation for production of recombinant green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Escherichia coli. The hardware part of the sensor consisted of a near-infrared in situ probe that monitored the E. coli biomass and an HPLC analyzer equipped with a filtration unit that measured the overflow metabolites. The computational part of the soft sensor used basic kinetic equations and summations for estimation of specific rates and total metabolite concentrations. Two control strategies for media feeding of the fed-batch cultivation were evaluated: (1) controlling the specific rates of overflow metabolism and mixed-acid fermentation metabolites at a fixed pre-set target values, and (2) controlling the concentration of the sum of these metabolites at a set level. The results indicate that the latter strategy was more efficient for maintaining a high titer and low variability of the produced recombinant GFP protein.

  18. Carbon conversion efficiency and central metabolic fluxes in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) embryos.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana P; Goffman, Fernando D; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency with which developing sunflower embryos convert substrates into seed storage reserves was determined by labeling embryos with [U-(14)C6]glucose or [U-(14)C5]glutamine and measuring their conversion to CO2, oil, protein and other biomass compounds. The average carbon conversion efficiency was 50%, which contrasts with a value of over 80% previously observed in Brassica napus embryos (Goffman et al., 2005), in which light and the RuBisCO bypass pathway allow more efficient conversion of hexose to oil. Labeling levels after incubating sunflower embryos with [U-(14)C4]malate indicated that some carbon from malate enters the plastidic compartment and contributes to oil synthesis. To test this and to map the underlying pattern of metabolic fluxes, separate experiments were carried out in which embryos were labeled to isotopic steady state using [1-(13)C1]glucose, [2-(13)C1]glucose, or [U-(13)C5]glutamine. The resultant labeling in sugars, starch, fatty acids and amino acids was analyzed by NMR and GC-MS. The fluxes through intermediary metabolism were then quantified by computer-aided modeling. The resulting flux map accounted well for the labeling data, was in good agreement with the observed carbon efficiency, and was further validated by testing for agreement with gas exchange measurements. The map shows that the influx of malate into oil is low and that flux through futile cycles (wasting ATP) is low, which contrasts with the high rates previously determined for growing root tips and heterotrophic cell cultures.

  19. Developing sensor activity relationships for the JPL electronic nose sensors using molecular modeling and QSAR techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Jewell, A. D.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    We report a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) study using Genetic Function Approximations (GFA) to describe the polymer-carbon composite sensor activities in the JPL Electronic Nose, when exposed to chemical vapors at parts-per-million concentration levels.

  20. Development of mine explosion ground truth smart sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steven R.; Harben, Phillip E.; Jarpe, Steve; Harris, David B.

    2015-09-14

    Accurate seismo-acoustic source location is one of the fundamental aspects of nuclear explosion monitoring. Critical to improved location is the compilation of ground truth data sets for which origin time and location are accurately known. Substantial effort by the National Laboratories and other seismic monitoring groups have been undertaken to acquire and develop ground truth catalogs that form the basis of location efforts (e.g. Sweeney, 1998; Bergmann et al., 2009; Waldhauser and Richards, 2004). In particular, more GT1 (Ground Truth 1 km) events are required to improve three-dimensional velocity models that are currently under development. Mine seismicity can form the basis of accurate ground truth datasets. Although the location of mining explosions can often be accurately determined using array methods (e.g. Harris, 1991) and from overhead observations (e.g. MacCarthy et al., 2008), accurate origin time estimation can be difficult. Occasionally, mine operators will share shot time, location, explosion size and even shot configuration, but this is rarely done, especially in foreign countries. Additionally, shot times provided by mine operators are often inaccurate. An inexpensive, ground truth event detector that could be mailed to a contact, placed in close proximity (< 5 km) to mining regions or earthquake aftershock regions that automatically transmits back ground-truth parameters, would greatly aid in development of ground truth datasets that could be used to improve nuclear explosion monitoring capabilities. We are developing an inexpensive, compact, lightweight smart sensor unit (or units) that could be used in the development of ground truth datasets for the purpose of improving nuclear explosion monitoring capabilities. The units must be easy to deploy, be able to operate autonomously for a significant period of time (> 6 months) and inexpensive enough to be discarded after useful operations have expired (although this may not be part of our business

  1. QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

    2009-07-01

    Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

  2. Development of microsized slip sensors using dielectric elastomer for incipient slippage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Do-Yeon; Kim, Baek-chul; Cho, Han-Jeong; Li, Zhengyuan; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jae-Do; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, J. C.

    2014-04-01

    A humanoid robot hand has received significant attention in various fields of study. In terms of dexterous robot hand, slip detecting tactile sensor is essential to grasping objects safely. Moreover, slip sensor is useful in robotics and prosthetics to improve precise control during manipulation tasks. In this paper, sensor based-human biomimetic structure is fabricated. We reported a resistance tactile sensor that enables to detect a slip on the surface of sensor structure. The resistance slip sensor that the novel developed uses acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) as a dielectric substrate and carbon particle as an electrode material. The presented sensor device in this paper has fingerprint-like structures that are similar with the role of the human's finger print. It is possible to measure the slip as the structure of sensor makes a deformation and it changes the resistance through forming a new conductive route. To verify effectiveness of the proposed slip detection, experiment using prototype of resistance slip sensor is conducted with an algorithm to detect slip and slip was successfully detected. In this paper, we will discuss the slip detection properties so four sensor and detection principle.

  3. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2014-11-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 1 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large reenforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  4. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 2 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  5. Review of Research Status and Development Trends of Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensors for Harsh Environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Tan, Qiulin; Jia, Pinggang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Measurement technology for various key parameters in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature and biomedical applications) continues to be limited. Wireless passive LC resonant sensors offer long service life and can be suitable for harsh environments because they can transmit signals without battery power or wired connections. Consequently, these devices have become the focus of many current research studies. This paper addresses recent research, key technologies, and practical applications relative to passive LC sensors used to monitor temperature, pressure, humidity, and harmful gases in harsh environments. The advantages and disadvantages of various sensor types are discussed, and prospects and challenges for future development of these sensors are presented. PMID:26053753

  6. The Development of Love Wave-Based Humidity Sensors Incorporating Multiple Layers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Jiansheng; He, Shitang

    2015-01-01

    A Love wave humidity sensor is developed by using a multilayer structure consisting of PVA/SiO2 layers on an ST-90°X quartz substrate. The theoretical result shows that the sensor with such a two-layer structure can achieve a higher sensitivity and a smaller loss than the structures with a single polymer layer. Comparative experiments are performed for the sensor incorporating PVA/SiO2 layers and the sensor incorporating a PVA layer. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predication. PMID:25875187

  7. Review of Research Status and Development Trends of Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensors for Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Tan, Qiulin; Jia, Pinggang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Measurement technology for various key parameters in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature and biomedical applications) continues to be limited. Wireless passive LC resonant sensors offer long service life and can be suitable for harsh environments because they can transmit signals without battery power or wired connections. Consequently, these devices have become the focus of many current research studies. This paper addresses recent research, key technologies, and practical applications relative to passive LC sensors used to monitor temperature, pressure, humidity, and harmful gases in harsh environments. The advantages and disadvantages of various sensor types are discussed, and prospects and challenges for future development of these sensors are presented. PMID:26053753

  8. Review of Research Status and Development Trends of Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensors for Harsh Environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Tan, Qiulin; Jia, Pinggang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-06-04

    Measurement technology for various key parameters in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature and biomedical applications) continues to be limited. Wireless passive LC resonant sensors offer long service life and can be suitable for harsh environments because they can transmit signals without battery power or wired connections. Consequently, these devices have become the focus of many current research studies. This paper addresses recent research, key technologies, and practical applications relative to passive LC sensors used to monitor temperature, pressure, humidity, and harmful gases in harsh environments. The advantages and disadvantages of various sensor types are discussed, and prospects and challenges for future development of these sensors are presented.

  9. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  10. Development of medical pressure and temperature sensors employing optical spectrum modulation.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, R A; Mitchell, G L; Saaski, E; Hartl, J C; Afromowitz, M A

    1991-10-01

    Fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensors have been developed whose optical reflectance varies with optical cavity depth (pressure) or with change in a material's refractive index (temperature). These sensors employ a unique combination of features: they are interrogated by an LED; they are designed to operate within a single reflectance cycle; and their returned light is analyzed by a dichroic ratio technique. The sensors use a step index glass fiber and are relatively insensitive to absolute light levels and fiber bending. They have an expanded linear operating range and can be built for low cost disposable applications. Sensor performance meets or exceeds established medical requirements. PMID:1761298

  11. Development of High Temperature SiC Based Hydrogen/Hydrocarbon Sensors with Bond Pads for Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liangyu; Biagi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Ward, Benjamin J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Lampard, Peter S.; Artale, Michael A.; Hampton, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes efforts towards the transition of existing high temperature hydrogen and hydrocarbon Schottky diode sensor elements to packaged sensor structures that can be integrated into a testing system. Sensor modifications and the technical challenges involved are discussed. Testing of the sensors at 500 C or above is also presented along with plans for future development.

  12. Development of Thermal Infrared Sensor to Supplement Operational Land Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Peter; Waczynski, Augustyn; Kan, Emily; Wen, Yiting; Rosenberry, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) is a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP)-based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a far-infrared imager operating in the pushbroom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 and 12 m. The focal plane will contain three 640 512 QWIP arrays mounted onto a silicon substrate. The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) addresses each pixel on the QWIP arrays and reads out the pixel value (signal). The ROIC is controlled by the focal plane electronics (FPE) by means of clock signals and bias voltage value. The means of how the FPE is designed to control and interact with the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA) is the basis for this work. The technology developed under the FPE is for the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA). The FPE must interact with the FPA to command and control the FPA, extract analog signals from the FPA, and then convert the analog signals to digital format and send them via a serial link (USB) to a computer. The FPE accomplishes the described functions by converting electrical power from generic power supplies to the required bias power that is needed by the FPA. The FPE also generates digital clocking signals and shifts the typical transistor-to-transistor logic (TTL) to }5 V required by the FPA. The FPE also uses an application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) named System Image, Digitizing, Enhancing, Controlling, And Retrieving (SIDECAR) from Teledyne Corp. to generate the clocking patterns commanded by the user. The uniqueness of the FPE for TIRS lies in that the TIRS FPA has three QWIP detector arrays, and all three detector arrays must be in synchronization while in operation. This is to avoid data skewing while observing Earth flying in space. The observing scenario may be customized by uploading new control software to the SIDECAR.

  13. Gravitational Reference Sensor Technology Development at the University of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John; Chilton, Andrew; Chiani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido; Shelley, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, consists of three Sun-orbiting spacecraft that form a million kilometer-scale equilateral triangle. Each spacecraft houses two free-floating test masses (TM), which are protected from disturbing forces so that they follow pure geodesics. A single TM together with its protective housing and associated components is referred to as a gravitational reference sensor (GRS). Laser interferometry is used to measure the minute variations in the distance, or light travel time, between these purely free-falling TMs, caused by gravitational waves. The demanding acceleration noise requirement of 3 x 10-15 m/sec^2Hz^1/2 for the LISA GRS has motivated a rigorous testing campaign in Europe and a dedicated technology mission, LISA Pathfinder, scheduled for launch in 2014. In order to increase U.S. competency in GRS technologies, various research activities at the University of Florida (UF) have been initiated. The first is the development of a nearly thermally noise limited torsion pendulum for testing the GRS and for understanding the dozens of acceleration noise sources that affect the performance of the LISA GRS. The team at UF also collaborates with Stanford and NASA Ames on a small satellite mission that will test the performance of UV LEDs for ac charge control in space. This presentation will describe the design of the GRS testing facility at UF, the status of the UV LED small satellite mission, and plans for UF participation in the LISA Pathfinder mission.

  14. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  15. Decoupling Principle Analysis and Development of a Parallel Three-Dimensional Force Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanzhi; Jiao, Leihao; Weng, Dacheng; Zhang, Dan; Zheng, Rencheng

    2016-01-01

    In the development of the multi-dimensional force sensor, dimension coupling is the ubiquitous factor restricting the improvement of the measurement accuracy. To effectively reduce the influence of dimension coupling on the parallel multi-dimensional force sensor, a novel parallel three-dimensional force sensor is proposed using a mechanical decoupling principle, and the influence of the friction on dimension coupling is effectively reduced by making the friction rolling instead of sliding friction. In this paper, the mathematical model is established by combining with the structure model of the parallel three-dimensional force sensor, and the modeling and analysis of mechanical decoupling are carried out. The coupling degree (ε) of the designed sensor is defined and calculated, and the calculation results show that the mechanical decoupling parallel structure of the sensor possesses good decoupling performance. A prototype of the parallel three-dimensional force sensor was developed, and FEM analysis was carried out. The load calibration and data acquisition experiment system are built, and then calibration experiments were done. According to the calibration experiments, the measurement accuracy is less than 2.86% and the coupling accuracy is less than 3.02%. The experimental results show that the sensor system possesses high measuring accuracy, which provides a basis for the applied research of the parallel multi-dimensional force sensor. PMID:27649194

  16. Decoupling Principle Analysis and Development of a Parallel Three-Dimensional Force Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanzhi; Jiao, Leihao; Weng, Dacheng; Zhang, Dan; Zheng, Rencheng

    2016-01-01

    In the development of the multi-dimensional force sensor, dimension coupling is the ubiquitous factor restricting the improvement of the measurement accuracy. To effectively reduce the influence of dimension coupling on the parallel multi-dimensional force sensor, a novel parallel three-dimensional force sensor is proposed using a mechanical decoupling principle, and the influence of the friction on dimension coupling is effectively reduced by making the friction rolling instead of sliding friction. In this paper, the mathematical model is established by combining with the structure model of the parallel three-dimensional force sensor, and the modeling and analysis of mechanical decoupling are carried out. The coupling degree (ε) of the designed sensor is defined and calculated, and the calculation results show that the mechanical decoupling parallel structure of the sensor possesses good decoupling performance. A prototype of the parallel three-dimensional force sensor was developed, and FEM analysis was carried out. The load calibration and data acquisition experiment system are built, and then calibration experiments were done. According to the calibration experiments, the measurement accuracy is less than 2.86% and the coupling accuracy is less than 3.02%. The experimental results show that the sensor system possesses high measuring accuracy, which provides a basis for the applied research of the parallel multi-dimensional force sensor. PMID:27649194

  17. Decoupling Principle Analysis and Development of a Parallel Three-Dimensional Force Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanzhi; Jiao, Leihao; Weng, Dacheng; Zhang, Dan; Zheng, Rencheng

    2016-09-15

    In the development of the multi-dimensional force sensor, dimension coupling is the ubiquitous factor restricting the improvement of the measurement accuracy. To effectively reduce the influence of dimension coupling on the parallel multi-dimensional force sensor, a novel parallel three-dimensional force sensor is proposed using a mechanical decoupling principle, and the influence of the friction on dimension coupling is effectively reduced by making the friction rolling instead of sliding friction. In this paper, the mathematical model is established by combining with the structure model of the parallel three-dimensional force sensor, and the modeling and analysis of mechanical decoupling are carried out. The coupling degree (ε) of the designed sensor is defined and calculated, and the calculation results show that the mechanical decoupling parallel structure of the sensor possesses good decoupling performance. A prototype of the parallel three-dimensional force sensor was developed, and FEM analysis was carried out. The load calibration and data acquisition experiment system are built, and then calibration experiments were done. According to the calibration experiments, the measurement accuracy is less than 2.86% and the coupling accuracy is less than 3.02%. The experimental results show that the sensor system possesses high measuring accuracy, which provides a basis for the applied research of the parallel multi-dimensional force sensor.

  18. "Deposition-flux to lung dose"--a new approach in radon inhalation dosimetry using wire-mesh capped direct radon progeny sensor.

    PubMed

    Rout, R P; Mishra, R; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S

    2014-12-01

    Assigning indoor radon doses to populations based on the widely used, cumulative radon concentration monitoring techniques is beset with errors arising due to uncertain equilibrium factors and unattached fractions. Moreover, the dose conversion factor (DCF) of radon decay products may vary by a factor of ∼40 within the particle size range from ∼0.5 nm to tens of micrometers. An ideal detector should have a response, which closely mimics the strong dependence of the DCF on the particle size. In this context, we propose a new approach in which the doses are computed directly from the time integrated progeny deposition fluxes on a suitably tailored surrogate surface. The deposition on this wire-mesh capped detector system closely mimics the deposition rate in human respiratory tract. The detection unit consists of an optimally designed wire-mesh capped Direct Radon Progeny Sensor (DRPS) system. Of the different wire-mesh types, 100 mesh types were found to be suitable considering the fine and coarse fraction penetration efficiencies. The calibration factor was theoretically derived as 0.0077 {mSv (Tracks cm(-2))(-1)}, for converting the measured atom flux in the 100-mesh capped DRPS system to inhalation dose attributed to radon progeny.

  19. Research and development in sensor technology: The DOE industrial energy conservation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    Sensor technology is an important component of modern day process technologies. It lends itself to further research and development with the potential for increased energy efficiency and productivity. Sensors are used by industry in practically every aspect of the production process. The utilization of automatic control systems and the anticipation of increased future applications of computers in production processes have highlighted the importance of research in this area. Recognizing this need, IP has funded a series of targeted projects to develop process-specific sensors as well as sensors for generic applications. This brochure describes, in summary form, the Office of Industrial Programs' research and development (R and D) efforts in the advancement of sensor technology.

  20. Development of metal oxide impregnated stilbite thick film ethanol sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabole, M. P.; Lakhane, M. A.; Choudhari, A. L.; Khairnar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of the sensing efficiency of Titanium oxide/ Stilbite and Copper oxide /Stilbite composites towards detection of hazardous pollutants like ethanol. Stilbite based composites are prepared by physically mixing zeolite with metal oxides namely TiO2 and CuO with weight ratios of 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25. The resulting sensor materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy techniques. Composite sensors are fabricated in the form of thick film by using screen printing technique. The effect of metal oxide concentration on various ethanol sensing parameters such as operating temperature, maximum uptake capacity and response/recovery time are investigated. The results indicate that metal oxide impregnated stilbite composites have great potential as low temperature ethanol sensor.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR HARMONIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred E. Crouch; Alan Dean; Carl Torres; Jeff Aron

    2004-03-01

    In a joint effort with Tuboscope Pipeline Services of Houston, Texas, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) adapted its nonlinear harmonic (NLH) sensing technology for use on a new in-line inspection system (smart pig). Nonlinear harmonics, an AC magnetic method for detecting local anomalies of stress and plastic deformation, shows promise of improved characterization of mechanical damage defects such as gouged dents, even though the dents may have re-rounded. The SwRI-Tuboscope project produced a sensor design, electronic design, and sensor suspension design that are directly adaptable to a multitechnology ILI system. This report describes the NLH method, the sensor, circuit, and suspension designs, and shows results from the supporting laboratory work.

  2. Development of Glucose Sensors by Modified Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatello, Jason; Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2009-03-01

    In 2007 the CDC estimates 7.8% of the US population had diabetes, and the percentage is rising [1]. Such numbers lead to a large demand for highly selective, sensitive glucose sensors. We have used vertically-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (VA-MWCNT) arrays [2] to fabricate glucose sensors. VA-MWCNTs were embedded in PMMA and polished to expose the tips. The tips were functionalized by carboxyl groups, then modified by immobilization of glucose oxidase. Initial results on sensors of this type were previously reported [3], but we have further characterized to include lowest detection limits, enzyme lifetime, and performance stability. Comprehensive electrochemical data will be presented along with Raman, IR, and SEM. 1. National Diabetes Fact Sheet, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health (2007) 2. J. Menda et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 87, 173106-3 (2005) 3. Y. Lin, F. Lu, Y. Tu, Z. Ren, Nano Lett., 4, 191-195 (2004)

  3. Development of eddy current probes based on magnetoresistive sensors arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Decitre, J.-M.; Fermon, C.; Pelkner, M.; Reimund, V.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2014-02-01

    Eddy Current Technique is a powerful method for detection of surface notches and of buried flaws during inspection of metallic parts. Recent EC array probes have demonstrated a fast and efficient control of large surfaces. Nevertheless, when the size of flaws decreases or the defect is rather deep, traditional winding coil probes turn out to be useless. Magnetoresistive sensors present the advantages of flat frequency response and micron size. These sensors are hence very attractive for the detection of buried defects that require low frequencies because of skin depth effect. An optimization of the probe with magnetoresistive sensors as receivers has been made by simulations using CIVA software and finite elements methods with OPERA. EC probes for buried flaw detection have been designed. Experimental results have been compared with simulations.

  4. Development of glucose and pH sensitive hydrogels for microfabricated biomedical sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Genyao

    This dissertation is concerned with the development of glucose-sensitive hydrogels and pH-sensitive hydrogels for biomedical sensor applications. The research is motivated by the limitations of current glucose sensors and an urgent societal need, which has not yet been met, for a continuous glucose monitoring sensor suitable for implantation and long-term use in diabetic patients. The sensing approach is the confinement of thin smart hydrogels between the diaphragm of a piezoresistive pressure sensor and a rigid porous membrane through which analyte diffusion occurs. Such a sensor is termed a "chemomechanical sensor." First, a macrosize chemomechanical sensor is used to screen various totally synthetic phenylboronic acid (PBA) containing glucose-sensitive hydrogels (GSHs) on the basis of (1) magnitude of osmotic swelling pressure response to glucose concentration change, (2) selectivity for glucose relative to fructose, and (3) response kinetics. All testing was performed in vitro, and a polyampholytic GSH is found to be the best choice. Next, polyampholytic GSHs are synthesized without use of potentially toxic acrylamide monomer and tested in the macrosize glucose sensor. Finally a UV-curing process is developed for in-situ synthesis of GSHs on integrated sensing chips containing custom-designed piezoresistive pressure sensors. Preliminary in vitro results for a microchip glucose sensor with pressure transducer diaphragms measuring 1 mm by 1 mm are presented. The results of this thesis will aid the long-term development of a smart hydrogels based sensor array suitable for subcutaneous implantation that is able to simultaneously measure glucose and pH values in real-time on a long-term basis for diabetic patients.

  5. The Development of Novel, High-Flux, Heat Transfer Cells for Thermal Control in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1996-01-01

    In order to meet the future needs of thermal management and control in space applications such as the Space Lab, new heat-transfer technology capable of much larger heat fluxes must be developed. To this end, we describe complementary numerical and experimental investigations into the fundamental fluid mechanics and heat-transfer processes involved in a radically new, self contained, heat transfer cell for microgravity applications. In contrast to conventional heat pipes, the heat transfer in this cell is based on a forced droplet evaporation process using a fine spray. The spray is produced by a novel fluidic technology recently developed at Georgia Tech. This technology is based on a vibration induced droplet atomization process. In this technique, a liquid droplet is placed on a flexible membrane and is vibrated normal to itself. When the proper drop size is attained, the droplet resonates with the surface motion of the membrane and almost immediately bursts into a shower of very fine secondary droplets. The small droplets travel to the opposite end of the cell where they impact a heated surface and are evaporated. The vapor returns to the cold end of the cell and condenses to form the large droplets that are fragmented to form the spray. Preliminary estimates show that a heat transfer cell based on this technology would have a heat-flux capacity that is an order of magnitude higher than those of current heat pipes designs used in microgravity applications.

  6. Underwater wet flux-cored arc welding development of stainless steel and nickel-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Frederick, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    The inaccessibility and high radiation fields of components in the lower two thirds of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) has generated the need for an automated underwater wet welding process to address repair applications. Mechanical methods presently employed for this type of repair application produce crevices, which promote concerns of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), crevice corrosion and pitting. To address these concerns, the EPRI Repair and Replacement Applications Center (RRAC) has developed underwater wet flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) technology for the welding of stainless steel and nickel based materials. The benefits of underwater wet welding include: (1) provides a permanent repair; (2) offers crevice-five conditions; (3) reduces future inspection requirements (4) eliminates the potential for ``loose parts`` (5) can be performed in a timely approach. Underwater wet shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been successfully used to repair components in radiation areas of the upper section of the RPV, although this process is a manual operation and is impractical for remote applications. The developmental work at the EPRI RRAC is directed towards remote repair applications of nickel-based and stainless steel components, which are inaccessible with normal manual repair techniques, e.g., access hole covers. The flux-cored arc welding process (FCAW) was considered a viable option for underwater development, due to the ease of automation, out of position welding proficiency and self-shielding capabilities.

  7. Development of a Hydrazine/Nitrogen Dioxide Fiber Optic Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrawis, Alfred S.; Santiago, Josephine

    2003-01-01

    Bromothymol Blue (BT)/Bromocresol Green (BG) mixture (1/1) in hydrogel (l/l), produces a blue-green indicator for HZ and/or NO2. The stability over a two months period of this BT/BG (1/1) indicator solution was tested and no evidence of performance deterioration was detected. A dual HZ/NO2 prototype sensor utilizing an acid-base indicator was previously constructed. A monitor and control circuit are also designed, built d tested during the course of this project. The circuit is controlled with Motorola MC68HC II microcontroller evaluation board to monitor the voltage level out of the photodetector. Low-pass filter and amplifier are used to interface the sensor's small voltage with the microcontroller's AD input. The sensor, interface circuit and the microcontroller board are then all placed in one unit and powered with a single power supply. The unit is then tested several times and the response was consistent and proved the feasibility of dual "J@ leak detection. Other sensor types, suitable for silica glass fiber, smaller in size, more rugged and suitable for use on board of the Space Shuttle and missile canisters, are then proposed.

  8. The development of wireless sensor network for ECG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun-Liang; Liu, Hsien-Chieh; Tai, Yu-Ting; Wu, Hsin-Hsien; Hsu, Shuo-Jen; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chen, You-Yin

    2006-01-01

    The main problem we want to solve contains two subjects: The first one is the patient's pressure due to wired physiological signal estimation. With wireless sensor network technique, patients only need to carry a few small nodes, and then the physiological signal can be transmitted in the air. The other subject of the vital problem is that some protocols, like Bluetooth, provide a peer to peer wireless communication technique, but such peer to peer network may need a complex algorithm to find the best data transmission path. In this study, we use the hierarchy routing as network topology that three-layer architecture contains PAN coordinator, router and device. The study focuses on implementation of a prototype electrocardiography (ECG) system which replaces wired connections between sensor points and a central node with wireless links. Successful implementation of the final system would be of benefit to all involved in the use of ECG as access to and movement of the patient would not be impeded by the physical constraints imposed by the cables. Most aspects of the design would also be portable to other sensor applications, making the work relevant to a vast range of systems where movement of sensors is desirable and constrained by hard-wired links. PMID:17946570

  9. Design and development of a MEMS capacitive bending strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aebersold, J.; Walsh, K.; Crain, M.; Martin, M.; Voor, M.; Lin, J.-T.; Jackson, D.; Hnat, W.; Naber, J.

    2006-05-01

    The design, modeling, fabrication and testing of a MEMS-based capacitive bending strain sensor utilizing a comb drive is presented. This sensor is designed to be integrated with a telemetry system that will monitor changes in bending strain to assist with the diagnosis of spinal fusion. ABAQUS/CAE finite-element analysis (FEA) software was used to predict sensor actuation, capacitance output and avoid material failure. Highly doped boron silicon wafers with a low resistivity were fabricated into an interdigitated finger array employing deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to create 150 µm sidewalls with 25 µm spacing between the adjacent fingers. The sensor was adhered to a steel beam and subjected to four-point bending to mechanically change the spacing between the interdigitated fingers as a function of strain. As expected, the capacitance output increased as an inverse function of the spacing between the interdigitated fingers. At the unstrained state, the capacitive output was 7.56 pF and increased inversely to 17.04 pF at 1571 µɛ of bending strain. The FEA and analytical models were comparable with the largest differential of 0.65 pF or 6.33% occurring at 1000 µɛ. Advantages of this design are a dice-free process without the use of expensive silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers.

  10. Sensor Development for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor,P.; Radeka, V.; Takacs, P.

    2007-06-07

    The Large Synoptic Survey project proposes to build an 8m-class ground-based telescope with a dedicated wide field camera. The camera consists of a large focal plane mosaic composed of multi-output CCDs with extended red response. Design considerations and preliminary characterization results for the sensors are presented in this contribution to the Workshop.

  11. Development and evaluation of technologies for testing visible and infrared imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, H. S.; Steely, S. L.; Phillips, W. J.; Nicholson, R. A.

    2014-05-01

    Ground testing of space and airborne imaging sensor systems is supported by visible-to-long wave infrared (LWIR) imaging sensor calibration and characterization, as well as hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation with high-fidelity complex scene projection to validate sensor mission performance. To accomplish this successfully, there must be the development and evaluation of technologies that are used in space simulation chambers for such testing, including emitter-array cryotesting, silicon-carbide mirror cryotesting, and flood-source development. This paper provides an overview of the efforts being investigated and implemented at Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC).

  12. Developing a robust wireless sensor network structure for environmental sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Oroza, C.; Glaser, S. D.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    The American River Hydrologic Observatory is being strategically deployed as a real-time ground-based measurement network that delivers accurate and timely information on snow conditions and other hydrologic attributes with a previously unheard of granularity of time and space. The basin-scale network involves 18 sub-networks set out at physiographically representative locations spanning the seasonally snow-covered half of the 5000 km2 American river basin. Each sub-network, covering about a 1-km2 area, consists of 10 wirelessly networked sensing nodes that continuously measure and telemeter temperature, and snow depth; plus selected locations are equipped with sensors for relative humidity, solar radiation, and soil moisture at several depths. The sensor locations were chosen to maximize the variance sampled for snow depth within the basin. Network design and deployment involves an iterative but efficient process. After sensor-station locations are determined, a robust network of interlinking sensor stations and signal repeaters must be constructed to route sensor data to a central base station with a two-way communicable data uplink. Data can then be uploaded from site to remote servers in real time through satellite and cell modems. Signal repeaters are placed for robustness of a self-healing network with redundant signal paths to the base station. Manual, trial-and-error heuristic approaches for node placement are inefficient and labor intensive. In that approach field personnel must restructure the network in real time and wait for new network statistics to be calculated at the base station before finalizing a placement, acting without knowledge of the global topography or overall network structure. We show how digital elevation plus high-definition aerial photographs to give foliage coverage can optimize planning of signal repeater placements and guarantee a robust network structure prior to the physical deployment. We can also 'stress test' the final network

  13. A unique approach to the development of adaptive sensor systems for future spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Tietz, J. C.; Sivertson, W. E.; Wilson, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    In the Shuttle era, it should be possible to develop adaptive remote sensor systems serving more directly specific researcher and user needs and at the same time alleviating the data management problem via intelligent sensor capabilities. The present paper provides a summary of such an approach, wherein specific capabilities have been developed for future global monitoring applications. A detailed description of FILE-I (Feature Identification and Location Experiment) is included along with a summary of future experiments currently under development.

  14. Development of a Tonometric Sensor with a Decoupled Circular Array for Precisely Measuring Radial Artery Pulse.

    PubMed

    Jun, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Min; Bae, Jang-Han; Jung, Chang Jin; Cho, Jung-Hee; Jeon, Young Ju

    2016-05-26

    The radial artery pulse is one of the major diagnostic indices used clinically in both Eastern and Western medicine. One of the prominent methods for measuring the radial artery pulse is the piezoresistive sensor array. Independence among channels and an appropriate sensor arrangement are important for effectively assessing the spatial-temporal information of the pulse. This study developed a circular-type seven-channel piezoresistive sensor array using face-down bonding (FDB) as one of the sensor combination methods. The three-layered housing structure that included independent pressure sensor units using the FDB method not only enabled elimination of the crosstalk among channels, but also allowed various array patterns to be created for effective pulse measurement. The sensors were arranged in a circular-type arrangement such that they could estimate the direction of the radial artery and precisely measure the pulse wave. The performance of the fabricated sensor array was validated by evaluating the sensor sensitivity per channel, and the possibility of estimating the blood vessel direction was demonstrated through a radial artery pulse simulator. We expect the proposed sensor to allow accurate extraction of the pulse indices for pulse diagnosis.

  15. Development of a Tonometric Sensor with a Decoupled Circular Array for Precisely Measuring Radial Artery Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Min; Bae, Jang-Han; Jung, Chang Jin; Cho, Jung-Hee; Jeon, Young Ju

    2016-01-01

    The radial artery pulse is one of the major diagnostic indices used clinically in both Eastern and Western medicine. One of the prominent methods for measuring the radial artery pulse is the piezoresistive sensor array. Independence among channels and an appropriate sensor arrangement are important for effectively assessing the spatial-temporal information of the pulse. This study developed a circular-type seven-channel piezoresistive sensor array using face-down bonding (FDB) as one of the sensor combination methods. The three-layered housing structure that included independent pressure sensor units using the FDB method not only enabled elimination of the crosstalk among channels, but also allowed various array patterns to be created for effective pulse measurement. The sensors were arranged in a circular-type arrangement such that they could estimate the direction of the radial artery and precisely measure the pulse wave. The performance of the fabricated sensor array was validated by evaluating the sensor sensitivity per channel, and the possibility of estimating the blood vessel direction was demonstrated through a radial artery pulse simulator. We expect the proposed sensor to allow accurate extraction of the pulse indices for pulse diagnosis. PMID:27240363

  16. Development, Test, and Evaluation of Microwave Radar Water Level (MWWL) Sensors' Wave Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, S. K.; Heitsenrether, R.

    2015-12-01

    Waves can have a significant impact on many coastal operations including navigational safety, recreation, and even the economy. Despite this, as of 2009, there were only 181 in situ real-time wave observation networks nationwide (IOOS 2009). There has recently been interest in adding real-time wave measurement systems to already existing NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) stations. Several steps have already been taken in order to achieve this, such as integrating information from existing wave measurement buoys and initial testing of multiple different wave measurement systems (Heitsenrether et al. 2012). Since wave observations can be derived from high frequency water level changes, we will investigate water level sensors' capability to measure waves. Recently, CO-OPS has been transitioning to new microwave radar water level (MWWL) sensors which have higher resolution and theoretically a greater potential wave measurement capability than the acoustic sensors in stilling wells. In this study, we analyze the wave measurement capability of MWWL sensors at two high energy wave environments, Duck, NC and La Jolla, CA, and compare results to two "reference" sensors (A Nortek acoustic waves and currents profiler (AWAC) at Duck and a single point pressure sensor at La Jolla). A summary of results from the two field test sites will be presented, including comparisons of wave energy spectra, significant wave height, and peak period measured by the test MWWL sensors and both reference AWAC and pressure sensors. In addition, relationships between MWWL versus reference wave sensor differences and specific wave conditions will be discussed. Initial results from spectral analysis and the calculation of bulk wave parameters indicate that MWWL sensors set to the "NoFilter" processing setting can produce wave measurements capability that compare well to the two reference sensors. These results support continued development to enable the

  17. Development of a Capacitive Ice Sensor to Measure Ice Growth in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiang; Cho, Hyo Chang; Wang, Bo; Ahn, Cheol Hee; Moon, Hyeong Soon; Go, Jeung Sang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the capacitive sensor to measure the growth of ice on a fuel pipe surface in real time. The ice sensor consists of pairs of electrodes to detect the change in capacitance and a thermocouple temperature sensor to examine the ice formation situation. In addition, an environmental chamber was specially designed to control the humidity and temperature to simulate the ice formation conditions. From the humidity, a water film is formed on the ice sensor, which results in an increase in capacitance. Ice nucleation occurs, followed by the rapid formation of frost ice that decreases the capacitance suddenly. The capacitance is saturated. The developed ice sensor explains the ice growth providing information about the icing temperature in real time. PMID:25808770

  18. Development of a capacitive ice sensor to measure ice growth in real time.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiang; Cho, Hyo Chang; Wang, Bo; Ahn, Cheol Hee; Moon, Hyeong Soon; Go, Jeung Sang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the capacitive sensor to measure the growth of ice on a fuel pipe surface in real time. The ice sensor consists of pairs of electrodes to detect the change in capacitance and a thermocouple temperature sensor to examine the ice formation situation. In addition, an environmental chamber was specially designed to control the humidity and temperature to simulate the ice formation conditions. From the humidity, a water film is formed on the ice sensor, which results in an increase in capacitance. Ice nucleation occurs, followed by the rapid formation of frost ice that decreases the capacitance suddenly. The capacitance is saturated. The developed ice sensor explains the ice growth providing information about the icing temperature in real time. PMID:25808770

  19. The development of micro/nano chemical sensor systems for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L.; Biaggi-Labiosa, A.; Ward, B. J.; Rowe, S.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Dutta, P.; Berger, G. M.; Vander Wal, R. L.

    2010-04-01

    Aerospace applications require a range of chemical sensing technologies to monitor conditions related to both space exploration and aeronautic aircraft operations. These applications include leak detection, engine emissions monitoring, fire detection, human health monitoring, and environmental monitoring. This paper discusses efforts to produce microsensor platforms and Smart Sensor Systems that can be tailored to measure a range of chemical species. This technology development ranges from development of base sensor platforms to the evaluation of more mature systems in relevant environments. Although microsensor systems can have a significant impact on aerospace applications, extensive application testing is necessary for their long-term implementation. The introduction of nanomaterials into microsensor platforms has the potential to significantly enable improved sensor performance, but control of those nanostructures is necessary in order to achieve maximum benefits. Examples will be given of microsensor platform technology, Smart Sensor Systems, application testing, and efforts to integrate and control nanostructures into sensor structures.

  20. Measurement of local high-level, transient surface heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continuing investigation to develop methods for measuring local transient surface heat flux. A method is presented for simultaneous measurements of dual heat fluxes at a surface location by considering the heat flux as a separate function of heat stored and heat conducted within a heat flux gage. Surface heat flux information is obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gage. Heat flux was determined over a range of 4 to 22 MW/sq m. It was concluded that the method is feasible. Possible applications are for heat flux measurements on the turbine blade surfaces of space shuttle main engine turbopumps and on the component surfaces of rocket and advanced gas turbine engines and for testing sensors in heat flux gage calibrators.

  1. Development of a New Radiation Sensor for Satellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Birgit; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Hauslage, Jens; Marsalek, Karel; Aeckerlein, Joachim; M, Hartmut

    The RAMIS (RAdiation Measurements In Space) experiment aims to measure cosmic radiation with energy deposition ranging from minimal ionizing protons up to relativistic iron nuclei. The radiation detector principle uses two silicon detectors, each with an active area of 0.5cm² that are arranged in a telescope configuration. The experiment will fly in 2016 on the first mission of the newly developed DLR (German Aerospace Center) Compact Satellite, which intends to provide an easy accessible platform for scientific research within DLR as well as for international partners and their experiments. As the satellite will orbit Earth at an altitude of about 600 km on a polar orbit, valuable insights are gained not only in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) component of the radiation field and in solar energetic particles (SEPs) in case of solar events. Also the trapped radiation in the horns of the electron belts around Earth can be studied in detail. Particle fluxes will be monitored and energy deposition spectra recorded from which linear energy transfer spectra will be generated. These spectra give an estimate for the quality of the radiation field. The RAMIS experiment consists of two modules, i.e. two small silicon detector telescopes, with one module being located outside on top of the satellite, while the other one is placed inside next to the primary payload of the satellite, the Eu:CROPIS experiment. Eu:CROPIS is a combined self-sustained biological life support system under Moon and Mars gravity, which uses Euglena as oxygen suppliers, biofilter for wastewater treatment and detoxification, and urine as primary fertilizer. In addition to its scientific output RAMIS will provide dosimetric monitoring for Eu:CROPIS and serve as a radiation exposure information system for the satellite bus. Furthermore the obtained data can be used for benchmarking and improvement of radiation belt models as well as of shielding models by combining the results of both modules. The RAMIS

  2. Effect of filtration flux on the development and operation of a dynamic membrane for anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mubashir; Alibardi, Luca; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Cossu, Raffaello; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    Dynamic membrane represents a cost effective alternative to conventional membranes by employing fouling as a means of solid-liquid separation. This study evaluated the effects of initial flux on both development rate of dynamic membrane and bioreactor performance during two consecutive experiments. The dynamic membrane was developed over a 200 μm mesh and the reactor was operated under anaerobic conditions. It was found that the effect of an initial higher applied flux on dynamic membrane development was more pronounced than mixed liquor suspended solid concentration inside the bioreactor. The development of the dynamic membrane was therefore positively associated with the applied flux. The rapid development of the dynamic membrane during the second experimental run at high initial fluxes and lower MLSS concentrations also affected the performance of the bioreactor in terms of more efficient COD removal and biogas production. A major shortcoming of applying higher initial applied flux was the formation of a denser and robust dynamic membrane layer that was resistant to applied hydraulic shear to control desired permeability and thus represented an obstacle in maintaining a long term operation with sustainable flux at lower transmembrane pressure (TMP). PMID:27280854

  3. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, Lammert; Bergsma, Aldo; Chuma, Beatus; de Bruin, Sytze

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) were used as input for a vegetation productivity model. This paper presents the vegetation productivity model, the sensor data sources and the implementation of the automated processing facility. Finally, an evaluation is made of the opportunities and limitations of sensor web based approaches for the development of web services which combine both satellite and in situ sensor sources.

  4. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Lammert; Bergsma, Aldo; Chuma, Beatus; de Bruin, Sytze

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) were used as input for a vegetation productivity model. This paper presents the vegetation productivity model, the sensor data sources and the implementation of the automated processing facility. Finally, an evaluation is made of the opportunities and limitations of sensor web based approaches for the development of web services which combine both satellite and in situ sensor sources. PMID:22574019

  5. Exploitation of unique properties of zeolites in the development of gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yangong; Li, Xiaogan; Dutta, Prabir K

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of microporous zeolites, including ion-exchange properties, adsorption, molecular sieving, catalysis, conductivity have been exploited in improving the performance of gas sensors. Zeolites have been employed as physical and chemical filters to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors. In addition, direct interaction of gas molecules with the extraframework cations in the nanoconfined space of zeolites has been explored as a basis for developing new impedance-type gas/vapor sensors. In this review, we summarize how these properties of zeolites have been used to develop new sensing paradigms. There is a considerable breadth of transduction processes that have been used for zeolite incorporated sensors, including frequency measurements, optical and the entire gamut of electrochemical measurements. It is clear from the published literature that zeolites provide a route to enhance sensor performance, and it is expected that commercial manifestation of some of the approaches discussed here will take place. The future of zeolite-based sensors will continue to exploit its unique properties and use of other microporous frameworks, including metal organic frameworks. Zeolite composites with electronic materials, including metals will lead to new paradigms in sensing. Use of nano-sized zeolite crystals and zeolite membranes will enhance sensor properties and make possible new routes of miniaturized sensors.

  6. Exploitation of Unique Properties of Zeolites in the Development of Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yangong; Li, Xiaogan; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of microporous zeolites, including ion-exchange properties, adsorption, molecular sieving, catalysis, conductivity have been exploited in improving the performance of gas sensors. Zeolites have been employed as physical and chemical filters to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors. In addition, direct interaction of gas molecules with the extraframework cations in the nanoconfined space of zeolites has been explored as a basis for developing new impedance-type gas/vapor sensors. In this review, we summarize how these properties of zeolites have been used to develop new sensing paradigms. There is a considerable breadth of transduction processes that have been used for zeolite incorporated sensors, including frequency measurements, optical and the entire gamut of electrochemical measurements. It is clear from the published literature that zeolites provide a route to enhance sensor performance, and it is expected that commercial manifestation of some of the approaches discussed here will take place. The future of zeolite-based sensors will continue to exploit its unique properties and use of other microporous frameworks, including metal organic frameworks. Zeolite composites with electronic materials, including metals will lead to new paradigms in sensing. Use of nano-sized zeolite crystals and zeolite membranes will enhance sensor properties and make possible new routes of miniaturized sensors. PMID:22666081

  7. Development of a multi-analyte integrated optical sensor platform for indoor air-quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaughey, Orla; Nooney, Robert; McEvoy, Aisling K.; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2005-11-01

    The major trends driving optical chemical sensor technology are miniaturisation and multi-parameter functionality on a single platform (so-called multi-analyte sensing). A multi-analyte sensor chip device based on miniature waveguide structures, porous sensor materials and compact optoelectronic components has been developed. One of the major challenges in fluorescence-based optical sensor design is the efficient capture of emitted fluorescence from a fluorophore and the effective detection of the signal. In this work, the sensor platform has been fabricated using poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, as the waveguide material. These platforms employ a novel optical configuration along with rapid prototyping technology, which facilitates the production of an effective sensor platform. Sensing films for oxygen, carbon dioxide and humidity have been developed. These films consist of a fluorescent indicator dye entrapped in a porous immobilisation matrix. The analyte diffuses through the porous matrix and reacts with the indicator dye, causing changes in the detected fluorescence. The reaction between the dye and the analyte is completely reversible with no degradation of the signal after detection of different concentrations of the analyte. A single LED excitation source is used for all three analytes, and the sensor platform is housed in a compact unit containing the excitation source, filters and detector. The simultaneous detection of several analytes is a major requirement for fields such as food packaging, environmental quality control and biomedical diagnostics. The current sensor chip is designed for use in indoor air-quality monitoring.

  8. Development of Solar Wind Model Driven by Empirical Heat Flux and Pressure Terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, E. C.; Ofman, L.; Selwa, M. A.; Kramar, M.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a time stationary self-consistent 2D MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind as suggested by Sittler et al. (2003). Sittler & Guhathakurta (1999) developed a semi-empirical steady state model (SG model) of the solar wind in a multipole 3-streamer structure, with the model constrained by Skylab observations. Guhathakurta et al. (2006) presented a more recent version of their initial work. Sittler et al. (2003) modified the SG model by investigating time dependent MHD, ad hoc heating term with heat conduction and empirical heating solutions. Next step of development of 2D MHD models was performed by Sittler & Ofman (2006). They derived effective temperature and effective heat flux from the data-driven SG model and fit smooth analytical functions to be used in MHD calculations. Improvements of the Sittler & Ofman (2006) results now show a convergence of the 3-streamer topology into a single equatorial streamer at altitudes > 2 RS. This is a new result and shows we are now able to reproduce observations of an equatorially confined streamer belt. In order to allow our solutions to be applied to more general applications, we extend that model by using magnetogram data and PFSS model as a boundary condition. Initial results were presented by Selwa et al. [2008]. We choose solar minimum magnetogram data since during solar maximum the boundary conditions are more complex and the coronal magnetic field may not be described correctly by PFSS model. As the first step we studied the simplest 2D MHD case with variable heat conduction, and with empirical heat input combined with empirical momentum addition for the fast solar wind. We use realistic magnetic field data based on NSO/GONG data, and plan to extend the study to 3D. This study represents the first attempt of fully self-consistent realistic model based on real data and including semi-empirical heat flux and semi-empirical effective pressure terms. References: Sittler E. C. Jr. and Guhathakurta M

  9. Calibration and algorithm development for estimation of nitrogen in wheat crop using tractor mounted N-sensor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjeet; Kumar, Rajneesh; Sharma, Ankit; Singh, Bhupinder; Thind, S K

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was planned to investigate the tractor mounted N-sensor (Make Yara International) to predict nitrogen (N) for wheat crop under different nitrogen levels. It was observed that, for tractor mounted N-sensor, spectrometers can scan about 32% of total area of crop under consideration. An algorithm was developed using a linear relationship between sensor sufficiency index (SIsensor) and SISPAD to calculate the N app as a function of SISPAD. There was a strong correlation among sensor attributes (sensor value, sensor biomass, and sensor NDVI) and different N-levels. It was concluded that tillering stage is most prominent stage to predict crop yield as compared to the other stages by using sensor attributes. The algorithms developed for tillering and booting stages are useful for the prediction of N-application rates for wheat crop. N-application rates predicted by algorithm developed and sensor value were almost the same for plots with different levels of N applied. PMID:25811039

  10. Calibration and Algorithm Development for Estimation of Nitrogen in Wheat Crop Using Tractor Mounted N-Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manjeet; Kumar, Rajneesh; Sharma, Ankit; Singh, Bhupinder; Thind, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was planned to investigate the tractor mounted N-sensor (Make Yara International) to predict nitrogen (N) for wheat crop under different nitrogen levels. It was observed that, for tractor mounted N-sensor, spectrometers can scan about 32% of total area of crop under consideration. An algorithm was developed using a linear relationship between sensor sufficiency index (SIsensor) and SISPAD to calculate the Napp as a function of SISPAD. There was a strong correlation among sensor attributes (sensor value, sensor biomass, and sensor NDVI) and different N-levels. It was concluded that tillering stage is most prominent stage to predict crop yield as compared to the other stages by using sensor attributes. The algorithms developed for tillering and booting stages are useful for the prediction of N-application rates for wheat crop. N-application rates predicted by algorithm developed and sensor value were almost the same for plots with different levels of N applied. PMID:25811039

  11. Development of Pyramidal Type 2-AXES Analog Sun Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Sung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Nam, Myung-Ryong; Park, Dong-Jo

    2000-12-01

    PSS (Pyramidal type 2-axes Analog Sun Sensor) which will be used for KAISTSAT-4 is designed to be small, light, low in power consumption, and adequate for small satellite attitude sensor. The PSS for the KAISTSAT-4 consists of the pyramidal structure, solar cells and amplifier. The pyramidal structure is suitable for the 2-axes sensing, Solar cells are made up of a rectangular shape of crystal silicon. The PSS measures the angle of incident light and initial satellite attitude measurement, and provides an alarm for the sunlight-sensitive payloads. This paper explains the PSS structure and the characteristic test result about the PSS with 50o in FOV, less than 3o in accuracy.

  12. Development of chemiresponsive sensors for detection of common homemade explosives.

    SciTech Connect

    Brotherton, Christopher M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2012-05-01

    Field-structured chemiresistors (FSCRs) are polymer based sensors that exhibit a resistance change when exposed to an analyte of interest. The amount of resistance change depends on the polymer-analyte affinity. The affinity can be manipulated by modifying the polymer within the FSCRs. In this paper, we investigate the ability of chemically modified FSCRs to sense hydrogen peroxide vapor. Five chemical species were chosen based on their hydrophobicity or reactivity with hydrogen peroxide. Of the five investigated, FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide exhibited a significant response to hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additionally, these same FSCRs were evaluated against a common interferrant in hydrogen peroxide detection, water vapor. For the conditions investigated, the FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide were able to successfully distinguish between water vapor and hydrogen peroxide vapor. A portion of the results presented here will be submitted to the Sensors and Actuators journal.

  13. Development of novel wireless sensor for food quality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son Nguyen, Dat; Ngan Le, Nguyen; Phat Lam, Tan; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric; Chien Dang, Mau; Tedjini, Smail

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a wireless sensor for the monitoring of food quality. We integrate sensing capability into ultrahigh frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags through the relationship between the physical read-range and permittivity of the object we label with the RFID tags. Using the known variations of food permittivity as a function of time, we can detect the contamination time at which a food product becomes unacceptable for consumption based on the measurement of read-range with the as-designed sensing tags. This low-cost UHF RFID passive sensor was designed and experimentally tested on beef, pork, and cheese with the same storage conditions as in supermarkets. The agreement between the experimental and simulation results show the potential of this technique for practical application in food-quality tracking.

  14. CATSI EDM: recent advances in the development and validation of a ruggedized passive standoff CWA sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Lacasse, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier is currently developing a ruggedized passive standoff sensor for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) based on differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometry. This system is referred to as the Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) Engineering Development Model (EDM). The CATSI EDM sensor is based on the use of a double-beam FTIR spectrometer that is optimized for optical subtraction. A description of the customized sensor is given along with a discussion on the detection and identification approaches that have been developed. Preliminary results of validation from a number of laboratory measurements and open-air trials are analyzed to establish the capability of detection and identification of various toxic and non-toxic chemical vapor plumes. These results clearly demonstrate the capability of the passive differential radiometric approach for the standoff detection and identification of chemical vapors at distances up to a few kilometers from the sensor.

  15. An Overview of the Development of High Temperature Wireless Smart Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    The harsh environment inherent in propulsion systems is especially challenging for Smart Sensor Systems; this paper addresses technology development for such applications. A basic sensing system for high temperature wireless pressure monitoring composed of a sensor, electronics, and wireless communication with scavenged power developed for health monitoring of aircraft engines and other high temperature applications has been demonstrated at 475 C. Other efforts will be discussed including a brief overview of the status of high temperature electronics and sensors, as well as their use and applications.

  16. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E.; Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Zhou, Z.; Ackland, B.; Dickinson, A.; Eid, E.; Inglis, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research and development of CMOS active pixel image sensors for low cost commercial applications. A number of sensor designs have been fabricated and tested in both p-well and n-well technologies. Major elements in the development of the sensor include on-chip analog signal processing circuits for the reduction of fixed pattern noise, on-chip timing and control circuits and on-chip analog-to-digital conversion (ADC). Recent results and continuing efforts in these areas will be presented.

  17. Review of the development of diamond radiation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P. F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    1999-09-01

    Diamond radiation sensors produced by chemical vapour deposition are studied for the application as tracking detectors in high luminosity experiments. Sensors with a charge collection distance up to 250 μm have been manufactured. Their radiation hardness has been studied with pions, proton and neutrons up to fluences of 1.9×10 15 π cm -2, 5×10 15 p cm -2 and 1.35×10 15 n cm -2, respectively. Diamond micro-strip detectors with 50 μm pitch have been exposed in a high-energy test beam in order to investigate their charge collection properties. The measured spatial resolution using a centre-of-gravity position finding algorithm corresponds to the digital resolution for this strip pitch. First results from a strip tracker with a 2×4 cm 2 surface area are reported as well as the performance of a diamond tracker read out by radiation-hard electronics with 25 ns shaping time. Diamond pixel sensors have been prepared to match the geometries of the recently available read-out chip prototypes for ATLAS and CMS. Beam test results are shown from a diamond detector bump-bonded to an ATLAS prototype read-out. They demonstrate a 98% bump-bonding efficiency and a digital resolution in both dimensions.

  18. Development of a photovoltaic power supply for wireless sensor networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Matthew R.; Kyker, Ronald D.

    2005-06-01

    This report examines the design process of a photovoltaic (solar) based power supply for wireless sensor networks. Such a system stores the energy produced by an array of photovoltaic cells in a secondary (rechargeable) battery that in turn provides power to the individual node of the sensor network. The goal of such a power supply is to enable a wireless sensor network to have an autonomous operation on the order of years. Ideally, such a system is as small as possible physically while transferring the maximum amount of available solar energy to the load (the node). Within this report, there is first an overview of current solar and battery technologies, including characteristics of different technologies and their impact on overall system design. Second is a general discussion of modeling, predicting, and analyzing the extended operation of a small photovoltaic power supply and setting design parameters. This is followed by results and conclusions from the testing of a few basic systems. Lastly, some advanced concepts that may be considered in order to optimize future systems will be discussed.

  19. Study of development and utilization of a multipurpose atmospheric corrosion sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.; Raman, A.; Bhattacharya, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    There has been a critical need for analyzing various aspects of atmospheric corrosion and for the development of atmospheric corrosion microsensors. The project work has involved the following activities: (1) making of multielectrode corrosion monitors on dielectric substrates; (2) testing them in the laboratory for functional characteristics; (3) preparing a report on the state of the art of atmospheric corrosion sensor development around the world; and (4) corrosion testing of electrochemical changes of sensor specimens and related fog testing. The study included work on the subject of development and utilization of a multipurpose atmospheric corrosion sensor and this report is the annual report on work carried out on this research project. This has included studies on the development of sensors of two designs, stage 1 and stage 2, and with glass and alumina substrate, experimentation and development and characterization of the coating uniformity, aspects of corrosion monitoring, literature search on the corrosion sensors and their development. A state of the art report on atmospheric corrosion sensor development was prepared and submitted.

  20. Development of Solar Wind Model Driven by Empirical Heat Flux and Pressure Terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C., Jr.; Ofman, L.; Selwa, M.; Kramar, M.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a time stationary self-consistent 2D MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind as suggested by Sittler et al. (2003). Sittler & Guhathakurta (1999) developed a semiempirical steady state model (SG model) of the solar wind in a multipole 3-streamer structure, with the model constrained by Skylab observations. Guhathakurta et al. (2006) presented a more recent version of their initial work. Sittler et al. (2003) modified the SG model by investigating time dependent MHD, ad hoc heating term with heat conduction and empirical heating solutions. Next step of development of 2D MHD models was performed by Sittler & Ofman (2006). They derived effective temperature and effective heat flux from the data-driven SG model and fit smooth analytical functions to be used in MHD calculations. Improvements of the Sittler & Ofman (2006) results now show a convergence of the 3-streamer topology into a single equatorial streamer at altitudes > 2 R(sub S). This is a new result and shows we are now able to reproduce observations of an equatorially confined streamer belt. In order to allow our solutions to be applied to more general applications, we extend that model by using magnetogram data and PFSS model as a boundary condition. Initial results were presented by Selwa et al. (2008). We choose solar minimum magnetogram data since during solar maximum the boundary conditions are more complex and the coronal magnetic field may not be described correctly by PFSS model. As the first step we studied the simplest 2D MHD case with variable heat conduction, and with empirical heat input combined with empirical momentum addition for the fast solar wind. We use realistic magnetic field data based on NSO/GONG data, and plan to extend the study to 3D. This study represents the first attempt of fully self-consistent realistic model based on real data and including semi-empirical heat flux and semi-empirical effective pressure terms.

  1. Sensor development for in situ detection of concentration polarization and fouling of reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrich, Kahlil T.; Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate three polymer electroding techniques in developing a novel in situ sensor for an RO system using the electrical response of a thin film composite sensor. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to measure the sensor response when exposed to sodium chloride solutions with concentrations from 0.1 M to 0.8 M in both single and double bath configurations. An insulated carbon grease sensor was mechanically stable while a composite Direct Assembly Process (DAP) sensor was fragile upon hydration. Scanning electron microscopy results from an impregnation-reduction technique showed gold nanoparticles were deposited most effectively when presoaked in a potassium hydroxide solution and on an uncoated membrane; surface resistances remained too high for sensor implementation. Through thickness carbon grease sensors showed a transient response to changes in concentration, and no meaningful concentration sensitivity was noted for the time scales over which EIS measurements were taken. Surface carbon grease electrodes attached to the polyamide thin film were not sensitive to concentration. The impedance spectra indicated the carbon grease sensor was unable to detect changes in concentration in double bath experiments when implemented with the polyamide surface exposed to salt solutions. DAP sensors lacked a consistent response to changes in concentration too. A reverse double bath experiment with the polysulfone layer exposed to a constant concentration exhibited a transient impedance response similar to through thickness carbon grease sensors in a single bath at constant concentration. These results suggest that the microporous polysulfone layer is responsible for sensor response to concentration.

  2. Development of silicon microforce sensors integrated with double meander springs for standard hardness test instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Doering, Lutz; Daus, Alwin; Brand, Uwe; Frank, Thomas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Silicon microforce sensors, to be used as a transferable standard for micro force and depth scale calibrations of hardness testing instruments, are developed using silicon bulk micromachining technologies. Instead of wet chemical etching, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is employed in the sensor fabrication process leading to more precise control of 300 μm deep structures with smooth sidewall profiles. Double meander springs are designed flanking to the boss replacing the conventional rectangular springs and thereby improving the system linearity. Two full p-SOI piezoresistive Wheatstone bridges are added on both clamped ends of the active sensors. To realize passive force sensors two spring-mass elements are stacked using glue and photoresist as joining materials. Correspondingly, although plastic deformation seems to occur when the second spring is contacted, the kink effect (i.e., abrupt increase of stiffness) is obviously observed from the first test of the passive stack sensor.

  3. Research options for the development of sensors to measure the thermal state of solid steel bodies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.A.; Lownie, H.W. Jr.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of the study reported here is to assist Battelle's Pcacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in planning a research and development program to develop temperature sensors for metal and ceramic industries. This study focuses on sensors to measure internal temperatures within bodies of hot steel. A series of literature surveys, interviews, field visits, and meetings with steel-industry organizations was conducted in seeking answers to questions posed by PNL. These questions, with responses, are summarized.

  4. Development of Hybrid Sensor Arrays for Sensor Arrays for Simultaneous Measurement of Pressure and Shear Stress Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This document reports on the progress in developing hybrid sensors for the simultaneous measurement of pressure and shear stress. The key feature for the success of the proposed hybrid sensor array is the ability to deposit Cu-Ni alloy with proper composition (55 - 45) on a silicon wafer to form a strain gage. This alloy strain gage replaces the normally used Si strain gages in MEMS, which are highly nonlinear and temperature dependent. The copper nickel, with proper composition (55 - 45), was successfully deposited on a silicon wafer with a few trials during this period of the project. Pictures of the Cu-Ni alloy strain gage and the x-ray spectra indicating the composition are shown. The planned tests are also reviewed.

  5. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  6. Development of a hand-held GPR MD sensor system (ALIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Motoyuki; Fujiwara, Jun; Feng, Xuan; Zhou, Zheng-Shu; Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-06-01

    ALIS (Advanced Landmine Imaging System), which is a novel landmine detection sensor system combined with a metal detector and GPR, was developed. This is a hand-held equipment, which has a sensor position tracking system, and can visualize the sensor output in real time on a head-mounted PC display. In order to achieve the sensor tracking system, ALIS needs only one CCD camera attached on the sensor handle. The new hand-held system ALIS is a very compact and do not require any additional sensor for sensor position tracking. The acquired signal from the metal detector and GPR is displayed on the PC display on real time, and the sensor trace can be checked by the operator. At the same time, the operator can visually recognize the signal on the same display. The CCD captured image is superimposed with the GPR and metal detector signal, therefore the detection and identification of buried targets is quite easy and reliable. Field evaluation test of ALIS was conducted in Afghanistan, and we demonstrated that it can detect buried antipersonnel landmines, and can also discriminate metal fragments from landmines.

  7. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  8. Metabolic network reconstruction and flux variability analysis of storage synthesis in developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Computational simulation of large-scale biochemical networks can be used to analyze and predict the metabolic behavior of an organism, such as a developing seed. Based on the biochemical literature, pathways databases and decision rules defining reaction directionality we reconstructed bna572, a stoichiometric metabolic network model representing Brassica napus seed storage metabolism. In the highly compartmentalized network about 25% of the 572 reactions are transport reactions interconnecting nine subcellular compartments and the environment. According to known physiological capabilities of developing B. napus embryos, four nutritional conditions were defined to simulate heterotrophy or photoheterotrophy, each in combination with the availability of inorganic nitrogen (ammonia, nitrate) or amino acids as nitrogen sources. Based on mathematical linear optimization the optimal solution space was comprehensively explored by flux variability analysis, thereby identifying for each reaction the range of flux values allowable under optimality. The range and variability of flux values was then categorized into flux variability types. Across the four nutritional conditions, approximately 13% of the reactions have variable flux values and 10-11% are substitutable (can be inactive), both indicating metabolic redundancy given, for example, by isoenzymes, subcellular compartmentalization or the presence of alternative pathways. About one-third of the reactions are never used and are associated with pathways that are suboptimal for storage synthesis. Fifty-seven reactions change flux variability type among the different nutritional conditions, indicating their function in metabolic adjustments. This predictive modeling framework allows analysis and quantitative exploration of storage metabolism of a developing B. napus oilseed.

  9. An Overview of Wide Bandgap Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liangyu; Spry, D.; Trunek, A.

    2007-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the sensors and electronics development work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center which is intended to meet the needs of future aerospace applications. Three major technology areas are discussed: 1) high temperature SiC electronics, 2) SiC gas sensor technology development, and 3) packaging of harsh environment devices. Highlights of this work include world-record operation of SiC electronic devices including 500?C JFET transistor operation with excellent properties, atomically flat SiC gas sensors integrated with an on-chip temperature detector/heater, and operation of a packaged AC amplifier. A description of the state-of-the-art is given for each topic. It is concluded that significant progress has been made and that given recent advancements the development of high temperature smart sensors is envisioned.

  10. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for Harsh Environments: Identification of Candidate Thin Film Ceramics to Test for Viability for Static Strain Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in propulsion system applications. In order to have a more passive method of negating changes of resistance due to temperature, an effort is underway at NASA GRC to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines, specifically in the fan and compressor modules on blades. Other applications include on aircraft hot section structures and on thermal protection systems. The near-term interim goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials to test for viability and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. This goal was achieved by a thorough literature search for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges, reviewing potential candidate materials for chemical & physical compatibility with NASA GRC's microfabrication procedures and substrates.

  11. Development of Acceleration Sensor and Acceleration Evaluation System for Super-Low-Range Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Shogo; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes the development process for acceleration sensors used on automobiles and an acceleration evaluation system designed specifically for acceleration at super-low-range frequencies. The features of the newly developed sensor are as follows. 1) Original piezo-bimorph design based on a disc-center-fixed structure achieves pyroeffect cancelling and stabilization of sensor characteristics and enables the detection of the acceleration of 0.0009 G at the super-low-range-frequency of 0.03 Hz. 2) The addition of a self-diagnostic function utilizing the characteristics of piezoceramics enables constant monitoring of sensor failure. The frequency range of acceleration for accurate vehicle motion control is considered to be from DC to about 50 Hz. However, the measurement of acceleration in the super-low-range frequency near DC has been difficult because of mechanical and electrical noise interruption. This has delayed the development of the acceleration sensor for automotive use. We have succeeded in the development of an acceleration evaluation system for super-low-range frequencies from 0.015 Hz to 2 Hz with detection of the acceleration range from 0.0002 G (0.2 gal) to 1 G, as well as the development of a piezoelectric-type acceleration sensor for automotive use.

  12. Development of nanostructured protective "sight glasses" for IR gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, René; Davis, Zachary James; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Clausen, Sønnik; Boisen, Anja; Jensen, Jens Møller; Buchner, Rainer; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2011-06-01

    In this work protective "sight glasses" for infrared gas sensors showing a sub-wavelength nanostructure with random patterns have been fabricated by reactive ion etching (RIE) in an easy and comparable cheap single step mask-less process. By an organic coating, the intrinsic water repellent property of the surface could be enhanced, shown by contact angle and roll-off angle measurements. The "self-cleaning" surface property and chemical robustness towards aggressive environments are demonstrated. FT-IR spectroscopy concerning the optical properties of these nanostructured silicon windows revealed a stable anti-reflective "moth-eye" effect in certain wavelength ranges owing to the nanostructures.

  13. Development of a fiber optic compressor blade sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh

    1995-01-01

    A complete working prototype of the fiber optic blade tip sensor was first tested in the laboratory, followed by a thorough evaluation at NASA W8 Single Compressor Stage Facility in Lewis Research Center. Subsequently, a complete system with three parallel channels was fabricated and delivered to Dr. Kurkov. The final system was tested in the Subsonic Wind Tunnel Facility, in parallel with The General Electric Company's light probe system. The results at all operating speeds were comparable. This report provides a brief description of the system and presents a summary of the experimental results.

  14. Development of the electrochemical fatigue sensor for evaluating fatigue damage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.F.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.Z.; DeLuccia, J.; Laird, C.

    1999-07-01

    The Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (EFS) is a device which operates by an electrochemical-mechanical interaction and which can sense the type and extent of fatigue damage both before and after crack initiation. It was initially explored through studies on soft metals. Here the authors report efforts to determine the ability of the device to read damage in hardened commercial alloys: 7075 aluminum alloy, 4130 steel and Ti-6Al-4V. They also demonstrate that the device, which uses an electrolytic medium, does not degrade the fatigue properties if care is used in electrolyte selection.

  15. Development of advanced magnetic resonance sensor for industrial applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    De Los Santos, A.

    1997-06-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and various subcontractors, in a cooperative agreement with the DOE, have developed and tested an advanced magnetic resonance (MR) sensor for several industrial applications and made various market surveys. The original goal of the program was to develop an advanced moisture sensor to allow more precise and rapid control of drying processes so that energy and/or product would not be wasted. Over the course of the program, it was shown that energy savings were achievable but in many processes the return in investment did not justify the cost of a magnetic resonance sensor. However, in many processes, particularly chemical, petrochemical, paper and others, the return in investment can be very high as to easily justify the cost of a magnetic resonance sensor. In these industries, substantial improvements in product yield, quality, and efficiency in production can cause substantial energy savings and reductions in product wastage with substantial environmental effects. The initial applications selected for this program included measurement of corn gluten at three different points and corn germ at one point in an American Maize corn processing plant. During the initial phases (I and II) of this program, SwRI developed a prototype advanced moisture sensor utilizing NMR technology capable of accurately and reliably measuring moisture in industrial applications and tested the sensor in the laboratory under conditions simulating on-line products in the corn wet milling industry. The objective of Phase III was to test the prototype sensor in the plant environment to determine robustness, reliability and long term stability. Meeting these objectives would permit extended field testing to improve the statistical database used to calibrate the sensor and subject the sensor to true variations in operating conditions encountered in the process rather than those which could only be simulated in the laboratory.

  16. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  17. The development of a solid-state hydrogen sensor for rocket engine leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    Hydrogen propellant leakage poses significant operational problems in the rocket propulsion industry as well as for space exploratory applications. Vigorous efforts have been devoted to minimizing hydrogen leakage in assembly, test, and launch operations related to hydrogen propellant. The objective has been to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems. Specifically, efforts have been made to develop a hydrogen leak detection system for point-contact measurement. Under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, the Electronics Design Center at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, has undertaken the development of a point-contact hydrogen gas sensor with potential applications to the hydrogen propellant industry. We envision a sensor array consisting of numbers of discrete hydrogen sensors that can be located in potential leak sites. Silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining techniques are used in the fabrication of these sensor prototypes. Evaluations of the sensor are carried out in-house at Case Western Reserve University as well as at Lewis Research Center and GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, California. The hydrogen gas sensor is not only applicable in a hydrogen propulsion system, but also usable in many other civilian and industrial settings. This includes vehicles or facility use, or in the production of hydrogen gas. Dual space and commercial uses of these point-contacted hydrogen sensors are feasible and will directly meet the needs and objectives of NASA as well as various industrial segments.

  18. Development of an Optical Gas Leak Sensor for Detecting Ethylene, Dimethyl Ether and Methane

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qiulin; Pei, Xiangdong; Zhu, Simin; Sun, Dong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Liang, Ting; Zhang, Wendong; Xiong, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach to develop an optical gas leak sensor that can be used to measure ethylene, dimethyl ether, and methane. The sensor is designed based on the principles of IR absorption spectrum detection, and comprises two crossed elliptical surfaces with a folded reflection-type optical path. We first analyze the optical path and the use of this structure to design a miniature gas sensor. The proposed sensor includes two detectors (one to acquire the reference signal and the other for the response signal), the light source, and the filter, all of which are integrated in a miniature gold-plated chamber. We also designed a signal detection device to extract the sensor signal and a microprocessor to calculate and control the entire process. The produced sensor prototype had an accuracy of ±0.05%. Experiments which simulate the transportation of hazardous chemicals demonstrated that the developed sensor exhibited a good dynamic response and adequately met technical requirements. PMID:23539025

  19. The development of a solid-state hydrogen sensor for rocket engine leakage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogen propellant leakage poses significant operational problems in the rocket propulsion industry as well as for space exploratory applications. Vigorous efforts have been devoted to minimizing hydrogen leakage in assembly, test, and launch operations related to hydrogen propellant. The objective has been to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems. Specifically, efforts have been made to develop a hydrogen leak detection system for point-contact measurement. Under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, the Electronics Design Center at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, has undertaken the development of a point-contact hydrogen gas sensor with potential applications to the hydrogen propellant industry. We envision a sensor array consisting of numbers of discrete hydrogen sensors that can be located in potential leak sites. Silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining techniques are used in the fabrication of these sensor prototypes. Evaluations of the sensor are carried out in-house at Case Western Reserve University as well as at Lewis Research Center and GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, California. The hydrogen gas sensor is not only applicable in a hydrogen propulsion system, but also usable in many other civilian and industrial settings. This includes vehicles or facility use, or in the production of hydrogen gas. Dual space and commercial uses of these point-contacted hydrogen sensors are feasible and will directly meet the needs and objectives of NASA as well as various industrial segments.

  20. Development of a high-heat-flux target for multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beams at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Bush, C.E.; Foster, C.A.; Haselton, H.H.; Hayes, P.H.; Menon, M.M.; Moeller, J.A.; Sluss, F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A high-heat-flux target has been developed for intercepting multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beam power at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Water-cooled copper swirl tubes are used for the heat transfer medium; these tubes exhibit an enhancement in burnout heat flux over conventional axial-flow tubes. The target consists of 126 swirl tubes (each 0.95 cm in outside diameter with 0.16-cm-thick walls and approx. =1 m long) arranged in a V-shape. Two arrays of parallel tubes inclined at an angle ..cap alpha.. to the beam axis form the V-shape, and this geometry reduces the surface heat flux by a factor of 1/sin ..cap alpha.. (for the present design, ..cap alpha.. =13/sup 0/ and 21/sup 0/). In tests with the ORNL long-pulse ion source (13- by 43-cm grid), the target has handled up to 3-MW, 30-s beam pulses with no deleterious effects. The peak power density was estimated at approx. =15 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (5.4 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces). The water flow rate through the target was 41.6 L/s (660 gpm) or 0.33 L/s (5.2 gpm) per tube (axial flow velocity = 11.6 m/s). The corresponding pressure drop across the target was 1.14 MPa (165 psi) with an inlet pressure of 1.45 MPa (210 psia). Data are also presented from backup experiments in which individual tubes were heated by a small ion source (10-cm-diam grid) to characterize tube performance. These results suggest that the target should handle peak power densities in the range 25 to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (approx. =10 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces) with the present flow parameters. This translates to beam power levels of 5 to 6 MW for equivalent beam optics.

  1. Energy Harvesting Chip and the Chip Based Power Supply Development for a Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dasheng

    2008-01-01

    In this study, an energy harvesting chip was developed to scavenge energy from artificial light to charge a wireless sensor node. The chip core is a miniature transformer with a nano-ferrofluid magnetic core. The chip embedded transformer can convert harvested energy from its solar cell to variable voltage output for driving multiple loads. This chip system yields a simple, small, and more importantly, a battery-less power supply solution. The sensor node is equipped with multiple sensors that can be enabled by the energy harvesting power supply to collect information about the human body comfort degree. Compared with lab instruments, the nodes with temperature, humidity and photosensors driven by harvested energy had variation coefficient measurement precision of less than 6% deviation under low environmental light of 240 lux. The thermal comfort was affected by the air speed. A flow sensor equipped on the sensor node was used to detect airflow speed. Due to its high power consumption, this sensor node provided 15% less accuracy than the instruments, but it still can meet the requirement of analysis for predicted mean votes (PMV) measurement. The energy harvesting wireless sensor network (WSN) was deployed in a 24-hour convenience store to detect thermal comfort degree from the air conditioning control. During one year operation, the sensor network powered by the energy harvesting chip retained normal functions to collect the PMV index of the store. According to the one month statistics of communication status, the packet loss rate (PLR) is 2.3%, which is as good as the presented results of those WSNs powered by battery. Referring to the electric power records, almost 54% energy can be saved by the feedback control of an energy harvesting sensor network. These results illustrate that, scavenging energy not only creates a reliable power source for electronic devices, such as wireless sensor nodes, but can also be an energy source by building an energy efficient

  2. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Staller, C.; Zhou, Z; Fossum, E.

    1994-01-01

    JPL, under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has been developing a second-generation solid-state image sensor technology. Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are a well-established first generation image sensor technology. For both commercial and NASA applications, CCDs have numerous shortcomings. In response, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been under research. The major advantages of APS technology are the ability to integrate on-chip timing, control, signal-processing and analog-to-digital converter functions, reduced sensitivity to radiation effects, low power operation, and random access readout.

  3. Development and field trial of a FBG-based magnetic sensor for large hydrogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracarolli, João. P. V.; Rosolem, João. B.; Tomiyama, Elias K.; Floridia, Claudio; Penze, Rivael S.; Peres, Rodrigo; Dini, Danilo C.; Hortencio, Claudio A.; Dilli, Paulo I. G.; da Silva, Erlon V.; dos Santos, Marcéu. C.; Fruett, Fabiano

    2016-05-01

    We propose a passive optical sensor for online magnetic field monitoring in large hydrogenerators, based on FBG (Fiber Bragg Grating) technology and a magnestostrictive material (Terfenol-D). The objective of this sensor is to detect faults in the rotor windings due to inter turn short-circuits. This device is packaged in a novel rod-shaped enclosure, allowing it to be easily installed on the ventilation ducts of the stator of the machine. This sensor was developed and tested in laboratory and it has been evaluated in a field test on a 200 MVA, 60 poles hydrogenerator.

  4. Challenges in sensor development for the electric utility industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Barry H.

    1999-01-01

    The electric utility industry is reducing operating costs in order to prepare for deregulation. The reduction in operating cost has meant a reduction in manpower. The ability to utilize remaining maintenance staff more effectively and to stay competitive in a deregulated environment has therefore become critical. In recent years, the industry has moved away from routine or periodic maintenance to predictive or condition based maintenance. This requires the assessment of equipment condition by frequent testing and inspection; a requirement that is incompatible with cost reduction. To overcome this dilemma, industry trends are toward condition monitoring, whereby the health of apparatus is monitored continuously. This requires the installation of sensors hr transducers on power equipment and the data taken forwarded to an intelligent device for further processing. These devices then analyze the data and make evaluations based on parameter levels or trends, in an attempt to predict possible deterioration. This continuous monitoring allows the electric utility to schedule maintenance on an as needed basis. The industry has been faced with many challenges in sensor design. The measurement of physical, chemical and electrical parameters under extreme conditions of electric fields, magnetic fields, temperature, corrosion, etc. is extensive. This paper will give an overview of these challenges and the solutions adopted for apparatus such as power transformers, circuit breakers, boilers, cables, batteries, and rotating machinery.

  5. Developing Fast Fluorescent Protein Voltage Sensors by Optimizing FRET Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Uhna; Sepehri-Rad, Masoud; Piao, Hong Hua; Jin, Lei; Hughes, Thomas; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Baker, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based protein voltage sensors can be useful for monitoring neuronal activity in vivo because the ratio of signals between the donor and acceptor pair reduces common sources of noise such as heart beat artifacts. We improved the performance of FRET based genetically encoded Fluorescent Protein (FP) voltage sensors by optimizing the location of donor and acceptor FPs flanking the voltage sensitive domain of the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase. First, we created 39 different “Nabi1” constructs by positioning the donor FP, UKG, at 8 different locations downstream of the voltage-sensing domain and the acceptor FP, mKO, at 6 positions upstream. Several of these combinations resulted in large voltage dependent signals and relatively fast kinetics. Nabi1 probes responded with signal size up to 11% ΔF/F for a 100 mV depolarization and fast response time constants both for signal activation (~2 ms) and signal decay (~3 ms). We improved expression in neuronal cells by replacing the mKO and UKG FRET pair with Clover (donor FP) and mRuby2 (acceptor FP) to create Nabi2 probes. Nabi2 probes also had large signals and relatively fast time constants in HEK293 cells. In primary neuronal culture, a Nabi2 probe was able to differentiate individual action potentials at 45 Hz. PMID:26587834

  6. Development of Abnormality Detection System for Bathers using Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yosuke; Abe, Takehiko; Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko; Ogoshi, Yasuhiro

    This paper proposes an abnormality detection system for bather sitting in bathtub. Increasing number of in-bathtub drowning accidents in Japan draws attention. Behind this large number of bathing accidents, Japan's unique social and cultural background come surface. For majority of people in Japan, bathing serves purpose in deep warming up of body, relax and enjoyable time. Therefore it is the custom for the Japanese to soak in bathtub. However overexposure to hot water may cause dizziness or fainting, which is possible to cause in-bathtub drowning. For drowning prevention, the system detects bather's abnormal state using an ultrasonic sensor array. The array, which has many ultrasonic sensors, is installed on the ceiling of bathroom above bathtub. The abnormality detection system uses the following two methods: posture detection and behavior detection. The function of posture detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's posture. Meanwhile, the function of behavior detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's behavior. By using these methods, the system detects bathers' different state from normal. As a result of experiment with a subject in the bathtub, the system was possible to detect abnormal state using subject's posture and behavior. Therefore the system is useful for monitoring bather to prevent drowning in bathtub.

  7. Development of subminiature multi-sensor hot-wire probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Russell V.; Ligrani, Phillip M.; Lemos, Fred R.

    1988-01-01

    Limitations on the spatial resolution of multisensor hot wire probes have precluded accurate measurements of Reynolds stresses very near solid surfaces in wind tunnels and in many practical aerodynamic flows. The fabrication, calibration and qualification testing of very small single horizontal and X-array hot-wire probes which are intended to be used near solid boundaries in turbulent flows where length scales are particularly small, is described. Details of the sensor fabrication procedure are reported, along with information needed to successfully operate the probes. As compared with conventional probes, manufacture of the subminiature probes is more complex, requiring special equipment and careful handling. The subminiature probes tested were more fragile and shorter lived than conventional probes; they obeyed the same calibration laws but with slightly larger experimental uncertainty. In spite of these disadvantages, measurements of mean statistical quantities and spectra demonstrate the ability of the subminiature sensors to provide the measurements in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers that are more accurate than conventional sized probes.

  8. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult.

  9. Developing Fast Fluorescent Protein Voltage Sensors by Optimizing FRET Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sung, Uhna; Sepehri-Rad, Masoud; Piao, Hong Hua; Jin, Lei; Hughes, Thomas; Cohen, Lawrence B; Baker, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based protein voltage sensors can be useful for monitoring neuronal activity in vivo because the ratio of signals between the donor and acceptor pair reduces common sources of noise such as heart beat artifacts. We improved the performance of FRET based genetically encoded Fluorescent Protein (FP) voltage sensors by optimizing the location of donor and acceptor FPs flanking the voltage sensitive domain of the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase. First, we created 39 different "Nabi1" constructs by positioning the donor FP, UKG, at 8 different locations downstream of the voltage-sensing domain and the acceptor FP, mKO, at 6 positions upstream. Several of these combinations resulted in large voltage dependent signals and relatively fast kinetics. Nabi1 probes responded with signal size up to 11% ΔF/F for a 100 mV depolarization and fast response time constants both for signal activation (~2 ms) and signal decay (~3 ms). We improved expression in neuronal cells by replacing the mKO and UKG FRET pair with Clover (donor FP) and mRuby2 (acceptor FP) to create Nabi2 probes. Nabi2 probes also had large signals and relatively fast time constants in HEK293 cells. In primary neuronal culture, a Nabi2 probe was able to differentiate individual action potentials at 45 Hz. PMID:26587834

  10. Non-Pertechnetate Technetium Sensor Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Heineman, William R.; Rapko, Brian M.; Branch, Shirmir D.

    2014-09-01

    There remain several significant uncertainties in the understanding and modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford waste tanks, glass, and low-temperature waste forms. A significant (2% to 25%) fraction of the 99Tc in the water-soluble portion of the tank waste may be present as a non-pertechnetate species that has not been identified and, based on experimentation to date, cannot be effectively separated from the wastes. This task will provide a sensor specifically tuned to detect the Tc(I)-carbonyl species believed to constitute the main fraction of the non-pertechnetate form of technetium. By direct measurement of the non-pertechnetate species, such a sensor will help reduce the uncertainties in the modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford tanks and waste forms. This report summarizes work done in FY 2014 exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Progress made in FY 2014 was sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management and is summarized in this report.

  11. Development of an In-Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network Test Bed for Structural Condition Monitoring - 12156

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, Kristine E.; Ferguson, Blythe A.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has established an In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Sensor Network Test Bed, a unique, small scale, configurable environment, for the assessment of prospective sensors on actual ISD system material, at minimal cost. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently implementing permanent entombment of contaminated, large nuclear structures via ISD. The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. Validation of ISD system performance models and verification of actual system conditions can be achieved through the development a system of sensors to monitor the materials and condition of the structure. The ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed to addresses the DOE-Environmental Management Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building at the Savannah River Site. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring, strain gauges for crack growth monitoring, tilt-meters for settlement monitoring, and a communication system for data collection. Baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment. The Sensor Network Test Bed at SRNL uses COTS sensors on concrete blocks from the outer wall of the P Reactor Building to measure conditions expected to occur in ISD structures. Knowledge and lessons learned gained from installation, testing, and monitoring of the equipment will be applied to sensor installation in a meso-scale test bed at FIU and in future ISD structures. The initial data collected from the sensors

  12. Ubiquitous Sensor Networking for Development (USN4D): An Application to Pollution Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Bagula, Antoine; Zennaro, Marco; Inggs, Gordon; Scott, Simon; Gascon, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new Ubiquitous Sensor Network (USN) Architecture to be used in developing countries and reveals its usefulness by highlighting some of its key features. In complement to a previous ITU proposal, our architecture referred to as “Ubiquitous Sensor Network for Development (USN4D)” integrates in its layers features such as opportunistic data dissemination, long distance deployment and localisation of information to meet the requirements of the developing world. Besides describing some of the most important requirements for the sensor equipment to be used in a USN4D setting, we present the main features and experiments conducted using the “WaspNet” as one of the wireless sensor deployment platforms that meets these requirements. Furthermore, building upon “WaspNet” platform, we present an application to Air pollution Monitoring in the city of Cape Town, in South Africa as one of the first steps towards building community wireless sensor networks (CSN) in the developing world using off-the-shelf sensor equipment. PMID:22368476

  13. Development of a biomimetic roughness sensor for tactile information with an elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Sung Joon; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2016-04-01

    Human uses various sensational information for identifying an object. When contacting an unidentified object with no vision, tactile sensation provides a variety of information to perceive. Tactile sensation plays an important role to recognize a shape of surfaces from touching. In robotic fields, tactile sensation is especially meaningful. Robots can perform more accurate job using comprehensive tactile information. And in case of using sensors made by soft material like silicone, sensors can be used in various situations. So we are developing a tactile sensor with soft materials. As the conventional robot operates in a controlled environment, it is a good model to make robots more available at any circumstance that sensory systems of living things. For example, there are lots of mechanoreceptors that each of them has different roles detecting simulation in side of human skin tissue. By mimicking the mechanoreceptor, a sensory system can be realized more closely to human being. It is known that human obtains roughness information through scanning the surface with fingertips. During that times, subcutaneous mechanoreceptors detect vibration. In the same way, while a robot is scanning a surface of object, a roughness sensor developed detects vibrations generated between contacting two surfaces. In this research, a roughness sensor made by an elastomer was developed and experiment for perception of objects was conducted. We describe means to compare the roughness of objects with a newly developed sensor.

  14. Ubiquitous Sensor Networking for Development (USN4D): an application to pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bagula, Antoine; Zennaro, Marco; Inggs, Gordon; Scott, Simon; Gascon, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new Ubiquitous Sensor Network (USN) Architecture to be used in developing countries and reveals its usefulness by highlighting some of its key features. In complement to a previous ITU proposal, our architecture referred to as "Ubiquitous Sensor Network for Development (USN4D)" integrates in its layers features such as opportunistic data dissemination, long distance deployment and localisation of information to meet the requirements of the developing world. Besides describing some of the most important requirements for the sensor equipment to be used in a USN4D setting, we present the main features and experiments conducted using the "WaspNet" as one of the wireless sensor deployment platforms that meets these requirements. Furthermore, building upon "WaspNet" platform, we present an application to Air pollution Monitoring in the city of Cape Town, in South Africa as one of the first steps towards building community wireless sensor networks (CSN) in the developing world using off-the-shelf sensor equipment.

  15. Development and Integration of Hardware and Software for Active-Sensors in Structural Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Overly, Timothy G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) promises to deliver great benefits to many industries. Primarily among them is a potential for large cost savings in maintenance of complex structures such as aircraft and civil infrastructure. However, several large obstacles remain before widespread use on structures can be accomplished. The development of three components would address many of these obstacles: a robust sensor validation procedure, a low-cost active-sensing hardware and an integrated software package for transition to field deployment. The research performed in this thesis directly addresses these three needs and facilitates the adoption of SHM on a larger scale, particularly in the realm of SHM based on piezoelectric (PZT) materials. The first obstacle addressed in this thesis is the validation of the SHM sensor network. PZT materials are used for sensor/actuators because of their unique properties, but their functionality also needs to be validated for meaningful measurements to be recorded. To allow for a robust sensor validation algorithm, the effect of temperature change on sensor diagnostics and the effect of sensor failure on SHM measurements were classified. This classification allowed for the development of a sensor diagnostic algorithm that is temperature invariant and can indicate the amount and type of sensor failure. Secondly, the absence of a suitable commercially-available active-sensing measurement node is addressed in this thesis. A node is a small compact measurement device used in a complete system. Many measurement nodes exist for conventional passive sensing, which does not actively excite the structure, but there are no measurement nodes available that both meet the active-sensing requirements and are useable outside the laboratory. This thesis develops hardware that is low-power, active-sensing and field-deployable. This node uses the impedance method for SHM measurements, and can run the sensor diagnostic algorithm also developed here

  16. NASA's Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensor Development and Its Applicability to the GER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; DSouza, Christopher; Strube, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper will address how a common Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensor suite can support Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) missions, and discuss how the model of common capability development to support multiple missions can enable system capability level partnerships and further GER objectives. NASA has initiated efforts to develop AR&D/C sensors, that are directly applicable to GER. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. NASA's AR&D/C sensor development path could benefit the International Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) and support the GER mission scenario by providing a common sensor suite upon which GER objectives could be achieved while

  17. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  18. State-of-the-Art of (Bio)Chemical Sensor Developments in Analytical Spanish Groups

    PubMed Central

    Plata, María Reyes; Contento, Ana María; Ríos, Angel

    2010-01-01

    (Bio)chemical sensors are one of the most exciting fields in analytical chemistry today. The development of these analytical devices simplifies and miniaturizes the whole analytical process. Although the initial expectation of the massive incorporation of sensors in routine analytical work has been truncated to some extent, in many other cases analytical methods based on sensor technology have solved important analytical problems. Many research groups are working in this field world-wide, reporting interesting results so far. Modestly, Spanish researchers have contributed to these recent developments. In this review, we summarize the more representative achievements carried out for these groups. They cover a wide variety of sensors, including optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric or electro-mechanical devices, used for laboratory or field analyses. The capabilities to be used in different applied areas are also critically discussed. PMID:22319260

  19. The HB-2D Polarized Neutron Development Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Lowell; Hamilton, WA; Zhao, JK; Robertson, JL

    2016-09-01

    The Polarized Neutron Development beamline, recently commissioned at the HB-2D position on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides a tool for development and testing of polarizers, polarized neutron devices, and prototyping of polarized neutron techniques. With available monochromators including pyrolytic graphite and polarizing enriched Fe-57 (Si), the instrument has operated at 4.25 and 2.6 Å wavelengths, using crystal, supermirror, or He-3 polarizers and analyzers in various configurations. The Neutron Optics and Development Team has used the beamline for testing of He-3 polarizers for use at other HFIR and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) instruments, as well as a variety of flipper devices. Recently, we have acquired new supermirror polarizers which have improved the instrument performance. The team and collaborators also have continuing demonstration experiments of spin-echo focusing techniques, and plans to conduct polarized diffraction measurements. The beamline is also used to support a growing use of polarization techniques at present and future instruments at SNS and HFIR.

  20. Evaluation of a novel noninvasive continuous core temperature measurement system with a zero heat flux sensor using a manikin of the human body.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Ivo F; Perl, Thorsten; Bauer, Martin; Bräuer, Anselm

    2015-02-01

    Reliable continuous perioperative core temperature measurement is of major importance. The pulmonary artery catheter is currently the gold standard for measuring core temperature but is invasive and expensive. Using a manikin, we evaluated the new, noninvasive SpotOn™ temperature monitoring system (SOT). With a sensor placed on the lateral forehead, SOT uses zero heat flux technology to noninvasively measure core temperature; and because the forehead is devoid of thermoregulatory arteriovenous shunts, a piece of bone cement served as a model of the frontal bone in this study. Bias, limits of agreements, long-term measurement stability, and the lowest measurable temperature of the device were investigated. Bias and limits of agreement of the temperature data of two SOTs and of the thermistor placed on the manikin's surface were calculated. Measurements obtained from SOTs were similar to thermistor values. The bias and limits of agreement lay within a predefined clinically acceptable range. Repeat measurements differed only slightly, and stayed stable for hours. Because of its temperature range, the SOT cannot be used to monitor temperatures below 28°C. In conclusion, the new SOT could provide a reliable, less invasive and cheaper alternative for measuring perioperative core temperature in routine clinical practice. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate these results.

  1. Critical heat flux experiments in an internally heated annulus with a non-uniform, alternate high and low axial heat flux distribution (AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Beus, S.G.; Seebold, O.P.

    1981-02-01

    Critical heat flux experiments were performed with an alternate high and low heat flux profile in an internally heated annulus. The heated length was 84 inches (213 cm) with a chopped wave heat flux profile over the last 24 inches (61 cm) having a maximum-to-average heat flux ratio of 1.26. Three test sections were employed: one with an axially uniform heat flux profile as a base case and two with 60 inch (152 cm) uniform and 24 inch (61 cm) alternating high and low heat flux sections. The third test section had a 2.15 inch (5.46 cm) section with a peak-to-average heat flux ratio of 2.19 (hot patch) superimposed at the exit end of the alternating high and low heat flux profile.

  2. Novel conducting polymer functionalized with metal-cyclam complex and its sensor application: development of azidothymidine drug sensor.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Swati; Prakash, Rajiv

    2010-04-15

    Functionalization of polyanthranilic acid (PAA) a self-doped conducting polymer with Co(II) metal complex has been reported and is used in the development of azidothymidine drug sensor. For the first time synthesis of a new type of polymer complex of Co(II)-cyclam macrocyclic ligand (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) with carboxylated polymer (as a second ligand) has been successfully accomplished and discussed in the present paper. The interaction of Co(II)-cyclam complex with polyanthranilic acid has been studied in solution phase using UV-vis spectra. Further, the formation and growth study of mixed ligand complex is carried out using electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. The characterization of solid mixed ligand complex Co(II)-cyclam-polyanthranilic acid (Co(II)-Cy-PAA) has been carried out for its structural, thermal and electrochemical properties using various techniques viz. FT-IR, SEM, ESR, DSC, impedance and electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical study shows the potential of mixed ligand complex towards catalytic and sensor applications. The mixed ligand complex for the first time is used in the development of "azidothymidine" anti-HIV drug sensor. The analysis of azidothymidine is known over hanging drop mercury electrode using electroreduction technique, however, for the first time its analysis is reported over graphite paste electrode modified with newly synthesized mixed ligand complex. Azidothymidine is quantified in wide range of concentration with 1 microM detection limit over modified graphite paste electrode, which shows potential to develop users friendly (non-toxic and simple) gadgets and low cost screen printed electrodes.

  3. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m2 in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m2 or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  4. Development of n-on-p Silicon Sensors for Very High Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Y.; Li, Z.; Affolder, A.A.; Allport, P.P. et al.

    2010-05-06

    We have developed a novel and highly radiation-tolerant n-in-p silicon microstrip sensor for very high radiation environments such as in the Super Large Hadron Collider. The sensors are designed for a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 15} neq/cm{sup 2} and are fabricated from p-type, FZ, 6 in. (150 mm) wafers onto which we lay out a single 9.75 cm x 9.75 cm large-area sensor and several 1 cm x 1 cm miniature sensors with various n-strip isolation structures. By evaluating the sensors both pre- and post-irradiation by protons and neutrons, we find that the full depletion voltage evolves to approximately 800 V and that the n-strip isolation depends on the p{sup +} concentration. In addition, we characterize the interstrip resistance, interstrip capacitance and the punch-through-protection (PTP) voltage. The first fabrication batch allowed us to identify the weak spots in the PTP and the stereo strip layouts. By understanding the source of the weakness, the mask was modified accordingly. After modification, the follow-up fabrication batches and the latest fabrication of about 30 main sensors and associated miniature sensors have shown good performance, with no sign of microdischarge up to 1000 V.

  5. Development and application of optical fibre strain and pressure sensors for in-flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, N. J.; Correia, R.; James, S. W.; Partridge, M.; Staines, S. E.; Gautrey, J. E.; Garry, K. P.; Holt, J. C.; Tatam, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    Fibre optic based sensors are becoming increasingly viable as replacements for traditional flight test sensors. Here we present laboratory, wind tunnel and flight test results of fibre Bragg gratings (FBG) used to measure surface strain and an extrinsic fibre Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFFPI) sensor used to measure unsteady pressure. The calibrated full scale resolution and bandwidth of the FBG and EFFPI sensors were shown to be 0.29% at 2.5 kHz up to 600 μɛ and 0.15% at up to 10 kHz respectively up to 400 Pa. The wind tunnel tests, completed on a 30% scale model, allowed the EFFPI sensor to be developed before incorporation with the FBG system into a Bulldog aerobatic light aircraft. The aircraft was modified and certified based on Certification Standards 23 (CS-23) and flight tested with steady and dynamic manoeuvres. Aerobatic dynamic manoeuvres were performed in flight including a spin over a g-range  -1g to  +4g and demonstrated both the FBG and the EFFPI instruments to have sufficient resolution to analyse the wing strain and fuselage unsteady pressure characteristics. The steady manoeuvres from the EFFPI sensor matched the wind tunnel data to within experimental error while comparisons of the flight test and wind tunnel EFFPI results with a Kulite pressure sensor showed significant discrepancies between the two sets of data, greater than experimental error. This issue is discussed further in the paper.

  6. Development of a portable taste sensor with a lipid/polymer membrane.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yusuke; Nakashi, Kenichi; Ji, Ke; Ikeda, Akihiro; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new portable taste sensor with a lipid/polymer membrane and conducted experiments to evaluate the sensor's performance. The fabricated sensor consists of a taste sensor chip (40 mm × 26 mm × 2.2 mm) with working and reference electrodes and a portable sensor device (80 mm × 25 mm × 20 mm). The working electrode consists of a taste-sensing site comprising a poly(hydroxyethyl)methacrylate (pHEMA) hydrogel layer with KCl as the electrolyte layer and a lipid/polymer membrane as the taste sensing element. The reference electrode comprises a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane layer with a small hole and a pHEMA layer with KCl. The whole device is the size of a USB memory stick, making it suitable for portable use. The sensor's response to tannic acid as the standard astringency substance showed good accuracy and reproducibility, and was comparable with the performance of a commercially available taste sensing system. Thus, it is possible for this sensor to be used for in-field evaluations and it can make a significant contribution to the food industry, as well as in various fields of research. PMID:23325168

  7. Algorithm developing of gross primary production from its capacity and a canopy conductance index using flux and global observing satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Furumi, Shinobu; Daigo, Motomasa

    2015-10-01

    We plan to estimate gross primary production (GPP) using the SGLI sensor on-board the GCOM-C1 satellite after it is launched in 2017 by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, as we have developed a GPP estimation algorithm that uses SGLI sensor data. The characteristics of this GPP estimation method correspond to photosynthesis. The rate of plant photosynthesis depends on the plant's photosynthesis capacity and the degree to which photosynthesis is suppressed. The photosynthesis capacity depends on the chlorophyll content of leaves, which is a plant physiological parameter, and the degree of suppression of photosynthesis depends on weather conditions. The framework of the estimation method to determine the light-response curve parameters was developed using ux and satellite data in a previous study[1]. We estimated one of the light-response curve parameters based on the linear relationship between GPP capacity at 2000 (μmolm-2s-1) of photosynthetically active radiation and a chlorophyll index (CIgreen [2;3] ). The relationship was determined for seven plant functional types. Decreases in the photosynthetic rate are controlled by stomatal opening and closing. Leaf stomatal conductance is maximal during the morning and decreases in the afternoon. We focused on daily changes in leaf stomatal conductance. We used open shrub flux data and MODIS reflectance data to develop an algorithm for a canopy. We first evaluated the daily changes in GPP capacity estimated from CIgreen and photosynthesis active radiation using light response curves, and GPP observed during a flux experiment. Next, we estimated the canopy conductance using flux data and a big-leaf model using the Penman-Monteith equation[4]. We estimated GPP by multiplying GPP capacity by the normalized canopy conductance at 10:30, the time of satellite observations. The results showed that the estimated daily change in GPP was almost the same as the observed GPP. From this result, we defined a normalized canopy

  8. Development of anion- and nitric oxide-selective chemical sensors and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Susan Lynn Ritenour

    1999-11-01

    The biological roles of chloride, nitrite, and nitric oxide create the need for techniques which can provide fast, sensitive, and selective detection of these analytes. Small sensor size is advantageous in biological applications, and the coupling of fluorescence transduction with optical fiber technology has allowed the preparation of micrometer and submicromter sized chemical sensors and biosensors with good selectivity, fast response times, and excellent signal to noise ratios, which are utilized for in vitro and cellular applications. Micrometer and submicrometer size fiber optic nitrite and chloride sensors have been prepared, based on immobilized metalloporphyrins, using the ion correlation principle, and characterized with respect to selectivity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. The chloride sensors were applied in vitro to rat conceptuses. The hemoprotein cytochrome c' and the heme domain of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) have been labeled with a fluorescent dye and utilized for intensity and fluorescence lifetime-based nitric oxide sensing. Ratiometric fiber optic sensors have been prepared by attaching the dye-labeled cytochrome c' or heme domain of sGC to the fiber along with reference dye spheres. In addition, the fluorescence lifetime of the dye-labeled cytochrome c' in solution has been monitored. A second class of nitric oxide sensors has also been developed. These are dye-based chemical sensors with a response based on the interaction of nitric oxide with a fluorophore adsorbed on a gold surface. Such chemical sensors have the advantage of commercially available components and long-term stability. The nitric oxide bio- and chemical sensors have excellent signal to noise ratios and linear responses down to low micromolar nitric oxide. The various sensors show minimal interference from numerous other chemicals that are commonly found in the cellular environment. In addition, the sensors have low micromolar limits of detection, subsecond response

  9. Development of a Corrosion Sensor for AN Aircraft Vehicle Health Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. A.; Price, D. C.; Edwards, G. C.; Batten, A. B.; Kolmeder, J.; Muster, T. H.; Corrigan, P.; Cole, I. S.

    2010-02-01

    A Rayleigh-wave-based sensor has been developed to measure corrosion damage in aircraft. This sensor forms an important part of a corrosion monitoring system being developed for a major aircraft manufacturer. This system measures the corrosion rate at the location of its sensors, and through a model predicts the corrosion rates in nearby places on an aircraft into which no sensors can be placed. In order to calibrate this model, which yields corrosion rates rather than the accumulated effect, an absolute measure of the damage is required. In this paper the development of a surface wave sensor capable of measuring accumulated damage will be described in detail. This sensor allows the system to measure material loss due to corrosion regardless of the possible loss of historical corrosion rate data, and can provide, at any stage, a benchmark for the predictive model that would allow a good estimate of the accumulated corrosion damage in similar locations on an aircraft. This system may obviate the need for costly inspection of difficult-to-access places in aircraft, where presently the only way to check for corrosion is by periodic dismantling and reassembly.

  10. Micromachined sensor and actuator research at Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1996-02-01

    An overview of surface micromachining projects at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of surface micromachined sensors and actuators. A technology that embeds micromechanical devices below the surface of the wafer prior to microelectronics fabrication has also been developed for integrating microelectronics with surface micromachined micromechanical devices.

  11. Development test results of the Portable, Reconfigurable Sky Sensor (PRSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Blattman, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    The protection of assets against surreptitious access from the sky is a continuing problem. The Portable, Reconfigurable Sky Sensor is designed to provide volumetric intruder detection against low-observable aircraft, helicopters, and parachutists in the sky. Multiple systems may be joined to form continuous detection volume for applications such as borders. The PRSS is resistant to nuisance alarms due to wind up to 70 mph, rain/snow up to 6 inches/hour or small targets such as birds. The PRSS has been successfully tested against multiple intrusions with altitude range from 50 to 3,000 feet and cross-range up to 3,000 feet. This paper summarizes some of these field tests and lists specifications and potential uses.

  12. Research and development of novel wireless digital capacitive displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Junning; He, Zhangqiang; Sun, Tao; Bian, Xingyuan; Han, Lu

    2015-02-01

    In order to solve the problem of noncontact, wireless and nonmagnetic displacement sensing with nanometer resolution within critical limited space for ultraprecision displacement monitoring in the Joule balance device, a novel wireless digital capacitive displacement sensor (WDCDS) is proposed. The WDCDS is fabricated with brass and other nonmagnetic material and powered with a small battery inside, a small integrated circuit is assembled inside for converting and processing of capacitive signal, and low power Bluetooth is used for wireless signal transmission and communication. Experimental results show that the WDCDS proposed has a resolution of better than 1nm and a nonlinearity of 0.077%, therefore it is a delicate design for ultraprecision noncontact displacement monitoring in the Joule balance device, meeting the demand for properties of wireless, nonmagnetic and miniaturized size.

  13. Feasible groundbased atmospheric and flux measurements by developing countries in support of satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, A. P.

    To allow increasing participation of developing countries in global change studies, ground based measurement systems which can be easily comissioned and provide support to satellite observations so as to fit into global mapping need to be chosen carefully. Those relating to atmospheric parameters (greenhouse gas concentrations, emission fluxes, transport properties, etc.) are discussed here. The simplest and of most immediate interest relate to sources and sinks of CH_4 (primarily from rice paddy fields, animals, wetlands) and N_2O (soils, oceans). Measurement techniques and inter-country campaign plans are discussed. There are also important possibilities of using the same technique for measurements of emissions from biomass burning alongwith ozone measurements coupled with survey of biomass burning areas from satellites. Another major area concerns the proposed ITYO programme (International Tropospheric Ozone Year), for which, apart from balloon ozone ascents, use of UV-B radiometry at selected wavelengths is considered. The third area discussed concerns measurements of atmospheric aerosols using Multi-wavelength Radiometer (MWR). In addition, in the last few years, a number of advanced groundlevel systems have been installed at low latitudes, which, if made available widely to developing country scientists, and their participation supported financially, could provide a major opportunity for world class research. These include: the MST radar at Tirupati (India) Chung-Li (Taiwan) and Arecibo, Puerto Rico; the Lidars at Thumba and at Natal, Brazil; and the Laser Heterodyning System and mm-wave radiospectrometer at Delhi.

  14. Developing Best Practices for Sharing Long-term Marine Sediment Flux Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulweiler, R. W.; Emery, H.; Maguire, T.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term data sets provide unique opportunities to examine temporal variability of key ecosystem processes. The need for such datasets is becoming increasingly important as we try to quantify the impact of human activities across various scales and in some cases, as we try to determine the success of management interventions. Unfortunately, long-term data sets for coastal ecosystems are rare and curating them is a real challenge. However, if we wish to make our data available for interested parties (e.g., students, managers, etc.) then we need to provide mechanisms that allow others to understand our methods, access the data, reproduce the results, and see updates as they become available. Here we use techniques, learned through the EarthCube Geosoft Geoscience Paper of the Future project, to develop best practices that will allow us to share a long-term data set of directly measured net sediment N2 fluxes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. By developing these data and software sharing tools we hope to help disseminate our data so that the community can better assess how this temperate estuary has changed overtime. We also hope to provide a model for others to follow so that long-term estuarine data is more easily shared and not lost overtime.

  15. Further Development of a New, Flux-Conserving Newton Scheme for the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of papers describing the development of a new numerical approach for solving the steady Navier-Stokes equations. The key features in the current development are (1) the discrete representation of the dependent variables by way of high order polynomial expansions, (2) the retention of all derivatives in the expansions as unknowns to be explicitly solved for, (3) the automatic balancing of fluxes at cell interfaces, and (4) the discrete simulation of both the integral and differential forms of the governing equations. The main purpose of this paper is, first, to provide a systematic and rigorous derivation of the conditions that are used to simulate the differential form of the Navier-Stokes equations, and second, to extend our previously-presented internal flow scheme to external flows and nonuniform grids. Numerical results are presented for high Reynolds number flow (Re = 100,000) around a finite flat plate, and detailed comparisons are made with the Blasius flat plate solution and Goldstein wake solution. It is shown that the error in the streamwise velocity decreases like r(sup alpha)(Delta)y(exp 2), where alpha approx. 0.25 and r = delta(y)/delta(x) is the grid aspect ratio.

  16. The Influence of a Fluctuating Mass Flux on the Development and Rise of Volcanic Eruption Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharff, L.; Hort, M. K.; Herzog, M.; Esposti Ongaro, T.

    2013-12-01

    Eruption clouds are a major hazard to aviation. Hence real-time tracking and forecasting of ash clouds are increasingly important tasks in volcanology. In-situ measurements of the dynamics inside the developing cloud are needed as constraint to the input parameters of the VAAC's numerical ash cloud dispersion models. The Doppler radar technique provides particle velocities and a proxy of the near-vent mass flux, and has been used in two field experiments at Santiaguito volcano (Guatemala) and Volcán de Colima (Mexico) to constrain the near-vent dynamics of Vulcanian events. The two Doppler radar datasets show that fluctuating (or pulsed, non-continuous) mass flux occurs at both volcanoes Santiaguito and Colima. Pulses have also been observed at other volcanoes (e.g. Stromboli, Italy, and Arenal volcano, Costa Rica) and may be a more common feature than previously assumed. Using (1) the 'active tracer high-resolution atmospheric model' (ATHAM) and (2) a multi-phase fluid dynamics model for dispersion of volcanic ash (PDAC), we model the first 400 m of eruption cloud formation. For a comparison with the measured Doppler radar data, synthetic Doppler data are calculated from the numerical model results by converting particle properties (size, velocity, and backscatter-efficiency) into synthetic velocity spectra. The two-dimensional axis-symmetric simulations show that the Doppler radar data can visually be classified into jet-dominated and buoyancy-dominated regimes and that pulses are local phenomena and can only be observed in the jet region of the cloud. The Colima Doppler radar dataset shows that a fluctuating mass flux can even be observed a few hundred meters above the vent if a direct measurement of the dynamics at the vent is not possible. Our portable Doppler radar needs to be installed within a 6 km radius to the vent and can only observe one vent at a time. Weather radars are able to observe several volcanoes simultaneously. However, they mainly observe

  17. Interpreting canopy development and physiology using a European phenology camera network at flux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingate, L.; Ogée, J.; Cremonese, E.; Filippa, G.; Mizunuma, T.; Migliavacca, M.; Moisy, C.; Wilkinson, M.; Moureaux, C.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hammerle, A.; Hörtnagl, L.; Gimeno, C.; Porcar-Castell, A.; Galvagno, M.; Nakaji, T.; Morison, J.; Kolle, O.; Knohl, A.; Kutsch, W.; Kolari, P.; Nikinmaa, E.; Ibrom, A.; Gielen, B.; Eugster, W.; Balzarolo, M.; Papale, D.; Klumpp, K.; Köstner, B.; Grünwald, T.; Joffre, R.; Ourcival, J.-M.; Hellstrom, M.; Lindroth, A.; George, C.; Longdoz, B.; Genty, B.; Levula, J.; Heinesch, B.; Sprintsin, M.; Yakir, D.; Manise, T.; Guyon, D.; Ahrends, H.; Plaza-Aguilar, A.; Guan, J. H.; Grace, J.

    2015-10-01

    Plant phenological development is orchestrated through subtle changes in photoperiod, temperature, soil moisture and nutrient availability. Presently, the exact timing of plant development stages and their response to climate and management practices are crudely represented in land surface models. As visual observations of phenology are laborious, there is a need to supplement long-term observations with automated techniques such as those provided by digital repeat photography at high temporal and spatial resolution. We present the first synthesis from a growing observational network of digital cameras installed on towers across Europe above deciduous and evergreen forests, grasslands and croplands, where vegetation and atmosphere CO2 fluxes are measured continuously. Using colour indices from digital images and using piecewise regression analysis of time series, we explored whether key changes in canopy phenology could be detected automatically across different land use types in the network. The piecewise regression approach could capture the start and end of the growing season, in addition to identifying striking changes in colour signals caused by flowering and management practices such as mowing. Exploring the dates of green-up and senescence of deciduous forests extracted by the piecewise regression approach against dates estimated from visual observations, we found that these phenological events could be detected adequately (RMSE < 8 and 11 days for leaf out and leaf fall, respectively). We also investigated whether the seasonal patterns of red, green and blue colour fractions derived from digital images could be modelled mechanistically using the PROSAIL model parameterised with information of seasonal changes in canopy leaf area and leaf chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations. From a model sensitivity analysis we found that variations in colour fractions, and in particular the late spring `green hump' observed repeatedly in deciduous broadleaf canopies

  18. Development of Ultrasonic Surface Wave Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffner, C.; Nalladega, V.; Na, J. K.

    2011-06-01

    To increase the power generating capacity of a wind turbine composite turbine blade manufacturers have been increasing the size of blades. Current utility-scale windmills are equipped with blades ranging from 40 m (130 ft) to 90 m (300 ft) in their sweep diameter. The increased blade size brings greater structural and safety demands. Recent blade recalls and field failures highlights the market need for sensors capable of part quality inspections on manufacturing line and for structural health monitoring (SHM) of the composites in service. An ultrasonic surface wave sensor technology based on interdigitization transduction (IDT) has been developed that can inspect and detect defects in the composite blades. The current work covers the design, fabrication, and characterization of the IDT sensors. The sensor characterization, coverage area, and detection capability for a variety of defects such as impact, cracking and delamination will be discussed.

  19. Development of waterborne oil spill sensor based on printed ITO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jieun; Jung, Jung-Yeul; Lee, Sangtae; Lee, Moonjin; Chang, Jiho

    2015-09-15

    Oil spill accidents occasionally occur in coastal and ocean environments, and cause critical environmental damage, spoiling the marine habitats and ecosystems. To mitigate the damages, the species and amount of spilled oil should be monitored. In this study, we developed a waterborne oil spill sensor using a printed ITO layer. ITO is a compatible material for salty environments such as oceans because ITO is strong against corrosion. The fabricated sensor was tested using three oils, gasoline, lubricant and diesel, and different oil thicknesses of 0, 5, 10, and 15mm. The results showed that the resistance of the sensor clearly increased with the oil thickness and its electrical resistance. For sustainable sensing applications in marine environments, XRD patterns confirmed that the crystal structure of the ITO sensor did not change and FE-SEM images showed that the surface was clearly maintained after tests.

  20. Development of waterborne oil spill sensor based on printed ITO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jieun; Jung, Jung-Yeul; Lee, Sangtae; Lee, Moonjin; Chang, Jiho

    2015-09-15

    Oil spill accidents occasionally occur in coastal and ocean environments, and cause critical environmental damage, spoiling the marine habitats and ecosystems. To mitigate the damages, the species and amount of spilled oil should be monitored. In this study, we developed a waterborne oil spill sensor using a printed ITO layer. ITO is a compatible material for salty environments such as oceans because ITO is strong against corrosion. The fabricated sensor was tested using three oils, gasoline, lubricant and diesel, and different oil thicknesses of 0, 5, 10, and 15mm. The results showed that the resistance of the sensor clearly increased with the oil thickness and its electrical resistance. For sustainable sensing applications in marine environments, XRD patterns confirmed that the crystal structure of the ITO sensor did not change and FE-SEM images showed that the surface was clearly maintained after tests. PMID:26162511

  1. Developments and Applications of Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Sensors Based on Micro- and Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hazelton, Sandra G.; Zheng, Xingwang; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun; Pierce, David T.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of recent developments and applications of electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) for sensors are described. While tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)-ruthenium(II) and luminol have dominated and continue to pervade the field of ECL-based sensors, recent work has focused on use of these lumophores with micro- and nanomaterials. It has also extended to inherently luminescent nanomaterials, such as quantum dots. Sensor configurations including microelectrode arrays and microfluidics are reviewed and, with the recent trend toward increased use of nanomaterials, special attention has been given to sensors which include thin films, nanoparticles and nanotubes. Applications of ECL labels and examples of label-free sensing that incorporate nanomaterials are also discussed.

  2. Modular design and development methodology for robotic multi-axis F/M sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qiao-Kang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Wu, Wan-Neng; Zou, Kun-Lin; Wang, Yao-Nan; Sun, Wei; Ge, Yun-Jian; Ge, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Accurate Force/Moment (F/M) measurements are required in many applications, and multi-axis F/M sensors have been utilized a wide variety of robotic systems since 1970s. A multi-axis F/M sensor is capable of measuring multiple components of force terms along x-, y-, z-axis (Fx, Fy, Fz), and the moments terms about x-, y- and z-axis (Mx, My and Mz) simultaneously. In this manuscript, we describe experimental and theoretical approaches for using modular Elastic Elements (EE) to efficiently achieve multi-axis, high-performance F/M sensors. Specifically, the proposed approach employs combinations of simple modular elements (e.g. lamella and diaphragm) in monolithic constructions to develop various multi-axis F/M sensors. Models of multi-axis F/M sensors are established, and the experimental results indicate that the new approach could be widely used for development of multi-axis F/M sensors for many other different applications.

  3. Modular design and development methodology for robotic multi-axis F/M sensors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiao-Kang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Wu, Wan-Neng; Zou, Kun-Lin; Wang, Yao-Nan; Sun, Wei; Ge, Yun-Jian; Ge, Yu

    2016-04-22

    Accurate Force/Moment (F/M) measurements are required in many applications, and multi-axis F/M sensors have been utilized a wide variety of robotic systems since 1970s. A multi-axis F/M sensor is capable of measuring multiple components of force terms along x-, y-, z-axis (Fx, Fy, Fz), and the moments terms about x-, y- and z-axis (Mx, My and Mz) simultaneously. In this manuscript, we describe experimental and theoretical approaches for using modular Elastic Elements (EE) to efficiently achieve multi-axis, high-performance F/M sensors. Specifically, the proposed approach employs combinations of simple modular elements (e.g. lamella and diaphragm) in monolithic constructions to develop various multi-axis F/M sensors. Models of multi-axis F/M sensors are established, and the experimental results indicate that the new approach could be widely used for development of multi-axis F/M sensors for many other different applications.

  4. Modular design and development methodology for robotic multi-axis F/M sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qiao-Kang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Wu, Wan-Neng; Zou, Kun-Lin; Wang, Yao-Nan; Sun, Wei; Ge, Yun-Jian; Ge, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Accurate Force/Moment (F/M) measurements are required in many applications, and multi-axis F/M sensors have been utilized a wide variety of robotic systems since 1970s. A multi-axis F/M sensor is capable of measuring multiple components of force terms along x-, y-, z-axis (Fx, Fy, Fz), and the moments terms about x-, y- and z-axis (Mx, My and Mz) simultaneously. In this manuscript, we describe experimental and theoretical approaches for using modular Elastic Elements (EE) to efficiently achieve multi-axis, high-performance F/M sensors. Specifically, the proposed approach employs combinations of simple modular elements (e.g. lamella and diaphragm) in monolithic constructions to develop various multi-axis F/M sensors. Models of multi-axis F/M sensors are established, and the experimental results indicate that the new approach could be widely used for development of multi-axis F/M sensors for many other different applications. PMID:27101924

  5. Development of Micro Air Reconnaissance Vehicle as a Test Bed for Advanced Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Fox, Robert L.; Kuhn, Theodore R.; Ingham, John; Logan, Michael J.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Guenther, Benjamin F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Micro/Mini Air Reconnaissance Vehicle for advanced sensors and electronics at NASA Langley Research Center over the last year. This vehicle is expected to have a total weight of less than four pounds, a design velocity of 40 mph, an endurance of 15-20 minutes, and a maximum range of 5km. The vehicle has wings that are simple to detach yet retain the correct alignment. The upper fuselage surface has a quick release hatch used to access the interior and also to mount the varying propulsion systems. The sensor suite developed for this vehicle consists of a Pitot-static measurement system for determining air speed, an absolute pressure measurement for determining altitude, magnetic direction measurement, and three orthogonal gyros to determine body angular rates. Swarming GPS-guidance and in-flight maneuvering is discussed, as well as design and installation of some other advance sensors like MEMS microphones, infrared cameras, GPS, humidity sensors, and an ultrasonic sonar sensor. Also low cost, small size, high performance control and navigation system for the Micro Air Vehicle is discussed. At the end, laboratory characterization of different sensors, motors, propellers, and batteries will be discussed.

  6. Modular design and development methodology for robotic multi-axis F/M sensors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiao-Kang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Wu, Wan-Neng; Zou, Kun-Lin; Wang, Yao-Nan; Sun, Wei; Ge, Yun-Jian; Ge, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Accurate Force/Moment (F/M) measurements are required in many applications, and multi-axis F/M sensors have been utilized a wide variety of robotic systems since 1970s. A multi-axis F/M sensor is capable of measuring multiple components of force terms along x-, y-, z-axis (Fx, Fy, Fz), and the moments terms about x-, y- and z-axis (Mx, My and Mz) simultaneously. In this manuscript, we describe experimental and theoretical approaches for using modular Elastic Elements (EE) to efficiently achieve multi-axis, high-performance F/M sensors. Specifically, the proposed approach employs combinations of simple modular elements (e.g. lamella and diaphragm) in monolithic constructions to develop various multi-axis F/M sensors. Models of multi-axis F/M sensors are established, and the experimental results indicate that the new approach could be widely used for development of multi-axis F/M sensors for many other different applications. PMID:27101924

  7. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Clausen, Henrik; Linstedt, Adam D

    2014-10-31

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms. Surprisingly, molecular probes to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity are lacking and there exist no effective global or isoform-specific inhibitors. Here we describe the development of T2- and T3-isoform specific fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway. Each sensor yielded little signal when glycosylated but was strongly activated in the absence of its glycosylation. Specificity of each sensor was assessed in HEK cells with either the T2 or T3 enzymes deleted. Although the sensors are based on specific substrates of the T2 and T3 enzymes, elements in or near the enzyme recognition sequence influenced their activity and required modification, which we carried out based on previous in vitro work. Significantly, the modified T2 and T3 sensors were activated only in cells lacking their corresponding isozymes. Thus, we have developed T2- and T3-specific sensors that will be valuable in both the study of GalNAc-transferase regulation and in high-throughput screening for potential therapeutic regulators of specific GalNAc-transferases.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSOR NETWORK TEST BED FOR ISD MATERIALS AND STRUCUTRAL CONDITION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K.; Ferguson, B.; Karapatakis, D.; Herbst, C.; Stripling, C.

    2011-07-06

    The P Reactor at the Savannah River Site is one of the first reactor facilities in the US DOE complex that has been placed in its end state through in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of remote sensors to provide verification of ISD system conditions and performance characteristics, an ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The test bed addresses the DOE-EM Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of: (1) Groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring; (2) Strain gauges for crack growth monitoring; (3) Tiltmeters for settlement monitoring; and (4) A communication system for data collection. Preliminary baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment.

  9. Development of Non-contact Respiratory Monitoring System for Newborn Using a FG Vision Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurami, Yoshiyuki; Itoh, Yushi; Natori, Michiya; Ohzeki, Kazuo; Aoki, Yoshimitsu

    In recent years, development of neonatal care is strongly hoped, with increase of the low-birth-weight baby birth rate. Especially respiration of low-birth-weight baby is incertitude because central nerve and respiratory function is immature. Therefore, a low-birth-weight baby often causes a disease of respiration. In a NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit), neonatal respiration is monitored using cardio-respiratory monitor and pulse oximeter at all times. These contact-type sensors can measure respiratory rate and SpO2 (Saturation of Peripheral Oxygen). However, because a contact-type sensor might damage the newborn's skin, it is a real burden to monitor neonatal respiration. Therefore, we developed the respiratory monitoring system for newborn using a FG (Fiber Grating) vision sensor. FG vision sensor is an active stereo vision sensor, it is possible for non-contact 3D measurement. A respiratory waveform is calculated by detecting the vertical motion of the thoracic and abdominal region with respiration. We attempted clinical experiment in the NICU, and confirmed the accuracy of the obtained respiratory waveform was high. Non-contact respiratory monitoring of newborn using a FG vision sensor enabled the minimally invasive procedure.

  10. Developing Superconducting Flux Qubit by Using Epitaxial NbN/AlN/NbN Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wei; Makise, Kazumasa; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen

    In an effort to eliminate the intrinsic noise sources that contained within the superconducting qubit circuits, we successfully fabricate superconducting flux qubit circuits (rf SQUID) with full epitaxially grown NbN/AlN/NbN tunnel junctions. The temperature dependent of magnetic flux shift has been investigated by using a NbN/AlN/NbN dc SQUID magnetometer in the temperature range from 20 mK to 2.5 K. Our results show that the shift of the magnetic flux is in the level of ∼1 mF 0 during the experiment.

  11. Development of thin-slice fiber Bragg grating-giant magnetostrictive material sensors used for measuring magnetic field of magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Wang, Huaqiang; Liu, Jiayi; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Biyun

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic field is a physical medium used to realize the levitation and motion control of magnetic bearings. It is necessary to conduct the air-gap flux density measurement so as to validate theoretical analyses and provide instructions for practical design. A thin-slice fiber Bragg grating-giant magnetostrictive material (FBG-GMM) sensor, in which the FBG was stuck perpendicular to the principal magnetostriction orientation of a thin GMM slice, was proposed to measure magnetic-flux density in the small air gap. The configuration of FBG-GMM sensor was the same with that of a sensor of 1.5 mm×14 mm×7 mm TbDyFe slice stuck with a 1300 nm-wavelength FBG on the side of the slice. The FBG-GMM magnetic field sensor was tested on an U-shape electromagnet test setup under static conditions. The sensor had a linear region of 0.121 to 0.261 T with the sensitivity of 1089.056 pm/T. The FBG-GMM magnetic field sensor was introduced to measure the air-gap flux density of radial magnetic bearings. Measurement of static flux density was conducted with 2 FBG-GMM sensors compensated with a temperature FBG; and the measured data showed that the FBG-GMM sensor had feasible linear region and sensitivity to measure the air-gap flux density of magnetic bearings.

  12. Developing Ubiquitous Sensor Network Platform Using Internet of Things: Application in Precision Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Ferrández-Pastor, Francisco Javier; García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Nieto-Hidalgo, Mario; Mora-Pascual, Jerónimo; Mora-Martínez, José

    2016-01-01

    The application of Information Technologies into Precision Agriculture methods has clear benefits. Precision Agriculture optimises production efficiency, increases quality, minimises environmental impact and reduces the use of resources (energy, water); however, there are different barriers that have delayed its wide development. Some of these main barriers are expensive equipment, the difficulty to operate and maintain and the standard for sensor networks are still under development. Nowadays, new technological development in embedded devices (hardware and communication protocols), the evolution of Internet technologies (Internet of Things) and ubiquitous computing (Ubiquitous Sensor Networks) allow developing less expensive systems, easier to control, install and maintain, using standard protocols with low-power consumption. This work develops and test a low-cost sensor/actuator network platform, based in Internet of Things, integrating machine-to-machine and human-machine-interface protocols. Edge computing uses this multi-protocol approach to develop control processes on Precision Agriculture scenarios. A greenhouse with hydroponic crop production was developed and tested using Ubiquitous Sensor Network monitoring and edge control on Internet of Things paradigm. The experimental results showed that the Internet technologies and Smart Object Communication Patterns can be combined to encourage development of Precision Agriculture. They demonstrated added benefits (cost, energy, smart developing, acceptance by agricultural specialists) when a project is launched. PMID:27455265

  13. Developing Ubiquitous Sensor Network Platform Using Internet of Things: Application in Precision Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Ferrández-Pastor, Francisco Javier; García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Nieto-Hidalgo, Mario; Mora-Pascual, Jerónimo; Mora-Martínez, José

    2016-07-22

    The application of Information Technologies into Precision Agriculture methods has clear benefits. Precision Agriculture optimises production efficiency, increases quality, minimises environmental impact and reduces the use of resources (energy, water); however, there are different barriers that have delayed its wide development. Some of these main barriers are expensive equipment, the difficulty to operate and maintain and the standard for sensor networks are still under development. Nowadays, new technological development in embedded devices (hardware and communication protocols), the evolution of Internet technologies (Internet of Things) and ubiquitous computing (Ubiquitous Sensor Networks) allow developing less expensive systems, easier to control, install and maintain, using standard protocols with low-power consumption. This work develops and test a low-cost sensor/actuator network platform, based in Internet of Things, integrating machine-to-machine and human-machine-interface protocols. Edge computing uses this multi-protocol approach to develop control processes on Precision Agriculture scenarios. A greenhouse with hydroponic crop production was developed and tested using Ubiquitous Sensor Network monitoring and edge control on Internet of Things paradigm. The experimental results showed that the Internet technologies and Smart Object Communication Patterns can be combined to encourage development of Precision Agriculture. They demonstrated added benefits (cost, energy, smart developing, acceptance by agricultural specialists) when a project is launched.

  14. Developing Ubiquitous Sensor Network Platform Using Internet of Things: Application in Precision Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Ferrández-Pastor, Francisco Javier; García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Nieto-Hidalgo, Mario; Mora-Pascual, Jerónimo; Mora-Martínez, José

    2016-01-01

    The application of Information Technologies into Precision Agriculture methods has clear benefits. Precision Agriculture optimises production efficiency, increases quality, minimises environmental impact and reduces the use of resources (energy, water); however, there are different barriers that have delayed its wide development. Some of these main barriers are expensive equipment, the difficulty to operate and maintain and the standard for sensor networks are still under development. Nowadays, new technological development in embedded devices (hardware and communication protocols), the evolution of Internet technologies (Internet of Things) and ubiquitous computing (Ubiquitous Sensor Networks) allow developing less expensive systems, easier to control, install and maintain, using standard protocols with low-power consumption. This work develops and test a low-cost sensor/actuator network platform, based in Internet of Things, integrating machine-to-machine and human-machine-interface protocols. Edge computing uses this multi-protocol approach to develop control processes on Precision Agriculture scenarios. A greenhouse with hydroponic crop production was developed and tested using Ubiquitous Sensor Network monitoring and edge control on Internet of Things paradigm. The experimental results showed that the Internet technologies and Smart Object Communication Patterns can be combined to encourage development of Precision Agriculture. They demonstrated added benefits (cost, energy, smart developing, acceptance by agricultural specialists) when a project is launched. PMID:27455265

  15. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor. Final report. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, L.A.

    1994-11-01

    The ultimate objective of the DOE-sponsored program discussed in this report is to commercialize an instrument for real-time, in-situ measurement of lignin in wood pulp at a variety of locations in the pulp process stream. The instrument will be used as a primary sensor for process control in the pulp and paper industry. Work done by B&W prior to the initiation of this program had shown: there is a functional relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the Kappa number as measured at the pulp mill laboratory. Kappa number is a standard wet chemical method for determination of the lignin concentration; the relationship is one of decreasing intensity with Kappa number, indicating operation in the quenched fluorescence regime; a great deal of scatter in the data. Because of the preliminary nature of the study, the origin of the scatter was not identified. This report documents the results of laboratory measurements made on a variety of well defined pulp samples to generate the data necessary to: determine the feasibility of an instrument for on-line lignin concentration measurement using laser fluorescence; identify the preferred measurement strategy; define the range of applicability of the instrument; and to provide background information to guide the design of a field-worthy prototype.

  16. Development electrochemical in-situ pH-pCO2-ORP sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitashima, K.; Koike, Y.; Kyo, M.; Henmi, H.

    2005-12-01

    The pH and pCO2 of seawater are an important factor that affects the thermodynamic state of all various acid-base systems and biological activity in the ocean. In recent years, in-situ measurement using pH and/or pCO2 sensors has attracted attention in relation to global warming issues. We developed the electrochemical in-situ pH-pCO2-ORP sensors for measurement of these parameters in seawater through the water column in high precision. The pH sensor was used an ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) for the pH electrode and a chlorine ion selective electrode (Cl-ISE) for the reference electrode. Both these electrodes have solid-type construction and therefore have high pressure and shock resistance and can be used satisfactorily in deep-sea conditions. For the pCO2 sensor, the pH sensor was sealed with a gas permeable membrane filled with the inner solution. The pH sensor can detect the pCO2 change as the inner solution pH changes which is caused by penetration of carbon dioxide through the membrane. An amorphous Teflon membrane manufactured by U.S. DuPont (Teflon AF) was used as the gas permeable membrane for this pCO2 sensor. The ORP sensor was used a platinum or gold electrode for the working electrode and Cl-ISE for the reference electrode. The sea tests using those sensors were carried out in various locations of the ocean, high accuracy, quick response, and long-term stability have been achieved. In the field, the response speed of the developed pH sensor is 1 second or less, and the measurement accuracy is _0.005 pH. The in-situ (3000m depth, 1.81/4C) response time of the pCO2 sensor was less than 60 seconds.

  17. A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Rei, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le