Science.gov

Sample records for fluxes geochemical partitioning

  1. Partitioning evapotranspiration fluxes using atmometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsag, Matej; Fischer, Milan; Trnka, Miroslav; Kucera, Jiri; Zalud, Zdenek

    2013-04-01

    This effort is aimed to derive a simple tool for separating soil evaporation and transpiration from evapotranspiration, measured by Bowen ration energy balance method (BREB) in short rotation coppice (SRC). The main idea is to utilize daily data of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measured above bare soil (spring 2010 - first year following harvest), reference evapotranspiration (ETo) measured by atmometer ETgage and precipitation data, in order to create an algorithm for estimation evaporation from bare soil. This approach is based on the following assumption: evaporation of wetted bare soil same as the ETo from atmometer is assumed to be identical in days with rain. In first and further days with no rain (and e.g. high evaporative demand) the easily evaporable soil water depletes and ETa so as crop coefficient of bare soil (Kcb) decreases in a way similar to decreasing power function. The algorithm represents a parameterized function of daily cumulated ETo (ETc) measured by atmometer in days elapsed from last rain event (Kcb = a*ETc^b). After each rain event the accumulation of ETo starts again till next rain event (e. g. only days with no rain are cumulated). The function provides decreasing Kcb for each day without rain. The bare soil evaporation can be estimated when the atmometer-recorded value is multiplied by Kcb for particular day without rain. In days with rain Kcb is assumed to be back at 1. This method was successfully tested for estimating evaporation from bare soil under closed canopy of poplar-based SRC. When subtracting the estimated soil evaporation from total ETa flux, measured above the canopy using BREB method, it is possible to obtain transpiration flux of the canopy. There is also possibility to test this approach on the contrary - subtracting transpiration derived from sap-flow measurement from total ETa flux is possible to get soil evaporation as well. Acknowledgements: The present experiment is made within the frame of project Inter

  2. Open software tools for eddy covariance flux partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agro-ecosystem management and assessment will benefit greatly from the development of reliable techniques for partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). Among other activities, flux partitioning can aid in evaluating consumptive vs. non-consumptive agricultural...

  3. FLUXPART: An FOSS solution for Eddy covariance flux partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on efforts to develop a FOSS solution for a particular geoscience application. Eddy covariance (EC) instruments are routinely used to measure field-scale evapotranspiration and CO2 fluxes. For many applications, it is desirable to partition the measured evapotranspiration flux into its c...

  4. Regulatory schemes to achieve optimal flux partitioning in bacterial metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei-Han; Yang, Zhu; Hui, Sheng; Kim, Pan-Jun; Li, Xue-Fei; Hwa, Terence

    2012-02-01

    The flux balance analysis (FBA) offers a way to compute the optimal performance of a given metabolic network when the maximum incoming flux of nutrient molecules and other essential ingredients for biosynthesis are specified. Here we report a theoretical and computational analysis of the network structure and regulatory interactions in an E. coli cell. An automated scheme is devised to simplify the network topology and to enumerate the independent flux degrees of freedom. The network organization revealed by the scheme enables a detailed interpretation of the three layers of metabolic regulation known in the literature: i) independent transcriptional regulation of biosynthesis and salvage pathways to render the network tree-like under a given nutrient condition; ii) allosteric end-product inhibition of enzyme activity at entry points of synthesis pathways for metabolic flux partitioning according to consumption; iii) homeostasis of currency and carrier compounds to maintain sufficient supply of global commodities. Using the amino-acid synthesis pathways as an example, we show that the FBA result can be reproduced with suitable implementation of the three classes of regulatory interactions with literature evidence.

  5. New Insights on Canopy Photosynthesis from novel Isotopic Flux Partitioning in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleska, Scott; Wehr, Richard; Munger, William; Zahniser, Mark; McManus, Barry; Nelson, David

    2014-05-01

    Standard approaches for partitioning net eddy fluxes of CO2 into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (R) typically work by extrapolating R from night to day using an empirical function fit to a week or a month of data. Such methods assume that daytime R behaves like nighttime R, and is either constant or a smoothly varying function of temperature. Isotopic partitioning is an alternative that involves no assumptions about the behavior of R or GPP (though it requires knowledge or assumptions about the isotopic fractionations occurring in and around the leaves) and which allows for the investigation of diel variations because each flux measurement is partitioned separately. A novel isotopic flux partitioning approach using the first long-term isotopic CO2 eddy flux record (measured at Harvard Forest) reveals differences in both the diel and the seasonally averaged behavior of GPP as compared to conventional partitioning. At the diel timescale, large (~10 umol m-2 s-1), rapid (~2 hours) variations in the respiratory component of measured NEE associated with subtle changes in wind direction are misattributed to GPP by conventional partitioning, leading to inconsistency in the response of GPP to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Isotopically partitioned GPP responds more consistently to PAR, and the seasonally averaged light response curve of isotopically partitioned GPP is more linear than that of conventionally partitioned GPP, suggesting that unsaturated (steeply inclined) leaves perform most of the canopy photosynthesis. Isotopic partitioning further suggests that conventional partitioning based on the temperature-dependent extrapolation of nighttime R overestimates GPP by 10-20%, on average, consistent with its neglect of the suppression of foliar dark respiration by sunlight. Isotopic partitioning is thus changing our interpretation of ecosystem CO2 exchange at the Harvard Forest.

  6. Impact of water use efficiency on eddy covariance flux partitioning using correlation structure analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partitioned land surfaces fluxes (e.g. evaporation, transpiration, photosynthesis, and ecosystem respiration) are needed as input, calibration, and validation data for numerous hydrological and land surface models. However, one of the most commonly used techniques for measuring land surface fluxes,...

  7. Geochemical partitioning of Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe, and Mn across the sediment-water interface in large lakes

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, J.D.; Wilson, T.P.; Long, D.T.; Owen, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The early diagenetic remobilization of Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, and Pb was evaluated by studying the geochemical partitioning of the metals among hydromorphic phases in interfacial sediment and in the sediment column, at a site in the Caribou sub-basin, Lake Superior. The sediment was collected with a vacuum/filtration system developed for the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II and the sediment column by gravity coring. The results show that: (1) Pb, Cu, and Zn exhibit sediment profiles in which their concentrations decrease with depth for total metal and some of the hydromorphic phases; (2) Mn and Fe profiles are the result of early diagenesis; (3) each of the metals is uniquely partitioned among the phases and the partitioning changes from the sediment to the sediment column and with depth; and (4) the concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Pb in the sediment are higher than those in the sediment column and, in some instances, appear to be an exponential extrapolations of the latter. The results are interpreted to indicate that the metals are remobilized during early diagenesis and that the sediment may be chemically unique compared to the sediment column, perhaps being similar to interfacial sediments identified in deep marine environments. In addition, it appears that studying the metal concentrations in the individual hydromorphic phases of the sediment is more useful in identifying diagenetic processes than is examination of either total hydromorphic or total metal concentrations of the sediment.

  8. WATER RESOURCES. Hydrologic connectivity constrains partitioning of global terrestrial water fluxes.

    PubMed

    Good, Stephen P; Noone, David; Bowen, Gabriel

    2015-07-10

    Continental precipitation not routed to the oceans as runoff returns to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration. Partitioning this evapotranspiration flux into interception, transpiration, soil evaporation, and surface water evaporation is difficult using traditional hydrological methods, yet critical for understanding the water cycle and linked ecological processes. We combined two large-scale flux-partitioning approaches to quantify evapotranspiration subcomponents and the hydrologic connectivity of bound, plant-available soil waters with more mobile surface waters. Globally, transpiration is 64 ± 13% (mean ± 1 standard deviation) of evapotranspiration, and 65 ± 26% of evaporation originates from soils and not surface waters. We estimate that 38 ± 28% of surface water is derived from the plant-accessed soil water pool. This limited connectivity between soil and surface waters fundamentally structures the physical and biogeochemical interactions of water transiting through catchments. PMID:26160944

  9. Variable Quaternary chemical weathering fluxes and imbalances in marine geochemical budgets.

    PubMed

    Vance, Derek; Teagle, Damon A H; Foster, Gavin L

    2009-03-26

    Rivers are the dominant source of many elements and isotopes to the ocean. But this input from the continents is not balanced by the loss of the elements and isotopes through hydrothermal and sedimentary exchange with the oceanic crust, or by temporal changes in the marine inventory for elements that are demonstrably not in steady state. To resolve the problem of the observed imbalance in marine geochemical budgets, attention has been focused on uncertainties in the hydrothermal and sedimentary fluxes. In recent Earth history, temporally dynamic chemical weathering fluxes from the continents are an inevitable consequence of periodic glaciations. Chemical weathering rates on modern Earth are likely to remain far from equilibrium owing to the physical production of finely ground material at glacial terminations that acts as a fertile substrate for chemical weathering. Here we explore the implications of temporal changes in the riverine chemical weathering flux for oceanic geochemical budgets. We contend that the riverine flux obtained from observations of modern rivers is broadly accurate, but not representative of timescales appropriate for elements with oceanic residence longer than Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles. We suggest that the pulse of rapid chemical weathering initiated at the last deglaciation has not yet decayed away and that weathering rates remain about two to three times the average for an entire late Quaternary glacial cycle. Taking into account the effect of the suggested non-steady-state process on the silicate weathering flux helps to reconcile the modelled marine strontium isotope budget with available data. Overall, we conclude that consideration of the temporal variability in riverine fluxes largely ameliorates long-standing problems with chemical and isotopic mass balances in the ocean.

  10. Geochemical Controls on the Partitioning and Hydrological Transport of Metals in a Human Impacted, Non-Acidic, River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorslund, J.; Jarsjo, J.; Wällstedt, T.; Morth, C. M.; Lychagin, M.; Chalov, S.

    2014-12-01

    The knowledge of coupled processes controlling the spreading and fate of metals in non-acidic river systems is currently much more limited than the knowledge of metal behavior under acidic conditions (e.g., in acid mine drainage systems). Critical geochemical controls governing metal speciation may thus differ substantially between acidic and non-acidic hydrological systems. We here aim at expanding the knowledge of metals in non-acidic river systems, by considering a high pH river, influenced by mining by the largest gold mining area in the Mongolian part of the transboundary Lake Baikal drainage basin. The combined impact of geochemical and hydrological processes is investigated, to be able to understand the solubility of various heavy metals, their partitioning between particulate and dissolved phase and its impact on overall transport. We show, through site specific measurements and a geochemical modelling approach, that the combined effects of precipitation of ferrihydrite and gibbsite and associated sorption complexes of several metals can explain the high impact of suspended transport relative to total transport often seen under non-acidic conditions. Our results also identifies the phosphate mineral Hydroxyapatite as a potential key sorption site for many metals, which has both site specific and general relevance for metal partitioning under non-acidic conditions. However, an adsorption database, which is currently unavailable for hydroxyapatite, needs to be developed for appropriate sorption quantification. Furthermore, Cd, Fe, Pb and Zn were particularly sensitive to increasing DOC concentrations, which increased the solubility of these metals due to metal-organic complexation. Modeling the sensitivity to changes in geochemical parameters showed that decreasing pH and increasing DOC concentrations in downstream regions would increase the dissolution and hence the toxicity and bioavailability of many pollutants of concern in the downstream ecosystem. In

  11. Impact of water use efficiency on eddy covariance flux partitioning using correlation structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ray; Skaggs, Todd; Alfieri, Joseph; Kustas, William; Wang, Dong; Ayars, James

    2016-04-01

    Partitioned land surfaces fluxes (e.g. evaporation, transpiration, photosynthesis, and ecosystem respiration) are needed as input, calibration, and validation data for numerous hydrological and land surface models. However, one of the most commonly used techniques for measuring land surface fluxes, Eddy Covariance (EC), can directly measure net, combined water and carbon fluxes (evapotranspiration and net ecosystem exchange/productivity). Analysis of the correlation structure of high frequency EC time series (hereafter flux partitioning or FP) has been proposed to directly partition net EC fluxes into their constituent components using leaf-level water use efficiency (WUE) data to separate stomatal and non-stomatal transport processes. FP has significant logistical and spatial representativeness advantages over other partitioning approaches (e.g. isotopic fluxes, sap flow, microlysimeters), but the performance of the FP algorithm is reliant on the accuracy of the intercellular CO2 (ci) concentration used to parameterize WUE for each flux averaging interval. In this study, we tested several parameterizations for ci as a function of atmospheric CO2 (ca), including (1) a constant ci/ca ratio for C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathway plants, (2) species-specific ci/ca-Vapor Pressure Deficit (VPD) relationships (quadratic and linear), and (3) generalized C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathway ci/ca-VPD relationships. We tested these ci parameterizations at three agricultural EC towers from 2011-present in C4 and C3 crops (sugarcane - Saccharum officinarum L. and peach - Prunus persica), and validated again sap-flow sensors installed at the peach site. The peach results show that the species-specific parameterizations driven FP algorithm came to convergence significantly more frequently (~20% more frequently) than the constant ci/ca ratio or generic C3-VPD relationship. The FP algorithm parameterizations with a generic VPD relationship also had slightly higher transpiration (5 Wm-2

  12. Partitioning of water flux in a Sierra Nevada ponderosa pine plantation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurpius, M.R.; Panek, J.A.; Nikolov, N.T.; McKay, M.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2003-01-01

    The weather patterns of the west side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains (cold, wet winters and hot, dry summers) strongly influence how water is partitioned between transpiration and evaporation and result in a specific strategy of water use by ponderosa pine trees (Pinus ponderosa) in this region. To investigate how year-round water fluxes were partitioned in a young ponderosa pine ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, water fluxes were continually measured from June 2000 to May 2001 using a combination of sap flow and eddy covariance techniques (above- and below-canopy). Water fluxes were modeled at our study site using a biophysical model, FORFLUX. During summer and fall water fluxes were equally partitioned between transpiration and soil evaporation while transpiration dominated the water fluxes in winter and spring. The trees had high rates of canopy conductance and transpiration in the early morning and mid-late afternoon and a mid-day depression during the dry season. We used a diurnal centroid analysis to show that the timing of high canopy conductance and transpiration relative to high vapor pressure deficit (D) shifted with soil moisture: during periods of low soil moisture canopy conductance and transpiration peaked early in the day when D was low. Conversely, during periods of high soil moisture canopy conductance and transpiration peaked at the same time or later in the day than D. Our observations suggest a general strategy by the pine trees in which they maximize stomatal conductance, and therefore carbon fixation, throughout the day on warm sunny days with high soil moisture (i.e. warm periods in winter and late spring) and maximize stomatal conductance and carbon fixation in the morning through the dry periods. FORFLUX model estimates of evaporation and transpiration were close to measured/calculated values during the dry period, including the drought, but underestimated transpiration and overestimated evaporation during the wet period. ?? 2003

  13. Geochemical partitioning of trace metals in the potential culture-bed of the Marine Bivalve, Anadara granosa

    SciTech Connect

    Maah, M.J.; Mat, I.; Johari, A.

    1995-02-01

    The relative distribution of trace metals in coastal sediment geochemical phases has received considerable attention as a mean of assessing the degree of trace metal pollution. Metals in the non-residual fraction (exchangeable, carbonate, easily reducible, moderately reducible and organic phases) have been demonstrated to be strongly correlated with tissue-metal concentrations in various benthic organisms. Among these phases, the oxides of manganese (easily reducible phase) and iron (moderately reducible phase) and organic matter have been emphasized as important scavengers of available trace metals. Therefore, these phases are undoubtedly among the criteria that should be considered explicitly when assessing the potential bioavailability of metals. The marine bivalve Anadara granosa is commercially cultured in the tidal mudflats along the western coast of the Peninsular Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to provide an assessment of the geochemical partitioning of trace metals in the sediments collected from a culture-bed of A. granosa. The selected area is thought to receive minimal or restricted impacts of trace metal pollution. The present investigation is of significance as a baseline of information for comparative studies with other aquaculture areas in the region. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. δ2H isotopic flux partitioning of evapotranspiration over a grass field following a water pulse and subsequent dry down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Stephen P.; Soderberg, Keir; Guan, Kaiyu; King, Elizabeth G.; Scanlon, Todd M.; Caylor, Kelly K.

    2014-02-01

    The partitioning of surface vapor flux (FET) into evaporation (FE) and transpiration (FT) is theoretically possible because of distinct differences in end-member stable isotope composition. In this study, we combine high-frequency laser spectroscopy with eddy covariance techniques to critically evaluate isotope flux partitioning of FET over a grass field during a 15 day experiment. Following the application of a 30 mm water pulse, green grass coverage at the study site increased from 0 to 10% of ground surface area after 6 days and then began to senesce. Using isotope flux partitioning, transpiration increased as a fraction of total vapor flux from 0% to 40% during the green-up phase, after which this ratio decreased while exhibiting hysteresis with respect to green grass coverage. Daily daytime leaf-level gas exchange measurements compare well with daily isotope flux partitioning averages (RMSE = 0.0018 g m-2 s-1). Overall the average ratio of FT to FET was 29%, where uncertainties in Keeling plot intercepts and transpiration composition resulted in an average of uncertainty of ˜5% in our isotopic partitioning of FET. Flux-variance similarity partitioning was partially consistent with the isotope-based approach, with divergence occurring after rainfall and when the grass was stressed. Over the average diurnal cycle, local meteorological conditions, particularly net radiation and relative humidity, are shown to control partitioning. At longer time scales, green leaf area and available soil water control FT/FET. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of combining isotope flux partitioning and flux-variance similarity theory to estimate water use efficiency at the landscape scale.

  15. Partition function and thermodynamic parameters of the all-particle cosmic-ray flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2016-11-01

    The all-particle cosmic-ray energy spectrum is studied in the 1 GeV-1011 GeV interval, the relativistic nuclei being treated as a free multi-component gas in stationary non-equilibrium. A phase-space derivation of the spectral number density, partition function and entropy is given, and an analytic expression for the flux density of the all-particle spectrum is semi-empirically obtained from a wideband spectral fit. The all-particle spectrum is the additive superposition of four strongly overlapping peaks with exponential cutoffs at the spectral breaks. The analytic flux density covers the mentioned interval ranging over eleven decades and accurately reproduces the spectral fine-structure, such as two weak spectral breaks between knee and ankle emerging in the IceTop-73 and KASCADE-Grande data sets. In the low-energy range below 104 GeV, the all-particle flux is approximated by adding the proton and helium flux densities obtained from fits to the AMS-02 and CREAM spectra, the contribution of heavier nuclei being negligible in this energy range. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (number count, internal energy, entropy and pressure) of the all-particle flux and the partial fluxes generating the spectral peaks are derived.

  16. Mercury and trace metal partitioning and fluxes in suburban Southwest Ohio watersheds.

    PubMed

    Naik, Avani P; Hammerschmidt, Chad R

    2011-10-15

    Many natural watersheds are increasingly affected by changes in land use associated with suburban sprawl and such alterations may influence concentrations, partitioning, and fluxes of toxic trace metals in fluvial ecosystems. We investigated the cycling of mercury (Hg), monomethylmercury, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc in three watersheds at the urban fringe of Dayton, Ohio, over a 13-month period. Metal concentrations were related positively to discharge in each stream, with each metal having a high affinity for suspended particles and Hg also having a noticeable association with dissolved organic carbon. Although not observed for the other metals, levels of Hg in river water varied seasonally and among streams. Yields of Hg from two of the catchments were comparable to that predicted for runoff of atmospherically deposited Hg (∼25% of wet atmospheric flux), whereas the third watershed had a significantly greater annual flux associated with greater particle-specific and filtered water Hg concentrations, presumably from a point source. Fluxes of metals other than Hg were similar among each watershed and suggestive of a ubiquitous source, which could be either atmospheric deposition or weathering. Results of this study indicate that, with the exception of Hg being increased in one watershed, processes affecting metal partitioning and loadings are similar among southwest Ohio streams and comparable to other North American rivers that are equally or less impacted by urban development. Relative differences in land use, catchment area, and presence or absence of waste water treatment facilities had little or no detectable effect on most trace metal concentrations and fluxes. This suggests that suburban encroachment on agricultural and undeveloped lands has either similarly or not substantially impacted trace metal cycling in streams at the urban fringe of Dayton and, by extension, other comparable metropolitan areas. PMID:21827962

  17. The inconvenient truth about eddy covariance flux partitioning and implications for global carbon cycle estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Galvagno, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross primary productivity (GPP) are key carbon cycle concepts. Global estimates of ER and GPP are largely based on measurements of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange by means of the eddy covariance method from which ER and GPP are inferred using so-called flux partitioning algorithms. Using a simple two-source model of ecosystem respiration, consisting of an above-ground respiration source driven by simulated air temperature and a below-ground respiration source driven by simulated soil temperature, we demonstrate that the two most popular flux partitioning algorithms are unable to provide unbiased estimates of daytime ER (ignoring any reduction of leaf mitochondrial respiration) and thus GPP. The bias is demonstrated to be either positive or negative and to depend in a complex fashion on the driving temperature, the ratio of above- to below-ground respiration, the respective temperature sensitivities, the soil depth where the below-ground respiration source originates from (and thus phase and amplitude of soil vs. surface temperature) and day length. The insights from the modeling analysis are subject to a reality check using direct measurements of ER at a grassland where measurements of ER were conducted both during night and day using automated opaque chambers. Consistent with the modeling analysis we find that using air temperature to extrapolate from nighttime to daytime conditions overestimates daytime ER (by 20% or ca. 65 gC m-2 over a 100 day study period), while soil temperature results in an underestimation (by 4% or 12 gC m-2). We conclude with practical recommendations for eddy covariance flux partitioning in the context of the FLUXNET project.

  18. Energy balance and turbulent flux partitioning in a corn-soybean rotation in the Midwestern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Prueger, John H.; Sauer, Thomas J.

    2010-03-01

    Quantifying the energy balance above plant canopies is critical for better understanding of water balance and changes in regional weather patterns. This study examined temporal variations of energy balance terms for contrasting canopies [corn ( Zea mays L.) and soybean ( Glycine max L. Merr.)]. We monitored energy balance for 4 years using eddy-covariance systems, net radiometers, and soil heat flux plates in adjacent production fields near Ames, Iowa. On an annual basis, soybean exhibited 20% and 30% lower sensible heat flux ( H) and Bowen ratio than corn, respectively. As canopies developed, a gradual shift in turbulent fluxes occurred with decreasing H and increasing latent heat flux (LE), but with a more pronounced effect for corn. Conversely, during mid-growing season and as both canopies progressively senesced, H in general increased and LE decreased; however, soybean exhibited slightly greater LE and much lower H than corn. These temporal variations in magnitude and partitioning of turbulent fluxes translated into a pronounced energy imbalance for soybean (0.80) and an enhanced closure for corn (0.98) in August and September. These discrepancies could be directly associated with differences in momentum transport as shown by friction velocities of 0.34 and 0.28 m s-1 for corn and soybean, respectively. These results support influential roles of plant canopy on intensity and mode of surface energy exchange processes.

  19. Diel and Seasonal Behavior of Canopy Photosynthesis Revealed by Novel Isotopic Flux Partitioning in a Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, R. A.; Munger, J. W.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Conventional methods for partitioning the net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange (NEE) of CO2 into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (R) work by extrapolating GPP or R using an empirical function fit to a week or a month of data. Accordingly, these methods do not allow investigation of short-term (e.g. diel) deviations of GPP or R from their monthly average behaviors. Moreover, these methods assume that daytime R is either constant or a smoothly varying function of temperature. Isotopic partitioning is an alternative that involves no assumptions about the behavior of R or GPP (though it requires knowledge or assumptions about the isotopic fractionations occurring in and around the leaves) and which allows for the investigation of diel variations because each flux measurement is partitioned separately. A novel isotopic flux partitioning approach using our unique long-term isotopic CO2 eddy flux record at the Harvard Forest reveals significant differences in both the diel and the seasonally averaged behavior of GPP as compared to conventional partitioning. At the diel timescale, large (~10 μmol m-2 s-1), rapid (~2 hours) variations in the respiratory component of measured NEE associated with subtle changes in wind direction (due to the breakdown of the basic EC assumption of horizontal landscape homogeneity) are misattributed to GPP by conventional partitioning, leading to inconsistency in the response of GPP to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Isotopically partitioned GPP responds much more consistently to PAR, and the seasonally averaged light response curve of isotopically partitioned GPP is much more linear than that of conventionally partitioned GPP (after controlling for the leaf-air water vapor gradient), suggesting that unsaturated (steeply inclined) leaves perform most of the canopy photosynthesis (Figure 1). The behavior of isotopically partitioned GPP follows largely from the observed behavior of the canopy-integrated stomatal

  20. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  1. Salt effects on stable isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications for geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske; Cole, David R.; Wesolowski, David J.

    1994-01-20

    The effects of dissolved salts (NaCI, KCI, MgCl{sub 2}, CaCI{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, MgSO{sub 4}, and their mixtures) on oxygen and hydrogen isotope partitioning between brines and coexisting phases (vapor and calcite) were experimentally determined at 50-350{degree} C and 300{degree} C, respectively. In liquid-vapor equilibration experiments, for all of the salts studied, the hydrogen isotope fractionation factors between the salt solutions and vapor decreased appreciably (up to 20{permille}) compared to pure water-vapor. Except for KCI solutions at 500 C, the oxygen isotope fractionation factors between salt solutions and vapor were higher (up to 4{permille}) than, or very close to, that of pure water. The observed isotope salt effects are all linear with the molalities of the solutions. Mixed salt solutions mimicking natural geothermal brines exhibit salt effects additive of those of individual salts. The isotope exchange experiments of calcite-water at 300{degree}C and 1 kbar yielded a fractionation factor of 5.9+0.3{permille} for pure water and effects of NaCl consistent with those obtained from the liquid-vapor equilibration experiments. The isotope salt effects observed in this study are too large to be ignored, and must be taken into account for isotopic studies of geothermal systems (i.e., estimation of isotope ratios and temperatures of deep-seated geothermal brines).

  2. Linking water and carbon fluxes in a Mediterranean oak woodland using a combined flux and ?18O partitioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, M.; Piayda, A.; Costa e Silva, F.; Correia, A.; Pereira, J. S.; Cuntz, M.; Werner, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water is one of the key factors driving ecosystem productivity, especially in water-limited ecosystems, where global climate change is expected to intensify drought and alter precipitation patterns. One such ecosystem is the ';Montado', where two vegetation layers respond differently to drought: oak trees avoid drought due to their access to deeper soil layers and ground water while herbaceous plants, surviving the summer in the form of seeds. We aimed at 1) quantifying the impact of the understory herbaceous vegetation on ecosystem carbon and water fluxes throughout the year, 2) determining the driving environmental factors for evapotranspiration (ET) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and 3) disentangling how ET components of the ecosystem relate to carbon dioxide exchange. We present one year data set comparing modeled and measured stable oxygen isotope signatures (δ18O) of soil evaporation, confirming that the Craig and Gordon equation leads to good agreement with measured δ18O of evaporation (Dubbert et al. 2013). Partitioning ecosystem ET and NEE into its three sources revealed a strong contribution of soil evaporation (E) and herbaceous transpiration (T) to ecosystem ET during spring and fall. In contrast, soil respiration (R) and herbaceous net carbon gain contributed to a lesser amount to ecosystem NEE during spring and fall, leading to consistently smaller water use efficiencies (WUE) of the herbaceous understory compared to the cork-oaks. Here, we demonstrate that the ability to assess ET, NEE and WUE independent of soil evaporation dynamics enables the understanding of the mechanisms of the coupling between water and carbon fluxes and their responses to drought. Dubbert, M., Cuntz, M., Piayda, A., Maguas, C., Werner, C., 2013: Partitioning evapotranspiration - Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes. J Hydrol. a) Oxygen isotope signatures of soil evaporation on bare soil plots calculated

  3. Evapotranspiration flux partitioning using an Iso-SPAC model in a temperate grassland ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.

    2014-12-01

    To partition evapotranspiration (ET) into soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration (T), a new numerical Iso-SPAC (coupled heat, water with isotopic tracer in Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Continuum) model was developed and applied to a temperate-grassland ecosystem in central Japan. Several models of varying complexity have been tested with the aim of obtaining the close to true value for the isotope composition of leaf water and transpiration flux. The agreement between the model predictions and observations demonstrates that the Iso-SPAC model with a steady-state assumption for transpiration flux can reproduce seasonal variations of all the surface energy balance components,leaf and ground surface temperature as well as isotope data (canopy foliage and ET flux). This good performance was confirmed not only at diurnal timescale but also at seasonal timescale. Thus, although the non-steady-state behavior of isotope budget in a leaf and isotopic diffusion between leaf and stem or root is exactly important, the steady-state assumption is practically acceptable for seasonal timescale as a first order approximation. Sensitivity analysis both in physical flux part and isotope part suggested that T/ET is relatively insensitive to uncertainties/errors in assigned model parameters and measured input variables, which illustrated the partitioning validity. Estimated transpiration fractions using isotope composition in ET flux by Iso-SPAC model and Keeling plot are generally in good agreement, further proving validity of the both approaches. However, Keeling plot approach tended to overestimate the fraction during an early stage of glowing season and a period just after clear cutting. This overestimation is probably due to insufficient fetch and influence of transpiration from upwind forest. Consequently, Iso-SPAC model is more reliable than Keeling plot approach in most cases.The T/ET increased with grass growth, and the sharp reduction caused by clear cutting was well

  4. Partitioning water and carbon fluxes in a Mediterranean oak woodland using stable oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra; Silva, Filipe Costa e.; Pereira, Joao; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    evaporation (Dubbert et al. 2013). Moreover, we found continuously strong deviations from isotopic steady-state in plant transpiration combined with large isoforcing on the atmosphere. This implies that assuming plant transpiration to be in the steady-state can have a huge impact at least for studies that distinguish relatively short time intervals (hours, e.g. partitioning studies). Finally. partitioning ecosystem ET and NEE into its three sources revealed a strong contribution of soil evaporation (E) and herbaceous transpiration (T) to ecosystem ET during spring and fall. In contrast, soil respiration (R) and herbaceous net carbon gain contributed to a lesser amount to ecosystem NEE during spring and fall, leading to consistently smaller water use efficiencies (WUE) of the herbaceous understory compared to the cork-oaks. Craig H, Gordon, LI. 1965. Deuterium and oxygen-18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. Paper presented at the Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperatures, Spoleto, Italy. Dubbert M, Cuntz M, Piayda A, Maguas C, Werner C, 2013: Partitioning evapotranspiration - Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes. J Hydrol.

  5. Partitioning a decade of evapotranspiration and carbon dioxide fluxes at a forested Ameriflux eddy-covariance site in southern Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, B. N.; Scanlon, T. M.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) technique measures fluxes of water vapor and carbon dioxide between ecosystems and the atmosphere. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) is the balance between ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross primary production (GPP), and evapotranspiration (ET) is the sum of transpiration and evaporation. In order to relate these measurements to physical and ecological processes, it is often necessary to partition the fluxes into their components. While established techniques for partitioning NEE are widely used in the EC community, partitioning of ET remains a challenge. A recently developed partitioning procedure uses assumed correlations between stomatal (photosynthesis and transpiration) and non-stomatal (respiration and evaporation) sources of water vapor and CO2 to simultaneously partition NEE and ET into their respective components. Because the technique uses the same high-frequency measurements as EC, it is easily applicable to existing EC datasets, provided ecosystem-scale water use efficiency can be specified. We applied the method to a ten-year record of EC fluxes at the Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) Ameriflux site, using estimates of water use efficiency from recent leaf-level gas exchange measurements. The technique has been tested in agricultural systems, but has not previously been evaluated in forests. ER and GPP from the correlation-based procedure qualitatively matched estimates from a more traditional partitioning method based on fitting nighttime NEE to a function of temperature and calculating GPP as the residual during the day, although the magnitudes of GPP and ER from the correlation-based technique were higher than those from the traditional technique. Partitioned respiration and evaporation were also consistent with sub-canopy flux measurements. Transpiration accounted for the majority of ET during the growing season, but had a strong seasonal cycle. Both evaporation and transpiration declined during periods of low soil

  6. Geochemical investigation of weathering processes in a forested headwater catchment: Mass-balance weathering fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Herman, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical research on natural weathering has often been directed towards explanations of the chemical composition of surface water and ground water resulting from subsurface water-rock interactions. These interactions are often defined as the incongruent dissolution of primary silicates, such as feldspar, producing secondary weathering products, such as clay minerals and oxyhydroxides, and solute fluxes (Meunier and Velde, 1979). The chemical composition of the clay-mineral product is often ignored. However, in earlier investigations, the saprolitic weathering profile at the South Fork Brokenback Run (SFBR) watershed, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, was characterized extensively in terms of its mineralogical and chemical composition (Piccoli, 1987; Pochatila et al., 2006; Jones et al., 2007) and its basic hydrology. O'Brien et al. (1997) attempted to determine the contribution of primary mineral weathering to observed stream chemistry at SFBR. Mass-balance model results, however, could provide only a rough estimate of the weathering reactions because idealized mineral compositions were utilized in the calculations. Making use of detailed information on the mineral occurrence in the regolith, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of compositional variation on mineral-solute mass-balance modelling and to generate plausible quantitative weathering reactions that support both the chemical evolution of the surface water and ground water in the catchment, as well as the mineralogical evolution of the weathering profile. ?? 2008 The Mineralogical Society.

  7. The use of Mediterranean shrub to flight against the land degradation. The rainfall partitioning fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Estringana, Pablo; Nieves Alonso-Blazquez, M.; Alegre, Jesús; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    Desertification can be triggered by the lost of vegetation (Izzo et al., 2013). One of the impacts of the lack of vegetation is the increase in the effective rainfall and then higher soil and water losses. Vegetation can reduce the effective rainfall by interception. To recover the land that is affected by Desertification we must select plant species that will intercept the rainfall, but will not avoid the rainfall to reach the soil. This is why, studies on the plant rainfall interception are relevant to flight Land Degradation processes. Soil erosion is highly dependent on the effective rainfall (Cerdà and Lasanta, 2005; Haile and Fetene; 2012; Miao et al., 2012, Prokop and Poręba, 2012). The amount of rainfall that reaches the soil surface and can contribute to detach and transport material is determined by the interception of plants. Interception is also a key factor of the watershed hydrology (Zema et al., 2012). The importance of the rainfall partitioning fluxes is related to the climatic conditions, as climate control the plant cover and the soil properties, and then the soil losses (Cerdà, 1998). Although the shrubs has been seen as a key vegetation cover in semiarid lands to control the soil and water losses (Cerdà and Doerr, 2007) little information is available about rainfall interception in Mediterranean shrub vegetation, due to technical difficulties to measure them in such small-sized vegetation (Belmonte Serrato and Romero Diaz, 1998). The aim of this work was to assess the influence of different Mediterranean shrubs (Retama sphaerocarpa, Colutea arborescens, Dorycnium pentaphyllum, Medicago strasseri, Pistacia Lentiscus and Quercus coccifera) on rainfall partitioning fluxes (interception losses, throughfall and stemflow) in semiarid environments. The experiment was carried out under natural rainfall conditions with live specimens during two years, with automatic measurement of rainfall partitioning fluxes. In order to assess the influence of

  8. Partitioning the climatic and biological controls on photosynthetic fluxes in Amazonian tropical evergreen forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Guan, K.; Albert, L.; Hayek, M.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Prohaska, N.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Marostica, S. F.; Stark, S. C.; Smith, M.; Silva, R. D.; Dye, D. G.; Nelson, B. W.; Huete, A. R.; Saleska, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the mechanistic controls on tropical forests photosynthetic metabolism is a central problem of ecology and global change biology. We hypothesize two different temporal scales for the mechanisms regulating tropical photosynthesis (Gross Ecosystem Productivity, GEP): (1) at seasonal scales, leaf phenology (changing age and amount of leaves) is the primary control on GEP seasonality; (2) at the hourly scale with a constant phenological stage, climatic variables are the first order controls on GEP. In order to test this hypothesis, we partitioned the sources of GEP variation measured on eddy flux towers in central Amazon forests into biological and climatic components. The biological component (photosynthetic capacity, or PC) was defined as the monthly mean value of GEP extracted under a fixed narrow range of climate conditions, representing phenological changes associated with the amount and age of leaves. The climatic component was extracted via a path analysis of the hourly flux data, conditioned on a given monthly PC, representing the effects of fluctuating climate operating on the given PC. The main climatic variables were PAR, air-temperature, VPD, and Cloudiness Index (CI), the fraction of reduction of incident solar radiance due to clouds and aerosols relative to that expected under clear sky conditions. We found that the variability in monthly GEP arises from both seasonality of PC and that of climate, but despite the strong seasonality of climate, GEP was dominated by PC seasonality (R2=0.92). We found that the variability in hourly GEP (relative to the potential represented by monthly PC) was controlled primarily by PAR and VPD (as modified by the influence of CI). The tradeoff between the positive GEP effects of increased PAR and the negative effects of higher VPD stress indicates that tropical forests are stable in the face of modest climatic variability. For example, a significant reduction in mean cloudiness (of 0.1 CI units, corresponding

  9. Partitioning modes and rates of sediment flux derived from terrace-channel coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higson, J. L.; Singer, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment supply to channels from failed banks/terraces is a geomorphic problem that has received scant treatment in the literature, especially with respect to the partitioning of such laterally eroded sediment into bedload v. suspended load and the resultant channel grain size distribution. Such coupling between terraces/banks and channels is an important component for understanding the exhaustion of the legacy sediments in disturbed watersheds, especially where terraces are contaminated by past mining activities. More than 4x106 kg of mercury (Hg) was lost during the 19th Century hydraulic mining process in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California and documented levels of total Hg concentration in legacy terraces all along the Yuba River are up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than background values. Thus, the ongoing erosion of legacy terraces from the mining period poses important risks to sensitive and ecologically productive lowlands downstream. The problem of bank/terrace erosion in river corridors is generally treated either using a channel centerline (toe cutting) approach or by infinite slope stability at a cross section, but the interaction of failed sediment with the channel is an important and missing component for fully assessing downstream risks of failing contaminated terraces. We have developed a new physically based model that can be used to quantify the extent and caliber of episodic erosion of legacy terrace sediments. The model combines analysis of bank/terrace failure in response to variable fluvial hydrology with a representation of local cross section evolution of grain size distribution and sediment routing. Terrace stability is calculated through an infinite slope stability model, driven by a Dupuit-Forchheimer groundwater model to assess soil moisture contributing to failure. The grain size distribution (GSD) in the channel bed is evolved based on calculation of sediment transport, which also yields net flux of fine material that is known

  10. Towards quantitative flux and provenance assessments of riverine suspended sediments: a geochemical investigation of the Fraser River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, B.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Venditti, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine sediments carry a wealth of information about terrestrial processes of erosion and weathering, primary production, and climate in their geochemical composition. Modern riverine sediments and sedimentary deposits in continental shelves, deltas, and lake beds are thus frequently interpreted as records of present and past terrestrial conditions. However, few modern systems have been adequately characterized such that a terrestrial 'end member' composition can be assigned to a given setting, leading to uncertainty in the causes for observed changes in sediment composition. Furthermore, the geochemical signal of a single river's sediment load is a complex product of source contributions from across its basin, as well as transport processes. In order to generate accurate budgets of the quantity (flux) and provenance of basin-integrated riverine suspended sediments, careful sampling across a river channel is required. Studies on a small number of large rivers across the globe have amply demonstrated that hydrodynamic sorting leads to bias in the geochemical composition of particles transported near the river surface versus near the bed. However, appropriate samples characterizing the basin-integrated riverine sediment signal do not exist for most rivers. We present results from the Fraser River in southwestern Canada, which illustrate the variability in modern sediment composition in a system with minimal anthropogenic modification of sediment dispersal (channelization, dam reservoirs). During the 2013 spring freshet on the Fraser River, we collected vertical profiles of point-integrated suspended sediment samples across a 550 m-wide transect of the river ~186 km upstream of the mouth. Sampling was done roughly 1 month after the peak flow (~11,500 m3/s) during a period of sustained high flow (8450 m3/s), when suspended sediment concentrations ranged from 80 - 400 mg/L. These samples, along with simultaneous discharge measurements, allow us to characterize the

  11. A Bayesian Deconvolution Approach to Partitioning Soil Respiration: Coupling Carbon Flux and Isotope Data with Process-based Flux and Mixing Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, K.; Cable, J. M.; Huxman, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    The respiratory loss of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems is a major carbon flux affecting local, regional, and global carbon cycling. Such losses (e.g., soil CO2 efflux), however, are often overly simplified in biogeochemical models compared to processes such as photosynthesis. This discrepancy is partly due to the difficulty associated with partitioning soil respiration (or CO2 efflux) into its various components (e.g., autotrophic vs. heterotrophic). Different components operate at dissimilar temporal and spatial scales, thus estimation of their relative activity based on bulk soil efflux measurements is challenging. Hence, development of a robust, biophysically-inspired method for partitioning the different components is paramount to teasing- apart the mechanisms underlying carbon source-sink dynamics within and across diverse landscapes. Towards this goal, we developed a semi-mechanistic Bayesian deconvolution modeling approach for partitioning soil respiration into its component sources. While the sources can be broadly categorized as autotrophic or heterotrophic, the fundamental sources of biogenic CO2 efflux arises from specific interactions between plants, micro-organisms, and the soil environment. Potential sources have been identified based on their different turnover rates and functional roles, including, (1) activity of roots, (2) rhizomicrobial (e.g., mycorrhiza) respiration, (3) microbial decomposition of plant tissues, (4) microbial activity primed by root exudation, and (5) microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. The relative contribution of each source to soil CO2 efflux can vary within the soil matrix, depending on spatial and temporal variability in soil properties, resource and substrate availability, and microclimate. Our Bayesian deconvolution framework allows for simultaneous analysis of multiple data sources related to soil respiration dynamics, and the data are analyzed within the context of process-based models. The data include

  12. Validation experiments to determine radiation partitioning of heat flux to an object in a fully turbulent fire.

    SciTech Connect

    Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

    2006-06-01

    It is necessary to improve understanding and develop validation data of the heat flux incident to an object located within the fire plume for the validation of SIERRA/ FUEGO/SYRINX fire and SIERRA/CALORE. One key aspect of the validation data sets is the determination of the relative contribution of the radiative and convective heat fluxes. To meet this objective, a cylindrical calorimeter with sufficient instrumentation to measure total and radiative heat flux had been designed and fabricated. This calorimeter will be tested both in the controlled radiative environment of the Penlight facility and in a fire environment in the FLAME/Radiant Heat (FRH) facility. Validation experiments are specifically designed for direct comparison with the computational predictions. Making meaningful comparisons between the computational and experimental results requires careful characterization and control of the experimental features or parameters used as inputs into the computational model. Validation experiments must be designed to capture the essential physical phenomena, including all relevant initial and boundary conditions. A significant question of interest to modeling heat flux incident to an object in or near a fire is the contribution of the radiation and convection modes of heat transfer. The series of experiments documented in this test plan is designed to provide data on the radiation partitioning, defined as the fraction of the total heat flux that is due to radiation.

  13. PARTITIONING OF WATER FLUX IN A SIERRA NEVADA PONDEROSA PINE PLANTATION. (R826601)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The weather patterns of the west side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains (cold, wet winters and hot, dry summers) strongly influence how water is partitioned between transpiration and evaporation and result in a specific strategy of water use by ponderosa pine trees (Pinus pond...

  14. Episodic particle flux in the deep Sargasso Sea: an organic geochemical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Maureen H.; Weber, J. C.; Ralph, Nathan

    1998-11-01

    Since 1978, the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) time-series sediment trap study has continuously measured particle fluxes in the deep Sargasso Sea (31°50'N, 64°10'W). One feature of this 19+ year record has been the episodic occurrence of large, short-lived flux maxima that are not associated with the annual spring bloom. These maxima generally occur during the Dec.-Jan. period, but not necessarily every year. They have also occurred in other seasons. In January 1996, OFP traps located at 3200 and 3400 m depths intercepted a major flux "event" in which there was an abrupt, threefold increase in mass flux at both depths. Mass flux measured at 3200 m during the event (87 mg m -2 d -1) was the highest recorded since biweekly resolved sampling was begun in 1989. Organic biomarker analyses of material collected prior to, and during, this high flux event determined that there was an abrupt change in material composition associated with the sudden flux increase. Prior to the event, cholesterol, a single bacteriaderived C 27 hopanone (22,29,30-tris norhopan-21-one), and saturated and odd/branched fatty acids predominated: these compounds indicated that the sedimenting material was extensively degraded. During the event, organic material was greatly enriched in C 26-C 29 phytosterols, haptophyte algae-derived C 37-C 39 alkenones, labile polyunsaturated acids, degradation products such as steroidal ketones, and also in bacteria-derived compounds such as C 27-C 34 hopanoids and β and ω-1 hydroxy acids. These compounds indicated the organic fraction contained a large amount of relatively fresh phytoplankton-derived debris and tracers of bacterial biomass and metabolism, which suggested that the sinking material was undergoing active bacterial decomposition. Thus, the flux "event" appears to have resulted from a shortlived bloom in the overlying surface waters which, for reasons not currently apparent, was inefficiently remineralized in the upper ocean and rapidly settled to

  15. Geochemical Modeling of Reactions and Partitioning of Trace Metals and Radionuclides during Titration of Contaminated Acidic Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Luo, Wensui; Spalding, Brian Patrick; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2008-01-01

    Many geochemical reactions that control aqueous metal concentrations are directly affected by solution pH. However, changes in solution pH are strongly buffered by various aqueous phase and solid phase precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior of the soil-solution system is thus critical to predict metal transport under variable pH conditions. This study was undertaken to develop a practical generic geochemical modeling approach to predict aqueous and solid phase concentrations of metals and anions during conditions of acid or base additions. The method of Spalding and Spalding was utilized to model soil buffer capacity and pH-dependent cation exchange capacity by treating aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. To simulate the dynamic and pH-dependent anion exchange capacity, the aquifer solids were simultaneously treated as a polyprotic base controlled by mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. An equilibrium reaction model that describes aqueous complexation, precipitation, sorption and soil buffering with pH-dependent ion exchange was developed using HydroGeoChem v5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration data of pH, Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for contaminated sediments indicated close agreement, suggesting that the model could potentially be used to predict the acid-base behavior of the sediment-solution system under variable pH conditions.

  16. Geochemical modeling of reactions and partitioning of trace metals and radionuclides during titration of contaminated acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C; Spalding, Brian P; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2008-11-01

    Many geochemical reactions that control aqueous metal concentrations are directly affected by solution pH. However, changes in solution pH are strongly buffered by various aqueous phase and solid phase precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior of the soil-solution system is thus critical to predict metal transport under variable pH conditions. This studywas undertaken to develop a practical generic geochemical modeling approach to predict aqueous and solid phase concentrations of metals and anions during conditions of acid or base additions. The method of Spalding and Spalding was utilized to model soil buffer capacity and pH-dependent cation exchange capacity by treating aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. To simulate the dynamic and pH-dependent anion exchange capacity, the aquifer solids were simultaneously treated as a polyprotic base controlled by mineral precipitation/ dissolution reactions. An equilibrium reaction model that describes aqueous complexation, precipitation, sorption and soil buffering with pH-dependent ion exchange was developed using HydroGeoChem v5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration data of pH, Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co, and SO4(2-) for contaminated sediments indicated close agreement suggesting that the model could potentially be used to predictthe acid-base behavior of the sediment-solution system under variable pH conditions.

  17. Influence of gas-particle partitioning on ammonia and nitric acid fluxes above a deciduous forest in the Midwestern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hornsby, K. E.; Boegh, E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of reactive nitrogen gasses (including ammonia (NH3) and nitric acid (HNO3)) is crucial to assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, measuring the deposition of reactive nitrogen is challenging due to bi-directionality of the flux, and the dynamics of the chemical gas/aerosol equilibrium of NH3 and HNO3 (or other atmospheric acids) with aerosol-phase ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). NH3 and HNO3 are both very reactive and typically exhibit higher deposition velocities than aerosol NH4+. Therefore, the phase partitioning between gas and aerosol phases can have a significant effect on local budgets and atmospheric transport distances (Nemitz et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2004). In this study, fluxes of NH3, HNO3 and carbon dioxide (CO2) along with size-resolved N-aerosol concentrations are measured above the deciduous forest, Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) in south-central Indiana (39°53'N, 86°25'W) during a field campaign. Two relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) systems are used to measure fluxes and concentrations of NH3 and HNO3 at 44 m. The NH3 REA system operates based on wet effluent diffusion denuders with detection by florescence and half-hourly flux measurements are calculated. HNO3 REA system is based on gas capture on sodium chloride (NaCl) coated denuders with subsequent analysis by ion-chromatography, and the resulting fluxes have a resolution of 3-4 hours. CO2 fluxes are measured by eddy covariance using a closed-path Licor LI-7500, while two MSP MOUDI-110 impactors are used to measure the 24-hourly average inorganic and 48 hourly averaged organic ion concentrations in 11 size bins, respectively, just above the canopy level (28 m). The results of this field campaign are used to quantify the fluxes of NH3, HNO3, CO2 to/from the forest during the transition towards senescence, and to investigate process-level controls (e.g. the role of phase

  18. SEDIMENT GEOCHEMICAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, sediment geochemical models (diagenetic models) have been only able to explain sedimentary flux and concentration profiles for a few simplified geochemical cycles (e.g., nitrogen, carbon and sulfur). However with advances in numerical methods, increased accuracy ...

  19. Geochemical modeling of reactions and partitioning of trace metals and radionuclides during titration of contaminated acidic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated sorption of uranium and technetium onto aluminum and iron hydroxides during titration of a contaminated groundwater using both Na hydroxide and carbonate as titrants. The contaminated groundwater has a low pH of 3.8 and high concentrations of NO3-, SO42-, Al, Ca, Mg, Mn, trace metals such as Ni and Co, and radionuclides such as U and Tc. During titration, most Al and Fe were precipitated out at pH above ~4.5. U as well as Tc was found to be removed from aqueous phase at pH below ~5.5, but to some extent released at higher pH values. An earlier geochemical equilibrium reaction path model that considered aqueous complexation and precipitation/dissolution reactions predicted mineral precipitation and adequately described concentration variations of Al, Fe and some other metal cations, but failed to predict sulfate, U and Tc concentrations during titration. Previous studies have shown that Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved sulfate, U and Tc species. Therefore, an anion exchange model was developed for the sorption of sulfate, U and Tc onto Al and Fe hydroxides. With the additional consideration of the anion exchange reactions, concentration profiles of sulfate, U and Tc were more accurately predicted. Results of this study indicate that consideration of complex reactions such as sorption/desorption on mixed mineral phases, in addition to hydrolysis and precipitation, could improve the prediction of various contaminants during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  20. Vegetation controls on surface heat flux partitioning, and land-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian N.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-11-01

    We provide observational evidence that land-atmosphere coupling is underestimated by a conventional metric defined by the correlation between soil moisture and surface evaporative fraction (latent heat flux normalized by the sum of sensible and latent heat flux). Land-atmosphere coupling is 3 times stronger when using leaf area index as a correlate of evaporative fraction instead of soil moisture, in the Southern Great Plains. The role of vegetation was confirmed using adjacent flux measurement sites having identical atmospheric forcing but different vegetation phenology. Transpiration makes the relationship between evaporative fraction and soil moisture nonlinear and gives the appearance of weak coupling when using linear soil moisture metrics. Regions of substantial coupling extend to semiarid and humid continental climates across the United States, in terms of correlations between vegetation metrics and evaporative fraction. The hydrological cycle is more tightly constrained by the land surface than previously inferred from soil moisture.

  1. New geochemical models of core formation in the Moon from metal-silicate partitioning of 15 siderophile elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenstra, E. S.; Rai, N.; Knibbe, J. S.; Lin, Y. H.; van Westrenen, W.

    2016-05-01

    We re-examine the conditions at which core formation in the Moon may have occurred by linking the observed lunar mantle depletions of 15 siderophile elements, including volatile siderophile elements (VSE) to predictive equations derived from a database compilation of metal-silicate partition coefficients obtained at lunar-relevant pressure-temperature-oxygen fugacity (P- T- fO2) conditions. Our results suggest that at mantle temperatures between the solidus and liquidus the depletions for all elements considered can be satisfied, but only if the Moon was essentially fully molten at the time of core formation while assuming a S-rich (>8 wt%) core comprising 2.5 wt% of the mass of the Moon. However, we observe that at temperatures exceeding the mantle liquidus, with increasing temperature the core S content required to satisfy the element depletions is reduced. As a S-poor core is likely from recent lunar mantle estimates of S abundance, this suggests much higher temperatures during lunar core formation than previously proposed. We conclude that the VSE depletions in the lunar mantle can be solely explained by core formation depletion, suggesting that no significant devolatilization has occurred in later periods of lunar evolution. This is in agreement with the discovery of significant amounts of other volatiles in the lunar interior, but hard to reconcile with current lunar formation models.

  2. Comparing three methods of NEE-flux partitioning from the same grassland ecosystem: the 13C, 18O isotope approach and using simulated Ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwolf, R.; Bantelmann, E.; Saurer, M.; Eugster, W.; Buchmann, N.

    2007-12-01

    As a change in the global climate occurs with increasing temperatures, the Carbon exchange processes of terrestrial ecosystems will change as well. However, it is difficult to quantify the degree to what ecosystem respiration will change relative to the CO2 uptake by photosynthesis. To estimate the carbon sequestration potential of terrestrial vegetation cover it is essential to know both fluxes: ecosystem respiration and the carbon uptake by the vegetation cover. Therefore the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was measured with the eddy covariance method and separated into assimilation and respiration flux. We applied three different approaches, 1) the conventional method, applying the nighttime relationship between soil temperature and NEE for calculating the respiration flux during the day, 2) the use of stable carbon and 3) oxygen isotopes. We compared the results of the three partitioning exercises for a temperate grassland ecosystem in the pre-Alps of Switzerland for four days in June 2004. The assimilation flux derived with the conventional NEE partitioning approach, was best represented at low PAR and low temperatures, in the morning between 5 and 9 am. With increasing temperature and PAR the assimilation for the whole canopy was underestimated. For partitioning NEE via 18O approach, correlations of temperature and radiation with assimilation and respiration flux were significantly higher for the partitioning approach with 18O than for the 13C NEE partitioning. A sensitivity analysis showed the importance of an accurate determination of the equilibrium term θ between CO2 and leaf water δ18O for the NEE partitioning with 18O. For using 13C to partition NEE, the correct magnitude of the 13C fractionation and for the respiration term is essential. The analysis of the data showed that for low light and low morning temperatures the conventional method delivers reasonably good results. When the temperatures exceeded 21°C the isotope approach provided the

  3. Evaluating the influence of plant-specific physiological parameterizations on the partitioning of land surface energy fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, Mauro; Langensiepen, Matthias; Shrestha, Prabhakar; Schickling, Anke; Simmer, Clemens; Kollet, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation has a significant influence on the partitioning of radiative forcing, the spatial and temporal variability of soil water and soil temperature. Therefore plant physiological properties play a key role in mediating and amplifying interactions and feedback mechanisms in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. Because of the direct impact on latent heat fluxes, these properties may also influence weather generating processes, such as the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In land surface models, plant physiological properties are usually obtained from literature synthesis by unifying several plant/crop species in predefined vegetation classes. In this work, crop-specific physiological characteristics, retrieved from detailed field measurements, are included in the bio-physical parameterization of the Community Land Model (CLM), which is a component of the Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP). The measured set of parameters for two typical European mid-latitudinal crops (sugar beet and winter wheat) is validated using eddy covariance measurements (sensible heat and latent heat) over multiple years from three measurement sites located in the North Rhine-Westphalia region, Germany. We found clear improvements of CLM simulations, when using the crop-specific physiological characteristics of the plants instead of the generic crop type when compared to the measurements. In particular, the increase of latent heat fluxes in conjunction with decreased sensible heat fluxes as simulated by the two new crop-specific parameter sets leads to an improved quantification of the diurnal energy partitioning. These findings are cross-validated using estimates of gross primary production extracted from net ecosystem exchange measurements. This independent analysis reveals that the better agreement between observed and simulated latent heat using the plant-specific physiological properties largely stems from an improved simulation of the

  4. Stand-level patterns of carbon fluxes and partitioning in a Eucalyptus grandis plantation across a gradient of productivity, in Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campoe, Otávio C; Stape, José Luiz; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Marsden, Claire; Nouvellon, Yann

    2012-06-01

    Wood production represents a large but variable fraction of gross primary production (GPP) in highly productive Eucalyptus plantations. Assessing patterns of carbon (C) partitioning (C flux as a fraction of GPP) between above- and belowground components is essential to understand mechanisms driving the C budget of these plantations. Better knowledge of fluxes and partitioning to woody and non-woody tissues in response to site characteristics and resource availability could provide opportunities to increase forest productivity. Our study aimed at investigating how C allocation varied within one apparently homogeneous 90 ha stand of Eucalyptus grandis (W. Hill ex Maiden) in Southeastern Brazil. We assessed annual above-ground net primary production (ANPP: stem, leaf, and branch production) and total belowground C flux (TBCF: the sum of root production and respiration and mycorrhizal production and respiration), GPP (computed as the sum of ANPP, TBCF and estimated aboveground respiration) on 12 plots representing the gradient of productivity found within the stand. The spatial heterogeneity of topography and associated soil attributes across the stand likely explained this fertility gradient. Component fluxes of GPP and C partitioning were found to vary among plots. Stem NPP ranged from 554 g C m(-2) year(-1) on the plot with lowest GPP to 923 g C m(-2) year(-1) on the plot with highest GPP. Total belowground carbon flux ranged from 497 to 1235 g C m(-2) year(-1) and showed no relationship with ANPP or GPP. Carbon partitioning to stem NPP increased from 0.19 to 0.23, showing a positive trend of increase with GPP (R(2) = 0.29, P = 0.07). Variations in stem wood production across the gradient of productivity observed at our experimental site were a result of the variability in C partitioning to different forest system components. PMID:22543478

  5. Vegetation controls on surface heat flux partitioning, and land-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. N.; Torn, M. S.; Lu, Y.; Kueppers, L. M.; Bagley, J.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between soil moisture and surface evaporative fraction (latent heat flux normalized by the sum of sensible and latent heat flux) is critical in linking land surface forcing to clouds and precipitation. The evaporative fraction (EF) can influence precipitation directly through precipitation recycling, and indirectly through convective triggering. Several studies have shown that the observed correlation between soil moisture and EF is weaker than the correlation predicted in climate models, suggesting that land-atmosphere coupling is overestimated in models. Here, we present evidence that observed land-atmosphere coupling is underestimated when defined by the correlation between soil moisture and EF. Land-atmosphere coupling is three times stronger when using leaf area index as a correlate of EF instead of soil moisture, in the Southern Great Plains. This stronger coupling results from transpiration of relatively deep soil moisture. Furthermore, transpiration makes the relationship between EF and soil moisture nonlinear, and gives rise to the false appearance of weak coupling when using linear soil moisture metrics. The geographical extent of land-atmosphere coupling is not as small as in previous estimates. Regions of substantial land-atmosphere coupling extend to semi-arid and humid continental climates across the United States, in terms of correlations between vegetation metrics and EF. A comparison of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) to observations in the Southern Great Plains reveals that the model overestimates correlations between soil moisture and EF, but underestimates correlations between leaf area index and EF by 30%, even when using observed daily leaf area index and meteorological forcing. It appears that the hydrological cycle is more tightly constrained by vegetation in observations than in climate models.

  6. Gas geochemical survey of long dormant Ciomadul volcano (South Harghita Mts., Romania): constraints on the flux and origin of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Boglárka-Mercedesz; Ionescu, Artur; Harangi, Szabolcs; Palcsu, László; Etiope, Giuseppe; Baciu, Cǎlin

    2016-04-01

    The Ciomadul, located in the South Harghita Mountains (Eastern Carpathians, Romania) is the youngest volcano built by the Neogene volcanism in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region. The volcanic activity was characterized by an initial extrusive lava dome building period from about 200 ka to 100 ka followed by a more explosive eruption stage from 57 to 32 ka. Although the volcano seems to be inactive, several features (e.g. geophysical anomalies in the crust; fast remobilization of near solidus long lasting crystal mush prior to the past eruptions) suggest that melt-bearing magmatic body could still exist beneath the Ciomadul. This is supported by the abundance of dry gas emanations (CO2, CH4, H2S), CO2 rich mineral water springs and bubbling pools. The long-term observation of seemingly inactive, dormant volcanoes has become important in the past years (Ontake volcano-Japan, Colli Albani volcano-Italy). Gas-geochemical survey and monitoring (noble gases, isotopic composition of carbon species, flux measurements) of such volcanoes is an adequate tool in detecting changes in their volcanic plumbing system. Starting from 2015 we commenced a gas-monitoring study to constrain the origin of fluids at Ciomadul by measuring the flux of two gas-species and collecting the gas-phase from several mofettes and mineral water springs. A total of 46 sites have been surveyed, including 29 gas emanations (mofettes and bubbling pools), 3 drilled wells, 11 springs and 3 surface water sites. We provide the first complex CO2 and CH4 flux measurements in the area considering mofettes and bubbling pools. The CO2 flux values range between 10 and 264 kg/day while the CH4 flux has a range between 125 and 4723 g/day. Estimates of total CO2 and CH4 output into the atmosphere are ~229 and ~1.3 t/year, respectively. These values are consistent with other geothermal systems in Europe. The chemical composition of samples indicate CO2 content of up to 96.77%, CH4 content up to 1.42% and He content up to

  7. Partitioning incident radiation fluxes based on photon recollision probability in vegetation canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M~Ottus, M.; Stenberg, P.

    2007-12-01

    Remote sensing of vegetation and modeling of canopy microclimate requires information on the fractions of incident radiation reflected, transmitted and absorbed by a plant canopy. The photon recollision probability p allows to calculate easily the amount of radiation absorbed by a vegetation canopy and to predict the spectral behavior of canopy scattering, i.e. the sum of canopy reflectance and transmittance. However, to divide the scattered radiation into reflected and transmitted fluxes, additional models are needed. To overcome this problem, we present a simple formula based on the photon recollision probability p to estimate the fraction of radiation scattered upwards by a canopy. The new semi-empirical method is tested with Monte Carlo simulations. A comparison with the analytical solution of the two-stream equation of radiative transfer in vegetation canopies is also provided. Our results indicate that the method is accurate for low to moderate leaf area index (LAI) values, and provides a reasonable approximation even at LAI=8. Finally, we present a new method to compute p using numerical radiative transfer models.

  8. Geochemical fluxes and weathering of volcanic terrains on high standing islands: Taranaki and Manawatu-Wanganui regions of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Steven T.; Carey, Anne E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Hicks, D. Murray

    2008-05-01

    Sediment fluxes from high standing oceanic islands (HSIs) such as New Zealand are some of the highest known [Milliman J. D. and Syvitski J. P. M. (1992) Geomorphic/tectonic control of sediment discharge to the ocean: the importance of small mountainous rivers. J. Geol.100, 525-544]. Recent geochemical work has suggested that along with their extremely high physical weathering yields, many New Zealand watersheds also have very high chemical weathering yields. In New Zealand, the magnitude of both the physical and chemical weathering yields is related to the lithology of the watershed. Most of the previous work on this topic has been undertaken in Southern Alps watersheds of schist and greywacke and in East Cape watersheds of semi-consolidated marine sediments and greywacke. We recently sampled North Island watersheds in the Taranaki and Manawatu-Wanganui regions which have been subjected to volcanism since the Miocene. We sampled watersheds that contain both volcanic and sedimentary rocks. A series of water and sediment samples was collected and analyzed for major, minor and trace elements. This was done to quantify the weathering intensities in the watersheds and to establish the relationship between physical and chemical weathering yields in volcanic lithologies. Our results reveal distinct chemical signatures for the different regions. Waters draining the Taranaki region volcanics are significantly enriched in K +, and depleted in Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ compared to waters draining the Manawatu-Wanganui region volcanics, which also traverse expanses of sedimentary siltstones and mudstones. The Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ depletions may reflect the relative absence of CaCO 3 in the Taranaki region watersheds. In addition, sediment samples from the Taranaki region show significant enrichment in Ti, Al, Ca, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, and P and depletion in Si and Rb compared to those of the Manawatu-Wanganui region. From total dissolved solids concentrations and mean annual water discharge, we

  9. Partitioning CO2 Fluxes in Transitional Bioenergy CROPS:EFFECT of Land Use Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, T.; Chen, J.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    The demand for alternatives to petroleum is increasing the production of bioenergy. Undisturbed ecosystems in different part of the globe were converted to bioenergy cultivations. In this study we examined the effect of land conversion on C Pools and fluxes using the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique in seven sites in southwestern Michigan undergoing such conversions. Of the seven sites, four had been managed for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) during the last 20 years to maintain them as grasslands. The other three were cultivated in a corn/soybean rotation. The effects of land use change were studied during 2009 when six of the fields (three CRP and three crop fields) were converted to soybean cultivation, with the 7th site remained as a grassland reference. Daytime estimates of ecosystem respiration (Reco) were obtained from the night NEE-temperature relationship. An Arrhenius-type model was used to describe the temperature dependence of Reco. The Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) was then obtained by subtracting Reco from NEE. Soil CO2 fluxes (SRR) were measured in all sites with a portable EGM-4 infrared gas analyzer (PP-Systems, UK). SRR, soil temperature, and soil moisture were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures analyses on one factor. SRR was modeled using a nonlinear regression function to describe SRR as dependant on soil temperature and soil moisture, expressed as soil water content relative to the soil water content at field capacity (RSWC). Standard errors of nonlinear regression parameters were estimated by a bootstrapping algorithm. During winter the agricultural sites were essentially carbon (C) neutral while the grasslands were C sources, with average emissions of 15 g C m-2 month-1. The annual NEP at sites converted from CRP to soybeans had a net emission of 156 (± 25) - 128 (± 27) g C m-2 year-1. The sites previously cultivated as corn/soybean rotation was a net C uptake, with NEP ranging from -91 (± 26) to -57 (± 21) g

  10. Variability in surface energy flux partitioning during Washita '92: Resulting effects on Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kustas, W.P.; Stannard, D.I.; Allwine, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Washita '92 field experiment, the local surface energy balance was evaluated at four locations in the USDA-ARS Little Washita River Watershed near Chickasha, OK, using the Bowen ratio-energy balance (BREB) approach. For any given day, differences in the partitioning of the available energy appeared to be mostly a function of the type of vegetation at the site, while the actual magnitude of the fluxes was mostly affected by cloud cover. The soil surface was initially wet, and gradually dried during the field experiment. However, there was not a corresponding decrease in the evaporative fraction, which would have indicated a decreasing contribution of soil evaporation to the total latent heat flux. Ground weather data indicated a large shift in the direction and magnitude of the surface winds, and a significant increase in air temperature and vapor pressure deficit. During this period, the evaporative fraction actually increased at two of the four sites. The response of the different sites to the changing near- surface atmospheric conditions was studied in more detail by evaluating the canopy resistance (r(c)) to evaporation using the Penman-Monteith equation and the Priestley-Taylor parameter (??). Midday averages of r(c) and (??) tended to decrease (increase) with increasing vapor pressure deficit for two of the sites while such a trend was not evident for the other two sites. Estimates of stomatal resistances indicated that significant plant physiological differences existed between the sites containing weedy vegetation versus the grasses at the pasture/rangeland sites. Even though soil moisture conditions were relatively wet, ?? was less than 1 at all sites and there was no trend in ?? as a function of surface soil moisture conditions. These findings suggest that vegetation types in mixed agricultural/rangeland ecosystems can have significantly different responses to similar atmospheric forcing conditions.

  11. Surface Energy Exchange in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest Environment: Flux Partitioning, and Seasonal and Land Cover-Related Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, F.; Alvarado-Barrientos, M. S.; González-Martínez, T.

    2015-12-01

    Relationships between seasonal climate, land cover and surface energy exchange in tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) environments are poorly understood. Yet, understanding these linkages is essential to evaluating the impacts of land use and climate change on the functioning of these unique ecosystems. In central Veracruz, Mexico, TMCF occurs between 1100 and 2500 m asl. The canopy of this forest consists of a mix of deciduous and broadleaved-evergreen tree species, the former of which shed their leaves for a short period during the dry season. The aim of this study was to quantify the surface energy balance, and seasonal variations therein, for TMCF, as well as for shaded coffee (CO) and sugarcane (SU), two important land uses that have replaced TMCF at lower elevations. Sensible (H) and latent heat (LE) fluxes were measured using eddy covariance and sap flow methods. Other measurements included: micrometeorological variables, soil heat flux, soil moisture and vegetation characteristics. Partitioning of available energy (A) into H and LE showed important seasonal changes as well as differences among land covers. During the wet-season month of July, average midday Bowen ratios for sunny days were lowest and least variable among land covers: 0.5 in TMCF and SU versus 0.7 in CO. However, because of higher A, along with lower Bowen ratio with respect to CO, LE over TMCF was ca. 20% higher compared to CO and SU. During the late dry-season months of March and April, average midday Bowen ratios for sunny days were generally much higher and more variable among land covers. The higher Bowen ratios indicated a reduction of LE under the drier conditions prevailing (low soil moisture and high VPD), something rarely observed in TMCFs. Moreover, because some trees were still partially leafless in March, LE over TMCF was about half that over CO and SU, suggesting an important effect of phenology on energy exchange of this TMCF. Observed differences between seasons and land

  12. Fluorine partitioning between hydrous minerals and aqueous fluid at 1 GPa and 770-947 °C: A new constraint on slab flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia; Koga, Kenneth T.

    2013-10-01

    Mechanisms of volatile element transfer from subducting slab to the melting region beneath arc volcanoes are probably the least understood process in arc magma genesis. Fluorine, which suffers minimal degassing in arc primitive melt inclusions, is highly enriched in arc lavas and retains information about the role of volatiles during magma genesis at depth. Experimentally determined solubility of F in aqueous fluids, and partition coefficients of F between fluid and minerals provide first order geochemical constraints about the character of the volatile-transporting agent. We present experimentally determined F solubility in fluid in equilibrium with hornblende and a humite group mineral at 1 GPa, from 770 to 947 °C, and partition coefficients between these phases. The composition of the fluid is determined by mass-balance calculations and consistency is verified by high pressure liquid chromatography measurements of the quenched fluids. The partition coefficient DFFlu /Hb can be represented by a single value of 0.13 ± 0.03. The average F concentration in the fluid is 2700 ppm for F-rich experiments, constraining the maximum amount of F carried by fluid in the presence of amphibole. Where the initial natural F concentrations in the slab are much lower than in our experiments, the increase of F concentration in the sub-arc mantle by a fluid in equilibrium with hornblende is expected to be no more than a few ppm. Thus significant arc lava F enrichments cannot result from aqueous fluids deriving from an amphibole-bearing subducting slab.

  13. Light, Soil Temperature, and VPD as controls of flux-tower NEE partitioning into gross photosynthesis and respiration in grassland and agricultural ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.

    2010-12-01

    Partitioning of the flux-tower net CO2 exchange measurements (NEE) into gross photosynthesis (Pg) and ecosystem respiration (Re) components is an essential step in post-processing flux tower data for analysis and modeling. We have developed a method of NEE = Pg - Re partitioning using photosynthetically active radiation (Q), soil temperature at 5 cm depth (Ts), and vapor pressure deficit at 2 m height (VPD) as factors in a nonrectangular hyperbolic model of net CO2 exchange in terrestrial ecosystems (Gilmanov et al. 2003, Bas. Appl. Ecol. 4: 167-183) modified to include the effect of vapor pressure deficit. In contrast to other VPD-based methods of NEE partitioning suggested in the literature, our method (i) describes combined effect of VPD on photosynthetic capacity (Amax) and apparent quantum yield (ALPHA) due to the special functional properties of the nonrectangular hyperbolic equation; (ii) delivers less biased estimates of light-response parameters due to explicit description of the convexity of the light-response compared to rectangular hyperbolic model, and (iii) generates more numerically robust and statistically significant estimates than methods using highly correlated predictors such as incoming radiation, air temperature and VPD. We demonstrate application of the method to flux-tower NEE data sets from grassland and agro-ecosystems of North America as a tool to estimate numerical values and uncertainty characteristics of productivity, respiration, and ecophysiological parameters (apparent quantum yield ALPHA, photosynthetic capacity Amax, gross ecological light-use efficiency LUE, carbon use efficiency CUE, and others). On a representative statistical material our results confirm earlier findings that gross photosynthesis estimates derived through partitioning of flux-tower NEE are significantly closer related to remote sensing indices (e.g., eMODIS NDVI) than variables directly provided by tower measurements such as day-time net CO2 flux totals. We

  14. Using an input manipulation experiment to partition greenhouse gas fluxes from a commercial Miscanthus plantation in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Andy; Davies, Christian; Smith, Pete; McNamara, Niall

    2014-05-01

    Miscanthus is a lignocellulosic C4 crop that can be grown for a number of practical end-uses but recently interest has increased in its viability as a bioenergy crop; both providing a renewable source of energy and helping to limit climate change by reducing carbon (C) emissions associated with energy generation. Recent studies have shown that Miscanthus plantations may increase stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) however there is still considerable uncertainty surrounding estimates of net C exchange and the best management practices to achieve the best greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Using an input manipulation experiment, we monitored emissions of N2O, CH4 and CO2 from living Miscanthus roots, aboveground plant litter and soil individually to quantify and partition these emissions and better understand the influence of abiotic factors on SOC and GHG dynamics under Miscanthus. In January 2009 twenty-five 2 m2 plots were set up in a three-year old 11 hectare commercial Miscanthus plantation in Lincolnshire, UK; with five replicates of five treatments. These treatments varied plant input (roots or senesced aboveground plant litter) to the soil by way of controlled exclusion techniques. The delta 13C value of soil C and CO2 emitted from each treatment was measured monthly between March 2009 and March 2013. Measurements of CH4 and N2O emissions were also taken at the soil surface from each treatment. Miscanthus-derived emissions were determined using the isotopic discrimination between C4 plant matter and C3 soil, and the treatments were compared to assess their effects on C inputs and outputs to the soil. Both CH4 and N2O emissions were below detection limits, mainly due to a lack of fertiliser additions and limited disturbance of the agricultural site. However, results for CO2 emissions indicate a strong seasonal variation; litter decomposition forms a large portion of the CO2 emissions in winter and spring whereas root respiration dominates the summer

  15. Ten years of continuous monitoring of soil CO2 flux: results and implications from the first geochemical monitoring network on Mount Etna.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, Marco; Gurrieri, Sergio; Giuffrida, Giovanni; Gaetano, Giudice; Cappuzzo, Santino

    2013-04-01

    Throughout the Mediterranean area, Mt. Etna is well known for its frequent eruptions and considerable lava flows, being, among all of the basaltic volcanoes, one of the most active in the world. The frequent activity of the last two decades has induced the scientific community and the Civil Defence to pay more attention to the surveillance of the volcano and, in view of this, a diverse range of monitoring systems have been developed, making Mt. Etna one of the most intensively studied volcanoes in the world. The measurement of soil CO2 flux for the purpose of identifying a possible correlation between CO2 flux variations and volcanic activity has been carried out for a long time on several active volcanoes around the world. Whilst almost all of these measurements have been made using direct sampling methods in the field, various kinds of automatic devices have more recently been developed to record real-time data, allowing a continuous remote monitoring of volcanic areas. On Mt. Etna the first network of continuous monitoring of geochemical parameters was developed in 2002 by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) of Palermo to monitor CO2 flux from the soil (EtnaGAS network) and was installed at various sites (18 in total) on the flanks of Mt. Etna. The very large quantity of soil CO2 flux data recorded by the network, during which several interesting eruptive phenomena took place, has provided the possibility to make an extensive statistical analysis, the outcome of which strongly suggests that anomalous measurements of CO2 flux was attributable to a volcanic origin and, in almost all cases, preceded the onset of volcanic activity. Here we present an interpretative model of the expected behaviour of CO2 flux from the soil (in terms of cycles of increase-decrease) during and between eruptions, and the actual data-series recorded by EtnaGAS which we found corresponded well with our model. A comparative multidisciplinary approach, incorporating

  16. Spatial and temporal geochemical trends in the hydrothermal system of Yellowstone National Park: Inferences from river solute fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Heasler, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale spatial heterogeneity in the inputs of the various solutes. The data also display non-uniform temporal trends; whereas solute concentrations and fluxes are nearly constant during base-flow conditions, concentrations decrease, solute fluxes increase, and HCO3-/Cl-, and SO42-/Cl- increase during the late-spring high-flow period. HCO3-/SO42- decreases with increasing discharge in the Madison and Falls Rivers, but increases with discharge in the Yellowstone and Snake Rivers. The non-linear relations between solute concentrations and river discharge and the change in anion ratios associated with spring runoff are explained by mixing between two components: (1) a component that is discharged during base-flow conditions and (2) a component associated with snow-melt runoff characterized by higher HCO3-/Cl- and SO42-/Cl-. The fraction of the second component is greater in the Yellowstone and Snake Rivers, which host lakes in their drainage basins and where a large fraction of the solute flux follows thaw of ice cover in the spring months. Although the total river HCO3- flux is larger than the flux of other solutes (HCO3-/Cl- ??? 3), the CO2 equivalent flux is only ??? 1% of the estimated emission of magmatic CO2 soil emissions from Yellowstone. No anomalous solute flux in response to perturbations in the hydrothermal system was observed, possibly because gage locations are too distant from areas of disturbance, or because of the relatively low sampling frequency. In order to detect changes in river hydrothermal solute fluxes, sampling at higher

  17. Geochemical insights to the formation of "sedimentary buffers": Considering the role of tributary-trunk stream interactions on catchment-scale sediment flux and drainage network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryirs, Kirstie; Gore, Damian B.

    2014-08-01

    The concept of disconnectivity (or decoupling) of sediment movement in river systems is an important concept in analyses of sediment flux in catchments. At the catchment scale, various blockages-termed buffers, barriers and blankets-form along the sediment cascade, interrupting the conveyance of sediments downstream. Long-lived buffers can control aspects of catchment sediment flux for an extended period. The upper Hunter catchment has a highly disconnected sediment cascade. The most highly disconnected subcatchment (Dart Brook) contains a distinct type of buffer, a trapped tributary fill, in its downstream reaches, reducing the effective catchment area of the upper Hunter catchment by ~ 18%. We test the use of elemental analyses provided by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry of homogenous sediment profiles taken from floodplain bank exposures to determine that the geochemical composition of the sediments that make up this trapped-tributary fill system have been derived from two distinct source areas (the tributary system and the trunk stream). Over at least the Holocene, sedimentation along the axis of the Hunter River valley (the trunk stream) has formed an impediment to sediment conveyance along the lower tributary catchment, essentially "trapping" the tributary. We present an evolutionary model of how this type of "blockage" has formed and discuss implications of tributary-trunk stream (dis)connectivity in analysis of catchment-scale sediment flux and drainage network dynamics. In this case, a relatively large tributary network is having a "geomorphically insignificant" impact on trunk stream dynamics.

  18. Evidence for Niche Partitioning Revealed by the Distribution of Sulfur Oxidation Genes Collected from Areas of a Terrestrial Sulfidic Spring with Differing Geochemical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Annette Summers

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and phylogenetic significance of bacterial genes in the environment has been well studied, but comparatively little attention has been devoted to understanding the functional significance of different variations of the same metabolic gene that occur in the same environment. We analyzed the geographic distribution of 16S rRNA pyrosequences and soxB genes along a geochemical gradient in a terrestrial sulfidic spring to identify how different taxonomic variations of the soxB gene were naturally distributed within the spring outflow channel and to identify possible evidence for altered SoxB enzyme function in nature. Distinct compositional differences between bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the Paracoccus sulfide oxidation pathway (e.g., Bradyrhizobium, Paracoccus, and Rhodovulum) and bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the branched pathway (e.g., Chlorobium, Thiothrix, Thiobacillus, Halothiobacillus, and Thiomonas) were identified. Different variations of the soxB genes were present at different locations within the spring outflow channel in a manner that significantly corresponded to geochemical conditions. The distribution of the different soxB gene sequence variations suggests that the enzymes encoded by these genes are functionally different and could be optimized to specific geochemical conditions that define niche space for bacteria capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur compounds. PMID:23220955

  19. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Stolyar, Sergey M; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Kucek, Leo A; Brown, Roslyn N; Lipton, Mary S; Osterman, Andrei; Fredrickson, Jim K; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Reed, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC) share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When growth is limited by the flux through photosystem I, terminal respiratory oxidases are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess reductant. Similarly, under photosystem II flux limitation, excess electron carriers must be removed via cyclic electron transport. Furthermore, in silico calculations were in good quantitative agreement with the measured growth rates whereas predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, which we used to further improve the resolution of intracellular flux values.

  20. Interactions of Cd and Cu in anaerobic estuarine sediments. 2: Bioavailability, body burdens and respiration effects as related to geochemical partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, J.H.; Alden, R.W. III

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between Cd and Cu distribution in sediment geochemical fractions and their bioavailability was studied. A fine-sandy textured estuarine sediment was treated with all combinations of 0, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg Cd and 0, 12, and 25 mg/kg Cu using the chloride salts of each metal. Grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) were exposed to the treated sediments in aquaria with 20 ppt artificial seawater for 14 d. Sediments were sequentially extracted before and after organism exposure to determine the exchangeable, easily reducible, organic-sulfide, moderately reducible, and acid extractable phases. Low mortalities were observed for all organism types and none were attributable to any of the treatments. The Cd and Cu concentrations in the easily reducible and organic-sulfide phases were found to be significantly related to the bioavailability of these metals. The most highly significant relationship was established between Cd in the easily reducible phase and body burden of Cd in the blue mussel. Notable interactions were found between Cd and Cu in some of the geochemical phases, body burdens, and respiration rates. Metal uptake, respiration, and interactions were highly dependent on the test species. A significant correlation was found between increased body burden and depressed respiration for Cd but not for Cu. Multiple regression models are used to describe these relationships. It appears that the interactive responses in the organisms are driven primarily by the sediment geochemical effects and mediated by individual organism processes. These results underscore the necessity of multicomponent (multielement) studies in assessing the fate and effects of toxic elements in the environment.

  1. Environment and phenology: CO2 net ecosystem exchange and CO2 flux partitioning at an acid and oligotrophic mire system in northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gažovič, Michal; Peichl, Matthias; Vermeij, Ilse; Limpens, Juul; Nilsson, Mats. B.

    2015-04-01

    Static chamber and environmental measurements in combination with vegetation indices (i.e. vascular green area (VGA) and the greenness chromatic color index (gcc) derived from digital camera images) were used to investigate effects of environment and phenology on the CO2 net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and CO2 flux partitioning at the Degerö Stormyr site in northern Sweden (64°11' 23.565" N, 19°33' 55.291 E) during two environmentally different years. Our measurement design included a control plot, a moss plot (where vascular plants were removed by clipping) and four heterotrophic respiration (RH) collars (where all green moss and vascular plant biomass were removed) to partition between soil heterotrophic and plant autotrophic (moss and vascular plants) respiration (RA), as well as between moss and vascular plant gross primary production (GPP). Environmental conditions, especially the shallow snow cover, peat soil frost and cold spring in 2014 caused delayed onset of spring green up, reduced soil respiration flux and reduced GPP of vascular plants. Soil temperature measured in 26 cm depth started to rise from spring temperatures of ~ 0.6 °C in 2013 and 0.15 °C in 2014 about 20 days earlier in 2013 compared to 2014. With earlier onset of the growing season and higher soil temperatures in 2013, heterotrophic soil respiration was higher in year 2013 than in year 2014. In 2013, RH dominated the total ecosystem respiration in all months but June and August. On contrary, autotrophic respiration dominated ecosystem respiration in all months of 2014. In both years, vascular plants and mosses were more or less equally contributing to autotrophic respiration. We measured higher GPP in year 2013 compared to year 2014. Also VGA and gcc were higher in spring and throughout the rest of 2013 compared to 2014. The onset of VGA was delayed by ~ 10 days in 2014. In general, total GPP was dominated by GPP of vascular plants in both years, although moss GPP had substantial

  2. Mapping surface energy flux partitioning at large scales with optical and microwave remote sensing data from Washita '92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, William P.; Zhan, Xiwu; Jackson, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    A model evaluating the energy balance of the soil/substrate and vegetation (i.e., two-source) was applied to remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture maps generated from passive microwave data collected during the Washita '92 experiment. Model parameters were derived from a soil texture and a land-use/land cover database along with a normalized difference vegetation index map created from a SPOT satellite image. The Bowen ratio (BO, ratio of sensible to latent heat flux) was used for investigating the temporal and spatial variability in model output. Comparisons between predicted and observed heat fluxes were made with values summed over the daytime period. Daily maps of midday BO indicated areas with low vegetation cover or bare soil and senescent vegetation were drying out significantly (i.e., dramatic increases in BO), while other areas with higher vegetation cover showed smaller increases in BO in response to a drying soil surface. This result agrees with the profile soil moisture and surface flux observations indicating adequate moisture was available to the vegetation for meeting atmospheric demand. The predicted daytime fluxes agreed to within 1 mm of the observations with ≈25% difference between modeled and observed daytime evapotranspiration. Differences between modeled and measured surface temperatures averaged ≈2 K. The discrepancies between model output and observations are similar to the uncertainty in these measurements, indicating that the model provided reliable daytime energy flux maps for the Washita '92 study area using remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture.

  3. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Trang; Stolyar, Sergey; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-04-05

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC) share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When photosystem II flux is high, terminal oxidases of respiratory electron transport are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess electrons. When photosystem I flux is high cyclic electron transport becomes important. Model predictions of growth rates were in good quantitative agreement with measured growth rates, and predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, when these latter datasets were used to constrain the model.

  4. Genome-Scale Modeling of Light-Driven Reductant Partitioning and Carbon Fluxes in Diazotrophic Unicellular Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Trang; Stolyar, Sergey; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-04-05

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC) share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When photosystem II flux is high, terminal oxidases of respiratory electron transport are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess electrons. When photosystem I flux is high cyclic electron transport becomes important. Model predictions of growth rates were in good quantitative agreement with measured growth rates, and predictions of reaction usage were ualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, when these latter datasets were used to constrain the model.

  5. Solid phase evolution in the Biosphere 2 hillslope experiment as predicted by modeling of hydrologic and geochemical fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Dontsova, K.; Steefel, C.I.; Desilets, S.; Thompson, A.; Chorover, J.

    2009-07-15

    A reactive transport geochemical modeling study was conducted to help predict the mineral transformations occurring over a ten year time-scale that are expected to impact soil hydraulic properties in the Biosphere 2 (B2) synthetic hillslope experiment. The modeling sought to predict the rate and extent of weathering of a granular basalt (selected for hillslope construction) as a function of climatic drivers, and to assess the feedback effects of such weathering processes on the hydraulic properties of the hillslope. Flow vectors were imported from HYDRUS into a reactive transport code, CrunchFlow2007, which was then used to model mineral weathering coupled to reactive solute transport. Associated particle size evolution was translated into changes in saturated hydraulic conductivity using Rosetta software. We found that flow characteristics, including velocity and saturation, strongly influenced the predicted extent of incongruent mineral weathering and neo-phase precipitation on the hillslope. Results were also highly sensitive to specific surface areas of the soil media, consistent with surface reaction controls on dissolution. Effects of fluid flow on weathering resulted in significant differences in the prediction of soil particle size distributions, which should feedback to alter hillslope hydraulic conductivities.

  6. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Mottl, Michael J.

    2000-02-01

    by compilations of data from other ridge-flank sites, which show a systematic relationship between inferred basement water composition and temperature. We use the Baby Bare spring waters along with constraints from the riverine flux of Mg to estimate upper limits on the global fluxes of 14 elements at warm ridge-flank sites such as Baby Bare. Maximum calculated fluxes of Mg, Ca, sulfate, B, and K may equal or exceed 25% of the riverine flux, and such sites may represent the missing, high K/Rb sink required for the K budget. Additional fluxes from/to the crust on ridge flanks are expected from cool (<20-25°C) hydrothermal sites.

  7. Three-source-partitioning of soil carbon pools and fluxes and priming effects induced by carbohydrates of different availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, E.; Khomyakov, N.; Myachina, O.; Blagodatsky, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is not uniform and includes: 1) fresh input of plant-derived organics, i.e. root exudates and rhizodeposits, 2) partially decomposed plant residues and 3) old humus material. The partitioning of these three carbon sources in soil C pools (microbial biomass and dissolved organic matter) and quantification of their contributions in soil CO2 ?uxes is a current challenge in soil science aiming to reveal the C pathways and drivers in terrestrial ecosystems. We applied uniformly labeled 14C-cellulose and 14C-glucose (as low and easily available substrates, respectively) in Ap of loamy Haplic Luvisol developed under C3 vegetation. Miscanthus x giganteus (Greef et Deu) - a perennial C4 plant - was grown for 12 years before the experiment with glucose/cellulose addition. Natural differences in the abundance of 13C between C4 and C3 plants were used to distinguish between old SOC (> 12 years) and recent Miscanthus-derived C (< 12 years). This enabled us to estimate mechanisms and sources of priming effects (PE) during decomposition of applied substrates with varying availability. The real and apparent priming effects were distinguished by partitioning of microbial C for substrate-C and SOM-derived C. Microbial specific growth rates and activity of hydrolytic enzymes were determined to reveal the mechanisms of real PEs. Both short-term apparent and long-term real PEs were induces by glucose, while the cellulose input caused only real PE. Remarkably, the shift to the domination of slow-growing microorganisms was observed during real PEs independently of substrate quality. This is the first direct confirmation of the hypothesized presumable contribution of K-strategists to real priming. 2.5-3 times increase in beta-glucosidase and phosphatase activity coupled with real PE in soil treated with glucose indicated that strong limitation and microbial starvation after glucose consumption caused the PE. Contrary to that the 75% increase in cellobiohydrolase

  8. Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange.

    PubMed

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra C; Costa E Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Joao S; Werner, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Semi-arid ecosystems contribute about 40% to global net primary production (GPP) even though water is a major factor limiting carbon uptake. Evapotranspiration (ET) accounts for up to 95% of the water loss and in addition, vegetation can also mitigate drought effects by altering soil water distribution. Hence, partitioning of carbon and water fluxes between the soil and vegetation components is crucial to gain mechanistic understanding of vegetation effects on carbon and water cycling. However, the possible impact of herbaceous vegetation in savanna type ecosystems is often overlooked. Therefore, we aimed at quantifying understory vegetation effects on the water balance and productivity of a Mediterranean oak savanna. ET and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) were partitioned based on flux and stable oxygen isotope measurements and also rain infiltration was estimated. The understory vegetation contributed importantly to total ecosystem ET and GPP with a maximum of 43 and 51%, respectively. It reached water-use efficiencies (WUE; ratio of carbon gain by water loss) similar to cork-oak trees. The understory vegetation inhibited soil evaporation (E) and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish WUE during water-limited times. The understory strongly increased soil water infiltration, specifically following major rain events. At the same time, the understory itself was vulnerable to drought, which led to an earlier senescence of the understory growing under trees as compared to open areas, due to competition for water. Thus, beneficial understory effects are dominant and contribute to the resilience of this ecosystem. At the same time the vulnerability of the understory to drought suggests that future climate change scenarios for the Mediterranean basin threaten understory development. This in turn will very likely diminish beneficial understory effects like infiltration and ground water recharge and therefore ecosystem resilience to drought. PMID

  9. Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange.

    PubMed

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra C; Costa E Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Joao S; Werner, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Semi-arid ecosystems contribute about 40% to global net primary production (GPP) even though water is a major factor limiting carbon uptake. Evapotranspiration (ET) accounts for up to 95% of the water loss and in addition, vegetation can also mitigate drought effects by altering soil water distribution. Hence, partitioning of carbon and water fluxes between the soil and vegetation components is crucial to gain mechanistic understanding of vegetation effects on carbon and water cycling. However, the possible impact of herbaceous vegetation in savanna type ecosystems is often overlooked. Therefore, we aimed at quantifying understory vegetation effects on the water balance and productivity of a Mediterranean oak savanna. ET and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) were partitioned based on flux and stable oxygen isotope measurements and also rain infiltration was estimated. The understory vegetation contributed importantly to total ecosystem ET and GPP with a maximum of 43 and 51%, respectively. It reached water-use efficiencies (WUE; ratio of carbon gain by water loss) similar to cork-oak trees. The understory vegetation inhibited soil evaporation (E) and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish WUE during water-limited times. The understory strongly increased soil water infiltration, specifically following major rain events. At the same time, the understory itself was vulnerable to drought, which led to an earlier senescence of the understory growing under trees as compared to open areas, due to competition for water. Thus, beneficial understory effects are dominant and contribute to the resilience of this ecosystem. At the same time the vulnerability of the understory to drought suggests that future climate change scenarios for the Mediterranean basin threaten understory development. This in turn will very likely diminish beneficial understory effects like infiltration and ground water recharge and therefore ecosystem resilience to drought.

  10. Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange

    PubMed Central

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra C.; Costa e Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Joao S.; Werner, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Semi-arid ecosystems contribute about 40% to global net primary production (GPP) even though water is a major factor limiting carbon uptake. Evapotranspiration (ET) accounts for up to 95% of the water loss and in addition, vegetation can also mitigate drought effects by altering soil water distribution. Hence, partitioning of carbon and water fluxes between the soil and vegetation components is crucial to gain mechanistic understanding of vegetation effects on carbon and water cycling. However, the possible impact of herbaceous vegetation in savanna type ecosystems is often overlooked. Therefore, we aimed at quantifying understory vegetation effects on the water balance and productivity of a Mediterranean oak savanna. ET and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) were partitioned based on flux and stable oxygen isotope measurements and also rain infiltration was estimated. The understory vegetation contributed importantly to total ecosystem ET and GPP with a maximum of 43 and 51%, respectively. It reached water-use efficiencies (WUE; ratio of carbon gain by water loss) similar to cork-oak trees. The understory vegetation inhibited soil evaporation (E) and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish WUE during water-limited times. The understory strongly increased soil water infiltration, specifically following major rain events. At the same time, the understory itself was vulnerable to drought, which led to an earlier senescence of the understory growing under trees as compared to open areas, due to competition for water. Thus, beneficial understory effects are dominant and contribute to the resilience of this ecosystem. At the same time the vulnerability of the understory to drought suggests that future climate change scenarios for the Mediterranean basin threaten understory development. This in turn will very likely diminish beneficial understory effects like infiltration and ground water recharge and therefore ecosystem resilience to drought. PMID

  11. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: Global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, C.G.; Mottl, M.J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The authors have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO{sub 2}, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58 C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes form seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. The authors use the Baby Bare spring water to estimate upper limits on the global fluxes of 14 elements at warm ridge-flank sites such as Baby Bare. Maximum calculated fluxes of Mg, Ca, sulfate, B, and K may equal or exceed 25% of the riverine flux, and such sites may represent the missing, high K/Rb sink required for the K budget.

  12. GPP/RE Partitioning of Long-term Network Flux Data as a Tool for Estimating Ecosystem-scale Ecophysiological Parameters of Grasslands and Croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.; Wylie, B. K.; Gu, Y.; Howard, D. M.; Zhang, L.

    2013-12-01

    The physiologically based model of canopy CO2 exchange by Thornly and Johnson (2000) modified to incorporate vapor pressure deficit (VPD) limitation of photosynthesis is a robust tool for partitioning tower network net CO2 exchange data into gross photosynthesis (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE) (Gilmanov et al. 2013a, b). In addition to 30-min and daily photosynthesis and respiration values, the procedure generates daily estimates and uncertainties of essential ecosystem-scale parameters such as apparent quantum yield ALPHA, photosynthetic capacity AMAX, convexity of light response THETA, gross ecological light-use efficiency LUE, daytime ecosystem respiration rate RDAY, and nighttime ecosystem respiration rate RNIGHT. These ecosystem-scale parameters are highly demanded by the modeling community and open opportunities for comparison with the rich data of leaf-level estimates of corresponding parameters available from physiological studies of previous decades. Based on the data for 70+ site-years of flux tower measurements at the non-forest sites of the Ameriflux network and the non-affiliated sites, we present results of the comparative analysis and multi-site synthesis of the magnitudes, uncertainties, patterns of seasonal and yearly dynamics, and spatiotemporal distribution of these parameters for grasslands and croplands of the conterminous United States (CONUS). Combining this site-level parameter data set with the rich spatiotemporal data sets of a remotely sensed vegetation index, weather and climate conditions, and site biophysical and geophysical features (phenology, photosynthetically active radiation, and soil water holding capacity) using methods of multivariate analysis (e.g., Cubist regression tree) offers new opportunities for predictive modeling and scaling-up of ecosystem-scale parameters of carbon cycling in grassland and agricultural ecosystems of CONUS (Zhang et al. 2011; Gu et al. 2012). REFERENCES Gilmanov TG, Baker JM, Bernacchi CJ

  13. Temporal and Spatial Variability in the Partitioning and Flux of Riverine Iron Delivered to the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, A. W.; Crusius, J.; Kroeger, K. D.; Hoyer, I. R.; Osburn, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is a micronutrient that is thought to limit phytoplankton productivity in offshore waters of the Gulf of Alaska (GoA). However, it has been proposed that in coastal regions where offshore, Fe-limited, nitrate-rich waters mix with relatively Fe-rich river plumes, productive ecosystems and fisheries result. Indeed, an observed northward increase in phytoplankton biomass along the pacific coast of North America has been attributed to higher input of riverine Fe to coastal waters, suggesting that many of the coastal ecosystems of the North Pacific rely heavily on this input of Fe as a nutrient source. Based on our studies of the Copper River (the largest point source of freshwater to the GoA) and its tributaries, it is clear that riverine Fe delivered to the GoA is primarily derived from fine glacial flour generated by glacial weathering, which imparts a unique partitioning of Fe species and Fe size fractionation in coastal river plumes. Furthermore, the distribution of Fe species and size fractionation exhibits significant seasonal and spatial variability based on the source of iron within the watershed, which varies from glacial mechanical weathering of bedrock to internal chemical processing in portions of watersheds with forest and wetland land covers. These findings are relevant to our understanding of the GoA biogeochemical system as it exists today and can help to predict how the system may evolve as glaciers within the GoA watershed continue to recede.

  14. Geochemical Analyses of Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition Over a Proposed Carbon Sequestration Site in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Parris; Michael Solis; Kathryn Takacs

    2009-12-31

    Using soil gas chemistry to detect leakage from underground reservoirs (i.e. microseepage) requires that the natural range of soil gas flux and chemistry be fully characterized. To meet this need, soil gas flux (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and the bulk (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and isotopic chemistry ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) of shallow soil gases (<1 m, 3.3 ft) were measured at 25 locations distributed among two active oil and gas fields, an active strip mine, and a relatively undisturbed research forest in eastern Kentucky. The measurements apportion the biologic, atmospheric, and geologic influences on soil gas composition under varying degrees of human surface disturbance. The measurements also highlight potential challenges in using soil gas chemistry as a monitoring tool where the surface cover consists of reclaimed mine land or is underlain by shallow coals. For example, enrichment of ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) and high CH{sub 4} concentrations in soils have been historically used as indicators of microseepage, but in the reclaimed mine lands similar soil chemistry characteristics likely result from dissolution of carbonate cement in siliciclastic clasts having {delta}{sup 13}C values close to 0{per_thousand} and degassing of coal fragments. The gases accumulate in the reclaimed mine land soils because intense compaction reduces soil permeability, thereby impeding equilibration with the atmosphere. Consequently, the reclaimed mine lands provide a false microseepage anomaly. Further potential challenges arise from low permeability zones associated with compacted soils in reclaimed mine lands and shallow coals in undisturbed areas that might impede upward gas migration. To investigate the effect of these materials on gas migration and composition, four 10 m (33 ft) deep monitoring wells were drilled in reclaimed mine material and in undisturbed soils with and without coals. The wells, configured with sampling zones at discrete intervals, show the persistence of some of the

  15. The 2014 Effusive eruption of Stromboli Volcano: The observed geochemical variations of soil CO2 fluxes and PCO2 in the thermal waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Vita, Fabio; Mazot, Agnes; Jacome Paz, Marianna Patricia; Cangemi, Marianna; Sollami, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    The Stromboli volcano, the more active of the Aeolian Archipelago, is characterized by an open conduct degassing system with a continuous explosive activity every 20-30'. In the recent years, effusive activities occurred in 1985, 2002-2003, 2007 and in 2014 while paroxysmal events have taken place only on 5th April 2003 and 15th March 2007. The geochemical monitoring program has been carried out through routine thermal well sampling (COA well) and continuous soil CO2 flux measurements on the summit of the volcano (STR02). The long time series of CO2 fluxes acquired in 1999-2008 period led to the identification of three classes of degassing Low (< 4000 g m-2 d-1), Normal (4000-10,000 g m-2 d-1) and High (> 10,000 g m-2 d-1). The data of soil CO2 fluxes in the 2010-2012 period showed a sustained degassing with daily average values almost always higher than the 10,000 g m-2 d-1. During the end 2012-begin 2013 a new trend in increase of soil CO2 flux was recorded with fluxes up to 20,000 g m-2 d-1. It is very interesting to note that the COA well showed an increase of the dissolved CO2 concentration from 60 to 200 cc/l STP recorded from the end of the eruption 2007 to mid-2010. Then, after a slight decrease in dissolved CO2 concentration of around 90 cc/l STP (December 2010), there was a new trend in growth, up to values of about 160 cc/l STP (April 2013). This continuous growth trend of the partial pressure of CO2 in the thermal aquifer, corroborates abnormal soil CO2 fluxes recorded at the summit of the volcano, supporting the hypothesis of a continuous process of pressurization of the volcanic system. On 7 August a new fracture opened at 650 m a.s.l., and lava moved down along the Sciara del Fuoco, reaching the sea; concurrently, persistent explosive activity ceased. On 28 October the lava flow abruptly decreased, until 13-17 November, when the effusion ceased. Six soil CO2 campaign to estimate the total output discharged from the summit area of Stromboli was

  16. Geochemical partitioning and pollution assessment of Ni and V as indicator of oil pollution in surface sediments from Shadegan wildlife refuge, Iran.

    PubMed

    Chaharlang, Behnam Heidari; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Mohammadi, Jahangard; Farshchi, Parvin

    2016-10-15

    The total concentrations and chemical partitioning of Ni, V and Fe have been assessed in surface sediments from 160 sites along the Shadegan wildlife refuge. The results showed that the average total level of Ni, V and Fe in surface sediments were 45.08±12.09, 25.25±20.8 and 25,979.01±6917.91μg/g dw, respectively. On the average, the chemical speciation of Ni, V and Fe in most stations were in the order of residual>oxidisable-organic>acid-reducible>exchangeable. In all fractions, the residual was accounted the highest proportion for the metals analyzed. Among the non-residual phases, the proportion of heavy metals in organic matter fraction was higher than other phases collected from all locations. The comparison between measured values in this study and some fresh water sediment quality guidelines indicated that the levels of nickel would be expected to sporadically cause harmful biological impacts on biota in the Shadegan wildlife refuge. PMID:27546735

  17. Geochemical partitioning and pollution assessment of Ni and V as indicator of oil pollution in surface sediments from Shadegan wildlife refuge, Iran.

    PubMed

    Chaharlang, Behnam Heidari; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Mohammadi, Jahangard; Farshchi, Parvin

    2016-10-15

    The total concentrations and chemical partitioning of Ni, V and Fe have been assessed in surface sediments from 160 sites along the Shadegan wildlife refuge. The results showed that the average total level of Ni, V and Fe in surface sediments were 45.08±12.09, 25.25±20.8 and 25,979.01±6917.91μg/g dw, respectively. On the average, the chemical speciation of Ni, V and Fe in most stations were in the order of residual>oxidisable-organic>acid-reducible>exchangeable. In all fractions, the residual was accounted the highest proportion for the metals analyzed. Among the non-residual phases, the proportion of heavy metals in organic matter fraction was higher than other phases collected from all locations. The comparison between measured values in this study and some fresh water sediment quality guidelines indicated that the levels of nickel would be expected to sporadically cause harmful biological impacts on biota in the Shadegan wildlife refuge.

  18. Rising Mean Annual Temperature Increases Carbon Flux and Alters Partitioning, but Does Not Change Ecosystem Carbon Storage in Hawaiian Tropical Montane Wet Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.; Selmants, P.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem carbon (C) storage exceeds that in the atmosphere by a factor of four, and represents a dynamic balance among C input, allocation, and loss. This balance is likely being altered by climate change, but the response of terrestrial C cycling to warming remains poorly quantified, particularly in tropical forests which play a disproportionately large role in the global C cycle. Over the past five years, we have quantified above- and belowground C pools and fluxes in nine permanent plots spanning a 5.2°C mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient (13-18.2°C) in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forest. This elevation gradient is unique in that substrate type and age, soil type, soil water balance, canopy vegetation, and disturbance history are constant, allowing us to isolate the impact of long-term, whole ecosystem warming on C input, allocation, loss and storage. Across the gradient, soil respiration, litterfall, litter decomposition, total belowground C flux, aboveground net primary productivity, and estimates of gross primary production (GPP) all increase linearly and positively with MAT. Carbon partitioning is dynamic, shifting from below- to aboveground with warming, likely in response to a warming-induced increase in the cycling and availability of soil nutrients. In contrast to observed patterns in C flux, live biomass C, soil C, and total ecosystem C pools remained remarkably constant with MAT. There was also no difference in soil bacterial taxon richness, phylogenetic diversity, or community composition with MAT. Taken together these results indicate that in tropical montane wet forests, increased temperatures in the absence of water limitation or disturbance will accelerate C cycling, will not alter ecosystem C storage, and will shift the products of photosynthesis from below- to aboveground. These results agree with an increasing number of studies, and collectively provide a unique insight into anticipated warming-induced changes in tropical

  19. The Gas Transfer through Polar Sea ice experiment: Insights into the rates and pathways that determine geochemical fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovely, A.; Loose, B.; Schlosser, P.; McGillis, W.; Zappa, C.; Perovich, D.; Brown, S.; Morell, T.; Hsueh, D.; Friedrich, R.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice is a defining feature of the polar marine environment. It is a critical domain for marine biota and it regulates ocean-atmosphere exchange, including the exchange of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. In this study, we determined the rates and pathways that govern gas transport through a mixed sea ice cover. N2O, SF6, 3He, 4He, and Ne were used as gas tracers of the exchange processes that take place at the ice-water and air-water interfaces in a laboratory sea ice experiment. Observation of the changes in gas concentrations during freezing revealed that He is indeed more soluble in ice than in water; Ne is less soluble in ice, and the larger gases (N2O and SF6) are mostly excluded during the freezing process. Model estimates of gas diffusion through ice were calibrated using measurements of bulk gas content in ice cores, yielding gas transfer velocity through ice (kice) of ˜5 × 10-4 m d-1. In comparison, the effective air-sea gas transfer velocities (keff) ranged up to 0.33 m d-1 providing further evidence that very little mixed-layer ventilation takes place via gas diffusion through columnar sea ice. However, this ventilation is distinct from air-ice gas fluxes driven by sea ice biogeochemistry. The magnitude of keff showed a clear increasing trend with wind speed and current velocity beneath the ice, as well as the combination of the two. This result indicates that gas transfer cannot be uniquely predicted by wind speed alone in the presence of sea ice.

  20. Whole-plant and organ-level nitrogen isotope discrimination indicates modification of partitioning of assimilation, fluxes and allocation of nitrogen in knockout lines of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kalcsits, Lee A; Guy, Robert D

    2013-10-01

    The nitrogen isotope composition (δ¹⁵N) of plants has potential to provide time-integrated information on nitrogen uptake, assimilation and allocation. Here, we take advantage of existing T-DNA and γ-ray mutant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana to modify whole-plant and organ-level nitrogen isotope composition. Nitrate reductase 2 (nia2), nitrate reductase 1 (nia1) and nitrate transporter (nrt2) mutant lines and the Col-0 wild type were grown hydroponically under steady-state NO₃⁻ conditions at either 100 or 1000 μM NO₃⁻ for 35 days. There were no significant effects on whole-plant discrimination and growth in the assimilatory mutants (nia2 and nia1). Pronounced root vs leaf differences in δ¹⁵N, however, indicated that nia2 had an increased proportion of nitrogen assimilation of NO₃⁻ in leaves while nia1 had an increased proportion of assimilation in roots. These observations are consistent with reported ratios of nia1 and nia2 gene expression levels in leaves and roots. Greater whole-plant discrimination in nrt2 indicated an increase in efflux of unassimilated NO₃⁻ back to the rooting medium. This phenotype was associated with an overall reduction in NO₃⁻ uptake, assimilation and decreased partitioning of NO₃⁻ assimilation to the leaves, presumably because of decreased symplastic intercellular movement of NO₃⁻ in the root. Although the results were more varied than expected, they are interpretable within the context of expected mechanisms of whole-plant and organ-level nitrogen isotope discrimination that indicate variation in nitrogen fluxes, assimilation and allocation between lines.

  1. In-vitro permeability of the human nail and of a keratin membrane from bovine hooves: influence of the partition coefficient octanol/water and the water solubility of drugs on their permeability and maximum flux.

    PubMed

    Mertin, D; Lippold, B C

    1997-01-01

    Penetration of homologous nicotinic acid esters through the human nail and a keratin membrane from bovine hooves was investigated by modified Franz diffusion cells in-vitro to study the transport mechanism. The partition coefficient octanol/water PCOct/W of the esters was over the range 7 to > 51,000. The permeability coefficient P of the nail plate as well as the hoof membrane did not increase with increasing partition coefficient or lipophilicity of the penetrating substance. This indicates that both barriers behave like hydrophilic gel membranes rather than lipophilic partition membranes as in the case of the stratum corneum. Penetration studies with the model compounds paracetamol and phenacetin showed that the maximum flux was first a function of the drug solubility in water or in the swollen keratin matrix. Dissociation hindered the diffusion of benzoic acid and pyridine through the hoof membrane. Since keratin, a protein with an isoelectric point of about 5, is also charged, this reduction can be attributed to an exclusion of the dissociating substance due to the Donnan equilibrium. Nevertheless, the simultaneous enhancement of the water solubility makes a distinct increase of the maximum flux possible. In order to screen drugs for potential topical application to the nail plate, attention has to be paid mainly to the water solubility of the compound. The bovine hoof membrane may serve as an appropriate model for the nail.

  2. Partition search

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    We introduce a new form of game search called partition search that incorporates dependency analysis, allowing substantial reductions in the portion of the tree that needs to be expanded. Both theoretical results and experimental data are presented. For the game of bridge, partition search provides approximately as much of an improvement over existing methods as {alpha}-{beta} pruning provides over minimax.

  3. Assessing the Accuracy and Precision of Inorganic Geochemical Data Produced through Flux Fusion and Acid Digestions: Multiple (60+) Comprehensive Analyses of BHVO-2 and the Development of Improved "Accepted" Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Scudder, R.; Dunlea, A. G.; Anderson, C. H.; Murray, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    The use of geological standard reference materials (SRMs) to assess both the accuracy and the reproducibility of geochemical data is a vital consideration in determining the major and trace element abundances of geologic, oceanographic, and environmental samples. Calibration curves commonly are generated that are predicated on accurate analyses of these SRMs. As a means to verify the robustness of these calibration curves, a SRM can also be run as an unknown item (i.e., not included as a data point in the calibration). The experimentally derived composition of the SRM can thus be compared to the certified (or otherwise accepted) value. This comparison gives a direct measure of the accuracy of the method used. Similarly, if the same SRM is analyzed as an unknown over multiple analytical sessions, the external reproducibility of the method can be evaluated. Two common bulk digestion methods used in geochemical analysis are flux fusion and acid digestion. The flux fusion technique is excellent at ensuring complete digestion of a variety of sample types, is quick, and does not involve much use of hazardous acids. However, this technique is hampered by a high amount of total dissolved solids and may be accompanied by an increased analytical blank for certain trace elements. On the other hand, acid digestion (using a cocktail of concentrated nitric, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids) provides an exceptionally clean digestion with very low analytical blanks. However, this technique results in a loss of Si from the system and may compromise results for a few other elements (e.g., Ge). Our lab uses flux fusion for the determination of major elements and a few key trace elements by ICP-ES, while acid digestion is used for Ti and trace element analyses by ICP-MS. Here we present major and trace element data for BHVO-2, a frequently used SRM derived from a Hawaiian basalt, gathered over a period of over two years (30+ analyses by each technique). We show that both digestion

  4. Seasonal variations on the residence times and partitioning of short-lived radionuclides (234Th, 7Be and 210Pb) and depositional fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskaran, M.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, Tampa Bay has been impacted heavily by a wide range of anthropogenic perturbations that may include, agricultural-, shipping-, phosphate mining/distribution-related activities, as well as a burgeoning coastal population. Due to the presence of U-rich underlying sediments, elevated activities of U- and Th-series daughter products may be naturally released into this system. This region is also known for summer thunderstorms and corresponding increases in precipitation and surface water runoff. Only limited work has been conducted on the partitioning of particle-reactive radionuclides (such as 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th) in such a dynamic coastal system. We investigated both the removal residence time and partitioning of these radionuclides between filter-retained particulate matter (≥ 0.5 μm) and the filtrate ( Our results indicate that the partitioning of 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th between filtrate and filter-retained phase is controlled foremost by enhanced bottom resuspension events during summer thunderstorms. As a consequence, no significant relationship exists between the distribution coefficients (Kd values) of these isotopes and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Relatively faster recycling rates of atmospheric water vapor derived from the ocean results in lower atmospheric depositional fluxes of 210Pb to the study site than predicted. The relationship between 7Be and 210Pb in bulk (wet + dry) deposition is compared to their respective water column activities. The residence times of particulate and dissolved 234Th, 7Be and 210Pb, as well the distribution coefficients of these radionuclides, are then compared to values reported in other coastal systems.

  5. Geochemical characteristics and fluxes of organic carbon in a human-disturbed mountainous river (the Luodingjiang River) of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shurong; Lu, X X; Sun, Huiguo; Han, Jingtai; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the state of the riverine organic carbon in the Luodingjiang River under human impacts, such as reforestation, construction of reservoirs and in-stream damming. Seasonal and spatial characteristics of total suspended sediment (TSS), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC), as well as C/N ratios and the stable carbon isotopic signatures of POC (delta(13)C(POC)) were examined based on a one-year study (2005) in the basin-wide scale. More frequent sampling was conducted in the outlet of the river basin at Guanliang hydrological station. DOC and POC concentrations showed flush effects with increasing water discharge and sediment load in the basin-wide scale. Atomic C/N ratio of POC had a positive relationship with TSS in the outlet of the basin, indicating the reduced aquatic sources and enhanced terrestrial sources during the high flood season. However, the similar relationship was not observed in the basin-wide scale mainly due to the spatial distributions of soil organic carbon and TSS. delta(13)C(POC) showed obvious seasonal variations with enriched values in the period with high TSS concentration, reflecting the increased contribution from C(4) plants with enhanced soil erosion. The specific flux of the total organic carbon (2.30 t km(-)(2) year(-1)) was smaller than the global average level. The ratio of DOC to POC was 1.17, which is higher than most rivers under Asian monsoon climate regime. The organic carbon flux was estimated to decline with decreasing sediment load as a result of reforestation, reservoir construction and in-stream damming, which demonstrates the impacts of human disturbances on the global carbon cycle.

  6. Geochemical characteristics and fluxes of organic carbon in a human-disturbed mountainous river (the Luodingjiang River) of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shurong; Lu, X X; Sun, Huiguo; Han, Jingtai; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the state of the riverine organic carbon in the Luodingjiang River under human impacts, such as reforestation, construction of reservoirs and in-stream damming. Seasonal and spatial characteristics of total suspended sediment (TSS), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC), as well as C/N ratios and the stable carbon isotopic signatures of POC (delta(13)C(POC)) were examined based on a one-year study (2005) in the basin-wide scale. More frequent sampling was conducted in the outlet of the river basin at Guanliang hydrological station. DOC and POC concentrations showed flush effects with increasing water discharge and sediment load in the basin-wide scale. Atomic C/N ratio of POC had a positive relationship with TSS in the outlet of the basin, indicating the reduced aquatic sources and enhanced terrestrial sources during the high flood season. However, the similar relationship was not observed in the basin-wide scale mainly due to the spatial distributions of soil organic carbon and TSS. delta(13)C(POC) showed obvious seasonal variations with enriched values in the period with high TSS concentration, reflecting the increased contribution from C(4) plants with enhanced soil erosion. The specific flux of the total organic carbon (2.30 t km(-)(2) year(-1)) was smaller than the global average level. The ratio of DOC to POC was 1.17, which is higher than most rivers under Asian monsoon climate regime. The organic carbon flux was estimated to decline with decreasing sediment load as a result of reforestation, reservoir construction and in-stream damming, which demonstrates the impacts of human disturbances on the global carbon cycle. PMID:19004473

  7. Carbon pools and fluxes in a Tibetan alpine Kobresia pygmaea pasture partitioned by coupled eddy-covariance measurements and ¹³CO₂ pulse labeling.

    PubMed

    Ingrisch, Johannes; Biermann, Tobias; Seeber, Elke; Leipold, Thomas; Li, Maoshan; Ma, Yaoming; Xu, Xingliang; Miehe, Georg; Guggenberger, Georg; Foken, Thomas; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-02-01

    The Tibetan highlands host the largest alpine grassland ecosystems worldwide, bearing soils that store substantial stocks of carbon (C) that are very sensitive to land use changes. This study focuses on the cycling of photoassimilated C within a Kobresia pygmaea pasture, the dominating ecosystems on the Tibetan highlands. We investigated short-term effects of grazing cessation and the role of the characteristic Kobresia root turf on C fluxes and belowground C turnover. By combining eddy-covariance measurements with (13)CO₂ pulse labeling we applied a powerful new approach to measure absolute fluxes of assimilates within and between various pools of the plant-soil-atmosphere system. The roots and soil each store roughly 50% of the overall C in the system (76 Mg C ha(-1)), with only a minor contribution from shoots, which is also expressed in the root:shoot ratio of 90. During June and July the pasture acted as a weak C sink with a strong uptake of approximately 2 g C m(-2) d(-1) in the first half of July. The root turf was the main compartment for the turnover of photoassimilates, with a subset of highly dynamic roots (mean residence time 20 days), and plays a key role for the C cycling and C storage in this ecosystem. The short-term grazing cessation only affected aboveground biomass but not ecosystem scale C exchange or assimilate allocation into roots and soil. PMID:25461119

  8. Watershed nitrogen and mercury geochemical fluxes integrate landscape factors in long-term research watersheds at Acadia National Park, Maine, USA.

    PubMed

    Kahl, J S; Nelson, S J; Fernandez, I; Haines, T; Norton, S; Wiersma, G B; Jacobson, G; Amirbahman, A; Johnson, K; Schauffler, M; Rustad, L; Tonnessen, K; Lent, R; Bank, M; Elvir, J; Eckhoff, J; Caron, H; Ruck, P; Parker, J; Campbell, J; Manski, D; Breen, R; Sheehan, K; Grygo, A

    2007-03-01

    This paper is an overview of this special issue devoted to watershed research in Acadia National Park (Acadia NP). The papers address components of an integrated research program on two upland watersheds at Acadia NP, USA (44 degrees 20' N latitude; 68 degrees 15' E longitude). These watersheds were instrumented in 1998 to provide a long-term foundation for regional ecological and watershed research. The research was initiated as part of EPA/NPS PRIMENet (Park Research and Intensive Monitoring of Ecosystems Network), a system of UV-monitoring stations and long-term watershed research sites located in US national parks. The initial goals at Acadia NP were to address research questions about mercury, acid rain, and nitrogen saturation developed from prior research. The project design was based on natural differences in forests and soils induced by an intense wildfire in one watershed in 1947. There is no evidence of fire in the reference watershed for several hundred years. We are testing hypotheses about controls on surface water chemistry, and bioavailability of contaminants in the contrasting watersheds. The unburned 47-ha Hadlock Brook watershed is 70% spruce-fir mature conifer forest. In contrast, burned 32-ha Cadillac Brook watershed, 4 km northeast of the Hadlock watershed, is 20% regenerating mixed northern hardwoods and 60% shrub/rocky balds. Differences in atmospheric deposition are controlled primarily by forest stand composition and age. The watersheds are gauged and have water chemistry stations at 122 m (Cadillac) and 137 m (Hadlock); watershed maximum elevations are 468 and 380 m, respectively. The stream water chemistry patterns reflect, in part, the legacy of the intense fire, which, in turn, controls differences in forest vegetation and soil characteristics. These factors result in higher nitrogen and mercury flux from the unburned watershed, reflecting differences in atmospheric deposition, contrasting ecosystem pools of nitrogen and mercury, and

  9. Experimental investigations of water fluxes within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system: Stable isotope mass-balance approach to partition evaporation and transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, Jochen; Beza, Desta Tadesse; Uhlenbrook, Stefan

    Irrigated agriculture is the largest user of freshwater worldwide and the scale of irrigated agriculture can be so large that it can have dramatic effects on the water cycle and even alter regional climates. Therefore, it is vital to improve the water use efficiency of irrigated lands in order to address the sustainable use of water resources, the growing need for agricultural products, and the health of ecosystems. Environmental isotopes have unique attributes that make them particularly suitable for tracing hydrological pathways and quantifying hydrological fluxes within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. The stable isotopic composition of soil water is mainly controlled by precipitation or irrigation inputs and evaporative losses. Because transpiration does not fractionate soil water isotopes, it is possible to estimate the relative proportions of evaporation and transpiration using isotopic mass balance calculations. In this study experimental investigations, combining classical hydrometric measurements, tracer hydrological methods and a soil water model were applied to laboratory lysimeters to study the transpiration processes of Teff ( Eragrostis tea (Zucc.) Trotter). Teff is an annual bunch cereal and an important aliment in Ethiopia and Eritrea and it is also gaining popularity in other countries. To determine the soil water contents, sensors using a capacitance/frequency domain technology were installed at different depths and soil water samples for the isotope analysis were taken using pore water samplers. Water contents in different depths and water fluxes, such as percolation and evaporation were modeled using the HYDRUS-1D software package. By using an isotope mass balance model the total evaporation and the fractions between soil evaporation and transpiration could be determined. The water losses which were estimated using the isotope mass-balance approach are in good agreement with the measured values using classical hydrometric measurements. The

  10. The Oxygen quantum yield in diverse algae and cyanobacteria is controlled by partitioning of flux between linear and cyclic electron flow within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    We have measured flash-induced oxygen quantum yields (O2-QYs) and primary charge separation (Chl variable fluorescence yield, Fv/Fm) in vivo among phylogenetically diverse microalgae and cyanobacteria. Higher O2-QYs can be attained in cells by releasing constraints on charge transfer at the Photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side by adding membrane-permeable benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives that oxidize plastosemiquinone QB(-) and QBH2. This method allows uncoupling PSII turnover from its natural regulation in living cells, without artifacts of isolating PSII complexes. This approach reveals different extents of regulation across species, controlled at the QB(-) acceptor site. Arthrospira maxima is confirmed as the most efficient PSII-WOC (water oxidizing complex) and exhibits the least regulation of flux. Thermosynechococcus elongatus exhibits an O2-QY of 30%, suggesting strong downregulation. WOC cycle simulations with the most accurate model (VZAD) show that a light-driven backward transition (net addition of an electron to the WOC, distinct from recombination) occurs in up to 25% of native PSIIs in the S2 and S3 states, while adding BQ prevents backward transitions and increases the lifetime of S2 and S3 by 10-fold. Backward transitions occur in PSIIs that have plastosemiquinone radicals in the QB site and are postulated to be physiologically regulated pathways for storing light energy as proton gradient through direct PSII-cyclic electron flow (PSII-CEF). PSII-CEF is independent of classical PSI/cyt-b6f-CEF and provides an alternative proton translocation pathway for energy conversion. PSII-CEF enables variable fluxes between linear and cyclic electron pathways, thus accommodating species-dependent needs for redox and ion-gradient energy sources powered by a single photosystem.

  11. The Oxygen quantum yield in diverse algae and cyanobacteria is controlled by partitioning of flux between linear and cyclic electron flow within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    We have measured flash-induced oxygen quantum yields (O2-QYs) and primary charge separation (Chl variable fluorescence yield, Fv/Fm) in vivo among phylogenetically diverse microalgae and cyanobacteria. Higher O2-QYs can be attained in cells by releasing constraints on charge transfer at the Photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side by adding membrane-permeable benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives that oxidize plastosemiquinone QB(-) and QBH2. This method allows uncoupling PSII turnover from its natural regulation in living cells, without artifacts of isolating PSII complexes. This approach reveals different extents of regulation across species, controlled at the QB(-) acceptor site. Arthrospira maxima is confirmed as the most efficient PSII-WOC (water oxidizing complex) and exhibits the least regulation of flux. Thermosynechococcus elongatus exhibits an O2-QY of 30%, suggesting strong downregulation. WOC cycle simulations with the most accurate model (VZAD) show that a light-driven backward transition (net addition of an electron to the WOC, distinct from recombination) occurs in up to 25% of native PSIIs in the S2 and S3 states, while adding BQ prevents backward transitions and increases the lifetime of S2 and S3 by 10-fold. Backward transitions occur in PSIIs that have plastosemiquinone radicals in the QB site and are postulated to be physiologically regulated pathways for storing light energy as proton gradient through direct PSII-cyclic electron flow (PSII-CEF). PSII-CEF is independent of classical PSI/cyt-b6f-CEF and provides an alternative proton translocation pathway for energy conversion. PSII-CEF enables variable fluxes between linear and cyclic electron pathways, thus accommodating species-dependent needs for redox and ion-gradient energy sources powered by a single photosystem. PMID:27117512

  12. Global geochemical problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Application of remote sensing techniques to the solution of geochemical problems is considered with emphasis on the 'carbon-cycle'. The problem of carbon dioxide sinks and the areal extent of coral reefs are treated. In order to assess the problems cited it is suggested that remote sensing techniques be utilized to: (1)monitor globally the carbonate and bicarbonate concentrations in surface waters of the world ocean; (2)monitor the freshwater and oceanic biomass and associated dissolved organic carbon; (3) inventory the coral reef areas and types and the associated oceanographic climatic conditions; and (4)measure the heavy metal fluxes from forested and vegetated areas, from volcanos, from different types of crustal rocks, from soils, and from sea surfaces.

  13. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed M; Condon, Laura E

    2016-07-22

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  14. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed M; Condon, Laura E

    2016-07-22

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes. PMID:27463671

  15. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Condon, Laura E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  16. Computer modeling of pesticide fate at the hillslope scale. Influence of vegetated filter strips on surface runoff pesticides transfer and partitioning between surface and subsurface fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djabelkhir, K.; Carluer, N.; Lauvernet, C.

    2012-04-01

    inside and between lanscape elements, with an adapted level of complexity. This led us to Catchment Modelling Framework (CMF), which fills these criteria. On top of that, structure of this model makes it possible to integrate buffer zones and pesticides behaviour simulation ; more, it needs data which are available on our study site. This hillslope model will be tested on the Morcille site, in the Beaujolais area (France) which is one of the sites monitored by the non point source pollution team of Irstea in Lyon, and for data on surface and subsurface fluxes is available.

  17. Tissue partitioning of micro-essential metals in the vent bivalve Bathymodiolus azoricus and associated organisms (endosymbiont bacteria and a parasite polychaete) from geochemically distinct vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kádár, Enikõ; Costa, Valentina; Santos, Ricardo S.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2006-07-01

    Hydrothermal communities are built on highly specialised organisms possessing effective adaptation mechanisms to tolerate elevated levels of toxic heavy metals typical of these extreme habitats. Bioavailability and tissue compartmentalisation of micro-essential metals (Cu, Zn, and Fe) were investigated in the bivalve Bathymodiolus azoricus from three geochemically distinct hydrothermal vents (Rainbow, Lucky Strike, Menez Gwen). Additionally , in order to make inferences on the effect of biological interactions on the metal uptake, the bivalves' endosymbiont bacteria and commensal parasite Branchipolynoe seepensis were analysed for metal bioaccumulation. Micro-essential metal concentrations in byssus threads exceeded many-fold concentrations in the gill and digestive gland, which in turn were consistently one order of magnitude above levels measured in the mantle. In spite of its high metal concentrations, the byssus is unlikely to be an active bioaccumulator. Its high surface to mass ratio and its binding sites for metals suggest a reversible adsorption of micro-essential metals in the vent mussel. Inter-site comparison showed highest Fe concentrations in tissues of mussels from the Rainbow site, whereas Zn and Cu in all tissues were highest in mussels from the Lucky Strike site, reflecting metal concentrations in the water surrounding macro-invertebrates at these vent sites. The omnipresence of the commensal parasite polychaete in gills of B. azoricus from the Lucky Strike vent field, unlike the other sites, is suggested to be an adaptation to the typically elevated Fe concentrations in the water column near mussel beds. Unprecedented Fe concentrations measured in the digestive gland of mussels from the Rainbow site (4000 μg g - 1 , three times higher than levels in bivalves from polluted sites) call for further post-capture ecotoxicological investigations of potentially novel Fe-handling strategies. We provide the first information on the bioaccumulation

  18. Continental-pelagic carbonate partitioning and the global carbonate-silicate cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, K.; Rampino, M. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    A carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle model is developed and used to explore dynamic and climatic consequences of constraints on shallow-water carbonate burial and possible carbon loss to the mantle associated with sea-floor subduction. The model partitions carbonate deposition between shallow-water and deep-water environments and includes carbon fluxes between the mantle and lithosphere. When total lithospheric carbonate mass is constant, there are two stable steady states, one in which the carbonate burial flux is mostly continental and another in which it is mostly pelagic. The continental steady state is characterized by a low metamorphic CO2 flux to the atmosphere and predominantly shallow-water carbonate burial. The pelagic steady state is characterized by a high metamorphic CO2 flux and predominantly deep-water carbonate burial. For reasonable parameter values, when total lithospheric carbonate mass is allowed to vary, the model oscillates between predominantly continental and predominantly pelagic modes. Model results suggest that carbonate deposition patterns established during the Cenozoic may be pushing the Earth system from the continental to the pelagic mode on a time scale of 10(8) yr, with a possible consequent order-of-magnitude increase in the metamorphic CO2 flux to the atmosphere.

  19. Young Children's Partitioning Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Kathy; Nason, Rod

    2000-01-01

    Studies knowledge of young children's partitioning strategies by setting out not only to identify new partitioning strategies, but also to develop taxonomy for classifying young children's partitioning strategies in terms of their abilities. Provides taxonomy utilizing children's informal partitioning strategies as the foundation upon which to…

  20. Geochemical data synthesis and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpotts, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Data obtained at the Goddard Flight Center were collected for the purpose of completing analyses started at Goddard in order to maximize the scientific yield of the geochemistry program which was terminated in 1977. The major analytical task undertaken was to complete Gd analyses on a large number of samples already analyzed by mass spectrometry for other rare earth element abundances at Goddard. Gd values are important for pinning down the central part of the geochemically significant rare earth abundance pattern and are especially useful in the high precision definition of the utilitarian Eu anomaly. Isotope-dilution Gd abundances were obtained for 39 samples. The data are for 27 partition-coefficient samples, six Apollo 15 and 16 breccia samples, four terrestrial impactities, and associated rock standards.

  1. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Collision volcanism can be defined as volcanism that takes place during an orogeny from the moment that continental subduction starts to the end of orogenic collapse. Its importance in the Geological Record is greatly underestimated as collision volcanics are easily misinterpreted as being of volcanic arc, extensional or mantle plume origin. There are many types of collision volcanic province: continent-island arc collision (e.g. Banda arc); continent-active margin collision (e.g. Tibet, Turkey-Iran); continent-rear-arc collision (e.g. Bolivia); continent-continent collision (e.g. Tuscany); and island arc-island arc collision (e.g. Taiwan). Superimposed on this variability is the fact that every orogeny is different in detail. Nonetheless, there is a general theme of cyclicity on different time scales. This starts with syn-collision volcanism resulting from the subduction of an ocean-continent transition and continental lithosphere, and continues through post-collision volcanism. The latter can be subdivided into orogenic volcanism, which is related to thickened crust, and post-orogenic, which is related to orogenic collapse. Typically, but not always, collision volcanism is preceded by normal arc volcanism and followed by normal intraplate volcanism. Identification and interpretation of collision volcanism in the Geologic Record is greatly facilitated if a dated stratigraphic sequence is present so that the petrogenic evolution can be traced. In any case, the basis of fingerprinting collision terranes is to use geochemical proxies for mantle and subduction fluxes, slab temperatures, and depths and degrees of melting. For example, syn-collision volcanism is characterized by a high subduction flux relative to mantle flux because of the high input flux of fusible sediment and crust coupled with limited mantle flow, and because of high slab temperatures resulting from the decrease in subduction rate. The resulting geochemical patterns are similar regardless of

  2. UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT KD, VALUES, VOLUME III: AMERICIUM, ARSENIC, CURIUM, IODINE, NEPTUNIUM, RADIUM, AND TECHNETIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the conceptualization, measurement, and use of the partition (or distribution) coefficient, Kd, parameter, and the geochemical aqueous solution and sorbent properties that are most important in controlling adsorption/retardation behavior of selected contamin...

  3. VARIATIONS IN THE SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE CDOM CAUSED BY PARTITIONING ONTO RIVER AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The optical properties and geochemical cycling of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are altered by its sorption to freshwater and estuarine sediments. Measured partition coefficients (Kp) of Satilla River (Georgia) and Cape Fear River estuary (North Carolina) CDOM ran...

  4. Pan-arctic river fluxes of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Daniel; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2011-10-01

    Observations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) concentrations in fluvial surface sediments near the mouths of the six Great Arctic Rivers (GARs; Ob, Yenisey, Lena, Indigirka, Kolyma, and Mackenzie) were combined with annual dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) loadings and hydraulic discharge to estimate the pan-Arctic river flux of PCBs. The highest total-phase fluxes of ∑(13)PCB were found for the Ob River, with 184 kg/yr and the smallest for the Indigirka River with 3.9 kg/yr. Consistent with a continent-scale trend among the Eurasian GARs of increasing POC concentrations eastward, which is extending to the North American Mackenzie River, a general shift in the estimated PCB partitioning from dissolved to particle-associated flux was found toward the east. Pentachlorinated and hexachlorinated PCBs constituted the majority (>70%) of the total PCB fluxes in the Eurasian Rivers. In contrast, trichlorinated and tetrachlorinated congeners were the most abundant in the Mackenzie (≈ 75%). The total ∑(13)PCB fluxes from the pan-Arctic rivers are here estimated to be ∼0.4 tonne/yr. This is geochemically consistent with the inventory of total PCBs in the Polar Mixed Layer of the entire Arctic Ocean (0.39 tonne) and about a factor 2 less than two new estimates of the PCB settling export to Arctic subsurface waters. Hence, the yearly Great Arctic River PCB fluxes only represent 0.001% of the historical PCB emission into the global environment. To our knowledge, this is the first estimate of circum-Arctic river flux of any organic pollutant based on a comprehensive investigation of the pollutants in several rivers and it contributes toward a more complete understanding of large-scale contaminant cycling in the Arctic. PMID:21863827

  5. Pan-arctic river fluxes of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Daniel; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2011-10-01

    Observations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) concentrations in fluvial surface sediments near the mouths of the six Great Arctic Rivers (GARs; Ob, Yenisey, Lena, Indigirka, Kolyma, and Mackenzie) were combined with annual dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) loadings and hydraulic discharge to estimate the pan-Arctic river flux of PCBs. The highest total-phase fluxes of ∑(13)PCB were found for the Ob River, with 184 kg/yr and the smallest for the Indigirka River with 3.9 kg/yr. Consistent with a continent-scale trend among the Eurasian GARs of increasing POC concentrations eastward, which is extending to the North American Mackenzie River, a general shift in the estimated PCB partitioning from dissolved to particle-associated flux was found toward the east. Pentachlorinated and hexachlorinated PCBs constituted the majority (>70%) of the total PCB fluxes in the Eurasian Rivers. In contrast, trichlorinated and tetrachlorinated congeners were the most abundant in the Mackenzie (≈ 75%). The total ∑(13)PCB fluxes from the pan-Arctic rivers are here estimated to be ∼0.4 tonne/yr. This is geochemically consistent with the inventory of total PCBs in the Polar Mixed Layer of the entire Arctic Ocean (0.39 tonne) and about a factor 2 less than two new estimates of the PCB settling export to Arctic subsurface waters. Hence, the yearly Great Arctic River PCB fluxes only represent 0.001% of the historical PCB emission into the global environment. To our knowledge, this is the first estimate of circum-Arctic river flux of any organic pollutant based on a comprehensive investigation of the pollutants in several rivers and it contributes toward a more complete understanding of large-scale contaminant cycling in the Arctic.

  6. Serpentinization-assisted deformation processes and characterization of hydrothermal fluxes at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, Gence

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems play a significantly important role in Earth’s energy and geochemical budgets and support the existence and development of complex biological ecosystems by providing nutrient and energy to microbial and macrafaunal ecosystems through geochemical fluxes. Heat output and fluid flow are key parameters which characterize hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers by constraining models of hydrothermal circulation. Although integrated measurements of heat flux in plumes are critically important as well, quantification of heat flux at discrete sources (vent orifices versus patches of seafloor shimmering diffuse flow) from direct measurements is particularly essential for examining the partitioning of heat flow into focused and diffuse components of venting and determining geochemical fluxes from these two modes of flow. Hydrothermal heat output also constrains the permeability of young oceanic crust and thickness of the conductive boundary layer that separates magmatic heat source from overlying hydrothermal circulation. This dissertation will be fundamentally focused on three main inter-connected topics: (1) the design and development of direct high- or low-temperature heat flow measuring devices for hydrothermal systems, (2) the collection of new heat output results on four cruises between 2008 and 2010 at several distinct hydrothermal sites along mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to estimate total heat output from individual vent structures such as Dante, Hulk or the whole vent field (e.g., Main Endeavour Vent Field (MEF)), the partitioning between focused and diffuse hydrothermal venting in MEF, and determination of initial estimates of geochemical flux from diffuse hydrothermal fluids which may be influenced by the activity in subsurface biosphere and finally (3) the deformation and uplift associated with serpentinization at MORs and subduction zones. Despite extensive efforts spent for the last couple of decades on heat flow measurement

  7. A New Round of Global Geochemical Mapping: Opportunity and Challenge to China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hangxin; Yang, Zhongfang; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zhao, Chuandong; Xie, Xuejin

    Since the projects of "International Geochemical Mapping (IGCP259)" and "Global Geochemical Baseline (IGCP360)" were met with approval by UNESCO in 1988, decisive contributions of working out the methodological guidance and the technical standard of global geochemical mapping have been made by China and Europe. Though demonstrations have been made by China and Europe through carrying out the projects of "Environmental Geochemical Monitoring Network and Dynamic Geochemical Mapping (EGMON)" and "FOREG geochemical baseline mapping", respectively, the expectation of acquiring a general picture of global geochemistry in 10 years has not yet been realized. Geochemists from China and Norway are now deliberating, through International Association of Hydrological Sciences/International Commission on Continental Erosion (IAHS/ICCE), about a major international cooperative project on "Global Geochemical Mapping and Sediment-Bound Flux of Major World Rivers", on carrying out a new round global geochemical mapping, and planning to start working first on the Arctic region under the project of the Year of Polar (IPY317). The practical plan for the global geochemical mapping is based on the "Draft of Sampling Plan of Floodplain Sediments" for the global geochemical mapping suggested by China and the "Draft of Sampling Plan of Overbank Sediments in Deltas" suggested by Norway, thereby further strengthening the advantages of Chinese methodology in geochemical mapping. After analyzing the opportunities and challenges to China, this article suggests that the competent authorities of science and technology should take the initiative of supporting the new round global geochemical mapping.

  8. Fuzzy Partition Models for Fitting a Set of Partitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, A. D.; Vichi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes methods for fitting a fuzzy consensus partition to a set of partitions of the same set of objects. Describes and illustrates three models defining median partitions and compares these methods to an alternative approach to obtaining a consensus fuzzy partition. Discusses interesting differences in the results. (SLD)

  9. Open geochemical database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, Denis; Ilyin, Vladimir; Bashev, Anton

    2010-05-01

    We regard "geochemical data" as data on chemical parameters of the environment, linked with the geographical position of the corresponding point. Boosting development of global positioning system (GPS) and measuring instruments allows fast collecting of huge amounts of geochemical data. Presently they are published in scientific journals in text format, that hampers searching for information about particular places and meta-analysis of the data, collected by different researchers. Part of the information is never published. To make the data available and easy to find, it seems reasonable to elaborate an open database of geochemical information, accessible via Internet. It also seems reasonable to link the data with maps or space images, for example, from GoogleEarth service. For this purpose an open geochemical database is being elaborating (http://maps.sch192.ru). Any user after registration can upload geochemical data (position, type of parameter and value of the parameter) and edit them. Every user (including unregistered) can (a) extract the values of parameters, fulfilling desired conditions and (b) see the points, linked to GoogleEarth space image, colored according to a value of selected parameter. Then he can treat extracted values any way he likes. There are the following data types in the database: authors, points, seasons and parameters. Author is a person, who publishes the data. Every author can declare his own profile. A point is characterized by its geographical position and type of the object (i.e. river, lake etc). Value of parameters are linked to a point, an author and a season, when they were obtained. A user can choose a parameter to place on GoogleEarth space image and a scale to color the points on the image according to the value of a parameter. Currently (December, 2009) the database is under construction, but several functions (uploading data on pH and electrical conductivity and placing colored points onto GoogleEarth space image) are

  10. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production.

  11. Isotope-based evapotranspiration partition in semi-arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen; McCabe, Matthew; Azcurra, Cecilia; Wang, Jin; Graham, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning is important for quantifying the water budget and understanding vegetation control on water cycles in various ecosystems. With the development of spectroscopy-based techniques for in-situ isotope measurements, the use of stable isotope based ET partition is rising rapidly. The sub-daily scale ET partition, however, is still rarely seen in the literature. In this study, we conducted an intensive field campaign measuring ET partition using laser-based isotope and chamber techniques in a pasture system between May and June 2012 in eastern Australia. Six soil collars were used, three of which had natural vegetation and the other three were bare soil collars where vegetation was artificially removed. The vegetated and bare soil collars were used to determine the isotopic composition of ET and evaporation, respectively. The isotopic composition of the transpiration flux was determined using a Licor leaf chamber for grasses inside the vegetated collars. The diurnal patterns in dET, dE and dT are observed. In the morning, they are depleted and became more enriched and level off during mid-day. Overall the total ET flux is dominated by evaporation, though transpiration contributions are relatively higher between 10am and 12pm. D-excess is a conservative tracer of ET components and may not be useful in ET partition. This study demonstrated the use of chamber-based measurements for direct partitioning of ET at sub-daily scale and showed a rarely observed diurnal pattern of ET partition.

  12. Geochemical modeling: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted.

  13. Partition density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, Jonathan

    Partition density functional theory (PDFT) is a method for dividing a molecular electronic structure calculation into fragment calculations. The molecular density and energy corresponding to Kohn Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) may be exactly recovered from these fragments. Each fragment acts as an isolated system except for the influence of a global one-body 'partition' potential which deforms the fragment densities. In this work, the developments of PDFT are put into the context of other fragment-based density functional methods. We developed three numerical implementations of PDFT: One within the NWChem computational chemistry package using basis sets, and the other two developed from scratch using real-space grids. It is shown that all three of these programs can exactly reproduce a KS-DFT calculation via fragment calculations. The first of our in-house codes handles non-interacting electrons in arbitrary one-dimensional potentials with any number of fragments. This code is used to explore how the exact partition potential changes for different partitionings of the same system and also to study features which determine which systems yield non-integer PDFT occupations and which systems are locked into integer PDFT occupations. The second in-house code, CADMium, performs real-space calculations of diatomic molecules. Features of the exact partition potential are studied for a variety of cases and an analytical formula determining singularities in the partition potential is derived. We introduce an approximation for the non-additive kinetic energy and show how this quantity can be computed exactly. Finally a PDFT functional is developed to address the issues of static correlation and delocalization errors in approximations within DFT. The functional is applied to the dissociation of H2 + and H2.

  14. FNAS phase partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Project NAS8-36955 D.O. #100 initially involved the following tasks: (1) evaluation of various coatings' ability to control wall wetting and surface zeta potential expression; (2) testing various methods to mix and control the demixing of phase systems; and (3) videomicroscopic investigation of cell partition. Three complementary areas were identified for modification and extension of the original contract. They were: (1) identification of new supports for column cell partition; (2) electrokinetic detection of protein adsorption; and (3) emulsion studies related to bioseparations.

  15. Geochemical quantification of semiarid mountain recharge.

    PubMed

    Wahi, Arun K; Hogan, James F; Ekwurzel, Brenda; Baillie, Matthew N; Eastoe, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of a typical semiarid mountain system recharge (MSR) setting demonstrates that geochemical tracers help resolve the location, rate, and seasonality of recharge as well as ground water flowpaths and residence times. MSR is defined as the recharge at the mountain front that dominates many semiarid basins plus the often-overlooked recharge through the mountain block that may be a significant ground water resource; thus, geochemical measurements that integrate signals from all flowpaths are advantageous. Ground water fluxes determined from carbon-14 ((14)C) age gradients imply MSR rates between 2 x 10(6) and 9 x 10(6) m(3)/year in the Upper San Pedro Basin, Arizona, USA. This estimated range is within an order of magnitude of, but lower than, prior independent estimates. Stable isotopic signatures indicate that MSR has a 65% +/- 25% contribution from winter precipitation and a 35% +/- 25% contribution from summer precipitation. Chloride and stable isotope results confirm that transpiration is the dominant component of evapotranspiration (ET) in the basin with typical loss of more than 90% of precipitation-less runoff to ET. Such geochemical constraints can be used to further refine hydrogeologic models in similar high-elevation relief basins and can provide practical first estimates of MSR rates for basins lacking extensive prior hydrogeologic measurements.

  16. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Rubie; Seth Andrew Jacobson

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so must the oxygen fugacity of the equilibrating material. The latter can occur if silicon partitions into the core and through the late delivery of oxidized material. Coupled dynamical accretion and multi-stage core formation models predict the evolving mantle and core compositions of all the terrestrial planets simultaneously and also place strong constraints on the bulk compositions and oxidation states of primitive bodies in the protoplanetary disk.

  17. Geochemical Evidence for a Terrestrial Magma Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agee, Carl B.

    1999-01-01

    The aftermath of phase separation and crystal-liquid fractionation in a magma ocean should leave a planet geochemically differentiated. Subsequent convective and other mixing processes may operate over time to obscure geochemical evidence of magma ocean differentiation. On the other hand, core formation is probably the most permanent, irreversible part of planetary differentiation. Hence the geochemical traces of core separation should be the most distinct remnants left behind in the mantle and crust, In the case of the Earth, core formation apparently coincided with a magma ocean that extended to a depth of approximately 1000 km. Evidence for this is found in high pressure element partitioning behavior of Ni and Co between liquid silicate and liquid iron alloy, and with the Ni-Co ratio and the abundance of Ni and Co in the Earth's upper mantle. A terrestrial magma ocean with a depth of 1000 km will solidify from the bottom up and first crystallize in the perovskite stability field. The largest effect of perovskite fractionation on major element distribution is to decrease the Si-Mg ratio in the silicate liquid and increase the Si-Mg ratio in the crystalline cumulate. Therefore, if a magma ocean with perovskite fractionation existed, then one could expect to observe an upper mantle with a lower than chondritic Si-Mg ratio. This is indeed observed in modern upper mantle peridotites. Although more experimental work is needed to fully understand the high-pressure behavior of trace element partitioning, it is likely that Hf is more compatible than Lu in perovskite-silicate liquid pairs. Thus, perovskite fractionation produces a molten mantle with a higher than chondritic Lu-Hf ratio. Arndt and Blichert-Toft measured Hf isotope compositions of Barberton komatiites that seem to require a source region with a long-lived, high Lu-Hf ratio. It is plausible that that these Barberton komatiites were generated within the majorite stability field by remelting a perovskite

  18. ARSENIC SOLID-PHASE PARTITIONING IN REDUCING SEDIMENTS OF CONTAMINATED WETLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The geochemical partitioning of arsenic in organic-rich sediments from a contaminated wetland is examined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and selective chemical extraction procedures, and evaluated in context to the anoxic diagenesis of iron and sulfur. The interaction betwe...

  19. Geochemical surveys in the Lusi mud eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Mazzini, Adriano; Etiope, Giuseppe; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Hussein, Alwi; Hadi J., Soffian

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the Java Island. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we carried out geochemical surveys in the Sidoarjo district (Eastern Java Island, Indonesia) to investigate the gas bearing properties of the Watukosek fault system that crosses the Lusi mud eruption area. Soil gas (222Rn, CO2, CH4) concentration and flux measurements were performed 1) along two detailed profiles (~ 1km long), trending almost W-E direction, and 2) inside the Lusi embankment (about 7 km2) built to contain the erupted mud. Higher gas concentrations and fluxes were detected at the intersection with the Watukosek fault and the antithetic fault system. These zones characterized by the association of higher soil gas values constitute preferential migration pathways for fluids towards surface. The fractures release mainly CO2 (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and display higher temperatures (up to 41°C). The main shear zones are populated by numerous seeps that expel mostly CH4. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that φCO2 is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fractures, and two orders of magnitude higher for φCH4. An additional geochemical profile was completed perpendicularly to the Watukosek fault escarpement (W-E direction) at the foots of the Penanngungang volcano. Results reveal CO2 and CH4 flux values significantly lower than those measured in the embankment, however an increase of radon and flux measurements is observed approaching the foots of the escarpment. These measurements are complemented with a database of ~350 CH4 and CO2 flux measurements and some soil gas concentrations (He, H2, CO2, CH4 and C2H6) and their isotopic analyses (δ13C-CH4, δD-CH4 and δ13C-CO2). Results show that the whole area is characterized by diffused gas release through seeps, fractures, microfractures and soil degassing. The collected results shed light on the origin of the

  20. The Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM)

    SciTech Connect

    Staudigel, H.; Albarede, F.; Shaw, H.; McDonough, B.; White, W.

    1996-12-01

    The Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM) initiative is a grass- roots effort with the goal of establishing a community consensus on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. Long term goal of GERM is a chemical reservoir characterization analogous to the geophysical effort of the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). Chemical fluxes between reservoirs are included into GERM to illuminate the long-term chemical evolution of the Earth and to characterize the Earth as a dynamic chemical system. In turn, these fluxes control geological processes and influence hydrosphere-atmosphere-climate dynamics. While these long-term goals are clearly the focus of GERM, the process of establishing GERM itself is just as important as its ultimate goal. The GERM initiative is developed in an open community discussion on the World Wide Web (GERM home page is at http://www-ep.es.llnl. gov/germ/germ-home.html) that is mediated by a series of editors with responsibilities for distinct reservoirs and fluxes. Beginning with the original workshop in Lyons (March 1996) GERM is continued to be developed on the Internet, punctuated by workshops and special sessions at professional meetings. It is planned to complete the first model by mid-1997, followed by a call for papers for a February 1998 GERM conference in La Jolla, California.

  1. Environmental Status and geochemical assessment Sediments of Lake Skadar, Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Kastratović, Vlatko; Jaćimović, Željko; Bigović, Miljan; Đurović, Dijana; Krivokapić, Slađana

    2016-08-01

    The environmental mobility and geochemical partitioning of ten metals were examined in sediments collected from the six locations around Lake Skadar in Montenegro. A three-step sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the distribution of the metals in various substrates of lacustrine sediments, and the concentrations were measured in the liquid extract by ICP-OES. The largest portion of the total amount of cadmium, strontium and manganese can be found in sediment bound to the hydrated iron and manganese oxides; cobalt, lead, copper and nickel in the oxidizable fraction and the highest portion of chromium, vanadium and zinc are in the residual fraction. The most mobilized and potentially mobile metals are strontium, cadmium and cobalt while the most immobilized metals are chromium, vanadium and zinc. Based on geochemical parameters, an assessment of sediment contamination by the investigated metals was performed and the results showed potential risks ranging from "no risk" to "low risk" to the environment.

  2. Environmental Status and geochemical assessment Sediments of Lake Skadar, Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Kastratović, Vlatko; Jaćimović, Željko; Bigović, Miljan; Đurović, Dijana; Krivokapić, Slađana

    2016-08-01

    The environmental mobility and geochemical partitioning of ten metals were examined in sediments collected from the six locations around Lake Skadar in Montenegro. A three-step sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the distribution of the metals in various substrates of lacustrine sediments, and the concentrations were measured in the liquid extract by ICP-OES. The largest portion of the total amount of cadmium, strontium and manganese can be found in sediment bound to the hydrated iron and manganese oxides; cobalt, lead, copper and nickel in the oxidizable fraction and the highest portion of chromium, vanadium and zinc are in the residual fraction. The most mobilized and potentially mobile metals are strontium, cadmium and cobalt while the most immobilized metals are chromium, vanadium and zinc. Based on geochemical parameters, an assessment of sediment contamination by the investigated metals was performed and the results showed potential risks ranging from "no risk" to "low risk" to the environment. PMID:27384227

  3. Multimedia partitioning of dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.; Hattemer-Frey, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    The general population is continuously being exposed to trace amounts of dioxin as exemplified by the fact that virtually all human adipose tissue samples contain dioxin levels of three parts per trillion (ppT) or greater. The purpose of this study is to investigate how 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is partitioned in the environment and to identify the major pathways of human exposure. 61 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    1985-12-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineralmore » phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.« less

  5. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    PubMed

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  6. Disentangling event-scale hydrologic flow partitioning in mountains of the Korean Peninsula under extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, Christopher L.

    2016-07-01

    Mountainous headwaters include a variety of spatial landscape units; however, the flow contribution from different hydrologic components is complex and often unclear. In addition to complex landscape controls, temporal meteorological drivers play an important role in the distribution between surface runoff and subsurface storage changes. This spatiotemporal variability in partitioning can influence catchment-wide flow accumulation and nutrient and sediment loading. We use a multi-year, multi-method analysis of stable isotopes, geochemical indicators, and discharge distributed throughout the Haean catchment in South Korea to identify temporal variability in hydrologic flow partitioning from surface runoff, springs, shallow interflow, and groundwater under monsoonal conditions. By combining a weighted, multi-method discharge approach, high frequency, synoptic, catchment-wide isotopic and geochemical sampling, and baseflow analysis, we characterize watershed-scale spatiotemporal hydrologic flow partitioning. Meteorological drivers are spatially variable throughout the catchment and temporally between individual events. Baseflow contributions in the high elevation, forested areas are up to 50%, while the majority of the catchment is approximately 20%. Our study builds on previously reported seasonality of isotopic signatures by quantifying trends in distributed event-based partitioning of isotopic tracers. We demonstrate that high frequency flow partitioning can accurately be determined in mountainous topography with high precipitation and that there is a need for multiple method characterizations. Our results further show the benefit of spatially distributed synoptic sampling for process understanding of hydrologic partitioning throughout the watersheds.

  7. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Elkin, Chris

    2006-05-09

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  8. Partitioning the Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, Philip L.; Lewin, John

    2016-11-01

    We review the historical purposes and procedures for stratigraphical division and naming within the Quaternary, and summarize the current requirements for formal partitioning through the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS). A raft of new data and evidence has impacted traditional approaches: quasi-continuous records from ocean sediments and ice cores, new numerical dating techniques, and alternative macro-models, such as those provided through Sequence Stratigraphy and Earth-System Science. The practical usefulness of division remains, but there is now greater appreciation of complex Quaternary detail and the modelling of time continua, the latter also extending into the future. There are problems both of commission (what is done, but could be done better) and of omission (what gets left out) in partitioning the Quaternary. These include the challenge set by the use of unconformities as stage boundaries, how to deal with multiphase records in ocean and terrestrial sediments, what happened at the 'Early-Mid- (Middle) Pleistocene Transition', dealing with trends that cross phase boundaries, and the current controversial focus on how to subdivide the Holocene and formally define an 'Anthropocene'.

  9. Estimating dry deposition and gas/particle partition coefficients of neutral poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances in northern German coast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Xie, Zhiyong; Möller, Axel; Mi, Wenying; Wolschke, Hendrik; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Dry deposition fluxes of 12 neutral poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were estimated at Büsum located in northern German coast, and their gas/particle partition coefficients were predicted by employing the polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). The gas deposition flux, particle deposition flux and total (gas + particle) flux of the 12 PFASs during sampling periods were 1088 ± 611, 189 ± 75 and 1277 ± 627 pg/(m(2) d), respectively. The gas deposition of PFASs played a key role during deposition to marine ecosystem. Sensitivity analysis showed that wind speed was the most sensitive parameter for gas deposition fluxes. Good agreements (within 1 log unit) were observed between the measured gas/particle partitioning data of PFASs and the predicted partition coefficients using PP-LFERs, indicating the model can reliably predict the gas/particle partitioning behaviors of atmospheric neutral PFASs.

  10. Leaf area controls on energy partitioning of a temperate mountain grassland.

    PubMed

    Hammerle, A; Haslwanter, A; Tappeiner, U; Cernusca, A; Wohlfahrt, G

    2008-03-20

    Using a six year data set of eddy covariance flux measurements of sensible and latent heat, soil heat flux, net radiation, above-ground phytomass and meteorological driving forces energy partitioning was investigated at a temperate mountain grassland managed as a hay meadow in the Stubai Valley (Austria). The main findings of the study were: (i) Energy partitioning was dominated by latent heat, followed by sensible heat and the soil heat flux; (ii) When compared to standard environmental forcings, the amount of green plant matter, which due to three cuts varied considerably during the vegetation period, explained similar, and partially larger, fractions of the variability in energy partitioning; (iii) There were little, if any, indications of water stress effects on energy partitioning, despite reductions in soil water availability in combination with high evaporative demand, e.g. during the summer drought of 2003.

  11. Geochemical processes in landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förstner, Ulrich; Kersten, Michael; Wienberg, Reinhard

    The present review focusses on the qualitative long-term perspectives of processes and mechanisms controlling the interactions of critical pollutants with organic and inorganic substrates both in "reactor landfills" and in deposits, which already consist of rock-like material ("final storage quality"). The behavior of pollutants in landfills is determined by the chemistry of interstitial solutions, i.e. by pH and redox conditions, and concentration of inorganic and organic ligands; in "reactor landfills" these conditions are widely variable as a result of biochemical reactions, while "final storage quality" implies less variations of chemical interactions. In both alternatives, however, prediction of short- and long-term effects on groundwater quality should be based on the proportion of "active species" of compounds ("mobility concept"). Qualitative assessment of potentially mobile pollutants may involve a controlled significative intensivation of important parameters such as pH-values. Using sequential extraction rearrangements of specific solid "phases" can be evaluated prior to the actual remobilisation of the pollutant into the dissolved phase. From a geochemical point of view the "reactor landfill" is characterized by labile conditions during the initial aerobic and acid anaerobic phases, the former mainly due to uncontrolled interactions with organic solutes. On the other hand, final storage quality, which is defined by the composition of earth crust material, in most cases is not attained by simple incineration of municipal waste, i.e. by reduction of organic fractions only. There is, in particular, the problem of easily soluble minerals, such as chlorides. Nonetheless the type of inorganic residue deposits will increasingly receive prevalence as a method of final storage for municipal wastes in the future.

  12. Geochemical Arrays at Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, K.; Wilson, R. M.; Chanton, J.; Lapham, L.; Farr, N.; Camilli, R.; Martens, C. S.; Pontbriand, C.

    2011-12-01

    A suite of geochemical monitoring arrays has been developed for the Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory in the northern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the oceanographic and tectonic forcing factors on the formation and stability of gas hydrates. These arrays are designed to collect sustained, time-series data of chemical concentrations, gradients and fluxes from the subsurface to the seafloor and into the near bottom water column. A Pore Fluid Array provides time-series measurements of methane, sulfate and salinity in subsurface pore waters to evaluate microbial activity, hydrate formation and/or hydrate dissociation. A Chimney Sampler Array collects in situ chemical and physical readings at the benthic boundary. The array is designed around a vertical cylinder with a known volume and washout rate for measuring chemical gradients and flux at the seafloor. The Benthic Boundary Layer Array extends into the water column with a package of sensors in a node close to the seafloor and a similar node 20 m above the seafloor to evaluate upward, downward and transversely advecting fluids. The three arrays can be used in concert to evaluate a release of methane by the dissociation of gas hydrates: the Pore Fluid Array identifies the breakdown of gas hydrates in the subsurface, the Chimney Array determines the rate of flux at the seafloor and the Benthic Boundary Layer Array evaluates the fate of the release in the water column. Combining the data from the geochemical arrays with output from the geophysical arrays provides key information to evaluate the specific and relative importance of tectonic and oceanographic triggers for hydrate dissociation. New probes and deployment platforms have been developed for the installation and maintenance of the arrays and new systems are in place and under development for the recovery of the data. Generally, the complete array or its components have to be recovered to download the data. However, this summer 2011, a new optic modem system was

  13. Manual for the geochemical analyses of marine sediments and suspended particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, D. H.; Rantala, R. T. T.

    1992-07-01

    Accurate and precise sampling and analytical procedures are essential in environmental geochemical studies. This report provides a detailed description of the techniques and analytical procedures for sampling, grain size determinations, and for precise and accurate AAS determination of the major and trace metals in marine sediments and suspended particulate matter. In addition, it describes the procedures for the chemical partition of the metals, determination of readily oxidizable organic matter, and calcium carbonate. A separate section discusses the normalization of trace metal data.

  14. An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Petitgirard, S.; Mezouar, M.; Borchert, M.; Appel, K.; Liermann, H.-P.; Andrault, D.

    2012-01-15

    Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth.

  15. ) Mold Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Myung-Duk; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of basicity (CaO/SiO2), B2O3, and Li2O addition on the crystallization behaviors of lime-silica-based mold fluxes have been investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and single hot thermocouple technique. It was found that the crystallization temperature of cuspidine increased with increasing the basicity of mold fluxes. The crystallization of wollastonite was suppressed with increasing the mold flux basicity due to the enhancement of cuspidine crystallization. The addition of B2O3 suppresses the crystallization of mold flux. The crystallization temperature of mold flux decreases with Li2O addition. The size of cuspidine increases, while the number of cuspidine decreases with increasing mold flux basicity. The morphology of cuspidine in mold fluxes with lower basicity is largely dendritic. The dendritic cuspidine in mold fluxes is composed of many fine cuspidine crystals. On the contrary, in mold fluxes with higher basicity, the cuspidine crystals are larger in size with mainly faceted morphology. The crystalline phase evolution was also calculated using a thermodynamic database, and compared with the experimental results determined by DSC and XRD. The results of thermodynamic calculation of crystalline phase formation are in accordance with the results determined by DSC and XRD.

  16. Hydrologic Regulation of Global Geochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.

    2015-12-01

    understand the processes controlling marine isotopic weathering processes, the need to integrate solute and solid transport into Earth system models, and the need to understand the role of extreme physical and temporal heterogeneities in moderating geochemical fluxes.

  17. Traceds: An Experimental Trace Element Partitioning Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, R. L.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this project, which is part of the EARTHCHEM initiative, is to compile the existing experimental trace element partitioning data, and to develop a transparent, accessible resource for the community. The primary goal of experimental trace element partitioning studies is to create a database that can be used to develop models of how trace elements behave in natural geochemical systems. The range of approaches as to how this is accomplished and how the data are reported differs dramatically from one system to another and one investigator to another. This provides serious challenges to the creation of a coherent database - and suggests the need for a standard format for data presentation and reporting. The driving force for this compilation is to provide community access to the complete database for trace element experiments. Our new effort includes all the published analytical results from experimental determinations. In compiling the data, we have set a minimum standard for the data to be included. The threshold criteria include: Experimental conditions (temperature, pressure, device, container, time, etc.) Major element composition of the phases Trace element analyses of the phases Data sources that did not report these minimum components were not included. The rationale for not including such data is that the degree of equilibration is unknown, and more important, no rigorous approach to modeling the behavior of trace elements is possible without a knowledge of the actual concentrations or the temperature and pressure of formation. The data are stored using a schema derived from that of the Library of Experimental Phase Relations (LEPR), modified to account for additional metadata, and restructured to permit multiple analytical entries for various element/technique/standard combinations. Our ultimate goal is to produce a database together with a flexible user interface that will be useful for experimentalists to set up their work and to build

  18. Manual hierarchical clustering of regional geochemical data using a Bayesian finite mixture model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of regional scale, multivariate geochemical data is aided by a statistical technique called “clustering.” We investigate a particular clustering procedure by applying it to geochemical data collected in the State of Colorado, United States of America. The clustering procedure partitions the field samples for the entire survey area into two clusters. The field samples in each cluster are partitioned again to create two subclusters, and so on. This manual procedure generates a hierarchy of clusters, and the different levels of the hierarchy show geochemical and geological processes occurring at different spatial scales. Although there are many different clustering methods, we use Bayesian finite mixture modeling with two probability distributions, which yields two clusters. The model parameters are estimated with Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability density function, which usually has multiple modes. Each mode has its own set of model parameters; each set is checked to ensure that it is consistent both with the data and with independent geologic knowledge. The set of model parameters that is most consistent with the independent geologic knowledge is selected for detailed interpretation and partitioning of the field samples.

  19. Temporal stability of network partitions.

    PubMed

    Petri, Giovanni; Expert, Paul

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to find the best temporal partition at any time scale and rank the relevance of partitions found at different time scales. This method is based on random walkers coevolving with the network and as such constitutes a generalization of partition stability to the case of temporal networks. We show that, when applied to a toy model and real data sets, temporal stability uncovers structures that are persistent over meaningful time scales as well as important isolated events, making it an effective tool to study both abrupt changes and gradual evolution of a network mesoscopic structures.

  20. Quantum field theory of partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.M.; Brody, D.C.; Meister, B.K.

    1999-07-01

    Given a sequence of numbers {l_brace}a{sub n}{r_brace}, it is always possible to find a set of Feynman rules that reproduce that sequence. For the special case of the partitions of the integers, the appropriate Feynman rules give rise to graphs that represent the partitions in a clear pictorial fashion. These Feynman rules can be used to generate the Bell numbers B(n) and the Stirling numbers S(n,k) that are associated with the partitions of the integers. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Temporal stability of network partitions.

    PubMed

    Petri, Giovanni; Expert, Paul

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to find the best temporal partition at any time scale and rank the relevance of partitions found at different time scales. This method is based on random walkers coevolving with the network and as such constitutes a generalization of partition stability to the case of temporal networks. We show that, when applied to a toy model and real data sets, temporal stability uncovers structures that are persistent over meaningful time scales as well as important isolated events, making it an effective tool to study both abrupt changes and gradual evolution of a network mesoscopic structures. PMID:25215787

  2. Partitioning ecosystems for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Murray, Martyn G

    2016-03-01

    Decline in the abundance of renewable natural resources (RNRs) coupled with increasing demands of an expanding human population will greatly intensify competition for Earth's natural resources during this century, yet curiously, analytical approaches to the management of productive ecosystems (ecological theory of wildlife harvesting, tragedy of the commons, green economics, and bioeconomics) give only peripheral attention to the driving influence of competition on resource exploitation. Here, I apply resource competition theory (RCT) to the exploitation of RNRs and derive four general policies in support of their sustainable and equitable use: (1) regulate resource extraction technology to avoid damage to the resource base; (2) increase efficiency of resource use and reduce waste at every step in the resource supply chain and distribution network; (3) partition ecosystems with the harvesting niche as the basic organizing principle for sustainable management of natural resources by multiple users; and (4) increase negative feedback between consumer and resource to bring about long-term sustainable use. A simple policy framework demonstrates how RCT integrates with other elements of sustainability science to better manage productive ecosystems. Several problem areas of RNR management are discussed in the light of RCT, including tragedy of the commons, overharvesting, resource collapse, bycatch, single species quotas, and simplification of ecosystems.

  3. Partitioning ecosystems for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Murray, Martyn G

    2016-03-01

    Decline in the abundance of renewable natural resources (RNRs) coupled with increasing demands of an expanding human population will greatly intensify competition for Earth's natural resources during this century, yet curiously, analytical approaches to the management of productive ecosystems (ecological theory of wildlife harvesting, tragedy of the commons, green economics, and bioeconomics) give only peripheral attention to the driving influence of competition on resource exploitation. Here, I apply resource competition theory (RCT) to the exploitation of RNRs and derive four general policies in support of their sustainable and equitable use: (1) regulate resource extraction technology to avoid damage to the resource base; (2) increase efficiency of resource use and reduce waste at every step in the resource supply chain and distribution network; (3) partition ecosystems with the harvesting niche as the basic organizing principle for sustainable management of natural resources by multiple users; and (4) increase negative feedback between consumer and resource to bring about long-term sustainable use. A simple policy framework demonstrates how RCT integrates with other elements of sustainability science to better manage productive ecosystems. Several problem areas of RNR management are discussed in the light of RCT, including tragedy of the commons, overharvesting, resource collapse, bycatch, single species quotas, and simplification of ecosystems. PMID:27209800

  4. Geochemical evidence for waning magmatism and polycyclic volcanism at Crater Flat, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V.; Crowe, B.M.

    1991-12-31

    Petrologic and geochemical studies of basaltic rocks in the Yucca Mountain region are currently focused on understanding the evolution of volcanism in the Crater Flat volcanic field and the mechanisms of polycyclic volcanism at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, the youngest center in the Crater Flat volcanic field. Geochemical and petrologic data indicate that the magma chambers which supplied the volcanic centers in Crater Flat became situated at greater crustal depths as the field evolved. Deep magma chambers may be related to a waning magma flux that was unable to sustain upper crystal magma conduits and chambers. Geochemical data from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center indicate that eruptive units identified from field and geomorphic relationships are geochemically distinct. The geochemical variations cannot be explained by fractional crystallization of a single magma batch, indicating that several magma batches were involved in the formation of the Lathrop Wells center. Considering the low magma flux in the Yucca Mountain region in the Quaternary, the probability of several magma batches erupting essentially simultaneously at Lathrop Wells in considered remote. It is more likely that the Lathrop Wells center was formed by a series of eruptions that took place over many thousands of years. The geochemical data from Lathrop Wells is consistent with the concept of a complex, polycyclic volcano, which was originally proposed based on geomorphic and soil-development data.

  5. Geochemical evidence for waning magmatism and polycyclic volcanism at Crater Flat, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, B. M.

    Petrologic and geochemical studies of basaltic rocks in the Yucca Mountain region are currently focused on understanding the evolution of volcanism in the Crater Flat volcanic field and the mechanisms of polycyclic volcanism at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, the youngest center in the Crater Flat volcanic field. Geochemical and petrologic data indicate that the magma chambers which supplied the volcanic centers in Crater Flat became situated at greater crustal depths as the field evolved. Deep magma chambers may be related to a waning magma flux that was unable to sustain upper crystal magma conduits and chambers. Geochemical data from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center indicate that eruptive units identified from field and geomorphic relationships are geochemically distinct. The geochemical variations cannot be explained by fractional crystallization of a single magma batch, indicating that several magma batches were involved in the formation of the Lathrop Wells center. Considering the low magma flux in the Yucca Mountain region in the Quaternary, the probability of several magma batches erupting essentially simultaneously at Lathrop Wells in considered remote. It is more likely that the Lathrop Wells center was formed by a series of eruptions that took place over many thousands of years. The geochemical data from Lathrop Wells is consistent with the concept of a complex, polycyclic volcano, which was originally proposed based on geomorphic and soil-development data.

  6. Graph Partitioning and Sequencing Software

    1995-09-19

    Graph partitioning is a fundemental problem in many scientific contexts. CHACO2.0 is a software package designed to partition and sequence graphs. CHACO2.0 allows for recursive application of several methods for finding small edge separators in weighted graphs. These methods include inertial, spectral, Kernighan Lin and multilevel methods in addition to several simpler strategies. Each of these approaches can be used to partition the graph into two, four, or eight pieces at each level of recursion.more » In addition, the Kernighan Lin method can be used to improve partitions generated by any of the other algorithms. CHACO2.0 can also be used to address various graph sequencing problems, with applications to scientific computing, database design, gene sequencing and other problems.« less

  7. Water partitioning between bridgmanite and postperovskite in the lowermost mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Joshua P.; Tsuchiya, Jun; Bina, Craig R.; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2016-11-01

    The lowermost mantle appears to contain geochemically primitive reservoirs of volatile components including water, as evidenced by certain ocean island basalts (Hallis et al., 2015). We used ab initio lattice dynamics to calculate the water partition coefficient between bridgmanite and postperovskite using quasi-harmonic free energies to determine how water is distributed between nominally anhydrous minerals in the D″ region. In the absence of aluminum, hydrogen was incorporated into both phases by a simple substitution of Mg2+ ⇔ 2H+, and we found that water favors bridgmanite over postperovskite by a factor of about 5:1 at conditions where an average mantle geotherm intersects the phase boundary. In the Al-bearing system, hydrogen and aluminum were coupled as Si4+ ⇔Al3+ +H+ defects into both phases, and we found that water favors postperovskite over bridgmanite in the Al-bearing system by a factor of about 3:1 at ambient mantle conditions, and by about 8:1 at colder slab conditions. Our results indicate that aluminum controls the partitioning of water between bridgmanite and postperovskite, and that aluminous postperovskite may be a potential host for primordial water in the lowermost region of the mantle. The strong partitioning of water into aluminous postperovskite over bridgmanite provides a potential mechanism for dehydration melting in the lowermost mantle that could be a source for ocean island basalts in regions of upwelling.

  8. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partition. 152.33 Section 152.33 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN..., REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152.33 Partition. (a) Partition without application. If the Secretary of the Interior shall find that...

  9. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partition. 152.33 Section 152.33 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN..., REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152.33 Partition. (a) Partition without application. If the Secretary of the Interior shall find that...

  10. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    dissolved substances" or "more like colloids" as the division between behaviors of macromolecules versus colloids remains ill-defined. Below we detail our work on two broadly defined objectives: (i) Partitioning of ENP into octanol, lipid bilayer, and water, and (ii) disruption of lipid bilayers by ENPs. We have found that the partitioning of NP reaches pseudo-equilibrium distributions between water and organic phases. The equilibrium partitioning most strongly depends on the particle surface charge, which leads us to the conclusion that electrostatic interactions are critical to understanding the fate of NP in the environment. We also show that the kinetic rate at which particle partition is a function of their size (small particles partition faster by number) as can be predicted from simple DLVO models. We have found that particle number density is the most effective dosimetry to present our results and provide quantitative comparison across experiments and experimental platforms. Cumulatively, our work shows that lipid bilayers are a more effective organic phase than octanol because of the definable surface area and ease of interpretation of the results. Our early comparison of NP partitioning between water and lipids suggest that this measurement can be predictive of bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. We have shown that nanoparticle disrupt lipid bilayer membranes and detail how NP-bilayer interaction leads to the malfunction of lipid bilayers in regulating the fluxes of ionic charges and molecules. Our results show that the disruption of the lipid membranes is similar to that of toxin melittin, except single particles can disrupt a bilayer. We show that only a single particle is required to disrupt a 150 nm DOPC liposome. The equilibrium leakage of membranes is a function of the particle number density and particle surface charge, consistent with results from our partitioning experiments. Our disruption experiments with varying surface functionality show that

  11. Influence of Silicate Melt Composition on Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, S. J.; Domanik, K.; Drake, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The depletion of the siderophile elements in the Earth's upper mantle relative to the chondritic meteorites is a geochemical imprint of core segregation. Therefore, metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle. The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. Several recent studies have shown the importance of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of siderophile elements between silicate and metallic liquids. It has been demonstrated that many elements display increased solubility in less polymerized (mafic) melts. However, the importance of silicate melt composition was believed to be minor compared to the influence of oxygen fugacity until studies showed that melt composition is an important factor at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that melt composition is also important for partitioning of high valency siderophile elements. Atmospheric experiments were conducted, varying only silicate melt composition, to assess the importance of silicate melt composition for the partitioning of W, Co and Ga and found that the valence of the dissolving species plays an important role in determining the effect of composition on solubility. In this study, we extend the data set to higher pressures and investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid.

  12. Partition behaviour of alkylphenols in crude oil/brine systems under subsurface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, B.; Larter, S. R.

    1997-10-01

    Partition of organic solutes between oils and water in the subsurface is an important geochemical process occurring during petroleum migration and reservoiring, during water washing, and during petroleum production. Currently no data exists on the quantitative aspects of the partition process at subsurface conditions for solutes such as phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons which are major components of both oils and waters. We have constructed an equilibration device for oils and waters based on flow injection analysis principles to measure partition coefficients of alkylphenols in crude oil/brine systems under reservoir conditions. Concentrations of C 0C 2 alkylphenols in waters and solid phase extracts of crude oils produced in the device were determined by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (RP-HPLC-ED), partition coefficients being measured as a function of pressure (25-340 bar), temperature (25-150°C), and water salinity (0-100,000 mg/L sodium chloride) for a variety of oils. Partition coefficients for all compounds decreased with increasing temperature, increased with water salinity and crude oil bulk NSO content, and showed little change with varying pressure. These laboratory measurements, determined under conditions close to those typically encountered in petroleum reservoirs, suggest temperature, water salinity, and crude oil bulk NSO content will have important influence on oil-water partition processes in the subsurface during migration and water washing.

  13. Partitioning of Organic Contaminants and Tracer Compounds in a CO2-Brine System at High Salinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Janesko, D.; Trutna, J.

    2011-12-01

    Nonionic chemical species including gases and organic compounds partition between the fluid CO2 phase and the aqueous phase in geologic carbon sequestration systems. The injection and migration of CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration systems covers a wide range of pressure and temperature, so it is important to understand the partitioning of these compounds at various P-T conditions and salinities. Geochemical data is particularly lacking for the partitioning of organic contaminant compounds and tracer compounds between highly saline brines and CO2. Most groundwater is relatively low in organic contaminants; however, groundwater associated with hydrocarbon migration pathways, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and hydrocarbon storage or extraction can contain high concentrations of known organic contaminants. CO2 injection in these systems may therefore be more likely to result in partitioning of contaminants into the CO2 phase that could, upon migration, represent an important risk to groundwater resources. We present the experimental apparatus and determination of partition coefficients between brine and CO2 for a suite of compounds including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), and low molecular weight polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In addition, partition coefficients are determined for the important gas phase tracer compounds: SF6 and Krypton covering a P-T envelope consistent with CO2 injection and plume migration to the near surface.

  14. Geochemical constraints on the origin of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Hypothesis for the origin of the moon involve variants on capture, double-planet, and fission processes. Double-planet and fission hypotheses are examined in the light of siderophile trace elements. The siderophile trace elements chosen (W, Re, Mo, P, Ga, Ge) have well understood geochemical behavior such that appropriate metal/silicate partition coefficients are available and their abundances in the lunar and terrestrial mantles 4.4-4.5 Gyr ago may be reasonably inferred. The fission hypothesis of Ringwood (1979) is not consistent with the behavior of Re, Mo, and P. The hybrid fission hypothesis of Wanke et al. (1983) overcomes many of the deficiencies of Ringwood's hypothesis, but is not readily reconcilable with the behavior of Re and Ir. The double-planet hypothesis as most recently advanced by Newsom and Drake (1982, 1983) appears to be consistent with siderophile-element behavior in the moon.

  15. Geochemical cycles of atmospheric gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Drever, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    The processes that control the atmosphere and atmospheric changes are reviewed. The geochemical cycles of water vapor, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and minor atmospheric constituents are examined. Changes in atmospheric chemistry with time are discussed using evidence from the rock record and analysis of the present atmosphere. The role of biological evolution in the history of the atmosphere and projected changes in the future atmosphere are considered.

  16. Tracer Partitioning in Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Hesse, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The concentration distributions of geochemical tracers in a subsurface reservoir can be used as an indication of the reservoir flow paths and constituent fluid origin. In this case, we are motivated by the origin of marked geochemical gradients in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir in northeastern New Mexico. This reservoir contains 99% CO2 with various trace noble gas components and overlies the formation brine in a sloping aquifer. It is thought that magmatic CO2 entered the reservoir, and displaced the brine. This displacement created gradients in the concentrations of the noble gases. Two models to explain noble gas partitioning in two-phase flow are presented here. The first model assumes that the noble gases act as tracers and uses a first order non-linear partial differential equation to compute the volume fraction of each phase along the displament path. A one-way coupled partial differential equation determines the tracer concentration, which has no effect on the overall flow or phase saturations. The second model treats each noble gas as a regular component resulting in a three-component, two-phase system. As the noble gas injection concentration goes to zero, we see the three-component system behave like the one-way coupled system of the first model. Both the analytical and numerical solutions are presented for these models. For the process of a gas displacing a liquid, we see that a noble gas tracer with greater preference for the gas phase, such as Helium, will move more quickly along the flowpath than a heavier tracer that will more easily enter the liquid phase, such as Argon. When we include partial miscibility of both the major and trace components, these differences in speed are shown in a bank of the tracer at the saturation front. In the three component model, the noble gas bank has finite width and concentration. In the limit where the noble gas is treated as a tracer, the width of the bank is zero and the concentration increases linearly

  17. The geochemical constraints on Earth's accretion and core formation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, J. F.; Kleine, T.; Bourdon, B.

    2010-12-01

    There are now a wide range of geochemical observations that can be used to place constraints on Earth's first hundred million years. During this time the Earth accreted through collisions between numerous planetary embryos, and these collisions are thought to have caused significant melting and segregation of metal, forming the Earth's core. Information on the pressure, temperature, and oxygen fugacity conditions of core formation can be obtained from the abundances of siderophile elements in Earth's mantle and high pressure partitioning experiments. Timing information can be obtained from isotopic measurements, notably Hf-W and U-Pb. Here we present a simple geochemical box model that can be used to provide constraints on Earth's accretion and core formation. A key parameter in the model is the degree of equilibration during metal-silicate segregation. Existing models have shown that the siderophile element abundances are consistent with full equilibration in a deep magma ocean, with an increase in oxygen fugacity during accretion. Here we show that the siderophile element abundances are equally consistent with scenarios involving partial equilibration. The Hf-W isotopic observations constrain the degree of equilibration to be at least 36%. The timing constraints depend strongly on the degree of equilibration, but nevertheless bounds can be placed on the timing of Earth's accretion. With full equilibration, the Hf-W observations imply a rapid early accretion stage (at least 80% of Earth accreting within 35 Myr), but with partial equilibration accretion may be much more protracted. If Pb partitions into Earth’s core, the U-Pb observations can be used to constrain the late stages of accretion, and are consistent with the final 10% of Earth’s accretion occurring during the Moon-forming giant impact at ~4.45Ga.

  18. A review of the recent geochemical evolution of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (1927-2010)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietruszka, Aaron J.; Vlastélic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Between 1927 and 2010, more than one hundred eruptions of Piton de la Fournaise produced ~1 km3 of lava, and the volcano’s summit collapsed twice (in 1931 and 2007). These lavas display, respectively, 20 and 65 % of the Sr–Nd and the Pb isotope ranges reported for La Réunion volcanoes over their known eruptive record (3.8 Ma). Variations in major and trace element concentrations and Sr–Pb isotopes do not define a temporal trend at the scale of the century, but display systematic short-term cyclic fluctuations. The positive correlation between 87Sr/86Sr and ratios of trace elements that are more versus less incompatible during partial melting of the mantle (e.g., Nd/Sm, La/Sm) probably results from the sampling of small-scale heterogeneities within the plume source. Changes in the degree of melting and/or crystallization are debated, but these appear ultimately linked to source properties. Lead isotopes do not co-vary with Sr isotopes, in part because of the partitioning of Pb into dense metallic phases that are preferentially sampled during high-flux eruptions. Taken together, Sr–Nd–Pb–Os–Th isotopes do not support contamination of magma with genetically unrelated components, such as the underlying Indian oceanic crust, mantle lithosphere, seawater, or seawater-altered lavas. Yet, in some rare cases (e.g. the 1998 Hudson eruption), the compositional patterns suggest that the parental magma assimilated older volcanic products within the edifice, such as crystal cumulates and/or interstitial differentiated melts. The geochemical fluctuations over the 1927–2010 time period constrain the residence time of magma in the shallow reservoir to 10–30 years and its size to 0.1–0.3 km3. The magma residence time during the course of the long-lived 1998 eruption is estimated to be an order of magnitude shorter, but the reservoir was probably of similar size. Instead, the shorter magma residence for the 1998 eruption was probably due to a higher magma

  19. Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, A; Carroll, S; Esser, B; Luther, G W; O'Day, P; Randall, S

    1999-08-16

    Our objective in the characterization of sediments from Seaplane Lagoon at the Alameda Naval Air Station (NAS) was to determine the geochemical interactions that control the partitioning of cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc between the sediments and the porewaters. Our approach was to collect several cores at the east outfall location of the Seaplane Lagoon. We determined the porewater chemistry by (1) making in situ micro-electrode measurements, (2) extracting porewaters, and (3) modeling geochemical reactions. We determined the sediment chemistry by measuring (1) elemental abundance, (2) mineralogy, and (3) trace-element speciation. This information should help the US Navy determine the long-term hazard of the sediments if they are left in place and the short-term hazard if they are dredged. We did not fully examine the geochemistry of sediments from the West Beach Landfill Wetlands site, because these sediments were distinct from the Seaplane Lagoon sediments. Our initial motivation for studying the Landfill Wetlands site was to determine the trace-element geochemistry in Seaplane Lagoon sediments that had been dredged and then disposed in the Landfill Wetlands. Unfortunately, the location of these dredged sediments is unknown. The cores we sampled were not from the Seaplane Lagoon.

  20. Rectilinear partitioning of irregular data parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1991-01-01

    New mapping algorithms for domain oriented data-parallel computations, where the workload is distributed irregularly throughout the domain, but exhibits localized communication patterns are described. Researchers consider the problem of partitioning the domain for parallel processing in such a way that the workload on the most heavily loaded processor is minimized, subject to the constraint that the partition be perfectly rectilinear. Rectilinear partitions are useful on architectures that have a fast local mesh network. Discussed here is an improved algorithm for finding the optimal partitioning in one dimension, new algorithms for partitioning in two dimensions, and optimal partitioning in three dimensions. The application of these algorithms to real problems are discussed.

  1. METAL PARTITIONING IN COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes ongoing research efforts at the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency examining [high temperature] metal behavior within combustion environments. The partitioning of non-volatile (Cr and Ni), semi-volatil...

  2. Radial diffusion and ion partitioning in the Io torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    A model is presented for radial diffusion and charge state partitioning of sulfur and oxygen ions in the Io torus, including effects of electron impact and charge exchange. When applied to Voyager 1 radial profiles of total ion flux tube content, the model shows that the ion residence time in the torus, tau(D), as defined in spectroscopic studies of ion partitioning, is related to the radial diffusion coefficient, D(LL), at L = 7 by tau(D) approximately 8/D(LL)(7). This result appears to bring spectroscopic estimates of the ion residence time (tau/D/ greater than about 60 to 100 days) into reasonable agreement with estimates of D(LL) from magnetospheric diffusion studies, D(LL) equals approximately 10 to the -6th/s.

  3. Some trees with partition dimension three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredlina, Ketut Queena; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    The concept of partition dimension of a graph was introduced by Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang (1998) [2]. Let G(V, E) be a connected graph. For S ⊆ V (G) and v ∈ V (G), define the distance d(v, S) from v to S is min{d(v, x)|x ∈ S}. Let Π be an ordered partition of V (G) and Π = {S1, S2, ..., Sk }. The representation r(v|Π) of vertex v with respect to Π is (d(v, S1), d(v, S2), ..., d(v, Sk)). If the representations of all vertices are distinct, then the partition Π is called a resolving partition of G. The partition dimension of G is the minimum k such that G has a resolving partition with k partition classes. In this paper, we characterize some classes of trees with partition dimension three, namely olive trees, weeds, and centipedes.

  4. Evapotranspiration partition at sub-daily scale using laser and chamber techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Parkes, S. D.; McCabe, M. F.; Azcurra, C.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning is important for quantifying the water budget and understanding vegetation control on water cycles in various ecosystems. With the development of spectroscopy-based techniques for in-situ isotope measurements, the use of stable isotope based ET partition is rising rapidly. The sub-daily scale ET partition, however, is still rarely seen in the literature. In this study, we conducted an intensive field campaign measuring ET partition using laser-based isotope and chamber techniques in a pasture system between May and June 2012 in eastern Australia. Six soil collars were used, three of which had natural vegetation and the other three were bare soil collars where vegetation was artificially removed. The vegetated and bare soil collars were used to determine the isotopic composition of ET and evaporation, respectively. The isotopic composition of the transpiration flux was determined using a Licor leaf chamber for grasses inside the vegetated collars. The diurnal patterns in isotopic compositions were observed. In the morning, the isotopic compositions were depleted. The isotopic composition of ET became more enriched and leveled off during midday. Similar patterns were found for the isotopic composition of evaporation. Overall the total ET flux over the campaign was dominated by evaporation, though transpiration contributions were high between 10am and 12pm. This study demonstrated the use of chamber-based measurements for direct partitioning of ET at sub-daily scale and showed a rarely observed diurnal pattern of ET partition.

  5. Terminology for trace-element partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, P. ); Drake, M. ); Jones, J.; McKay, G. ); Leeman, W. ); Longhi, J. ); Nielsen, R. ); Palme, H. ); Shaw, D. ); Takahashi, E. ); Watson, B. )

    1993-04-01

    A self-consistent terminology for partitioning data is presented. Ratios of the concentration of a component in two phases are termed partition coefficients and given the symbol D. Ratios of partition coefficients are termed exchange coefficients and given the symbol K[sub D]. The prefix bulk implies that these coefficients are weighted according to the proportions of coexisting phases. Bulk partition and bulk exchange coefficients are denoted by [bar D] and [ovr K[sub D

  6. Energy Partition From Various Climate Conditions And Land Use Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Han; Hsu2, Pang-Chi

    2015-04-01

    Investigating how energy partitions and what factors control energy exchange is critical for better understanding the hydrological cycle, boundary layer dynamics, and land -atmosphere coupling. Climate and land use conditions are the two main factors to control energy partitation. However, previous studies discussed energy partition and factors that controlled Bowen ratio (i.e., ratio of sensible heat flux to latent heat flux) in limited land use types and climate conditions. To provide a more comprehensive analysis over various climate and vegetation types, in this study, we studied eleven different land use types in the eight different climate zones within the United State. The results found out that the Mediterranean climate zone with dry summer season, dry arid (desert) climate zone, and the higher latitude area with severe winter would had higher Bowen ratio, lower precipitation and net radiation. In contrast, the humid climate zones had the lower Bowen ratio, higher net radiation and precipitation. Moreover, the higher Bowen ratio usually happened in the winter or early spring seasons. Regarding land conditions, it is found that soil moistures are the key factor to control Bowen ratio in the drier climate areas. Hence, the grassland and closed shrublands sites have higher Bowen ratio than deciduous broadleaf forests and evergreen needle-leaf forests sites' because of shallower root systems that lack access to the full storage of water in the vadose zone. However, in the humid areas, land use factors, such as stomatal resistance and leaf area, would play an important role in changing latent heat and sensible heat. Based on the tight relationships between Bowen ratio and conditions of climate and land use, we suggest that Bowen ratio could be a useful tool for understanding the potential feedbacks of changes in climate and land use to energy partition and exchange.

  7. 25 CFR 158.56 - Partition records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partition records. 158.56 Section 158.56 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER OSAGE LANDS § 158.56 Partition records. Upon completion of an action in partition, a copy of the judgment roll showing schedule of costs...

  8. 25 CFR 158.56 - Partition records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partition records. 158.56 Section 158.56 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER OSAGE LANDS § 158.56 Partition records. Upon completion of an action in partition, a copy of the judgment roll showing schedule of costs...

  9. TAPIR--Finnish national geochemical baseline database.

    PubMed

    Jarva, Jaana; Tarvainen, Timo; Reinikainen, Jussi; Eklund, Mikael

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, a Government Decree on the Assessment of Soil Contamination and Remediation Needs has generated a need for reliable and readily accessible data on geochemical baseline concentrations in Finnish soils. According to the Decree, baseline concentrations, referring both to the natural geological background concentrations and the diffuse anthropogenic input of substances, shall be taken into account in the soil contamination assessment process. This baseline information is provided in a national geochemical baseline database, TAPIR, that is publicly available via the Internet. Geochemical provinces with elevated baseline concentrations were delineated to provide regional geochemical baseline values. The nationwide geochemical datasets were used to divide Finland into geochemical provinces. Several metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn) showed anomalous concentrations in seven regions that were defined as metal provinces. Arsenic did not follow a similar distribution to any other elements, and four arsenic provinces were separately determined. Nationwide geochemical datasets were not available for some other important elements such as Cd and Pb. Although these elements are included in the TAPIR system, their distribution does not necessarily follow the ones pre-defined for metal and arsenic provinces. Regional geochemical baseline values, presented as upper limit of geochemical variation within the region, can be used as trigger values to assess potential soil contamination. Baseline values have also been used to determine upper and lower guideline values that must be taken into account as a tool in basic risk assessment. If regional geochemical baseline values are available, the national guideline values prescribed in the Decree based on ecological risks can be modified accordingly. The national geochemical baseline database provides scientifically sound, easily accessible and generally accepted information on the baseline values, and it can be used in various

  10. TAPIR--Finnish national geochemical baseline database.

    PubMed

    Jarva, Jaana; Tarvainen, Timo; Reinikainen, Jussi; Eklund, Mikael

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, a Government Decree on the Assessment of Soil Contamination and Remediation Needs has generated a need for reliable and readily accessible data on geochemical baseline concentrations in Finnish soils. According to the Decree, baseline concentrations, referring both to the natural geological background concentrations and the diffuse anthropogenic input of substances, shall be taken into account in the soil contamination assessment process. This baseline information is provided in a national geochemical baseline database, TAPIR, that is publicly available via the Internet. Geochemical provinces with elevated baseline concentrations were delineated to provide regional geochemical baseline values. The nationwide geochemical datasets were used to divide Finland into geochemical provinces. Several metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn) showed anomalous concentrations in seven regions that were defined as metal provinces. Arsenic did not follow a similar distribution to any other elements, and four arsenic provinces were separately determined. Nationwide geochemical datasets were not available for some other important elements such as Cd and Pb. Although these elements are included in the TAPIR system, their distribution does not necessarily follow the ones pre-defined for metal and arsenic provinces. Regional geochemical baseline values, presented as upper limit of geochemical variation within the region, can be used as trigger values to assess potential soil contamination. Baseline values have also been used to determine upper and lower guideline values that must be taken into account as a tool in basic risk assessment. If regional geochemical baseline values are available, the national guideline values prescribed in the Decree based on ecological risks can be modified accordingly. The national geochemical baseline database provides scientifically sound, easily accessible and generally accepted information on the baseline values, and it can be used in various

  11. Growth rate controlled barium partitioning in calcite and aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetschl, Katja Elisabeth; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Baldermann, Andre; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The barium (Ba) content and the Ba/Ca molar ratios in biogenic and abiotic carbonates have been widely used from the scientific community as a geochemical proxy especially in marine and early diagenetic settings. The Ba content of carbonate minerals has been earlier associated to changes in oceanic circulation that may have been caused by upwelling, changes in weathering regimes and river-runoff as well as melt water discharge. The physicochemical controls of Ba ion incorporation in the two most abundant CaCO3 polymorphs found in Earth's surface environments, i.e. calcite and aragonite, have adequately been studied only for calcite. These earlier studies (i.e. [1]) suggest that at increasing growth rate, Ba partitioning in calcite is increasing as well. In contrast, to date the effect of growth rate on the partitioning of Ba in aragonite remains questionable, despite the fact that this mineral phase is the predominant carbonate-forming polymorph in shallow marine environments. To shed light on the mechanisms controlling Ba ion uptake in carbonates in this study we performed steady-state Ba co-precipitation experiments with calcite and aragonite at 25°C. The obtained results for the partitioning of Ba in calcite are in good agreement with those reported earlier by [1], whereas those for aragonite indicate a reduction of Ba partitioning at elevated aragonite growth rates, with the partitioning coefficient value between solid and fluid to be approaching the unity. This finding is good agreement with the formation of a solid solution in the aragonite-witherite system, owing to the isostructural crystallography of the two mineral phases. Moreover, our data set provides new insights that are required for reconstructing the evolution of the Ba content of pristine marine versus diagenetically altered carbonate minerals commonly occurring in marine subfloor settings, as the thermodynamically less stable aragonite will transform to calcite enriched in Ba, whilst affecting

  12. Geochemical partitioning of Cu and Ni in mangrove sediments: relationships with their bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Ramteke, Darwin; Chakraborty, Sucharita

    2015-04-15

    Sequential extraction study was performed to determine the concentrations of non-residual metal-complexes in the mangrove sediments from the Divar Island, (west coast of India). Accumulation of metal in the mangrove roots (from the same location) was determined and used as an indicator of bioavailability of metal. An attempt was made to establish a mechanistic linkage between the non-residual metal complexes and their bioavailability in the mangrove system. The non-residual fractions of Cu and Ni were mainly associated with Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide and organic phases in the sediments. A part of these metal fractions were bioavailable in the system. These two phases were the major controlling factors for Ni speciation and their bioavailability in the studied sediments. However, Cu was found to interact more strongly with the organic phases than Ni in the mangrove sediments. Organic phases in the mangrove sediments acted as buffer to control the speciation and bioavailability of Cu in the system. PMID:25748786

  13. Geochemical partitioning of Cu and Ni in mangrove sediments: relationships with their bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Ramteke, Darwin; Chakraborty, Sucharita

    2015-04-15

    Sequential extraction study was performed to determine the concentrations of non-residual metal-complexes in the mangrove sediments from the Divar Island, (west coast of India). Accumulation of metal in the mangrove roots (from the same location) was determined and used as an indicator of bioavailability of metal. An attempt was made to establish a mechanistic linkage between the non-residual metal complexes and their bioavailability in the mangrove system. The non-residual fractions of Cu and Ni were mainly associated with Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide and organic phases in the sediments. A part of these metal fractions were bioavailable in the system. These two phases were the major controlling factors for Ni speciation and their bioavailability in the studied sediments. However, Cu was found to interact more strongly with the organic phases than Ni in the mangrove sediments. Organic phases in the mangrove sediments acted as buffer to control the speciation and bioavailability of Cu in the system.

  14. Twisted sectors from plane partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shouvik; Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Li, Wei; Peng, Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Twisted sectors arise naturally in the bosonic higher spin CFTs at their free points, as well as in the associated symmetric orbifolds. We identify the coset representations of the twisted sector states using the description of W_{∞} representations in terms of plane partitions. We confirm these proposals by a microscopic null-vector analysis, and by matching the excitation spectrum of these representations with the orbifold prediction.

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

  16. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  17. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  18. Geochemical challenge to earthquake prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Wakita, H

    1996-01-01

    The current status of geochemical and groundwater observations for earthquake prediction in Japan is described. The development of the observations is discussed in relation to the progress of the earthquake prediction program in Japan. Three major findings obtained from our recent studies are outlined. (i) Long-term radon observation data over 18 years at the SKE (Suikoen) well indicate that the anomalous radon change before the 1978 Izu-Oshima-kinkai earthquake can with high probability be attributed to precursory changes. (ii) It is proposed that certain sensitive wells exist which have the potential to detect precursory changes. (iii) The appearance and nonappearance of coseismic radon drops at the KSM (Kashima) well reflect changes in the regional stress state of an observation area. In addition, some preliminary results of chemical changes of groundwater prior to the 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-ken nanbu) earthquake are presented. PMID:11607665

  19. A hybrid model of the CO2 geochemical cycle and its application to large impact events.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Richardson, S M; Pollack, J B; Toon, O B

    1986-05-01

    A hybrid model of the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is presented which is capable of calculating the partitioning of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere, ocean, and sedimentary rocks. The ocean is subdivided into a shallow, mixed layer, which remains in equilibrium with the atmosphere, and a massive, deep layer which does not. Gradients in dissolved carbon content are established between the mixed layer and the deep ocean as a consequence of downward fluxes of fecal matter and of dead planktonic organisms. The dissolved carbon content and alkalinity of the ocean as a whole are controlled by weathering and metamorphism of sedimentary rocks. Equilibrium solutions are derived for the preindustrial atmosphere/ocean system and for a system that may be similar to that existing during the Late Cretaceous Period. The model is then used to determine how the modern and ancient marine biospheres might be affected by an oceanic impact of a large asteroid or comet. Such an event could perturb the carbon cycle in several different ways. Global darkening caused by stratospheric dust veil could destroy most of the existing phytoplankton in a period of several weeks to several months. At the same time, dissolution of atmospheric NOx compounds synthesized during the impact would lower the pH of ocean surface waters and release CO2 into the atmosphere. Both effects might be enhanced by an influx of CO2 released from upwelling of deep ocean water near the hot impact site, from oxidation of dead organic matter, and from the comet itself. The net result could be to raise surface temperatures by several degrees and to make the surface ocean uninhabitable by calcareous organisms for as much as 20 yrs (the time scale for mixing with deep ocean). It appears unlikely, however, that an impact could create a "Strangelove ocean," in which surface waters remained corrosive to calcium carbonate for thousands or tens of thousands of years. Thus, disruption of the carbon cycle by an impact

  20. Groundwater sources and geochemical processes in a crystalline fault aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, Clément; Aquilina, Luc; Bour, Olivier; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Dewandel, Benoît; Pauwels, Hélène; Labasque, Thierry; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Hochreutener, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    The origin of water flowing in faults and fractures at great depth is poorly known in crystalline media. This paper describes a field study designed to characterize the geochemical compartmentalization of a deep aquifer system constituted by a graben structure where a permeable fault zone was identified. Analyses of the major chemical elements, trace elements, dissolved gases and stable water isotopes reveal the origin of dissolved components for each permeable domain and provide information on various water sources involved during different seasonal regimes. The geochemical response induced by performing a pumping test in the fault-zone is examined, in order to quantify mixing processes and contribution of different permeable domains to the flow. Reactive processes enhanced by the pumped fluxes are also identified and discussed. The fault zone presents different geochemical responses related to changes in hydraulic regime. They are interpreted as different water sources related to various permeable structures within the aquifer. During the low water regime, results suggest mixing of recent water with a clear contribution of older water of inter-glacial origin (recharge temperature around 7 °C), suggesting the involvement of water trapped in a local low-permeability matrix domain or the contribution of large scale circulation loops. During the high water level period, due to inversion of the hydraulic gradient between the major permeable fault zone and its surrounding domains, modern water predominantly flows down to the deep bedrock and ensures recharge at a local scale within the graben. Pumping in a permeable fault zone induces hydraulic connections with storage-reservoirs. The overlaid regolith domain ensures part of the flow rate for long term pumping (around 20% in the present case). During late-time pumping, orthogonal fluxes coming from the fractured domains surrounding the major fault zone are dominant. Storage in the connected fracture network within the

  1. On some trees having partition dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida Bagus Kade Puja Arimbawa, K.; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    In 1998, G. Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang introduced the notion of partition dimension of a graph. Since then, the study of this graph parameter has received much attention. A number of results have been obtained to know the values of partition dimensions of various classes of graphs. However, for some particular classes of graphs, finding of their partition dimensions is still not completely solved, for instances a class of general tree. In this paper, we study the properties of trees having partition dimension 4. In particular, we show that, for olive trees O(n), its partition dimension is equal to 4 if and only if 8 ≤ n ≤ 17. We also characterize all centipede trees having partition dimension 4.

  2. Metal-Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten from 10 to 50 GPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Campbell, A. J.; Danielson, L.; Rahman, Z.; Righter, K.

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical models of core formation are commonly based on core and mantle abundances of siderophile elements that partitioned between silicate and metal in a magma ocean in the early Earth. Tungsten is a moderately siderophile element that may provide constraints on the pressure, temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity conditions, and on the timing of core formation in the Earth. Previous experimental studies suggest that pressure exerts little to no influence over W metal-silicate partitioning up to 24 GPa, and indicate that the stronger influences are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity. However, core formation models based in part on W, predict metal-silicate equilibration pressures outside the available experimental pressure range, requiring extrapolation of parameterized models. Therefore, higher pressure experimental data on W were needed to constrain this important parameter.

  3. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2010-09-28

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  4. Evapotranspiration partitioning in a semi-arid African savanna using stable isotopes of water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Good, S. P.; O'Connor, M.; King, E. G.; Caylor, K. K.

    2012-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) represents a major flux of water out of semi-arid ecosystems. Thus, understanding ET dynamics is central to the study of African savanna health and productivity. At our study site in central Kenya (Mpala Research Centre), we have been using stable isotopes of water vapor to partition ET into its constituent parts of plant transpiration (T) and soil evaporation (E). This effort includes continuous measurement (1 Hz) of δ2H and δ18O in water vapor using a portable water vapor isotope analyzer mounted on a 22.5 m eddy covariance flux tower. The flux tower has been collecting data since early 2010. The isotopic end-member of δET is calculated using a Keeling Plot approach, whereas δT and δE are measured directly via a leaf chamber and tubing buried in the soil, respectively. Here we report on a two recent sets of measurements for partitioning ET in the Kenya Long-term Exclosure Experiment (KLEE) and a nearby grassland. We combine leaf level measurements of photosynthesis and water use with canopy-scale isotope measurements for ET partitioning. In the KLEE experiment we compare ET partitioning in a 4 ha plot that has only seen cattle grazing for the past 15 years with an adjacent plot that has undergone grazing by both cattle and wild herbivores (antelope, elephants, giraffe). These results are compared with a detailed study of ET in an artificially watered grassland.

  5. The geochemical transformation of soils by agriculture and its dependence on soil erosion: An application of the geochemical mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kyungsoo; Fisher, Beth; Ji, Junling; Aufdenkampe, Anthony; Klaminder, Jonatan

    2015-07-15

    Agricultural activities alter elemental budgets of soils and thus their long-term geochemical development and suitability for food production. This study examined the utility of a geochemical mass balance approach that has been frequently used for understanding geochemical aspect of soil formation, but has not previously been applied to agricultural settings. Protected forest served as a reference to quantify the cumulative fluxes of Ca, P, K, and Pb at a nearby tilled crop land. This comparison was made at two sites with contrasting erosional environments: relatively flat Coastal Plain in Delaware vs. hilly Piedmont in Pennsylvania. Mass balance calculations suggested that liming not only replenished the Ca lost prior to agricultural practice but also added substantial surplus at both sites. At the relatively slowly eroding Coastal Plain site, the agricultural soil exhibited enrichment of P and less depletion of K, while both elements were depleted in the forest soil. At the rapidly eroding Piedmont site, erosion inhibited P enrichment. In similar, agricultural Pb contamination appeared to have resulted in Pb enrichment in the relatively slowly eroding Coastal Plain agricultural soil, while not in the rapidly eroding Piedmont soils. We conclude that agricultural practices transform soils into a new geochemical state where current levels of Ca, P, and Pb exceed those provided by the local soil minerals, but such impacts are significantly offset by soil erosion. PMID:25847176

  6. Mass partitioning effects in diffusion transport.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milos; Milosevic, Miljan; Wu, Suhong; Blanco, Elvin; Ferrari, Mauro; Ziemys, Arturas

    2015-08-28

    Frequent mass exchange takes place in a heterogeneous environment among several phases, where mass partitioning may occur at the interface of phases. Analytical and computational methods for diffusion do not usually incorporate molecule partitioning masking the true picture of mass transport. Here we present a computational finite element methodology to calculate diffusion mass transport with a partitioning phenomenon included and the analysis of the effects of partitioning. Our numerical results showed that partitioning controls equilibrated mass distribution as expected from analytical solutions. The experimental validation of mass release from drug-loaded nanoparticles showed that partitioning might even dominate in some cases with respect to diffusion itself. The analysis of diffusion kinetics in the parameter space of partitioning and diffusivity showed that partitioning is an extremely important parameter in systems, where mass diffusivity is fast and that the concentration of nanoparticles can control payload retention inside nanoparticles. The computational and experimental results suggest that partitioning and physiochemical properties of phases play an important, if not crucial, role in diffusion transport and should be included in the studies of mass transport processes.

  7. Mass partitioning effects in diffusion transport.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milos; Milosevic, Miljan; Wu, Suhong; Blanco, Elvin; Ferrari, Mauro; Ziemys, Arturas

    2015-08-28

    Frequent mass exchange takes place in a heterogeneous environment among several phases, where mass partitioning may occur at the interface of phases. Analytical and computational methods for diffusion do not usually incorporate molecule partitioning masking the true picture of mass transport. Here we present a computational finite element methodology to calculate diffusion mass transport with a partitioning phenomenon included and the analysis of the effects of partitioning. Our numerical results showed that partitioning controls equilibrated mass distribution as expected from analytical solutions. The experimental validation of mass release from drug-loaded nanoparticles showed that partitioning might even dominate in some cases with respect to diffusion itself. The analysis of diffusion kinetics in the parameter space of partitioning and diffusivity showed that partitioning is an extremely important parameter in systems, where mass diffusivity is fast and that the concentration of nanoparticles can control payload retention inside nanoparticles. The computational and experimental results suggest that partitioning and physiochemical properties of phases play an important, if not crucial, role in diffusion transport and should be included in the studies of mass transport processes. PMID:26204522

  8. Geochemical Modeling Of Aqueous Systems

    1995-09-07

    EQ3/6 is a software package for geochemical modeling of aqueous systems. This description pertains to version 7.2b. It addresses aqueous speciation, thermodynamic equilibrium, disequilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The major components of the package are EQ3NR, a speciation-solubility code, and EQ6 a reaction path code. EQ3NR is useful for analyzing groundwater chemistry data, calculating solubility limits, and determining whether certain reactions are in states of equilibrium or disequilibrium. It also initializes EQ6 calculations. EQ6 models themore » consequences of reacting an aqueous solution with a specified set of reactants (e.g., minerals or waste forms). It can also model fluid mixing and the effects of changes in temperature. Each of five supporting data files contain both standard state and activity coefficient-related data. Three support the use of the Davies or B-dot equations for the activity coefficients; the other two support the use of Pitzer''s equations. The temperature range of the thermodynamic data on the data files varies from 25 degrees C only to 0-300 degrees C.« less

  9. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberg, J

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  10. Geochemical Evidence of Microbially-Mediated Subglacial Mineral Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montross, S. N.; Skidmore, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Interactions between dilute meltwater and fine-grained, freshly comminuted debris at the bed of temperate glaciers liberate significant solute. The proportions of solute produced in the subglacial environment via biotic and abiotic processes remains unknown, however, this work suggests the biotic contribution is substantial. Laboratory analyses of microbiological and geochemical properties of sediment and meltwater from the Haut Glacier d'Arolla (HGA) indicates that a metabolically active microbial community exists in water-saturated sediments at the ice-bedrock interface. Basal sediment slurries and meltwater were incubated in the laboratory for 100 days under near in situ subglacial conditions. Relative proportions of solute produced via abiotic v. biotic mineral weathering were analyzed by comparing the evolved aqueous chemistry of biologically active "live" sediment slurries with sterilized controls. Aqueous chemical analyses indicate an increase in solute produced from mineral weathering coupled with nitrate depletion in the biologically active slurries compared with the killed controls. These results infer that microbial activity at HGA is likely an important contributor to chemical weathering associated solute fluxes from the glaciated catchment. Due to the magnitude of past glaciations throughout geologic time (e.g., Neoproterozoic and Late-Pleistocene), and evidence that subglacial microbial activity impacts mineral weathering, greater consideration needs to be given to cold temperature biogeochemical weathering and its impact on global geochemical cycles.

  11. Conditional flux analysis and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeman, M. J.; Knohl, A.; Sturm, P.; Buchmann, N. C.; Thomas, C. K.

    2009-12-01

    We propose to investigate to what extend conditional flux analysis can benefit from the addition of stable isotope information. Stable isotopes have been recognized for their potential as process tracer, and could add an extra dimension to the conditional flux concept, which aims at directly quantifying component fluxes and identifying their sources. Differences in 13C abundance in carbon dioxide can be used to distinguish assimilation or respiration sources, whereas the 18O abundance expresses differences in water exchange, for instance between canopy and soil. Lending to recent advances in measurement technology, stable isotopes can now be measured at high temporal resolutions (10Hz) required for commonly applied micrometeorological methods such as the eddy-covariance technique, or related conditional flux methods. We will present current ideas on how the conditional flux method, as recently proposed and evaluated by Thomas et al. (2008), Scanlon & Sahu (2008), to perform daytime flux partitioning at the ecosystem level, can be refined by stable isotope analysis (13C and 18O) of carbon dioxide as additional dimension for identification of fluxes.

  12. Upscaling and downscaling of land surface fluxes with surface temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key surface boundary condition that is significantly correlated to surface flux partitioning between latent and sensible heat. The spatial and temporal variation in LST is driven by radiation, wind, vegetation cover and roughness as well as soil moisture status ...

  13. Modeling energy and mass fluxes from prairie canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The main emphasis of this research project is on partitioning of mass and energy fluxes between vegetation and soil at the FIFE site, preparation of data from the FIFE Information System for an international thermal data set comparison, and studying the relation between surface temperatures observed from satellites and in situ measurements of surface temperature.

  14. The National Geochemical Survey; database and documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    The USGS, in collaboration with other federal and state government agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting the National Geochemical Survey (NGS) to produce a body of geochemical data for the United States based primarily on stream sediments, analyzed using a consistent set of methods. These data will compose a complete, national-scale geochemical coverage of the US, and will enable construction of geochemical maps, refine estimates of baseline concentrations of chemical elements in the sampled media, and provide context for a wide variety of studies in the geological and environmental sciences. The goal of the NGS is to analyze at least one stream-sediment sample in every 289 km2 area by a single set of analytical methods across the entire nation, with other solid sample media substituted where necessary. The NGS incorporates geochemical data from a variety of sources, including existing analyses in USGS databases, reanalyses of samples in USGS archives, and analyses of newly collected samples. At the present time, the NGS includes data covering ~71% of the land area of the US, including samples in all 50 states. This version of the online report provides complete access to NGS data, describes the history of the project, the methodology used, and presents preliminary geochemical maps for all analyzed elements. Future editions of this and other related reports will include the results of analysis of variance studies, as well as interpretive products related to the NGS data.

  15. Geochemical behavior of heavy metals in differents environments in Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon - RJ/Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Estefan M; Baptista Neto, José A; Fernandez, Marcos A; McAlister, John; Smith, Bernard

    2011-06-01

    The accelerated urbanisation without a planning, brought several environmental problems to Rio de Janeiro coastal zone, especially in areas such as Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon, which receives a great amount of untreated sewage every day. To assess the nature, potentially sources and extent of heavy metal pollution in the lagoon, sediments from the surrounding streets, from the entrance of the main canal that drains to the lagoon and from the bottom of the lagoon were collected and analysed by a modified selective extraction procedure in order to study the geochemical partitioning and bioavailability of Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni and Pb in these three compartments. The present study verified an increase in the Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations in the north of the Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon. Despite the different levels of oxidation between the sediments accumulated in the streets and in the bottom of the lagoon, the geochemical partitioning of the heavy metals did not show any pattern of variation for the metals, except for the element Cu. No concentrations were found in the soluble phase of samples collected in the surfacial sediments of the lagoon, suggesting no bioavailability of heavy metals. PMID:21670872

  16. Estimating dry deposition and gas/particle partition coefficients of neutral poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances in northern German coast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Xie, Zhiyong; Möller, Axel; Mi, Wenying; Wolschke, Hendrik; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Dry deposition fluxes of 12 neutral poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were estimated at Büsum located in northern German coast, and their gas/particle partition coefficients were predicted by employing the polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). The gas deposition flux, particle deposition flux and total (gas + particle) flux of the 12 PFASs during sampling periods were 1088 ± 611, 189 ± 75 and 1277 ± 627 pg/(m(2) d), respectively. The gas deposition of PFASs played a key role during deposition to marine ecosystem. Sensitivity analysis showed that wind speed was the most sensitive parameter for gas deposition fluxes. Good agreements (within 1 log unit) were observed between the measured gas/particle partitioning data of PFASs and the predicted partition coefficients using PP-LFERs, indicating the model can reliably predict the gas/particle partitioning behaviors of atmospheric neutral PFASs. PMID:25818091

  17. Organic geochemical constraints on paleoelevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polissar, P. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Currie, B. S.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The elevation history of the land surface is an important factor in the interpretation of past tectonic, climate and ecological processes. However, quantitative estimates of paleoelevation are difficult to produce and new techniques are needed. Organic geochemical approaches to quantifying paleoelevations provide a new perspective on this difficult task. The hydrogen isotopic composition of organic biomarker molecules synthesized by plants and algae is systematically related to the water used for growth. Organic molecules in ancient sediments can provide values for the isotopic composition of this water and thus elevation, provided the relationship between elevation and isotopic values is known. Molecular hydrogen isotope ratios from Cenozoic lake sediments on the Tibetan Plateau demonstrate the utility of a biomarker approach. Terrestrial plant-wax D/H values on Neogene sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin provide new paleoelevation estimates that compare well with previous studies. Plant wax D/H ratios paired with lacustrine carbonate oxygen isotope values from the Lunpola and Hoh-Xil basins illustrate how paired isotope systems can unravel the isotopic composition of precipitation from evaporative enrichment of lake waters. A potentially fruitful avenue for future research is illustrated by D/H analyses on older sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin. These sediments—like many that could be useful for paleoaltimetry—have experienced significant burial and heating. As temperatures approach the oil window it becomes possible to exchange hydrogen in both the extractable organic molecules (bitumen) and the insoluble organic residue (kerogen). The extent to which this exchange alters the original isotopic composition will determine the usefulness of D/H analyses on thermally mature organic matter. The potential payoff and pitfalls of D/H analyses on heated sediments is illustrated with thermally immature and mature samples from the Namling-Oiyug Basin.

  18. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  19. Assimilate partitioning during reproductive growth

    SciTech Connect

    Finazzo, S.F.; Davenport, T.L.

    1987-04-01

    Leaves having various phyllotactic relationships to fruitlets were labeled for 1 hour with 10/sub r/Ci of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Fruitlets were also labeled. Fruitlets did fix /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Translocation of radioactivity from the peel into the fruit occurred slowly and to a limited extent. No evidence of translocation out of the fruitlets was observed. Assimilate partitioning in avocado was strongly influenced by phyllotaxy. If a fruit and the labeled leaf had the same phyllotaxy then greater than 95% of the radiolabel was present in this fruit. When the fruit did not have the same phyllotaxy as the labeled leaf, the radiolabel distribution was skewed with 70% of the label going to a single adjacent position. Avocado fruitlets exhibit uniform labeling throughout a particular tissue. In avocado, assimilates preferentially move from leaves to fruits with the same phyllotaxy.

  20. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  1. MULTIVARIATE KERNEL PARTITION PROCESS MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures provide a useful approach for relaxing parametric assumptions. Discrete mixture models induce clusters, typically with the same cluster allocation for each parameter in multivariate cases. As a more flexible approach that facilitates sparse nonparametric modeling of multivariate random effects distributions, this article proposes a kernel partition process (KPP) in which the cluster allocation varies for different parameters. The KPP is shown to be the driving measure for a multivariate ordered Chinese restaurant process that induces a highly-flexible dependence structure in local clustering. This structure allows the relative locations of the random effects to inform the clustering process, with spatially-proximal random effects likely to be assigned the same cluster index. An exact block Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, avoiding truncation of the infinite measure. The methods are applied to hormone curve data, and a dependent KPP is proposed for classification from functional predictors. PMID:24478563

  2. Solid-liquid iron partitioning in Earth's deep mantle.

    PubMed

    Andrault, Denis; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Lo Nigro, Giacomo; Devidal, Jean-Luc; Veronesi, Giulia; Garbarino, Gaston; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2012-07-18

    Melting processes in the deep mantle have important implications for the origin of the deep-derived plumes believed to feed hotspot volcanoes such as those in Hawaii. They also provide insight into how the mantle has evolved, geochemically and dynamically, since the formation of Earth. Melt production in the shallow mantle is quite well understood, but deeper melting near the core-mantle boundary remains controversial. Modelling the dynamic behaviour of deep, partially molten mantle requires knowledge of the density contrast between solid and melt fractions. Although both positive and negative melt buoyancies can produce major chemical segregation between different geochemical reservoirs, each type of buoyancy yields drastically different geodynamical models. Ascent or descent of liquids in a partially molten deep mantle should contribute to surface volcanism or production of a deep magma ocean, respectively. We investigated phase relations in a partially molten chondritic-type material under deep-mantle conditions. Here we show that the iron partition coefficient between aluminium-bearing (Mg,Fe)SiO(3) perovskite and liquid is between 0.45 and 0.6, so iron is not as incompatible with deep-mantle minerals as has been reported previously. Calculated solid and melt density contrasts suggest that melt generated at the core-mantle boundary should be buoyant, and hence should segregate upwards. In the framework of the magma oceans induced by large meteoritic impacts on early Earth, our results imply that the magma crystallization should push the liquids towards the surface and form a deep solid residue depleted in incompatible elements.

  3. Solid-liquid iron partitioning in Earth's deep mantle.

    PubMed

    Andrault, Denis; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Lo Nigro, Giacomo; Devidal, Jean-Luc; Veronesi, Giulia; Garbarino, Gaston; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2012-07-19

    Melting processes in the deep mantle have important implications for the origin of the deep-derived plumes believed to feed hotspot volcanoes such as those in Hawaii. They also provide insight into how the mantle has evolved, geochemically and dynamically, since the formation of Earth. Melt production in the shallow mantle is quite well understood, but deeper melting near the core-mantle boundary remains controversial. Modelling the dynamic behaviour of deep, partially molten mantle requires knowledge of the density contrast between solid and melt fractions. Although both positive and negative melt buoyancies can produce major chemical segregation between different geochemical reservoirs, each type of buoyancy yields drastically different geodynamical models. Ascent or descent of liquids in a partially molten deep mantle should contribute to surface volcanism or production of a deep magma ocean, respectively. We investigated phase relations in a partially molten chondritic-type material under deep-mantle conditions. Here we show that the iron partition coefficient between aluminium-bearing (Mg,Fe)SiO(3) perovskite and liquid is between 0.45 and 0.6, so iron is not as incompatible with deep-mantle minerals as has been reported previously. Calculated solid and melt density contrasts suggest that melt generated at the core-mantle boundary should be buoyant, and hence should segregate upwards. In the framework of the magma oceans induced by large meteoritic impacts on early Earth, our results imply that the magma crystallization should push the liquids towards the surface and form a deep solid residue depleted in incompatible elements. PMID:22810700

  4. Trace element partition coefficient in ionic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, H

    1966-05-01

    Partition coefficient monovalent trace ions between liquids and either solid NaNO(2) or KCl were determined. The isotropic elastic model of ionic crystals was used for calculating the energy change caused by the ionic substitutions. The observed values of partition coefficients in KCl good agreement with calculate values.

  5. [On the partition of acupuncture academic schools].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyan; Luo, Xi; Xia, Youbing

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays extensive attention has been paid on the research of acupuncture academic schools, however, a widely accepted method of partition of acupuncture academic schools is still in need. In this paper, the methods of partition of acupuncture academic schools in the history have been arranged, and three typical methods of"partition of five schools" "partition of eighteen schools" and "two-stage based partition" are summarized. After adeep analysis on the disadvantages and advantages of these three methods, a new method of partition of acupuncture academic schools that is called "three-stage based partition" is proposed. In this method, after the overall acupuncture academic schools are divided into an ancient stage, a modern stage and a contemporary stage, each schoolis divided into its sub-school category. It is believed that this method of partition can remedy the weaknesses ofcurrent methods, but also explore a new model of inheritance and development under a different aspect through thedifferentiation and interaction of acupuncture academic schools at three stages.

  6. Building Ecology and Partition Design. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This bulletin is intended as a resource for school system facility planners and architects who design schools. Ways in which decision makers can incorporate environmental concerns in the design of school buildings are detailed. Focus is on the design of interior partition systems. Partition systems in schools serve several purposes; they define…

  7. Isoperimetric graph partitioning for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Grady, Leo; Schwartz, Eric L

    2006-03-01

    Spectral graph partitioning provides a powerful approach to image segmentation. We introduce an alternate idea that finds partitions with a small isoperimetric constant, requiring solution to a linear system rather than an eigenvector problem. This approach produces the high quality segmentations of spectral methods, but with improved speed and stability.

  8. Exact Abjm Partition Function from Tba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrov, Pavel; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2012-11-01

    We report on the exact computation of the S3 partition function of U(N)k × U(N)-k ABJM theory for k = 1, N = 1, …, 19. The result is a polynomial in π-1 with rational coefficients. As an application of our results, we numerically determine the coefficient of the membrane 1-instanton correction to the partition function.

  9. Geochemical factors affecting PAH distribution in Chesapeake Bay sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.; Dickhut, R.M.; Kimbrough, K.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment/pore water distribution coefficients (K{sub d}s) of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were examined with depth at two sites in the Elizabeth River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Areas of the Elizabeth River have been historically extensively contaminated with PAHs. Varying trends in distribution coefficients were observed both across the range of molecular weights of the PAHs and with depth in the sediment. Linear relations between log K{sub d} and octanol-water partition coefficient (log K{sub ow}) were observed deep in the cores but not near the surface of the sediments. This phenomena indicates that PAH sediment/porewater distributions are not at equilibrium near the sediment-water interface. Moreover, down-core K{sub d}s decreased and were, in most cases, inversely related with fraction organic carbon. These data indicate that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may play a potentially significant role in mobilizing sediment-associated organic contaminants. The extent to which DOC and other geochemical parameters such as total lipid extract (TLE) and BET surface area control K{sub d}s of PAHs, is under further investigation.

  10. Parallel hypergraph partitioning for scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Devine, Karen Dragon; Catalyurek, Umit; Bisseling, Robert; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-07-01

    Graph partitioning is often used for load balancing in parallel computing, but it is known that hypergraph partitioning has several advantages. First, hypergraphs more accurately model communication volume, and second, they are more expressive and can better represent nonsymmetric problems. Hypergraph partitioning is particularly suited to parallel sparse matrix-vector multiplication, a common kernel in scientific computing. We present a parallel software package for hypergraph (and sparse matrix) partitioning developed at Sandia National Labs. The algorithm is a variation on multilevel partitioning. Our parallel implementation is novel in that it uses a two-dimensional data distribution among processors. We present empirical results that show our parallel implementation achieves good speedup on several large problems (up to 33 million nonzeros) with up to 64 processors on a Linux cluster.

  11. Cell partition in two phase polymer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Aqueous phase-separated polymer solutions can be used as support media for the partition of biological macromolecules, organelles and cells. Cell separations using the technique have proven to be extremely sensitive to cell surface properties but application of the systems are limited to cells or aggregates which do not significantly while the phases are settling. Partition in zero g in principle removes this limitation but an external driving force must be applied to induce the phases to separate since their density difference disappears. We have recently shown that an applied electric field can supply the necessary driving force. We are proposing to utilize the NASA FES to study field-driven phase separation and cell partition on the ground and in zero g to help define the separation/partition process, with the ultimate goal being to develop partition as a zero g cell separation technique.

  12. Low-density geochemical mapping and the robustness of geochemical patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Reimann, C.

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical mapping of entire continents and, ultimately, the world is still a challenge for applied geochemists. At sample densities traditionally used for geochemical exploration (1 site per 1-25 km2), geochemical mapping of whole continents is logistically extremely demanding and tremendously expensive. The first low-density geochemical surveys (1 site per 200 km2) were carried out during the late 1960s in Africa. Later surveys conducted in various parts of the world had sample densities ranging from 1 site per 300 km2 to 1 site per 18 000 km2. Although these surveys were deemed successful by the investigators in defining variations in background element content on a regional scale, the scientific community was sceptical that low-density geochemical mapping was possible and would provide useful information. The main area of criticism centred around the concern that at such low sample densities the resulting maps would not be robust, i.e. if the same area were resampled and remapped, different geochemical patterns would emerge. Different examples from the USA, Europe, China and Africa demonstrate that low-density geochemical mapping will result in stable and robust geochemical patterns at the continental scale. Such maps are urgently needed for a wide variety of applications. ?? 2008 AAG/ Geological Society of London.

  13. Dense Subgraph Partition of Positive Hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hairong; Latecki, Longin Jan; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel partition framework, called dense subgraph partition (DSP), to automatically, precisely and efficiently decompose a positive hypergraph into dense subgraphs. A positive hypergraph is a graph or hypergraph whose edges, except self-loops, have positive weights. We first define the concepts of core subgraph, conditional core subgraph, and disjoint partition of a conditional core subgraph, then define DSP based on them. The result of DSP is an ordered list of dense subgraphs with decreasing densities, which uncovers all underlying clusters, as well as outliers. A divide-and-conquer algorithm, called min-partition evolution, is proposed to efficiently compute the partition. DSP has many appealing properties. First, it is a nonparametric partition and it reveals all meaningful clusters in a bottom-up way. Second, it has an exact and efficient solution, called min-partition evolution algorithm. The min-partition evolution algorithm is a divide-and-conquer algorithm, thus time-efficient and memory-friendly, and suitable for parallel processing. Third, it is a unified partition framework for a broad range of graphs and hypergraphs. We also establish its relationship with the densest k-subgraph problem (DkS), an NP-hard but fundamental problem in graph theory, and prove that DSP gives precise solutions to DkS for all kin a graph-dependent set, called critical k-set. To our best knowledge, this is a strong result which has not been reported before. Moreover, as our experimental results show, for sparse graphs, especially web graphs, the size of critical k-set is close to the number of vertices in the graph. We test the proposed partition framework on various tasks, and the experimental results clearly illustrate its advantages.

  14. Resolving the Multi-scale Behavior of Geochemical Weathering in the Critical Zone Using High Resolution Hydro-geochemical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Rajaram, H.

    2015-12-01

    This work investigates hydrologic and geochemical interactions in the Critical Zone (CZ) using high-resolution reactive transport modeling. Reactive transport models can be used to predict the response of geochemical weathering and solute fluxes in the CZ to changes in a dynamic environment, such as those pertaining to human activities and climate change in recent years. The scales of hydrology and geochemistry in the CZ range from days to eons in time and centimeters to kilometers in space. Here, we present results of a multi-dimensional, multi-scale hydro-geochemical model to investigate the role of subsurface heterogeneity on the formation of mineral weathering fronts in the CZ, which requires consideration of many of these spatio-temporal scales. The model is implemented using the reactive transport code PFLOTRAN, an open source subsurface flow and reactive transport code that utilizes parallelization over multiple processing nodes and provides a strong framework for simulating weathering in the CZ. The model is set up to simulate weathering dynamics in the mountainous catchments representative of the Colorado Front Range. Model parameters were constrained based on hydrologic, geochemical, and geophysical observations from the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BcCZO). Simulations were performed in fractured rock systems and compared with systems of heterogeneous and homogeneous permeability fields. Tracer simulations revealed that the mean residence time of solutes was drastically accelerated as fracture density increased. In simulations that include mineral reactions, distinct signatures of transport limitations on weathering arose when discrete flow paths were included. This transport limitation was related to both advective and diffusive processes in the highly heterogeneous systems (i.e. fractured media and correlated random permeability fields with σlnk > 3). The well-known time-dependence of mineral weathering rates was found to be the most

  15. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb2 +) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb2 + concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb2 + concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb2 + concentrations are the same for all three

  16. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  17. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  18. A rheostat mechanism governs the bifurcation of carbon flux in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Murima, Paul; Zimmermann, Michael; Chopra, Tarun; Pojer, Florence; Fonti, Giulia; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Alonso, Sylvie; Sauer, Uwe; Pethe, Kevin; McKinney, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an important feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection. Consumption of fatty acids requires regulation of carbon flux bifurcation between the oxidative TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. In Escherichia coli, flux bifurcation is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD), a paradigmatic example of post-translational mechanisms governing metabolic fluxes. Here, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E. coli, carbon flux bifurcation in mycobacteria is regulated not by phosphorylation but through metabolic cross-activation of ICD by glyoxylate, which is produced by the glyoxylate shunt enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL). This regulatory circuit maintains stable partitioning of fluxes, thus ensuring a balance between anaplerosis, energy production, and precursor biosynthesis. The rheostat-like mechanism of metabolite-mediated control of flux partitioning demonstrates the importance of allosteric regulation during metabolic steady-state. The sensitivity of this regulatory mechanism to perturbations presents a potentially attractive target for chemotherapy. PMID:27555519

  19. A rheostat mechanism governs the bifurcation of carbon flux in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Murima, Paul; Zimmermann, Michael; Chopra, Tarun; Pojer, Florence; Fonti, Giulia; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Alonso, Sylvie; Sauer, Uwe; Pethe, Kevin; McKinney, John D

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an important feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection. Consumption of fatty acids requires regulation of carbon flux bifurcation between the oxidative TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. In Escherichia coli, flux bifurcation is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD), a paradigmatic example of post-translational mechanisms governing metabolic fluxes. Here, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E. coli, carbon flux bifurcation in mycobacteria is regulated not by phosphorylation but through metabolic cross-activation of ICD by glyoxylate, which is produced by the glyoxylate shunt enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL). This regulatory circuit maintains stable partitioning of fluxes, thus ensuring a balance between anaplerosis, energy production, and precursor biosynthesis. The rheostat-like mechanism of metabolite-mediated control of flux partitioning demonstrates the importance of allosteric regulation during metabolic steady-state. The sensitivity of this regulatory mechanism to perturbations presents a potentially attractive target for chemotherapy. PMID:27555519

  20. Accretion and core formation: constraints from metal-silicate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bernard J

    2008-11-28

    Experimental metal-silicate partitioning data for Ni, Co, V, Cr, Nb, Mn, Si and W were used to investigate the geochemical consequences of a range of models for accretion and core formation on Earth. The starting assumptions were chondritic ratios of refractory elements in the Earth and the segregation of metal at the bottom of a magma ocean, which deepened as the planet grew and which had, at its base, a temperature close to the liquidus of the silicate. The models examined were as follows. (i) Continuous segregation from a mantle which is chemically homogeneous and which has a fixed oxidation state, corresponding to 6.26 per cent oxidized Fe. Although Ni, Co and W partitioning is consistent with chondritic ratios, the current V content of the silicate Earth cannot be reconciled with core segregation under these conditions of fixed oxidation state. (ii) Continuous segregation from a mantle which is chemically homogeneous but in which the Earth became more oxidized as it grew. In this case, the Ni, Co, W, V, Cr and Nb contents of core and mantle are easily matched to those calculated from the chondritic ratios of refractory elements. The magma ocean is calculated to maintain a thickness approximately 35 per cent of the depth to the core-mantle boundary in the accreting Earth, yielding a maximum pressure of 44GPa. This model yields a Si content of the core of 5.7 per cent, in good agreement with cosmochemical estimates and with recent isotopic data. (iii) Continuous segregation from a mantle which is not homogeneous and in which the core equilibrates with a restricted volume of mantle at the base of the magma ocean. This is found to increase depth of the magma ocean by approximately 50 per cent. All of the other elements (except Mn) have partitioning consistent with chondritic abundances in the Earth, provided the Earth became, as before, progressively oxidized during accretion. (iv) Continuous segregation of metal from a crystal-melt mush. In this case, pressures

  1. Partitioning of Si and platinum group elements between liquid and solid Fe-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Siebert, J.; Badro, J.

    2014-05-01

    Crystallization of the Earth's inner core fractionates major and minor elements between the solid and liquid metal, leaving physical and geochemical imprints on the Earth's core. For example, the density jump observed at the Inner Core Boundary (ICB) is related to the preferential partitioning of lighter elements in the liquid outer core. The fractionation of Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid during inner core crystallization has been invoked as a process that explains the observed Os isotopic signature of mantle plume-derived lavas (Brandon et al., 1998; Brandon and Walker, 2005) in terms of core-mantle interaction. In this article we measured partitioning of Si, Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid metal. Isobaric (2 GPa) experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder press at temperatures between 1250 °C and 1600 °C in which an imposed thermal gradient through the sample provided solid-liquid coexistence in the Fe-Si system. We determined the narrow melting loop in the Fe-Si system using Si partitioning values and showed that order-disorder transition in the Fe-Si solid phases can have a large effect on Si partitioning. We also found constant partition coefficients (DOs, DPt, DRe) between liquid and solid metal, for Si concentrations ranging from 2 to 12 wt%. The compact structure of Fe-Si liquid alloys is compatible with incorporation of Si and platinum group elements (PGEs) elements precluding solid-liquid fractionation. Such phase diagram properties are relevant for other light elements such as S and C at high pressure and is not consistent with inter-elemental fractionation of PGEs during metal crystallization at Earth's inner core conditions. We therefore propose that the peculiar Os isotopic signature observed in plume-derived lavas is more likely explained by mantle source heterogeneity (Meibom et al., 2002; Baker and Krogh Jensen, 2004; Luguet et al., 2008).

  2. New geochemical investigations in Platanares and Azacualpa geothermal sites (Honduras)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, Franco; Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Cioni, Roberto; Lelli, Matteo; Menichini, Matia; Ranaldi, Massimo; Ricci, Tullio; Tarchini, Luca

    2013-05-01

    Platanares and Azacualpa geothermal sites of Honduras are located in an inner part of the Caribbean Plate far from the active volcanic front of Central America. Here geology indicates that there are not the conditions for the occurrence of shallow magmatic heat sources for high-enthalpy geothermal resources. Geothermal perspectives are related to the possibility of a deep circulation of meteoric water along faults and the storage of the heated fluid in fractured permeable reservoirs. Geochemical geothermometers indicate a temperature for the deeper part of the geothermal reservoir close to 200 °C for Platanares and of 150-170 °C for Azacualpa. Calcite scaling, with subordinate silica deposition has to be expected in both sites. CO2 soil flux investigations have been carried out in both areas and reveal the presence of positive anomalies likely corresponding to the presence at depth of fractured degassing geothermal reservoirs. Compared with the geothermal areas of Central Italy whose reservoirs are hosted in carbonate rocks, e.g. Latera (Chiodini et al., 2007), the CO2 soil flux measured in Honduras is significantly lower (mean of 17 g/m2day at Platanares and of 163 g/m2day at Azacualpa) probably because of the dominant silicate nature of the deep reservoirs.

  3. Broad climatological variation of surface energy balance partitioning across land and ocean predicted from the maximum power limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Chirag; Renner, Maik; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-07-01

    Longwave radiation and turbulent heat fluxes are the mechanisms by which the Earth's surface transfers heat into the atmosphere, thus affecting the surface temperature. However, the energy partitioning between the radiative and turbulent components is poorly constrained by energy and mass balances alone. We use a simple energy balance model with the thermodynamic limit of maximum power as an additional constraint to determine this partitioning. Despite discrepancies over tropical oceans, we find that the broad variation of heat fluxes and surface temperatures in the ERA-Interim reanalyzed observations can be recovered from this approach. The estimates depend considerably on the formulation of longwave radiative transfer, and a spatially uniform offset is related to the assumed cold temperature sink at which the heat engine operates. Our results suggest that the steady state surface energy partitioning may reflect the maximum power constraint.

  4. How pervasive is the Hirshfeld partitioning?

    SciTech Connect

    Heidar-Zadeh, Farnaz; Ayers, Paul W.

    2015-01-28

    One can partition the molecular density into its atomic contributions by minimizing the divergence of the atom-in-molecule densities from their corresponding reference pro-atomic densities, subject to the constraint that the sum of the atom-in-molecule densities is the total molecular density. We expose conditions on the divergence measure that are necessary, and sufficient, to recover the popular Hirshfeld partitioning. Specifically, among all local measures of the divergence between two probability distribution functions, the Hirshfeld partitioning is obtained only for f-divergences.

  5. Convex Regression with Interpretable Sharp Partitions

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Simon, Noah; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable on the basis of a small number of covariates, using an interpretable yet non-additive model. We propose convex regression with interpretable sharp partitions (CRISP) for this task. CRISP partitions the covariate space into blocks in a data-adaptive way, and fits a mean model within each block. Unlike other partitioning methods, CRISP is fit using a non-greedy approach by solving a convex optimization problem, resulting in low-variance fits. We explore the properties of CRISP, and evaluate its performance in a simulation study and on a housing price data set.

  6. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Fung Fung

    1988-01-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  7. Convex Regression with Interpretable Sharp Partitions

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Simon, Noah; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable on the basis of a small number of covariates, using an interpretable yet non-additive model. We propose convex regression with interpretable sharp partitions (CRISP) for this task. CRISP partitions the covariate space into blocks in a data-adaptive way, and fits a mean model within each block. Unlike other partitioning methods, CRISP is fit using a non-greedy approach by solving a convex optimization problem, resulting in low-variance fits. We explore the properties of CRISP, and evaluate its performance in a simulation study and on a housing price data set. PMID:27635120

  8. Energy partitioning schemes: a dilemma.

    PubMed

    Mayer, I

    2007-01-01

    Two closely related energy partitioning schemes, in which the total energy is presented as a sum of atomic and diatomic contributions by using the "atomic decomposition of identity", are compared on the example of N,N-dimethylformamide, a simple but chemically rich molecule. Both schemes account for different intramolecular interactions, for instance they identify the weak C-H...O intramolecular interactions, but give completely different numbers. (The energy decomposition scheme based on the virial theorem is also considered.) The comparison of the two schemes resulted in a dilemma which is especially striking when these schemes are applied for molecules distorted from their equilibrium structures: one either gets numbers which are "on the chemical scale" and have quite appealing values at the equilibrium molecular geometries, but exhibiting a counter-intuitive distance dependence (the two-center energy components increase in absolute value with the increase of the interatomic distances)--or numbers with too large absolute values but "correct" distance behaviour. The problem is connected with the quick decay of the diatomic kinetic energy components.

  9. HPAM: Hirshfeld Partitioned Atomic Multipoles.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l(max) on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l(max) = 0 (atomic charges) to l(max) = 4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l(max) are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L ≤ l(max). In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only (l(max) = 0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used.

  10. Energy partitioning schemes: a dilemma.

    PubMed

    Mayer, I

    2007-01-01

    Two closely related energy partitioning schemes, in which the total energy is presented as a sum of atomic and diatomic contributions by using the "atomic decomposition of identity", are compared on the example of N,N-dimethylformamide, a simple but chemically rich molecule. Both schemes account for different intramolecular interactions, for instance they identify the weak C-H...O intramolecular interactions, but give completely different numbers. (The energy decomposition scheme based on the virial theorem is also considered.) The comparison of the two schemes resulted in a dilemma which is especially striking when these schemes are applied for molecules distorted from their equilibrium structures: one either gets numbers which are "on the chemical scale" and have quite appealing values at the equilibrium molecular geometries, but exhibiting a counter-intuitive distance dependence (the two-center energy components increase in absolute value with the increase of the interatomic distances)--or numbers with too large absolute values but "correct" distance behaviour. The problem is connected with the quick decay of the diatomic kinetic energy components. PMID:17328441

  11. Partitioning technique for open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brändas, Erkki J.

    2010-11-01

    The focus of the present contribution is essentially confined to three research areas carried out during the author's turns as visiting (assistant, associate and full) professor at the University of Florida's Quantum Theory Project, QTP. The first two topics relate to perturbation theory and spectral theory for self-adjoint operators in Hilbert space. The third subject concerns analytic extensions to non-self-adjoint problems, where particular consequences of the occurrence of continuous energy spectra are measured. In these studies general partitioning methods serve as general cover for perturbation-, variational- and general matrix theory. In addition we follow up associated inferences for the time dependent problem as well as recent results and conclusions of a rather general yet surprising character. Although the author spent most of his times at QTP during visits in the 1970s and 1980s, collaborations with department members and shorter stays continued through later decades. Nevertheless the impact must be somewhat fragmentary, yet it is hoped that the present account is sufficiently self-contained to be realistic and constructive.

  12. REE Partitioning in Lunar Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Lapen, T. J.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are an extremely useful tool in modeling lunar magmatic processes. Here we present the first experimentally derived plagioclase/melt partition coefficients in lunar compositions covering the entire suite of REE. Positive europium anomalies are ubiquitous in the plagioclase-rich rocks of the lunar highlands, and complementary negative Eu anomalies are found in most lunar basalts. These features are taken as evidence of a large-scale differentiation event, with crystallization of a global-scale lunar magma ocean (LMO) resulting in a plagioclase flotation crust and a mafic lunar interior from which mare basalts were subsequently derived. However, the extent of the Eu anomaly in lunar rocks is variable. Fagan and Neal [1] reported highly anorthitic plagioclase grains in lunar impact melt rock 60635,19 that displayed negative Eu anomalies as well as the more usual positive anomalies. Indeed some grains in the sample are reported to display both positive and negative anomalies. Judging from cathodoluminescence images, these anomalies do not appear to be associated with crystal overgrowths or zones.

  13. Spectral partitioning in diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    1999-06-14

    The scattering mechanism of diffraction tomography is described by the integral form of the Helmholtz equation. The goal of diffraction tomography is to invert this equation in order to reconstruct the object function from the measured scattered fields. During the forward propagation process, the spatial spectrum of the object under investigation is ''smeared,'' by a convolution in the spectral domain, across the propagating and evanescent regions of the received field. Hence, care must be taken in performing the reconstruction, as the object's spectral information has been moved into regions where it may be considered to be noise rather than useful information. This will reduce the quality and resolution of the reconstruction. We show haw the object's spectrum can be partitioned into resolvable and non-resolvable parts based upon the cutoff between the propagating and evanescent fields. Operating under the Born approximation, we develop a beam-forming on transmit approach to direct the energy into either the propagating or evanescent parts of the spectrum. In this manner, we may individually interrogate the propagating and evanescent regions of the object spectrum.

  14. Microbial minorities modulate methane consumption through niche partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Bodelier, Paul LE; Meima-Franke, Marion; Hordijk, Cornelis A; Steenbergh, Anne K; Hefting, Mariet M; Bodrossy, Levente; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Microbes catalyze all major geochemical cycles on earth. However, the role of microbial traits and community composition in biogeochemical cycles is still poorly understood mainly due to the inability to assess the community members that are actually performing biogeochemical conversions in complex environmental samples. Here we applied a polyphasic approach to assess the role of microbial community composition in modulating methane emission from a riparian floodplain. We show that the dynamics and intensity of methane consumption in riparian wetlands coincide with relative abundance and activity of specific subgroups of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), which can be considered as a minor component of the microbial community in this ecosystem. Microarray-based community composition analyses demonstrated linear relationships of MOB diversity parameters and in vitro methane consumption. Incubations using intact cores in combination with stable isotope labeling of lipids and proteins corroborated the correlative evidence from in vitro incubations demonstrating γ-proteobacterial MOB subgroups to be responsible for methane oxidation. The results obtained within the riparian flooding gradient collectively demonstrate that niche partitioning of MOB within a community comprised of a very limited amount of active species modulates methane consumption and emission from this wetland. The implications of the results obtained for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning are discussed with special reference to the role of spatial and temporal heterogeneity and functional redundancy. PMID:23788331

  15. Nickel phase partitioning and toxicity in field-deployed sediments.

    PubMed

    Costello, David M; Burton, G Allen; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Rogevich, Emily C; Schlekat, Christian E

    2011-07-01

    The pool of bioavailable metal in sediments can be much smaller than total metal concentration due to complexation and precipitation with ligands. Metal bioavailability and toxicity in sediment is often predicted from models of simultaneous extracted metal and acid volatile sulfide (SEM-AVS); however, studies of the applicability of these models for Ni-contaminated sediments have been conducted primarily in laboratory settings. We investigated the utility of the SEM-AVS models under field conditions: Five lotic sediments with a range of sulfide and organic carbon contents were amended with four concentrations of Ni, deployed in streams for eight weeks, and examined for colonizing macroinvertebrates. After four weeks, colonizing macroinvertebrates showed a strong negative response to the Ni-treated sediments and SEM-AVS models of bioavailability differentiated between toxic and nontoxic conditions. By Week 8, relationships deteriorated between colonizing macroinvertebrates and SEM-AVS model predictions. Total Ni in the sediment did not change through time; however, Ni partitioning shifted from being dominated by organic cabon at deployment to associations with Fe and Mn. Combined geochemical and toxicity results suggest that Fe and Mn oxides in surface sediments resulted in Ni being less available to biota. This implies that current SEM-AVS models may overestimate bioavailable Ni in sediments with oxic surface layers and sufficient Fe and Mn. PMID:21648434

  16. Combined thermodynamic-geochemical modeling in metamorphic geology: Boron as tracer of fluid-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Halama, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative geochemical modeling is today applied in a variety of geological environments from the petrogenesis of igneous rocks to radioactive waste disposal. In addition, the development of thermodynamic databases and computer programs to calculate equilibrium phase diagrams has greatly advanced our ability to model geodynamic processes. Combined with experimental data on elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation, thermodynamic forward modeling unfolds enormous capacities that are far from exhausted. In metamorphic petrology the combination of thermodynamic and trace element forward modeling can be used to study and to quantify processes at spatial scales from μm to km. The thermodynamic forward models utilize Gibbs energy minimization to quantify mineralogical changes along a reaction path of a chemically open fluid/rock system. These results are combined with mass balanced trace element calculations to determine the trace element distribution between rock and melt/fluid during the metamorphic evolution. Thus, effects of mineral reactions, fluid-rock interaction and element transport in metamorphic rocks on the trace element and isotopic composition of minerals, rocks and percolating fluids or melts can be predicted. Here we illustrate the capacities of combined thermodynamic-geochemical modeling based on two examples relevant to mass transfer during metamorphism. The first example focuses on fluid-rock interaction in and around a blueschist-facies shear zone in felsic gneisses, where fluid-induced mineral reactions and their effects on boron (B) concentrations and isotopic compositions in white mica are modeled. In the second example, fluid release from a subducted slab, the associated transport of B as well as variations in B concentrations and isotopic compositions in liberated fluids and residual rocks are modeled. We compare the modeled results of both examples to geochemical data of natural minerals and rocks and demonstrate that the combination

  17. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  18. Partitioned Exhaled Nitric Oxide to Non-Invasively Assess Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, James L.; George, Steven C.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs, characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness. Chronic repetitive bouts of acute inflammation lead to airway wall remodeling and possibly the sequelae of fixed airflow obstruction. Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive molecule synthesized by NO synthases (NOS). NOS are expressed by cells within the airway wall and functionally, two NOS isoforms exist: constitutive and inducible. In asthma, the inducible isoform is over expressed, leading to increased production of NO, which diffuses into the airway lumen, where it can be detected in the exhaled breath. The exhaled NO signal can be partitioned into airway and alveolar components by measuring exhaled NO at multiple flows and applying mathematical models of pulmonary NO dynamics. The airway NO flux and alveolar NO concentration can be elevated in adults and children with asthma and have been correlated with markers of airway inflammation and airflow obstruction in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies which specifically address the clinical potential of partitioning exhaled NO for diagnosis, managing therapy, and predicting exacerbation are needed. PMID:18718562

  19. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.E. ); Cuenca, R.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program's SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  20. Metal pollution in a contaminated bay: relationship between metal geochemical fractionation in sediments and accumulation in a polychaete.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhong; Xu, Zhizhen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-08-01

    Jinzhou Bay in Northern China has been seriously contaminated with metals due to the impacts of smelting activities. In this study, we investigated the relationship between metal accumulation in a deposit-feeding polychaete Neanthes japonica and metal concentration and geochemical fractionation (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and Ni) in sediments of Jinzhou Bay. Compared with the historical data, metals in the more mobile geochemical fraction (exchangeable and carbonate fractions) were gradually partitioned into the more stable fraction (Fe-Mn oxides) over time. Metal concentration and geochemical fractionation in sediment significantly affected metal bioavailability and accumulation in polychaetes, except for Ni. Metal accumulation in polychaetes was significantly influenced by Fe or Mn content, and to a lesser degree by organic matter. Prediction of metal bioaccumulation in polychaetes was greatly improved by normalizing metal concentrations to Mn content in sediment. The geochemical fractionation of metals in sediments including the exchangeable, organic matter and Fe-Mn oxides were important in controlling the sediment metal bioavailability to polychaetes.

  1. Novel structures for optimal space partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opsomer, E.; Vandewalle, N.

    2016-10-01

    Partitioning space into polyhedra with a minimum total surface area is a fundamental question in science and mathematics. In 1887, Lord Kelvin conjectured that the optimal partition of space is obtained with a 14-faced space-filling polyhedron, called tetrakaidecahedron. Kelvin’s conjecture resisted a century until Weaire and Phelan proposed in 1994 a new structure, made of eight polyhedra, obtained from numerical simulations. Herein, we propose a stochastic method for finding efficient polyhedral structures, maximizing the mean isoperimeter Q, instead of minimizing total area. We show that novel optimal structures emerge with non-equal cell volumes and uncurved facets. A partition made of 24 polyhedra, is found to surpass the previous known structures. Our work suggests that other structures with high isoperimeter values are still to be discovered in the pursuit of optimal space partitions.

  2. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  3. Merging Groups to Maximize Object Partition Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klastorin, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of objectively comparing two independently determined partitions of N objects or variables is discussed. A similarity measure based on the simple matching coefficient is defined and related to previously suggested measures. (Author/JKS)

  4. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Stephen T.; Guillian, Eugene H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. PMID:18172211

  5. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Dye, Stephen T; Guillian, Eugene H

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. PMID:18172211

  6. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Dye, Stephen T; Guillian, Eugene H

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth.

  7. Isorropia Partitioning and Load Balancing Package

    2006-09-01

    Isorropia is a partitioning and load balancing package which interfaces with the Zoltan library. Isorropia can accept input objects such as matrices and matrix-graphs, and repartition/redistribute them into a better data distribution on parallel computers. Isorropia is primarily an interface package, utilizing graph and hypergraph partitioning algorithms that are in the Zoltan library which is a third-party library to Tilinos.

  8. Deriving the Hirshfeld partitioning using distance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Heidar-Zadeh, Farnaz; Ayers, Paul W.; Bultinck, Patrick

    2014-09-07

    The atoms in molecules associated with the Hirshfeld partitioning minimize the generalized Hellinger-Bhattacharya distance to the reference pro-atom densities. Moreover, the reference pro-atoms can be chosen by minimizing the distance between the pro-molecule density and the true molecular density. This provides an alternative to both the heuristic “stockholder” and the mathematical information-theoretic interpretations of the Hirshfeld partitioning. These results extend to any member of the family of f-divergences.

  9. A combined geochemical and hydrological approach for understanding macronutrient sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapworth, Dan J.; Gooddy, Daren C.; Kent, Flo; Heaton, Tim H. E.; Cole, Steven J.; Allen, Debbie

    2013-09-01

    This study employed complementary geochemical techniques and distributed hydrological modelling to investigate multiple sources of catchment macronutrients and characterise their changes in contrasting storm and baseflow conditions. This approach was demonstrated for the Beult catchment in the county of Kent (England), a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) indentified as failing to meet water quality standards for key nutrients under the Water Framework Directive. Significant changes in nutrient stoichiometry and bioavailability are observed for surface waters under contrasting flow regimes. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations are approximately twice as high during baseflow compared to high flow, while the inverse is true for particulate, colloidal and dissolved hydrolysable phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon and nitrate. Nitrogen (N):phosphorus (P) ratios are lower during baseflow for most surface waters impacted by diffuse sources of pollution. Fluorescence indices of dissolved organic matter (DOM) show that waste water inputs may be locally important sources of more complex low molecular weight DOM, particularly during baseflow. Nitrate N and O isotope signatures, combined with other dissolved chemical tracers, confirm the dominance of wastewater N inputs at sites downsteam of sewerage treatment works during baseflow, with a shift towards the soil N pool in surface waters across the catchment during high flow. Distributed hydrological modelling using the Grid-to-Grid model reveal areas with the greatest runoff also export higher N and P concentrations, and hence deliver a greater flux of macronutrients, while forested areas with low nutrient concentrations reduce runoff and nutrient fluxes. During periods of high runoff, nested sampling indicates that nutrient fluxes scale with catchment area. This combined approach enables a more thorough assessment of the macronutrient sources and dynamics, better informing management options

  10. Laboratory simulation of organic geochemical processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eglinton, G.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of laboratory simulations that are important to organic geochemistry in that they provide direct evidence relating to geochemical cycles involving carbon. Reviewed processes and experiments include reactions occurring in the geosphere, particularly, short-term diagenesis of biolipids and organochlorine pesticides in estuarine muds, as well as maturation of organic matter in ancient sediments.

  11. Geochemical Reaction Mechanism Discovery from Molecular Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-10

    Methods to explore reactions using computer simulation are becoming increasingly quantitative, versatile, and robust. In this review, a rationale for how molecular simulation can help build better geochemical kinetics models is first given. We summarize some common methods that geochemists use to simulate reaction mechanisms, specifically classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. Useful tools such as umbrella sampling and metadynamics that enable one to explore reactions are discussed. Several case studies wherein geochemists have used these tools to understand reaction mechanisms are presented, including water exchange and sorption on aqueous species and mineral surfaces, surface charging, crystal growth and dissolution, and electron transfer. The impact that molecular simulation has had on our understanding of geochemical reactivity are highlighted in each case. In the future, it is anticipated that molecular simulation of geochemical reaction mechanisms will become more commonplace as a tool to validate and interpret experimental data, and provide a check on the plausibility of geochemical kinetic models.

  12. Geochemical Reaction Mechanism Discovery from Molecular Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-10

    Methods to explore reactions using computer simulation are becoming increasingly quantitative, versatile, and robust. In this review, a rationale for how molecular simulation can help build better geochemical kinetics models is first given. We summarize some common methods that geochemists use to simulate reaction mechanisms, specifically classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. Useful tools such as umbrella sampling and metadynamics that enable one to explore reactions are discussed. Several case studies wherein geochemists have used these tools to understand reaction mechanisms are presented, including water exchange and sorption on aqueous species and mineralmore » surfaces, surface charging, crystal growth and dissolution, and electron transfer. The impact that molecular simulation has had on our understanding of geochemical reactivity are highlighted in each case. In the future, it is anticipated that molecular simulation of geochemical reaction mechanisms will become more commonplace as a tool to validate and interpret experimental data, and provide a check on the plausibility of geochemical kinetic models.« less

  13. Organising metabolic networks: Cycles in flux distributions.

    PubMed

    Kritz, Maurício Vieira; Trindade Dos Santos, Marcelo; Urrutia, Sebastián; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2010-08-01

    Metabolic networks are among the most widely studied biological systems. The topology and interconnections of metabolic reactions have been well described for many species. This is, however, not sufficient to understand how their activity is regulated in living organisms. These descriptions depict a static set of possible chains of reactions, with no information about the dynamic activity of reaction fluxes. Cyclic structures are thought to play a central role in the homeostasis of biological systems and in their resilience to a changing environment. In this work, we present a methodology to help investigating dynamic fluxes associated to biochemical reactions in metabolic networks. We introduce an algorithm for partitioning fluxes between cyclic and acyclic sub-networks, adapted from an algorithm initially developed to study fluxes in trophic networks. Using this algorithm, we analyse three metabolic systems: the central metabolism of wild type and a deletion mutant of Escherichia coli, erythrocyte metabolism and the central metabolism of the bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens. This methodology unveils the role of cycles in driving and maintaining metabolic fluxes under perturbations in these examples, and may be used to further investigate and understand the organisational invariance of biological systems.

  14. Hydrological and geochemical consequences of river regulation - hyporheic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siergieiev, Dmytro; Lundberg, Angela; Widerlund, Anders

    2014-05-01

    River-aquifer interfaces, essential for ecosystem functioning in terms of nutrient exchange and biological habitat, appear greatly threatened worldwide. Although river regulation is a vast pressure on river-aquifer interaction, influencing entire watersheds, knowledge about hyporheic exchange in regulated rivers is rather limited. In this study, we combine two decades of research on hydrological and geochemical impacts of hydropower regulation on river water and hyporheic zone in two large boreal rivers, unregulated Kalix River and regulated Lule River. Altered river discharge, with reduced spring peaks, daily summer fluctuations and elevated winter base flow severely modified Lule River water geochemistry and thus the transport of solutes to the Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea). Further, these river modifications changed the river-aquifer exchange on both daily and seasonal scale, which resulted in deteriorated hyporheic conditions with reduced riverbed hydraulic conductivity (formation of a clogging layer) reflected in a declined hyporheic flux. Altered hydrological regime of the hyporheic zone created quasi-stagnant conditions beneath the river-aquifer interface and promoted the formation of geochemically suboxic environment. Taken that hyporheic water is a mixture of river water and groundwater, mixing models for the regulated site demonstrate a considerable addition of Fe, Mn, Al, NH4 and removal of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, which suggests the hyporheic zone in the Lule River to be a source of solutes. This contradicts the observations from the hyporheic zone in the unregulated river, with opposite behaviour functioning as a barrier. These results suggest that the hyporheic zone function is dependent on the river discharge and the state of the river-aquifer connectivity. Improved knowledge about the latter on a watershed scale will substantially increase our understanding about the status and potential pressures of riverine ecosystems and assist management and

  15. Geochemical and Geomechanical Effects on Wellbore Cement Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomograpy (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways, and permeability with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core with artificial fractures was prepared and reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects. Cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. After the CO2 reaction, XMT images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. The permeability calculated based on CFD simulation was in agreement with the experimentally measured permeability. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater under static conditions, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are still likely to remain vulnerable to the leakage of CO2. CFD simulation for the flow of different fluids (CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2) using a pressure difference of 20 kPa and 200 kPa along ~2 cm-long cement fractures showed that a pressure gradient increase resulted in an increase of CO2 fluids flux by a factor of only ~3-9 because the friction of CO2 fluids on cement fracture surfaces increased with higher flow rate as well. At the same pressure gradient, the simulated flow rate was higher for supercritical CO2 than CO2-saturated brine by a factor of only ~2-3, because the viscosity of supercritical CO2 is much

  16. Geochemical and Geomechanical Effects on Wellbore Cement Fractures

    DOE PAGES

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomograpy (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways, and permeability with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core with artificial fractures was prepared and reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects. Cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnectionmore » of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. After the CO2 reaction, XMT images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. The permeability calculated based on CFD simulation was in agreement with the experimentally measured permeability. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater under static conditions, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are still likely to remain vulnerable to the leakage of CO2. CFD simulation for the flow of different fluids (CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2) using a pressure difference of 20 kPa and 200 kPa along ~2 cm-long cement fractures showed that a pressure gradient increase resulted in an increase of CO2 fluids flux by a factor of only ~3-9 because the friction of CO2 fluids on cement fracture surfaces increased with higher flow rate as well. At the same pressure gradient, the simulated flow rate was higher for supercritical CO2 than CO2-saturated brine by a factor of only ~2-3, because the viscosity of supercritical CO2 is

  17. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  18. Software Partitioning Schemes for Advanced Simulation Computer Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clymer, S. J.

    Conducted to design software partitioning techniques for use by the Air Force to partition a large flight simulator program for optimal execution on alternative configurations, this study resulted in a mathematical model which defines characteristics for an optimal partition, and a manually demonstrated partitioning algorithm design which…

  19. 47 CFR 101.1415 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GHz Band § 101.1415 Partitioning and disaggregation. (a) MVDDS licensees are permitted to partition...) MVDDS licensees may apply to the Commission to partition their licensed geographic service areas to eligible entities and are free to partition their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of...

  20. Development of Cyber-Infrastructure for Experimental Data and Trace Element Partitioning (traceDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, R. L.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Koppers, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the past few years, we have seen the development of databases that support model development, e.g. LEPR, PetDB, and EarthChem. A critical missing component is an exhaustive online database of experimental data on trace element partitioning between phases. Over the past ten years, we have developed a web-based resource for trace element partitioning data (as part of GERM at EarthRef.org). That database is a much-used, but rather undeveloped resource. It is searchable only by rock or mineral type, does not link to any other databases, nor does it provide significant guidance with respect to the selection of appropriate partition coefficients. To remedy this situation we are currently undertaking a fundamental reorganization and expansion of this database. This new “traceDs” database will (i) provide community access to a dataset that is now effectively unavailable to more than a handful of “micro-specialists” on each phase, (ii) provide a standard interface for input into any model that requires trace element partitioning information, (iii) interoperate seamlessly in the existing geochemical cyber-infrastructure and (iv) enable independent development of partitioning constraints based on phase compositions and intensive variables. The new traceDs database will include experimental partitioning data, together with major, minor and trace element compositions of phase assemblages (bulk, melt, fluids and minerals), and the physical conditions under which the experiments were carried out (e.g., temperature, pressure, volatile content, oxygen fugacity, doping methods, container material). Development of this common resource becomes increasingly important as both the experimental database and the level of expertise required to apply the numerical constraints increase in number and complexity. Trace element experimental data has significantly greater granularity/complexity than bulk rock or mineral chemistry, a primary reason why the database is such an important

  1. Gliding Box method applied to trace element distribution of a geochemical data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz González, Antonio; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Rosario García Moreno, M.; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge; Saa Requejo, Antonio; María Tarquis, Ana

    2010-05-01

    The application of fractal theory to process geochemical prospecting data can provide useful information for evaluating mineralization potential. A geochemical survey was carried out in the west area of Coruña province (NW Spain). Major elements and trace elements were determined by standard analytical techniques. It is well known that there are specific elements or arrays of elements, which are associated with specific types of mineralization. Arsenic has been used to evaluate the metallogenetic importance of the studied zone. Moreover, as can be considered as a pathfinder of Au, as these two elements are genetically associated. The main objective of this study was to use multifractal analysis to characterize the distribution of three trace elements, namely Au, As, and Sb. Concerning the local geology, the study area comprises predominantly acid rocks, mainly alkaline and calcalkaline granites, gneiss and migmatites. The most significant structural feature of this zone is the presence of a mylonitic band, with an approximate NE-SW orientation. The data set used in this study comprises 323 samples collected, with standard geochemical criteria, preferentially in the B horizon of the soil. Occasionally where this horizon was not present, samples were collected from the C horizon. Samples were taken in a rectilinear grid. The sampling lines were perpendicular to the NE-SW tectonic structures. Frequency distributions of the studied elements departed from normal. Coefficients of variation ranked as follows: Sb < As < Au. Significant correlation coefficients between Au, Sb, and As were found, even if these were low. The so-called ‘gliding box' algorithm (GB) proposed originally for lacunarity analysis has been extended to multifractal modelling and provides an alternative to the ‘box-counting' method for implementing multifractal analysis. The partitioning method applied in GB algorithm constructs samples by gliding a box of certain size (a) over the grid map in all

  2. Geobiochemistry: Placing Biochemistry in Its Geochemical Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, E.; Boyer, G. M.; Canovas, P. A., III; Prasad, A.; Dick, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Goals of geobiochemistry include simultaneously evaluating the relative stabilities of microbial cells and minerals, and predicting how the composition of biomolecules can change in response to the progress of geochemical reactions. Recent developments in theoretical geochemistry make it possible to predict standard thermodynamic properties of proteins, nucleotides, lipids, and many metabolites including the constituents of the citric acid cycle, at all temperatures and pressures where life is known to occur, and beyond. Combining these predictions with constraints from geochemical data makes it possible to assess the relative stabilities of biomolecules. Resulting independent predictions of the environmental occurrence of homologous proteins and lipid side-chains can be compared with observations from metagenomic and metalipidomic data to quantify geochemical driving forces that shape the composition of biomolecules. In addition, the energetic costs of generating biomolecules from within a diverse range of habitable environments can be evaluated in terms of prevailing geochemical variables. Comparisons of geochemical bioenergetic calculations across habitats leads to the generalization that the availability of H2 determines the cost of autotrophic biosynthesis relative to the aquatic environment external to microbial cells, and that pH, temperature, pressure, and availability of C, N, P, and S are typically secondary. Increasingly reduced conditions, which are determined by reactions of water with mineral surfaces and mineral assemblages, allow many biosynthetic reactions to shift from costing energy to releasing energy. Protein and lipid synthesis, as well as the reverse citric acid cycle, become energy-releasing processes under these conditions. The resulting energy balances that determine habitability contrast dramatically with assumptions derived from oxic surface conditions, such as those where human biochemistry operates.

  3. The Partition Intervalometer: A Programmable Underwater Timer for Marking Accumulated Sediment Profiles Collected in Anderson Sediment Traps: Development, Operation, Testing Procedures, and Field Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rendigs, Richard R.; Anderson, Roger Y.; Xu, Jingping; Davis, Raymond E.; Bergeron, Emile M.

    2009-01-01

    This manual illustrates the development of a programmable instrument designed to deploy a series of wafer-shaped discs (partitions) into the collection tube of a sediment trap in various aquatic environments. These hydrodynamically shaped discs are deployed at discrete time intervals from the Intervalometer and provide markers that delineate time intervals within the sediments that accumulate in the collection tube. The timer and mechanical system are lodged in an air-filled, water-tight pressure housing that is vertically hung within the confines of a cone-shaped sediment trap. The instrumentation has been operationally pressure tested to an equivalent water depth of approximately 1 km. Flaws discovered during extensive laboratory and pressure testing resulted in the implementation of several mechanical modifications (such as a redesign of the rotor and the discs) that improved the operation of the rotor assembly as well as the release of discs through the end cap. These results also identified a preferred azimuth placement of the rotor disc relative to the drop hole of the end cap. In the initial field trial, five sediment traps and coupled Intervalometers were attached to moored arrays and deployed at two sites off the coast of Southern California for approximately 8 months. Each of the instruments released 18 discs at the programmed 10 day intervals, except one unit, which experienced a malfunction after approximately 4 months. Most of the discs oriented in a near-horizontal position upon the surface of the sediment in the collection tubes. Sampling of the sediments for geochemical analyses was improved by these clearly defined markers, which indicated the changes in the flux and nature of sediments accumulated during the deployment period of each sediment trap.

  4. Flux-p: automating metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Birgitta E; Lamprecht, Anna-Lena; Steffen, Bernhard; Blank, Lars M

    2012-11-12

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  5. A geomorphic-geochemical framework for quantifying the cycling of sediment-associated contaminants in fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Patrick; Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; Williams, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Recent high-profile contamination events linked to extreme floods have underlined the persistent environmental risk posed by legacy metals stored in fluvial systems worldwide. While we understand that the fate of sediment-associated metals is largely determined by the dynamics of the fluvial transport system, we still lack a process-based understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms that affect the physical and geochemical transfer of metals through catchments. This interdisciplinary project will exploit advances in geomorphic and geochemical analyses to develop a methodological approach and conceptual framework to answer key questions related to the dynamics and timescales of metal cycling in fluvial systems. The approach will be tested in two reaches of the mining-impacted Afon Twymyn, Wales. The main objectives are: (i) quantify the physical transport of sediment and metals over a range of river flows and model sediment pathways; (ii) establish the geochemical mobility and speciation of sediment-associated metals and how this is modified through the sediment pathways. To achieve these objectives a geomorphic-geochemical combined methodology will be applied. It includes: (i) Aerial imagery that will be acquired from UAV surveys pre- and post-high flows and transformed into high-resolution DEMs using Structure-from-Motion; (ii) suspended sediment flux will be estimated indirectly by field calibration with a logging turbidimeter; (iii) 2D hydraulic and sediment transport model (Delft3D) will be used to quantify the transport of sediment and associated metals and to map the source, pathway and sink of contaminated sediment; (iv) soil and sediment samples (including suspended sediment) will be collected pre- and post-high flows for geochemical (concentration, speciation) and mineralogical (XRD, SEM) analyses; (v) finally, a geochemical model (Geochemists Workbench) will be developed to generate hypotheses that explain observed geochemical change as a function

  6. The partitioning of copper among selected phases of geologic media of two porphyry copper districts, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Learned, R.E.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    In experiments designed to determine the manner in which copper is partitioned among selected phases that constitute geologic media, we have applied the five-step sequential extraction procedure of Chao and Theobald to the analysis of drill core, soils, and stream sediments of the Rio Vivi and Rio Tanama porphyry copper districts of Puerto Rico. The extraction procedure affords a convenient means of determining the trace-metal content of the following fractions: (1) Mn oxides and "reactive" Fe oxides; (2) "amorphous" Fe oxides; (3) "crystalline" Fe oxides; (4) sulfides and magnetite; and (5) silicates. An additional extraction between steps (1) and (2) was performed to determine organic-related copper in stream sediments. The experimental results indicate that apportionment of copper among phases constituting geologic media is a function of geochemical environment. Distinctive partitioning patterns were derived from the analysis of drill core from each of three geochemical zones: (a) the supergene zone of oxidation; (b) the supergene zone of enrichment; and (c) the hypogene zone; and similarly, from the analysis of; (d) soils on a weakly leached capping; (e) soils on a strongly leached capping; and (f) active stream sediment. The experimental results also show that geochemical contrasts (anomaly-to-background ratios) vary widely among the five fractions of each sampling medium investigated, and that at least one fraction of each medium provides substantially stronger contrast than does the bulk medium. Fraction (1) provides optimal contrast for stream sediments of the district; fraction (2) provides optimal contrast for soils on a weakly leached capping; fraction (3) provides optimal contrast for soils on a strongly leached capping. Selective extraction procedures appear to have important applications to the orientation and interpretive stages of geochemical exploration. Further investigation and testing of a similar nature are recommended. ?? 1981.

  7. The Surface Heat Flux as a Function of Ground Cover for Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Wayland, Robert; Toll, David

    1997-01-01

    Surface heat fluxes were examined as a function of surface properties and meteorological conditions in a 100 km x 100 km grid square at 1-km spatial resolution centered at the location of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE), the Forest Ecosystem Dynamics site in central Maine, and a semiarid rangeland site around Walnut Gulch, Arizona. This investigation treats the surface heat flux variability within a GCM grid box to provide insight into methods for treating that variability in climate models. The heat fluxes were calculated using NOAA AVHRR and available meteorological data. The average heat fluxes that were estimated using the various area ground-cover representations were compared with the ensemble average heat fluxes for the entire area, which were assumed to be the best representation of the heat fluxes for the areas. Average beat fluxes were estimated for the entire 100 km x 100 km area based on a single ground-cover representation, and the mean error for the area sensible heat flux was about 10% and for the area latent heat flux, 21%. The estimation error was reduced, and in some cases significantly reduced, when the area heat fluxes were estimated by partitioning the area according to significant ground cover. The most significant effect of the partitioning was on the latent heat flux estimates.

  8. Screening of pesticides for environmental partitioning tendency.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2002-06-01

    The partitioning tendency of chemicals, in this study pesticides in particular, into different environmental compartments depends mainly on the concurrent relevance of the physico-chemical properties of the chemical itself. To rank the pesticides according to their distribution tendencies in the different environmental compartments we propose a multivariate approach: the combination, by principal component analysis, of those physico-chemical properties like organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc), n-octanol/water partition coefficient (Kow), water solubility (Sw), vapour pressure and Henry's law constant (H) that are more relevant to the determination of environmental partitioning. The resultant macrovariables, the PC1 and PC2 scores here named leaching index (LIN) and volatality index (VIN), are proposed as preliminary environmental partitioning indexes in different media. These two indexes are modeled by theoretical molecular descriptors with satisfactory predictive power. Such an approach allows a rapid pre-determination and screening of the environmental distribution of pesticides starting only from the molecular structure of the pesticide, without any a priori knowledge of the physico-chemical properties.

  9. Photosynthate Partitioning into Starch in Soybean Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chatterton, N. Jerry; Silvius, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Photosynthesis, photosynthate partitioning into foliar starch, and translocation were investigated in soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Amsoy 71), grown under different photoperiods and photosynthetic periods to determine the controls of leaf starch accumulation. Starch accumulation rates in soybean leaves were inversely related to the length of the daily photosynthetic period under which the plants were grown. Photosynthetic period and not photoperiod per se appears to be the important factor. Plants grown in a 14-hour photosynthetic period partitioned approximately 60% of the daily foliar accumulation into starch whereas 7-hour plants partitioned about 90% of their daily foliar accumulation into starch. The difference in starch accumulation resulted from a change in photosynthate partitioning between starch and leaf residual dry weight. Residual dry weight is defined as leaf dry weight minus the weight of total nonstructural carbohydrates. Differences in photosynthate partitioning into starch were also associated with changes in photosynthetic and translocation rates, as well as with leaf and whole plant morphology. It is concluded that leaf starch accumulation is a programmed process and not simply the result of a limitation in translocation. PMID:16661047

  10. Multi-A Graph Patrolling and Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elor, Y.; Bruckstein, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a novel multi agent patrolling algorithm inspired by the behavior of gas filled balloons. Very low capability ant-like agents are considered with the task of patrolling an unknown area modeled as a graph. While executing the proposed algorithm, the agents dynamically partition the graph between them using simple local interactions, every agent assuming the responsibility for patrolling his subgraph. Balanced graph partition is an emergent behavior due to the local interactions between the agents in the swarm. Extensive simulations on various graphs (environments) showed that the average time to reach a balanced partition is linear with the graph size. The simulations yielded a convincing argument for conjecturing that if the graph being patrolled contains a balanced partition, the agents will find it. However, we could not prove this. Nevertheless, we have proved that if a balanced partition is reached, the maximum time lag between two successive visits to any vertex using the proposed strategy is at most twice the optimal so the patrol quality is at least half the optimal. In case of weighted graphs the patrol quality is at least (1)/(2){lmin}/{lmax} of the optimal where lmax (lmin) is the longest (shortest) edge in the graph.

  11. Computational prediction of solubilizers' effect on partitioning.

    PubMed

    Hoest, Jan; Christensen, Inge T; Jørgensen, Flemming S; Hovgaard, Lars; Frokjaer, Sven

    2007-02-01

    A computational model for the prediction of solubilizers' effect on drug partitioning has been developed. Membrane/water partitioning was evaluated by means of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography. Four solubilizers were used to alter the partitioning in the IAM column. Two types of molecular descriptors were calculated: 2D descriptors using the MOE software and 3D descriptors using the Volsurf software. Structure-property relationships between each of the two types of descriptors and partitioning were established using partial least squares, projection to latent structures (PLS) statistics. Statistically significant relationships between the molecular descriptors and the IAM data were identified. Based on the 2D descriptors structure-property relationships R(2)Y=0. 99 and Q(2)=0.82-0.83 were obtained for some of the solubilizers. The most important descriptor was related to logP. For the Volsurf 3D descriptors models with R(2)Y=0.53-0.64 and Q(2)=0.40-0.54 were obtained using five descriptors. The present study showed that it is possible to predict partitioning of substances in an artificial phospholipid membrane, with or without the use of solubilizers.

  12. Electronic and nuclear flux densities in the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Paulus, B.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.; Pohl, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and nuclear flux densities of a vibrating H2 molecule after an electronic excitation by a short femtosecond laser pulse. The final state, a coherent superposition of the electronic ground state X1Σg+ and the electronic excited state B1Σu+, evolves freely and permits the partition of the electronic flux density into two competing fluxes: the adiabatic and the transition flux density. The nature of the two fluxes allows us to identify two alternating dynamics of the electronic motion, occurring on the attosecond and the femtosecond time scales. In contradistinction to the adiabatic electronic flux density, the transition electronic flux density shows a dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field, encoding information of the interaction of the electrons with the electric field. Furthermore, the nuclear flux density displays multiple reversals, a quantum effect recently discovered by Manz et al. [J. Manz, J. F. Pérez-Torres, and Y. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 153004 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.153004], calling for investigation of the electronic flux density.

  13. Rovibrational energies, partition functions and equilibrium fractionation of the CO2 isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerezo, J.; Bastida, A.; Requena, A.; Zúñiga, J.

    2014-11-01

    Rovibrational energy levels, partition functions and relative abundances of the stable isotopologues of CO2 in gas phase at equilibrium are calculated using an empirical Morse-cosine potential energy surface (PES) refined by fitting to the updated pure (l2=0) vibrational frequencies observed for the main 12C16O2 isotopologue. The rovibrational energy levels are calculated variationally using a system of optimized hyperspherical normal coordinates, and from these the vibrational terms Gv and rotational constants Bv of the isotopologues are determined. The refined potential surface is shown to be clearly superior to the original potential surface, with the former reproducing the observed values of the spectroscopic constants Gv and Bv with accuracies of about 0.1 cm-1 and 0.00020 cm-1, respectively, for levels with l2≥0 up to 10,000 cm-1 above the ground state. The internal partition functions of the isotopologues are calculated by approximated direct summation over the rovibrational energies and compared with both previous partition sums and values obtained from analytical expressions based on the harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor models. The partition functions calculated by approximated direct summation are then used to determine the abundances of the CO2 isotopologues at thermodynamic equilibrium using the method developed by Wang et al. [74]. Significant variations in the relative abundances of some of the CO2 multiple substituted isotopologues at terrestrial temperatures with respect to those provided by the classical harmonic-based Urey theory are found, which may be of relevance in geochemical processes.

  14. Metal-silicate partitioning during core formation on super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, L. K.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, D. D.; Remo, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Separation of the Earth into a rocky mantle and metallic Fe core is a problem long studied in the planetary science community (e.g. [1]). The timing of core formation influences the abundances of the siderophile elements found in the Earth's mantle, and the mechanism of core formation influences the degree of chemical equilibration between the rocky mantle and the core at the time of metal separation. However, limited work has been done on formation of metallic cores and its effects on mantle chemistry in rocky planets larger than the Earth. Super-Earths, exoplanets with masses up to ~ 5 Earth masses and radii up to ~1.6-1.7 Earth radii, have significantly larger internal pressures and consequently higher internal temperatures than the Earth, therefore conclusions from Earth-centric studies of core formation may be erroneous. Partitioning coefficients for many of the relevant elements (e.g. Fe, Ni, Si, O, etc.) are available in the literature, but only to relatively low pressures. The relevant pressures for super-Earths are significantly larger. However, data on Fe-O-Ni-Si partitioning at pressures (200-500 GPa) and temperatures relevant to super-Earths have been measured by laser-induced shocks with the ZBL laser at Sandia National Laboratory with a method described in [2]. We will present a model which integrates this data with lower pressure partition coefficients from the literature (e.g. [3],[4],[5]), with special emphasis on Fe and O, to describe partitioning behavior at high pressures and discuss its implications for core size and composition on rocky super-Earths. [1] Ringwood, A.E. (1977) Geochem. J. 11, 111-135. [2] Remo, J.L., Petaev, M.I., Jacobsen, S. B. (2008) LPSC abstract, 1420. [3] Frost, D.J. et al. (2010) JGR, B02202. [4] Kombayashi, T. (2014) JGR, 4164-4177. [5] Rubie, D.C. et al. (2011) EPSL, 301, 31-42. [5

  15. Geochemical fractions of copper in soil chronosequences of selected European floodplains.

    PubMed

    Graf, M; Lair, G J; Zehetner, F; Gerzabek, M H

    2007-08-01

    The influence of soil formation on copper sorption is documented based on chronosequences of soils from three river floodplains in Europe (Danube, Ebro and Elbe). Sequential extraction was used to fractionate copper in original and spiked soils in order to study the long-term and short-term behaviour of copper retention. Copper partitioning among defined geochemical fractions was mainly determined by soil pH and the contents of carbonates, organic matter and Fe-/Mn-oxides and hydroxides. Copper extracted with NH(2)OH.HCl correlated well with the contents of crystalline Fe-oxides and hydroxides, demonstrating increasing retention capacity with progressing soil development. Copper retained in original soils was found in more strongly bound fractions, whereas sorption of freshly added copper was primarily influenced by the presence of carbonates. Beyond the effect of progressing soil formation, variations in organic carbon contents due to different land use history affected the copper retention capacity of the investigated soils.

  16. Statistical categorization geochemical modeling of groundwater in Ain Azel plain (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkhiri, Lazhar; Boudoukha, Abderrahmane; Mouni, Lotfi; Baouz, Toufik

    2011-01-01

    Water analysis data of 54 groundwater samples from 18 uniformly distributed wells were collected during three campaigns (June, September and December 2004). Q-mode hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was employed for partitioning the water samples into hydrochemical facies. Interpretation of analytical data showed that the abundance of major ions was identified as follows: Ca ⩾ Mg > Na > K and HCO 3 ⩾ Cl > SO 4. Three major water facies are suggested by the HCA analysis. The samples from the area were classified as recharge area waters (Ca-Mg-HCO 3 water), transition area waters (Mg-Ca-HCO 3-Cl water), and discharge area waters (Mg-Ca-Cl-HCO 3 water). Inverse geochemical modeling suggests that relatively few phases are required to derive the water chemistry in the area. In a broad sense, the reactions responsible for the hydrochemical evolution in the area fall into two categories: (1) evaporite weathering reactions and (2) precipitation of carbonate minerals.

  17. Application of the two-source energy balance model to partition evapotranspiration in an arid wine vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kool, Dilia; Kustas, William P.; Agam, Nurit

    2016-04-01

    The partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) into transpiration (T), a productive water use, and soil water evaporation (E), which is generally considered a water loss, is highly relevant to agriculture in the light of increasing desertification and water scarcity. This task is challenged by the complexity of soil and plant interactions, coupled with changes in atmospheric and soil water content conditions. Many of the processes controlling water/energy exchange are not adequately modeled. The two-source energy balance model (TSEB) was evaluated and adapted for independent E and T estimations in an isolated drip-irrigated wine vineyard in the arid Negev desert. The TSEB model estimates ET by computing vegetation and soil energy fluxes using remotely sensed composite surface temperature, local weather data (solar radiation, air temperature and humidity, and wind speed), and vegetation metrics (row spacing, canopy height and width, and leaf area). The soil and vegetation energy fluxes are computed numerically using a system of temperature gradient and resistance equations; where soil and canopy temperatures are derived from the composite surface temperature. For estimation of ET, the TSEB model has been shown to perform well for various agricultural crops under a wide range of environmental conditions, but validation of T and E fluxes is limited to one study in a well-watered cotton crop. Extending the TSEB approach to water-limited vineyards demands careful consideration regarding how the complex canopy structure of vineyards will influence the accuracy of the partitioning between E and T. Data for evaluation of the TSEB model were collected over a season (bud break till harvest). Composite, canopy, and soil surface temperatures were measured using infrared thermometers. The composite vegetation and soil surface energy fluxes were assessed using independent measurements of net radiation, and soil, sensible and latent heat flux. The below canopy energy balance was

  18. Seeking a geochemical identifier for authigenic carbonate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Authigenic carbonate was recently invoked as a third major global carbon sink in addition to primary marine carbonate and organic carbon. Distinguishing the two carbonate sinks is fundamental to our understanding of Earth's carbon cycle and its role in regulating the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. Here, using microscale geochemical measurements of carbonates in Early Triassic strata, we show that the growth of authigenic carbonate follows a different trajectory from primary marine carbonate in a cross-plot of uranium concentration and carbon isotope composition. Thus, a combination of the two geochemical variables is able to distinguish between the two carbonate sinks. The temporal distribution of authigenic carbonates in the Early Triassic strata suggests that the increase in the extent of carbonate authigenesis acted as a negative feedback to the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:26947562

  19. Seeking a geochemical identifier for authigenic carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Authigenic carbonate was recently invoked as a third major global carbon sink in addition to primary marine carbonate and organic carbon. Distinguishing the two carbonate sinks is fundamental to our understanding of Earth's carbon cycle and its role in regulating the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. Here, using microscale geochemical measurements of carbonates in Early Triassic strata, we show that the growth of authigenic carbonate follows a different trajectory from primary marine carbonate in a cross-plot of uranium concentration and carbon isotope composition. Thus, a combination of the two geochemical variables is able to distinguish between the two carbonate sinks. The temporal distribution of authigenic carbonates in the Early Triassic strata suggests that the increase in the extent of carbonate authigenesis acted as a negative feedback to the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:26947562

  20. Geochemical dynamics in selected Yellowstone hydrothermal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G.; Kamyshny, A.; Findlay, A.; Nuzzio, D.

    2010-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park has a wide diversity of thermal features, and includes springs with a range of pH conditions that significantly impact sulfur speciation. We have utilized a combination of voltammetric and spectroscopic techniques to characterize the intermediate sulfur chemistry of Cinder Pool, Evening Primrose, Ojo Caliente, Frying Pan, Azure, and Dragon thermal springs. These measurements additionally have demonstrated the geochemical dynamics inherent in these systems; significant variability in chemical speciation occur in many of these thermal features due to changes in gas supply rates, fluid discharge rates, and thermal differences that occur on second time scales. The dynamics of the geochemical settings shown may significantly impact how microorganisms interact with the sulfur forms in these systems.

  1. Partitioning of Pb, Cd, and Cu in natural and disturbed salt marshes of eastern San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Alai, M.; Fegan, N. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Sediment from different marsh systems along eastern San Francisco Bay was analyzed to determine how metals are partitioned in different environments influenced by human activity. Human influences in the marshes may have altered the geochemical processes controlling the metal partitioning. The three marsh systems analyzed include a natural marsh (San Francisco Wildlife Refuge), a natural marsh influenced by landfill leachate (Triangle Marsh), and a disturbed marsh constructed of artificial fill (Hayward Landing). The trace metal concentrations were compared in: easily exchangeable, weakly acid soluble, reducible, and oxidizable fractions representing the sediment phases of: clays, carbonates, Mn or Fe oxyhydroxides, and sulfides or organic material, respectively. The sediment fractions were analyzed for Pb, Cd, and Cu. In all three marshes, the pattern of metal partitioning with depth is similar; however, there are some inconsistencies. The Pb, Cd, and Cu in the reducible fraction typically decrease with depth while the metals in the oxidizable fraction generally increase or remain approximately constant with depth. This data suggests that the partitioning of metals in all three environments is initially controlled by sorption of metals onto Mn or Fe oxyhydroxides at the surface and shifts to organic or sulfides as the sediments is buried and the environment becomes more reducing.

  2. Fluxes of Ultrafine Particles Over and In a Deciduous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    Given the importance of forests to land surface cover and particle removal (due to the very high deposition velocities and well-developed turbulence) there is a specific need to understand removal to, and in, forests. Fluxes of size-resolved and total particle number fluxes over (at 46 m) and in (at 7 m) a deciduous forest over a 14 month period are presented based on data from two Gill 3-D WindMaster Pro sonic anemometers, an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (UCPC) operated at 10 Hz and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) operated at 1 Hz. Size-resolved particle profiles during the same period are measured using a separate FMPS scanning at three measurement heights across the canopy (top, middle and bottom). Three methods are being applied to derive the total number and size-resolved fluxes from the UCPC and FMPS respectively; eddy covariance, inertial dissipation and the co-spectral approach. The results are integrated with fluxes of sensible heat, momentum and carbon dioxide derived using a Licor LI-7200. Results for the total number flux concentrations and the size-resolved concentrations derived using the three different approaches applied to the above canopy sampling level show a high degree of accord, but that the eddy-covariance fluxes are generally of smaller magnitude than those derived using the spectral methods. In keeping with prior research our results show a considerable number of fluxes are characterized by upward fluxes. Further our results show distinctly different flux diurnal profiles for the nucleation versus Aitken mode particles indicating some differential control on fluxes of particles of different sizes (including a role for aerosol dynamics). This presentation will provide details regarding the experimental approach, flux and gradient estimation methodologies, diagnose the size dependence of the fluxes, and compare and contrast the canopy and ground partitioning of the particle fluxes during leaf-on and leaf-off periods.

  3. Synthesizing Earth's geochemical data for hydrogeochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S. L.; Kubicki, J.; Miller, D.; Richter, D.; Giles, L.; Mitra, P.

    2007-12-01

    For over 200 years, geochemical, microbiological, and chemical data have been collected to describe the evolution of the surface earth. Many of these measurements are data showing variations in time or in space. To forward predict hydrologic response to changing tectonic, climatic, or anthropogenic forcings requires synthesis of these data and utilization in hydrogeochemical models. Increasingly, scientists are attempting to synthesize such data in order to make predictions for new regions or for future time periods. However, to make such complex geochemical data accessible requires development of sophisticated cyberinfrastructures that both invite uploading as well as usage of data. Two such cyberinfrastructure (CI) initiatives are currently developing, one to invite and promote the use of environmental kinetics data (laboratory time course data) through ChemxSeer, and the other to invite and promote the use of spatially indexed geochemical data for the Earth's Critical Zone through CZEN.org. The vision of these CI initiatives is to provide cyber-enhanced portals that encourage domain scientists to upload their data before publication (in private cyberspace), and to make these data eventually publicly accessible (after an embargo period). If the CI can be made to provide services to the domain specialist - e.g. to provide data analysis services or data comparison services - we envision that scientists will upload data. In addition, the CI can promote the use and comparison of datasets across disciplines. For example, the CI can facilitate the use of spatially indexed geochemical data by scientists more accustomed to dealing with time-course data for hydrologic flow, and can provide user-friendly interfaces with CI established to facilitate the use of hydrologic data. Examples of the usage of synthesized data to predict soil development over the last 13ky and its effects on active hydrological flow boundaries in surficial systems will be discussed for i) a N

  4. Summary report on geochemical barrier special study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Long-term management of uranium mill tailings must provide assurance that soluble contaminants will not migrate beyond the Point of Compliance. Conventional management alternatives provide containment through the use of physical barriers which are designed to prevent migration of water through the tailings pile. An alternative is to geochemically modify the tailings to immobilize the contaminants. This investigation examined three potential geochemical modifiers to determine their ability to immobilize inorganic groundwater contaminants found in uranium mill tailings. These modifiers were hydrated lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), and a sphaegnum peat moss. This investigation focused on both the geochemical interactions between the tailings and the modifiers, and the effects the modifiers had on the physical strength of the tailings. The geochemical investigations began with characterization of the tailings by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. This was followed by batch leaching experiments in which various concentrations of each modifier were added to tailings in shaker flasks and allowed to come to equilibrium. Finally, column experiments were conducted to simulate flow through a tailings pile. The results show that all of the modifiers were at least moderately effective at immobilizing most of the groundwater contaminants of concern at uranium mill tailings sites. Hydrated lime was able to achieve 90 percent concentration reduction of arsenic, cadmium, selenium, uranium, and sulfate when added at a two percent concentration. Limestone was somewhat less effective and peat removed greater than 90 percent of arsenic, lead, uranium, and sulfate at a one percent concentration. The column tests showed that kinetic and/or mass transfer limitations are important and that sufficient time must be allowed for the immobilization reactions to occur.

  5. Geochemical patterns in the soils of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Cohen, David R; Rutherford, Neil F; Morisseau, Eleni; Zissimos, Andreas M

    2012-03-15

    The soil geochemical atlas of Cyprus is a recent addition to the series of national to continental-scale geochemical mapping programmes implemented over the last two decades for environmental and resource applications. The study has been conducted at the high sampling density of 1 site per 1km(2), with multi-element and multi-method analysis performed on samples of top soil (0-25cm) and sub soil (50-75cm) from a grid of over 5350 sites across a major portion of Cyprus. Major and most trace elements display sharp concentration changes across the main geological boundaries but a high degree of spatial continuity and consistency of values within those boundaries. Some elements display one to two orders of magnitude difference in median concentrations between the soils developed over ultramafic or mafic units and those developed over sedimentary rocks or alluvial units. The ratio of aqua regia-extractable to total metal contents provides an indication of the general mineralogical host for a number of trace elements. The majority of soils are near-neutral to alkaline with the small proportion of areas with soil pH<5 largely restricted to the major Cu deposits. There is strong correlation between top soil and sub soil geochemical values. Where the concentrations of some elements (including Pb, Hg and Sn) are indicative of contamination, the values are typically higher in the top soil samples in these areas. Variations in the concentration of elements with strong redox controls on mobility are linked to changes in sedimentary environment between deep and shallow marine conditions. Some element patterns can be related to the effects of urbanisation and sulphide mining operations; however the dominant control on soil geochemistry is the parent geology and regolith forming processes. The atlas demonstrates the effectiveness of high-density sampling in mapping local to regional-scale features of the geochemical landscape. PMID:22330424

  6. Geochemical patterns in the soils of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Cohen, David R; Rutherford, Neil F; Morisseau, Eleni; Zissimos, Andreas M

    2012-03-15

    The soil geochemical atlas of Cyprus is a recent addition to the series of national to continental-scale geochemical mapping programmes implemented over the last two decades for environmental and resource applications. The study has been conducted at the high sampling density of 1 site per 1km(2), with multi-element and multi-method analysis performed on samples of top soil (0-25cm) and sub soil (50-75cm) from a grid of over 5350 sites across a major portion of Cyprus. Major and most trace elements display sharp concentration changes across the main geological boundaries but a high degree of spatial continuity and consistency of values within those boundaries. Some elements display one to two orders of magnitude difference in median concentrations between the soils developed over ultramafic or mafic units and those developed over sedimentary rocks or alluvial units. The ratio of aqua regia-extractable to total metal contents provides an indication of the general mineralogical host for a number of trace elements. The majority of soils are near-neutral to alkaline with the small proportion of areas with soil pH<5 largely restricted to the major Cu deposits. There is strong correlation between top soil and sub soil geochemical values. Where the concentrations of some elements (including Pb, Hg and Sn) are indicative of contamination, the values are typically higher in the top soil samples in these areas. Variations in the concentration of elements with strong redox controls on mobility are linked to changes in sedimentary environment between deep and shallow marine conditions. Some element patterns can be related to the effects of urbanisation and sulphide mining operations; however the dominant control on soil geochemistry is the parent geology and regolith forming processes. The atlas demonstrates the effectiveness of high-density sampling in mapping local to regional-scale features of the geochemical landscape.

  7. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, D.; Adams, L.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper the authors propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning and interprocessor data communication techniques. They prove that the PSOR method has the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the Red/Black (R/B) SOR method for the five-point stencil on both strip and block partitions, and as the four-color (R/B/G/O) SOR method for the nine-point stencil on strip partitions. They also demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different MIMD multiprocessors (a KSR1, an Intel Delta, a Paragon, and an IBM SP2). Finally, they compare the parallel performance of PSOR, R/B SOR, and R/B/G/O SOR. Numerical results on the Paragon indicate that PSOR is more efficient than R/B SOR and R/B/G/O SOR in both computation and interprocessor data communication.

  8. Parallel algorithms for dynamically partitioning unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, P.; Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1994-10-01

    Grid partitioning is the method of choice for decomposing a wide variety of computational problems into naturally parallel pieces. In problems where computational load on the grid or the grid itself changes as the simulation progresses, the ability to repartition dynamically and in parallel is attractive for achieving higher performance. We describe three algorithms suitable for parallel dynamic load-balancing which attempt to partition unstructured grids so that computational load is balanced and communication is minimized. The execution time of algorithms and the quality of the partitions they generate are compared to results from serial partitioners for two large grids. The integration of the algorithms into a parallel particle simulation is also briefly discussed.

  9. Nitrogen Partitioning Between Reduced Silicate Melts and Metallic Iron Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, L. S.; Falksen, E.; Von Der Handt, A.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Solubility and partitioning of elements during early planetary history is critical in understanding element concentrations and distribution in the terrestrial planets. Nitrogen is the most depleted element in the bulk silicate Earth relative to CI chondrites [1], which may be explained by its high pressure behavior under reduced conditions relevant to planetary accretion and differentiation. Under oxidized conditions N dissolves in silicate melts as N2, but as fO2 decreases N-H species become the dominant form of dissolved N and the solubility increases [2-7]. DNmetal/melt (the N partition coefficient between metal and melt) is affected by pressure, fO2, fH2, and metal composition [3-5] but with less than 20 published experiments over a wide pressure range, these dependencies have been poorly constrained. Here we present new N-bearing experiments on graphite-saturated silicate melts in equilibrium with Fe-rich metallic melts. Experiments were performed at 1.2 GPa and 1400 ˚C in a piston cylinder apparatus, with N added as Si3N4, FexN, and urea [(NH2)2CO] to basaltic starting compositions. Glassy and metallic run products were gold coated and analyzed by EMPA. Detection limits and standard errors in N concentrations were improved (e.g. better than 1% for > 0.4 wt% N) relative to previous studies [2-5] by fitting non-linear backgrounds to wavelength-scans on standards and unknowns. Preliminary experiments with fO2 of IW-2 to IW-4 produced glasses with a maximum of 0.6 wt% N and metals with a maximum of 1.1 wt% N. DNmetal/melt are comparable to values at a similar pressure determined in the LH-DAC [5]. Further experiments will explore the effects of fO2 and H content on DN and N solubility. References: [1] Halliday (2013) GCA 105, 146-171. [2] Libourel et al. (2003) GCA 67, 4123-4135. [3] Kadik et al. (2011) Geochem. Int. 49, 429-438. [4] Kadik et al. (2013) PEPI 214, 14-24. [5] Roskosz et al. (2013) GCA 121, 15-28. [6] Stanley et al. (2014) GCA 129, 54-76. [7

  10. Geochemical evolution of a fractured zone in the cap rock of an underground carbon storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialle, S.; Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Assessment and management of environmental risks associated with underground storage of CO2 in geological systems is essential for the commercial deployment of this technology. A major risk is leakage of the CO2 from its storage reservoir, through wellbores, and along faults and fractures in the cap rock. The geochemical reactions likely to take place as CO2 leaks through a damage zone and their impact on cap rock integrity still need to be better understood and quantified. Should CO2 leakage occur, geochemical reactions would govern the environmental impact on shallow groundwater aquifers and could provide an indication of the leak prior to surface-based monitoring techniques. We used the reactive transport code TOUGH2/TOUGHREACT to model a leakage scenario through a fractured cap rock. Since geochemical reactions will strongly depend upon the local hydrodynamics of the CO2 leak, the first step of the study is to provide an appropriate physical representation of fluid flow through the system. Typically, for a low porosity rock formation, a fault/damaged zone system is composed of a core of low permeability and a damage zone with second-order fractures whose density decreases with distance from the fault core. Permeability is thus increased along the fault plane and laterally decreases down to the permeability value of the undamaged cap rock. Appropriate scaling relationships (e.g., and analytical expression of for permeability as a function of fracture aperture and fracture density), effective physical parameters as well as constitutive relationships are carefully chosen to model the fractured system, treated as an equivalent porous medium. The cap rock is initially saturated with brine (salinity of 0.15 in mass fraction) and due to overpressure in the lower storage reservoir, CO2 migrates through the damage zone. Geochemical reactions involve both salt precipitation due to the partitioning of H2O and CO2 between liquid and gas phases as well as well reactions

  11. Chiral partition functions of quantum Hall droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, Andrea Viola, Giovanni; Zemba, Guillermo R.

    2010-02-15

    Chiral partition functions of conformal field theory describe the edge excitations of isolated Hall droplets. They are characterized by an index specifying the quasiparticle sector and transform among themselves by a finite-dimensional representation of the modular group. The partition functions are derived and used to describe electron transitions leading to Coulomb blockade conductance peaks. We find the peak patterns for Abelian hierarchical states and non-Abelian Read-Rezayi states, and compare them. Experimental observation of these features can check the qualitative properties of the conformal field theory description, such as the decomposition of the Hilbert space into sectors, involving charged and neutral parts, and the fusion rules.

  12. Partitioning SAT Instances for Distributed Solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, Antti E. J.; Junttila, Tommi; Niemelä, Ilkka

    In this paper we study the problem of solving hard propositional satisfiability problem (SAT) instances in a computing grid or cloud, where run times and communication between parallel running computations are limited.We study analytically an approach where the instance is partitioned iteratively into a tree of subproblems and each node in the tree is solved in parallel.We present new methods for constructing partitions which combine clause learning and lookahead. The methods are incorporated into the iterative approach and its performance is demonstrated with an extensive comparison against the best sequential solvers in the SAT competition 2009 as well as against two efficient parallel solvers.

  13. Controls on OIB and MORB Geochemical Variabilty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, O.; Maclennan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The geochemical variability preserved in Ocean Island and Mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is a key tracer of the magmatic storage and transport processes they experience during their ascent through the mantle and crust. The effect of these processes is to collapse the huge diversity of melt compositions predicted to form during polybaric fractional melting of a lithologically heterogeneous mantle, into the narrow range we see expressed in most ocean island and mid-ocean ridge settings. Magma mixing can therefore be seen as contaminating the variance structure of primitive mantle melts, akin to the way in which wall-rock assimilation contaminates melts by chemical addition. The key observation from the melt inclusion and whole-rock records from ocean islands such as Iceland, is that as crystallisation proceeds mixing in magma chambers progressively reduces geochemical variability, until by ~5wt% MgO almost all primary chemical diversity has been lost. These chemical systematics allow us to extend the observations made at ocean islands to make predictions about how mixing processes should operate in MORB generally and the key factors controlling mixing efficiency: melt flow out of the mantle, crustal thickness, magma supply rate, and by extension spreading rate, and mantle potential temperature. However, with its low sampling density, the global MORB database does not easily allow testing of these hypotheses. We have developed a novel geospatial statistical analysis to bridge the gap between observations made on a small scale - at single ocean islands and ridge segments - to the entire global dataset of MORB chemistry. By analysing the geochemical variance in MORB over a range of bandwidths we have captured the ~200km lengthscale at which the simple relationships between geochemical variability and MgO appear. Our results demonstrate that on short lengthscales mantle chemical structure and magmatic processes operate coherently in destruction of geochemical variability

  14. Ranking Geochemical Energy Availability in Hydrothermal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M. E.; Shock, E. L.; Meyer-Dombard, D.; Amend, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    The energy available to hyperthermophilic microorganisms in hot springs can be theoretically estimated using thermodynamic calculations based on geochemical measurements. The relative abundance of different geochemical energy sources (the "ranking" of these reactions) in particular hot springs may provide one explanation for the differences in hot spring microbial communities and also facilitate the culture of ecologically-relevant microorganisms. Geochemical sampling of seven Yellowstone National Park hot springs was repeated five times from 1999 to 2004 with the intent to compare the geochemistry and geochemical energy available to microorganisms. These seven hot springs were located in three separate regions of Yellowstone National Park: three hot springs, including Obsidian Pool, were sampled in the Mud Volcano area; two in the Sylvan Springs area (Gibbon Meadows); and one each in Imperial Meadows and Sentinel Meadows (Lower Geyser Basin). The hot springs were 75 to 93° C (with one 65° C exception) and spanned the bulk of the pH range at Yellowstone (pH 1.8 to 7.6). Geochemical measurements made on hot springs included redox-active species containing C, N, O, H, S, and Fe; these species were measured by field spectrophotometry and ion chromatography of fluid samples and gas chromatographic analysis of gas samples. From these measurements chemical affinities were calculated for 179 inorganic reactions which encompass the suite of autotrophic energy sources potentially available in each pool. Composite affinities for each reaction were compiled for each of the seven primary pools. The composite for each pool was assembled from repeat measurements from the primary pool as well as nearby pools with similar geochemistry. Calculations show that over half of these inorganic reactions could provide enough energy for a microorganism to survive, based on the threshold value of energy required by {it E. coli} (20 kJ per mole of electron pairs). Some microorganisms

  15. Dry deposition, concentration and gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric carbazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esen, Fatma; Tasdemir, Yücel; Cindoruk, S. Sıddık

    2010-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations and dry deposition of carbazole were measured to present the temporal changes, gas/particle partitioning and magnitude of fluxes. Atmospheric samples were collected from July 2004 to May 2005 at four different sites in Bursa, Turkey. The average total (gas and particulate) carbazole concentrations were 7.6 ± 9.9 ng m - 3 in Gulbahce (Residential), 1.1 ± 1.2 ng m - 3 in BUTAL (Traffic), 3.3 ± 5.0 ng m - 3 in BOID (Industrial), and 1.2 ± 0.7 ng m - 3 in the Uludag University Campus (UU) (Suburban). Experimental gas/particle partition coefficient ( Kp) was determined using the study results and compared with Kp values calculated from octanol-air and soot-air + octanol partitioning models. Total dry deposition fluxes of carbazole were 290 ± 484 ng m - 2 d - 1 in BUTAL and 72 ± 67 ng m - 2 d - 1 in the UU Campus. Particulate phase dry deposition velocities were 0.81 ± 0.78 cm s - 1 and 0.90 ± 1.53 cm s - 1 for BUTAL and the UU Campus, respectively. On the other hand, gas-phase mass transfer coefficients were calculated to be 0.34 ± 0.29 cm s - 1 and 0.26 ± 0.17 cm s - 1 for BUTAL and the UU Campus, respectively.

  16. Energy partitioning and environmental influence factors in different vegetation types in the GEWEX Asian Monsoon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengshan; Tao, Fulu; Li, Shenggong; Zhang, Shuai; Xiao, Dengpan; Wang, Meng

    2014-12-01

    Environmental influences upon energy balance in areas of different vegetation types (i.e., forest at Kog-Ma in Thailand and at Yakutsk in Russia, grassland at Amdo in Chinese Tibet and at Arvaikheer in Mongolia, and mixed farmland at Tak in Thailand) in the GEWEX Asian Monsoon Experiment were investigated. The sites we investigated are geographically and climatologically different; and consequently had quite large variations in temperature ( T), water vapor pressure deficit (VPD), soil moisture (SM), and precipitation (PPT). During May-October, the net radiation flux ( R n) (in W·m-2) was 406.21 at Tak, 365.57 at Kog-Ma, 390.97 at Amdo, 316.65 at Arvaikheer, and 287.10 at Yakutsk. During the growing period, the R n partitioned into latent heat flux ( λE/ R n) was greater than that partitioned into sensible heat flux ( H/ R n) at Tak and at Kog-Ma. In contrast, λE/ R n was lower than H/ R n at Arvaikheer, H/ R n was less than λE/ R n between DOY 149 and DOY 270 at Amdo, and between DOY 165 and DOY 235 at Yakutsk. The R n partitioned into ground heat flux was generally less than 0.15. The short-wave albedo was 0.12, 0.18, and 0.20 at the forest, mixed land, and grass sites, respectively. At an hourly scale, energy partitions had no correlation with environmental factors, based on average summer halfhourly values. At a seasonal scale energy partitions were linearly correlated (usually p<0.05) with T, VPD, and SM. The λE/ R n increased with increases in SM, T, and VPD at forest areas. At mixed farmlands, λE/ R n generally had positive correlations with SM, T, and VPD, but was restrained at extremely high values of VPD and T. At grasslands, λE/ R n was enhanced with increases of SM and T, but was decreased with VPD.

  17. Models of geochemical systems from mixture theory: diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kirwan, A.D. Jr; Kump, L.R.

    1987-05-01

    The problem of diffusion of a geochemical component in a natural environment is investigated from the standpoint of mixture theory. The approach here differs from previous diffusion studies in that both the conservation of mass and momentum for the component is considered. This approach avoids parameterizing the diffusive flux in the mass equation by Fick's law. It is shown that when the momentum equation is included with the mass equation, the linear approximation for the space-time distribution of a solute in a binary system is the telegraph equation, well known from electrodynamics. This contrasts with the diffusion equation, which relies on introducing the Fick's law assumption into the conservation of mass equation for the solute. Solutions for both the diffusion and telegraph equation models are obtained and compared for the case of migration of a minor component into the sea bed when the sediment-water interface concentration is a prescribed function of time. Although the stationary, steady state solutions of the telegraph and diffusion equations are identical, the former has a transient solution in which fluctuations propagate at finite speed. The Fickian assumption, in contrast, requires an infinite speed of propagation.

  18. Patterns of Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, A.; Cheung, M.

    2008-05-01

    The high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Solar Optical Telescope on the JAXA Hinode spacecraft have allowed capturing many examples of magnetic flux emergence from the scale of granulation to active regions. The observed patterns of emergence are quite similar. Flux emerges as a array of small bipoles on scales from 1 to 5 arc seconds throughout the region that the flux eventually condenses. Because the fields emerging from the underlying flux rope my appear many in small segments and the total flux (absolute sum) is not a conserved quantity the amount of total flux on the surface may vary significantly during the emergence process. Numerical simulations of flux emergence exhibit patterns similar to observations. Movies of both observations and numerical simulations will be presented.

  19. Temporal and Spatial Heterogeneities of Surface Fluxes in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, J. K.; Smith, J. A.; Baeck, M. L.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Ramamurthy, P.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we examine the regional climatology of the water cycle in urban environments through analyses of the surface energy balance. Analyses center on long-term observations (2007 - 2011) and land-surface model simulations of latent and sensible heat flux for the Princeton University campus. Model analyses are based on the Noah Land Surface Model (LSM), which is widely used for problems involving coupled land-atmospheric interactions. The research site is characterized by a mixture of grassland, trees, and urban surfaces. Partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux plays an important role in determining the regional rainfall climatology. This research is motivated by the following question: How does temporal variability of soil moisture and vegetation state affect the partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux in a heterogeneous urban environment? We use turbulent-flux measurements at a 5-minute time scale from an eddy covariance station, as well as measurements of the surface radiation balance (upwelling and downwelling longwave and shortwave), meteorological variables, CO2 concentration, soil moisture, and precipitation. Additionally, a water vapor-CO2 (q-c) flux similarity method developed by Scanlon and Kustas (2010) was implemented to partition the measured latent heat flux at the eddy covariance station into bare soil evaporation and transpiration components; results from this partitioning are used to examine the Noah land-surface model formulation. We show that: 1.) soil moisture plays an important role in the surface energy balance, even for this heterogeneous urban environment, 2.) the Noah LSM does a poor job of capturing soil moisture variability, due largely to inadequate representation of vertical structure of urban soils, 3.) seasonal variation of vegetation state is important for the surface energy balance, and 4.) the bare-soil evaporation simulated by the Noah LSM exhibits a positive

  20. Unraveling Ecohydrological Fluxes: Separating the Grain From the Chaff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    In order to better understand energy, water and carbon cycling in ecosystems, ecological, hydrological, and meteorological measurements can be combined in creative ways to illuminate the myriad of component processes that control these exchanges. This talk with feature examples of this approach from experiments carried out in semiarid south-western U.S. In the first experiment, multiple eddy covariance systems were deployed to partition ecosystem water fluxes into their overstory and understory components in riparian woodland in order to partition ecosystem evapotranspiration into its groundwater or surface water sources. In the second experiment, sap flow sensors were deployed on lateral (surface) and tap (deep) roots of trees and borehole ground penetrating radar was used to quantify deep vadose zone soil moisture changes in order to assess the hydraulic redistribution activity of trees. In the final example, a combination of eddy covariance and sap flow were used to partition ecosystem evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan desert shrubland. By determining the transpiration and evaporation, a more complete picture of the timing and interplay between these fluxes is given and the relationship between these fluxes and ecosystem carbon exchange is shown.

  1. Modeling Low-temperature Geochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, D. K.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemical modeling has become a popular and useful tool for a wide number of applications from research on the fundamental processes of water-rock interactions to regulatory requirements and decisions regarding permits for industrial and hazardous wastes. In low-temperature environments, generally thought of as those in the temperature range of 0-100 °C and close to atmospheric pressure (1 atm=1.01325 bar=101,325 Pa), complex hydrobiogeochemical reactions participate in an array of interconnected processes that affect us, and that, in turn, we affect. Understanding these complex processes often requires tools that are sufficiently sophisticated to portray multicomponent, multiphase chemical reactions yet transparent enough to reveal the main driving forces. Geochemical models are such tools. The major processes that they are required to model include mineral dissolution and precipitation; aqueous inorganic speciation and complexation; solute adsorption and desorption; ion exchange; oxidation-reduction; or redox; transformations; gas uptake or production; organic matter speciation and complexation; evaporation; dilution; water mixing; reaction during fluid flow; reaction involving biotic interactions; and photoreaction. These processes occur in rain, snow, fog, dry atmosphere, soils, bedrock weathering, streams, rivers, lakes, groundwaters, estuaries, brines, and diagenetic environments. Geochemical modeling attempts to understand the redistribution of elements and compounds, through anthropogenic and natural means, for a large range of scale from nanometer to global. "Aqueous geochemistry" and "environmental geochemistry" are often used interchangeably with "low-temperature geochemistry" to emphasize hydrologic or environmental objectives.Recognition of the strategy or philosophy behind the use of geochemical modeling is not often discussed or explicitly described. Plummer (1984, 1992) and Parkhurst and Plummer (1993) compare and contrast two approaches for

  2. A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bronson, Dustin; Bladyka, Emma; Gower, Stith T.

    2011-07-16

    Partitioning the soil surface CO{sub 2} flux (R{sub S}) flux is an important step in understanding ecosystem-level carbon cycling, given that R{sub S} is poorly constrained and its source components may have different responses to climate change. Trenched plots are a classic method of separating the R{sub S} source fluxes, but labor-intensive and may cause considerable disturbance to the soil environment. This study tested if various methods of plant suppression in trenched plots affected R{sub S} fluxes, quantified the R{sub S} response to soil temperature and moisture changes, and estimated the heterotrophic contribution to R{sub S}. It was performed in a boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) plantation, using a complete randomized design, during the 2007 growing season (May-November). Trenched plots had significantly lower R{sub S} than control plots, with differences appearing {approx}100 days after trenching; spatial variability doubled after trenching but then declined throughout the experiment. Most trenching treatments had significantly lower (by {approx}0.5 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) R{sub S} than the controls, and there was no significant difference in R{sub S} among the various trenching treatments. Soil temperature at 2 cm explained more R{sub S} variability than did 10-cm temperature or soil moisture. Temperature sensitivity (Q10) declined in the control plots from {approx}2.6 (at 5 C) to {approx}1.6 (at 15 C); trenched plots values were higher, from 3.1 at 5 C to 1.9 at 15 C. We estimated R{sub S} for the study period to be 241 {+-} 40 g C m{sup -2}, with roots contributing 64% of R{sub S} after accounting for fine root decay, and 293 g C m{sup -2} for the entire year. These findings suggest that laborious hand weeding of vegetation may be usefully replaced by other methods, easing future studies of this large and poorly-understood carbon flux.

  3. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  4. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  5. Geochemical anomalies in the bottom waters of the Tadjoura rift zone, Gulf of Aden

    SciTech Connect

    Demina, L.L.; Tambiev, S.B.

    1987-04-01

    The study of geochemical fields and geochemical anomalies is a necessary part of exploration for ore deposits on the ocean floor. Geochemical processes related to hydrothermal activity occurring at the boundary between different media are of special interest. About 10 years ago, concentrations of suspended iron 20 times greater than those in the overlying waters were found in the bottom waters of the Mid-Atlantic Rift near 26/sup 0/N. A number of reports then appeared, showing that in other rift zones as well, the bottom/water interface is characterized by elevated concentrations of iron, manganese, zinc, copper, nickel, and other elements. Thus the present writers were persuaded that the minor elements in bottom waters can serve as indicators of hydrothermal flux to the ocean floor. In carrying out investigations of this kind, one must study the distribution of the metals not only in the bottom waters, but through the entire depth of the sea, so that anomalies can be detected and localized against the level of the background concentrations. In addition, to obtain information on the sources of the metals, one must determine not just the total contents, but also distinguish the metals in solution and in suspension. Results are discussed. The observations clarify the relations between dissolved and suspended forms of metals in weakly mineralized waters above oceanic rifts. 13 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  6. A geochemical atlas of South Carolina--an example using data from the National Geochemical Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, David M.

    2005-01-01

    National Geochemical Survey data from stream-sediment and soil samples, which have been analyzed using consistent methods, were used to create maps, graphs, and tables that were assembled in a consistent atlas format that characterizes the distribution of major and trace chemical elements in South Carolina. Distribution patterns of the elements in South Carolina may assist mineral exploration, agriculture, waste-disposal-siting issues, health, environmental, and other studies. This atlas is an example of how data from the National Geochemical Survey may be used to identify general or regional patterns of elemental occurrences and to provide a snapshot of element concentration in smaller areas.

  7. UNCERTAINTY IN SOURCE PARTITIONING USING STABLE ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope analyses are often used to quantify the contribution of multiple sources to a mixture, such as proportions of food sources in an animal's diet, C3 vs. C4 plant inputs to soil organic carbon, etc. Linear mixing models can be used to partition two sources with a sin...

  8. Lipid metabolism and nutrient partitioning strategies.

    PubMed

    Morris, A M; Calsbeek, D J; Eckel, R H

    2004-10-01

    The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity worldwide is daunting and requires prompt attention by the affected, health care profession, government and the pharmaceutical industry. Because overweight/obesity are defined as an excess of adipose tissue mass, all approaches in prevention and treatment must consider redirecting lipid storage in adipose tissue to oxidative metabolism. Lipid partitioning is a complex process that involves interaction between fat and other macronutrients, particularly carbohydrate. In an isocaloric environment, when fat is stored carbohydrate is oxidized and vice versa. Processes that influence fat partitioning in a manner in which weight is maintained must be modified by changes in organ-specific fat transport and metabolism. When therapy is considered, however, changes in lipid partitioning alone will be ineffective unless a negative energy balance is also achieved, i.e. energy expenditure exceeds energy intake. The intent of this review is to focus on molecules including hormones, enzymes, cytokines, membrane transport proteins, and transcription factors directly involved in fat trafficking and partitioning that could be potential drug targets. Some examples of favorably altering body composition by systemic and/or tissue specific modification of these molecules have already been provided with gene knockout and/or transgenic approaches in mice. The translation of this science to humans remains a challenging task. PMID:15544448

  9. Partitioning of penoxsulam, a new sulfonamide herbicide.

    PubMed

    Jabusch, Thomas W; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2005-09-01

    Penoxsulam (trade name Granite) is a new acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor herbicide for postemergence control of annual grasses, sedges, and broadleaf weeds in rice culture. This study was done to understand the equilibrium phase partitioning of penoxsulam to soil and air under conditions simulating California rice field conditions. Partitioning of penoxsulam was determined between soil and water (Kd) by the batch equilibrium method and between air and water (K(H)) by the gas-purge method. In four representative soils from the Sacramento Valley, the Kd values ranged from 0.14 to 5.05 and displayed a modest increase with soil pH. In soil amended with manure compost, soil sorption increased 4-fold with increasing soil organic matter content, but was still low with a Kd of 0.4 in samples with high organic carbon contents of 15%. Penoxsulam was confirmed to be extremely nonvolatile and did not partition into air at any measurable rate at 20 or 40 degrees C. K(H) (pH 7) was estimated at 4.6 x 10(-15) Pa x L x mol(-1) on the basis of available water solubility and vapor pressure data. The results imply that soil and air partitioning of penoxsulam do not significantly affect its potential for degradation or offsite movement in water.

  10. Hydrologic transport and partitioning of phosphorus fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretta, C.; Sansalone, J.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryPhosphorus (P) in rainfall-runoff partitions between dissolved and particulate matter (PM) bound phases. This study investigates the transport and partitioning of P to PM fractions in runoff from a landscaped and biogenically-loaded carpark in Gainesville, FL (GNV). Additionally, partitioning and concentration results are compared to a similarly-sized concrete-paved source area of a similar rainfall depth frequency distribution in Baton Rouge, LA (BTR), where in contrast vehicular traffic represents the main source of pollutants. Results illustrate that concentrations of P fractions (dissolved, suspended, settleable and sediment) for GNV are one to two orders of magnitude higher than BTR. Despite these differences the dissolved fraction ( f d) and partitioning coefficient ( K d) distributions are similar, illustrating that P is predominantly bound to PM fractions. Examining PM size fractions, specific capacity for P (PSC) indicates that the P concentration order is suspended > settleable > sediment for GNV, similarly to BTR. For GNV the dominant PM mass fraction is sediment (>75 μm), while the mass of P is distributed predominantly between sediment and suspended (<25 μm) fractions since these PM mass fractions dominated the settleable one. With respect to transport of PM and P fractions the predominance of events for both areas is mass-limited first-flush, although each fraction illustrated unique washoff parameters. However, while transport is predominantly mass-limited, the transport of each PM and P fraction is influenced by separate hydrologic parameters.

  11. hydrogen partitioning between postperovskite and bridgmanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, J. P.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Bina, C. R.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present new results from first-principles calculations of phonon spectra of lower mantle phases of MgSiO3 bridgmanite (brg) and postperovskite (ppv) including hydrous defects, and alumino-hydrous defects. We compute the partition coefficient of hydrogen between ppv and brg for hydrous and alumino-hydrous compositions at D" pressures and temperatures from first-principles lattice dynamics simulations and free energy calculations computed under the quasiharmonic approximation. We find that for aluminum free hydrous conditions the hydrogen partition coefficient between ppv and brg ranges from 0.2-0.8 within D". However, in the presence of aluminum the aluminum-hydrogen partition coefficient between ppv and brg is approximately 1.5. In general for a given pressure, lower temperature increases the partitioning of hydrogen into ppv for the aluminous models, but not for the aluminum free models. Because aluminum is is expected to occur in both natural slab and mantle compositions this suggests aluminous-hydrous ppv may be a host for water in D".

  12. Partitioning of selected antioxidants in mayonnaise.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, C; Schwarz, K; Stöckmann, H; Meyer, A S; Adler-Nissen, J

    1999-09-01

    This study examined partitioning of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-tocopherol and six polar antioxidants (Trolox, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, propyl gallate, gallic acid, and catechin) in mayonnaise. Partitioning of antioxidants between different phases was determined after separation of mayonnaise by either (a) centrifugation + ultracentrifugation or (b) centrifugation + dialysis. Antioxidants partitioned in accordance with their chemical structure and polarity: Tocopherols were concentrated in the oil phase (93-96%), while the proportion of polar antioxidants in the oil phase ranged from 0% (gallic acid and catechin) to 83% (Trolox). Accordingly, proportions of 6% (Trolox) to 80% (gallic acid and catechin) were found in the aqueous phase. Similar trends were observed after dialysis. After ultracentrifugation, large proportions of polar antioxidants were found in the "emulsion phase" and the "precipitate" (7-34% and 2-7%, respectively). This indicated entrapment of antioxidants at the oil-water interface in mayonnaise. The results signify that antioxidants partitioning into different phases of real food emulsions may vary widely.

  13. Set Partitions and the Multiplication Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Elise; Caughman, John S., IV

    2016-01-01

    To further understand student thinking in the context of combinatorial enumeration, we examine student work on a problem involving set partitions. In this context, we note some key features of the multiplication principle that were often not attended to by students. We also share a productive way of thinking that emerged for several students who…

  14. Measure-theoretic sensitivity via finite partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian

    2016-07-01

    For every positive integer n≥slant 2 , we introduce the concept of measure-theoretic n-sensitivity for measure-theoretic dynamical systems via finite measurable partitions, and show that an ergodic system is measure-theoretically n-sensitive but not (n  +  1)-sensitive if and only if its maximal pattern entropy is log n .

  15. Application of partition technology to particle electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Harris, J. Milton; Karr, Laurel J.; Bamberger, Stephan; Matsos, Helen C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of polymer-ligand concentration on particle electrophoretic mobility and partition in aqueous polymer two-phase systems are investigated. Polymer coating chemistry and affinity ligand synthesis, purification, and analysis are conducted. It is observed that poly (ethylene glycol)-ligands are effective for controlling particle electrophoretic mobility.

  16. Energy balance and non-turbulent fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moderow, Uta; Feigenwinter, Christian; Bernhofer, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Often, the sum of the turbulent fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat from eddy covariance (EC) measurements does not match the available energy (sum of net radiation, ground heat flux and storage changes). This is referred to as energy balance closure gap. The reported imbalances vary between 0% and 50% (Laubach 1996). In various publications, it has been shown that the uncertainty of the available energy itself does not explain the gap (Vogt et al. 1996; Moderow et al. 2009). Among other reasons, the underestimation is attributed to an underestimation of turbulent fluxes and undetected non-turbulent transport processes, i.e. advection (e.g. Foken et al. 2006). The imbalance is typically larger during nighttime than during daytime as the EC method fails to capture non-turbulent transports that can be significant during night (e.g. Aubinet 2008). Results for the budget of CO2 showed that including non-turbulent fluxes can change the budgets considerably. Hence, it is interesting to see how the budget of energy is changed. Here, the consequences of including advective fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat in the energy balance are explored with focus on nighttime conditions. Non-turbulent fluxes will be inspected critically regarding their plausibility. Following Bernhofer et al. (2003), a ratio similar to Bowen's ratio of the turbulent fluxes are defined for the non-turbulent fluxes and compared to each other. This might have implications for the partitioning of the available energy into sensible heat and latent heat. Data of the ADVEX-campaigns (Feigenwinter et al. 2008) of three different sites across Europe are used and selected periods are inspected. References Aubinet M (2008) Eddy covariance CO2-flux measurements in nocturnal conditions: An analysis of the problem. Ecol Appl 18: 1368-1378 Bernhofer C, Grünwald T, Schwiebus A, Vogt R (2003) Exploring the consequences of non-zero energy balance closure for total surface flux. In: Bernhofer C (ed

  17. STRATIFIED COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON PLANETARY NEUTRON FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    O. GASNAULT; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons [1]. Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium [2, 3], the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium [2] and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass [4]. Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm{sup {minus}2} in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  18. Advective excess Ba transport as shown from sediment and trap geochemical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fagel, N.; Andre, L.; Dehairs, F.

    1999-08-01

    The authors report the results of a geochemical study of sediment and trap material. Major and trace elements (Zr, Ba, rare earth elements, and Th) were analyzed on bulk sedimentary material collected along the NE Atlantic margin. The aim is to test the widespread use of Ba-barite as a proxy for paleoproductivity in a continental margin area. This environment is of great interest because atmospheric-oceanic exchanges are important. In sediments, the geochemical signatures remain close to an upper crust reference, with flat shale-normalized rare earth elements patterns and constant elementary ratios. The calculated biogenic fraction of Ba or excess Ba (20--45%) remains lower than the excess Ba record in trap material (80--99%). The evolution of the geochemical signature along the margin reflects variable dilution of a detrital Post Archean Australian Shale-like component by a biogenic carbonaceous seawater-derived component. The trap material displays a wide range of variation in its trace element content (e.g., Ba {approximately}150--3,000 ppm, Zr {approximately}2--100 ppm), except for the abyssal site, which is characterized by constant signature. In the two other sites, all of the trace element contents increase with water depth and present pronounced seasonal changes at each sampled water depth. The amount of excess Ba also increases in the deepest traps, and its evolution throughout the year mimics the change of the other analyzed trace elements. In contrast, its relationships with particulate organic carbon are not obvious. In terms of fluxes, two periods of enhanced excess Ba fluxes are observed: (1) excess Ba flux increases with the detrital-like elements like Th especially during winter, and (2) excess Ba flux is enhanced without any change for the other trace elements during spring. To explain the first case, a supply through lateral advection is proposed. Such transient input of significant excess Ba flux will have a great impact on the yearly averaged

  19. Partitioning of residual D-limonene cleaner vapor among organic materials in weapons

    SciTech Connect

    LeMay, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    D-limonene is a replacement solvent selected by Sandia and Allied-Signal to clean solder flux from electronics assemblies in firesets and programmers. D-limonene is much slower drying than the solvents it has replaced and this has raised concerns that residual quantities of the cleaner could be trapped in the electronics assemblies and eventually carried into warhead assemblies. This paper describes a study designed to evaluate how vapors from residual d-limonene cleaner would be partitioned among typical organic materials in a Livermore device. The goal was to identify possible compatibility problems arising from the use of d-limonene and, in particular, any interactions it may have with energetic materials. To predict the partitioning behavior of d-limonene, a simple model was developed and its predictions are compared to the experimental findings.

  20. Return flux experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    1992-01-01

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  1. Return flux experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  2. Experimental determination of crystal/melt partitioning of Ga and Ge in the system forsterite-anorthite-diopside

    SciTech Connect

    Malvin, D.J.; Drake, M.J.

    1987-08-01

    The crystal/liquid partitioning of Ga and Ge has been measured experimentally between forsterite, diopside, anorthite and spinel and melts in the pseudoternary system forsterite-anorthite-diopside at one atmosphere pressure and 1300/sup 0/C. Gallium is incompatible with forsterite and diopside, is only slightly incompatible in anorthite, and is highly compatible in spinel. The partition coefficient for Ge is within a factor of two of unity for forsterite, diopside, and anorthite, but Ge is incompatible in spinel (D (Ge) = 0.1). The coefficients for the exchange of Ga and Al and the exchange of Ge and Si between minerals and melts generally are within a factor of two of unity, as it expected from the geochemical coherence of these element pairs in natural samples. The application of these results to the interpretation of natural basaltic and mantle samples from the Earth and basalts from the Moon and the Shergottite Parent Body demonstrates that it is possible to discriminate between different mantle source compositions using Ga/Al and Ge/Si ratios. The Ge variation among lunar mare basalts may be indicative of a heterogeneous lunar mantle. The substantial depletion of Ge in Chassigny relative to the other SNC meteorites may be evidence of either a heterogeneous Shergottite Parent Body (SPB) mantle, or of different geochemical behavior for Ge in the SPB.

  3. Optimising query execution time in LHCb Bookkeeping System using partition pruning and Partition-Wise joins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Zoltan; Charpentier, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb experiment produces a huge amount of data which has associated metadata such as run number, data taking condition (detector status when the data was taken), simulation condition, etc. The data are stored in files, replicated on the Computing Grid around the world. The LHCb Bookkeeping System provides methods for retrieving datasets based on their metadata. The metadata is stored in a hybrid database model, which is a mixture of Relational and Hierarchical database models and is based on the Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS). The database access has to be reliable and fast. In order to achieve a high timing performance, the tables are partitioned and the queries are executed in parallel. When we store large amounts of data the partition pruning is essential for database performance, because it reduces the amount of data retrieved from the disk and optimises the resource utilisation. This research presented here is focusing on the extended composite partitioning strategy such as range-hash partition, partition pruning and usage of the Partition-Wise joins. The system has to serve thousands of queries per minute, the performance and capability of the system is measured when the above performance optimization techniques are used.

  4. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Matthew

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  5. A Geochemical Speciation Program Based on PHREEQE

    1992-02-18

    HARPHRQ is a program based on the code PHREEQE and is designed to model geochemical reactions. Like PHREEQE, it can calculate the pH, redox potential and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress and the composition of solution in equilibrium with multiple phases. In addition, HARPHRQ includes options to allow the composition of a solution at a fixed pH to be calculated and to automatically add or remove mineral phases as they become saturatedmore » or exhausted. A separate module can also be interfaced to give a choice of sorption models including the triple-layer model.« less

  6. Amphibole-melt trace element partitioning of fractionating calc-alkaline magmas in the lower crust: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandedkar, Rohit H.; Hürlimann, Niklaus; Ulmer, Peter; Müntener, Othmar

    2016-09-01

    Amphibole is one of the most important hydrous minerals of the middle and lower continental crust and plays a key role in the formation of intermediate to silica-rich magmas. This study reports a consistent set of amphibole trace element partition coefficients derived from fractional crystallization experiments at 0.7 GPa in a piston cylinder apparatus. Starting materials were doped with trace elements on the 20-40 ppm level and measured using laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS. Amphibole is stable from 1010 to 730 °C and systematically changes its composition from pargasite to magnesiohornblende to cummingtonite, while coexisting liquids vary from andesite to dacite and rhyolite. Amphibole-liquid partition coefficients increase systematically with decreasing temperature and increasing SiO2 in the liquid. Potassium displays an inverse behavior and partitioning decreases with decreasing temperature. Rare earth element (REE) partition coefficients, assumed to occupy the M4 site within the amphibole structure, increase continuously up to one order of magnitude. The calculated lattice parameters, ideal cation radius ( r 0) and Young's modulus ( E) remain nearly constant with decreasing temperature. The high-field strength elements Zr and Hf that occupy the M2 site of the amphibole structure reveal a fivefold increase in partition coefficients with decreasing temperature and constant lattice parameters r 0 and E. Partition coefficients correlate with edenite, tschermaks and cummingtonite exchange vectors indicating that the maximum partition coefficient ( D 0) for an ideal cation radius increases with decreasing edenite component, while the latter decreases linearly with temperature. Regressing Amph/L D Ca against trace elements results in fair to excellent correlations ( r 2 0.55-0.99) providing a predictive tool to implement the trace element partition coefficients in numerical geochemical modeling. Our data result in positive correlations between Amph/L D Nb/Ta and Amph/L D

  7. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  8. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  9. The influence of colloids on the geochemical behavior of metals in polluted water using as an example Yongdingxin River, Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huimin; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Berg, Michael; Qi, Weixiao; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The role of colloids in estuarine and marine systems has been studied extensively in recent years, whereas less is known about the polluted freshwater system. Yongdingxin River is one of the major recipients of industrial effluents in Tianjin. This article evaluates the role of colloids in controlling geochemical behavior of Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Hg and Cr at the confluences between Yongdingxin River and its major tributaries Beijing Drainage River, Jinzhong River and Beitang Drainage River. Based on the distribution of metal partitioning among particulate (>0.22mum), colloidal (1kDa to 0.22mum) and truly dissolved (<1kDa) fractions, the metals can be assigned to the following groups: Group 1 - organic colloidal pool-borne elements Cu and Cr; Group 2 - inorganic colloidal pool-borne metals Fe and Mn; Group 3 - Zn and Hg characterized by varying complexation patterns. The distribution of metal partitioning among particulate, colloidal and truly dissolved fractions was influenced by anthropogenic input. In addition, the theoretical concentrations of elements in case of conservative mixing between the waters of Yongdingxin River and the waters of its tributaries were compared with the measured values to evaluate the geochemical role of colloids. The result showed that all of the metals presented a non-conservative mixing behavior. Addition of colloids resulted in the removal of metals from the water column to bed sediment during river water mixing, which was furthermore confirmed by the similar partition coefficient of metal concentration between colloid and sediment.

  10. 33. Elevation of Doors / Typical Cement Toilet Partitions / ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Elevation of Doors / Typical Cement Toilet Partitions / Typical Cement Shower Bath Partitions / Typical Marble Shower Bath Partitions / Dispensary Cupboard Supply Room Cupboard Similar / Section / Kitchen Cupboard and Sink / Screened Porch Cupboard (drawing 10) - Whittier State School, Hospital & Receiving Building, 11850 East Whittier Boulevard, Whittier, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., regional, and MTA licensees may apply to partition their authorized geographic service area or disaggregate their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... partitioned service area on a schedule to the application. The partitioned service area shall be defined by...

  12. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., regional, and MTA licensees may apply to partition their authorized geographic service area or disaggregate their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... partitioned service area on a schedule to the application. The partitioned service area shall be defined by...

  13. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., regional, and MTA licensees may apply to partition their authorized geographic service area or disaggregate their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... partitioned service area on a schedule to the application. The partitioned service area shall be defined by...

  14. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., regional, and MTA licensees may apply to partition their authorized geographic service area or disaggregate their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... partitioned service area on a schedule to the application. The partitioned service area shall be defined by...

  15. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., regional, and MTA licensees may apply to partition their authorized geographic service area or disaggregate their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... partitioned service area on a schedule to the application. The partitioned service area shall be defined by...

  16. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  17. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  18. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  19. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  20. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  1. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  2. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  3. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  4. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  5. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  6. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  7. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  8. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  9. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  10. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  11. 25 CFR 158.55 - Institution of partition proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Institution of partition proceedings. 158.55 Section 158... Institution of partition proceedings. (a) Prior authorization should be obtained from the Secretary, or his authorized representative, before the institution of proceedings to partition the lands of deceased...

  12. 47 CFR 90.1019 - Eligibility for partitioned licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and disaggregation. (1) Phase I non-nationwide licensees may apply to partition their licensed.... (2) Phase I nationwide licensees may apply to partition their licensed geographic service area or... licensees may apply to partition their licensed geographic service area or disaggregate their...

  13. 25 CFR 158.55 - Institution of partition proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Institution of partition proceedings. 158.55 Section 158... Institution of partition proceedings. (a) Prior authorization should be obtained from the Secretary, or his authorized representative, before the institution of proceedings to partition the lands of deceased...

  14. 47 CFR 90.1019 - Eligibility for partitioned licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and disaggregation. (1) Phase I non-nationwide licensees may apply to partition their licensed.... (2) Phase I nationwide licensees may apply to partition their licensed geographic service area or... licensees may apply to partition their licensed geographic service area or disaggregate their...

  15. Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of the Deep Subsurface Environment: Kumano Mud Volcano, Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, D. H.; Ijiri, A.; Morono, Y.; Orphan, V. J.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes play an important environmental role by delivering deep-sourced fluids, elements, and hydrocarbons to the seafloor. These fluxes in turn support chemosynthetic benthic communities. However, due to difficulty in accessing the deep biosphere most mud volcano samples only represent the top one to several meters below seafloor (mbsf) obtainable by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) or gravity cores. Thus, the geochemical and microbiological conditions, as well as vertical homogeneity, deep within mud volcanoes remains poorly constrained. In 2012, using the deep-sea drilling vessel Chikyu, we drilled one of the most active submarine mud volcanoes in the Kumano forearc basin of the Nankai Trough, off the Kii Peninsula of Japan (33°67.581'N, 136°56.8085'E: 1,986.7 m in water depth). Cores were obtained down to 200 mbsf. Cell counts indicate the presence of microorganisms at relatively low abundance (less than 105 cells/cm3) throughout the cored depth. Molecular analyses reveal vertical heterogeneity in the microbial community composition, including specific depth horizons harboring putative methanogenic and methanotrophic phylotypes at >100 mbsf. Geochemical profiles indicate the potential for microbial activity and rate measurements with radiotracers revealed active homoacetogenesis rates that were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than rates of homo- and acetoclastic methanogenesis. To assess active autotrophic, methanotrophic and heterotrophic populations, 13C- and 15N-amendment experiments with sediment samples collected from 15 and 115 mbsf were established and single cell stable isotope analyses with nanoSIMS are in progress. Our samples and analyses represent a unique observation of a subseafloor setting different from previously explored stratified sediments on continental margins and will allow further understanding of how submarine mud volcanoes contribute to geochemical and microbiological fluxes into the surface biosphere.

  16. Regional airborne flux measurements in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioli, B.; Miglietta, F.; Vaccari, F. P.; Zaldei, A.; Hutjes, R. W. A.

    2003-04-01

    The problem of identifying the spatial and temporal distribution of sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 is the subject of considerable scientific and political debate. Even if it is now possible to estimate within reasonable accuracy the sink strength of European forests at the local scale, difficulties still exist in determining the partitioning of the sinks at the global and regional scales. The aim of the EU-project RECAB (Regional Assessment of the Carbon Balance in Europe) that is coordinated by Alterra, Wageningen (NL), is to bridge the gap between local scale flux measurements and continental scale inversion models by a generic modelling effort and measurement program, focussing on a limited number of selected regions in Europe for which previous measurements exists. This required the establishment of a European facility for airborne measurement of surface fluxes of CO2 at very low altitude, and a research aircraft capable of performing airborne eddy covariance measurements has been acquired by this project and used on several occasions at the different RECAB sites. The aircraft is the italian Sky Arrows ERA (Environmental Research Aircraft) equipped with the NOAA/ARA Mobile Flux Platform (MFP), and a commercial open-path infrared gas analyser. Airborne eddy covariance measurements were made from June 2001 onwards in Southern Spain near Valencia (June and December 2001), in Central Germany near Jena (July 2001), in Sweden near Uppsala (August 2001), in The Netherlands near Wageningen (January and July 2002) and in Italy near Rome (June 2002). Flux towers were present at each site to provide a validation of airborne eddy covariance measurements. This contribution reports some validation results based on the comparison between airborne and ground based flux measurements and some regional scale results for different locations and different seasons, in a wide range of meteorological and ecological settings.

  17. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  18. Plastid-cytosol partitioning and integration of metabolic pathways for APS/PAPS biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Anne-Sophie; Kopriva, Stanislav; Takahashi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Plants assimilate sulfate from the environment to synthesize biologically active sulfur-containing compounds required for growth and cellular development. The primary steps of sulfur metabolism involve sequential enzymatic reactions synthesizing adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) and 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). Recent finding suggests that an adenosine nucleotide transport system facilitating the exchange of PAPS and 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate across the plastid envelope is essential for establishing an intimate connection between the plastidic and cytosolic sulfate assimilation pathways in plants. Subcellular partitioning and integration of metabolic pathways provide focal points for investigating metabolic flux regulations. This perspective article presents an integrative view of sulfur metabolic flux control mechanisms with an emphasis on subcellular partitioning of APS/PAPS biosynthetic pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  19. Partitioning of strontium-90 among aqueous and mineral species in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.E.; Inch, K.J.

    1983-04-01

    The geochemical partitioning of a toxic metal contaminant, /sup 90/Sr, during its migration through a shallow sand aquifer is discussed. Adsorption of /sup 90/Sr from the contaminated groundwaters (pH approx. 6, I approx.0.001) causes it to have a migration velocity of only 3% of that of transporting ground water. Five microscopically identified adsorbents were isolated in the aquifer sediments and showed the following affinity sequence for /sup 90/Sr: vermiculite > feldspar > biotite > muscovite > quartz. While 4a80% of the adsorbed /sup 90/Sr is exchangeable with 0.1 M SrCl/sub 2/, the residual adsorbed /sup 90/Sr is strongly correlated with extractable Fe, Al, and Mn, suggesting specific adsorption by these metal oxides. An equilibrium adsorption model was used to determine the partitioning of /sup 90/Sr between adsorbents and between solid and solution phases. Over 90% of all /sup 90/SR in the aquifer is adsorbed. Approximately 90% of all adsorbed /sup 90/SR is equally divided between vermiculite and feldspar minerals.

  20. Eastern Devonian shales: Organic geochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, I.A.; Hatchner, P.G.; Miknis, F.P.; Romankiw, L.A.

    1983-02-01

    The Eastern Devonian shales are represented by a sequence of sediments extending from New York state, south to the northern regions of Georgia and Alabama, and west into Ohio and to the Michigan and Illinois Basins. Correlatives are known in Texas. The shale is regionally known by a number of names: Chattanooga, Dunkirk, Rhinestreet, Huron, Antrim, Ohio, Woodford, etc. These shales, other than those in Texas, have elicited much interest because they have been a source of unassociated natural gas. It is of particular interest, however, that most of these shales have no associated crude oil, in spite of the fact that they have some of the characteristics normally attributed to source beds. This paper addresses some of the organic geochemical aspects of the kerogen in these shales, in relation to their oil generating potential. Past organic geochemical studies on Eastern Devonian shales are reviewed. Recent solid state /sup 13/C NMR studies on the nature of the organic matter in Eastern Devonian shales show that Eastern Devonian shales contain a larger fraction of aromatic carbon in their chemical composition. Thus, despite their high organic matter contents, their potential as a petroleum source rock is low, because the kerogen in these shales is of a ''coaly'' nature and hence more prone to producing natural gas.

  1. Geochemical controls on groundwater chemistry in shales

    SciTech Connect

    Von Damm, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of groundwaters is one of the most important parameters in determining the mobility of species within a rock formation. A three pronged approach was used to determine the composition of, and geochemical controls, on groundwaters specifically within shale formations: (1) available data were collected from the literature, the US Geological Survey WATSTORE data base, and field sampling, (2) the geochemical modeling code EQ3/6 was used to simulate interaction of various shales and groundwaters, and (3) several types of shale were reacted with synthetic groundwaters in the laboratory. The comparison of model results to field and laboratory data provide a means of validating the models, as well as a means of deconvoluting complex field interactions. Results suggest that groundwaters in shales have a wide range in composition and are primarily of the Na-Cl-HCO/sub 3/- type. The constancy of the Na:Cl (molar) ratio at 1:1 and the Ca:Mg ratio from 3:1 to 1:1 suggests the importance of halite and carbonates in controlling groundwater compositions. In agreement with the reaction path modeling, most of the groundwaters are neutral to slightly alkaline at low temperatures. Model and experimental results suggest that reaction (1) at elevated temperatures, or (2) in the presence of oxygen will lead to more acidic conditions. Some acetate was found to be produced in the experiments; depending on the constraints applied, large amounts of acetate were produced in the model results. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Archean crust-mantle geochemical differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope measurements on carbonatite complexes and komatiites can provide information on the geochemical character and geochemical evolution of the mantle, including the sub-continental mantle. Measurements on young samples establish the validity of the method. These are based on Sr, Nd and Pb data from the Tertiary-Mesozoic Gorgona komatiite and Sr and Pb data from the Cretaceous Oka carbonatite complex. In both cases the data describe a LIL element-depleted source similar to that observed presently in MORB. Carbonatite data have been used to study the mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield one billion years (1 AE) ago. The framework for this investigation was established by Bell et al., who showed that large areas of the province appear to be underlain by LIL element-depleted mantle (Sr-85/Sr-86=0.7028) at 1 AE ago. Additionally Bell et al. found four complexes to have higher initial Sr ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86=0.7038), which they correlated with less depleted (bulk earth?) mantle sources, or possibly crustal contamination. Pb isotope relationships in four of the complexes have been studied by Bell et al.

  3. Is formamide a geochemically plausible prebiotic solvent?

    PubMed

    Bada, Jeffrey L; Chalmers, John H; Cleaves, H James

    2016-07-27

    From a geochemical perspective, significant amounts of pure formamide (HCONH2) would have likely been rare on the early Earth. There may have been mixed formamide-water solutions, but even in the presence of catalyst, solutions with >20 weight% water in formamide would not have produced significant amounts of prebiotic compounds. It might be feasible to produce relatively pure formamide by a rare occurrence of freezing formamide/water mixtures at temperatures lower than formamide's freezing point (2.55 °C) but greater than the freezing point of water. Because of the high density of formamide ice it would have sunk and accumulated at the bottom of the solution. If the remaining water froze on the surface of this ice, and was then removed by a sublimation-ablation process, a small amount of pure formamide ice might have been produced. In addition a recent report suggested that ∼85 weight% formamide could be prepared by a geochemical type of fractional distillation process, offering another possible route for prebiotic formamide production. PMID:27253848

  4. The Benefits of Adaptive Partitioning for Parallel AMR Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steensland, Johan

    2008-07-01

    Parallel adaptive mesh refinement methods potentially lead to realistic modeling of complex three-dimensional physical phenomena. However, the dynamics inherent in these methods present significant challenges in data partitioning and load balancing. Significant human resources, including time, effort, experience, and knowledge, are required for determining the optimal partitioning technique for each new simulation. In reality, scientists resort to using the on-board partitioner of the computational framework, or to using the partitioning industry standard, ParMetis. Adaptive partitioning refers to repeatedly selecting, configuring and invoking the optimal partitioning technique at run-time, based on the current state of the computer and application. In theory, adaptive partitioning automatically delivers superior performance and eliminates the need for repeatedly spending valuable human resources for determining the optimal static partitioning technique. In practice, however, enabling frameworks are non-existent due to the inherent significant inter-disciplinary research challenges. This paper presents a study of a simple implementation of adaptive partitioning and discusses implied potential benefits from the perspective of common groups of users within computational science. The study is based on a large set of data derived from experiments including six real-life, multi-time-step adaptive applications from various scientific domains, five complementing and fundamentally different partitioning techniques, a large set of parameters corresponding to a wide spectrum of computing environments, and a flexible cost function that considers the relative impact of multiple partitioning metrics and diverse partitioning objectives. The results show that even a simple implementation of adaptive partitioning can automatically generate results statistically equivalent to the best static partitioning. Thus, it is possible to effectively eliminate the problem of determining the

  5. Subcanopy Flux Measurements in Forest Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Paul-Limoges, E.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Eddy-covariance measurements of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy provide direct evidence for the biosphere-atmosphere exchange at the ecosystem scale. Such continuous measurements are typically performed in the atmospheric surface layer above the canopy and integrate fluxes over the entire ecosystem within the footprint. Forest ecosystems, however, have complex vertical structures composed of several layers with different functional properties that are represented to a limited extend by above canopy measurements. Concurrent eddy-covariance measurements below canopy (subcanopy) can provide valuable insights on (1) understory processes, (2) their contributions to total ecosystem fluxes, and (3) the partitioning of component fluxes. Accordingly, there is a large potential for including standardized subcanopy forest measurements into large-scale measurement networks such as FLUXNET. However, our understanding of the performance and limitations for such measurements is still very limited. To gain a better understanding of subcanopy measurements, we conducted (I) a survey across FLUXNET on their availability, and (II) a literature review on published subcanopy measurements. Subsequently, we are preparing a standardized synthesis dataset on subcanopy measurements within FLUXNET. We will present the results from our survey, summarize the current process understanding, and discuss research priorities for concurrent below and above canopy eddy-covariance measurements.

  6. Investigating sulfur partitioning between nominally volatile-free minerals and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoli, A.; Callegaro, S.; Baker, D. R.; Geraki, K.; Maneta, V.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the key role played by volatile species in magmatic systems, it is still challenging to quantify their concentrations in ancient melts. We suggested a quantitative approach for estimating S contents in basaltic melts (Callegaro et al., 2014), based on direct measurement of S on clinopyroxene and calculation of its concentration in the melt through an experimentally determined partition coefficient (KD). We further investigated the partitioning of sulfur between silicate melts and nominally volatile-free minerals (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase), as well as between melt and amphibole. Partitioning experiments were performed with basaltic, andesitic and dacitic bulk compositions, at hydrous and anhydrous conditions, and at high and low oxygen fugacities (fO2), where sulfur in the melt is dominantly present as an S6+ or S2- species, respectively (Wilke et al., 2011). Sulfur concentrations in melts were measured by electron microprobe and in crystals by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence. At low fO2 the average crystal/liquid KDs for sulfur vary from 0.0004 (at a maximum) for olivine, to 0.003 (another maximum) for orthopyroxene, to 0.03 for clinopyroxene, and to 0.07 for plagioclase. The KDs correlate positively with the cation-oxygen bond lengths in the crystals. At high fO2 the KDs drop to approximately one-third of those observed at low fO2. These observations suggest that S2- replaces oxygen in the crystal structure. Water has no measureable influence on the crystal/melt partitioning of sulfur. Clinopyroxene/melt KDs are correlated with the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio of the crystal, but appear insensitive to the IVAl in the structure. Plagioclase/melt S partitioning appears unaffected by anorthite content and iron concentration in the crystal. These new KDs allow the determination of sulfur concentration in the igneous melts co-existing with these crystals and provide insights into the volatile concentrations of ancient magmas and their possible

  7. A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, U.S.A., was prepared using National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) stream-sediment data. Before termination of the NURE program, sampling of nearly the entire state (48,666 square miles of land area) was completed and geochemical analyses were obtained. The NURE data are applicable to mineral exploration, agriculture, waste disposal siting issues, health, and environmental studies. Applications in state government include resource surveys to assist mineral exploration by identifying geochemical anomalies and areas of mineralization. Agriculture seeks to identify areas with favorable (or unfavorable) conditions for plant growth, disease, and crop productivity. Trace elements such as cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, zinc, and molybdenum must be present within narrow ranges in soils for optimum growth and productivity. Trace elements as a contributing factor to disease are of concern to health professionals. Industry can use pH and conductivity data for water samples to site facilities which require specific water quality. The North Carolina NURE database consists of stream-sediment samples, groundwater samples, and stream-water analyses. The statewide database consists of 6,744 stream-sediment sites, 5,778 groundwater sample sites, and 295 stream-water sites. Neutron activation analyses were provided for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, Dy in groundwater and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in stream sediments. Supplemental analyses by other techniques were reported on U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn for 4,619 stream-sediment samples. A small subset of 334 stream samples was analyzed for gold. The goal of the atlas was to make available the statewide NURE data with minimal interpretation to enable prospective users to modify and manipulate the data for their end use. The atlas provides only

  8. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  9. Non-parametric partitioning of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, G.; Galland, F.; Réfrégier, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    We describe and analyse a generalization of a parametric segmentation technique adapted to Gamma distributed SAR images to a simple non parametric noise model. The partition is obtained by minimizing the stochastic complexity of a quantized version on Q levels of the SAR image and lead to a criterion without parameters to be tuned by the user. We analyse the reliability of the proposed approach on synthetic images. The quality of the obtained partition will be studied for different possible strategies. In particular, one will discuss the reliability of the proposed optimization procedure. Finally, we will precisely study the performance of the proposed approach in comparison with the statistical parametric technique adapted to Gamma noise. These studies will be led by analyzing the number of misclassified pixels, the standard Hausdorff distance and the number of estimated regions.

  10. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  11. Grid-based partitioning for comparing attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. L.; Byers, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    Stationary dynamical systems have invariant measures (or densities) that are characteristic of the particular dynamical system. We develop a method to characterize this density by partitioning the attractor into the smallest regions in phase space that contain information about the structure of the attractor. To accomplish this, we develop a statistic that tells us if we get more information about our data by dividing a set of data points into partitions rather than just lumping all the points together. We use this method to show that not only can we detect small changes in an attractor from a circuit experiment, but we can also distinguish between a large set of numerically generated chaotic attractors designed by Sprott. These comparisons are not limited to chaotic attractors—they should work for signals from any finite-dimensional dynamical system.

  12. Analysis of fractals with combined partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedovich, T. G.; Tokarev, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The space—time properties in the general theory of relativity, as well as the discreteness and non-Archimedean property of space in the quantum theory of gravitation, are discussed. It is emphasized that the properties of bodies in non-Archimedean spaces coincide with the properties of the field of P-adic numbers and fractals. It is suggested that parton showers, used for describing interactions between particles and nuclei at high energies, have a fractal structure. A mechanism of fractal formation with combined partition is considered. The modified SePaC method is offered for the analysis of such fractals. The BC, PaC, and SePaC methods for determining a fractal dimension and other fractal characteristics (numbers of levels and values of a base of forming a fractal) are considered. It is found that the SePaC method has advantages for the analysis of fractals with combined partition.

  13. Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Hongyuan; He, Xiaofeng; Ding, Chris; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-05-07

    Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender system. In this paper, the authors propose a new data clustering method based on partitioning the underlying biopartite graph. The partition is constructed by minimizing a normalized sum of edge weights between unmatched pairs of vertices of the bipartite graph. They show that an approximate solution to the minimization problem can be obtained by computing a partial singular value decomposition (SVD) of the associated edge weight matrix of the bipartite graph. They point out the connection of their clustering algorithm to correspondence analysis used in multivariate analysis. They also briefly discuss the issue of assigning data objects to multiple clusters. In the experimental results, they apply their clustering algorithm to the problem of document clustering to illustrate its effectiveness and efficiency.

  14. Metal partitioning and toxicity in sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson-Ekvall, C.E.A.; Morrison, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    Over 20 years of research has failed to provide an unequivocal correlation between chemically extracted metals in sewage sludge applied to agricultural soil and either metal toxicity to soil organisms or crop uptake. Partitioning of metals between phases and species can provide a better estimation of mobility and potential bioavailability. Partition coefficients, K{sub D} for Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in a sludge/water solution were determined considering the sludge/water solution as a three-phase system (particulate, colloidal and electrochemically available) over a range of pH values, ionic strengths, contact times and sludge/water ratios and compared with the KD values for sludge/water solution as a two-phase system (aqueous phase and particulate phase). Partitioning results were interpreted in terms of metal mobility from sludge to colloids and in terms of potential bioavailability from colloids to electrochemically available. The results show that both mobility and potential bioavailability are high for Zn, while Cu partitions into the mobile colloidal phase which is relatively non-bioavailable. Lead is almost completely bound to the solid phase, and is neither mobile nor bioavailable. A comparison between K, values and toxicity shows that Zn in sludge is more toxic than can be accounted for in the aqueous phase, which can be due to synergistic effects between sludge organics and Zn. Copper demonstrates clear synergism which can be attributed to the formation of lipid-soluble Cu complexes with known sludge components such as LAS, caffeine, myristic acid and nonylphenol.

  15. Environment Partitioning and Reactivity of Polybrominated Diphenylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Inez; Iraci, Laura T.; Jafvert, Chad; Bezares-Cruz, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are an important class of flame retardants. Annual global demand for these compounds was over 67,000 metric tons in 2001. PBDEs have recently been extensively investigated as environmental contaminants because they have been detected in air, sediment, and tissue samples from urban and remote areas. Important issues include quantifying PBDE partitioning in various environmental compartments, and elucidating transformation pathways. The partitioning of PBDE congeners to aerosols was estimated for 16 sites in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The aerosol particles were PM2.5, the total suspended particle (TSP) concentration varied between 3.0 - 55.4 micro g/cubic meter, and the organic fraction ranged from 11 - 41%; these data are published values for each site. It is estimated that the largest fraction of each PBDE associated with the aerosol particles occurs in Mexico City, and the smallest fraction in Colorado Plateau. Although the organic fraction in Mexico City is about 60% of that observed in the Colorado Plateau, the TSP is larger by a factor of about 18.5, and it is the difference in TSP that strongly influences the fraction of particle-bound PBDE in this case. PBDE partitioning to PM2.5 particles also varies seasonally because of temperature variations. For the less brominated congeners the percentage that is particle-bound is relatively low, regardless of air temperature. In contrast, the heavier congeners exhibit a significant temperature dependence: as the temperature decreases (fall, winter) the percentage of PBDE that is particle-bound increases. The partitioning calculations complement experimental data indicating that decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE) dissolved in hexane transforms very rapidly when irradiated with solar light. DBDE is the most highly brominated PBDE congener (10 bromine atoms) and occurs in the commercial formulation which is subject to the largest global demand.

  16. Time-dependent nucleation in partitioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelton, K.F.; Narayan, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Nucleation in multi-component systems is poorly understood, particularly when the rates of long-range diffusion are comparable with the rates of attachment at the cluster interface. For illustration, measurements of the time-dependent nucleation rates in silicate and metallic glasses are discussed. A new model for nucleation in partitioning systems, which explains many of devitrification microstructural features in bulk metallic glasses, is presented.

  17. Combinatorics, partitions, and many-body physics

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzou, W.N.

    1980-03-01

    Some combinatorial techniques are presented which streamline the graphical analysis used in N-body scattering theory. The basic results are derived using properties of the lattice of partitions of N particles, which naturally arises on classifying translational symmetry properties of N-body operators. Classical cumulant expansions are recovered, previously obtained results are presented from a unified point of view, and some new theorems concerning connectivity of N-body equations are presented.

  18. Partitioned-field uniaxial holographic lenses.

    PubMed

    López, Ana M; Atencia, Jesús; Tornos, José; Quintanilla, Manuel

    2002-04-01

    The efficiency and aberration of partitioned-field uniaxial volume holographic compound lenses are theoretically and experimentally studied. These systems increase the image fields of holographic volume lenses, limited by the angular selectivity that is typical of these elements. At the same time, working with uniaxial systems has led to a decrease in aberration because two recording points (that behave as aberration-free points) are used. The extension of the image field is experimentally proved.

  19. Electrodynamic forces of the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system for maglev vehicles on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. The equivalent circuits and general magnetic force expressions for the system are developed. Simple analytical formulas for the magnetic force partitions on the basis of harmonic approximation are presented, and numerical results are also included.

  20. Productivity and carbon dioxide exchange of the leguminous crops: Estimates from flux tower measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net CO2 exchange data on legume crops at 17 flux tower sites in North America and 3 sites in Europe representing 29 site-years of measurements were partitioned into gross photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration using a light-response function method, resulting in new estimates of ecosystem-scale ec...

  1. Iron partitioning and the self-oxidation of the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, A.; Badro, J.; Ryerson, F. J.; Fiquet, G.

    2007-12-01

    Magnesium silicate perovskite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 (Mg-pv) and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O (fp) are the dominant phases in the lower-mantle. Their physical and chemical properties determine the dynamics of the deep Earth. It is thus of prime importance to constrain element partitioning at high pressure for improving the geochemical models of the Earth. We investigated iron partitioning between Mg-pv and fp synthetised under lower-mantle conditions (up to 115 GPa and 2200 K) in a laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC). Recovered samples were thinned to electron transparency by focussed ion beam (FIB) and characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) and nanometer scale ion probe (nanoSIMS). Iron concentrations in both phases were obtained from EDX measurements and nanoSIMS. Our results are the first to show that recently reported transitions in the lower-mantle (Badro et al, 2003; Murakami et al., 2004) directly affect the evolution of Fe-Mg partitioning between both phases. Mg-pv is increasingly iron-depleted above 70-80 GPa possibly due to the high spin-low spin transition of iron in fp. Conversely, the perovskite to post-perovskite transition is accompanied by a strong iron enrichment of the silicate phase. Iron concentrations determined by ATEM and nanoSIMS are in excellent agreement. Nanoparticles of metallic iron were observed in the Mg-pv bearing runs (figure), suggesting the disproportionation of ferrous iron and the self-oxidation of the mantle, but were not observed when the post- perovskite (ppv) phase was present. Implications on the oxidation state of the Earth and core segregation will be discussed. References J. Badro, G. Fiquet, F. Guyot, J.-P. Rueff, V.V. Struzhkin, G. Vanko, and G. Monaco, Science 300 789-791 (2003) M. Murakami, K. Hirose, N. Kawamura, N. Sata, and Y. Ohishi, Science 304 855-858 (2004)

  2. Biogeography of time partitioning in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bennie, Jonathan J.; Duffy, James P.; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals regulate their activity over a 24-h sleep–wake cycle, concentrating their peak periods of activity to coincide with the hours of daylight, darkness, or twilight, or using different periods of light and darkness in more complex ways. These behavioral differences, which are in themselves functional traits, are associated with suites of physiological and morphological adaptations with implications for the ecological roles of species. The biogeography of diel time partitioning is, however, poorly understood. Here, we document basic biogeographic patterns of time partitioning by mammals and ecologically relevant large-scale patterns of natural variation in “illuminated activity time” constrained by temperature, and we determine how well the first of these are predicted by the second. Although the majority of mammals are nocturnal, the distributions of diurnal and crepuscular species richness are strongly associated with the availability of biologically useful daylight and twilight, respectively. Cathemerality is associated with relatively long hours of daylight and twilight in the northern Holarctic region, whereas the proportion of nocturnal species is highest in arid regions and lowest at extreme high altitudes. Although thermal constraints on activity have been identified as key to the distributions of organisms, constraints due to functional adaptation to the light environment are less well studied. Global patterns in diversity are constrained by the availability of the temporal niche; disruption of these constraints by the spread of artificial lighting and anthropogenic climate change, and the potential effects on time partitioning, are likely to be critical influences on species’ future distributions. PMID:25225371

  3. Diversity partitioning during the Cambrian radiation.

    PubMed

    Na, Lin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-04-14

    The fossil record offers unique insights into the environmental and geographic partitioning of biodiversity during global diversifications. We explored biodiversity patterns during the Cambrian radiation, the most dramatic radiation in Earth history. We assessed how the overall increase in global diversity was partitioned between within-community (alpha) and between-community (beta) components and how beta diversity was partitioned among environments and geographic regions. Changes in gamma diversity in the Cambrian were chiefly driven by changes in beta diversity. The combined trajectories of alpha and beta diversity during the initial diversification suggest low competition and high predation within communities. Beta diversity has similar trajectories both among environments and geographic regions, but turnover between adjacent paleocontinents was probably the main driver of diversification. Our study elucidates that global biodiversity during the Cambrian radiation was driven by niche contraction at local scales and vicariance at continental scales. The latter supports previous arguments for the importance of plate tectonics in the Cambrian radiation, namely the breakup of Pannotia. PMID:25825755

  4. Airborne phthalate partitioning to cotton clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Glenn; Li, Hongwan; Mishra, Santosh; Buechlein, Melissa

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation on indoor surfaces and fabrics can increase dermal uptake and non-dietary ingestion of semi-volatile organic compounds. To better understand the potential for dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing, we measured the mass accumulation on cotton fabrics of two phthalate esters commonly identified in indoor air: diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP). In 10-day chamber experiments, we observed strong air-to-cloth partitioning of these phthalates to shirts and jean material. Area-normalized partition coefficients ranged from 209 to 411 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 2850 to 6580 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. Clothing volume-normalized partition coefficients averaged 2.6 × 105 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 3.9 × 106 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. At equilibrium, we estimate that a typical set of cotton clothing can sorb DnBP from the equivalent of >10,000 m3 of indoor air, thereby substantially decreasing external mass-transfer barriers to dermal uptake. Further, we estimate that a significant fraction of a child's body burden of DnBP may come from mouthing fabric material that has been equilibrated with indoor air.

  5. Diversity partitioning during the Cambrian radiation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Lin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record offers unique insights into the environmental and geographic partitioning of biodiversity during global diversifications. We explored biodiversity patterns during the Cambrian radiation, the most dramatic radiation in Earth history. We assessed how the overall increase in global diversity was partitioned between within-community (alpha) and between-community (beta) components and how beta diversity was partitioned among environments and geographic regions. Changes in gamma diversity in the Cambrian were chiefly driven by changes in beta diversity. The combined trajectories of alpha and beta diversity during the initial diversification suggest low competition and high predation within communities. Beta diversity has similar trajectories both among environments and geographic regions, but turnover between adjacent paleocontinents was probably the main driver of diversification. Our study elucidates that global biodiversity during the Cambrian radiation was driven by niche contraction at local scales and vicariance at continental scales. The latter supports previous arguments for the importance of plate tectonics in the Cambrian radiation, namely the breakup of Pannotia. PMID:25825755

  6. Global Fluorine Flux Associated with Submarine Hydrothermal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, T.; Sano, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We estimated a fluorine flux associated with hydrothermal fluid emission at mid-ocean ridges (MOR) based on vent fluid chemistry and MORB vesicle compositions. Multiplication of fluorine concentrations in submarine hydrothermal fluids and the vent fluid flux at MOR may give us an estimate of fluorine flux at MOR. A worldwide vent chemistry research [1] suggested that submarine vent fluids are depleted in fluorine (<0.74 ppm F) relative to seawater (1.29 ppm F). The global flux of submarine hydrothermal fluids of (8.0+/-2.1)x1015 g/y was calculated using a numerical Bayesian inversion procedure to explain the relationship between compositions of high-temperature hydrothermal fluids and altered sheeted dikes, which enables us to estimate fluorine flux to be less than (3.1+/-0.8)x108 mol/y. This value is almost comparable with fluorine flux of (7.1+/-2.8)x108 mol/y estimated using F/3He ratios in MORB vesicles and the known 3He flux at MOR [3]. This flux calculation is based on preferentially degassed components from the magma as a form of MORB vesicle, thus may be related to fluorine flux associated with hydrothermal fluid emission. However, this flux should be overestimated because seawater incursion was not considered for the calculation. The average of the two different fluxes was calculated to be (5.1+/-2.0)x108 mol/y, which may be the maximum value of fluorine flux associated with hydrothermal fluid emission at MOR. It should be noted that this flux is much lower than the one estimated using the F/CO2 ratio in the MORB source and the known CO2 flux from the mantle [4] because the most of fluorine resides in the melt and should not be released immediately after formation of oceanic crust. Comparing MOR and arc fluxes, the global cycle of fluorine will be discussed in the presentation. [1] German & Von Damm (2006) Treatise On Geochemistry 6 (eds Holland & Turekian) 181-222 (Elsevier, London). [2] Coogan & Dosso (2012) EPSL 323-324, 92-101. [3] Kagoshima et al

  7. Effect of lamp type and temperature on development, carbon partitioning and yield of soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougher, T. A. O.; Bugbee, B.

    1997-01-01

    Soybeans grown in controlled environments are commonly taller than field-grown plants. In controlled environments, including liquid hydroponics, height of the dwarf cultivar ``Hoyt'' was reduced from 46 to 33 cm when plants were grown under metal halide lamps compared to high pressure sodium lamps at the same photosynthetic photon flux. Metal halide lamps reduced total biomass 14% but did not significantly reduce seed yield. Neither increasing temperature nor altering the difference between day/night temperature affected plant height. Increasing temperature from 21 to 27 degC increased yield 32%. High temperature significantly increased carbon partitioning to stems and increased harvest index.

  8. Polymers as Reference Partitioning Phase: Polymer Calibration for an Analytically Operational Approach To Quantify Multimedia Phase Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Witt, Gesine; Smedes, Foppe; Mayer, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    Polymers are increasingly applied for the enrichment of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) from various types of samples and media in many analytical partitioning-based measuring techniques. We propose using polymers as a reference partitioning phase and introduce polymer-polymer partitioning as the basis for a deeper insight into partitioning differences of HOCs between polymers, calibrating analytical methods, and consistency checking of existing and calculation of new partition coefficients. Polymer-polymer partition coefficients were determined for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) by equilibrating 13 silicones, including polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in methanol-water solutions. Methanol as cosolvent ensured that all polymers reached equilibrium while its effect on the polymers' properties did not significantly affect silicone-silicone partition coefficients. However, we noticed minor cosolvent effects on determined polymer-polymer partition coefficients. Polymer-polymer partition coefficients near unity confirmed identical absorption capacities of several PDMS materials, whereas larger deviations from unity were indicated within the group of silicones and between silicones and LDPE. Uncertainty in polymer volume due to imprecise coating thickness or the presence of fillers was identified as the source of error for partition coefficients. New polymer-based (LDPE-lipid, PDMS-air) and multimedia partition coefficients (lipid-water, air-water) were calculated by applying the new concept of a polymer as reference partitioning phase and by using polymer-polymer partition coefficients as conversion factors. The present study encourages the use of polymer-polymer partition coefficients, recognizing that polymers can serve as a linking third phase for a quantitative understanding of equilibrium partitioning of HOCs between any two phases.

  9. Constraints on core formation in Vesta from metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenstra, E. S.; Knibbe, J. S.; Rai, N.; van Westrenen, W.

    2016-03-01

    It is now widely accepted that the asteroid 4-Vesta has an Fe-rich metallic core, but the composition of the core and the conditions prevailing during core-mantle differentiation are poorly constrained. In light of new constraints on Vesta's geophysical and geochemical properties obtained by the DAWN mission, we have re-examined the conditions at which core-mantle differentiation in Vesta may have occurred by linking the estimated mantle depletions of siderophile elements P, Co, Ni, Cu, Ga, Ge, Mo and W in the vestan mantle to newly derived predictive equations for core-mantle partitioning of these elements. We extend the number of elements previously considered in geochemical modeling of vestan core formation and use published metal-silicate partitioning data obtained at low pressures to characterize the dependence of metal/silicate partition coefficients (D) on pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity and composition of the silicate and metallic melt. In our modeling we implement newly derived mantle depletions of P, Co, Ni and Ga through analysis of published HED meteorite analyses and assess two contrasting bulk compositional models for Vesta. Modeling results using Monte Carlo simulations constrain vestan core formation to have occurred at mildly reducing conditions of approximately 2 log units below the iron-wüstite (IW) buffer (ΔIW = -2.05 ± 0.20) if the two most likely bulk compositions (binary mixtures of H + CM or H + CV chondritic meteorites) are considered, assuming a temperature range between 1725 and 1850 K and a sulfur-free pure Fe core. If the core is assumed to be sulfur-rich (15 wt.% S) as predicted by the latter bulk compositional models, observed depletions for all eight siderophile elements can be simultaneously satisfied at ΔIW = -2.35 ± 0.10 and 1725-1850 K for the H + CV bulk composition and ΔIW = -2.30 ± 0.15 and 1725-1850 K for the H + CM bulk composition. More reducing conditions are not consistent with the observed siderophile

  10. Paleoproterozoic Kimozero kimberlite (Karelian Craton): Geological setting and geochemical typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, A. V.; Babarina, I. I.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Yutkina, E. V.; Kondrashov, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    Geological and structural mapping of Paleoproterozoic Kimozero kimberlite with account for lithological facies and geochemical specialization provides evidence for the multiphase structure of the kimberlite pipe, which underwent fragmentation as a result of shear-faulting deformations. Two geochemical types of kimberlite (magnesium and carbonate) are distinguished.

  11. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.E.; Cuenca, R.H.

    1990-12-31

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program`s SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  12. Ammonia Partitioning into the Condensed Phase in Winter Time Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Bililign, S.; Fiddler, M. N.; Leen, J. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Thornton, J. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary aerosol (SOA) formation has been linked to health problems and environmental damage in regions impacted by the emission of gaseous NH3 and SO2. SOA formation, (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3, in the presence of NO NO2, is favored under high relative humidity and low temperature and low temperature conditions. In the East and Mid Atlantic regions of the United States humidity is low in wintertime. Utilizing ambient concentration data of gaseous NO, NO2, SO2 and NH3 collected aboard a survey aircraft we examined the partitioning of gaseous NH3 towards aerosol products. The calculated mixing ratio of gaseous SO2/NH3 correlated with relative humidity will give an indication of the potential SOA formation when the mixing ratio of other reactants is small in the region of interest. The data obtained originates from a series of night and day survey flights on a C-130 aircraft that occurred from February 3 to March 13, 2015 over the Eastern coastal region of the United States extending from New York to Florida. NOx was obtained from the Airborne Ring-down Nitrogen Oxide Laser Detector (ARNOLD) instrument (NOAA) and Thermal Dissociation-Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF) (UC Berkley). SO2 measurements were done using the TECO 43C SO2 analyzer and for NH3 measurements the an Ammonia Analyzer - Trace (NH3) (Los Gatos Research). Estimates of aerosol dry deposition fluxes are presented.

  13. Three dimensional mirror symmetry and partition function on S 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Anindya; Distler, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    We provide non-trivial checks of = 4 , D = 3 mirror symmetry in a large class of quiver gauge theories whose Type IIB (Hanany-Witten) descriptions involve D3 branes ending on orbifold/orientifold 5-planes at the boundary. From the M-theory perspective, such theories can be understood in terms of coincident M2 branes sitting at the origin of a product of an A-type and a D-type ALE (Asymtotically Locally Euclidean) space with G-fluxes. Families of mirror dual pairs, which arise in this fashion, can be labeled as ( A m-1 , D n ), where m and n are integers. For a large subset of such infinite families of dual theories, corresponding to generic values of n ≥ 4, arbitrary ranks of the gauge groups and varying m, we test the conjectured duality by proving the precise equality of the S 3 partition functions for dual gauge theories in the IR as functions of masses and FI parameters. The mirror map for a given pair of mirror dual theories can be read off at the end of this computation and we explicitly present these for the aforementioned examples. The computation uses non-trivial identities of hyperbolic functions including certain generalizations of Cauchy determinant identity and Schur's Pfaffian identity, which are discussed in the paper.

  14. Geochemical constraints on Earth's core composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, Julien

    2016-04-01

    The density of the core as measured from seismic-wave velocities is lower (by 10-15%) than that of pure iron, and therefore the core must also contain some light elements. Geophysical and cosmochemical constraints indicate that obvious candidates for these light elements include silicon, oxygen, and sulfur. These elements have been studied extensively for the past 30 years but a joint solution fulfilling all the requirements imposed by cosmochemistry and geochemistry, seismology, and models of Earth's accretion and core formation is still a highly controversial subject. Here are presented new experimental data in geochemistry used to place constraints on Earth's core composition. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments were performed at pressures and temperatures directly similar to those that prevailed in a deep magma ocean in the early Earth. The results show that core formation can reconcile the observed concentrations of siderophile elements in the silicate mantle with geophysical constraints on light elements in the core. Partitioning results also lead to a core containing less than 1 wt.% of sulfur, inconsistent with a S-rich layer to account for the observed structure of the outer core. Additionally, isotopic fractionations in core formation experiments are presented. This experimental tool merging the fields of experimental petrology and isotope geochemistry represents a promising approach, providing new independent constraints on the nature of light elements in the core.

  15. Origin of geochemical mantle components: Role of subduction filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Gill, James B.; Skora, Susanne; van Keken, Peter E.; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    We quantitatively explore element redistribution at subduction zones using numerical mass balance models to evaluate the roles of the subduction zone filter in the Earth's geochemical cycle. Our models of slab residues after arc magma genesis differ from previous ones by being internally consistent with geodynamic models of modern arcs that successfully explain arc magma genesis and include element fluxes from the dehydration/melting of each underlying slab component. We assume that the mantle potential temperature (Tp) was 1400-1650°C at 3.5-1.7 Ga and gradually decreased to 1300-1350°C today. Hot subduction zones with Tp ˜1650°C have a thermal structure like modern SW Japan where high-Mg andesite is formed which is chemically like continental crust. After 2.5-1.7 Gyr of storage in the mantle, the residual igneous oceanic crust from hot subduction zones can evolve isotopically to the HIMU mantle component, the residual base of the mantle wedge to EMI, the residual sediment becomes an essential part of EMII, and the residual top of the mantle wedge can become the subcontinental lithosphere component. The Common or Focal Zone component is a stable mixture of the first three residues occasionally mixed with early depleted mantle. Slab residues that recycled earlier (˜2.5 Ga) form the DUPAL anomaly in the southern hemisphere, whereas residues of more recent recycling (˜1.7 Ga) underlie the northern hemisphere. These ages correspond to major continental crust forming events. The east-west heterogeneity of the depleted upper mantle involves subcontinental mantle except in the Pacific.

  16. Intramolecular Nuclear Flux Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, I.; Daniel, C.; Gindensperger, E.; Manz, J.; PéRez-Torres, J. F.; Schild, A.; Stemmle, C.; Sulzer, D.; Yang, Y.

    The topic of this survey article has seen a renaissance during the past couple of years. Here we present and extend the results for various phenomena which we have published from 2012-2014, with gratitude to our coauthors. The new phenomena include (a) the first reduced nuclear flux densities in vibrating diatomic molecules or ions which have been deduced from experimental pump-probe spectra; these "experimental" nuclear flux densities reveal several quantum effects including (b) the "quantum accordion", i.e., during the turn from bond stretch to bond compression, the diatomic system never stands still — instead, various parts of it with different bond lengths flow into opposite directions. (c) Wavepacket interferometry has been extended from nuclear densities to flux densities, again revealing new phenomena: For example, (d) a vibrating nuclear wave function with compact initial shape may split into two partial waves which run into opposite directions, thus causing interfering flux densities. (e) Tunneling in symmetric 1-dimensional double-well systems yields maximum values of the associated nuclear flux density just below the potential barrier; this is in marked contrast with negligible values of the nuclear density just below the barrier. (f) Nuclear flux densities of pseudorotating nuclei may induce huge magnetic fields. A common methodologic theme of all topics is the continuity equation which connects the time derivative of the nuclear density to the divergence of the flux density, subject to the proper boundary conditions. (g) Nearly identical nuclear densities with different boundary conditions may be related to entirely different flux densities, e.g., during tunneling in cyclic versus non-cyclic systems. The original continuity equation, density and flux density of all nuclei, or of all nuclear degrees of freedom, may be reduced to the corresponding quantities for just a single nucleus, or just a single degree of freedom.

  17. The geochemical record in rock glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steig, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Potter, N.; Clark, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    A 9.5 m ice core was extracted from beneath the surficial debris cover of a rock glacier at Galena Creek, northwestern Wyoming. The core contains clean, bubble-rich ice with silty debris layers spaced at roughly 20 cm intervals. The debris layers are similar in appearance to those in typical alpine glaciers, reflecting concentration of debris by melting at the surface during the summer ablation season. Profiles of stable isotope concentrations and electrical conductivity measurements provide independent evidence for melting in association with debris layers. These observations are consistent with a glacial origin for the ice, substantiating the glacigenic model for rock glacier formation. The deuterium excess profile in the ice indicates that the total depth of meltwater infiltration is less than the thickness of one annual layer, suggesting that isotope values and other geochemical signatures are preserved at annual resolution. This finding demonstrates the potential for obtaining useful paleoclimate information from rock glacier ice.

  18. A geochemical basis for endomyocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, M S; Kartha, C C; Panday, V K; Dang, H S; Sunta, C M

    1986-09-01

    In a search for geochemical factors that could play a role in the pathogenesis of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis, endomyocardial tissue samples obtained from patients at necropsy or operation were analysed for major elements present in laterite and monazite, which are important soil constituents of Kerala State of India. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used for detecting iron, silicon, aluminium, zinc, magnesium, calcium, sodium, potassium, and manganese and neutron activation analysis for thorium. Compared with control samples from victims of fatal accidents, an excess of thorium, sodium, and calcium and a deficiency of magnesium were present in samples from patients. It has been shown earlier that the staple diets of people in Kerala have high concentrations of thorium, and these data show that thorium can become concentrated in cardiac tissues. It is speculated that thorium excess in conjunction with magnesium deficiency may play a role in the causation of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis. PMID:3791358

  19. A geochemical basis for endomyocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, M S; Kartha, C C; Panday, V K; Dang, H S; Sunta, C M

    1986-09-01

    In a search for geochemical factors that could play a role in the pathogenesis of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis, endomyocardial tissue samples obtained from patients at necropsy or operation were analysed for major elements present in laterite and monazite, which are important soil constituents of Kerala State of India. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used for detecting iron, silicon, aluminium, zinc, magnesium, calcium, sodium, potassium, and manganese and neutron activation analysis for thorium. Compared with control samples from victims of fatal accidents, an excess of thorium, sodium, and calcium and a deficiency of magnesium were present in samples from patients. It has been shown earlier that the staple diets of people in Kerala have high concentrations of thorium, and these data show that thorium can become concentrated in cardiac tissues. It is speculated that thorium excess in conjunction with magnesium deficiency may play a role in the causation of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis.

  20. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  1. Heat Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A heat flux microsensor developed under a NASP Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) has a wide range of potential commercial applications. Vatell Corporation originally designed microsensors for use in very high temperatures. The company then used the technology to develop heat flux sensors to measure the rate of heat energy flowing in and out of a surface as well as readings on the surface temperature. Additional major advantages include response to heat flux in less than 10 microseconds and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 1,200 degrees centigrade. Commercial applications are used in high speed aerodynamics, supersonic combustion, blade cooling, and mass flow measurements, etc.

  2. High dimensional data clustering by partitioning the hypergraphs using dense subgraph partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xili; Tian, Shoucai; Lu, Yonggang

    2015-12-01

    Due to the curse of dimensionality, traditional clustering methods usually fail to produce meaningful results for the high dimensional data. Hypergraph partition is believed to be a promising method for dealing with this challenge. In this paper, we first construct a graph G from the data by defining an adjacency relationship between the data points using Shared Reverse k Nearest Neighbors (SRNN). Then a hypergraph is created from the graph G by defining the hyperedges to be all the maximal cliques in the graph G. After the hypergraph is produced, a powerful hypergraph partitioning method called dense subgraph partition (DSP) combined with the k-medoids method is used to produce the final clustering results. The proposed method is evaluated on several real high-dimensional datasets, and the experimental results show that the proposed method can improve the clustering results of the high dimensional data compared with applying k-medoids method directly on the original data.

  3. Flux vector splitting and approximate Newton methods. [for solution of steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.; Pulliam, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    In the present investigation, the basic approach is employed to view an iterative scheme as Newton's method or as a modified Newton's method. Attention is given to various modified Newton methods which can arise from differencing schemes for the Euler equations. Flux vector splitting is considered as the basic spatial differencing technique. This technique is based on the partition of a flux vector into groups which have certain properties. The Euler equations fluxes can be split into two groups, the first group having a flux Jacobian with all positive eigenvalues, and the second group having a flux Jacobian with all negative eigenvalues. Flux vector splitting based on a velocity-sound speed split is considered along with the use of numerical techniques to analyze nonlinear systems, and the steady Euler equations for quasi-one-dimensional flow in a nozzle. Results are given for steady flows with shocks.

  4. Code System to Model Aqueous Geochemical Equilibria.

    2001-08-23

    Version: 00 MINTEQ is a geochemical program to model aqueous solutions and the interactions of aqueous solutions with hypothesized assemblages of solid phases. It was developed for the Environmental Protection Agency to perform the calculations necessary to simulate the contact of waste solutions with heterogeneous sediments or the interaction of ground water with solidified wastes. MINTEQ can calculate ion speciation/solubility, adsorption, oxidation-reduction, gas phase equilibria, and precipitation/dissolution ofsolid phases. MINTEQ can accept a finite massmore » for any solid considered for dissolution and will dissolve the specified solid phase only until its initial mass is exhausted. This ability enables MINTEQ to model flow-through systems. In these systems the masses of solid phases that precipitate at earlier pore volumes can be dissolved at later pore volumes according to thermodynamic constraints imposed by the solution composition and solid phases present. The ability to model these systems permits evaluation of the geochemistry of dissolved traced metals, such as low-level waste in shallow land burial sites. MINTEQ was designed to solve geochemical equilibria for systems composed of one kilogram of water, various amounts of material dissolved in solution, and any solid materials that are present. Systems modeled using MINTEQ can exchange energy and material (open systems) or just energy (closed systems) with the surrounding environment. Each system is composed of a number of phases. Every phase is a region with distinct composition and physically definable boundaries. All of the material in the aqueous solution forms one phase. The gas phase is composed of any gaseous material present, and each compositionally and structurally distinct solid forms a separate phase.« less

  5. Synthesis of benthic flux components in the Patos Lagooncoastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this work is to synthesize components of benthic flux in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Specifically, the component of benthic discharge flux forced by the terrestrial hydraulic gradient is 0.8 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux associated with the groundwater tidal prism are both 2.1 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity wave setup are both 6.3 m3 d-1; the component of benthic discharge flux that transports radium-228 is 350 m3 d-1; and components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity waves propagating over a porous medium are both 1400 m3 d-1. (All models are normalized per meter shoreline.) Benthic flux is a function of components forced by individual mechanisms and nonlinear interactions that exist between components. Constructive and destructive interference may enhance or diminish the contribution of benthic flux components. It may not be possible to model benthic flux by summing component magnitudes. Geochemical tracer techniques may not accurately model benthic discharge flux or submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). A conceptual model provides a framework on which to quantitatively characterize benthic discharge flux and SGD with a multifaceted approach.

  6. Synthesis of benthic flux components in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    The primary objective of this work is to synthesize components of benthic flux in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Specifically, the component of benthic discharge flux forced by the terrestrial hydraulic gradient is 0.8 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux associated with the groundwater tidal prism are both 2.1 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity wave setup are both 6.3 m3 d-1; the component of benthic discharge flux that transports radium-228 is 350 m3 d-1; and components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity waves propagating over a porous medium are both 1400 m3 d-1. (All models are normalized per meter shoreline.) Benthic flux is a function of components forced by individual mechanisms and nonlinear interactions that exist between components. Constructive and destructive interference may enhance or diminish the contribution of benthic flux components. It may not be possible to model benthic flux by summing component magnitudes. Geochemical tracer techniques may not accurately model benthic discharge flux or submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). A conceptual model provides a framework on which to quantitatively characterize benthic discharge flux and SGD with a multifaceted approach.

  7. A comparison of ethanol partitioning in biological and model membranes: nonideal partitioning is enhanced in synaptosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Sarasua, M M; Faught, K R; Steedman, S L; Gordin, M D; Washington, M K

    1989-10-01

    The partitioning of ethanol into mouse brain synaptosomes at 37 degrees C was characterized as a function of ethanol concentration. In addition, the partitioning of ethanol into multilamellar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles was characterized as a function of ethanol concentration and temperature. DPPC liposomes provided a model for ethanol partitioning into a phospholipid bilayer of defined composition allowing comparison to the more complex synaptosomal membrane. The values of the partition coefficients for ethanol depend on the convention used to express concentration in the partition coefficient ratio. We express these concentrations as mole fractions as ethanol in the membrane and aqueous phases. Ethanol partitioning is nonideal (ethanol membrane: buffer partition coefficients vary with total ethanol concentration). In synaptosomes, the partition coefficients vary markedly with concentration and asymptotically approach zero at higher concentrations. In the DPPC system, the variation of the partition coefficient is less pronounced, but significant. The ethanol: DPPC partition coefficients decrease by a factor of 2 at ethanol concentrations above 3.2 x 10(-3) M. This suggests a model involving at least two distinguishable types of interactions of ethanol with the membrane. Ethanol appears to undergo both bulk phase partitioning into the membrane bilayer core and nonspecific binding to the membrane surface. In pure DPPC, bulk phase hydrophobic partitioning predominates. In synaptosomes, nonspecific surface binding appears to be a major interaction. Temperature studies indicate ethanol partitioning into DPPC increases above the phospholipid gel to liquid crystalline phase transition temperature. This suggests a preferred partitioning of ethanol into fluid state lipid. However, significant membrane concentrations of ethanol are found in gel state DPPC.

  8. A brief history of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2016-04-01

    'Number rules the universe.' The Pythagoras 'If you wish to forsee the future of mathematics our course is to study the history and present conditions of the science.' Henri Poincaré 'The primary source (Urqell) of all mathematics are integers.' Hermann Minkowski This paper is written to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the Mathematical Association of America. It deals with a short history of different kinds of natural numbers including triangular, square, pentagonal, hexagonal and k-gonal numbers, and their simple properties and their geometrical representations. Included are Euclid's and Pythagorean's main contributions to elementary number theory with the main contents of the Euclid Elements of the 13-volume masterpiece of mathematical work. This is followed by Euler's new discovery of the additive number theory based on partitions of numbers. Special attention is given to many examples, Euler's theorems on partitions of numbers with geometrical representations of Ferrers' graphs, Young's diagrams, Lagrange's four-square theorem and the celebrated Waring problem. Included are Euler's generating functions for the partitions of numbers, Euler's pentagonal number theorem, Gauss' triangular and square number theorems and the Jacobi triple product identity. Applications of the theory of partitions of numbers to different statistics such as the Bose- Einstein, Fermi- Dirac, Gentile, and Maxwell- Boltzmann statistics are briefly discussed. Special attention is given to pedagogical information through historical approach to number theory so that students and teachers at the school, college and university levels can become familiar with the basic concepts of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications, and can pursue advanced study and research in analytical and computational number theory.

  9. A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

  10. Selected Pharmaceuticals Entering an Estuary: Concentrations, Temporal Trends, Partitioning and Fluxes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In many coastal watersheds and ecosystems, rivers discharging to estuaries receive waters from domestic wastewater-treatment plants resulting in the release and distribution of pharmaceuticals to the marine environment. In the present study, 15 active pharmaceutical ingredients w...

  11. The Extraterrestrial Mass Flux on the Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Arnold, G. L.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Zahnle, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    We have measured iridium and platinum in ancient metasediments to obtain the first direct constraints on the extraterrestrial mass flux at the Earth's surface before 3.8 Gyr (the Hadean era). The craters of the Moon record an intense "late heavy bombardment" (LHB) beginning as early as 4.15 Gyr, and terminating ca.3.85 +/- 0.05 Gyr. Recent geochemical studies of metasediments and other supracrustal rocks from Akilia Island, in southern West Greenland, appear to extend both the record of marine sedimentation and the record of metabolically-sophisticated life to > 3.8 Gyr. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Association of nicotinamide with parabens: effect on solubility, partition and transdermal permeation.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Sara; Zani, Franca; Bilzi, Stefania; Bettini, Ruggero; Santi, Patrizia

    2008-06-01

    Nicotinamide is a hydrophilic molecule, freely soluble in water, used as cosmetic active ingredient for its moisturizing and depigmenting properties. Moreover it has the ability to augment the solubility of poorly water-soluble molecules acting as a hydrotrope. The aim of this work was to study the effect of nicotinamide on the transdermal permeation of methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl paraben. Parabens flux was measured in vitro in the presence and absence of different amounts of nicotinamide. From solubility studies it was found that nicotinamide forms one or more complexes with methyl, propyl and butyl paraben in water, even though with low stability constants. The interaction of ethyl paraben seems to be less easy to explain. The association of nicotinamide with parabens causes a significant reduction of the permeability coefficients of these preservatives through rabbit ear skin, caused by a reduction of the stratum corneum/vehicle partition coefficient. The effects of nicotinamide on parabens solubility, permeation and partitioning are potentially very interesting because nicotinamide can facilitate paraben dissolution in aqueous media (solutions, gels), reduce parabens partitioning in the oily phase thus guaranteeing an effective concentration in the water phase in emulsion and reduce transdermal penetration, thus reducing the toxicological risk.

  13. Determination of water saturation using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse electrical conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2013-05-21

    Water saturation is an important indicator of contaminant distribution and plays a governing role in contaminant transport within the vadose zone. Understanding the water saturation distribution is critical for both remediation and contaminant flux monitoring in unsaturated environments. In this work we propose and demonstrate a method of remotely determining water saturation levels using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse bulk electrical conductivity measurements. The theoretical development includes the partitioning chemistry for the tracers we demonstrate (ammonia and carbon dioxide), as well as a review of the petrophysical relationship governing how these tracers influence bulk conductivity. We also investigate methods of utilizing secondary information provided by electrical conductivity breakthrough magnitudes induced by the tracers. We test the method on clean, well characterized, intermediate-scale sand columns under controlled conditions. Results demonstrate the capability to predict partitioning coefficients and accurately monitor gas breakthrough curves along the length of the column according to the corresponding electrical conductivity response, leading to accurate water saturation estimates. This work is motivated by the need to develop effective characterization and monitoring techniques for contaminated deep vadose zone environments, and provides a proof-of-concept toward uniquely characterizing and monitoring water saturation levels at the field scale and in three-dimensions using electrical resistivity tomography.

  14. Carbon partitioning between oil and carbohydrates in developing oat (Avena sativa L.) seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Åsa; Hayden, Daniel M.; Dehesh, Katayoon; Bülow, Leif; Stymne, Sten

    2008-01-01

    Cereals accumulate starch in the endosperm as their major energy reserve in the grain. In most cereals the embryo, scutellum, and aleurone layer are high in oil, but these tissues constitute a very small part of the total seed weight. However, in oat (Avena sativa L.) most of the oil in kernels is deposited in the same endosperm cells that accumulate starch. Thus oat endosperm is a desirable model system to study the metabolic switches responsible for carbon partitioning between oil and starch synthesis. A prerequisite for such investigations is the development of an experimental system for oat that allows for metabolic flux analysis using stable and radioactive isotope labelling. An in vitro liquid culture system, developed for detached oat panicles and optimized to mimic kernel composition during different developmental stages in planta, is presented here. This system was subsequently used in analyses of carbon partitioning between lipids and carbohydrates by the administration of 14C-labelled sucrose to two cultivars having different amounts of kernel oil. The data presented in this study clearly show that a higher amount of oil in the high-oil cultivar compared with the medium-oil cultivar was due to a higher proportion of carbon partitioning into oil during seed filling, predominantly at the earlier stages of kernel development. PMID:19036843

  15. Partitioning of Evapotranspiration Using a Stable Water Isotope Technique in a High Temperature Agricultural Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Liang, L.; Wang, L.; Jenerette, D.; Grantz, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production in the hot and arid low desert systems of southern California relies heavily on irrigation. A better understanding of how much and to what extent the irrigation water is transpired by crops relative to being lost through evaporation will contribute to better management of increasingly limited agricultural water resources. In this study, we examined the evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning over a field of forage sorghum (S. bicolor) during a growing season with several irrigation cycles. In several field campaigns we used continuous measurements of near-surface variations in the stable isotopic composition of water vapor (δ2H). We employed custom built transparent chambers coupled with a laser-based isotope analyzer and used Keeling plot and mass balance methods for surface flux partitioning. The preliminary results show that δT is more enriched than δE in the early growing season, and becomes less enriched than δE later in the season as canopy cover increases. There is an increase in the contribution of transpiration to ET as (1) leaf area index increases, and (2) as soil surface moisture declines. These results are consistent with theory, and extend these measurements to an environment that experiences extreme soil surface temperatures. The data further support the use of chamber based methods with stable isotopic analysis for characterization of ET partitioning in challenging field environments.

  16. Rainfall partitioning by vegetation under Mediterranean conditions. A review of studies in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Domingo, Francisco

    2007-03-01

    SummaryRainfall partitioning by vegetation plays an important role affecting the water balance at local and catchment scale due to the control that vegetation canopies exert by modifying both evaporation and the redistribution of incident rainfall. The parameters associated with this process can be found in the literature but this task is not always easy. In this context, this paper presents an exhaustive review of experimental studies dealing with rainfall interception in the Mediterranean area of Europe in the last 30 years, with information on 29 different species (89% referred to tree stands and 11% to shrubs or bushes) from 83 sites in 63 research areas found in 90 papers on studies performed in France, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain. The revision includes articles in international journals and books (37%), local journals (27%), Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses and technical documents (27%) and proceedings (10%) until 2004. The studies are representative of a wide range of rainfall, temperatures and potential evapotranspiration. The lack of a standard protocol to measure bulk rainfall, throughfall and stemflow in interception studies makes it difficult to merge information in this type of review. Nevertheless, this review presents a detailed classification of the information compiled according to research focus, climate and vegetation characteristics, rainfall partitioning flux measurement methods and the quality of the information, giving rise to an important database of rainfall partitioning studies in the European Mediterranean area.

  17. The role of mosses in carbon uptake and partitioning in arctic vegetation.

    PubMed

    Street, Lorna E; Subke, Jens-Arne; Sommerkorn, Martin; Sloan, Victoria; Ducrotoy, Helene; Phoenix, Gareth K; Williams, Mathew

    2013-07-01

    The Arctic is already experiencing changes in plant community composition, so understanding the contribution of different vegetation components to carbon (C) cycling is essential in order to accurately quantify ecosystem C balance. Mosses contribute substantially to biomass, but their impact on carbon use efficiency (CUE) - the proportion of gross primary productivity (GPP) incorporated into growth - and aboveground versus belowground C partitioning is poorly known. We used (13) C pulse-labelling to trace assimilated C in mosses (Sphagnum sect. Acutifolia and Pleurozium schreberi) and in dwarf shrub-P. schreberi vegetation in sub-Arctic Finland. Based on (13) C pools and fluxes, we quantified the contribution of mosses to GPP, CUE and partitioning. Mosses incorporated 20 ± 9% of total ecosystem GPP into biomass. CUE of Sphagnum was 68-71%, that of P. schreberi was 62-81% and that of dwarf shrub-P. schreberi vegetation was 58-74%. Incorporation of C belowground was 10 ± 2% of GPP, while vascular plants alone incorporated 15 ± 4% of their fixed C belowground. We have demonstrated that mosses strongly influence C uptake and retention in Arctic dwarf shrub vegetation. They increase CUE, and the fraction of GPP partitioned aboveground. Arctic C models must include mosses to accurately represent ecosystem C dynamics.

  18. Carbon partitioning between oil and carbohydrates in developing oat (Avena sativa L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Asa; Hayden, Daniel M; Dehesh, Katayoon; Bülow, Leif; Stymne, Sten

    2008-01-01

    Cereals accumulate starch in the endosperm as their major energy reserve in the grain. In most cereals the embryo, scutellum, and aleurone layer are high in oil, but these tissues constitute a very small part of the total seed weight. However, in oat (Avena sativa L.) most of the oil in kernels is deposited in the same endosperm cells that accumulate starch. Thus oat endosperm is a desirable model system to study the metabolic switches responsible for carbon partitioning between oil and starch synthesis. A prerequisite for such investigations is the development of an experimental system for oat that allows for metabolic flux analysis using stable and radioactive isotope labelling. An in vitro liquid culture system, developed for detached oat panicles and optimized to mimic kernel composition during different developmental stages in planta, is presented here. This system was subsequently used in analyses of carbon partitioning between lipids and carbohydrates by the administration of 14C-labelled sucrose to two cultivars having different amounts of kernel oil. The data presented in this study clearly show that a higher amount of oil in the high-oil cultivar compared with the medium-oil cultivar was due to a higher proportion of carbon partitioning into oil during seed filling, predominantly at the earlier stages of kernel development.

  19. Modeling Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Chun; Keppens, Rony

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic configuration hosting prominences can be a large-scale helical magnetic flux rope. As a necessary step towards future prominence formation studies, we report on a stepwise approach to study flux rope formation. We start with summarizing our recent three-dimensional (3D) isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation where a flux rope is formed, including gas pressure and gravity. This starts from a static corona with a linear force-free bipolar magnetic field, altered by lower boundary vortex flows around the main polarities and converging flows towards the polarity inversion. The latter flows induce magnetic reconnection and this forms successive new helical loops so that a complete flux rope grows and ascends. After stopping the driving flows, the system relaxes to a stable helical magnetic flux rope configuration embedded in an overlying arcade. Starting from this relaxed isothermal endstate, we next perform a thermodynamic MHD simulation with a chromospheric layer inserted at the bottom. As a result of a properly parametrized coronal heating, and due to radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction, the system further relaxes to an equilibrium where the flux rope and the arcade develop a fully realistic thermal structure. This paves the way to future simulations for 3D prominence formation.

  20. How drought severity constrains GPP and its partitioning among carbon pools in a Quercus ilex coppice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambal, S.; Lempereur, M.; Limousin, J. M.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, J.

    2014-06-01

    The partitioning of photosynthates toward biomass compartments has a crucial role in the carbon sink function of forests. Few studies have examined how carbon is allocated toward plant compartments in drought prone forests. We analyzed the fate of GPP in relation to yearly water deficit in an old evergreen Mediterranean Quercus ilex coppice severely affected by water limitations. Gross and net carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured with an eddy-covariance flux tower running continuously since 2001. Discrete measurements of litterfall, stem growth and fAPAR allowed us to derive annual productions of leaves, wood, flowers and acorns and an isometric relationship between stem and belowground biomass has been used to estimate perennial belowground growth. By combining eddy-covariance fluxes with annual productions we managed to close a C budget and derive values of autotrophic and heterotrophic respirations, NPP and carbon use efficiency (CUE, the ratio between NPP and GPP). Average values of yearly NEP, GPP and Reco were 282, 1259 and 977 g C m-2. The corresponding ANPP components were 142.5, 26.4 and 69.6 g C m-2 for leaves, reproductive effort (flowers and fruits) and stems. Gross and net carbon exchange between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were affected by annual water deficit. Partitioning to the different plant compartments was also impacted by drought, with a hierarchy of responses going from the most affected, the stem growth, to the least affected, the leaf production. The average CUE was 0.40, which is well in the range for Mediterranean-type forest ecosystems. CUE tended to decrease more slightly in response to drought than GPP and NPP, probably due to drought-acclimation of autotrophic respiration. Overall, our results provide a baseline for modeling the inter-annual variations of carbon fluxes and allocation in this widespread Mediterranean ecosystem and highlight the value of maintaining continuous experimental

  1. Deformed topological partition function and Nekrasov backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Hohenegger, S.; Narain, K. S.; Taylor, T. R.

    2010-10-01

    A deformation of the N=2 topological string partition function is analyzed by considering higher-dimensional F-terms of the type W2gϒ, where W is the chiral Weyl superfield and each ϒ factor stands for the chiral projection of a real function of N=2 vector multiplets. These terms generate physical amplitudes involving two anti-self-dual Riemann tensors, 2g-2 anti-self-dual graviphoton field strengths and 2 n self-dual field strengths from the matter vector multiplets. Their coefficients F generalizing the genus g partition function F of the topological twisted type II theory, can be used to define a generating functional by introducing deformation parameters besides the string coupling. Choosing all matter field strengths to be that of the dual heterotic dilaton supermultiplet, one obtains two parameters that we argue should correspond to the deformation parameters of the Nekrasov partition function in the field theory limit, around the conifold singularity. Its perturbative part can be obtained from the one loop analysis on the heterotic side. This has been computed in Morales and Serone (1996) [1] and in the field theory limit shown to be given by the radius deformation of c=1 CFT coupled to two-dimensional gravity. Quite remarkably this result reproduces the gauge theory answer up to a phase difference that may be attributed to the regularization procedure. The type II results are expected to be exact and should also capture the part that is non-perturbative in heterotic dilaton.

  2. Boron, beryllium, and lithium, partitioning in olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Neroda, Elizabeth

    1996-05-01

    A one atmosphere experimental study was performed to determine the mineral/melt partition coefficients for B, Be, and Li in forsteritic olivine. Two compositions were chosen along the 1350{degrees}C isotherm, 1b (Fo{sub 17.3} Ab{sub 82.7} An{sub 0} by weight) and 8c (Fo{sub 30} Ab{sub 23.3} An{sub 47.8}, by weight) were then combined in equal amounts to form a composition was doped with 25ppm Li, B, Yb, Nb, Zr, Sr, and Hf, 50ppm Sm, and 100ppm Be, Nd, Ce, and Rb. Electron and ion microprobe analyses showed that the olivine crystals and surrounding glasses were homogeneous with respect to major and trace elements. Partition coefficients calculated from these analyses are as follows: 1b: D{sub B} = 4.41 ({+-} 2.3) E-03, D{sub Be} = 2.86 ({+-} 0.45) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.54 ({+-} 0.21) E-01, 50/50: D{sub B} = 2.86 ({+-} 0.5) E-03, D{sub Be} = 2.07 ({+-} 0.09) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.51 ({+-} 0.18) E-01, 8c: D{sub B} = 6.05 ({+-} 1.5) E-03, D{sub Be} = 1.81 ({+-} 0.03) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.31 ({+-} 0.09) E-01. The results of this study will combined with similar data for other minerals as part of a larger study to understand the partitioning behavior of B, Be, and Li in melting of the upper mantle at subduction zones.

  3. The minimal length and quantum partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasiyan-Motlaq, M.; Pedram, P.

    2014-08-01

    We study the thermodynamics of various physical systems in the framework of the generalized uncertainty principle that implies a minimal length uncertainty proportional to the Planck length. We present a general scheme to analytically calculate the quantum partition function of the physical systems to first order of the deformation parameter based on the behavior of the modified energy spectrum and compare our results with the classical approach. Also, we find the modified internal energy and heat capacity of the systems for the anti-Snyder framework.

  4. Spatially-partitioned many-body vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiman, S.; Alon, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    A vortex in Bose-Einstein condensates is a localized object which looks much like a tiny tornado storm. It is well described by mean-field theory. In the present work we go beyond the current paradigm and introduce many-body vortices. These are made of spatially- partitioned clouds, carry definite total angular momentum, and are fragmented rather than condensed objects which can only be described beyond mean-field theory. A phase diagram based on a mean-field model assists in predicting the parameters where many-body vortices occur. Implications are briefly discussed.

  5. Entanglement concentration of three-partite states

    SciTech Connect

    Groisman, Berry; Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu

    2005-12-15

    We investigate the concentration of multiparty entanglement by focusing on a simple family of three-partite pure states, superpositions of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states and singlets. Despite the simplicity of the states, we show that they cannot be reversibly concentrated by the standard entanglement concentration procedure, to which they seem ideally suited. Our results cast doubt on the idea that for each N there might be a finite set of N-party states into which any pure state can be reversibly transformed. We further relate our results to the concept of locking of entanglement of formation.

  6. Light period regulation of carbohydrate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janes, Harry W.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that the photosynthetic period is important in regulating carbon partitioning. Even when the same amount of carbon is fixed over a 24h period considerably more is translocated out of the leaf under the longer photosynthetic period. This is extremely important when parts of the plant other than the leaves are to be sold. It is also important to notice the amount of carbon respired in the short photosynthetic period. The light period effect on carbohydrate fixation, dark respiration, and translocation is shown in this report.

  7. Partitioning technique for discrete quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2011-06-15

    We develop the partitioning technique for quantum discrete systems. The graph consists of several subgraphs: a central graph and several branch graphs, with each branch graph being rooted by an individual node on the central one. We show that the effective Hamiltonian on the central graph can be constructed by adding additional potentials on the branch-root nodes, which generates the same result as does the the original Hamiltonian on the entire graph. Exactly solvable models are presented to demonstrate the main points of this paper.

  8. The IUGS/IAGC Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David B.; Wang, Xueqiu; Reeder, Shaun; Demetriades, Alecos

    2012-01-01

    The Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines, operating under the auspices of both the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) and the International Association of Geochemistry (IAGC), has the long-term goal of establishing a global geochemical database to document the concentration and distribution of chemical elements in the Earth’s surface or near-surface environment. The database and accompanying element distribution maps represent a geochemical baseline against which future human-induced or natural changes to the chemistry of the land surface may be recognized and quantified. In order to accomplish this long-term goal, the activities of the Task Group include: (1) developing partnerships with countries conducting broad-scale geochemical mapping studies; (2) providing consultation and training in the form of workshops and short courses; (3) organizing periodic international symposia to foster communication among the geochemical mapping community; (4) developing criteria for certifying those projects whose data are acceptable in a global geochemical database; (5) acting as a repository for data collected by those projects meeting the criteria for standardization; (6) preparing complete metadata for the certified projects; and (7) preparing, ultimately, a global geochemical database. This paper summarizes the history and accomplishments of the Task Group since its first predecessor project was established in 1988.

  9. Partitioning structural VHDL circuits for parallel execution on hypercubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, Kevin L.

    1993-12-01

    Distributing simulations among multiple processors is one approach to reducing VHDL simulation time for large VLSI circuit designs. However, parallel simulation introduces the problem of how to partition the logic gates and system behaviors among the available processors in order to obtain maximum speedup. This research investigates deliberate partitioning algorithms that account for the complex inter-dependency structure of the circuit behaviors. Once an initial partition has been obtained, a border annealing algorithm is used to iteratively improve the partition. In addition, methods of measuring the cost of a partition and relating it to the resulting simulation performance are investigated. Structural circuits ranging from one thousand to over four thousand behaviors are simulated. The deliberate partitions consistently provided superior speedup to a random distribution of the circuit behaviors.

  10. Modular properties of full 5D SYM partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jian; Tizzano, Luigi; Winding, Jacob; Zabzine, Maxim

    2016-03-01

    We study properties of the full partition function for the U(1) 5D N = {2}^{ast } gauge theory with adjoint hypermultiplet of mass M . This theory is ultimately related to abelian 6D (2,0) theory. We construct the full non-perturbative partition function on toric Sasaki-Einstein manifolds by gluing flat copies of the Nekrasov partition function and we express the full partition function in terms of the generalized double elliptic gamma function G 2 C associated with a certain moment map cone C. The answer exhibits a curious SL(4 , ℤ) modular property. Finally, we propose a set of rules to construct the partition function that resembles the calculation of 5d supersymmetric partition function with the insert ion of defects of various co-dimensions.

  11. Method for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2015-06-02

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  12. Apparatus for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2012-05-08

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  13. Automatic partitioning of unstructured grids into connected components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents two partitioning schemes that guarantee connected components given a connected initial grid. Connected components are important for convergence of methods such as domain decomposition or multigrid. For many of the grids tested, the schemes produce partitions as good (in terms of number of cut edges) or better than spectral partitioning and require only modest computational resources. This paper describes the two schemes in detail and presents comparison results from a number of two and three dimensional unstructured grids.

  14. TAP - Tools for Adaptive Partitioning v. 0.99 Beta

    2008-11-19

    TAP is a set of tools which are essential for conducting research on adaptive partitioners. The basic premise is that a single partitioner may not be a good choice for adaptive mesh simulations; rather one must match a partitioner (obtained from a partitioning package like Zoltan, ParMetis etc) with the mesh being partitioned. TAP provides the tools that can judge the suitability of a partitioning algorithm to a given mesh.

  15. Experimental halogen partitioning between earth upper mantle minerals and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, Bastian; Pawley, Alison; Lyon, Ian; Henkel, Torsten; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    Owing to their incompatibility, halogens have similar geochemical properties to noble gases in many systems and may therefore be used as key tracers of volatile transport processes in the earth. Halogen fractionation may occur during partial melting of the upper mantle, fractional crystallization or partitioning between immiscible fluids. Experimental determination of the halogen partitioning behaviour is the basis for the investigation of the concentration and distribution of halogens in the earth's mantle. High P-T partition experiments were performed in a piston cylinder apparatus using a model primitive mantle composition proposed by Jagoutz et al. (1979) simplified to the four components CaO, MgO, A2lO3 and SiO2 (CMAS) according to the procedure of O'Hara (1968). Defined small amounts of halogens (0.2 wt%) were added as CaF2, CaCl2 and CaBr2. All experiments were first heated up to 1720° C and then cooled slowly to the target temperature to guarantee growth of large homogeneous crystals, following the method of Beyer et al. (2011). Pressures range between 1.0 GPa and 2.5 GPa and final experimental temperatures between 1500° C and 1600° C, thus representing partial melting conditions of the earth upper mantle. Back-scattered electron images of polished samples show euhedral, almost rectangular forsterite grains or a mixture of euhedral forsterite and pyroxene grains with a side length of up to 150 μm, which are embedded in a MORB-like melt. Electron microprobe analysis reveals a homogeneous major element composition of the forsterite and pyroxene single crystals as well as of the melt. Halogen mapping, measured via Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), shows no concentration gradients within the minerals or within the melt. These observations suggest that the experiments were performed at equilibrium conditions. The fact that we were able to produce large pyroxene and forsterite crystals at equilibrium conditions in a halogen doped

  16. Isotope partitioning of soil respiration: A Bayesian solution to accommodate multiple sources of variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Kiona; Pendall, Elise

    2015-02-01

    Isotopic methods offer great potential for partitioning trace gas fluxes such as soil respiration into their different source contributions. Traditional partitioning methods face challenges due to variability introduced by different measurement methods, fractionation effects, and end-member uncertainty. To address these challenges, we describe a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) approach for isotopic partitioning of soil respiration that directly accommodates such variability. We apply our HB method to data from an experiment conducted in a shortgrass steppe ecosystem, where decomposition was previously shown to be stimulated by elevated CO2. Our approach simultaneously fits Keeling plot (KP) models to observations of soil or soil-respired δ13C and [CO2] obtained via chambers and gas wells, corrects the KP intercepts for apparent fractionation (Δ) due to isotope-specific diffusion rates and/or method artifacts, estimates method- and treatment-specific values for Δ, propagates end-member uncertainty, and calculates proportional contributions from two distinct respiration sources ("old" and "new" carbon). The chamber KP intercepts were estimated with greater confidence than the well intercepts and compared to the theoretical value of 4.4‰, our results suggest that Δ varies between 2 and 5.2‰ depending on method (chambers versus wells) and CO2 treatment. Because elevated CO2 plots were fumigated with 13C-depleted CO2, the source contributions were tightly constrained, and new C accounted for 64% (range = 55-73%) of soil respiration. The contributions were less constrained for the ambient CO2 treatments, but new C accounted for significantly less (47%, range = 15-82%) of soil respiration. Our new HB partitioning approach contrasts our original analysis (higher contribution of old C under elevated CO2) because it uses additional data sources, accounts for end-member bias, and estimates apparent fractionation effects.

  17. Partitioning evapotranspiration based on the concept of underlying water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sha; Yu, Bofu; Zhang, Yao; Huang, Yuefei; Wang, Guangqian

    2016-02-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is dominated by transpiration (T) in the terrestrial water cycle. However, continuous measurement of transpiration is still difficult, and the effect of vegetation on ET partitioning is unclear. The concept of underlying water use efficiency (uWUE) was used to develop a new method for ET partitioning by assuming that the maximum, or the potential uWUE is related to T while the averaged or apparent uWUE is related to ET. T/ET was thus estimated as the ratio of the apparent over the potential uWUE using half-hourly flux data from 17 AmeriFlux sites. The estimated potential uWUE was shown to be essentially constant for 14 of the 17 sites, and was broadly consistent with the uWUE evaluated at the leaf scale. The annual T/ET was the highest for croplands, i.e., 0.69 for corn and 0.62 for soybean, followed by grasslands (0.60) and evergreen needle leaf forests (0.56), and was the lowest for deciduous broadleaf forests (0.52). The enhanced vegetation index (EVI) was shown to be significantly correlated with T/ET and could explain about 75% of the variation in T/ET among the 71 site-years. The coefficients of determination between EVI and T/ET were 0.84 and 0.82 for corn and soybean, respectively, and 0.77 for deciduous broadleaf forests and grasslands, but only 0.37 for evergreen needle leaf forests. This ET partitioning method is sound in principle and simple to apply in practice, and would enhance the value and role of global FLUXNET in estimating T/ET variations and monitoring ecosystem dynamics.

  18. Investigation of the geochemical evolution of groundwater under agricultural land: A case study in northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma-Ruiz, Rogelio; Pastén-Zapata, Ernesto; Parra, Roberto; Harter, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Zona Citrícola is an important area for Mexico due to its citriculture activity. Situated in a sub-humid to humid climate adjacent to the Sierra Madre Oriental, this valley hosts an aquifer system that represents sequences of shales, marls, conglomerates, and alluvial deposits. Groundwater flows from mountainous recharge areas to the basin-fill deposits and provides base flows to supply drinking water to the adjacent metropolitan area of Monterrey. Recent studies examining the groundwater quality of the study area urge the mitigation of groundwater pollution. The objective of this study was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the groundwater and to assess the processes controlling the groundwater's chemistry. Correlation was used to identify associations among various geochemical constituents. Factor analysis was applied to identify the water's chemical characteristics that were responsible for generating most of the variability within the dataset. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed in combination with a post-hoc analysis of variance to partition the water samples into hydrochemical water groups: recharge waters (Ca-HCO3), transition zone waters (Ca-HCO3-SO4 to Ca-SO4-HCO3) and discharge waters (Ca-SO4). Inverse geochemical models of these groups were developed and constrained using PHREEQC to elucidate the chemical reactions controlling the water's chemistry between an initial (recharge) and final water. The primary reactions contributing to salinity were the following: (1) water-rock interactions, including the weathering of evaporitic rocks and dedolomitization; (2) dissolution of soil gas carbon dioxide; and (3) input from animal/human wastewater and manure in combination with by denitrification processes. Contributions from silicate weathering to salinity ranged from less important to insignificant. The findings suggest that it may not be cost-effective to regulate manure application to mitigate groundwater pollution.

  19. Integrating Geochemical and Geodynamic Numerical Models of Mantle Evolution and Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Xie, S.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's mantle and plates are inextricably coupled by the plate tectonic - mantle convective system. Convection causes chemical differentiation, recycling and mixing, while chemical variations affect the convection through physical properties such as density and viscosity which depend on composition. It is now possible to construct numerical mantle convection models that track the thermo-chemical evolution of major and minor elements, and which can be used to test prospective models and hypotheses regarding Earth's chemical and thermal evolution. Model thermal and chemical structures can be compared to results from seismic tomography, while geochemical signatures (e.g., trace element ratios) can be compared to geochemical observations. The presented, two-dimensional model combines a simplified 2-component major element model with tracking of the most important trace elements, using a tracer method. Melting is self-consistently treated using a solidus, with melt placed on the surface as crust. Partitioning of trace elements occurs between melt and residue. Decaying heat-producing elements and secular cooling of the mantle and core provide the driving heat sources. Pseudo-plastic yielding of the lithosphere gives a first-order approximation of plate tectonics, and also allows planets with a rigid lid or intermittent plate tectonics to be modeled simply by increasing the yield strength. Preliminary models with an initially homogeneous mantle show that regions with a HIMU-like signature can be generated by crustal recycling, and regions with high 3He/4He ratios can be generated by residuum recycling. Outgassing of Argon is within the observed range. Models with initially layered mantles will also be investigated. In future it will be important to include a more realistic bulk compositional model that allows continental crust as well as oceanic crust to form, and to extend the model to three dimensions since toroidal flow may alter

  20. Geochemical processes between steel projectiles and silica-rich targets in hypervelocity impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Matthias; Hecht, Lutz; Deutsch, Alexander; Kenkmann, Thomas; Wirth, Richard; Berndt, Jasper

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of fractionation processes between projectile and target matter is critical with regard to the classification of the impactor type from geochemical analysis of impactites from natural craters. Here we present results of five hypervelocity MEMIN impact experiments (Poelchau et al., 2013) using the Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel D290-1 as projectile and two different silica-rich lithologies (Seeberger sandstone and Taunus quartzite) as target materials. Our study is focused on geochemical target-projectile interaction occurring in highly shocked and projectile-rich ejecta fragments. In all of the investigated impact experiments, whether sandstone or quartzite targets, the ejecta fragments show (i) shock-metamorphic features e.g., planar-deformation features (PDF) and the formation of silica glasses, (ii) partially melting of projectile and target, and (iii) significant mechanical and chemical mixing of the target rock with projectile material. The silica-rich target melts are strongly enriched in the "projectile tracer elements" Cr, V, and Fe, but have just minor enrichments of Co, W, and Mo. Inter-element ratios of these tracer elements within the contaminated target melts differ strongly from the original ratios in the steel. The fractionation results from differences in the reactivity of the respective elements with oxygen during interaction of the metal melt with silicate melt. Our results indicate that the principles of projectile-target interaction and associated fractionation do not depend on impact energies (at least for the selected experimental conditions) and water-saturation of the target. Partitioning of projectile tracer elements into the silicate target melt is much more enhanced in experiments with a non-porous quartzite target compared with the porous sandstone target. This is mainly the result of higher impact pressures, consequently higher temperatures and longer reaction times at high temperatures in the experiments with quartzite as

  1. Geochemical heterogeneities within the Crozet hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Thomas; Nauret, François; Pichat, Sylvain; Moine, Bertrand; Moreira, Manuel; Rose-Koga, Estelle F.; Auclair, Delphine; Bosq, Chantal; Wavrant, Laurène-Marie

    2013-08-01

    The Crozet Plateau is a 54 Ma-old volcanic plateau that supports five islands characterized by recent volcanic manifestations that are the surface expression of a deep-mantle plume. Due to their remote location and difficult access, the Crozet Islands are poorly sampled. Both the petrological descriptions and geochemical data are scarce. Thus, the sources of the Crozet plume are still under debate. Similarly, the interactions between the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) and the Crozet plume remain questioned. Here, we present a new set of isotopes (Pb, Sr, Nd and He), major and trace elements data on basalts from three islands of the Crozet Archipelago: Penguins, East, and Possession Islands. Our main purpose is to characterize the sources of the Crozet plume and to test its influence at regional scale. Two groups of lavas can be distinguished based on the isotopic data: East and Possession lavas, and Penguins lavas. Principal component analyses on our high-precision Pb isotopes data and literature data show that two mantle sources can explain most of the geochemical variability measured in Crozet lavas. A third minor contribution is however needed to fully explain the data. The entire set of isotopic compositions (Pb, Sr, Nd and He) can be explained by a mixing between three mantle sources: (1) a FOZO (Focus Zone) component, with 206Pb/204Pb higher than 19.5 and high 207Pb/204Pb, 208Pb/204Pb 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd and R/Ra (R/Ra=(He3/He4)sample/(He3/He4)atmosphere) ratios, that is mainly sampled Penguins lavas, (2) a component called “East-Possession” that is mostly sampled by the East-Possession lava group and which presents Pb, Sr and Nd isotope signatures similar to those of the Reunion-Mauritius Islands, and (3) a third minor contribution of the local Depleted MORB Mantle (DMM). The new He isotopes data on the Crozet plume allow us to propose that Crozet plume material is present in the segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge located between the Indomed (ITF

  2. Predictive Radiological Background Distributions from Geochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, D.; Burnley, P. C.; Marsac, K.; Malchow, R.

    2014-12-01

    Gamma ray surveys are an important tool for both national security interests as well as industry in determininglocations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radiologic material. The purpose ofthis project is to predict the radiologic exposure rate of geologic materials by creating a model using publishedgeochemical data, geologic data, GIS software, and freely available remote sensing data sets. If K, U, and Thabundance values are known for a given geologic unit, the expected radiation exposure rate can be calculated. Oneof the primary challenges surrounding this project is that alluvial units are classified by age rather than rock type. Itis therefore important to determine sediment sources and estimate their relative contribution to alluvial units.ASTER data from the Terra satellite can differentiate between surface mineralogies and can aid us in calculating therelative percentage of sediment from each source and by extension the geochemical concentrations of challengingsurfaces such as alluvium. An additional problem is that U and Th do not directly contribute to the measuredradiation exposure rate. Instead, daughter isotopes of these radioelements emit detectable gamma rays and may nothave reached equilibrium in younger surfaces. U can take up to 1.5 Ma to come to equilibrium with its daughterisotopes while Th takes only about 40 years. Further modeling with software such as Monte Carlo N-ParticleTransport from Los Alamos National Laboratory, will help us correct for this disequilibrium in our models. Once the predicted exposure rate is calculated for a geologic unit, it can then be assigned to a geographic area basedon geologic and geomorphic trends. This prediction will be subtracted from data collected through aerial surveys,effectively ignoring geology, and allowing areas of interest to be narrowed down considerably. The study areasinclude the alluvium on the west shore of Lake Mohave and Government Wash north of Lake Mead

  3. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  4. Inversion of hematocrit partition at microfluidic bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zaiyi; Coupier, Gwennou; Kaoui, Badr; Polack, Benoît; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi; Podgorski, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Partitioning of red blood cells (RBCs) at the level of bifurcations in the microcirculatory system affects many physiological functions yet it remains poorly understood. We address this problem by using T-shaped microfluidic bifurcations as a model. Our computer simulations and in vitro experiments reveal that the hematocrit (ϕ0) partition depends strongly on RBC deformability, as long as ϕ0<20% (within the normal range in microcirculation), and can even lead to complete deprivation of RBCs in a child branch. Furthermore, we discover a deviation from the Zweifach-Fung effect which states that the child branch with lower flow rate recruits less RBCs than the higher flow rate child branch. At small enough ϕ0, we get the inverse scenario, and the hematocrit in the lower flow rate child branch is even higher than in the parent vessel. We explain this result by an intricate up-stream RBC organization and we highlight the extreme dependence of RBC transport on geometrical and cell mechanical properties. These parameters can lead to unexpected behaviors with consequences on the microcirculatory function and oxygen delivery in healthy and pathological conditions.

  5. Approximate algorithms for partitioning and assignment problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of optimally assigning the modules of a parallel/pipelined program over the processors of a multiple computer system under certain restrictions on the interconnection structure of the program as well as the multiple computer system was considered. For a variety of such programs it is possible to find linear time if a partition of the program exists in which the load on any processor is within a certain bound. This method, when combined with a binary search over a finite range, provides an approximate solution to the partitioning problem. The specific problems considered were: a chain structured parallel program over a chain-like computer system, multiple chain-like programs over a host-satellite system, and a tree structured parallel program over a host-satellite system. For a problem with m modules and n processors, the complexity of the algorithm is no worse than O(mnlog(W sub T/epsilon)), where W sub T is the cost of assigning all modules to one processor and epsilon the desired accuracy.

  6. Unsupervised image categorization by hypergraph partition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuchi; Liu, Qingshan; Lv, Fengjun; Gong, Yihong; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2011-06-01

    We present a framework for unsupervised image categorization in which images containing specific objects are taken as vertices in a hypergraph and the task of image clustering is formulated as the problem of hypergraph partition. First, a novel method is proposed to select the region of interest (ROI) of each image, and then hyperedges are constructed based on shape and appearance features extracted from the ROIs. Each vertex (image) and its k-nearest neighbors (based on shape or appearance descriptors) form two kinds of hyperedges. The weight of a hyperedge is computed as the sum of the pairwise affinities within the hyperedge. Through all of the hyperedges, not only the local grouping relationships among the images are described, but also the merits of the shape and appearance characteristics are integrated together to enhance the clustering performance. Finally, a generalized spectral clustering technique is used to solve the hypergraph partition problem. We compare the proposed method to several methods and its effectiveness is demonstrated by extensive experiments on three image databases. PMID:21282850

  7. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  8. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  9. Ferrous iron partitioning in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Joshua M. R.; Brodholt, John P.

    2016-08-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) to examine the partitioning of ferrous iron between periclase and bridgmanite under lower mantle conditions. To study the effects of the three major variables - pressure, temperature and concentration - these have been varied from 0 to 150 GPa, from 1000 to 4000 K and from 0 to 100% total iron content. We find that increasing temperature increases KD, increasing iron concentration decreases KD, while pressure can both increase and decrease KD. We find that KD decreases slowly from about 0.32 to 0.06 with depth under lower mantle conditions. We also find that KD increases sharply to 0.15 in the very lowermost mantle due to the strong temperature increases near the CMB. Spin transitions have a large effect on the activity of ferropericlase which causes KD to vary with pressure in a peak-like fashion. Despite the apparently large changes in KD through the mantle, this actually results in relatively small changes in total iron content in the two phases, with XFefp ranging from about 0.20 to 0.35, before decreasing again to about 0.28 at the CMB, and XFebd has a pretty constant value of about 0.04-0.07 throughout the lower mantle. For the very high Fe concentrations suggested for ULVZs, Fe partitions very strongly into ferropericlase.

  10. Partitioning of on-demand electron pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubbelohde, Niels; Hohls, Frank; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs; Wagner, Timo; Fricke, Lukas; Kästner, Bernd; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W.; Haug, Rolf J.

    2015-01-01

    The on-demand generation and separation of entangled photon pairs are key components of quantum information processing in quantum optics. In an electronic analogue, the decomposition of electron pairs represents an essential building block for using the quantum state of ballistic electrons in electron quantum optics. The scattering of electrons has been used to probe the particle statistics of stochastic sources in Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiments and the recent advent of on-demand sources further offers the possibility to achieve indistinguishability between multiple sources in Hong-Ou-Mandel experiments. Cooper pairs impinging stochastically at a mesoscopic beamsplitter have been successfully partitioned, as verified by measuring the coincidence of arrival. Here, we demonstrate the splitting of electron pairs generated on demand. Coincidence correlation measurements allow the reconstruction of the full counting statistics, revealing regimes of statistically independent, distinguishable or correlated partitioning, and have been envisioned as a source of information on the quantum state of the electron pair. The high pair-splitting fidelity opens a path to future on-demand generation of spin-entangled electron pairs from a suitably prepared two-electron quantum-dot ground state.

  11. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Dexuan

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning together with an interprocessor data-communication technique. For the 5-point approximation to the Poisson equation on a square, we show that the ordering of the PSOR based on the strip partition leads to a consistently ordered matrix, and hence the PSOR and the SOR using the row-wise ordering have the same convergence rate. However, in general, the ordering used in PSOR may not be {open_quote}consistently ordered{close_quotes}. So, there is a need to analyze the convergence of PSOR directly. In this paper, we present a PSOR theory, and show that the PSOR method can have the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the corresponding sequential SOR method for a wide class of linear systems in which the matrix is {open_quotes}consistently ordered{close_quotes}. Finally, we demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different message passing multiprocessors (a KSR1, the Intel Delta, an Intel Paragon and an IBM SP2), along with a comparison with the point Red-Black and four-color SOR methods.

  12. A Combinatorial Partitioning Method to Identify Multilocus Genotypic Partitions That Predict Quantitative Trait Variation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, M.R.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Ferrell, R.E.; Sing, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in genome research have accelerated the process of locating candidate genes and the variable sites within them and have simplified the task of genotype measurement. The development of statistical and computational strategies to utilize information on hundreds — soon thousands — of variable loci to investigate the relationships between genome variation and phenotypic variation has not kept pace, particularly for quantitative traits that do not follow simple Mendelian patterns of inheritance. We present here the combinatorial partitioning method (CPM) that examines multiple genes, each containing multiple variable loci, to identify partitions of multilocus genotypes that predict interindividual variation in quantitative trait levels. We illustrate this method with an application to plasma triglyceride levels collected on 188 males, ages 20–60 yr, ascertained without regard to health status, from Rochester, Minnesota. Genotype information included measurements at 18 diallelic loci in six coronary heart disease–candidate susceptibility gene regions: APOA1-C3-A4, APOB, APOE, LDLR, LPL, and PON1. To illustrate the CPM, we evaluated all possible partitions of two-locus genotypes into two to nine partitions (∼106 evaluations). We found that many combinations of loci are involved in sets of genotypic partitions that predict triglyceride variability and that the most predictive sets show nonadditivity. These results suggest that traditional methods of building multilocus models that rely on statistically significant marginal, single-locus effects, may fail to identify combinations of loci that best predict trait variability. The CPM offers a strategy for exploring the high-dimensional genotype state space so as to predict the quantitative trait variation in the population at large that does not require the conditioning of the analysis on a prespecified genetic model. PMID:11230170

  13. Subcellular partitioning of metals in Aporrectodea caliginosa along a gradient of metal exposure in 31 field-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Beaumelle, Léa; Gimbert, Frédéric; Hedde, Mickaël; Guérin, Annie; Lamy, Isabelle

    2015-07-01

    Subcellular fractionation of metals in organisms was proposed as a better way to characterize metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the impact of a laboratory exposure to a wide range of field-metal contaminated soils on the subcellular partitioning of metals in the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa. Soils moderately contaminated were chosen to create a gradient of soil metal availability; covering ranges of both soil metal contents and of several soil parameters. Following exposure, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were determined both in total earthworm body and in three subcellular compartments: cytosolic, granular and debris fractions. Three distinct proxies of soil metal availability were investigated: CaCl2-extractable content dissolved content predicted by a semi-mechanistic model and free ion concentration predicted by a geochemical speciation model. Subcellular partitionings of Cd and Pb were modified along the gradient of metal exposure, while stable Zn partitioning reflected regulation processes. Cd subcellular distribution responded more strongly to increasing soil Cd concentration than the total internal content, when Pb subcellular distribution and total internal content were similarly affected. Free ion concentrations were better descriptors of Cd and Pb subcellular distribution than CaCl2 extractable and dissolved metal concentrations. However, free ion concentrations and soil total metal contents were equivalent descriptors of the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Pb because they were highly correlated. Considering lowly contaminated soils, our results raise the question of the added value of three proxies of metal availability compared to soil total metal content in the assessment of metal bioavailability to earthworm.

  14. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  15. A partitioning strategy for nonuniform problems on multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, M. J.; Bokhari, S.

    1985-01-01

    The partitioning of a problem on a domain with unequal work estimates in different subddomains is considered in a way that balances the work load across multiple processors. Such a problem arises for example in solving partial differential equations using an adaptive method that places extra grid points in certain subregions of the domain. A binary decomposition of the domain is used to partition it into rectangles requiring equal computational effort. The communication costs of mapping this partitioning onto different microprocessors: a mesh-connected array, a tree machine and a hypercube is then studied. The communication cost expressions can be used to determine the optimal depth of the above partitioning.

  16. A Framework for Parallel Nonlinear Optimization by Partitioning Localized Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, You; Chen, Yixin

    2008-06-28

    We present a novel parallel framework for solving large-scale continuous nonlinear optimization problems based on constraint partitioning. The framework distributes constraints and variables to parallel processors and uses an existing solver to handle the partitioned subproblems. In contrast to most previous decomposition methods that require either separability or convexity of constraints, our approach is based on a new constraint partitioning theory and can handle nonconvex problems with inseparable global constraints. We also propose a hypergraph partitioning method to recognize the problem structure. Experimental results show that the proposed parallel algorithm can efficiently solve some difficult test cases.

  17. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; García, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system.

  18. Geochemical heterogeneities in magma beneath Mount Etna recorded by 2001-2006 melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, Federica; Rosciglione, Alberto; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Katsura; Nakamura, Eizo; Nuccio, Pasquale Mario; Ottolini, Luisa; Paonita, Antonio; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    We present a geochemical study on olivine and clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) from 2001 to 2006 Etna basaltic lavas and pyroclastites. Three MI suites are distinguished on the basis of trace element fingerprinting. Type-1 MIs (from 2001 Upper South and 2002 Northeast vents) share their trace element signature with low-K lavas erupted before 1971. Critical trace element ratios (e.g., K/La, Ba/Nb), along with Pb isotope data of Type-1 MIs provide evidence for a heterogeneous mantle source resulting from mixing of three end-members with geochemical and isotopic characteristics of EM2, DMM, and HIMU components. Type-1 MIs composition does not support involvement of subduction-related components. Type-2 (from 2001 Lower and 2002 South vents) and Type-3 (2004 eruption) MIs reveal "ghost plagioclase signatures," namely lower concentrations in strongly incompatible elements, and positive Sr, Ba, and Eu anomalies. Both Type-1 and Type-2 MIs occur in 2006 olivines, which highlight the occurrence of mixing between Type-1 and Type-2 end-members. Type-2/Type-3 MIs testify to en route processes (plagioclase assimilation and volatile fluxing) peculiar for "deep dike fed" eruptions. The latter are strongly controlled by tectonics or flank instability that occasionally promote upraise of undegassed, more radiogenic primitive magma, which may interact with plagioclase-rich crystal mush/cumulates before erupting. Type-2/Type-3 MIs approach the less radiogenic Pb isotopic composition of plagioclase from prehistoric lavas, thus suggesting geochemical overprinting of present-day melts by older products released from distinct mantle sources. Our study emphasizes that MIs microanalysis offers new insights on both source characteristics and en route processes, allowing to a link between melt composition and magma dynamics.

  19. Constraining geochemistry and biological primary productivity in hydrothermal systems via in situ mass spectrometric geochemical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidoudez, Charles; Marcon, Yann; Bach, Wolfgang; Lebris, Nadine; Dubilier, Nicole; Girguis, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are biological hot spots, supported by chemoautotrophic primary productivity and achieving densities comparable to rainforests. Nevertheless, our understanding of the geochemical factors that govern the distribution of animals and microbes within vents is limited. It is well known that vent endemic organisms are found in specific vent "microenvironments", and that these microenvironments are distributed -coarsely speaking- in predictable patterns within a vent field. However, the relative differences in activity among these faunal patches, and their role in influencing geochemical flux remains largely unknown due to historical limitations in our ability to sample and quantify geochemical constituents with fine spatial resolution. In particular, the distribution of biologically important volatiles around vent fields is poorly constrained, as is the degree to which their distribution influences the destiny and distribution of organisms. To characterize the relationship between the distribution of volatiles, chemosynthetic microbes, and chemosynthetic symbioses, we generated detailed geo-referenced maps of methane, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and oxygen (four of the key volatiles that are both vent- and seawater derived) using an in situ mass spectrometer (ISMS). We characterized these concentrations in over 130 spots across three vent sites associated with the mid-Atlantic ridge in the Menez Gwen vent field. We quantified gases in sites ranging from hot fluids to mussel beds, and found notable relationships between the distribution and consumption of hydrogen sulfide and methane and the animal and microbial communities. Finally, we also developed a metabolic energy "map", which enables us to constrain both the potential energy that is available to these communities as well as the extent to which it is being used, and places constraints on the extent of primary production that can be supported by the realized use of these volatiles.

  20. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A.

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  1. Geochemical variations during the 2012 Emilia seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Cantucci, Barbara; Galli, Gianfranco; Cinti, Daniele; Pizzino, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Several geochemical surveys (soil gas and shallow water) were performed in the Modena province (Massa Finalese, Finale Emilia, Medolla and S. Felice sul Panaro), during 2006-2014 period. In May-June 2012, a seismic sequence (main shocks of ML 5.9 and 5.8) was occurred closely to the investigated area. In this area 300 CO2 and CH4 fluxes measurements, 150 soil gas concentrations (He, H2, CO2, CH4 and C2H6), 30 shallow waters and their isotopic analyses (δ13C- CH4, δD- CH4 and δ13C- CO2) were performed in April-May 2006, October and December 2008, repeated in May and September 2012, June 2013 and July 2014 afterwards the 2012 Emilia seismic sequences. Chemical composition of soil gas are dominated by CH4 in the southern part by CO2 in the northern part. Very anomalous fluxes and concentrations are recorded in spot areas; elsewhere CO2 and CH4 values are very low, within the typical range of vegetative and of organic exhalation of the cultivated soil. After the seismic sequence the CH4 and CO2 fluxes are increased of one order of magnitude in the spotty areas, whereas in the surrounding area the values are within the background. On the contrary, CH4 concentration decrease (40%v/v in the 2012 surveys) and CO2 concentration increase until to 12.7%v/v (2013 survey). Isotopic gas analysis were carried out only on samples with anomalous values. Pre-seismic data hint a thermogenic origin of CH4 probably linked to leakage from a deep source in the Medolla area. Conversely, 2012/2013 isotopic data indicate a typical biogenic origin (i.e. microbial hydrocarbon production) of the CH4, as recognized elsewhere in the Po Plain and surroundings. The δ13C-CO2 value suggests a prevalent shallow origin of CO2 (i.e. organic and/or soil-derived) probably related to anaerobic oxidation of heavy hydrocarbons. Water samples, collected from domestic, industrial and hydrocarbons exploration wells, allowed us to recognize different families of waters. Waters are meteoric in origin and

  2. Geochemical characterization of the Nirano Mud Volcano Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Cantucci, Barbara; Ricci, Tullio; Conventi, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    Mud volcanoes, among fluid venting structures, are the most important phenomena related to natural seepage from the Earth's surface. The occurrence of mud volcanoes is controlled by several factors, such as tectonic activity and continuous hydrocarbon accumulation in a reservoir. Mud volcanoes in Italy occur along the external compressive margin of the Apennine chain. These mud volcanoes are usually small and unspectacular, when compared to other world examples. They rarely exhibit the periodic explosions, which is often related to important seismic activity. The Nirano Mud Volcano Field (NMVF) is located in the western sector of the Modena Apennine margin (Italy), which belongs to the Northern Apennines. The NMVF occurs over the crest of a thrust anticline associated with the main Pede-Apennine thrust and represents a good example of an onshore relationship between a mud volcano caldera structure and active thrust deformation, even if the fluid pathways are still not well understood at depth. The mud volcanoes are distributed along an area of about 10 ha, inside of the wider Natural Reserve, and are situated at the bottom of a wide sub-circular depression. The NMVF is currently formed by four main vents composed of a number of individual active cones (or gryphons) defining structural alignments trending ENE-WSW. A geochemical soil gas survey of 230 CO2 and CH4 fluxes and 150 CO2, CH4, Rn, He, H2 concentration measurements has been carried out inside the NMVF. Moreover, the fluid emissions from 4 active cones located in different sectors of NMVF have been sampled for chemical and isotopical analysis of water and free gas. The distribution of pathfinder elements as 222Rn, He e H2 has been studied in order to identify potential faults and/or fractures related to preferential migration pathways and the possible interactions between reservoir and surface. Soil gas data highlight two zones characterized by higher values, localized in the WSW and ENE of the NMVF area. In

  3. Isotopic partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange reveals the importance of methane oxidation in a boreal peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselquist, Niles; Peichl, Matthias; Öquist, Mats; Crill, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Partitioning net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) into its different flux components is crucial as it provides a mechanistic framework to better assess how the terrestrial carbon cycle may respond to projected environmental change. This is especially important for northern boreal peatlands, which store approximately one-quarter of the world's soil carbon and yet at the same time are projected to experience some of the greatest environmental changes in the future. Using an experimental setup with automated chambers for measuring NEE (transparent chambers), ecosystem respiration (Reco; opaque chambers) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh; opaque chambers on vegetation-free trenched plots) in combination with continuous measurements of δ13C using near-infrared, diode-laser-based cavity-ring down spectroscopy (Picarro G1101-i analyzer), we partitioned NEE of CO2 into gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Reco), heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and autotrophic respiration (Ra) using two different approaches (i.e., chamber- and isotope-based methods) in a boreal peatland in northern Sweden (Degerö). Given that δ13C was continuously measured in each chamber, we were also able to further partition Rh into soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization by saprotrophic microbes and the oxidation of methane (CH4) by methanotrophic bacteria. During the ten day measurement period (in late July 2014), the average daily NEE flux at the mire was -0.6 g C m-2 d-1. Overall, the two partitioning approaches yielded similar estimates for the different NEE component fluxes. Average daily fluxes of Rh and Ra were similar in magnitude, yet these two flux components showed contrasting diurnal responses: Ra was greatest during the day whereas there was little diurnal variation in Rh. In general, average 13C signature of CO2 efflux from the Rh chambers (-41.1 ± 0.6 ‰) was between the 13C signature of SOM (-25.8 ± 0.6 ‰) and CH4 in pore water (-69.0 ± 0.8 ‰). Assuming that

  4. Geochemical Aspects of Radioactive Waste Disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Judith B.

    1984-04-01

    The author's stated purpose in writing this book is to summarize the large number of government-sponsored research reports on the geochemical aspects of high-level nuclear waste isolation. Although this book has a 1984 publication date, the majority of the cited documents were published before 1982. Unfortunately, passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 and its signing into law by President Reagan (January 1983) [U.S. Congress, 1983] has significantly altered the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program. Therefore this book does not accurately reflect the present U.S. program in geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. For example, chapter 2, “Radioactive Waste Management,” is almost 3 years out of date in a field that is changing rapidly (see U.S. DOE [1984a] for the current status of the CRWM Program). Additionally, the source material, which forms the input for this book, is chiefly grey literature, i.e., the referenced documents may or may not have undergone peer review and therefore do not represent the technical judgment of the scientific community. Also, this book only presents a selective sampling of information because the literature cited does not include a representative selection of the widespread available literature on this topic.

  5. Constraining Habitable Environments on Mars by Quantifying Available Geochemical Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, L. L.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    The search for life on Mars includes the availability of liquid water, access to biogenic elements and an energy source. In the past, when water was more abundant on Mars, a source of energy may have been the limiting factor for potential life. Energy, either from photosynthesis or chemosynthesis, is required in order to drive metabolism. Potential martian organisms most likely took advantage of chemosynthetic reactions at and below the surface. Terrestrial chemolithoautotrophs, for example, thrive off of chemical disequilibrium that exists in many environments and use inorganic redox (reduction-oxidation) reactions to drive metabolism and create cellular biomass. The chemical disequilibrium of six different martian environments were modeled in this study and analyzed incorporating a range of water and rock compositions, water:rock mass ratios, atmospheric fugacities, pH, and temperatures. All of these models can be applied to specific sites on Mars including environments similar to Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater. Both a mass transfer geochemical model of groundwater-basalt interaction and a mixing model of groundwater-hydrothermal fluid interaction were used to estimate hypothetical martian fluid compositions that results from mixing over the entire reaction path. By determining the overall Gibbs free energy yields for redox reactions in the H-O-C-S-Fe-Mn system, the amount of geochemical energy that was available for potential chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms was quantified and the amount of biomass that could have been sustained was estimated. The quantity of biomass that can be formed and supported within a system depends on energy availability, thus sites that have higher levels and fluxes of energy have greater potential to support life. Results show that iron- and sulfur-oxidation reactions would have been the most favorable redox reactions in aqueous systems where groundwater and rock interacted at or near the surface. These types of reactions could

  6. Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates (COFFEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Charlie; Jan, Dastugue; Jackie, May; Rowley, Clark; Smith, Scott; Spence, Peter; Gremes-Cordero, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the evolution of ocean temperature in regional ocean models depends on estimates of surface heat fluxes and upper-ocean processes over the forecast period. Within the COFFEE project (Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates, real-time satellite observations are used to estimate shortwave, longwave, sensible, and latent air-sea heat flux corrections to a background estimate from the prior day's regional or global model forecast. These satellite-corrected fluxes are used to prepare a corrected ocean hindcast and to estimate flux error covariances to project the heat flux corrections for a 3-5 day forecast. In this way, satellite remote sensing is applied to not only inform the initial ocean state but also to mitigate errors in surface heat flux and model representations affecting the distribution of heat in the upper ocean. While traditional assimilation of sea surface temperature (SST) observations re-centers ocean models at the start of each forecast cycle, COFFEE endeavors to appropriately partition and reduce among various surface heat flux and ocean dynamics sources. A suite of experiments in the southern California Current demonstrates a range of COFFEE capabilities, showing the impact on forecast error relative to a baseline three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation using operational global or regional atmospheric forcing. Experiment cases combine different levels of flux calibration with assimilation alternatives. The cases use the original fluxes, apply full satellite corrections during the forecast period, or extend hindcast corrections into the forecast period. Assimilation is either baseline 3DVAR or standard strong-constraint 4DVAR, with work proceeding to add a 4DVAR expanded to include a weak constraint treatment of the surface flux errors. Covariance of flux errors is estimated from the recent time series of forecast and calibrated flux terms. While the California Current examples are shown, the approach is

  7. Superradiance and flux conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as superradiance still continue to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that superradiance in a quantum field theory context is not the same as superradiance (superfluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux nonconservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of superradiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both superradiance and damping.

  8. Flux amplification in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodestro, Lynda; Hooper, E. B.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Wood, R. D.; McLean, H. S.

    2007-11-01

    Flux amplification---the ratio of poloidal flux enclosed between the magnetic and geometric axes to that between the separatrix and the geometric axis---is a key measure of efficiency for edge-current-driven spheromaks. With the new, modular capacitor bank, permitting flexible programming of the gun current, studies of flux amplification under various drive scenarios can be performed. Analysis of recent results of pulsed operation with the new bank finds an efficiency ˜ 0.2, in selected shots, of the conversion of gun energy to confined magnetic energy during the pulses, and suggests a route toward sustained efficiency at 0.2. Results of experiments, a model calculation of field build-up, and NIMROD simulations exploring this newly suggested scenario will be presented.

  9. Geochemical and isotopic water results, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Heikoop, Jeff; Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent

    2012-07-18

    Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

  10. Toxicity of major geochemical ions to freshwater species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive testing regarding the toxicity of major geochemical ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Hyalella azteca, and Pimephales promelas will be presented. For C. dubia, tests of single salts and binary mixtures in various dilution waters demonstrated multiple mechanisms of toxicity an...

  11. Man as an object of geochemical and geophysical influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilova, Irina

    There are an increasing number of papers in the last years that evidence of a correlation between geochemical and geophysical factors and human health parameters and human behaviour. The basic factors that could affect human health and behaviour are: the geochemical composition of the geographical environment; the tectonic processes; the geomagnetic field variations (GMV), the climatic changes and the changes of the solar activity as well as the fact that all of them could influence mutually each other. The subject of this paper is the theoretical basis of the geochemical and geophysical influences on human health. The biological mechanisms according to which the geomagnetic field influences the psychological and behavioural reactions of people are not highlighted or identified yet. We present some of the existing suggestions and theories trying to explain these mechanisms. The studies performed in this area and the obtained results will be very useful in developing measures to protect man from the harmful influence of geochemical and geophysical factors.

  12. Serpentinization and Carbonation on Mars: A Geochemical Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultel, B.; Klein, F.; Andréani, M.; Quantin, C.

    2014-07-01

    We use geochemical models to reproduce the alteration of typical martian rocks to assess the thermodynamical conditions that may have lead to the formation of Fe-Mg-phyllosilicates and carbonates, a common assemblage found in previous studies.

  13. Geochemical Anomalies and Rock Coatings on Mars: Significance to MSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. C.; Gellert, R.

    2016-08-01

    Mars rover missions [Spirit (MER-A), Opportunity (MER-B), Curiosity (MSL)] have discovered unexpected geochemical extremes from aqueous alteration. Coatings and certain trace elements show large enrichment's well beyond magmatic differentiation.

  14. Preliminary geochemical/geophysical model of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwade, L.E.; Cederberg, G.A.

    1987-12-31

    A comprehensive geochemical/geophysical model incorporates the current and relevant stratigraphic, petrologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and material data associated with a candidate repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A geochemical/geophysical model will provide support and confidence to the Systems Performance calculations, determine whether the data collected as part of the site characterization provide the information needed by the design and performance assessment task, and provide the most accurate and referenced foundation on which to base the radionuclide transport calculations. In this report, the known repository data are compiled and unknown parameter values are estimated based on the available data. It is concluded that more data are needed before the geochemical/geophysical model of Yucca Mountain can be regarded as satisfactory and suitable base for multidimensional predicative flow and transport simulations. Recommendations for future studies concerning site characterization and data acquisition are presented. 36 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Geochemical data for Colorado soils-Results from the 2006 state-scale geochemical survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.; Kilburn, James E.

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, soil samples were collected at 960 sites (1 site per 280 square kilometers) throughout the state of Colorado. These samples were collected from a depth of 0-15 centimeters and, following a near-total multi-acid digestion, were analyzed for a suite of more than 40 major and trace elements. The resulting data set provides a baseline for the natural variation in soil geochemistry for Colorado and forms the basis for detecting changes in soil composition that might result from natural processes or anthropogenic activities. This report describes the sampling and analytical protocols used and makes available all the soil geochemical data generated in the study.

  16. Modeling the Impact of Biogeochemical Hotspots and Hot Moments on Subsurface Carbon Fluxes from a Flood Plain Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Spycher, N.; Steefel, C. I.; King, E.; Conrad, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots and hot moments are known to account for a high percentage of carbon and nutrient cycling within flood plain environments. To quantify the impact of these hotspots and hot moments on the carbon cycle, a 2D reactive transport model was developed for the saturated-unsaturated zone of a flood plain site in Rifle, CO. Previous studies have identified naturally reduced zones (NRZs) in the saturated zone of the Rifle site to be hotspots and important regions for subsurface biogeochemical cycling. Wavelet analysis of geochemical concentrations at the site suggested that hydrologic and temperature variations are hot moments and exert an important control on biogeochemical conditions in the Rifle aquifer. Here, we describe the development of a reactive transport model that couples hydrologic and biogeochemical processes to microbial functional distributions inferred from site-specific 'omic' data. The model includes microbial contributions from heterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic processes. We use Monod based formulations to represent biomass formation and consider energy partitioning between catabolic and anabolic processes. We use this model to explore community emergence at the Rifle site and further constrain the extent and rates of nutrient uptake as well as abiotic and biotic reactions using stable carbon isotopes. Results from 2D model simulations with only abiotic reactions predict lower CO2 partial pressures in the unsaturated zone and severely underpredict (~200%) carbon fluxes to the river compared to simulations with chemolithoautotrophic pathways. δ13C-CO2 profiles also point to biotic sources for the locally observed high CO2 concentrations above NRZs. Results further indicate that groundwater carbon fluxes from the Rifle site to the river are underestimated by almost 180% (to 3.3 g m-2 d-1) when temperature fluctuations are ignored in the simulations. Preliminary results demonstrate the emergence of denitrifiers at specific depths

  17. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  18. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements. PMID:26082786

  19. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  20. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  1. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  2. Understanding the Hydrological Controls on the Water Chemistry at the Watershed Scale Using an Integrated Hydro-Thermo-Geochemical Model PIHM-RT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, C.; Li, L.; Shi, Y.; Qiao, C.; Sullivan, P. L.; Brantley, S. L.; Duffy, C.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrological and geochemical processes are intricately coupled at the watershed scale. Despite recent advances, modeling the complex hydro-thermo-geochemical interactions at the watershed scale has been challenging. Many efforts have been put forward to solve the well-known puzzles such as the 'double paradox ' raised by Kirchner either mechanistically or through simplified numerical modeling. However, a major gap remains in explicitly modeling and integrating these processes at the watershed scale. This work presents an integrated approach to understanding and quantifying the hydrologic controls on water chemistry at the watershed scale. A fully coupled finite volume hydro -thermo-geochemical model, PIHM-RT (Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model -Reactive Transport) has been developed based on the land surface hydrologic model, Flux-PIHM. Flux-PIHM is capable of simulating the terrestrial water cycle and the surface energy balance (SEB) to reproduce the spatially distributed observations of water, temperature, and saturation . Adding the reactive transport module enables explicit modeling of the evolving water chemistry, which is controlled by hydrologic processes and geochemical reactions. The reactions include mineral dissolution, precipitation and ion exchange. PIHM-RT utilizes an a priori database EQ3EQ6 that is widely used for geochemical thermodynamics and kinetics. The RT module utilizes an operator splitting scheme described in Zysset et al. (1994), to solve for the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADR). The advection dispersion equation was solved using the Euler forward method and the reaction process was solved implicitly. In addition, because the reaction and transport processes differ significantly between the unsaturated and saturated zones, we implemented a volume explicit mass conservation law to account for the variable depth of groundwater and the mixing process involved at the boundary between the saturated and unsaturated zone. The use

  3. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fisher, J. B.; Jung, M.; Kanamitsu, M.; Reichle, R. H.; Reichstein, M.; Rodell, M.; Sheffield, J.; Tu, K.; Wang, K.

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  4. Surface Energy Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.; Vukovich, Fred M.; Pontikes, Elizabeth G.

    1997-01-01

    Realistic estimates of surface energy heat fluxes are needed for the study of water and energy interactions between the land and atmosphere. The primary objective of this work is to study the estimation of surface heat energy fluxes using remote sensing derived parameters under different spatial and temporal conditions. Surface energy fluxes and remote sensing derived data from two sources were analyzed. First, we used surface heat flux, remote sensing, and ancillary data from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), mapped at a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid. Second, we used NOAA AVHRR (1 km), weather station, and ancillary data to derive estimates of surface latent and sensible heat energy fluxes over a 100 sq kilometers area for three test sites: 1) First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) grassland site, Konza Prairie, Kansas; 2) Howland, Maine Forest Ecosystem Dynamics Site; and 3) Walnut Gulch, scrubland site, surrounding Tombstone, Arizona. Satellite derived estimates of land surface temperature, surface albedo, and spectral vegetation index are used in selected models to provide estimates of surface heat fluxes. Analysis of results from the 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid for North America indicated there were similar, overall correlations between sensible and latent heat energy fluxes versus remotely sensed vegetation index and ground temperature during dry and wet year conditions. However, there were significant differences in correlations between years when stratified by land cover class. Analysis of 100 km x 100 km data (1 km resolution) indicated partitioning the areas in to primary versus secondary cover, with the secondary cover comprising less than 5% of the area, significantly improved surface heat energy flux estimates.

  5. Interspecific resource partitioning in sympatric ursids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belant, J.L.; Kielland, K.; Follmann, E.H.; Adams, L.G.

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental niche of a species is rarely if ever realized because the presence of other species restricts it to a narrower range of ecological conditions. The effects of this narrower range of conditions define how resources are partitioned. Resource partitioning has been inferred but not demonstrated previously for sympatric ursids. We estimated assimilated diet in relation to body condition (body fat and lean and total body mass) and reproduction for sympatric brown bears (Ursus arctos) and American black bears (U. americanus) in southcentral Alaska, 1998-2000. Based on isotopic analysis of blood and keratin in claws, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) predominated in brown bear diets (>53% annually) whereas black bears assimilated 0-25% salmon annually. Black bears did not exploit salmon during a year with below average spawning numbers, probably because brown bears deterred black bear access to salmon. Proportion of salmon in assimilated diet was consistent across years for brown bears and represented the major portion of their diet. Body size of brown bears in the study area approached mean body size of several coastal brown bear populations, demonstrating the importance of salmon availability to body condition. Black bears occurred at a comparable density (mass:mass), but body condition varied and was related directly to the amount of salmon assimilated in their diet. Both species gained most lean body mass during spring and all body fat during summer when salmon were present. Improved body condition (i.e., increased percentage body fat) from salmon consumption reduced catabolism of lean body mass during hibernation, resulting in better body condition the following spring. Further, black bear reproduction was directly related to body condition; reproductive rates were reduced when body condition was lower. High body fat content across years for brown bears was reflected in consistently high reproductive levels. We suggest that the fundamental niche of black bears

  6. Interspecific resource partitioning in sympatric ursids.

    PubMed

    Belant, Jerrold L; Kielland, Knut; Follmann, Erich H; Adams, Layne G

    2006-12-01

    The fundamental niche of a species is rarely if ever realized because the presence of other species restricts it to a narrower range of ecological conditions. The effects of this narrower range of conditions define how resources are partitioned. Resource partitioning has been inferred but not demonstrated previously for sympatric ursids. We estimated assimilated diet in relation to body condition (body fat and lean and total body mass) and reproduction for sympatric brown bears (Ursus arctos) and American black bears (U. americanus) in south-central Alaska, 1998-2000. Based on isotopic analysis of blood and keratin in claws, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) predominated in brown bear diets (> 53% annually) whereas black bears assimilated 0-25% salmon annually. Black bears did not exploit salmon during a year with below average spawning numbers, probably because brown bears deterred black bear access to salmon. Proportion of salmon in assimilated diet was consistent across years for brown bears and represented the major portion of their diet. Body size of brown bears in the study area approached mean body size of several coastal brown bear populations, demonstrating the importance of salmon availability to body condition. Black bears occurred at a comparable density (mass:mass), but body condition varied and was related directly to the amount of salmon assimilated in their diet. Both species gained most lean body mass during spring and all body fat during summer when salmon were present. Improved body condition (i.e., increased percentage body fat) from salmon consumption reduced catabolism of lean body mass during hibernation, resulting in better body condition the following spring. Further, black bear reproduction was directly related to body condition; reproductive rates were reduced when body condition was lower. High body fat content across years for brown bears was reflected in consistently high reproductive levels. We suggest that the fundamental niche of black

  7. The CORSAGE Programme: Continuous Orbital Remote Sensing of Archipelagic Geochemical Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, J. G.; Brown, C. W.; Hine, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    Current and pending oceanographic remote sensing technology allows the conceptualization of a programme designed to investigate ocean island interactions that could induce short-term nearshore fluxes of particulate organic carbon and biogenic calcium carbonate from pelagic island archipelagoes. These events will influence the geochemistry of adjacent waters, particularly the marine carbon system. Justification and design are provided for a study that would combine oceanographic satellite remote sensing (visible and infrared radiometry, altimetry and scatterometry) with shore-based facilities. A programme incorporating the methodology outlined here would seek to identify the mechanisms that cause such events, assess their geochemical significance, and provide both analytical and predictive capabilities for observations on greater temporal and spatial scales.

  8. [Research advances in ecosystem flux].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Peng, Zhenhua; Qi, Lianghua; Zhou, Jinxing

    2005-10-01

    To develop the long-term localized observation and investigation on ecosystem flux is of great importance. On the basis of generalizing the concepts and connotations of ecosystem flux, this paper introduced the construction and development histories of Global Flux Networks, Regional Flux Networks (Ameri-Flux, Euro-Flux and Asia-Flux) and China-Flux, as well as the main methodologies, including micrometeorological methods (such as eddy correlation method, mass balance method, energy balance method and air dynamic method)and chamber methods (static and dynamic chamber methods), and their basic operation principles. The research achievements, approaches and advances of CO2, N2O, CH4, and heat fluxes in forest ecosystem, farmland ecosystem, grassland ecosystem and water ecosystem were also summarized. In accordance with the realities and necessities of ecosystem flux research in China, some suggestions and prospects were put forward.

  9. Carbon partitioning to the terpenoid biosynthetic pathway enables heterologous β-phellandrene production in Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Melis, Anastasios

    2014-12-01

    Escherichia coli was used as a microbial system for the heterologous synthesis of β-phellandrene, a monoterpene of plant origin with several potential commercial applications. Expression of Lavandula angustifolia β-phellandrene synthase (PHLS), alone or in combination with Picea abies geranyl-diphosphate synthase in E. coli, resulted in no β-phellandrene accumulation, in sharp contrast to observations with PHLS-transformed cyanobacteria. Lack of β-phellandrene biosynthesis in E. coli was attributed to the limited endogenous carbon partitioning through the native 2-C-methylerythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Heterologous co-expression of the mevalonic acid pathway, enhancing cellular carbon partitioning and flux toward the universal isoprenoid precursors, isopentenyl-diphosphate and dimethylallyl-diphosphate, was required to confer β-phellandrene production. Differences in endogenous carbon flux toward the synthesis of isoprenoids between photosynthetic (Synechocystis) and non-photosynthetic bacteria (E. coli) are discussed in terms of differences in the regulation of carbon partitioning through the MEP biosynthetic pathway in the two systems. PMID:25116411

  10. Environmental Controls of Microbial Resource Partitioning in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandeler, Ellen; Poll, Christian; Kramer, Susanne; Mueller, Karolin; Marhan, Sven

    2015-04-01

    The mineralization and flow of plant-derived carbon in soils is relevant to global carbon cycling. Current models of organismic carbon fluxes in soil assume that separate bacterial and fungal energy channels exist in soil. Recent studies disentangle the herbivore and detritivore pathways of microbial resource use, identify the key players contributing to these two different pathways, and determine to what extent microbial substrate use is affected by environmental controls. To follow the kinetics of litter and root decomposition and to quantify the contribution of key players, it is necessary to use isotopic approaches like PLFA-SIP and ergosterol-SIP. It was shown that bacteria and sugar consuming fungi initiated litter decomposition in an incubation experiment during the first two weeks, whereas higher fungi started to grow after the depletion of low molecular weight substrates. Analyses of PLFA-SIP revealed, for example, that fungi assimilated C directly from the litter, whereas bacteria took up substrates in the soil and therefore depended more on external transport processes than fungi. In addition, we will present data from a field experiment showing the incorporation of root and shoot litter C into organic and microbial C pools under field conditions over a period of two years. Similar amounts of C derived from the two resources differing in substrate quality and amount were incorporated into microbial C and ergosterol pools over time, indicating the importance of root-derived C for the soil food web. High incorporation of maize C (up to 76%) into ergosterol suggests fast and high assimilation of maize C into fungal biomass. Nevertheless, there is still a debate whether bacteria, archaea and fungi start feeding on new substrates at the same time or if their activity occurs at different successional stages. This presentation gives a summery of current knowledge on microbial resource partitioning under lab and field conditions.

  11. Quantitative framework for preferential flow initiation and partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.

    2016-01-01

    A model for preferential flow in macropores is based on the short-range spatial distribution of soil matrix infiltrability. It uses elementary areas at two different scales. One is the traditional representative elementary area (REA), which includes a sufficient heterogeneity to typify larger areas, as for measuring field-scale infiltrability. The other, called an elementary matrix area (EMA), is smaller, but large enough to represent the local infiltrability of soil matrix material, between macropores. When water is applied to the land surface, each EMA absorbs water up to the rate of its matrix infiltrability. Excess water flows into a macropore, becoming preferential flow. The land surface then can be represented by a mesoscale (EMA-scale) distribution of matrix infiltrabilities. Total preferential flow at a given depth is the sum of contributions from all EMAs. Applying the model, one case study with multi-year field measurements of both preferential and diffuse fluxes at a specific depth was used to obtain parameter values by inverse calculation. The results quantify the preferential–diffuse partition of flow from individual storms that differed in rainfall amount, intensity, antecedent soil water, and other factors. Another case study provided measured values of matrix infiltrability to estimate parameter values for comparison and illustrative predictions. These examples give a self-consistent picture from the combination of parameter values, directions of sensitivities, and magnitudes of differences caused by different variables. One major practical use of this model is to calculate the dependence of preferential flow on climate-related factors, such as varying soil wetness and rainfall intensity.

  12. Benthic foraminiferal micro-ecology and the geochemical environments they sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Brittani; Loubere, Paul; Yavorska, Iryna; Klitgaard-Kristensen, Dorthe; Jernas, Patrycja

    2010-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera inhabit, and are adapted to, microenvironments ranging from within the water column to centimeters into the sediments. These influence the geochemistry of the foraminiferal shell, and the paleoceanographic tracers we extract from that geochemistry. For a number of proxies it is important to know what geochemical environments the foraminifera are calcifying in, and whether species are consistent in the habitats they select for calcification. We examine these issues by sampling pore water chemistry and living species distributions on the microscale that the foraminifera themselves experience. We maintained cores from the Norwegian margin under in-situ conditions while measuring oxygen microprofiles and small scale sampling for foraminifera using rose Bengal and cell tracker green staining. In addition we sampled cores for porosity and pore water carbon isotopes using two extraction techniques so as to measure isotope profiles and degree of sediment irrigation via infaunal structures. The primary forcing variable we examined was changing labile organic carbon flux to the seabed. Under moderate to higher fluxes we found evidence for extensive bio-irrigation which influenced the composition of pore waters and microhabitats available to foraminifera. Macro-meiofaunal burrows and tubes produced a mosaic of pore water geochemical conditions rather than smooth gradients from the sediment-water interface. We found species adapted to particular conditions living at various subsurface depths, where their preferred conditions existed. We also found evidence that foraminiferal species responded to larger organism activities (feeding activities) and products (fecal deposits). It appears that taxa select for particular conditions rather than simply living at specific subsurface depths, recording whatever geochemistry happens to exist at that level.

  13. Concerning evaluation of eco-geochemical background in remediation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The geochemical concept of biosphere developed by V.I. Vernadsky states the geological role of the living organisms in the course of their active chemical interaction with the inert matter (Vernadsky, 1926, 1960). Basing on this theory it is reasonable to suggest that coevolution of living organisms and their environment led to development of the dynamically stable biogeocenoses precisely adequate to their geochemical environment. Soil cover was treated by V.I. Vernadsky as a balanced bio-inert matter resulting from this interaction. Appearance of human mind and then a civilization led to global expansion of human beings, first able to survive in unfavorable geochemical conditions and then starting chemical transformation of the environment to satisfy the growing demands of mankind in food and energy. The residence in unfavorable environment and local contamination was followed by appearance of endemic diseases of plants, animals and man. Therefore zonal, regional and local chemical composition of the soil cover formed in natural conditions may be used for estimation of the optimum geochemical background, most adequate for the corresponding zonal biogeocenoses and species. Moreover, the natural geochemical background and technogenic fields have unequal spatial structure and this facilitates their identification that may be relatively easy realized in remediation strategy. On the assumption of the foregoing, the adequate methodical approach to remediation of technogenically affected areas should account of the interaction of the existing natural and the newly formed technogenic geochemical fields and include the following steps: 1) the study and mapping of geochemical structure of the natural geochemical background basing on soil maps; 2) the study of contaminants and mapping spatial distribution of technogenic releases; 3) construction of risk maps for the target risk groups with due regard to natural ecological threshold concentration in context of risk degree for

  14. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; Hummel, Eric; Da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Chakraborty, Romy; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Karaoz, Ulas; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-09-22

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13-26% of available metabolites, with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. In conclusion, these results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity.

  15. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; Hummel, Eric; Da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Chakraborty, Romy; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Karaoz, Ulas; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-01-01

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13−26% of available metabolites, with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. These results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity. PMID:26392107

  16. Partitional Classification: A Complement to Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Marc; Dassy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The tree of life is currently an active object of research, though next to vertical gene transmission non vertical gene transfers proved to play a significant role in the evolutionary process. To overcome this difficulty, trees of life are now constructed from genes hypothesized vital, on the assumption that these are all transmitted vertically. This view has been challenged. As a frame for this discussion, we developed a partitional taxonomical system clustering taxa at a high taxonomical rank. Our analysis (1) selects RNase P RNA sequences of bacterial, archaeal, and eucaryal genera from genetic databases, (2) submits the sequences, aligned, to k-medoid analysis to obtain clusters, (3) establishes the correspondence between clusters and taxa, (4) constructs from the taxa a new type of taxon, the genetic community (GC), and (5) classifies the GCs: Archaea–Eukaryotes contrastingly different from the six others, all bacterial. The GCs would be the broadest frame to carry out the phylogenies. PMID:27346943

  17. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; Hummel, Eric; Da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Chakraborty, Romy; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Karaoz, Ulas; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; et al

    2015-09-22

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13-26% of available metabolites,more » with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. In conclusion, these results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity.« less

  18. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  19. Partitioned-Interval Quantum Optical Communications Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The proposed quantum receiver in this innovation partitions each binary signal interval into two unequal segments: a short "pre-measurement" segment in the beginning of the symbol interval used to make an initial guess with better probability than 50/50 guessing, and a much longer segment used to make the high-sensitivity signal detection via field-cancellation and photon-counting detection. It was found that by assigning as little as 10% of the total signal energy to the pre-measurement segment, the initial 50/50 guess can be improved to about 70/30, using the best available measurements such as classical coherent or "optimized Kennedy" detection.

  20. Recursive Partitioning Method on Competing Risk Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Che, Jiahua; Kong, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In some cancer clinical studies, researchers have interests to explore the risk factors associated with competing risk outcomes such as recurrence-free survival. We develop a novel recursive partitioning framework on competing risk data for both prognostic and predictive model constructions. We define specific splitting rules, pruning algorithm, and final tree selection algorithm for the competing risk tree models. This methodology is quite flexible that it can corporate both semiparametric method using Cox proportional hazards model and parametric competing risk model. Both prognostic and predictive tree models are developed to adjust for potential confounding factors. Extensive simulations show that our methods have well-controlled type I error and robust power performance. Finally, we apply both Cox proportional hazards model and flexible parametric model for prognostic tree development on a retrospective clinical study on oropharyngeal cancer patients. PMID:27486300