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Sample records for fm laser radar

  1. Generating nonlinear FM chirp waveforms for radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Nonlinear FM waveforms offer a radar matched filter output with inherently low range sidelobes. This yields a 1-2 dB advantage in Signal-to-Noise Ratio over the output of a Linear FM waveform with equivalent sidelobe filtering. This report presents design and implementation techniques for Nonlinear FM waveforms.

  2. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  3. Laser Radar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Laser and radar instruments aboard NASA aircraft provide measurements of the snow and ice surface and down to the bedrock under the ice. Lasers, with a shorter wavelength, measure the surface eleva...

  4. Analysis of chaotic FM system synchronization for bistatic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Chandra S.; Verdin, Berenice; Flores, Benjamin C.; Boehm, James; Debroux, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    We propose a scheme for bistatic radar that uses a chaotic system to generate a wideband FM signal that is reconstructed at the receiver via a conventional phase lock loop. The setup for the bistatic radar includes a 3 state variable drive oscillator at the transmitter and a response oscillator at the receiver. The challenge is in synchronizing the response oscillator of the radar receiver utilizing a scaled version of the transmitted signal sr(t, x) = αst(t, x) where x is one of three driver oscillator state variables and α is the scaling factor that accounts for antenna gain, system losses, and space propagation. For FM, we also assume that the instantaneous frequency of the received signal, xs, is a scaled version of the Lorenz variable x. Since this additional scaling factor may not be known a priori, the response oscillator must be able to accept the scaled version of x as an input. Thus, to achieve synchronization we utilize a generalized projective synchronization technique that introduces a controller term -μe where μ is a control factor and e is the difference between the response state variable xs and a scaled x. Since demodulation of sr(t) is required to reconstruct the chaotic state variable x, the phase lock loop imposes a limit on the minimum error e. We verify through simulations that, once synchronization is achieved, the short-time correlation of x and xs is high and that the self-noise in the correlation is negligible over long periods of time.

  5. Forensic Application of FM-CW and Pulse Radar

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Koppenjan; R. S. Freeland; M. L. Miller; R. E. Yoder

    2003-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology has supplied vital assistance in criminal investigations. However, law enforcement personnel desire further developments such that the technology is rapidly deployable, and that it provides both a simple user interface and sophisticated target identification. To assist in the development of target identification algorithms, our efforts involve gathering background GPR data for the various site conditions and circumstances that often typify clandestine burials. For this study, forensic anthropologists established shallow-grave plots at The University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) that are specific to GPR research. These plots contain donated human cadavers lying in various configurations and depths, surrounded by assorted construction material and backfill debris. We scanned the plots using two GPR technologies: (1) a multi-frequency synthetic-aperture FM-CW radar (200-700 MHz) (GPR-X) developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Special Technologies Laboratory (STL), Bechtel Nevada (Koppenjan et al., 2000), and (2) a commercial pulse radar (SIR-20) manufactured by Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc. (400 and 900 MHz)(GSSI). The sweep-frequency data show the large biological mass decomposing within the torso as encircled ''hot spots.'' The 400-MHz pulse radar exhibit major horizontal reflectors above the body, with shadow reflectors (horizontal multiples) occurring beneath the body at 60 cm depth. The 400-MHz antenna was able to discern the grave walls and folded tarp covering the lower body. Under these moist, clay-rich conditions, the 900-MHz antenna was able to penetrate slightly beyond 30 cm beneath the concrete layer. However, neither system was able to penetrate beyond a one meter depth in the moist, clay-rich soil (fine, mixed, thermic Typic Paleudalf). Example scans from each system are provided, along with a discussion of the survey protocol and general performance.

  6. Generating nonlinear FM chirp radar signals by multiple integrations

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2011-02-01

    A phase component of a nonlinear frequency modulated (NLFM) chirp radar pulse can be produced by performing digital integration operations over a time interval defined by the pulse width. Each digital integration operation includes applying to a respectively corresponding input parameter value a respectively corresponding number of instances of digital integration.

  7. Noise analysis for near field 3-D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-06-19

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for several applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit the performance in several ways including reduction in system sensitivity and reduction of image dynamic range. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  8. Medical applications of shortwave FM radar: Remote monitoring of cardiac and respiratory motion

    PubMed Central

    Mostov, K.; Liptsen, E.; Boutchko, R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article introduces the use of low power continuous wave frequency modulated radar for medical applications, specifically for remote monitoring of vital signs in patients. Methods: Gigahertz frequency radar measures the electromagnetic wave signal reflected from the surface of a human body and from tissue boundaries. Time series analysis of the measured signal provides simultaneous information on range, size, and reflective properties of multiple targets in the field of view of the radar. This information is used to extract the respiratory and cardiac rates of the patient in real time. Results: The results from several preliminary human subject experiments are provided. The heart and respiration rate frequencies extracted from the radar signal match those measured independently for all the experiments, including a case when additional targets are simultaneously resolved in the field of view and a case when only the patient’s extremity is visible to the radar antennas. Conclusions: Micropower continuous wave FM radar is a reliable, robust, inexpensive, and harmless tool for real-time monitoring of the cardiac and respiratory rates. Additionally, it opens a range of new and exciting opportunities in diagnostic and critical care medicine. Differences between the presented approach and other types of radars used for biomedical applications are discussed. PMID:20384270

  9. A portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar for local investigation of severe storms

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, W.P.; Wolf, M.A.; Bluestein, H.B.

    1988-01-01

    During the 1987 spring storm season we used a portable 1-W X-band CW Doppler radar to probe a tornado, a funnel cloud, and a wall cloud in Oklahoma and Texas. This same device was used during the spring storm season in 1988 to probe a wall cloud in Texas. The radar was battery powered and highly portable, and thus convenient to deploy from our chase vehicle. The device separated the receding and approaching Doppler velocities in real time and, while the radar was being used, it allowed convenient stereo data recording for later spectral analysis and operator monitoring of the Doppler signals in stereo headphones. This aural monitoring, coupled with the ease with which an operator can be trained to recognize the nature of the signals heard, made the radar very easy to operate reliably and significantly enhanced the quality of the data being recorded. At the end of the 1988 spring season, the radar was modified to include FM-CW ranging and processing. These modifications were based on a unique combination of video recording and FM chirp generation, which incorporated a video camera and recorder as an integral part of the radar. After modification, the radar retains its convenient portability and the operational advantage of being able to listen to the Doppler signals directly. The original mechanical design was unaffected by these additions. During the summer of 1988, this modified device was used at the Langmuir Laboratory at Socorro, New Mexico in an attempt to measure vertical convective flow in a thunderstorm. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  10. A proposed multi-modal FM/CW aircraft radar for use during ground operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, Craig A.; Grimes, Dale M.

    A proposed forward looking, relatively small and inexpensive, multimodal radar is described. The design objective is to determine range, range rate, and bearing to targets at 2-500 m, at operational speeds, and at +/-8.5 deg either side of boresite. For this open-loop, wide-angle, expanded monopulse-like, FM/CW radar, it is planned to time-share the transmitted power to TE10, TE20, and TE30 rectangular waveguide modes that, in turn, drive a small aperture horn antenna. By transmitting and receiving on the different modes, six independent views of the forward direction are obtained. Echoed returns into the transmitted mode are used to find range and range rate. Returns into all three modes are frequency integrated to reduce angle noise, then ratioed to obtain target angle. This inexpensive control radar, which is termed cradar, quickly obtains a two-dimensional forward plot of the protected pathway without moving parts.

  11. Noise analysis for near-field 3D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for demanding security applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit performance in several ways. Practical imaging systems can employ arrays with low gain antennas and relatively large signal distribution networks that have substantial losses which limit transmit power and increase the effective noise figure of the receiver chain, resulting in substantial thermal noise. Phase noise can also limit system performance. The signal coupled from transmitter to receiver is much larger than expected target signals. Phase noise from this coupled signal can set the system noise floor if the oscillator is too noisy. Frequency modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) radar transceivers used in short range systems are relatively immune to the effects of the coupled phase noise due to range correlation effects. This effect can reduce the phase-noise floor such that it is below the thermal noise floor for moderate performance oscillators. Phase noise is also manifested in the range response around bright targets, and can cause smaller targets to be obscured. Noise in synthetic aperture imaging systems is mitigated by the processing gain of the system. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  12. Range resolution improvement in passive bistatic radars using nested FM channels and least squares approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Musa T.; Tofighi, Mohammad; Sevimli, Rasim A.; ćetin, Ahmet E.

    2015-05-01

    One of the main disadvantages of using commercial broadcasts in a Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) system is the range resolution. Using multiple broadcast channels to improve the radar performance is offered as a solution to this problem. However, it suffers from detection performance due to the side-lobes that matched filter creates for using multiple channels. In this article, we introduce a deconvolution algorithm to suppress the side-lobes. The two-dimensional matched filter output of a PBR is further analyzed as a deconvolution problem. The deconvolution algorithm is based on making successive projections onto the hyperplanes representing the time delay of a target. Resulting iterative deconvolution algorithm is globally convergent because all constraint sets are closed and convex. Simulation results in an FM based PBR system are presented.

  13. Numerical simulation of imaging laser radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shaokun; Lu, Bo; Jiang, Ming; Liu, Xunliang

    2008-03-01

    Rational and effective design of imaging laser radar systems is the key of imaging laser radar system research. Design must fully consider the interrelationship between various parameters. According to the parameters, choose suitable laser, detector and other components. To use of mathematical modeling and computer simulation is an effective imaging laser radar system design methods. This paper based on the distance equation, using the detection statistical methods, from the laser radar range coverage, detection probability, false-alarm rate, SNR to build the laser radar system mathematical models. In the process of setting up the mathematical models to fully consider the laser, atmosphere, detector and other factors on the performance that is to make the models be able to respond accurately the real situation. Based on this using C# and Matlab designed a simulation software.

  14. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  15. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  16. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  17. Observations of tornadoes and wall clouds with a portable FM-CW Doppler radar: 1989--1990 results

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B. . School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on our progress using a portable, 1 W,FM (frequency modulated)-CW (continuous wave) Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to make measurements of the wind field in tornadoes and wall clouds along with simultaneous visual documentation. Results using a CW version of the radar in 1987--1988 are given in Bluestein and Unruh (1989). 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Progress in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress with coherent laser radar has been made over the last few years, most notably perhaps in the available range of high performance devices and components and the confidence with which systems may now be taken into the field for prolonged periods of operation. Some of this increasing maturity was evident at the 3rd Topical Meeting on Coherent Laser Radar: Technology and Applications. Topics included in discussions were: mesoscale wind fields, nocturnal valley drainage and clear air down bursts; airborne Doppler lidar studies and comparison of ground and airborne wind measurement; wind measurement over the sea for comparison with satellite borne microwave sensors; transport of wake vortices at airfield; coherent DIAL methods; a newly assembled Nd-YAG coherent lidar system; backscatter profiles in the atmosphere and wavelength dependence over the 9 to 11 micrometer region; beam propagation; rock and soil classification with an airborne 4-laser system; technology of a global wind profiling system; target calibration; ranging and imaging with coherent pulsed and CW system; signal fluctuations and speckle. Some of these activities are briefly reviewed.

  19. On the measurement of wind speeds in tornadoes with a portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B. . School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Both the formation mechanism and structure of tornadoes are not yet well understood. The Doppler radar is probably the best remote-sensing instrument at present for determining the wind field in tornadoes. Although much has been learned about the non-supercell tornado from relatively close range using Doppler radars at fixed sites, close-range measurements in supercell tornadoes are relatively few. Doppler radar can increase significantly the number of high-resolution, sub-cloud base measurements of both the tornado vortex and its parent vortex in supercells, with simultaneous visual documentation. The design details and operation of the CW/FM-CW Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and used by storm-intercept teams at the Univ. of Oklahoma are described elsewhere. The radar transmits 1 W at 3 cm, and can be switched back and forth between CW and FM-CW modes. In the FM-CW mode the sweep repetition frequency is 15.575 kHz and the sweep width 1.9 MHz; the corresponding maximum unambiguous range and velocity, and range resolution are 5 km, {plus minus} 115 m s{sup {minus}1}, and 78 m respectively. The bistatic antennas, which have half-power beamwidths of 5{degree}, are easily pointed wit the aid of a boresighted VCR. FM-CW Data are recorded on the VCR, while voice documentation is recorded on the audio tape; video is recorded on another VCR. The radar and antennas are easily mounted on a tripod, and can be set up by three people in a minute or two. The purpose of this paper is to describe the signal processing techniques used to determine the Doppler spectrum in the FM-CW mode and a method of its interpretation in real time, and to present data gathered in a tornadic storm in 1990. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Sixteenth International Laser Radar Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Given here are extended abstracts of papers presented at the 16th International Laser Radar Conference, held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 20-24, 1992. Topics discussed include the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic dust laser observations, global change, ozone measurements, Earth mesospheric measurements, wind measurements, imaging, ranging, water vapor measurements, and laser devices and technology.

  1. Pulse Switching and Stability in FM Mode-Locked Fiber Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Usechak, N.G.; Agrawal, G.P.

    2005-09-30

    We investigate the dynamics of the pulse switching mechanism in FM mode-locked fiber lasers for what we believe to be the first time. Two completely different pulse switching mechanisms are identified.

  2. Laser radar for spacecraft guidance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, C. C.; Abramovici, A.; Bartman, R. K.; Bunker, R. L.; Chapsky, J.; Chu, C. C.; Clouse, D.; Dillon, J. W.; Hausmann, B.; Hemmati, H.; Kornfeld, R. P.; Kwa, C.; Mobasser, S.; Newell, M.; Padgett, C.; Roberts, W. T.; Spiers, G.; Warfield, Z.; Wright, M.

    2003-01-01

    A flight qualified laser radar called LAMP (LAser MaPper) is under development at JPL. LAMP is a guidance and control sensor that can form 3 dimensional images of its field of regard. This paper describes the detailed design of the LAMP sensor.

  3. Terrain segmentation using laser radar range data.

    PubMed

    Letalick, D; Millnert, M; Renhorn, I

    1992-05-20

    A novel approach to segmentation of laser radar range images is presented. The approach is based on modeling horizontal and vertical scans of the terrain as piecewise-constant or piecewise-linear functions. The approach uses adaptive estimation based on Kalman filtering techniques. The performance of the segmentation algorithm is evaluated by application to laser range measurements. We also discuss how the output from the segmentation algorithm can be used for, e.g., object detection.

  4. Influences of weather phenomena on automotive laser radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasshofer, R. H.; Spies, M.; Spies, H.

    2011-07-01

    Laser radar (lidar) sensors provide outstanding angular resolution along with highly accurate range measurements and thus they were proposed as a part of a high performance perception system for advanced driver assistant functions. Based on optical signal transmission and reception, laser radar systems are influenced by weather phenomena. This work provides an overview on the different physical principles responsible for laser radar signal disturbance and theoretical investigations for estimation of their influence. Finally, the transmission models are applied for signal generation in a newly developed laser radar target simulator providing - to our knowledge - worldwide first HIL test capability for automotive laser radar systems.

  5. Counter-sniper 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Orr; LePage, Andrew J.; Wijntjes, Geert J.; Zehnpfennig, Theodore F.; Sackos, John T.; Nellums, Robert O.

    1999-01-01

    Visidyne, Inc., teaming with Sandia National Laboratories, has developed the preliminary design for an innovative scannerless 3-D laser radar capable of acquiring, tracking, and determining the coordinates of small caliber projectiles in flight with sufficient precision, so their origin can be established by back projecting their tracks to their source. The design takes advantage of the relatively large effective cross-section of a bullet at optical wavelengths. Kay to its implementation is the use of efficient, high- power laser diode arrays for illuminators and an imaging laser receiver using a unique CCD imager design, that acquires the information to establish x, y (angle-angle) and range coordinates for each bullet at very high frame rates. The detection process achieves a high degree of discrimination by using the optical signature of the bullet, solar background mitigation, and track detection. Field measurements and computer simulations have been used to provide the basis for a preliminary design of a robust bullet tracker, the Counter Sniper 3-D Laser Radar. Experimental data showing 3-D test imagery acquired by a lidar with architecture similar to that of the proposed Counter Sniper 3-D Lidar are presented. A proposed Phase II development would yield an innovative, compact, and highly efficient bullet-tracking laser radar. Such a device would meet the needs of not only the military, but also federal, state, and local law enforcement organizations.

  6. Laser Docking System Radar flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Harry O.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments to verify the Laser Docking System Radar are discussed. The docking requirements are summarized, and the breadboarded hardware is described, emphasizing the two major scanning concepts being utilized: a mechanical scanning technique employing galvanometer beamsteerers and an electronic scanning technique using an image dissector. The software simulations used to apply hardware solutions to the docking requirements are briefly discussed, the tracking test bed is described, and the objectives of the flight experiment are reviewed.

  7. FM characteristics and compact modules for coherent semiconductor lasers coupled to an external cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.H.; Teshima, M.; Ohtsu, M. ); Imai, T.; Yoshida, J.; Nishide, K. )

    1990-03-01

    FM responses of a semiconductor laser optically coupled off-axis to a confocal Fabry--Perot cavity were measured. It is reported that this cavity acted as a frequency discriminator and as a phase comparator for slow and fast frequency fluctuations, respectively. The crossover between them was determined by a half linewidth of the cavity. Based on these investigations, we made two kinds of coherent semiconductor laser modules. External FP cavities were made by using an optical fiber and a hemispherical micro-lens, respectively. Linewidths of these lasers were less than 25 kHz.

  8. Improved optical resonator for laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Pierre; McCarthy, Nathalie; Parent, Andre; Pascale, Danny

    1986-01-01

    It is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that Gaussian reflectivity mirrors can improve the performance of lasers for radar applications. The effects of misalignment and hard apertures are investigated. The optimum design parameters are given. Single mode operation of a TE-CO2 laser was obtained in a Cassegrain resonator made of a hard concave mirror and a convex mirror with a Gaussian reflectivity profile. The 70-nsec FWHM pulses had an energy of 175 mJ, a peak power of about 2.0 MW, a near-diffraction-limited far field, and a chirp rate smaller than 0.060 MHz/microsec sq.

  9. Compensation system for FM-to-AM effects in high-power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuiyu; Jiang, Youen; Wang, Jiangfeng; Fan, Wei; Li, Xuechun

    2015-10-01

    In the high-power laser facility, frequency modulation to amplitude modulation (FM-to-AM) effects has seriously affected the power balance between beams and restricted the laser flux levels of safe operation in the system. For FM-to- AM effects produced by gain-narrowing effects, according to the amplifier gain-narrowing function model, after simulating and analyzing the properties of FM-to-AM effects, a corresponding compensation function is designed. Using sinusoidal compensation function, with the use of a birefringent crystal and liquid crystal modulator, adjusting the crystal angle in the range of 45 °, the center wavelength could be reduced in the magnitude of the range from 0 to 30dBm. By changing the voltage of the liquid crystal, the center wavelength could be adjusted within 1051.5-1054.5nm freely. For the regenerative amplifier with the gain of 70dB and input center wavelength of 1053nm and bandwidth of 0.7nm, the output FM-to-AM magnitude could be controlled within ~11% by this compensation system.

  10. Solid-state coherent laser radar wind shear measuring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1992-01-01

    Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) was established in 1984 to engage in the development of coherent laser radar systems and subsystems with applications in atmospheric remote sensing, and in target tracking, ranging and imaging. CTI focuses its capabilities in three major areas: (1) theoretical performance and design of coherent laser radar system; (2) development of coherent laser radar systems for government agencies such as DoD and NASA; and (3) development of coherent laser radar systems for commercial markets. The topics addressed are: (1) 1.06 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system; (2) wind measurement using 1.06 micron system; and flashlamp-pumped 2.09 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system.

  11. Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Technology and Applications Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The tenth conference on coherent laser radar technology and applications is the latest in a series beginning in 1980 which provides a forum for exchange of information on recent events current status, and future directions of coherent laser radar (or lidar or lader) technology and applications. This conference emphasizes the latest advancement in the coherent laser radar field, including theory, modeling, components, systems, instrumentation, measurements, calibration, data processing techniques, operational uses, and comparisons with other remote sensing technologies.

  12. FM-to-AM conversion measurement for high power nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PENNINCKX, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Through numerical simulations we show that the spectral content of amplitude modulations induced by a transfer function converting frequency modulations required for high-power lasers may be very broad. Hence, measurement of FM-to-AM conversion should be first done in the spectral domain to remove unwanted transfer functions at low frequency scale and then in the time domain to obtain an accurate value.

  13. AlGaAs laser diode FM spectrum: Phased array antenna application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Martin; Tetu, Michel

    Preliminary results are presented on the use of an AlGaAs laser diode to generate microwave signals suitable for application with phased array antennas. The relative intensity noise (RIN) was measured under various operating conditions to give an indication of the frequency response limitation of the laser diode. The frequency response to intensity modulation was also measured directly at microwave frequencies. Finally, the FM spectrum was observed using a heterodyne technique and compared with an empirical model. The spectrum of intensity fluctuations shows a peak near the relaxation oscillation frequency. This is a good indication of the cutoff frequency for direct current modulation of the laser diode. The behavior of the modulated laser diode is well characterized by the simultaneous intensity and frequency modulation taking into account a phase difference between the two.

  14. Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Ismail, Syed (Editor); Schwemmer, Geary K. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference, held at Annapolis, Maryland, July 6-10, 1998; 260 papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were Aerosol Clouds, Multiple Scattering; Tropospheric Profiling, Stratospheric/Mesospheric Profiling; Wind Profiling; New Lidar Technology and Techniques; Lidar Applications, Including Altimetry and Marine; Space and Future Lidar; and Lidar Commercialization/Eye Safety. This conference reflects the breadth of research activities being conducted in the lidar field. These abstracts address subjects from lidar-based atmospheric investigations, development of new lasers and lidar system technology, and current and future space-based lidar systems.

  15. Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Ismail, Syed (Editor); Schwemmer, Geary K. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference, held at Annapolis, Maryland, July 6-10, 1998; 260 papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were Aerosol Clouds, Multiple Scattering; Tropospheric Profiling; Stratospheric/Mesospheric Profiling; Wind Profiling; New Lidar Technology and Techniques; Lidar Applications, including Altimetry and Marine; Space and Future Lidar; and Lidar Commercialization/Eye Safety. This conference reflects the breadth of research activities being conducted in the lidar field. These abstracts address subjects from lidar-based atmospheric investigations, development of new lasers and lidar system technology, and current and future space-based lidar systems.

  16. Sixteenth International Laser Radar Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the 16th International Laser Radar Conference. One-hundred ninety-five papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: (1) Mt. Pinatubo Volcanic Dust Layer Observations; (2) Global Change/Ozone Measurements; (3) GLOBE/LAWS/LITE; (4) Mesospheric Measurements and Measurement Systems; (5) Middle Atmosphere; (6) Wind Measurements and Measurement Systems; (7) Imaging and Ranging; (8) Water Vapor Measurements; (9) Systems and Facilities; and (10) Laser Devices and Technology. This conference reflects the breadth of research activities being conducted in the lidar field. These abstracts address subjects from lidar-based atmospheric investigations relating to global change to the development of new lidar systems and technology.

  17. FM and FSK response of tunable two-electrode DFB lasers and their performance with noncoherent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, A.E.; Kuznetsov, M.; Kaminow, I.P.; Stone, J.; Stulz, L.W.; Burrus, C.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Two-electrode DFB lasers show promise for combining high speed and frequency tunability for FDM-FSK networks. The authors have measured the FM and FSK response of such lasers up to modulation frequencies of {approximately} GHz. Using these lasers in a noncoherent detection system in which a fiber Fabry-Perot tunable optical filter converts an FSK signal into ASK format, the authors demonstrate 10{sup {minus}9} BER up to 1 Gbit/s. Nonuniform FM response and consequent tone broadening of the optical-filtering FSK spectra can lead to system power penalties due to optical-filtering effects. Thus, for a given FM response, they can project the behavior of these lasers in FSK optical systems.

  18. Effect of low level laser on ototoxicity prevention of FM1-43 in postnatal organotypic culture of rat utricles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yong Won; Kim, Yong Saeng; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Rhee, Chung-Ku

    2007-02-01

    Backgrounds and Objectives: The styryl pyridinium dye FM1-43 is nontoxic, fluorescent, cationic dye whose fluorescence markedly increases after partitioning into membrane. Rapid entry of FM1-43 is inhibited by drugs that block the mechanically gated transduction channels, suggesting the dye can itself act as a permanent blocker of the channels. In this study, the effects of low level laser (LLL) and FM1-43 on gentiamicin induced ototoxicity in postnatal organotypic culture of rat utricles were investigated. Materials and Methods: An organotypic culture of 2- 7-day-old rat utricular maculae was established. In a series of experiments utricles were exposed to either irradiation of low level laser(LG group)or 10 ?M FM1-43(FG group) or both(LFG group) followed by 1mM of gentamicin treatment for 12 hrs. The results of experimental groups were compared with the control group by confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy. Results: LLL prevented vestibular hair cells ototoxicity. Rapid incubation with FM1-43 dye protected vestibular hair cell damage induced by gentamicin treatment. Substantial additive effect of LLL on ototoxicity prevention was noted in combination therapy with FM1-43. There were statistical significant differences among all groups but between control and LFG group by both confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, caspase-3 activity was hardly found in LFG group after double staining with Phalloidin-FITC by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Conclusion: These results suggest that there is an additive protection effect of LLL and FM1-43 against gentamicin ototoxicity in postnatal organotypic culture of rat utricles. LLL may have clinical preventive and therapeutic implications on ototoxicity.

  19. WS(2)/fluorine mica (FM) saturable absorbers for all-normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Jiang, Shouzhen; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Xi; Duan, Lina; Mao, Dong; Li, Zhen; Man, Baoyuan; Si, Jinhai

    2015-11-01

    The report firstly propose a new WS(2) absorber based on fluorine mica (FM) substrate. The WS(2) material was fabricated by thermal decomposition method. The FM was stripped into one single layer as thin as 20 μm and deposited WS(2) on it, which can be attached to the fiber flank without causing the laser deviation. Similar to quartz, the transmission rate of FM is as high as 90% at near infrared wavelength from one to two micrometers. Furthermore, FM is a highly elastic material so that it is not easy to break off even its thickness was only 20 μm. On the contrary, quartz is hard to be processed and easy to break off when its thickness is less than 100 μm. Compared to organic matrix such as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), FM has higher softening temperature, heat dissipation and laser damage threshold than those of organic composites. In our work, the modulation depth (MD) and non-saturable losses (NLs) of this kind of saturable absorber were measured to be 5.8% and 14.8%, respectively. The WS(2)/FM absorber has a high damage threshold of 406 MW/cm(2), two times higher than that of WS(2)/PVA. By incorporating the saturable absorber into Yb-doped fiber laser cavity, a mode-locked fiber laser was achieved with central wavelength of 1052.45 nm. The repetition rate was 23.26 MHz and the maximum average output power was 30 mW. The long term stability of working was proved to be good too. The results indicate that WS(2)/FM film is a practical nonlinear optical material for photonic applications.

  20. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  1. Laser radar system for obstacle avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bers, Karlheinz; Schulz, Karl R.; Armbruster, Walter

    2005-09-01

    The threat of hostile surveillance and weapon systems require military aircraft to fly under extreme conditions such as low altitude, high speed, poor visibility and incomplete terrain information. The probability of collision with natural and man-made obstacles during such contour missions is high if detection capability is restricted to conventional vision aids. Forward-looking scanning laser radars which are build by the EADS company and presently being flight tested and evaluated at German proving grounds, provide a possible solution, having a large field of view, high angular and range resolution, a high pulse repetition rate, and sufficient pulse energy to register returns from objects at distances of military relevance with a high hit-and-detect probability. The development of advanced 3d-scene analysis algorithms had increased the recognition probability and reduced the false alarm rate by using more readily recognizable objects such as terrain, poles, pylons, trees, etc. to generate a parametric description of the terrain surface as well as the class, position, orientation, size and shape of all objects in the scene. The sensor system and the implemented algorithms can be used for other applications such as terrain following, autonomous obstacle avoidance, and automatic target recognition. This paper describes different 3D-imaging ladar sensors with unique system architecture but different components matched for different military application. Emphasis is laid on an obstacle warning system with a high probability of detection of thin wires, the real time processing of the measured range image data, obstacle classification und visualization.

  2. Radar Imaging of Non-Uniformly Rotating Targets via a Novel Approach for Multi-Component AM-FM Signal Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A novel radar imaging approach for non-uniformly rotating targets is proposed in this study. It is assumed that the maneuverability of the non-cooperative target is severe, and the received signal in a range cell can be modeled as multi-component amplitude-modulated and frequency-modulated (AM-FM) signals after motion compensation. Then, the modified version of Chirplet decomposition (MCD) based on the integrated high order ambiguity function (IHAF) is presented for the parameter estimation of AM-FM signals, and the corresponding high quality instantaneous ISAR images can be obtained from the estimated parameters. Compared with the MCD algorithm based on the generalized cubic phase function (GCPF) in the authors’ previous paper, the novel algorithm presented in this paper is more accurate and efficient, and the results with simulated and real data demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method. PMID:25806870

  3. Coherent laser radar at 2 microns using solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Suni, Paul J. M.; Hale, Charley P.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Magee, James R.; Bruns, Dale L.; Yuen, Eric H.

    1993-01-01

    Coherent laser radar systems using 2-micron Tm- and Tm, Ho-doped solid-state lasers are useful for the remote range-resolved measurement of atmospheric winds, aerosol backscatter, and DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor and CO2 concentrations. Recent measurements made with a 2-micron coherent laser radar system, advances in the laser technology, and atmospheric propagation effects on 2-micron coherent lidar performance are described.

  4. Quantitative data quality metrics for 3D laser radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Jeffrey R.; Lopez, Norman A.; Burton, Robin R.

    2011-06-01

    Several quantitative data quality metrics for three dimensional (3D) laser radar systems are presented, namely: X-Y contrast transfer function, Z noise, Z resolution, X-Y edge & line spread functions, 3D point spread function and data voids. These metrics are calculated from both raw and/or processed point cloud data, providing different information regarding the performance of 3D imaging laser radar systems and the perceptual quality attributes of 3D datasets. The discussion is presented within the context of 3D imaging laser radar systems employing arrays of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) detectors, but the metrics may generally be applied to linear mode systems as well. An example for the role of these metrics in comparison of noise removal algorithms is also provided.

  5. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  6. Nonlinearity correction and dispersion analysis in FMCW laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hao; Liu, Bingguo; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Yu, Yahui; Gan, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave laser radar is one of the most important ways to measure the large-size targets , combining the advantages of laser with conventional FMCW radar. Dispersion compensation and non-linear calibration are two key aspects in FMCW laser radar measurement. The paper studies the method of frequency-sampling to correct the Nonlinearity and analyzes the importance of dispersion compensation. We set up experimental verification platform, choose 1550nm band continuously tunable external cavity infrared laser as the light source, use all-fiber optical device structures, choose balanced detectors as photoelectric conversion, and finally acquire data with high speed PCI-E data acquisition card, write a measurement software with Labview. We measured the gage block 1 meter away. The experiment results show that the frequency sampling method correct the Nonlinearity well and there is a significant impact on the accuracy because of the fiber dispersion, dispersion must be compensated to obtain high accuracy. The experiment lays the foundation for further research on FMCW Laser radar.

  7. Stable all-fiber Er-doped Q-switched laser with a WS2/fluorine mica (FM) saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu; Wang, ZhenFu; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Xi; Yang, Guowen; Jiang, Shouzhen

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a stable all-fiber Q-switched Er-doped fiber (EDF) laser with WS2/fluorine mica (FM) as the saturable absorber (SA). The SA device is obtained by depositing WS2 nanosheet layers onto a 20 µm thick one-layer FM substrate using a thermal decomposition method. The modulation depth (MD) of the SA is 8.22% and the non-saturable loss (NL) is 16.38%. By inserting the SA into the EDF laser cavity, stable Q-switched operation is achieved with a central wavelength of 1567 nm. The repetition rate can be tuned from 20.98 kHz to 33.74 kHz and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8.3 µs to 6.98 µs by increasing the pump power. The maximum output power and the maximum pulse energy are measured to be 2.07 mW and 61.4 nJ, respectively. The experimental results evidently show that the WS2/FM can be regarded as a high-performance SA for fiber lasers.

  8. Application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleichman, Kurt; Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Sampson, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the scenario of an autonomous landing like that required for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. An application of laser radar for conducting autonomous hazard detection and avoidance is discussed. A trade-study is performed to identify operational and implementation constraints as well as the state of the art in component technology.

  9. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  10. The design of infrared laser radar for vehicle initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Xu, Xi-ping; Li, Xiao-yu; Li, Tian-zhi; Liu, Yu-long; Wu, Jia-hui

    2013-09-01

    Laser radar for vehicle is mainly used in advanced vehicle on-board active safety systems, such as forward anti-collision systems, active collision warning systems and adaptive cruise control systems, etc. Laser radar for vehicle plays an important role in the improvement of vehicle active safety and the reduction of traffic accidents. The stability of vehicle active anti-collision system in dynamic environment is still one of the most difficult problems to break through nowadays. According to people's driving habit and the existed detecting technique of sensor, combining the infrared laser range and galvanometer scanning technique , design a 3-D infrared laser radar which can be used to assist navigation, obstacle avoidance and the vehicle's speed control for the vehicle initiative safety. The device is fixed to the head of vehicle. Then if an accident happened, the device could give an alarm to remind the driver timely to decelerate or brake down, by which way can people get the purpose of preventing the collision accidents effectively. To accomplish the design, first of all, select the core components. Then apply Zemax to design the transmitting and receiving optical system. Adopt 1550 nm infrared laser transmitter as emission unit in the device, a galvanometer scanning as laser scanning unit and an InGaAs-APD detector as laser echo signal receiving unit. Perform the construction of experimental system using FPGA and ARM as the core controller. The system designed in this paper can not only detect obstacle in front of the vehicle and make the control subsystem to execute command, but also transfer laser data to PC in real time. Lots of experiments using the infrared laser radar prototype are made, and main performance of it is under tested. The results of these experiments show that the imaging speed of the laser radar can reach up to 25 frames per second, the frame resolution of each image can reach 30×30 pixels, the horizontal angle resolution is about 6. 98

  11. Measured turbulence and speckle effects in laser radar target returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papurt, D. M.; Shapiro, J. H.; Lau, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Field data were obtained with a coherent CO2 laser radar to verify an analytical model for target return fluctuations. The model accounts for the statistical effects of target speckle and glint, and local oscillator shot noise and atmospheric turbulence-induced scintillation. A transportable laser radar unit provided field data for matching with predictions for a 1 km range with a retroreflector and a flame-polished aluminum sphere as targets. Additional tests were performed at GaAs laser wavelengths. The necessity of including jitter effects in the model was confirmed. Once jitter was incorporated into the model, it was found to be responsible for staring-mode speckle target decorrelation. Finally, the jitter-corrected returns exhibited signs of lognormal scintillation from turbulence between the source and the retroreflector.

  12. Speckle reduction in CO2 heterodyne laser radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutzmann, Peter; Ebert, Reinhard R.

    1990-10-01

    A limitation of heterodyne C02-laser radars results from the statistical properties of speckle effects. Suppression of speckle influence by adding uncorrelated speckle pattern was experimentally studied. Using a space separation technique involving a quadrant detector allows to 'look' at different parts of the laser spot on the target at the same time. By choosing the proper diameter of the receiver optics nearly uncorrelated signals are seen with the four detector elements. The signal statistics was measured for direct and heterodyne detection. The achieved improvement in the signal probability distribution and in the contrast were compared with theory. The measurements were done with both a laboratory setup and with the Ff0 Laser-Radar-System BASIS 2.

  13. Novel Doppler laser radar for diagnostics in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Madhavan; Slotwinski, Anthony

    2004-10-01

    We describe the development of a novel Doppler laser radar (DOLAR) for remote measurement of flow velocity (0-10 m/s) and film thickness of liquid metal walls, currently being studied for their superior heat handling and self-healing characteristics. Small fluctuations in flow velocity({approx}mm/s) and flow thickness ({approx}50 {mu}m) that may arise during plasma discharges can also be measured. The DOLAR is also designed for non intrusive mapping of features of plasma-facing solid surfaces with very high precision ({approx}50 {mu}m). It can also measure the motion of structural components of a fusion reactor during plasma discharges and during plasma disruptions. The device utilizes frequency modulation laser radar principles for precision range measurements. Compensation of Doppler frequency shift is used to measure flow velocity. The DOLAR probe head is designed with acousto-optic and piezoelectric devices for operation in the harsh fusion environment.

  14. 3-D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiley, Michael F.; Carmer, Dwayne C.; Pont, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    A sophisticated 3D laser radar sensor simulation, developed and applied to the task of autonomous hazard detection and avoidance, is presented. This simulation includes a backward ray trace to sensor subpixels, incoherent subpixel integration, range dependent noise, sensor point spread function effects, digitization noise, and AM-CW modulation. Specific sensor parameters, spacecraft lander trajectory, and terrain type have been selected to generate simulated sensor data.

  15. Maximum angular accuracy of pulsed laser radar in photocounting limit.

    PubMed

    Elbaum, M; Diament, P; King, M; Edelson, W

    1977-07-01

    To estimate the angular position of targets with pulsed laser radars, their images may be sensed with a fourquadrant noncoherent detector and the image photocounting distribution processed to obtain the angular estimates. The limits imposed on the accuracy of angular estimation by signal and background radiation shot noise, dark current noise, and target cross-section fluctuations are calculated. Maximum likelihood estimates of angular positions are derived for optically rough and specular targets and their performances compared with theoretical lower bounds.

  16. Beam profile shaping for laser radars that use detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, W B; Kastner, C J

    1982-01-15

    The beam shaper we developed shapes the transmit beam of a CO(2) laser radar that uses a linear detector array. It consists of a diffraction grating and an anamorphic prism beam compressor and produces a stretched profile that efficiently and uniformly illuminates the far-field footprint of the detector array. The diffraction grating phase modulates the near field or the laser beam to generate a far-field flattop intensity profile, whereas the compressor produces the necessary profile eccentricity. We have achieved conversion efficiencies in the 70-90% range.

  17. Optical smoothing of laser imprinting in planar-target experiments on OMEGA EP using multi-FM 1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Fiksel, G.; Bonino, M. J.; Canning, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Dorrer, C.; Kessler, T. J.; Kruschwitz, B. E.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-09-01

    Direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires single-beam smoothing to minimize imprinting of laser nonuniformities that can negatively affect implosion performance. One-dimensional, multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) has been proposed to provide the required smoothing [Marozas et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 294 (2010)]. A prototype multi-FM SSD system has been integrated into the NIF-like beamline of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Experiments have been performed to verify the smoothing performance by measuring Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates in planar targets of laser-imprinted and preimposed surface modulations. Multi-FM 1-D SSD has been observed to reduce imprint levels by ˜50% compared to the nominal OMEGA EP SSD system. The experimental results are in agreement with 2-D DRACO simulations using realistic, time-dependent far-field spot-intensity calculations that emulate the effect of SSD.

  18. Coherent laser radar at 1.06 microm using Nd:YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Kane, T J; Kozlovsky, W J; Byer, R L; Byvik, C E

    1987-04-01

    A coherent laser radar system operating at the 1.06-microm Nd:YAG laser wavelength has been built and operated. A laser-diode-pumped monolithic ring laser served as the master oscillator. A single flash-lamp-pumped zigzag slab amplified the oscillator output to a power of 2.3 kW. Single-mode optical fiber was used to collect and mix the return signal with the local-oscillator output. Signals from clouds at a range of 2.7 km and from atmospheric aerosols at a range of 600 m were detected.

  19. Proportional proximity sensing for telerobots using Coherent Laser Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Goode, Plesent W.; Slotwinski, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of a telerobotic manipulator to operate in confined spaces while avoiding unwanted collisions is enhanced by the accurate sensing of its proximate environment. To achieve the fidelity required for precise manipulator control, a proportional proximity sensor system with a sufficiently large measurement envelope is required. Current proximity sensors provide a binary indication of the presence of obstacles within a small envelope with coarse or no proportional measurement of their location. A proportional proximity sensor system configured as a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) Coherent Laser Radar (CLR) using a semiconductor laser as the energy source is described and analyzed. The source and reflected energies mix coherently to generate a radio frequency (RF) signal whose frequency is proportional to the range. The system is tested for accuracy, range, depth of range, speed, and sensitivity and the results are presented. Techniques to derive orientation information and an application to telerobotic control are also described.

  20. Off the line-of-sight laser radar.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswami, K; Tilleman, M

    1998-01-20

    The results of field and laboratory experiments of a novel laser radar (ladar) are presented. This ladar was designed to detect objects off the line of sight by deploying a fiber-optic relay between the launch and probe sites by monitoring the retroreflected signals. The apparatus incorporates a pulsed diode laser emitting at 1.55 mum, a wavelength that is ideal for eye safety and bears minimum loss in silica fibers. With its immediate application in transportation safety, the system issues a warning within a millisecond of detecting an obstacle in the path of a vehicle. The results of the field experiments yield signal-to-noise ratios high enough to trigger reliably an alarm with a probability of greater than 0.999 for detecting an obstacle and less than 10(-12) probability of false alarms.

  1. NO plume mapping by laser-radar techniques.

    PubMed

    Edner, H; Sunesson, A; Svanberg, S

    1988-09-01

    Mapping of NO plumes by using laser-radar techniques has been demonstrated with a mobile differential absorption lidar system. The system was equipped with a narrow-linewidth Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser that, with doubling and mixing, generated pulse energies of 3-5 mJ at 226 nm, with a linewidth of 1pm. This permitted range-resolved measurements of NO, with a range of about 500 m. The detection limit was estimated to 3 microg/m(3), with an integration interval of 350 m. Spectroscopic studies on the gamma(0, 0) bandhead near 226.8 nm were performed with 1-pm resolution, and the differential absorption cross section was determined to be (6.6 +/- 0.6) x 10(-22) m(2), with a wavelength difference of 12 pm.

  2. Agile beam laser radar using computational imaging for robotic perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Michael A.; Stann, Barry L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a new concept that applies computational imaging techniques to laser radar for robotic perception. We observe that nearly all contemporary laser radars for robotic (i.e., autonomous) applications use pixel basis scanning where there is a one-to-one correspondence between world coordinates and the measurements directly produced by the instrument. In such systems this is accomplished through beam scanning and/or the imaging properties of focal-plane optics. While these pixel-basis measurements yield point clouds suitable for straightforward human interpretation, the purpose of robotic perception is the extraction of meaningful features from a scene, making human interpretability and its attendant constraints mostly unnecessary. The imposing size, weight, power and cost of contemporary systems is problematic, and relief from factors that increase these metrics is important to the practicality of robotic systems. We present a system concept free from pixel basis sampling constraints that promotes efficient and adaptable sensing modes. The cornerstone of our approach is agile and arbitrary beam formation that, when combined with a generalized mathematical framework for imaging, is suited to the particular challenges and opportunities of robotic perception systems. Our hardware concept looks toward future systems with optical device technology closely resembling modern electronically-scanned-array radar that may be years away from practicality. We present the design concept and results from a prototype system constructed and tested in a laboratory environment using a combination of developed hardware and surrogate devices for beam formation. The technological status and prognosis for key components in the system is discussed.

  3. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  4. Optical Performance Measurements of the BELA EQM and FM Transmitter Laser during AIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, C.; Michaelis, H.; Lingenauber, K.; Behnke, T.; Togno, S. d.; Kallenbach, R.; Wickhusen, K.; Althaus, C.

    2014-04-01

    The BepiColombo Laser Altimeter (BELA) onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter is Europe's first built Laser Altimeter for a planetary mission. Its main objectives are global mapping of Mercury's topography as well as measuring its tidal deformations to learn about the internal structure of this small terrestrial planet [1]. Crucial part of the instrument for this task is the transmitter laser. It must withstand all mission phases till operation in orbit and work within tight parameter margins. To ensure this a dedicated verification program has been performed at DLR Institute for Planetary Research Berlin which is described in the present paper.

  5. Eye safe single aperture laser radar scanners for 3D acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodubov, D.; McCormick, K.; Nolan, P.; Volfson, L.; Finegan, T. M.

    2016-05-01

    The single aperture implementation of laser radars in combination with beam scanning solutions enables low cost, compact and efficient laser systems for 3D acquisition. The design benefits include the lack of dead zones, improved stability and compact footprint for the system implementation. In our presentation we focus on the scanning solution development for 3D laser radars that is based on all solid state magneto-optic design. The novel solid-state scanner implementation results are presented.

  6. Laser radar VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23-25, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Becherer, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Topics presented include lidar wind shear detection for commercial aircraft, centroid tracking of range-Doppler images, an analytic approach to centroid performance analysis, simultaneous active/passive IR vehicle detection, and resolution limits for high-resolution imaging lidar. Also presented are laser velocimetry applications, the application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing, 3D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing, and ground based CW atmospheric Doppler lidar performamce modeling.

  7. MIMO based optical phased array technology with electronic beam steering for laser radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neha; Zmuda, Henry

    2010-04-01

    This paper will address the analysis and design of an electronically scanned phased array laser radar (ladar) system utilizing the techniques of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) array design. MIMO radar is has attracted much attention recently from both researchers and practitioners alike due to its significant potential for advancing the state-of-the-art RF radar technology. The laser radar architecture presented stands to gain significant inroads on the ability to apply RF array processing methods to laser radar systems in several ways. Specifically, using MIMO array design concepts, it is shown that the resolution of the ladar array can substantially exceed the diffraction limited resolution of a conventional array. Additionally, the use of array methods provides the capability to electronically steer the aperture, thus avoiding the mechanical beam scanning methods generally encountered in laser radar systems. Finally, by using an array of radiators, an increase in total radiated power is achieved, relieving the power burden on a single laser. The problems traditionally encountered in applying conventional array techniques to laser/detector arrays, for example, the inability to achieve half-wavelength spacing or the surfacing of source coherence issues, actually work to one's advantage when viewed in the MIMO paradigm. It is anticipated that the successful implementation of this system will significantly advance the state-of-the-art of laser radar capabilities for high speed imaging, target detection, tracking, and signature analysis.

  8. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  9. Simulation and analysis about noisy range images of laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingbo; He, Jun; Fu, Qiang; Xi, Dan

    2011-06-01

    A measured range image of imaging laser radar (ladar) is usually disturbed by dropouts and outliers. For the difficulty of obtaining measured data and controlling noise level of dropouts and outliers, a new simulation method for range image with noise is proposed. Based on the noise formation mechanism of ladar range image, an accurate ladar range imaging model is formulated, including three major influencing factors: speckle, atmospheric turbulence and receiver noise. The noisy range images under different scenarios are obtained using MATLABTM. Analysis on simulation results reveals that: (1) Despite of detection strategy, the speckle, the atmospheric turbulence and the receiver noise are major factors which cause dropouts and outliers. (2) The receiver noise itself has limited effect on outliers. However, if other factors (speckle, atmospheric turbulence, etc.) also exist, the effect will be sharply enhanced. (3) Both dropouts and outliers exist in background and target regions.

  10. Effects of target shape and reflection on laser radar cross sections.

    PubMed

    Steinvall, O

    2000-08-20

    Laser radar cross sections have been evaluated for a number of ideal targets such as cones, spheres, paraboloids, and cylinders by use of different reflection characteristics. The time-independent cross section is the ratio of the cross section of one of these forms to that of a plate with the same maximum radius. The time-dependent laser radar cross section involves the impulse response from the object shape multiplied by the beam's transverse profile and the surface bidirectional reflection distribution function. It can be clearly seen that knowledge of the combined effect of object shape and reflection characteristics is important for determining the shape and the magnitude of the laser radar return. The results of this study are of interest for many laser radar applications such as ranging, three-dimensional imaging-modeling, tracking, antisensor lasers, and target recognition.

  11. Redundancy analysis of raw Geiger-mode laser radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Norman A.; Kamerman, Gary W.

    2010-04-01

    In the past decade arrays of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) detectors have increased in size from 4×4 to 128×32, resulting in significant increases in data rates. If not handled appropriately, data collected with larger arrays and higher laser pulse repetition frequencies could potentially stress existing data dissemination and storage infrastructures. Data compression techniques that reduce storage requirements by taking advantage of data redundancies could be used to mitigate this problem. In this paper we present an analysis of the coding redundancy that exists in raw data captured with three dimensional imaging laser radar systems that employ arrays of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) detectors. The data we analyzed was collected in three different scanning modes, namely: mapping-mode, target-mode and stare-mode. We found that there is a significant amount of coding redundancy in raw GmAPD data which can be used to minimize storage sizes. We demonstrate that a trivial and simple approach reduces data for some scan patterns. This work represents a first step towards developing robust compression algorithms for raw GmAPD data. We present considerations for future work.

  12. Optical system of an imaging CO{sub 2} laser radar

    SciTech Connect

    He Yi; Wu Jian

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, an optical system is described that is an optical head of a coherent imaging CO{sub 2} laser radar. Discrimination and field of regard limit decided by the optical head itself are discussed. In the experimental laser radar only one continuous wave, single mode CO{sub 2} laser is used, and the signals from buildings of 7km away are obtained with acceptable SNR while the laser output is about 5w. Furthermore, the comparison between two optical systems based on individually linear frequency modulation (or chirp) pulse compression and frequency modulated continuous wave technique is also introduced in this paper.

  13. Optical smoothing of laser imprinting in planar-target experiments on OMEGA EP using multi-FM 1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hohenberger, M.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Fiksel, G.; Bonino, M. J.; Canning, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Dorrer, C.; Kessler, T. J.; Kruschwitz, B. E.; et al

    2016-09-07

    Direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires single-beam smoothing to minimize imprinting of laser nonuniformities that can negatively affect implosion performance. One-dimensional, multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) has been proposed to provide the required smoothing [J. A. Marozas, J. D. Zuegel, and T. J. B. Collins, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 294 (2010)]. A prototype multi-FM SSD system has been integrated into the NIF-like beamline of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Experiments have been performed to verify the smoothing performance by measuring Rayleigh–Taylor growth rates in planar targets of laser-imprinted and preimposed surface modulations. Multi-FM 1-D SSDmore » has been observed to reduce imprint levels by ~50% compared to the nominal OMEGA EP SSD system. In conclusion, the experimental results are in agreement with 2-D DRACO simulations using realistic, time-dependent far-field spot-intensity calculations that emulate the effect of SSD.« less

  14. Spectral analysis, digital integration, and measurement of low backscatter in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.; Callan, R. D.; Bowdle, D. A.; Rothermel, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of surface acoustic wave (SAW) spectral analysis and digital integration that has been used previously in coherent CW laser work with CO2 lasers at 10.6 microns is described. Expressions are derived for the signal to noise ratio in the measured voltage spectrum with an approximation for the general case and rigorous treatment for the low signal case. The atmospheric backscatter data accumulated by the airborne LATAS (laser true airspeed) coherent laser radar system are analyzed.

  15. A geodetic laser radar rangefinder with 10(exp -7) resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, Y.; Takeichi, M.; Warashima, Y.; Takeshima, A.; Ogawa, I.; Ichie, K.; Schiller, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel geodetic laser radar rangefinder (GLRR) unit utilizing a pair of synchronized 10-psec streak camera systems was developed for displacement measurements of the earth's plates. In order to achieve minimum computing error and assure extremely high spatial resolution, an optical pulse registration clock was developed and used to register a fiducial mark on the time scale of the system. Conventional optical rangefinders have been limited to a relative resolution of 10(exp -6) even for short distances. The system to be reported on today has the capability of measuring a 50km range with an accuracy of 4mm corresponding to a relative resolution of 10(exp -7). With a gain of greater than 3 x 10(exp 3), the system has the capability of detecting extremely weak signals on the order of photon counting. This combined with temporal gating makes daytime measurements comparable in signal-to-noise ratio to nighttime viewing. This is useful for measuring faint signals returning over a range of several tens of kilometers. The present ranging system was designed to observe the mutual displacement of geodetic plates and was employed to measure the boundary between the Philippine and Asian geodetic plates that pass beneath the Suruga Bay near Hamamatsu City, Japan. The system has been in operation for over 3 years. In addition, the system has the ability of producing and detecting optical ranging pulses of several wavelengths simultaneously, making this a complete multicolor system. The basic GLRR system consists of a frequency stabilizing crystal, optical clock, YAG laser, KDP doubling crystal, DK*P tripling crystal, two matched streak cameras (A and B), a control computer, and an output/input periscope system.

  16. A 16-channel CMOS preamplifier for laser ranging radar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ru-qing; Zhu, Jing-guo; Jiang, Yan; Li, Meng-lin; Li, Feng

    2015-10-01

    A 16-channal front-end preamplifier array has been design in a 0.18um CMOS process for pulse Laser ranging radar receiver. This front-end preamplifier array incorporates transimpedance amplifiers(TIAs) and differential voltage post-amplifier(PAMP),band gap reference and other interface circuits. In the circuit design, the regulated cascade (RGC) input stage, Cherry-Hooper and active inductor peaking were employed to enhance the bandwidth. And in the layout design, by applying the layout isolation structure combined with P+ guard-ring(PGR), N+ guard-ring(NGR),and deep-n-well(DNW) for amplifier array, the crosstalk and the substrate noise coupling was reduced effectively. The simulations show that a single channel receiver front-end preamplifier achieves 95 dBΩ transimpedance gain and 600MHz bandwidth for 3 PF photodiode capacitance. The total power of 16-channel front-end amplifier array is about 800mW for 1.8V supply.

  17. Multiple-return laser radar for three-dimensional imaging through obscurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Bradley W.; Barr, Dallas N.; Templeton, Glen C.; Mizerka, Lawrence J.; Trussell, C. Ward

    2002-05-01

    A compact imaging laser radar was constructed and tested to investigate phenomenological issues in targeting, especially cases involving imaging through obscurations such as foliage and camouflage netting. The laser radar employs a Nd:YAG microchip laser that operates at a wavelength of 1.06 mum and produces pulses of 1.2-ns duration at a 3-kHz rate. The detector is a commercial indium gallium arsenide avalanche photodiode. A single computer controls the scanning mirrors and performs the digitization of the returning signal at 2 giga samples/s. A detailed description of the laser radar is presented as well as results from field experiments that examined its range accuracy capability and its ability to image a target through camouflage. Results of data collected from deciduous tree lines are also discussed to characterize the presence and quantity of multiple returns.

  18. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging using self-mixing interferometry with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Lui, H S; Taimre, T; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Lachab, M; Valavanis, A; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Rakić, A D

    2014-05-01

    We propose a terahertz (THz)-frequency synthetic aperture radar imaging technique based on self-mixing (SM) interferometry, using a quantum cascade laser. A signal processing method is employed which extracts and exploits the radar-related information contained in the SM signals, enabling the creation of THz images with improved spatial resolution. We demonstrate this by imaging a standard resolution test target, achieving resolution beyond the diffraction limit.

  19. Three radar imaging methods based on the one-dimensional laser range profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yuan; Wu, Zhen-sen; Qu, Tan; Liao, Run-gui

    2013-09-01

    One-dimensional range profile is known as a simple radar imaging technology. Based on the imaging mechanism, the laser range profiles (LRPS) of the convex rotators in three different methods, which named as the Beam Scattering Method (BS method), Radar Cross Section Method (RCS method) and Surface Elements Method (SE method),were studied. In detail, BS method, which combined the laser beam pulse scattering theory and radar equation, is the very model that can be applied to the convex quadric rotary bodies, however, it may produce singular solutions in certain incident directions. The RCS method is just an extension of the theory of radar cross section theory and radar equation. According to the definition, the simplest forms of RCS which were then substituted into the radar equation were obtained, finally the one-dimensional range profiles were analytically resolved. The SE Method is a much more comprehensive theory to get the laser range profiles of arbitrary objects. The object should be first divided into numerous small triangle facets, and sum the backscattering power of these facets in the same distance, and in this way the final LRPS were deduced. In the meanwhile, the SE method is the most convenient way to evolve into the three-dimensional range profile. In the paper, the LRPS of a cone based on the three models above were simulated, it was found that the features and shape of each profiles were similar basically, but theoretical correction to SE method was still needed.

  20. Active laser radar (lidar) for measurement of corresponding height and reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Christoph; Mettenleiter, M.; Haertl, F.

    1997-08-01

    For the survey and inspection of environmental objects, a non-tactile, robust and precise imaging of height and depth is the basis sensor technology. For visual inspection,surface classification, and documentation purposes, however, additional information concerning reflectance of measured objects is necessary. High-speed acquisition of both geometric and visual information is achieved by means of an active laser radar, supporting consistent 3D height and 2D reflectance images. The laser radar is an optical-wavelength system, and is comparable to devices built by ERIM, Odetics, and Perceptron, measuring the range between sensor and target surfaces as well as the reflectance of the target surface, which corresponds to the magnitude of the back scattered laser energy. In contrast to these range sensing devices, the laser radar under consideration is designed for high speed and precise operation in both indoor and outdoor environments, emitting a minimum of near-IR laser energy. It integrates a laser range measurement system and a mechanical deflection system for 3D environmental measurements. This paper reports on design details of the laser radar for surface inspection tasks. It outlines the performance requirements and introduces the measurement principle. The hardware design, including the main modules, such as the laser head, the high frequency unit, the laser beam deflection system, and the digital signal processing unit are discussed.the signal processing unit consists of dedicated signal processors for real-time sensor data preprocessing as well as a sensor computer for high-level image analysis and feature extraction. The paper focuses on performance data of the system, including noise, drift over time, precision, and accuracy with measurements. It discuses the influences of ambient light, surface material of the target, and ambient temperature for range accuracy and range precision. Furthermore, experimental results from inspection of buildings, monuments

  1. A HWIL test facility of infrared imaging laser radar using direct signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Lu, Wei; Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Qi

    2005-01-01

    Laser radar has been widely used these years and the hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing of laser radar become important because of its low cost and high fidelity compare with On-the-Fly testing and whole digital simulation separately. Scene generation and projection two key technologies of hardware-in-the-loop testing of laser radar and is a complicated problem because the 3D images result from time delay. The scene generation process begins with the definition of the target geometry and reflectivity and range. The real-time 3D scene generation computer is a PC based hardware and the 3D target models were modeled using 3dsMAX. The scene generation software was written in C and OpenGL and is executed to extract the Z-buffer from the bit planes to main memory as range image. These pixels contain each target position x, y, z and its respective intensity and range value. Expensive optical injection technologies of scene projection such as LDP array, VCSEL array, DMD and associated scene generation is ongoing. But the optical scene projection is complicated and always unaffordable. In this paper a cheaper test facility was described that uses direct electronic injection to provide rang images for laser radar testing. The electronic delay and pulse shaping circuits inject the scenes directly into the seeker's signal processing unit.

  2. [The error analysis and experimental verification of laser radar spectrum detection and terahertz time domain spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Tao; Li, Jing-Wen; Sun, Zhi-Hui

    2010-03-01

    Terahertz waves (THz, T-ray) lie between far-infrared and microwave in electromagnetic spectrum with frequency from 0.1 to 10 THz. Many chemical agent explosives show characteristic spectral features in the terahertz. Compared with conventional methods of detecting a variety of threats, such as weapons and chemical agent, THz radiation is low frequency and non-ionizing, and does not give rise to safety concerns. The present paper summarizes the latest progress in the application of terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to chemical agent explosives. A kind of device on laser radar detecting and real time spectrum measuring was designed which measures the laser spectrum on the bases of Fourier optics and optical signal processing. Wedge interferometer was used as the beam splitter to wipe off the background light and detect the laser and measure the spectrum. The result indicates that 10 ns laser radar pulse can be detected and many factors affecting experiments are also introduced. The combination of laser radar spectrum detecting, THz-TDS, modern pattern recognition and signal processing technology is the developing trend of remote detection for chemical agent explosives. PMID:20496663

  3. [The error analysis and experimental verification of laser radar spectrum detection and terahertz time domain spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Tao; Li, Jing-Wen; Sun, Zhi-Hui

    2010-03-01

    Terahertz waves (THz, T-ray) lie between far-infrared and microwave in electromagnetic spectrum with frequency from 0.1 to 10 THz. Many chemical agent explosives show characteristic spectral features in the terahertz. Compared with conventional methods of detecting a variety of threats, such as weapons and chemical agent, THz radiation is low frequency and non-ionizing, and does not give rise to safety concerns. The present paper summarizes the latest progress in the application of terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to chemical agent explosives. A kind of device on laser radar detecting and real time spectrum measuring was designed which measures the laser spectrum on the bases of Fourier optics and optical signal processing. Wedge interferometer was used as the beam splitter to wipe off the background light and detect the laser and measure the spectrum. The result indicates that 10 ns laser radar pulse can be detected and many factors affecting experiments are also introduced. The combination of laser radar spectrum detecting, THz-TDS, modern pattern recognition and signal processing technology is the developing trend of remote detection for chemical agent explosives.

  4. Iterative restoration algorithms for improving the range accuracy in imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Yan, Huimin; Zhang, Xiuda; Shangguan, Wangpin; Su, Heng

    2010-11-01

    Scannerless imaging laser radar has been a focus of research in these years for its fast imaging speed and high resolution. We introduced a three-dimensional imaging laser radar using intensified CCD as the receiver with constant gain and line modulated gain. The distance map of a scene is obtained from two intensity images. According to the transmission characteristics of the imaging system, a model of degeneration of the gray images is established and the range accuracy of imaging laser radar based on this model is analyzed. The results show that the range accuracy is related with the reflectivity, the actual distance and some other factors on the fast-distance-varying region, while it is mainly concerned with shot noise for the flat area. On the basis of the cause of measurement error and the distribution characteristics of noise, a method which uses iterative restoration algorithms on obtained intensity images is presented, Simulation is carried out and the results show that root mean square error of distance map obtained with this method is decreased by 50%, compared with the distance map obtained by measurement. Finally the restoration results of radar images are demonstrated to verify the effectiveness of this method.

  5. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  6. Laser radar cross-section estimation from high-resolution image data.

    PubMed

    Osche, G R; Seeber, K N; Lok, Y F; Young, D S

    1992-05-10

    A methodology for the estimation of ladar cross sections from high-resolution image data of geometrically complex targets is presented. Coherent CO(2) laser radar was used to generate high-resolution amplitude imagery of a UC-8 Buffalo test aircraft at a range of 1.3 km at nine different aspect angles. The average target ladar cross section was synthesized from these data and calculated to be sigma(T) = 15.4 dBsm, which is similar to the expected microwave radar cross sections. The aspect angle dependence of the cross section shows pronounced peaks at nose on and broadside, which are also in agreement with radar results. Strong variations in both the mean amplitude and the statistical distributions of amplitude with the aspect angle have also been observed. The relative mix of diffuse and specular returns causes significant deviations from a simple Lambertian or Swerling II target, especially at broadside where large normal surfaces are present.

  7. Synthetic-aperture imaging laser radar: laboratory demonstration and signal processing.

    PubMed

    Beck, Steven M; Buck, Joseph R; Buell, Walter F; Dickinson, Richard P; Kozlowski, David A; Marechal, Nicholas J; Wright, Timothy J

    2005-12-10

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging laser radar system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope's aperture. We investigate a technique known as synthetic-aperture imaging laser radar (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long-range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. We detail our laboratory-scale SAIL testbed, digital signal-processing techniques, and image results. In particular, we report what we believe to be the first optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed, diffusely scattering target with a moving aperture. A number of fine-resolution, well-focused SAIL images are shown, including both retroreflecting and diffuse scattering targets, with a comparison of resolution between real-aperture imaging and synthetic-aperture imaging. A general digital signal-processing solution to the laser waveform instability problem is described and demonstrated, involving both new algorithms and hardware elements. These algorithms are primarily data driven, without a priori knowledge of waveform and sensor position, representing a crucial step in developing a robust imaging system.

  8. A high detection probability method for Gm-APD photon counting laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-jing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jian-zhong

    2013-08-01

    Since Geiger mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) device was applied in laser radar system, the performance of system has been enhanced due to the ultra-high sensitivity of GmAPD, even responding a single photon. However, the background noise makes ultra-high sensitive GmAPD produce false alarms, which severely impacts on the detection of laser radar system based on Gm-APD and becomes an urgent problem which needs to be solved. To address this problem, a few times accumulated two-GmAPDs strategy is proposed in this paper. Finally, an experimental measurement is made under the background noise in sunny day. The results show a few times accumulated two- GmAPDs strategy can improve the detection probability and reduce the false alarm probability, and obtain a clear 3D image of target.

  9. N-pulse logic peak detection for laser radar range measurement of distributed range targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluckiger, David U.

    1988-08-01

    In this report N-pulse detection logic is discussed in the context of high angular resolution laser radar range processing. In the event that a resolved target is obscured by one or more unresolved scatterers such as wires, tree branches, camouflage netting, antennas, and the like, one sees multiple returns in the range I.F. due to the multiple scatterers in the line-of-sight path to the target. A laser radar that peak detects the N largest pulses in the range I.F. utilizes N-pulse peak detection logic. This report contains a discussion of the utility of N-pulse logic and also samples of data of N-pulse returns from trees and wires. A limit is found for the average resolvable distance between two scatterers based on Gaussian pulse shapes but not taking into account noise and target fluctuations (speckle).

  10. Advanced system model for 1574-nm imaging, scannerless, eye-safe laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, Ulrich; Rothe, Hendrik

    2002-10-01

    Laser radar based on gated viewing uses narrow laser pulses to illuminate a whole scene for direct (incoherent) detection. Due to the time of flight principle and a very fast shutter with precisely controlled delay time, only light reflected in the range R (range slice ΔR) is detected by a camera. Scattered light which reaches the shutter outside a given exposure time (gate) is suppressed. Hence, it is possible to "look" along the optical axis through changing atmospheric transmissions (rain, haze, fog, snow). For each laser pulse, the grey value image ES(x,y) of the camera is captured by a framegrabber for subsequent evaluation. Image sequences from these laser radar systems are ideally suited to recognize objects, because of the automatic contrast generation of the technology. Difficult object recognition problems, detection, target tracking, or obstacle avoidance at bad weather conditions are favorite applications. In this paper we discuss improvements in the system modelling and simulation of our laser radar system. Formerly the system performance was calculated for the whole system using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), leading to a general estimation of the maximum range of target detection. Changing to a pixel oriented approach, we are now able to study the system response for targets with arbitrary two and even three dimensional form. We take into account different kinds of target reflectivity and the Gaussian nature of the illuminating laser spot. Hence it is possible to simulate gray value images (range slices) and calculate range images. This will lead to a modulation transfer function for the system in future. Finally, the theoretical considerations are compared with experimental results from indoor measurements.

  11. Variable reflectivity unstable resonators for coherent laser radar emitters.

    PubMed

    Parent, A; Lavigne, P

    1989-03-01

    Beam properties obtained from a TE CO(2) laser in a Cassegrain resonator using various graded reflectivity mirror couplers are compared. It is shown that, experimentally, Gaussian profiles maximize the far-field intensity while parabolic profiles yield more uniform near fields with a lower energy extraction. Both configurations appear suited for coherent ladar systems. PMID:20548582

  12. Measurement of trace stratospheric constituents with a balloon borne laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Mcgee, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research was to measure the concentration of the stratospheric hydroxyl radical and related chemical species as a function of altitude, season, and time of day. Although hydroxyl plays a very important role in the chemistry controlling stratospheric ozone, little is known about its behavior because it has been a difficult species to measure. The instrument employed in this program was a laser radar, employing the technique of remote laser induced fluorescence. This instrument offers a number of attractive features including extreme specificity and sensitivity, a straightforward relationship between observed quantity and the desired concentration, and immunity to self-contamination.

  13. Compact multichannel receiver using InGaAs APDs for single-pulse eye-safe laser radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Hoyt N.; Yun, Steven T.; Dinndorf, Kenneth M.; Hayden, David R.

    1997-08-01

    Active imaging laser radars form 3D images which can be processed to provide target identification and precision aimpoint definition in real time. Earlier raster-scanned and pushbroom-scanned 3D imaging laser radar receivers required multiple laser pulses to assemble a complete 3D image frame. Platform/target motion and atmospheric effects caused tearing and jitter in the assembled 3D images, which complicated the subsequent image processing and necessitated the use of stabilized scanning systems. This paper describes the current status of the parallel/multichannel imaging laser radar receiver (PMR) which is being developed under an SBIR Phaser II program by the USAF Wright Laboratories Armament Directorate. The PMR uses an array of multichannel laser radar receivers to form single-pulse, 3D laser radar images, thus eliminating the complex and costly scanning system, and enabling much higher frame rates than were ever before possible. The heart of the PMR is the multichannel optical receiver photonic hybrid (MORPH), a high performance 16-channel laser radar receiver module which uses an array of InGaAs avalanche photodiodes for eyesafe operation. The MORPH provides high downrange resolution, multihit range data for each detector on a compact circuit card. Optical flux is transferred from the receiver focal plane to each MORPH via a fiber optic ribbon cable. An array of MORPHs are plugged into a compact passive backplane, along with a single digital control card (DCC). The DCC, which is the same form factor as the MORPH, synchronizes the MORPHs and transfers the digital range information to the host processor over a standard parallel data interface cable. The system described here illustrates one approach to integrating and packaging high-density photonic arrays and their associated signal processing electronics to yield a compact, low power, scannerless, high performance imaging laser radar receiver, using existing technology.

  14. High-resolution 3D imaging laser radar flight test experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Richard M.; Davis, W. R.; Rich, G. C.; McLaughlin, J. L.; Lee, E. I.; Stanley, B. M.; Burnside, J. W.; Rowe, G. S.; Hatch, R. E.; Square, T. E.; Skelly, L. J.; O'Brien, M.; Vasile, A.; Heinrichs, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Situation awareness and accurate Target Identification (TID) are critical requirements for successful battle management. Ground vehicles can be detected, tracked, and in some cases imaged using airborne or space-borne microwave radar. Obscurants such as camouflage net and/or tree canopy foliage can degrade the performance of such radars. Foliage can be penetrated with long wavelength microwave radar, but generally at the expense of imaging resolution. The goals of the DARPA Jigsaw program include the development and demonstration of high-resolution 3-D imaging laser radar (ladar) ensor technology and systems that can be used from airborne platforms to image and identify military ground vehicles that may be hiding under camouflage or foliage such as tree canopy. With DARPA support, MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed a rugged and compact 3-D imaging ladar system that has successfully demonstrated the feasibility and utility of this application. The sensor system has been integrated into a UH-1 helicopter for winter and summer flight campaigns. The sensor operates day or night and produces high-resolution 3-D spatial images using short laser pulses and a focal plane array of Geiger-mode avalanche photo-diode (APD) detectors with independent digital time-of-flight counting circuits at each pixel. The sensor technology includes Lincoln Laboratory developments of the microchip laser and novel focal plane arrays. The microchip laser is a passively Q-switched solid-state frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser transmitting short laser pulses (300 ps FWHM) at 16 kilohertz pulse rate and at 532 nm wavelength. The single photon detection efficiency has been measured to be > 20 % using these 32x32 Silicon Geiger-mode APDs at room temperature. The APD saturates while providing a gain of typically > 106. The pulse out of the detector is used to stop a 500 MHz digital clock register integrated within the focal-plane array at each pixel. Using the detector in this binary response mode

  15. Laser radar for wide-area fire detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennelly, Alphonsus J.; Fry, Edward L.; Zukic, Muamer; McColgan, Michele W.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-11-01

    A Lidar system designed by the authors to detect and observe the tracks of effluents emitted by ships at sea under propulsion by combustion of fossil fuels could have many useful applications. A prototype system uses a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser as the transmitter, at wavelengths of 0.53 and 1.06 micrometers , and examine the return for Rayleigh, Mie, fluorescence, and Raman scattering (hence called Advanced Rayleigh-Raman-Mie, ARRM), to determine thermodynamic and chemical conditions out to a given distance surrounding the Lidar operating station. We discuss the business potential of the system, its application to a number of technical and environmental problems, the potential for job creation by the use of such systems, and their value to both the users and the rest of society. One such application is discussed to a limited extent: Wide-area surveillance for fire detection, in both urban and rural applications. Conversations with the City of Huntsville's Fire Department have revealed that the system is a quantum leap in fire detection, reporting, and hence firefighting response. Constant motion through the sky of a beam of green light could be a public nuisance. Therefore in an urban setting use of a primary surveillance transmitter consisting of a frequency-doubled CO2 laser is necessary for initial detection of the thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic indications of the rising plume, from the Mie and Rayleigh scattering. After each detection of a new plume, the system switches to the Nd:YAG transmitter for detailed characterization of the plume from the measured ARRM parameters.

  16. Laser radar for wide-area fire detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennelly, Alphonsus J.; Fry, Edward L.; Zukic, Muamer; Wilson, Michele M.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-09-01

    A Lidar system designed by the authors to detect and observe the tracks of effluents emitted by ships at sea under propulsion by combustion of fossil fuels could have many useful applications. A prototype system uses a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser as the transmitter, at wavelengths of 0.53 and 1.06 micrometers , and examine the return for Rayleigh, Mie, fluorescence, and Raman scattering (hence called Advanced Rayleigh-Raman-Mie, ARRM), to determine thermodynamic and chemical conditions out to a given distance surrounding the Lidar operating station. We discuss the business potential of the system, its application to a number of technical and environmental problems, the potential for job creation by the use of such systems, and their value to both the users and the rest of society. One such application is discussed to a limited extent: wide-area surveillance for fire detection, in both urban and rural applications. Conversations with the City of Huntsville's Fire Department have revealed that the system is a quantum leap in fire detection, reporting, and hence firefighting response. Constant motion through the sky of a beam of green light could be a public nuisance. Therefore in an urban setting use of a primary surveillance transmitter consisting of a frequency-doubled CO2 laser is necessary for initial detection of the thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic indications of the rising plume, from the Mie and Rayleigh scattering. After each detection of a new plume, the system switches to the Nd:YAG transmitter for detailed characterization of the plume from the measured ARRM parameters.

  17. An operational theory of laser-radar selenodesy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, R.L.; Schlier, R.E.; Hull, J.A.; Larson, G.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of the utilization of laser techniques for ranging from the Earth to the Moon for the purpose of providing control points on the lunar surface at which the figure of the Moon is measured to an accuracy at least an order of magnitude better than that of the present astrometric measurements is presented. This, in turn, increases the accuracy of the horizontal selenocentric coordinates of topographical features measured by present astrometric methods. The improvement in the vertical and horizontal coordinates of control points in the Apollo landing zone will aid in the analysis of Unmanned Lunar Orbiter photographs for the selection of Apollo landing sites. The present discussion proposes the means of obtaining the ground control upon which the Orbiter photogrammetry is to be fastened. In addition, a technique of combining Goldstone tracking data to show where the resulting lunar figure is positioned relative to the Moon's center of mass is presented. If corner reflectors are placed on the lunar surface, as suggested by many members of the scientific community, or on a lunar orbiting vehicle, one or more Earth-based laser ranging systems are essential. These reflectors will give enough enhancement in return signal to allow for an additional increase in range accuracy of one to two orders of magnitude. In addition to the primary data on the figure of the Moon, a number of other measurements of scientific importance are then readily obtainable. As far as the measurement of control points is concerned, however, the use of corner reflectors is not essential for the success of this project. Questions regarding the influence on the present shape of the Moon of the frozen tide, isostasy, and past impacts of large asteroids appear in large part answerable through the data which are indicated to be obtainable under the present theory. ?? 1967.

  18. Study on the data matching of ground-based radar and laser point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Wang, Chenxi; Yue, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    Due to the unique imaging approach for ground-based radar, identification and classification in observation area is very difficult. In order to improve the accuracy of the calculation and application combine with other data resource. it is necessary to implement data matching of radar images and 3D laser point cloud. First, the 3D cloud should to be transformed to orthographic maps, and then the horizontal rotation and orbit attitude angle parameters would be estimated for similarity transformation according to the characteristics such as common points and lines. Finally, the same reference point of the ground-based SAR data and cloud data is employed to accomplished in a two-dimensional coordinate system (called local common coordinate system).

  19. A New GaAs Laser Radar for Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. T.; Stoliar, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    A special GaAs lidar using fiber coupled diode lasers was constructed for the purpose of measuring the extinction coefficient distribution within a large atmospheric volume at a rate compatible with atmospheric kinematics. The technique is based on taking backscatter signature ratios over spatial increments after the returns are normalized by pulse integration. Essential aspects of the lidar design are beam pulse power, repetition rate, detection system dynamic range and decay linearity. It was necessary to preclude the possibility of eye hazard under any operating conditions, including directly viewing the emitting aperture at close distance with a night-adapted eye. The electronic signal processing and control circuits were built to allow versatile operations. Extinction coefficient measurements were made in fog and clouds using a low-power laboratory version of the lidar, demonstrating feasibility. Data are presented showing range squared corrected backscatter profiles converted to extinction coefficient profiles, temporal signal fluctuations, and solar induced background noise. These results aided in the design of the lidar which is described. Functional tests of this lidar and the implications relevant to the design of a prototype model are discussed. This work was jointly sponsored by Sperry Rand Corporation under its Independent Research and Development program; the Air Force Avionics Laboratory, Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio; and the Naval Ammunition Depot, Crane, Indiana.

  20. Comparison of Retracking Algorithms Using Airborne Radar and Laser Altimeter Measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.; Swift, Calvin T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares four continental ice sheet radar altimeter retracking algorithms using airborne radar and laser altimeter data taken over the Greenland ice sheet in 1991. The refurbished Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) airborne radar altimeter has a large range window and stores the entire return waveform during flight. Once the return waveforms are retracked, or post-processed to obtain the most accurate altitude measurement possible, they are compared with the high-precision Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) altimeter measurements. The AAFE waveforms show evidence of varying degrees of both surface and volume scattering from different regions of the Greenland ice sheet. The AOL laser altimeter, however, obtains a return only from the surface of the ice sheet. Retracking altimeter waveforms with a surface scattering model results in a good correlation with the laser measurements in the wet and dry-snow zones, but in the percolation region of the ice sheet, the deviation between the two data sets is large due to the effects of subsurface and volume scattering. The Martin et al model results in a lower bias than the surface scattering model, but still shows an increase in the noise level in the percolation zone. Using an Offset Center of Gravity algorithm to retrack altimeter waveforms results in measurements that are only slightly affected by subsurface and volume scattering and, despite a higher bias, this algorithm works well in all regions of the ice sheet. A cubic spline provides retracked altitudes that agree with AOL measurements over all regions of Greenland. This method is not sensitive to changes in the scattering mechanisms of the ice sheet and it has the lowest noise level and bias of all the retracking methods presented.

  1. Semianalytic pulsed coherent laser radar equation for coaxial and apertured systems using nearest Gaussian approximation.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Shumpei; Ando, Toshiyuki; Asaka, Kimio; Hirano, Yoshihito

    2010-09-20

    We present a semianalytic pulsed coherent laser radar (CLR) equation for coaxial and apertured systems. It combines the conventional CLR equation, numerical Fresnel integration (NFI), and nearest Gaussian approximation, using correction factors that correspond to beam truncation. The range dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio obtained by this semianalytic equation was found to agree well with the precise NFI solution for not only the focal range, but also the near-field range. Furthermore, the optimum beam truncation condition depending on the atmospheric refractive index structure constant is shown. The derived equation is useful for precisely predicting the CLR performance simply by its semianalytic expression.

  2. Radiation effects on optical components of a laser radar sensor designed for remote metrology in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Grann, E.B.; Slotwinski, A.

    1997-09-01

    A frequency modulated laser radar is being developed for in-vessel metrology and viewing of plasma-facing surfaces. Some optical components of this sensor must withstand intense gamma radiation (3 {times} 10{sup 6} rad/h) during operation. The authors have tested the effect of radiation on a silica core polarization maintaining optical fiber and on TeO{sub 2} crystals at doses up to {approximately} 10{sup 9} rad. Additional tests are planned for evaluating the performance of a complete acousto-optic (AO) scanning device. The progress made in these tests is also described.

  3. Synthetic-aperture-radar imaging with a solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Green, T J; Marcus, S; Colella, B D

    1995-10-20

    We report the operation of an imaging Nd:YAG microchip-laser synthetic-aperture radar, with which we imaged two-dimensional (2-D) models of military targets. The images obtained showed spatial resolution significantly better than the diffraction limit of the real aperture in the along-track dimension. The signal processing is described, and the measurement sensitivity is both predicted and verified. In addition, 2-D images with high resolution in both dimensions were generated by using an asymmetric aperture to match the along-track synthetic-aperture resolution with the across-track diffraction-limited resolution.

  4. Two Decades of Elevation Changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet from Radar and Laser Altimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Forsberg, R.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Meister, R.; Simonsen, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet has been mapped by radar altimetry since the launch of ERS-1 in 1991, which was followed by ERS-2, Envisat and currently CryoSat-2. For the period 2003-2009 the ice sheet topography was also mapped by laser altimetry by the ICESat mission. Here, we apply suitable elevation change algorithms to radar data from ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat, and CryoSat-2 data, with the goal to derive continuous, ice sheet-wide elevation changes for the period 1992 to 2015. This analysis has been made possible through the recent release of data from the REAPER project, in which ERS-1 and ERS-2 radar have been reprocessed in a consistent way to that used for Envisat data. Over this 23-year period, the pattern of elevation changes varies significantly. Whilst thickening and thinning can both be observed during different periods, the overall trend of the elevation of the ice sheet is negative, i.e. an overall lowering can be seen during the two decades studied. This work is part of the ESA Greenland Ice Sheet CCI project. We compare elevation changes derived from radar and laser altimetry (2003-09) and find a complex pattern of difference between the two sensor types, and we explain how some of this pattern can be explained by changes in firn compaction and accumulation rates, obtained from a regional climate model and an offline firn model. Also we show how this pattern changes if using differently retracked Envisat data. A special focus will be on results obtained from the CryoSat-2 measurements that provide radar heights of unprecedented coverage and resolution. Here we present the results of a validation exercise carried out as part of the ESA-funded CryoVAL-LI project in which the accuracy of the CryoSat-2 measurements of land ice is assessed. The results presented here signify an important milestone in measuring the surface elevation of the ice sheet: providing us with an insight into past as well as recent changes, providing up-to-date information on the behaviour

  5. Laser radar range and detection performance for MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Jost, Steven R.; Smith, M. J.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-01-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to characterize the performance of MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays under laser illumination. These arrays have significant military and commercial application in the areas of: (1) target identification; (2) target tracking; (3) target location; (4) identification friend-or-foe (IFF); (5) parcel tracking, and; (6) search and rescue assistance. BAE SYSTEMS has theoretically determined the feasibility of these devices to learn if sufficient signal-to-noise performance exists to permit a cooperative laser radar sensor to be considered for device location and interrogation. Results indicate that modest power-apertures are required to achieve SNR performance consistent with high probability of detection and low false alarm rates.

  6. Laser radar range and detection performance for MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Stewart, Hamilton; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-12-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to characterize the performance of MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays under laser illumination. These arrays have significant military and commercial application in the areas of: 1) target identification; 2) target tracking; 3) target location; 4) identification friend-or-foe (IFF); 5) parcel tracking, and; 6) search and rescue assistance. BAE SYSTEMS has theoretically determined the feasibility of these devices to learn if sufficient signal-to-noise performance exists to permit a cooperative laser radar sensor to be considered for device location and interrogation. Results indicate that modest power-apertures are required to achieve SNR performance consistent with high probability of detection and low false alarm rates.

  7. Cloud-base water content measurement using single wavelength laser-radar data.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A

    1975-12-01

    Monochromatic backscattering laser-radar data are used for the determination on the number density of cloud droplets within a cumulus cloud base. The method is based upon general properties of a cloud base as derived from in situ measurements in a large variety of continental cumulus clouds. The backscatter laser profile from the cloud base is analyzed, and points with equal optical-depth values are detected in each profile. The method of detection requires no knowledge of the multiple scattering contribution, even though its effect is not neglected and is allowed to vary as a function of the optical depth. Corrections for general clouds are suggested based upon lidar measurements and analysis of the backscattering profile characteristics.

  8. Heterodyne efficiency for a coherent laser radar with diffuse or aerosol targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a Coherent Laser Radar is determined by the statistics of the coherent Doppler signal. The heterodyne efficiency is an excellent indication of performance because it is an absolute measure of beam alignment and is independent of the transmitter power, the target backscatter coefficient, the atmospheric attenuation, and the detector quantum efficiency and gain. The theoretical calculation of heterodyne efficiency for an optimal monostatic lidar with a circular aperture and Gaussian transmit laser is presented including beam misalignment in the far-field and near-field regimes. The statistical behavior of estimates of the heterodyne efficiency using a calibration hard target are considered. For space based applications, a biased estimate of heterodyne efficiency is proposed that removes the variability due to the random surface return but retains the sensitivity to misalignment. Physical insight is provided by simulation of the fields on the detector surface. The required detector calibration is also discussed.

  9. Analysis of influential factors on a space target's laser radar cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi; Sun, Huayan; Guo, Huichao

    2014-03-01

    This paper utilises the idea of theoretical analysis to introduce a fast and visual laser radar cross-section (LRCS) calculation method for space targets that is implemented with OpenGL. We chose the cube, cylinder and cone as targets based on the general characteristics of satellite shapes. The four-parameter mono-station BRDF is used, and we assume the surface materials are either purely diffuse, purely specular or mixed. The degree of influence on a target's total LRCS of the target's shape and size and the surface materials' BRDF are described. We describe the general laws governing influential factors by comparing simulated results. These conclusions can provide a reference for new research directions and methods to determine a target's laser scattering characteristics.

  10. Hybrid optical/electronic signal processor for laser radar signals in fire control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findley, George B., Jr.; Anderson, Christopher S.; Townley, S. K.; Pascale, Michael J.; Watson, Lee V.; Jenkinson, Howard A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid optical/electronic signal processor for laser radar signals in fire control applications. The breadboard system being developed consists of three subsystems: (1) a signal generator producing target-representative signals, (2) the signal processor consisting of a radiometric channel and a Doppler channel, and (3) a data acquisition, analysis, and display subsystem. The radiometric channel provides target ladar cross section (LCS) resolved in crossrange, while the Doppler channel provides target radial velocity, also resolved in crossrange. Data from the two channels is fused and processed within the data analysis subsystem. Results are to be displayed in near real-time. The breadboard system will be used to demonstrate the capabilities of hybrid signal processor technology and to investigate processing laser radar returns for noncooperative target recognition, target orientation determination, and target trajectory estimation functions. It is anticipated that these functions will enhance the effectiveness of advanced fire control systems in future helicopters and ground vehicles.

  11. Comparison of Surface Elevation Changes of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Radar and Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Barbieri, Kristine; DiMarzio, John P.; Li, Jun; Robbins, John; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    A primary purpose of satellite altimeter measurements is determination of the mass balances of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and changes with time by measurement of changes in the surface elevations. Since the early 1990's, important measurements for this purpose have been made by radar altimeters on ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and CryoSat and a laser altimeter on ICESat. One principal factor limiting direct comparisons between radar and laser measurements is the variable penetration depth of the radar signal and the corresponding location of the effective depth of the radar-measured elevation beneath the surface, in contrast to the laser-measured surface elevation. Although the radar penetration depth varies significantly both spatially and temporally, empirical corrections have been developed to account for this effect. Another limiting factor in direct comparisons is caused by differences in the size of the laser and radar footprints and their respective horizontal locations on the surface. Nevertheless, derived changes in elevation, dHldt, and time-series of elevation, H(t), have been shown to be comparable. For comparisons at different times, corrections for elevation changes caused by variations in the rate offrrn compaction have also been developed. Comparisons between the H(t) and the average dH/dt at some specific locations, such as the Vostok region of East Antarctic, show good agreement among results from ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and ICESat. However, Greenland maps of dHidt from Envisat and ICESat for the same time periods (2003-2008) show some areas of significant differences as well as areas of good agreement. Possible causes of residual differences are investigated and described.

  12. Reciprocal path-scattering effects for a ground-based, monostatic laser radar tracking a space target through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Robert A.; Phillips, Ronald L.

    1997-08-01

    A phenomenological model is developed for the strength and spatial width of the coherent intensity peak of backscatter produced by reciprocal path scattering through atmospheric turbulence. The model is applied to a ground-based, monostatic laser radar tracking a space target under the condition of optical atmospheric turbulence saturation.

  13. SAR processing with non-linear FM chirp waveforms.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-12-01

    Nonlinear FM (NLFM) waveforms offer a radar matched filter output with inherently low range sidelobes. This yields a 1-2 dB advantage in Signal-to-Noise Ratio over the output of a Linear FM (LFM) waveform with equivalent sidelobe filtering. This report presents details of processing NLFM waveforms in both range and Doppler dimensions, with special emphasis on compensating intra-pulse Doppler, often cited as a weakness of NLFM waveforms.

  14. Laser- and Radar-based Mission Concepts for Suborbital and Spaceborne Monitoring of Seismic Surface Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W; Schultz, C A; Tralli, D M

    2004-09-21

    The development of a suborbital or spaceborne system to monitor seismic waves poses an intriguing prospect for advancing the state of seismology. This capability would enable an unprecedented global mapping of the velocity structure of the earth's crust, understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics and wave propagation effects, and event source location, characterization and discrimination that are critical for both fundamental earthquake research and nuclear non-proliferation applications. As part of an ongoing collaboration between LLNL and JPL, an advanced mission concept study assessed architectural considerations and operational and data delivery requirements, extending two prior studies by each organization--a radar-based satellite system (JPL) for earthquake hazard assessment and a feasibility study of space- or UAV-based laser seismometer systems (LLNL) for seismic event monitoring. Seismic wave measurement requirements include lower bounds on detectability of specific seismic sources of interest and wave amplitude accuracy for different levels of analysis, such as source characterization, discrimination and tomography, with a 100 {micro}m wave amplitude resolution for waves nominally traveling 5 km/s, an upper frequency bound based on explosion and earthquake surface displacement spectra, and minimum horizontal resolution (1-5 km) and areal coverage, in general and for targeted observations. For a radar system, corresponding engineering and operational factors include: Radar frequency (dictated by required wave amplitude measurement accuracy and maximizing ranging, Doppler or interferometric sensitivity), time sampling (maximum seismic wave frequency and velocity), and overall system considerations such as mass, power and data rate. Technical challenges include characterization of, and compensation for, phase distortion resulting from atmospheric and ionospheric perturbations and turbulence, and effects of ground scattering characteristics and seismic

  15. High-power pulsed diode laser for automotive scanning radar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuji; Matsushita, Noriyuki; Kato, Hisaya; Abe, Katsunori; Atsumi, Kinya

    2000-02-01

    High performance pulsed AlGaAs/GaAs wide stripe diode laser has been developed for the automotive distance-measuring scanning radar sensor. The laser diode is required high output power of 15 W and a long time reliability in spite of being used in a harsh environment such as wide temperature range, mechanical vibrations at the front bumper and so on. The device is designed by employing a multiple quantum well structure as an active layer for high output power with low drive current and high temperature operations. Moreover we reduce catastrophic optical damage power level and control the beam divergence angle by introducing optimized optical waveguide layers. In the chips bonding part, we developed a new thin film Au-Sn-Ni solder system. The bonding temperature can be lowered by using this system, whereby the thermal damage to the laser diode can be reduced. Furthermore, highly stable bonding is carried out by improving wetting ability in this system. We have achieved more than 22 W light output power at 20A pulse current under room temperature and more than 16 W light output power under 90 degrees Celsius. High reliability over 10,000 hours is performed for automotive use under pulsed operation at 90 degrees Celsius, 50 ns pulse width, 8 kHz frequency and 15 W light output power.

  16. A Miniature, High-Resolution Laser Radar Operating at Video Rates

    SciTech Connect

    SMITHPETER,COLIN L.; NELLUMS,ROBERT O.; LEBIEN,STEVEN M.; STUDOR,GEORGE

    2000-06-26

    The authors are developing a laser radar to meet the needs of NASA for a 5-lb, 150 in{sup 3} image sensor with a pixel range accuracy of 0.1-inch. NASA applications include structural dynamics measurements, navigation guidance in rendezvous and proximity operations, and space vehicle inspection. The sensor is based on the scannerless range imager architecture developed at Sandia. This architecture modulates laser floodlight illumination and a focal plane receiver to phase encode the laser time of flight (TOF) for each pixel. They believe this approach has significant advantages over architectures directly measuring TOF including high data rate, reduced detector bandwidth, and conventional FPA detection. A limitation of the phase detection technique is its periodic nature, which provides relative range information over a finite ambiguity interval. To extend the operating interval while maintaining a given range resolution, a LADAR sensor using dual modulation frequencies has been developed. This sensor also extends the relative range information to absolute range by calibrating a gating function on the receiver to the TOF. The modulation frequency values can be scaled to meet the resolution and range interval requirements of different applications. Results from the miniature NASA sensor illustrate the advantages of the dual-frequency operation and the ability to provide the range images of 640 by 480 pixels at 30 frames per second.

  17. Sensor fusion with passive millimeter-wave and laser radar for target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Shin; Amphay, Sengvieng A.; Sundstrom, Bryce M.

    1999-07-01

    Advanced sensors and guidance techniques are required in killing mobile offensive and defensive systems. Many different sensors such as radar, video camera, laser radar (LADAR), millimeter wave systems, infrared imagers, acoustic sensors, etc. are available for such usage. However, no single sensor provides completely satisfactory capabilities. Since some sensors have complementary capabilities, integration of multiple sensors for kill can relax the task difficulty and provide more reliable results. The use of multiple sensors can also reduce the possibility of being defeated by countermeasures. In this study, we investigated the framework and investigated potential techniques for integration and fusion of information from passive millimeter wave (PMMW) and LADAR systems. The focus has been on target detection. The PMMW is used to detect metal objects and the LADAR examines those regions of interest for other evidence of existence of a target. Advances obtained by integrating these two sensors include reduction of task complexity and improvement of reliability, both due to efficient localization of regions of interest from the PMMW. Since PMMW possesses weather penetration capabilities through fog, cloud, smoke, etc., the combined system has a near-all-weather capability. A LADAR provides 3D information, and it should be used as the primary sensor for target acquisition upon target detection. The framework of the fusion is based on the Dempster-Shafer decision method. The fusion may be done in the algorithm level and sensor level. With the Dempster-Shafer method as the framework, new sensors or new decision components can be easily integrated.

  18. Occluded target viewing and identification high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Dippel, George F.; Cecchetti, Kristen D.; Wikman, John C.; Drouin, David P.; Egbert, Paul I.

    2007-09-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has developed a high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar (LADAR) system that has proven its ability to detect and identify hard targets in occluded environments, through battlefield obscurants, and through naturally occurring image-degrading atmospheres. Limitations of passive infrared imaging for target identification using medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) atmospheric windows are well known. Of particular concern is that as wavelength is increased the aperture must be increased to maintain resolution, hence, driving apertures to be very larger for long-range identification; impractical because of size, weight, and optics cost. Conversely, at smaller apertures and with large f-numbers images may become photon starved with long integration times. Here, images are most susceptible to distortion from atmospheric turbulence, platform vibration, or both. Additionally, long-range identification using passive thermal imaging is clutter limited arising from objects in close proximity to the target object.

  19. Feasibility study of synthetic aperture infrared laser radar techniques for imaging of static and moving objects.

    PubMed

    Yoshikado, S; Aruga, T

    1998-08-20

    Techniques for two types of 10-mum band synthetic aperture infrared laser radar using a hypothetical reference point target (RPT) are presented. One is for imaging static objects with a single two-dimensional scanning aperture. Through the simple manipulation of a reference wave phase, a desired image can be obtained merely by the two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the correlator output between the intermediate frequency signals of the reference and object waves. The other, with a one-dimensional aperture array, is for moving objects that pass across the array direction without attitude change. We performed imaging by using a two-dimensional RPT correlation method. We demonstrate the capability of these methods for imaging and evaluate the necessary conditions for signal-to-noise ratio and random phase errors in signal reception through numerical simulations in terms of feasibility.

  20. Interpreting Segmented Laser Radar Images Using a Knowledge-Based System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chen-Chau; Nandhakumar, Nagaraj; Aggarwal, Jake K.

    1990-03-01

    This paper presents a knowledge-based system (KBS) for man-made object recognition and image interpretation using laser radar (ladar) images. The objective is to recognize military vehicles in rural scenes. The knowledge-based system is constructed using KEE rules and Lisp functions, and uses results from pre-processing modules for image segmentation and integration of segmentation maps. Low-level attributes of segments are computed and converted to KEE format as part of the data bases. The interpretation modules detect man-made objects from the background using low-level attributes. Segments are grouped into objects and then man-made objects and background segments are classified into pre-defined categories (tanks, ground, etc.) A concurrent server program is used to enhance the performance of the KBS by serving numerical and graphics-oriented tasks for the interpretation modules. Experimental results using real ladar data are presented.

  1. Lidar-radar velocimetry using a pulse-to-pulse coherent rf-modulated Q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Vallet, M; Barreaux, J; Romanelli, M; Pillet, G; Thévenin, J; Wang, L; Brunel, M

    2013-08-01

    An rf-modulated pulse train from a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been generated using an extra-cavity acousto-optic modulator. The rf modulation reproduces the spectral quality of the local oscillator. It leads to a high pulse-to-pulse phase coherence, i.e., phase memory, over thousands of pulses. The potentialities of this transmitter for lidar-radar are demonstrated by performing Doppler velocimetry on indoor moving targets. The experimental results are in good agreement with a model based on elementary signal processing theory. In particular, we show experimentally and theoretically that lidar-radar is a promising technique that allows discrimination between translation and rotation movements. Being independent of the laser internal dynamics, this scheme can be applied to any Q-switched laser. PMID:23913058

  2. Lidar-radar velocimetry using a pulse-to-pulse coherent rf-modulated Q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Vallet, M; Barreaux, J; Romanelli, M; Pillet, G; Thévenin, J; Wang, L; Brunel, M

    2013-08-01

    An rf-modulated pulse train from a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been generated using an extra-cavity acousto-optic modulator. The rf modulation reproduces the spectral quality of the local oscillator. It leads to a high pulse-to-pulse phase coherence, i.e., phase memory, over thousands of pulses. The potentialities of this transmitter for lidar-radar are demonstrated by performing Doppler velocimetry on indoor moving targets. The experimental results are in good agreement with a model based on elementary signal processing theory. In particular, we show experimentally and theoretically that lidar-radar is a promising technique that allows discrimination between translation and rotation movements. Being independent of the laser internal dynamics, this scheme can be applied to any Q-switched laser.

  3. Distorted weak anti-localization effects in Bi2Se3/La0.70Sr0.30MnO3 (TI/FM) heterostructures grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunte, Frank; Kumar, Raj; Lee, Yi-Fang; Punugupati, Sandhyarani; Schwartz, Justin; Narayan, Jay

    Topological insulator/ferromagnet (TI/FM) heterostructures with broken time reversal symmetry by interface-induced magnetism are the potential platforms for the observation of novel quantum transport phenomena, magnetic monopoles and exotic quantum magneto-electric effects. TI/FM heterostructures with low Curie temperature ferromagnets i. e. GdN, EuS have been fabricated and studied. One of the challenges encountered with these heterostructures is their low Curie temperatures which limits their potential for applications in spintronic devices at room temperature. To address this issue, we have grown Bi2Se3/La0.70Sr0.30MnO3 (TI/FM) heterostructures by the method of pulsed laser deposition. La0.70Sr0.30MnO3(LSMO) is a strong ferromagnetic material with Tc ~350 K and Bi2Se3 is the most studied topological insulator. XRD and phi scan results show that epitaxial thin films of Bi2Se3 are grown on the LSMO template. Strong in-plane magnetization is confirmed by magnetometry measurements of the Bi2Se3/LSMO heterostructure. Magneto-transport measurements show a distorted weak anti-localization effect with hysteretic behavior due to interface induced ferromagnetism in the Bi2Se3 TI films. This work was supported, in part, by National Science Foundation ECCS-1306400.

  4. Research on high precision timing system based on FPGA non scanning imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanbo; Han, Shaokun; Wang, Liang; Ma, Yayun

    2015-08-01

    The article introduced the system structure and imaging principle of no three-dimensional imaging laser radar. This paper used the XC7K325T XILINX chip of KINTEX 7 series and used temporal interpolation method to measure distance. Rough side used PLL multiplier 400MHZ, which reached 2.5ns time accuracy. This method used a thin chip delay chains carry resources to reach 50ps accuracy and greatly improved the accuracy of the timing of imaging. Application technique used a delay line in APD array imaging system, such that each channel distance accuracy greatly improved. Echo signal by photoelectric conversion is completed by APD array detector, and designed by the impedance amplifier and other analog signal processing circuit. FPGA signal processing circuit is to complete the back-end processing, which is the timing function. FPGA array timer clock is to achieve coarse portion through timing, and delay line technique for measuring the length of time a non-integer multiple of the period of the laser pulse emission and the moment of reception, each stage of the delay units delay accuracy of sub ns magnitude, so as to achieve precision measuring part timers. With the above device was close imaging experiments, obtaining the 5 × 5 pixel imaging test results, presented to further improve system accuracy improved method.

  5. Error Ellipsoid Analysis for the Diameter Measurement of Cylindroid Components Using a Laser Radar Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengchun; Wu, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2016-05-19

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) data in the industrial measurement field is becoming increasingly popular because of the rapid development of laser scanning techniques based on the time-of-flight principle. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of these types of measurement methods are seldom investigated. In this study, a mathematical uncertainty evaluation model for the diameter measurement of standard cylindroid components has been proposed and applied to a 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS). First, a single-point error ellipsoid analysis for the LRMS was established. An error ellipsoid model and algorithm for diameter measurement of cylindroid components was then proposed based on the single-point error ellipsoid. Finally, four experiments were conducted using the LRMS to measure the diameter of a standard cylinder in the laboratory. The experimental results of the uncertainty evaluation consistently matched well with the predictions. The proposed uncertainty evaluation model for cylindrical diameters can provide a reliable method for actual measurements and support further accuracy improvement of the LRMS.

  6. Error Ellipsoid Analysis for the Diameter Measurement of Cylindroid Components Using a Laser Radar Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhengchun; Wu, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) data in the industrial measurement field is becoming increasingly popular because of the rapid development of laser scanning techniques based on the time-of-flight principle. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of these types of measurement methods are seldom investigated. In this study, a mathematical uncertainty evaluation model for the diameter measurement of standard cylindroid components has been proposed and applied to a 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS). First, a single-point error ellipsoid analysis for the LRMS was established. An error ellipsoid model and algorithm for diameter measurement of cylindroid components was then proposed based on the single-point error ellipsoid. Finally, four experiments were conducted using the LRMS to measure the diameter of a standard cylinder in the laboratory. The experimental results of the uncertainty evaluation consistently matched well with the predictions. The proposed uncertainty evaluation model for cylindrical diameters can provide a reliable method for actual measurements and support further accuracy improvement of the LRMS. PMID:27213385

  7. Error Ellipsoid Analysis for the Diameter Measurement of Cylindroid Components Using a Laser Radar Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengchun; Wu, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) data in the industrial measurement field is becoming increasingly popular because of the rapid development of laser scanning techniques based on the time-of-flight principle. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of these types of measurement methods are seldom investigated. In this study, a mathematical uncertainty evaluation model for the diameter measurement of standard cylindroid components has been proposed and applied to a 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS). First, a single-point error ellipsoid analysis for the LRMS was established. An error ellipsoid model and algorithm for diameter measurement of cylindroid components was then proposed based on the single-point error ellipsoid. Finally, four experiments were conducted using the LRMS to measure the diameter of a standard cylinder in the laboratory. The experimental results of the uncertainty evaluation consistently matched well with the predictions. The proposed uncertainty evaluation model for cylindrical diameters can provide a reliable method for actual measurements and support further accuracy improvement of the LRMS. PMID:27213385

  8. Transmitter and receiver antenna gain analysis for laser radar and communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive and fairly self-contained study of centrally obscured optical transmitting and receiving antennas is presented and is intended for use by the laser radar and communication systems designer. The material is presented in a format which allows the rapid and accurate evaluation of antenna gain. The Fresnel approximation to scalar wave theory is reviewed and the antenna analysis proceeds in terms of the power gain. Conventional range equations may then be used to calculate the power budget. The transmitter calculations, resulting in near and far field antenna gain patterns, assumes the antenna is illuminated by a laser operating in the fundamental cavity mode. A simple equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn which display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the outgoing beam as a function of antenna size and central obscuration. The use of telescope defocusing as an approach to spreading the beam for target acquisition is compared to some alternate methods.

  9. FY05 FM Dial Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Batdorf, Michael T.

    2005-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Infrared Sensors team is focused on developing methods for standoff detection of nuclear proliferation. In FY05, PNNL continued the development of the FM DIAL (frequency-modulated differential absorption LIDAR) experiment. Additional improvements to the FM DIAL trailer provided greater stability during field campaigns which made it easier to explore new locations for field campaigns. In addition to the Hanford Townsite, successful experiments were conducted at the Marine Science Laboratory in Sequim, WA and the Nevada Test Site located outside Las Vegas, NV. The range of chemicals that can be detected by FM DIAL has also increased. Prior to FY05, distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCL) were used in the FM DIAL experiments. With these lasers, only simple chemicals with narrow (1-2 cm-1) absorption spectra, such as CO2 and N2O, could be detected. Fabry-Perot (FP) QC lasers have much broader spectra (20-40 cm-1) which allows for the detection of larger chemicals and a wider array of chemicals that can be detected. A FP-QCL has been characterized and used during initial studies detecting DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate).

  10. A digital elevation model of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from combined laser and radar altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Smith, Ben; Sørensen, Louise S.; Forsberg, René

    2014-05-01

    When estimating elevation changes of ice-covered surfaces from radar altimetry, it is important to correct for slope-induced errors. They cause the reflecting point of the pulse to move up-slope and thus return estimates in the wrong coordinates. Slope-induced errors can be corrected for by introducing a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this work, such a DEM is developed for the Greenland Ice Sheet using a combination of Envisat radar and ICESat laser altimetry. If time permits, CryoSat radar altimetry will be included as well. The reference year is 2010 and the spatial resolution 2.5 x 2.5 km. This is in accordance with the results obtained in the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project showing that a 5 x 5 km grid spacing is reasonable for ice sheet-wide change detection (Levinsen et al., 2013). Separate DEMs will be created for the given data sets, and the geostatistical spatial interpolation method collocation will be used to merge them, thus adjusting for potential inter-satellite biases. The final DEM is validated with temporally and spatially agreeing airborne lidar data acquired in the NASA IceBridge and ESA CryoVex campaigns. The motivation for developing a new DEM is based on 1) large surface changes presently being observed, and mainly in margin regions, hence necessitating updated topography maps for accurately deriving and correcting surface elevation changes, and 2) although radar altimetry is subject to surface penetration of the signal into the snowpack, data is acquired continuously in time. This is not the case with e.g. ICESat, where laser altimetry data were obtained in periods of active lasers, i.e. three times a year with a 35-day repeat track. Previous DEMs e.g. have 2007 as the nominal reference year, or they are built merely from ICESat data. These have elevation errors as small as 10 cm, which is lower than for Envisat and CryoSat. The advantage of an updated DEM consisting of combined radar and laser altimetry therefore is the possibility of

  11. A wide angle search technique for a 10.6 micron ladar. [scanning radar using Q switched carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, S.; Adelman, S.; Lowrey, D. O.

    1975-01-01

    A ladar (laser radar) sensor designed around a pulsed passively Q-switched CO2 laser, capable of a efficient and rapid scans with a narrow beam over a wide field of view, is considered for surveillance and tracking applications in space. The output is a train of narrow pulses with a controllable pulse repetition rate. A resonant vibrating mirror in back of a classical Gregorian telescope, and a plane pointing mirror in front for beam steering, are used in scanning. Scan pulse sequences are described and illustrated. The 10.6 micron ladar set is under consideration as baseline sensor for various space rendezvous and docking applications.

  12. Algorithm of geometry correction for airborne 3D scanning laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-11-01

    Airborne three-dimensional scanning laser radar is used for wholesale scanning exploration to the target realm, then three-dimensional model can be established and target features can be identified with the characteristics of echo signals. So it is used widely and have bright prospect in the modern military, scientific research, agriculture and industry. At present, most researchers are focus on higher precision, more reliability scanning system. As the scanning platform is fixed on the aircraft, the plane cannot keep horizontal for a long time, also impossibly for a long time fly in the route without deviation. Data acquisition and the subsequence calibration rely on different equipments. These equipments bring errors both in time and space. Accurate geometry correction can amend the errors created by the process of assembly. But for the errors caused by the plane during the flight, whole imaging process should be analyzed. Take the side-roll as an example; scanning direction is inclined, so that the scanning point deviates from the original place. New direction and coordinate is the aim to us. In this paper, errors caused by the side-roll, pitch, yaw and assembly are analyzed and the algorithm routine is designed.

  13. Novel eye-safe line scanning 3D laser-radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, B.; Kern, Tobias; Hammer, Marcus; Schwanke, Ullrich; Nowak, Heinrich

    2014-10-01

    Today, the civil market provides quite a number of different 3D-Sensors covering ranges up to 1 km. Typically these sensors are based on single element detectors which suffer from the drawback of spatial resolution at larger distances. Tasks demanding reliable object classification at long ranges can be fulfilled only by sensors consisting of detector arrays. They ensure sufficient frame rates and high spatial resolution. Worldwide there are many efforts in developing 3D-detectors, based on two-dimensional arrays. This paper presents first results on the performance of a recently developed 3D imaging laser radar sensor, working in the short wave infrared (SWIR) at 1.5 μm. It consists of a novel Cadmium Mercury Telluride (CMT) linear array APD detector with 384x1 elements at a pitch of 25 μm, developed by AIM Infrarot Module GmbH. The APD elements are designed to work in the linear (non-Geiger) mode. Each pixel will provide the time of flight measurement, and, due to the linear detection mode, allowing the detection of three successive echoes. The resolution in depth is 15 cm, the maximum repetition rate is 4 kHz. We discuss various sensor concepts regarding possible applications and their dependence on system parameters like field of view, frame rate, spatial resolution and range of operation.

  14. Multi-sensor image interpretation using laser radar and thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chen-Chau; Aggarwal, J. K.

    1991-03-01

    A knowledge based system is presented which interprets registered laser radar and thermal images. The object is to detect and recognize man-made objects at kilometer range in outdoor scenes. The multisensor fusion approach is applied to various sensing modalities (range, intensity, velocity, and thermal) to improve both image segmentation and interpretation. The ability to use multiple sensors greatly helps an intelligent platform to understand and interact with its environment. The knowledge-based interpretation system, AIMS, is constructed using KEE and Lisp. Low-level attributes of image segments (regions) are computed by the segmentation modules and then converted into the KEE format. The interpretation system applies forward chaining in a bottom-up fashion to derive object-level interpretations from data bases generated by low-level processing modules. Segments are grouped into objects and then objects are classified into predefined categories. AIMS employs a two tiered software structure. The efficiency of AIMS is enhanced by transferring nonsymbolic processing tasks to a concurrent service manager (program). Therefore, tasks with different characteristics are executed using different software tools and methodologies.

  15. Digital Elevation Models of Greenland based on combined radar and laser altimetry as well as high-resolution stereoscopic imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Simonsen, S. B.; Forsberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    A number of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Greenland exist, each of which are applicable for different purposes. This study presents two such DEMs: One developed by merging contemporary radar and laser altimeter data, and one derived from high-resolution stereoscopic imagery. All products are made freely available. The former DEM covers the entire Greenland. It is specific to the year 2010, providing it with an advantage over previous models suffering from either a reduced spatial/ temporal data coverage or errors from surface elevation changes (SEC) occurring during data acquisition. Radar data are acquired with Envisat and CryoSat-2, and laser data with the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite, the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor, and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Correcting radar data for errors from slope effects and surface penetration of the echoes, and merging these with laser data, yields a DEM capable of resolving both surface depressions as well as topographic features at higher altitudes. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km, making the DEM ideal for application in surface mass balance studies, SEC detection from radar altimetry, or for correcting such data for slope-induced errors. The other DEM is developed in a pilot study building the expertise to map all ice-free parts of Greenland. The work combines WorldView-2 and -3 as well as GeoEye1 imagery from 2014 and 2015 over the Disko, Narsaq, Tassilaq, and Zackenberg regions. The novelty of the work is the determination of the product specifications after elaborate discussions with interested parties from government institutions, the tourist industry, etc. Thus, a 10 m DEM, 1.5 m orthophotos, and vector maps are produced. This opens to the possibility of using orthophotos with up-to-date contour lines or for deriving updated coastlines to aid, e.g., emergency management. This allows for a product development directly in line with the needs of parties with specific interests in Greenland.

  16. Status and future of laser scanning, synthetic aperture radar and hyperspectral remote sensing data for forest biomass assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    This is a review of the latest developments in different fields of remote sensing for forest biomass mapping. The main fields of research within the last decade have focused on the use of small footprint airborne laser scanning systems, polarimetric synthetic radar interferometry and hyperspectral data. Parallel developments in the field of digital airborne camera systems, digital photogrammetry and very high resolution multispectral data have taken place and have also proven themselves suitable for forest mapping issues. Forest mapping is a wide field and a variety of forest parameters can be mapped or modelled based on remote sensing information alone or combined with field data. The most common information required about a forest is related to its wood production and environmental aspects. In this paper, we will focus on the potential of advanced remote sensing techniques to assess forest biomass. This information is especially required by the REDD (reducing of emission from avoided deforestation and degradation) process. For this reason, new types of remote sensing data such as fullwave laser scanning data, polarimetric radar interferometry (polarimetric systhetic aperture interferometry, PolInSAR) and hyperspectral data are the focus of the research. In recent times, a few state-of-the-art articles in the field of airborne laser scanning for forest applications have been published. The current paper will provide a state-of-the-art review of remote sensing with a particular focus on biomass estimation, including new findings with fullwave airborne laser scanning, hyperspectral and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar interferometry. A synthesis of the actual findings and an outline of future developments will be presented.

  17. Parameters of spinning FM reticles.

    PubMed

    Driggers, R G; Halford, C E; Boreman, G D; Lattman, D; Williams, K F

    1991-03-01

    The literature describes tracking devices that allow a single detector coupled to a spinning FM reticle to determine target location. The spinning FM reticles presented were limited to single parameter reticles of frequency vs angle, frequency vs radius, or phase. This study presents these parameters with their capabilities and limitations and shows that multiple parameters can be integrated into a single reticle. Also, a general equation is developed that describes any FM reticle of the spinning type. PMID:20582075

  18. Atmospheric turbulence reciprocal path scattering effects for a ground-based monostatic laser radar tracking a space target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Robert A.; Phillips, Ronald L.

    1996-10-01

    A phenomenological model is developed for the strength and spatial width of the backscattered coherent intensity peak produced by reciprocal path scattering through atmospheric turbulence. The model is applied to a ground-based monostatic laser radar tracking a space target under optically saturated atmospheric turbulence conditions. The models for the amplitude and width of the RPS peak are based upon the spatial coherence widths of the propagating fields over the up-link and down-link paths within the atmospheric turbulence as well as the cross-sectional area of the up- link beam.

  19. Airborne laser scan data: a valuable tool with which to infer weather radar partial beam blockage in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonini, Roberto; Moisseev, Dmitri; Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam

    2016-10-01

    High-spatial-resolution weather radar observations are of primary relevance for hydrological applications in urban areas. However, when weather radars are located within metropolitan areas, partial beam blockages and clutter by buildings can seriously affect the observations. Standard simulations with simple beam propagation models and digital elevation models (DEMs) are usually not able to evaluate buildings' contribution to partial beam blockages. In recent years airborne laser scanners (ALSs) have evolved to the state-of-the-art technique for topographic data acquisition. Providing small footprint diameters (10-30 cm), ALS data allow accurate reconstruction of buildings and forest canopy heights. Analyzing the three weather C-band radars located in the metropolitan area of Helsinki, Finland, the present study investigates the benefits of using ALS data for quantitative estimations of partial beam blockages. The results obtained applying beam standard propagation models are compared with stratiform 24 h rainfall accumulation to evaluate the effects of partial beam blockages due to constructions and trees. To provide a physical interpretation of the results, the detailed analysis of beam occultations is achieved by open spatial data sets and open-source geographic information systems.

  20. A system for high resolution 3D mapping using laser radar and requiring no beam scanning mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Paul

    1988-06-01

    The inherently high angular and range resolution capabilities associated with radar systems operating at optical frequencies are at once a blessing and a curse. Standard implementations consist of very narrow field of view optical receivers operating in conjunction with laser transmitters or even narrower illumination beamwidth. While high angular resolution is thus achieved, mechanical scanning is required to gather data over extended fields of view. The many laser pulse transmissions necessary to cover the entire field of view increase the detectability of the system by enemy sensors. A system concept is proposed which, through the use of a single laser transmitter and multiple optical receivers, largely eliminate these deficiencies. Complete 3D data over a broad angular field of view and depth of field can be gathered based upon the reflections from a single transmitted laser pulse. Covert operation is enhanced as a result of the sparse laser transmissions required. The eye safety characteristics of the system are also enhanced. Proprietary coding of optical shutters in each of the multiple optical receivers permits the number of such receivers to be reduced to a very practical few. An alternative configuration of the system reduces the number of receivers required to one, at the expense of increased data acquisition time. The multiple receiver configuration is simply a parallel processing implementation of the single receiver approach. While data rate is reduced by the single receiver configuration, it still greatly exceeds that of scanning systems, and hardware complexity is also reduced significantly.

  1. Linearization of the frequency sweep of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave semiconductor laser radar and the resulting ranging performance.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, C J; Olsson, F A

    1999-05-20

    The performance of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) semiconductor laser radar has been examined. Frequency modulation (linear chirp) has been studied experimentally in detail. To create a linear frequency sweep, we modified the modulating function according to the measured frequency response of the laser, using an arbitrary function generator. The measurements indicate the possibility of achieving a spectral width of the signal peak that is transform limited rather than limited by the frequency modulation response of the laser, which permits the use of a narrow detection bandwidth. The narrow width results in a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio for low output power and thus also in relatively long-range and high-range accuracy. We have performed measurements of a diffuse target to determine the performance of a test laser radar system. The maximum range, range accuracy, and speed accuracy for a semiconductor laser with an output power of 10 mW and a linewidth of 400 kHz are presented. The influence of the laser's output power and coherence length on the performance of a semiconductor-laser-based FMCW laser radar is discussed. PMID:18319935

  2. Nuclear fission of Fm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Chiba, S.

    2010-06-01

    Multi-modal fission has been systematically investigated for the series of isotopes of Fm and Cf. The multi-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation is used for the dynamical calculation. The primary fission mode changes from mass-asymmetric fission to mass-symmetric fission with the increase of neutron numbers for both Fm and Cf cases.

  3. An analysis of FM jamming and noise quality measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Timothy N.

    1993-12-01

    This thesis provides a description of FM-by-noise jamming, both at RF and at the output of the radar receiver, in terms of spectra, time-domain waveforms, and univariate probability density of amplitude. Particular emphasis is given to the case where the peak frequency deviation of the FM modulator is sufficiently small that Woodward's Theorem does not provide a good approximation of the RF spectrum. Additionally, noise quality measures which have been used to measure noise quality of radar jammers are considered theoretically and experimentally, and it is concluded that a noise measure which incorporates both a spectral measure and a probability density measure should be adopted. One such measure is proposed here. Lastly, a technique for measuring the noise quality of an operational jammer is demonstrated and the programs necessary to measure noise quality of an operational jammer are included here.

  4. Laser radar studies: A study of the feasibility of remote measurement of atmospheric density and turbidity by means of rotational Raman scattering of laser light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A remote sensing technique is described which utilizes elastic scattering and rotational Raman scattering of laser light in the atmosphere to obtain soundings of turbidity, transmissivity and density. A scheme is devised whereby, through selective weighting of the rotational Raman lines, the effect of atmospheric temperature structure may be eliminated. The close spectral proximity of the elastic and Raman-scattered signals, combined with the fact that the Raman scattering is quite weak, produces special requirements for the spectroscopic and light-gathering components of a rotational Raman laser radar system. These requirements are investigated. A computation of typical signal-to-noise ratios is made. It is shown that daytime signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 db are to be expected for observation heights of 5 km and below. For nighttime work, 10 db signal-to-noise ratios are achievable to altitudes as high as 15 km.

  5. A lightweight, rugged, solid state laser radar system enabled by non-mechanical electro-optic beam steerers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Gann, Derek; Luey, Ben; Gamble, Joseph D.; Ziemkiewicz, Michael; Anderson, Mike

    2016-05-01

    There is currently a good deal of interest in developing laser radar (ladar) for autonomous navigation and collision avoidance in a wide variety of vehicles. In many of these applications, minimizing size, weight and power (SWaP) is of critical importance, particularly onboard aircraft and spacecraft where advanced imaging systems are also needed for location, alignment, and docking. In this paper, we describe the miniaturization of a powerful ladar system based on an electro-optic (EO) beamsteering device in which liquid crystal birefringence is exploited to achieve a 20° x 5° field of view (FOV) with no moving parts. This FOV will be significantly increased in future versions. In addition to scanning, the device is capable of operating in a "point and hold" mode where it locks onto a single moving object. The nonmechanical design leads to exceptionally favorable size and weight values: 1 L and < 1 kg respectively. Furthermore, these EO scanners operate without mechanical resonances or inertial effects. A demonstration was performed with a 50 kHz, 1 microjoule laser with a 2 mm beam diameter to image at a range of 100 m yielding a 2 fps frame rate limited by the pulse laser repetition rate. The fine control provided by the EO steerer results in an angle precision of 6x10-4 degrees. This FOV can be increased with discreet, non-mechanical polarization grating beamsteerers. In this paper, we will present the design, preliminary results, and planned next generation improvements.

  6. Effect of H-wave polarization on laser radar detection of partially convex targets in random media.

    PubMed

    El-Ocla, Hosam

    2010-07-01

    A study on the performance of laser radar cross section (LRCS) of conducting targets with large sizes is investigated numerically in free space and random media. The LRCS is calculated using a boundary value method with beam wave incidence and H-wave polarization. Considered are those elements that contribute to the LRCS problem including random medium strength, target configuration, and beam width. The effect of the creeping waves, stimulated by H-polarization, on the LRCS behavior is manifested. Targets taking large sizes of up to five wavelengths are sufficiently larger than the beam width and are sufficient for considering fairly complex targets. Scatterers are assumed to have analytical partially convex contours with inflection points.

  7. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Tang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  8. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Tang, Hui; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-12-10

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  9. Exploratory laser experiments. [measurement of atmospheric water vapor via optical radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Experiments are described which were undertaken to explore the application of various dye laser methods for generating laser pulses which could be tuned over H2O absorption lines in the visible and near infrared. Specific topics discussed include: operation of a long pulse dye laser with a tunable, narrow band output at high energies near the 5915 A water vapor absorption bands; assembly and operation of a short duration dye laser near the 5915 A water vapor absorption bands; construction of a dye laser to be pumped to operate in the red and near infrared; and preliminary studies of the beam divergence of the output of the a laser-pumped system. Results are summarized.

  10. HI-CLASS on AEOS: a large-aperture laser radar for space surveillance/situational awareness investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Mark A.; Dryden, Gordon L.; Pohle, Richard H.; Ayers, Kirstie; Carreras, Richard A.; Crawford, Linda L.; Taft, Russell

    2001-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory/Directed Energy Directorate (AFRL/DE) via the ALVA (Applications of Lidars for Vehicles with Analysis) program installed in late 2000 a wideband, 12 J 15 Hz CO2 laser radar (ladar) on the 3.67 meter aperture AEOS (Advanced Electro-Optics System) telescope. This system is part of the Maui Space Surveillance System (MSSS), on the summit of Haleakala, Maui, HI. This ladar adopts the technology successfully demonstrated by the first generation HI-CLASS (High Performance CO2) Ladar Surveillance Sensor) operating on the nearby 0.6 meter aperture Laser Beam Director (LBD) and developed under the Field Ladar Demonstration program, jointly sponsored by AFRL/DE and the Army's Space and Missile Defense Command. The moderate power (approximately 180 watts) HI-CLASS/AEOS system generates multiple, coherent waveforms for precision satellite tracking and characterization of space objects for 1 m2 targets at ranges out to 10,000 km. This system also will be used to track space objects smaller than30 cm at ranges to 2,000 km. A third application of this system is to provide data for developing satellite identification, characterization, health and status techniques. This paper will discuss the operating characteristics and innovative features of the new system. The paper will also review recent results in support of AF needs, demonstrations, experiments, as well as planned activities that directly support applications in the DoD, scientific, and commercial arenas.

  11. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  12. FM-to-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniuszko, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Circuit includes array of low-cost multivibrators. Inexpensive circuit converts frequency-modulated (FM) signal into digital signal. Consists of zero-crossing detector and series of monostable multivibrators and D-type flip-flops. Used to control filter.

  13. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging with a quantum cascade laser transmitter.

    PubMed

    Danylov, Andriy A; Goyette, Thomas M; Waldman, Jerry; Coulombe, Michael J; Gatesman, Andrew J; Giles, Robert H; Qian, Xifeng; Chandrayan, Neelima; Vangala, Shivashankar; Termkoa, Krongtip; Goodhue, William D; Nixon, William E

    2010-07-19

    A coherent transceiver using a THz quantum cascade (TQCL) laser as the transmitter and an optically pumped molecular laser as the local oscillator has been used, with a pair of Schottky diode mixers in the receiver and reference channels, to acquire high-resolution images of fully illuminated targets, including scale models and concealed objects. Phase stability of the received signal, sufficient to allow coherent image processing of the rotating target (in azimuth and elevation), was obtained by frequency-locking the TQCL to the free-running, highly stable optically pumped molecular laser. While the range to the target was limited by the available TQCL power (several hundred microwatts) and reasonably strong indoor atmospheric attenuation at 2.408 THz, the coherence length of the TQCL transmitter will allow coherent imaging over distances up to several hundred meters. Image data obtained with the system is presented.

  14. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the radar function for the space shuttle. [(pulse radar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Results are discussed of a study to define a radar and antenna system which best suits the space shuttle rendezvous requirements. Topics considered include antenna characteristics and antenna size tradeoffs, fundamental sources of measurement errors inherent in the target itself, backscattering crosssection models of the target and three basic candidate radar types. Antennas up to 1.5 meters in diameter are within specified installation constraints, however, a 1 meter diameter paraboloid and a folding, four slot backfeed on a two gimbal mount implemented for a spiral acquisition scan is recommended. The candidate radar types discussed are: (1) noncoherent pulse radar (2) coherent pulse radar and (3) pulse Doppler radar with linear FM ranging. The radar type recommended is a pulse Doppler with linear FM ranging. Block diagrams of each radar system are shown.

  15. Short-range verification experiment of a trial one-dimensional synthetic aperture infrared laser radar operated in the 10-microm band.

    PubMed

    Yoshikado, S; Aruga, T

    2000-03-20

    A trial one-dimensional (1-D) synthetic aperture infrared laser radar (SAILR) system for imaging static objects, with two CO(2) lasers as a transmitter and a local oscillator for heterodyne detection, was constructed. It has a single receiving aperture mounted on a linearly movable stage with a length of 1 m and a position accuracy of 1 microm. In an indoor short-range experiment to confirm the fundamental functions of the system and demonstrate its unique imaging process we succeeded in obtaining 1-D synthetic aperture images of close specular point targets with theoretically expected resolution.

  16. Towards Quantitative Optical Cross Sections in Entomological Laser Radar – Potential of Temporal and Spherical Parameterizations for Identifying Atmospheric Fauna

    PubMed Central

    Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the field of remote sensing of birds and insects in the atmosphere (the aerial fauna) has advanced considerably, and modern electro-optic methods now allow the assessment of the abundance and fluxes of pests and beneficials on a landscape scale. These techniques have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of, and ability to quantify and manage, the ecological environment. This paper presents a concept whereby laser radar observations of atmospheric fauna can be parameterized and table values for absolute cross sections can be catalogued to allow for the study of focal species such as disease vectors and pests. Wing-beat oscillations are parameterized with a discrete set of harmonics and the spherical scatter function is parameterized by a reduced set of symmetrical spherical harmonics. A first order spherical model for insect scatter is presented and supported experimentally, showing angular dependence of wing beat harmonic content. The presented method promises to give insights into the flight heading directions of species in the atmosphere and has the potential to shed light onto the km-range spread of pests and disease vectors. PMID:26295706

  17. CERES ERBE-like Monthly Geographical Averages (ES-4) in HDF (CER_ES4_FM1+FM2+FM3+FM4_Edition1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator)

    The ERBE-like Monthly Geographical Averages (ES-4) product contains a month of space and time averaged Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The ES-4 is also produced for combinations of scanner instruments. For each observed 2.5-degree spatial region, the daily average, the hourly average over the month, and the overall monthly average of shortwave and longwave fluxes at the Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA) from the CERES ES-9 product are spatially nested up from 2.5-degree regions to 5- and 10-degree regions, to 2.5-, 5-, and 10-degree zonal averages, and to global monthly averages. For each nested area, the albedo and net flux are given. For each region, the daily average flux is estimated from an algorithm that uses the available hourly data, scene identification data, and diurnal models. This algorithm is 'like' the algorithm used for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The following CERES ES4 data sets are currently available: CER_ES4_FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES4_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES4_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES4_PFM+FM1_Edition1 CER_ES4_PFM+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES4_TRMM-PFM_Edition1 CER_ES4_TRMM-PFM_Edition2 CER_ES4_Terra-FM1_Edition1 CER_ES4_Terra-FM2_Edition1 CER_ES4_FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES4_Terra-FM1_Edition2 CER_ES4_Terra-FM2_Edition2 CER_ES4_Aqua-FM3_Edition1 CER_ES4_Aqua-FM4_Edition1 CER_ES4_FM1+FM2+FM3+FM4_Edition1 CER_ES4_Aqua-FM3_Edition2 CER_ES4_Aqua-FM4_Edition2 CER_ES4_FM1+FM3_Edition2 CER_ES4_FM1+FM4_Edition2 CER_ES4_PFM+FM1_Edition2 CER_ES4_PFM+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES4_Aqua-FM3_Edition1-CV CER_ES4_Aqua-FM4_Edition1-CV CER_ES4_Terra-FM1_Edition1-CV CER_ES4_Terra-FM2_Edition1-CV. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2003-12-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=2.5 degree; Longitude_Resolution=2.5 degree; Horizontal

  18. Analysis of subglacial hydrodynamics and ice dynamics through combined terrestrial laser scanning and ground penetrating radar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbud, Chrystelle; Rüttimann, Sébastien; Micheletti, Natan; Irving, James; Lane, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    This study shows how high resolution surveys of subglacial channel morphology combined with high resolution terrestrial laser scanner survey of an Alpine glacier help to understand subglacial hydrological forcing of ice dynamics. The study area is the Haut Glacier d'Arolla in Switzerland, an Alpine valley glacier for which subglacial drainage system has been well studied. A new generation of terrestrial laser scanners was used to investigate glacier surface ablation and other elements of glacial hydrodynamics at exceptionally high spatial and temporal resolution. The LiDAR RIEGL VZ-6000 scanner, with a laser 3B specifically designed for measurements of snow and ice cover surfaces, was tested at seasonal and daily scales. The data revealed spatial variations in the patterns of surface melt, controlled by both aspect and differential debris cover at the seasonal scale, and controlled by ogive-related differences in ice surface debris content at the daily scale. More tentatively, intra-daily scale measurements pointed to possible hydraulic jacking of the glacier associated with short-term water pressure rises at the downstream part of the glacier. A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) field campaign was conducted a year later in the location where possible hydraulic jacking had been detected previously. The aims of this campaign were (i) to assess GPR usage for subglacial channel detection; (ii) identify more precisely the channel morphology; and (iii) investigate further the hydraulic jacking hypothesis. 100 MHz antennas were used to map a 240 x 34 m area near the glacier snout where the ice thickness did not exceed 50 m. The corresponding data, after processing, allowed reconstruction of the bed topography and the morphology of subglacial channels in 3D, showing two of the latter in this area. One channel was followed for approximately 20 m upglacier and corresponding morphology estimates were performed. These data allowed for 3D reconstructions of both the bed

  19. Doublet Pulse Coherent Laser Radar for Tracking of Resident Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rudd, Van; Shald, Scott; Sandford, Stephen; Dimarcantonio, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the development of a long range ladar system known as ExoSPEAR at NASA Langley Research Center for tracking rapidly moving resident space objects is discussed. Based on 100 W, nanosecond class, near-IR laser, this ladar system with coherent detection technique is currently being investigated for short dwell time measurements of resident space objects (RSOs) in LEO and beyond for space surveillance applications. This unique ladar architecture is configured using a continuously agile doublet-pulse waveform scheme coupled to a closed-loop tracking and control loop approach to simultaneously achieve mm class range precision and mm/s velocity precision and hence obtain unprecedented track accuracies. Salient features of the design architecture followed by performance modeling and engagement simulations illustrating the dependence of range and velocity precision in LEO orbits on ladar parameters are presented. Estimated limits on detectable optical cross sections of RSOs in LEO orbits are discussed.

  20. Cryogenic metrology for the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module alignment target fixtures using laser radar through a chamber window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjimichael, T.; Kubalak, D.; Slotwinski, A.; Davila, P.; Eegholm, B.; Eichhorn, W.; Hayden, J.; Mentzell, E.; Ohl, R.; Scharfstein, G.; Telfer, R.

    2010-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module utilizes two fixtures to align the Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM) to the coordinate systems established on the ISIM and the ISIM Test Platform (ITP). These fixtures contain targets which are visible to the OSIM Alignment Diagnostics Module (ADM). Requirements on these fixtures must be met under ambient and cryogenic conditions. This paper discusses the cryogenic metrology involving Laser Radar measurements through a chamber window that will be used to link photogrammetry target measurements used during ISIM structure cryogenic verification and the ADM targets, including evaluation of distortion introduced from the window.

  1. Autofocus technique for three-dimensional imaging, direct-detection laser radar using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode focal-plane array.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min Seok; Kong, Hong Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jo, Sung Eun

    2010-12-15

    An autofocus technique is proposed for a three-dimensional imaging, direct-detection laser radar system that uses a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode focal plane array (GmAPD-FPA). This technique is implemented by pointing laser pulses on a target of interest and observing its scattered photon distribution on a GmAPD-FPA. Measuring the standard deviation of the photon distribution on a GmAPD-FPA enables the best focus condition to be found. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated experimentally by employing a 1 × 8 pixel GmAPD-FPA. It is shown that the spatial resolution improves when the GmAPD-FPA is located in the best focus position found by the autofocus technique. PMID:21165141

  2. Radar reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-07-01

    This TOP describes a method for measuring the radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft. It uses a rotating platform and various radar systems to obtain calibrated radar Automatic Gain Control values for each degree of aspect angle for the aircraft. The purpose of this test is to provide comparable values of radar reflectivity for Army aircraft at various radar frequencies and parameter for fixed positions and aspect angles on the aircraft. Data collected on each specific aircraft can be used to evaluate radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft skin material, paint, and structural changes such as flat versus curved surfaces.

  3. Use of 3D laser radar for navigation of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles in urban and indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Venable, Don; Smearcheck, Mark

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the integration of Inertial measurements with measurements from a three-dimensional (3D) imaging sensor for position and attitude determination of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and autonomous ground vehicles (AGV) in urban or indoor environments. To enable operation of UAVs and AGVs at any time in any environment a Precision Navigation, Attitude, and Time (PNAT) capability is required that is robust and not solely dependent on the Global Positioning System (GPS). In urban and indoor environments a GPS position capability may not only be unavailable due to shadowing, significant signal attenuation or multipath, but also due to intentional denial or deception. Although deep integration of GPS and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data may prove to be a viable solution an alternative method is being discussed in this paper. The alternative solution is based on 3D imaging sensor technologies such as Flash Ladar (Laser Radar). Flash Ladar technology consists of a modulated laser emitter coupled with a focal plane array detector and the required optics. Like a conventional camera this sensor creates an "image" of the environment, but producing a 2D image where each pixel has associated intensity vales the flash Ladar generates an image where each pixel has an associated range and intensity value. Integration of flash Ladar with the attitude from the IMU allows creation of a 3-D scene. Current low-cost Flash Ladar technology is capable of greater than 100 x 100 pixel resolution with 5 mm depth resolution at a 30 Hz frame rate. The proposed algorithm first converts the 3D imaging sensor measurements to a point cloud of the 3D, next, significant environmental features such as planar features (walls), line features or point features (corners) are extracted and associated from one 3D imaging sensor frame to the next. Finally, characteristics of these features such as the normal or direction vectors are used to compute the platform position and attitude

  4. Radar return from a continuous vegetation canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter coefficient, sigma deg, of alfalfa was investigated as a function of both radar parameters and the physical characteristics of the alfalfa canopy. Measurements were acquired with an 8-18 GHz FM-CW mobile radar over an angular range of 0 - 70 deg as measured from nadir. The experimental data indicates that the excursions of sigma deg at nadir cover a range of nearly 18 dB during one complete growing cycle. An empirical model for sigma deg was developed which accounts for its variability in terms of soil moisture, plant moisture and plant height.

  5. Spontaneous fission of /sup 259/Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.; Wild, J.F.; Hoffman, D.C.; Weber, J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.

    1980-03-01

    A 1.5-s spontaneous fission activity has been produced by irradiating /sup 257/Fm with 16-MeV tritons. On the basis of formation cross sections, fission half-life systematics, and the identification of other possible products, this 1.5-s activity has been attributed to /sup 259/Fm formed by the reaction /sup 257/Fm(t,p)/sup 259/Fm. /sup 259/Fm is the heaviest known isotope of Fm and has more neutrons than any other nuclide thus far identified. This measurement of the spontaneous fission of /sup 259/Fm is the first to show a narrow, predominantly symmetric, mass division from spontaneous fission. It is accompanied by a very high kinetic energy, the most probable total kinetic energy being 242 +- 6 MeV. These features show a marked acceleration in the trend toward more symmetric mass division and higher total kinetic energies than have been observed previously for the Fm isotopes as the mass increased.

  6. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  7. 47 CFR 73.827 - Interference to the input signals of FM translator or FM booster stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... translator or FM booster stations. 73.827 Section 73.827 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... Interference to the input signals of FM translator or FM booster stations. (a) An authorized LPFM station will not be permitted to continue to operate if an FM translator or FM booster station demonstrates...

  8. Project Echo: FM Demodulators with Negative Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthroff, Clyde L.

    1961-01-01

    The primary experimental objective of Project Echo was the transmission of radio communications between points on the earth by reflection from the balloon satellite. Owing to the large path losses from transmitter to receiver via the satellite, a wide-band frequency modulation technique was used in which bandwidth was traded for signal-to-noise ratio. This paper describes the FM receiving demodulators employed. Negative feedback applied to the local oscillator reduces the FM modulation index in the receiver IF amplifiers, resulting in threshold performance superior to that of conventional FM receivers.

  9. All-Fiber Multifunction Continuous-Wave Coherent Laser Radar at 1.55 num for Range, Speed, Vibration, and Wind Measurements.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, C J; Olsson, F A; Letalick, D; Harris, M

    2000-07-20

    The design and performance of a simple, multifunction 1.55-mum continuous-wave (cw) and frequency-modulated cw coherent laser radar system with an output power of 1 W is presented. The system is based on a semiconductor laser source plus an erbium-doped fiber amplifier, a polarization-independent fiber-optic circulator used as the transmit-receive switch, and digital signal processing. The system is shown to be able to perform wind-speed measurements even in clear atmospheric conditions when the visibility exceeds 40 km. The aerosol measurements indicate the potential to use single-particle detection for wind measurements with enhanced sensitivity. The system can perform range and line-of-sight velocity measurements of hard targets at ranges of the order of several kilometers with a range accuracy of a few meters and a velocity accuracy of 0.1 m/s by use of triangular-wave frequency modulation with compensation of the frequency-modulation response of the semiconductor laser. The system also demonstrates a capability for vibration sensing.

  10. On siphons and sediments: A new model for draining active subglacial lakes in Antarctica informed with satellite radar and laser altimeter observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. P.; Fricker, H. A.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of repeat-pass satellite-based surface altimetry over much of Antarctica, approximately 130 new subglacial lakes have been discovered entirely from observations of surface uplift and subsidence; these are commonly referred to as "active lakes". In contrast to the ~160 lakes detected by radar sounding ("RES" lakes), which are typically in mountains bedrock terrain near the ice divide and static with residence times spanning millenia, active lakes are typically located in fast flowing ice streams far from the divides, and have short residence times. To understand how water transfers through active lake systems we have developed a new model based on earlier theoretical work and informed by lake-volume estimates inferred from of ice surface displacements detected by satellite radar and laser altimetry. We find that although the overall pattern of filling and drainage is similar to that for ice dammed lakes in alpine regions via channels thermally eroded into the ice that then creeps shut as water pressure declines, Antarctic lake drainage is better simulated by invoking a channel mechanically eroded into the underlying sediment. The necessity of an erodable deformable substrate to explain lake drainage suggests that the distribution of active lakes is an indicator for the presence of sediment. Furthermore the process of lake drainage appears quite sensitive to the composion and strength of the underlying till. We explore these possibilities by testing the model on subglacial lakes in both East and West Antarctica, including Recovery Glacier and MacAyeal Ice stream.

  11. Pulsed coherent solid-state 1.06-micron and 2.1-micron laser radar systems for remote velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Huffaker, R. Milton; Kavaya, Michael J.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.

    1990-01-01

    A low average power, pulsed, solid-state, 1.06-micron coherent laser radar (CLR) for range and velocity measurements of atmospheric and hard targets has been developed. The system has been operating at a field test site near Boulder, CO since September, 1988. Measurements have been taken on moving targets such as atmospheric aerosol particles, belt sanders, spinning disks, and various stationary targets. The field measurements have shown that this system exhibits excellent velocity measurement performance. A fast-tuning CW Nd:YAG oscillator has also been developed which has a frequency tuning range of greater than 30 GHz (which spans a target radial velocity range of over 16 km/s) and a tuning speed greater than 30 GHz/ms.

  12. Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram

    2004-10-01

    Weather radar is an indispensable component for remote sensing of the atmosphere, and the data and products derived from weather radar are routinely used in climate and weather-related studies to examine trends, structure, and evolution. The need for weather remote sensing is driven by the necessity to understand and explain a specific atmospheric science phenomenon. The importance of remote sensing is especially evident in high-profile observational programs, such as the WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar) network, TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission), and ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement). A suite of ground-based and airborne radar instruments is maintained and deployed for observing wind, clouds, and precipitation. Weather radar observation has become an integral component of weather forecasting and hydrology and climate studies. The inclusion of weather radar observations in numerical weather modeling has enhanced severe storm forecasting, aviation weather, hurricane intensity and movement, and the global water cycle.

  13. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  14. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  15. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  16. The Use of Polysymptomatic Distress Categories in the Evaluation of Fibromyalgia (FM) and FM Severity

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Frederick; Walitt, Brian T.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Katz, Robert S.; Hauser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Objective The polysymptomatic distress (PSD) scale is derived from variables used in the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) fibromyalgia (FM) criteria modified for survey and clinical research. The scale is useful in measuring the effect of PSD over the full range of pain-related clinical symptoms, not just in those who are FM criteria-positive. However, no PSD scale categories have been defined to distinguish severity of illness in FM or in those who do not satisfy the FM criteria. We analyzed the scale and multiple covariates to develop clinical categories and to further validate the scale. Methods FM was diagnosed according to the research criteria modification of the 2010 ACR FM criteria. We investigated categories in a large database of patients with pain (2732 with rheumatoid arthritis) and developed categories by using germane clinic variables that had been previously studied for severity groupings. By definition, FM cannot be diagnosed unless PSD is at least 12. Results Based on population categories, regression analysis, and inspections of curvilinear relationships, we established PSD severity categories of none (0–3), mild (4–7), moderate (8–11), severe (12–19), and very severe (20–31). Categories were statistically distinct, and a generally linear relationship between PSD categories and covariate severity was noted. Conclusion PSD categories are clinically relevant and demonstrate FM type symptoms over the full range of clinical illness. Although FM criteria can be clinically useful, there is no clear-cut symptom distinction between FM (+) and FM (−), and PSD categories can aid in more effectively classifying patients. PMID:26077414

  17. 47 CFR 73.297 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.297... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.297 FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. (a) An FM..., quadraphonic, etc.) sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment under...

  18. 47 CFR 73.297 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.297... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.297 FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. (a) An FM..., quadraphonic, etc.) sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment under...

  19. 47 CFR 73.297 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.297... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.297 FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. (a) An FM..., quadraphonic, etc.) sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment under...

  20. 47 CFR 73.297 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.297... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.297 FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. (a) An FM..., quadraphonic, etc.) sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment under...

  1. 47 CFR 73.297 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.297... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.297 FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. (a) An FM..., quadraphonic, etc.) sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment under...

  2. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  3. Melanoma incidence and frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Orjan; Johansson, Olle

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been increasing steadily in many countries since 1960, but the underlying mechanism causing this increase remains elusive. The incidence of melanoma has been linked to the distance to frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting towers. In the current study, the authors sought to determine if there was also a related link on a larger scale for entire countries. Exposure-time-specific incidence was extracted from exposure and incidence data from 4 different countries, and this was compared with reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. Geographic differences in melanoma incidence were compared with the magnitude of this environmental stress. The exposure-time-specific incidence from all 4 countries became almost identical, and they were approximately equal to the reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. A correlation between melanoma incidence and the number of locally receivable FM transmitters was found. The authors concluded that melanoma is associated with exposure to FM broadcasting.

  4. A lightweight ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenjan, S.K.; Allen, C.M.; Gardner, D.; Wong, H.R.

    1998-12-31

    The detection of buried objects, particularly unexploded ordnance (UXO), has gained significant interest in the US in the late 1990s. The desire to remediate the thousands of sites worldwide has become an increasing humanitarian concern. The application of radar to this problem has received renewed attention. Bechtel Nevada, Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) has developed several frequency modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) units for the US Department of Energy since 1984. To meet these new technical requirements for high resolution data and UXO detection, STL is moving forward with advances to GPR technology, signal processing, and imaging with the development of an innovative system. The goal is to design and fabricate a lightweight, battery operated unit that does not require surface contact and can be operated by a novice user.

  5. The 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    The design, construction, testing, and accuracy of an 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer, an FM-CW system which employs a dual antenna system, is described. The antennas, transmitter, and a portion of the receiver are mounted at the top of a 26 meter hydraulic boom which is in turn mounted on a truck for system mobility. HH and VV polarized measurements are possible at incidence angles ranging from 0 deg. to 80 deg. Calibration is accomplished by referencing the measurements against a Luneberg lens of known radar cross section.

  6. Validation of GPM Ka-Radar Algorithm Using a Ground-based Ka-Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    GPM led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of US (NASA) aims to observe global precipitation. The core satellite is equipped with a microwave radiometer (GMI) and a dual-frequency radar (DPR) which is the first spaceborne Ku/Ka-band dual-wavelength radar dedicated for precipitation measurement. In the DPR algorithm, measured radar reflectivity is converted to effective radar reflectivity by estimating the rain attenuation. Here, the scattering/attenuation characteristics of Ka-band radiowaves are crucial, particularly for wet snow. A melting layer observation using a dual Ka-band radar system developed by JAXA was conducted along the slope of Mt. Zao in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The dual Ka-band radar system consists of two nearly identical Ka-band FM-CW radars, and the precipitation systems between two radars were observed in opposite directions. From this experiment, equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) and specific attenuation (k) were obtained. The experiments were conducted for two winter seasons. During the data analyses, it was found that k estimate easily fluctuates because the estimate is based on double difference calculation. With much temporal and spatial averaging, k-Ze relationship was obtained for melting layers. One of the results is that the height of the peak of k seems slightly higher than that of Ze. The results are compared with in-situ precipitation particle measurements.

  7. High-power picosecond laser diodes based on different methods of fast gain control for high-precision radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Sergey; Kostamovaara, Juha; Lantratov, Vladimir; Kaluzhniy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey

    2007-05-01

    Current-pumped picosecond-range laser diodes with a peak power significantly exceeding that achievable from gainswitched lasers are of major interest for a large variety of commercial applications. A group of phenomena have been explored in which the peak transient gain is efficiently controlled by a fast reduction in the pumping current. Common to all these phenomena is the fact that the peak powers of the emitted picosecond optical pulses (15-100 ps) exceed that obtainable from gain-switched laser diodes by at least an order of magnitude, although the physical reasons for the high gain and the design principles of the semiconductor structures are different. The main problem in the realization of these picosecond modes in low-cost practical systems is the high sensitivity of the operation regime to structural and circuit parameters. A related problem is the questionable reproducibility of the fabrication processes used so far. Proper development of reliable high-power picosecond transmitters will require the use of more advanced fabrication methods and further study of the effect of structural parameters on the properties of the picosecond lasing mode. In this paper we report on a record value for the power density of the picosecond lasing (50W / 30ps) obtained from a laser diode chip of width 20 μm and give a qualitative interpretation of the operating mode. Use of the MOCVD process for diode fabrication should allow reproducible technology for picosecond laser diodes to be developed.

  8. Studies on remote sensing method of particle size and water density distribution in mists and clouds using laser radar techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, H.; Kobayasi, T.; Inaba, H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of remote measurement of the particle size and density distribution of water droplets was developed. In this method, the size of droplets is measured from the Mie scattering parameter which is defined as the total-to-backscattering ratio of the laser beam. The water density distribution is obtained by a combination of the Mie scattering parameter and the extinction coefficient of the laser beam. This method was examined experimentally for the mist generated by an ultrasonic mist generator and applied to clouds containing rain and snow. Compared with the conventional sampling method, the present method has advantages of remote measurement capability and improvement in accuracy.

  9. Direct Global Measurements of Tropspheric Winds Employing a Simplified Coherent Laser Radar using Fully Scalable Technology and Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Spiers, Gary D.; Lobl, Elena S.; Rothermel, Jeff; Keller, Vernon W.

    1996-01-01

    Innovative designs of a space-based laser remote sensing 'wind machine' are presented. These designs seek compatibility with the traditionally conflicting constraints of high scientific value and low total mission cost. Mission cost is reduced by moving to smaller, lighter, more off-the-shelf instrument designs which can be accommodated on smaller launch vehicles.

  10. Determining the response of an FM receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency response to frequency-modulation (FM) receiver is measured with aid of phase-modulation (PM) transmitter by applying correction to output power level. As modulating frequency is increased, output level obtained in response to PM input is reduced by 6 db per octane.

  11. Radar history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  12. Processing of pure-tone and FM stimuli in the auditory cortex of the FM bat, Myotis lucifugus.

    PubMed

    Shannon-Hartman, S; Wong, D; Maekawa, M

    1992-08-01

    FM bats perceive their surroundings during echolocation by analyzing frequency-modulated (FM) acoustic signals. Results from this study indicate a cortical organization in Myotis lucifugus which is largely made up of neurons sensitive to FM sounds (FM-sensitive neurons). Three types of neurons were distinguished by their responses to pure-tone and FM stimuli: (1) Type I FM-sensitive units (83%), Type II FM-sensitive units (13%) and pure-tone sensitive units (4%). Type I FM-sensitive units responded to pure tones, but exhibited greater response magnitudes to FM stimuli when the best FM swept through the BF. An orderly frequency representation was found when the frequencies of pure tones essential for response (EPTs) in Type I units were mapped along the cortical surface. The EPTs for Type I neurons were usually found within the last millisecond of a downward FM sweep. As outlined by two neuronal network models, both the responses of Type I and II units could likely result from the convergence of excitatory and inhibitory lower level neurons with slightly differing BFs. Type II units were selective for an FM sweep and showed negligible to no response to pure-tone stimuli. Pure-tone sensitive units exhibited weak or no responses to FM stimuli. These neurons were clustered in a small area located rostrodorsal to the tonotopic zone and had significantly lower best frequencies than adjacent EPT frequencies of Type I FM-sensitive neurons. PMID:1326505

  13. Frequency of tropical precipitating clouds as observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar and ICESat/Geoscience Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Sean P. F.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Schumacher, Courtney

    2007-07-01

    Convective clouds in the tropics can be grouped into three categories: shallow clouds with cloud top heights near 2 km above the surface, midlevel congestus clouds with tops near the 0°C level, and deep convective clouds capped by the tropopause. This trimodal distribution is visible in cloud data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), carried aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), as well as in precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). Fractional areal coverage (FAC) data is calculated at each of the three levels to describe how often optically thick clouds or precipitation are seen at each level. By dividing the FAC of TRMM PR-observed precipitation by the FAC of thick GLAS/ICESat-observed clouds, we derive the fraction of clouds that are precipitating. We find that the tropical mean precipitating cloud fraction is low: 3.7% for shallow clouds, 6.5% for midlevel clouds, and 24.1% for deep clouds.

  14. A novel low-cost targeting system (LCTS) based upon a high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Wikman, John C.; Skaluba, Fred W.; Dippel, George F.; McDaniel, Robert V.; Ferrell, David S.; Seibel, William

    2005-10-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has developed a Low Cost Targeting System (LCTS) consisting of a FLIR for target detection, laser-illuminated, gated imaging for target identification, laser rangefinder and designator, GPS positioning, and auto-tracking capability within a small compact system size. This system has proven its ability to acquire targets, range and identify these targets, and designate or provide precise geo-location coordinates to these targets. The system is based upon BAE Systems proven micro-bolometer passive LWIR camera coupled with Intevac's new EBAPS camera. A dual wavelength diode pumped laser provides eyesafe ranging and target illumination, as well as designation; a custom detector module senses the return pulse for target ranging and to set the range gates for the gated camera. Intevac's camera is a CMOS based device with used selectable gate widths and can read at up to 28 frames/second when operated in VGA mode. The Transferred Electron photocathode enables high performance imaging in the SWIR band by enabling single photon detection at high quantum efficiency. Trials show that the current detectors offer complete extinction of signals outside of the gated range, thus, providing high resolution within the gated region. The images have shown high spatial resolution arising from the use of solid state focal plane array technology. Imagery has been collected in both the laboratory and the field to verify system performance during a variety of operating conditions.

  15. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  16. 5. Photocopy of photograph showing target tracking radar from 'Procedures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph showing target tracking radar from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Hercules Missile Battery,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-82 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1959 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  17. 3. Photocopy of photograph showing acquisition radar from 'Procedures and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph showing acquisition radar from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Hercules Missile Battery,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-82 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1959 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  18. 14. Photocopy of drawing showing data flow of radar at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of drawing showing data flow of radar at control area from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  19. 4. Photocopy of photograph showing battery acquisition radar from 'Procedures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph showing battery acquisition radar from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Hercules Missile Battery,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-82 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1959 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  20. 2. Photocopy of photograph showing cable supports for radar equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph showing cable supports for radar equipment from Procedures and Drills for NIKE Ajax System, Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA 1959 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  1. GEOS-3 C-Band radar investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The absolute accuracy of instrumentation radar systems, refined methods of calibrating these systems, and the techniques employed in processing the associated data. A world-wide network of C-Band instrumentation radars augmented by lasers and other tracking instrumentation systems were used. The NASA WFC AN/FPQ-6 instrumentation radar and the AN/FPS-16 instrumentation radar also located at NASA WFC were the primary instruments used in the accuracy and calibration evaluations. The results achieved at WFC were then disseminated to other Ranges where they were verified, augmented and used as part of routine operations.

  2. Scanning-Pencil-Beam Radar Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, David G.; Freilich, Michael H.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Noon, Don E.

    1992-01-01

    SCANSCAT conceptual scanning radar scatterometer placed in nearly polar orbit around Earth at altitude of 705 km aboard Spacecraft B of NASA's Earth Observing System. Measures radar backscattering from surface of ocean. Data processed on ground into normalized radar-backscattering cross sections, then processed into velocities of winds near surface of ocean by use of empirical mathematical model of relationship between normalized backscattering cross section, wind vector at scanned spot, and angle of incidence and azimuth angle of radar beam. Accuracy and coverage exceeds those of fan-beam scatterometer. Modified versions of scanning plan useful in laser inspection of surface finishes on machined parts.

  3. Power Beaming for Space-Based Electricity on Earth: Near-Term Experiments with Radars, Lasers and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffert, E.; Soukup, P.; Hoffert, M.

    2004-12-01

    Power beaming experiments thus far have been done over distances close enough where receiver apertures approximately the same diameter as transmitters can capture most of the beam (the "near- field"). The best experimentally verified wireless power transmission DC-to-DC efficiencies are 54% for a microwave transmission measured over a short distance; the longest range wireless power transmission stands at 1.6 km in 1975 (Brown, 1998; Dickinson, 1975, 2002). The next logical step is longer-range, "far-field" power beaming, particularly Space-to-Earth, or its reciprocal, Earth-to-Space, to validate beam propagation models and establish a solid experimental basis for power transmission through the atmosphere. To minimize costs, we propose adapting ground-based microwave transmitters designed for radio astronomy (Arecibo), planetary communications (NASA Deep Space Network) and detection (USAF Space Surveillance Network) for Earth-to-Space beaming tests. The receiving end could, in principle, be an NRO satellite antenna reportedly orbiting today and/or rectennas unfurled by the International Space Station (ISS). Laser SSP has lower transmission efficiency; but smaller, more flexible, and potentially cheaper components make it worth exploring. Lasers require smaller components because diffraction effects are less at optical than at microwave wavelengths The Air Force Maui Optical Station (AMOS), with facilities for accurately firing lasers through ground-based telescopes with adaptive optics at targets in space, appears ideal for laser beaming tests in conjunction with orbiting PV arrays targets. Platforms like the ISS and/or GEO communication satellites may likewise have (or could easily have) lightweight PV arrays capable of converting light to DC for end-to-end power efficiency tests. If successful, these experiments might be followed with impressive demonstrations of SSP technology such as illumination of lamps visible from Earth's surface on orbiting satellites, or

  4. Cancer versus FM radio polarization types.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Örjan

    2016-07-01

    In 2002, a detailed analysis of skin melanoma in 289 Swedish municipalities showed a strong association with the number of horizontally polarized main FM transmitters covering a municipality. Basic antenna theory says that body-resonance and standing waves cannot appear above a metal spring mattress unless the electric field is horizontally polarized. To test the hypothesis that body-resonant radiation can cause increased cancer risk in other European countries, I collected and analysed reported data from 24 countries, among which six were using vertical polarization. The results showed a strong association between cancer risk and the use of horizontally polarized FM broadcasting radiation, whereas vertical polarization seemed to cause no health effects. This information should form the basis for initiating relevant corrective actions by responsible authorities. PMID:26954356

  5. Detailed spectroscopy of {sup 249}Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Martens, A.; Hauschild, K.; Briancon, Ch.; Korichi, A.; Yeremin, A. V.; Belozerov, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Malyshev, O. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Popeko, A. G.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shutov, A. V.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Curien, D.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B.; Khalfallah, F.

    2006-10-15

    Excited states in {sup 249}Fm were populated via the {alpha} decay of {sup 253}No and the subsequent decay was observed with the GABRIELA detection system installed at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator. The energies, spins, and parities of these states could be established through combined {alpha},{gamma}, and conversion-electron spectroscopy. The first members of the ground-state rotational band were identified. Their excitation energies as well as the observation of a cross-over E2 transition confirm the assignment of 7/2{sup +}624 for the ground state of {sup 249}Fm. Two excited states were also observed and their decay properties suggest that they correspond to the particle excitation 9/2{sup -}734 and hole excitation 5/2{sup +}622. The analysis suggests that the 279-keV transition de-exciting the 9/2{sup -} state has anomalous E1 conversion coefficients.

  6. Automatic frequency control for FM transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic frequency control circuit for an FM television transmitter is described. The frequency of the transmitter is sampled during what is termed the back porch portion of the horizontal synchronizing pulse which occurs during the retrace interval, the frequency sample compared with the frequency of a reference oscillator, and a correction applied to the frequency of the transmitter during this portion of the retrace interval.

  7. Graphs for Isotopes of 100-Fm (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 100-Fm (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100).

  8. Signal enhancement in AM-FM interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quantieri, Thomas F.; Dunn, Robert B.; McAulay, Robert J.

    1994-05-01

    A new approach to interference suppression is developed to enhance the audibility of signals corrupted by amplitude-modulated (AM) and frequency-modulated (FM) tonal interference. The suppression algorithm uses a short-time, least-squares estimation of the parameters of an AM-FM model of the time-varying tonal interference. The method, developed in a sine-wave analysis/synthesis framework, can be integrated with time and frequency modifications for further signal enhancement. Suppression is applied to single and multitone synthetic and actual AM-FM interference, the latter including man-made signals (e.g., siren interference) and those that occur naturally (e.g., biologic interference). The relative advantages and disadvantages of the sine-wave framework in contrast to a short-time Fourier transform overlap-add framework are described. The enhancement techniques are robust in a large range of environments and can be designed to preserve a random noise background. Finally, it is shown that interference suppression on multichannels prior to beamforming enhances beamformer performance.

  9. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    technique could bring significant impact on future radar development. The novel feature of this innovation is the non-linear FM (NLFM) waveform design. The traditional linear FM has the limit (-20 log BT -3 dB) for achieving ultra-low-range sidelobe in pulse compression. For this study, a different combination of 20- or 40-microsecond chirp pulse width and 2- or 4-MHz chirp bandwidth was used. These are typical operational parameters for airborne or spaceborne weather radars. The NLFM waveform design was then implemented on a FPGA board to generate a real chirp signal, which was then sent to the radar transceiver simulator. The final results have shown significant improvement on sidelobe performance compared to that obtained using a traditional linear FM chirp.

  10. 75 FR 13236 - FM Table of Allotments, Port Angeles, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... applications. See 73 FR 75631, published December 12, 2008. In the first application (File No. BPH-20080710AJA... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM Table of Allotments, Port Angeles, Washington AGENCY: Federal Communications... KSWW(FM), Montesano, Washington, to substitute FM Channel 271A for vacant Channel 229A at Port...

  11. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  12. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  13. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  14. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  15. 47 CFR 73.317 - FM transmission system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FM transmission system requirements. 73.317 Section 73.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.317 FM transmission system requirements. (a)...

  16. 75 FR 19340 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Jewett, Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Jewett, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission..., proposing the allotment of FM Channel 232A at Jewett, Texas, as a first local service. The reference.... Section 73.202(b), the Table of FM Allotments under Texas, is ameded by adding Jewett, Channe...

  17. 47 CFR 73.599 - NCE-FM engineering charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NCE-FM engineering charts. 73.599 Section 73.599 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.599 NCE-FM engineering charts....

  18. 47 CFR 73.599 - NCE-FM engineering charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false NCE-FM engineering charts. 73.599 Section 73.599 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.599 NCE-FM engineering charts....

  19. 47 CFR 73.295 - FM subsidiary communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM subsidiary communications services. 73.295 Section 73.295 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.295 FM subsidiary communications services....

  20. 47 CFR 73.322 - FM stereophonic sound transmission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound transmission standards... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.322 FM stereophonic sound transmission... modulation levels apply: (i) When a signal exists in only one channel of a two channel (biphonic)...

  1. 47 CFR 73.322 - FM stereophonic sound transmission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound transmission standards... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.322 FM stereophonic sound transmission... modulation levels apply: (i) When a signal exists in only one channel of a two channel (biphonic)...

  2. 47 CFR 73.597 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.597... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.597 FM stereophonic sound..., transmit stereophonic sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment...

  3. 47 CFR 73.597 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.597... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.597 FM stereophonic sound..., transmit stereophonic sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment...

  4. 47 CFR 73.597 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.597... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.597 FM stereophonic sound..., transmit stereophonic sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment...

  5. 47 CFR 73.597 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.597... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.597 FM stereophonic sound..., transmit stereophonic sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment...

  6. 47 CFR 73.597 - FM stereophonic sound broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound broadcasting. 73.597... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.597 FM stereophonic sound..., transmit stereophonic sound programs upon installation of stereophonic sound transmitting equipment...

  7. 47 CFR 73.322 - FM stereophonic sound transmission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound transmission standards... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.322 FM stereophonic sound transmission... modulation levels apply: (i) When a signal exists in only one channel of a two channel (biphonic)...

  8. 47 CFR 73.322 - FM stereophonic sound transmission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound transmission standards... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.322 FM stereophonic sound transmission... modulation levels apply: (i) When a signal exists in only one channel of a two channel (biphonic)...

  9. 47 CFR 73.322 - FM stereophonic sound transmission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FM stereophonic sound transmission standards... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.322 FM stereophonic sound transmission... modulation levels apply: (i) When a signal exists in only one channel of a two channel (biphonic)...

  10. 47 CFR 73.599 - NCE-FM engineering charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false NCE-FM engineering charts. 73.599 Section 73.599 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.599 NCE-FM engineering charts....

  11. 47 CFR 73.599 - NCE-FM engineering charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false NCE-FM engineering charts. 73.599 Section 73.599 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.599 NCE-FM engineering charts....

  12. 47 CFR 73.599 - NCE-FM engineering charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false NCE-FM engineering charts. 73.599 Section 73.599 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.599 NCE-FM engineering charts....

  13. Radar measurement of soil moisture content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of soil moisture on the radar backscattering coefficient was investigated by measuring the 4- to 8-GHz spectral response from two types of bare-soil fields: slightly rough and very rough, in terms of the wavelength. An FM-CW radar system mounted atop a 75-ft truck-mounted boom was used to measure the return at ten frequency points across the 4- to 8-GHz band, at eight different look angles (0 through 70 deg), and for all polarization combinations. A total of 17 sets of data were collected covering the range from 4 to 36% soil moisture content by weight. The results indicate that the radar response to soil moisture content is highly dependent on the surface roughness, microwave frequency, and look angle. The response seems to be linear, however, over the range from 15 to 30% moisture content for all angles, frequencies, polarizations and surface conditions.

  14. Radar measurement of soil moisture content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of soil moisture on the radar backscattering coefficient was investigated by measuring the 4-8 GHz spectral response from two types of bare-soil fields: slightly rough and very rough, in terms of the wavelength. An FM-CW radar system was used to measure the return at 10 frequency points across the 4-8 GHz band, at different look angles, and for all polarization combinations. The results indicate that the radar response to soil moisture content is highly dependent on the surface roughness, microwave frequency, and look angle. The response seems to be linear over the range 15%-30% moisture content for all angles, frequencies, polarizations and surface conditions.

  15. 47 CFR 73.827 - Interference to the input signals of FM translator or FM booster stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference to the input signals of FM translator or FM booster stations. 73.827 Section 73.827 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) §...

  16. 47 CFR 73.827 - Interference to the input signals of FM translator or FM booster stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference to the input signals of FM translator or FM booster stations. 73.827 Section 73.827 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) §...

  17. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  18. Exchange bias in sputtered FM/BiFeO3 thin films (FM = Fe and Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. W.; Yuan, F. T.; Shih, C. W.; Li, W. L.; Chen, P. H.; Wang, C. R.; Chang, W. C.; Jen, S. U.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic properties of sputter-deposited ferromagnetic (FM)/BiFeO3 (BFO) films on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si(100) substrate (FM = Co and Fe) have been investigated. Isotropic perovskite BFO single phase is obtained for 200-nm-thick BFO films deposited at 300-450 °C and BFO films at 400 °C with thickness of 50-400 nm. Large exchange bias field (HEB) of 308-400 Oe and coercivity (Hc) of 1201-3632 Oe at RT are obtained for polycrystalline Co/BFO bilayers. The roughened surface induced by high deposition temperature and increasing thickness of BFO layer enhances localized shape anisotropy of FM layer, resulting in the increase of Hc the improved crystallinity and roughened surface of BFO/Co interface might be responsible for the HEB enhancement. Additionally, comparison on the HEB in polycrystalline Co/BFO and Fe/BFO systems is also discussed.

  19. Digital receiver for on-board FM/FSK-FM/BPSK demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscagli, G.; Comparini, M. C.; Martone, M.

    An all-digital demodulator FM/FSK-FM/BPSK is presented. The proposed architecture allows the 1-bit IF down-sampling technique with the hardware simplification of receiver analog section. The receiver exhibits great flexibility both in terms of signal demodulation (FSK or BPSK, subcarrier/ tone frequency, data rate) and interface capability. The demodulator is going to be realized in a VLSI chip (20 Kgate complexity). This paper describes the demodulator structure and its demodulation performances obtained with a breadboard based on programmable logic devices. The choice of a simple and effective scheme for frequency detection (FM and FSK demodulators) is suggested by system design considerations as well. Signal processing algorithms include also a Costas carrier phase recovery scheme in the case of BPSK signal and data transition tracking loop for the bit clock recovery. Test results address this solution as one of the most suitable for TT&C space application.

  20. Digital receiver for on-board FM/FSK-FM/BPSK demodulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boscagli, G.; Comparini, M. C.; Martone, M.

    1993-01-01

    An all-digital demodulator FM/FSK-FM/BPSK is presented. The proposed architecture allows the 1-bit IF down-sampling technique with the hardware simplification of receiver analog section. The receiver exhibits great flexibility both in terms of signal demodulation (FSK or BPSK, subcarrier/ tone frequency, data rate) and interface capability. The demodulator is going to be realized in a VLSI chip (20 Kgate complexity). This paper describes the demodulator structure and its demodulation performances obtained with a breadboard based on programmable logic devices. The choice of a simple and effective scheme for frequency detection (FM and FSK demodulators) is suggested by system design considerations as well. Signal processing algorithms include also a Costas carrier phase recovery scheme in the case of BPSK signal and data transition tracking loop for the bit clock recovery. Test results address this solution as one of the most suitable for TT&C space application.

  1. Airborne laser scan measurements of winter snow accumulation in high alpine catchments - hydrological implications and verification by ground penetrating radar at glacier surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfricht, K.; Keuschnig, M.; Heilig, A.; Mayer, C.; Kuhn, M.

    2012-04-01

    The snow cover as storage of winter precipitation is a substantial source for runoff generation in high mountain catchments. Redistribution of solid precipitation, caused by wind and gravity, leads to a characteristic spatial distribution of snow accumulation which differs from simple model assumption of a homogenous snowpack increasing with altitude. Both, the distinct distribution of snow accumulation and the total amount of SWE stored in the snow cover, affect the magnitude and seasonality of melt water runoff. Complex relations exist between the spatial pattern of snow accumulation and the presence of glaciers and vice versa. For proper hydrological modeling in high mountain catchments, knowledge about snow cover distribution is an important requirement. To date, to evaluate modeling results, spatially insufficient point data on snow depths and SWE are usually available. On catchment scale, optical space-borne remote sensing techniques deliver areal extent of snow cover, but no snow depths and hence no volume of snow cover. Multi-temporal airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing method to obtain elevation changes extensively even in inaccessible alpine terrain. Before the start and at the end of accumulation season of winter 2010/2011, two airborne laser scan acquisitions were performed in the Ötztal Alps (Tirol, Austria). Differences of the respective digital elevation models were interpreted as snow depths and converted into SWE using a simple regression method between snow depths and snow density. Preferred snow accumulation areas were determined, e.g. wind sheltered depressions, the base of steep mountain walls and flat glacier surfaces. At catchment scale, solid precipitation is obviously redistributed from wind exposed mountain ridges to lower elevations, inducing characteristic elevations of maximum snow accumulation. Overall, catchment precipitation derived from snow accumulation is a valuable reference for precipitation approaches in

  2. CIE 1991 International Conference on Radar (CICR-91), Beijing, China, Oct. 22-24, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nengjing; Zhou, Siyong

    The present volume on radar discusses a modern perspective on radar signal processing, a historical survey on airborne early warning, array pattern and target parameter estimation for distributed array radar, and a review of surface surveillance radars. Attention is given to new concepts of spaceborne surveillance radar, UHF Doppler wind-profiling radar and performance analyses, a low-angle tracking method for tactical monopulse radars, and a laser radar for the detection of cables and other hazardous obstacles. Topics addressed include real-time multifunction radar simulation, new estimators of probability tails for radar application, an advanced low-altitude search radar, and beam spacing optimization for a surveillance phased array radar. Also discussed are broadband aspects of a triple-patch antenna as an array element, an effective way to analyze broadband radomes, selective devices on magnetostatic surface waves, and the orthogonality algorithm in adaptive arrays.

  3. Two-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of 1-D Multi-FM SSD Experiments on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydky, A.; Hohenberger, M.; Marozas, J. A.; Bonino, M. J.; Canning, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Kessler, T. J.; Kruschwitz, B. E.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    Adequate single-beam smoothing is crucial for successful direct-drive target implosions. One-dimensional, multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) has been proposed to provide the required level of smoothing. A prototype multi-FM SSD system has been integrated into one beamline of the OMEGA EP Laser System and has been used in laser-driven planar-foil experiments to study the effectiveness of multi-FM SSD in reducing laser imprint. Recent experiments have achieved significantly improved signal-to-noise by employing a newly-qualified soft x-ray imaging diagnostic. Results of 2-D DRACO simulations will be compared with the available experimental data. The simulations include realistic time-dependent far-field spot intensity calculations that emulate the effect of the SSD and have a sufficiently fine computational mesh to resolve speckles. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  5. 47 CFR 74.1204 - Protection of FM broadcast, FM Translator and LP100 stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accepted for filing if the proposed operation would involve overlap of predicted field contours with any... overlap with an LP100 station, as set forth: (1) Commercial Class B FM Stations (Protected Contour: 0.5 mV/m) Frequency separation Interference contour of proposed translator station Protected contour...

  6. 47 CFR 74.1204 - Protection of FM broadcast, FM Translator and LP100 stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accepted for filing if the proposed operation would involve overlap of predicted field contours with any... overlap with an LP100 station, as set forth: (1) Commercial Class B FM Stations (Protected Contour: 0.5 mV/m) Frequency separation Interference contour of proposed translator station Protected contour...

  7. 47 CFR 74.1204 - Protection of FM broadcast, FM Translator and LP100 stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... accepted for filing if the proposed operation would involve overlap of predicted field contours with any... overlap with an LP100 station, as set forth: (1) Commercial Class B FM Stations (Protected Contour: 0.5 mV/m) Frequency separation Interference contour of proposed translator station Protected contour...

  8. 47 CFR 74.1204 - Protection of FM broadcast, FM Translator and LP100 stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accepted for filing if the proposed operation would involve overlap of predicted field contours with any... overlap with an LP100 station, as set forth: (1) Commercial Class B FM Stations (Protected Contour: 0.5 mV/m) Frequency separation Interference contour of proposed translator station Protected contour...

  9. Measurements of Partial Reflections at 3.18 Mhz Using the CW Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priese, J.; Singer, W.

    1984-01-01

    An equipment for measuring partial reflections using the FM-CW-radar principle at 3.18 MHz, installed at the Ionospheric Observatory Juliusruh of the CISTP (HHI), is described. The linear FM-chirp of 325 kHz bandwidth is Gaussian-weighted in amplitude and gives a height resolution of 1.5 km (chirp length is 0.6 sec). Preliminary results are presented for the first observation period in winter 1982/83.

  10. Aircraft-protection radar for use with atmospheric lidars.

    PubMed

    Duck, Thomas J; Firanski, Bernard; Lind, Frank D; Sipler, Dwight

    2005-08-10

    A modified X-band radar system designed to detect aircraft during atmospheric lidar operations is described and characterized. The capability of the radar to identify aircraft approaching from a variety of directions was tested, and first detections were found to occur between the -10 and -3 dB perimeters of the gain horn's antenna pattern. A model based on the radar equation projects the performance of the radar for different sizes of aircraft and at different altitude levels. Risk analysis indicates that the probability of accidently illuminating an aircraft with the laser beam during joint lidar-radar operations is low.

  11. Radar and sensor netting - Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, A.; Studer, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that a natural evolution of radar systems leads to the netting of radars dispersed on a certain portion of the surveillance space. The motivation for this evolution was provided by the possibility of fusing a great amount of data taken by radars operating independently. Multiradar tracking (MRT) represents a well-known system employed in civilian and military applications. The multistatic radar system is another well known netting concept. The present paper has the objective to provide some information regarding the potential of the netted system concepts. The netting of sensors other than radars is also promising, taking into account lasers, TV, radiometer, and acoustic devices. Attention is given to details concerning the multiradar system concept (the present), the multistatic system concept, wideband netting (the future), the multisensor system concept (the future), and artificial intelligence.

  12. What FM can offer DFCS design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John

    1990-01-01

    The results of aircrafts and spacecrafts flight tests are reported. It is shown that the problems of Digital Flight Control Systems (DFCS) are the problems of systems whose complexity has exceeded the reach of the intellectual tools employed. It is also shown that intuition, experience, and techniques derived from mechanical and analog systems are insufficient for complex, integrated, digital systems. Formal Methods (FM) of computer science can offer DFCS systematic techniques for the construction of trustworthy software, including: techniques for the precise specification of requirements and the development of designs; systematic approaches to the design and structuring of distributed and concurrent systems; fault tolerance algorithms; and systematic methods of testing and analytic methods of verification.

  13. End-to-end RMS error testing on a constant bandwidth FM/FM system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, G. R.; Salter, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    End-to-end root-mean-square (rms) tests performed on a constant bandwidth FM/FM system with various settings of system parameters are reported. The testing technique employed is that of sampling, digitizing, delaying, and comparing the analog input against the sampled and digitized corresponding output. Total system error is determined by fully loading all channels with band-limited noise and conducting end-to-end rms error tests on one channel. Tests are also conducted with and without a transmission link and plots of rms errors versus receiver signal-to-noise (S/N) values are obtained. The combined effects of intermodulation, adjacent channel crosstalk, and residual system noise are determined as well as the single channel distortion of the system.

  14. Quantum transport of injected electrons in an asymmetric FM/I 1/SC/I 2/FM junction: Directional dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soodchomshom, Bumned; Tang, I.-Ming; Hoonsawat, Rassmidara

    2008-07-01

    We have studied the directional dependence of the spin dependent coherent quantum transport in an asymmetric nano layer FM/I1/SC/I2/FM junction. We have used the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations to describe the quasiparticles in the different layers in the junction. The two ferromagnetic layers are taken to be the same material, while the SC is taken to be a s-wave superconductor, I1 and I2 are taken to be thin insulating layers made with different materials. Both the effects of parallel (P) and anti parallel (AP) alignments of the magnetizations in the different FM layers are studied. We find that the probabilities for the Andreev and normal reflections and for the transmission of the particles into the ferromagnetic layers are dependent on the spins. We also find that the transports of the particles injected from the left side into the FM/I1/SC/I2/FM and into the FM/I2/SC/I1/FM junctions are different. When the I1 and I2 are removed (resulting in the formation of a trilayer FM/SC/FM junction) and the thickness of the SC layer is made small, the probability for the Andreev reflection is seen to depend on the spins of the particles in contradiction to the results obtained by Bozovic and Radovic [M. Bozovic, Z. Radovic, Phys. Rev. B 66 (2002) 134524].

  15. Forward-looking automotive radar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Paul; Potts, Steven; Okurowski, Frank

    1995-12-01

    For intelligent cruise control (ICC) and forward looking collision warning systems to be successful products they must provide robust performance in a complex roadway environment. Inconveniences caused by dropped tracks and nuisance alarms will not be tolerated by consumers, and would likely result in rejection of these new technologies in the marketplace. The authors report on a low-cost automotive millimeter wave (MMW) radar design which addresses shortcomings associated with previously reported ICC system implementations. The importance of the sensor's ability to identify and separately track all obstacles in the field of view is discussed. The applicability of the MMW's FM-CW sensor implementation to collision warning systems is also discussed.

  16. Thirteenth International Laser Radar Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    One hundred fifteen papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: spaceborne lidar applications; extinction/visibility; differential absorption lidar; winds and tropospheric studies; middle atmosphere; clouds and multiple scattering; pollution studies; and new systems.

  17. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  18. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  19. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  20. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  1. 47 CFR 73.4108 - FM transmitter site map submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM transmitter site map submissions. 73.4108... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4108 FM transmitter site map submissions. See Memorandum Opinion and Order and Public Notice, adopted October 24, 1986. 1 FCC Rcd 381...

  2. 47 CFR 73.4108 - FM transmitter site map submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM transmitter site map submissions. 73.4108... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4108 FM transmitter site map submissions. See Memorandum Opinion and Order and Public Notice, adopted October 24, 1986. 1 FCC Rcd 381...

  3. Design of a 12 Channel FM Microwave Receiver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risch, Craig O.; And Others

    The design, fabrication, and performance of elements of a low cost FM microwave satellite ground station receiver are described. It is capable of accepting 12 contiguous color television equivalent bandwidth channels in the 11.72 to 12.2 GHz band. Each channel is 40 MHz wide and incorporates a 4MHz guard band. The modulation format is wideband FM,…

  4. FM: Clinically Meaningful Rorschach Index with Minority Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    Uses a case vignette to consider the possibility that the Rorschach FM index may be a forerunner of abstract thinking. Data support the major finding that FM may enable educational diagnosticians to more accurately estimate the intellectual capabilities of some preschool minority and other culturally disadvantaged children. (Author/JAC)

  5. 75 FR 41092 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Kingsland, Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Kingsland, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... of Katherine Pyeatt, proposing the allotment of Channel 284A at Kingsland, Texas, as its first local..., 303, 334, 336. Sec. 73.202 Amended 0 2. Section 73.202(b), the Table of FM Allotments under Texas,...

  6. Compact acousto-optic modulator operatingin the purely Raman - Nath diffraction regime as a phase modulator in FM spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N; Epikhin, V M

    2010-08-03

    We report fabrication of a new acousto-optic modulator (AOM-RN) operating purely in the Raman - Nath diffraction regime. This device can be used as an external phase modulator in frequency-modulation (FM) optical heterodyne spectroscopy for fast and broadband frequency control of diode lasers. The AOM-RN design is significantly simplified, and its dimensions are minimised due to a decrease (by almost an order of magnitude in comparison with the existing AOMs) in the acousto-optic interaction length and the absence of impedance matching circuit. The FM spectroscopy based on AOM-RN makes it possible to analyse both absorption and dispersion properties of optical resonances under study; this possibility is shown by the example of saturated-absorption resonances in cesium vapour. The possibility of detecting coherent population trapping resonances using FM spectroscopy with AOM-RN as an external phase modulator is experimentally demonstrated.

  7. Bistatic passive radar simulator with spatial filtering subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossa, Robert; Szlachetko, Boguslaw; Lewandowski, Andrzej; Górski, Maksymilian

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly introduce the structure and features of the developed virtual passive FM radar implemented in Matlab system of numerical computations and to present many alternative ways of its performance. An idea of the proposed solution is based on analytic representation of transmitted direct signals and reflected echo signals. As a spatial filtering subsystem a beamforming network of ULA and UCA dipole configuration dedicated to bistatic radar concept is considered and computationally efficient procedures are presented in details. Finally, exemplary results of the computer simulations of the elaborated virtual simulator are provided and discussed.

  8. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  9. Effect of phasing-sector angular extent in FM reticles.

    PubMed

    Driggers, R G; Halford, C E; Meads, M M; Boreman, G D

    1992-08-01

    A technique is presented for increasing the useful power of the FM modulation signal from a spinning FM reticle with a phasing sector. Spinning FM reticles often determine a target location by using a combination of a phasing sector to establish the angular target location and a radial frequency variation to establish the radial target location. Typically, the phasing sector of this reticle type consists of a semicircular transmissive sector with the other semicircular sector which provides FM modulation. The power of the FM modulation signal is increased by matching the phased-sector geometry to the size that corresponds to the period of the modulation frequency. This type of reticle is compared and contrasted with the more typical semicircular phasing-sector reticle in both the time and frequency domains. PMID:20725463

  10. Research of beam conditioning technologies using continuous phase plate, Multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Jia, Huaiting; Tian, Xiaocheng; Yuan, Haoyu; Zhu, Na; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-10-01

    In the research of inertial confinement fusion, laser plasma interaction (LPI) is becoming a key problem that affects ignition. Here, multi-frequency modulation (Multi-FM) smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), continuous phase plate (CPP) and polarization smoothing (PS) were experimentally studied and implemented on the SG-III laser facility. After using these techniques, the far field distribution of SG-Ⅲ laser facility can be adjusted, controlled and repeated accurately. The output spectrums of the cascade phase modulators used for Multi-FM SSD were stable and the FM-to-AM effect can be restrained. Experiments on SG-III laser facility indicate that when the number of color cycles adopts 1, imposing SSD with 3.3 times diffraction limit (TDL) did not lead to pinhole closure in the spatial filters of preamplifier and main amplifiers with 30-TDL pinhole size. The nonuniformity of the focal spots using Multi-FM SSD, CPP and PS drops to 0.18, comparing to 0.26 with CPP+SSD, 0.57 with CPP+PS and 0.84 with only CPP and wedged lens. Polarization smoothing using flat birefringent plate in the convergent beam of final optics assembly (FOA) was studied. The PS plates were manufactured and equipped on SG-III laser facility for LPI research. Combined beam smoothing and polarization manipulation were also studied to solve the LPI problem. Results indicate that through adjusting dispersion directions of SSD beams in a quad, two dimensional SSD can be obtained. Using polarization control plate (PCP), polarization on the near field and far field can be manipulated, providing new method to solve LPI problem in indirect drive laser fusion.

  11. Ground penetrating radar and terrestrial laser scanner surveys on deposits of dilute pyroclastic density current deposits: insights for dune bedform genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémi Dujardin, Jean; Amin Douillet, Guilhem; Abolghasem, Amir; Cordonnier, Benoit; Kueppers, Ulrich; Bano, Maksim; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Dune bedforms formed by dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDC) are often described or interpreted as antidunes and chute and pools. However, the interpretation remains essentially speculative and is not well understood. This is largely due to the seeming impossibility of in-situ measurements and experimental scaling, as well as the lack of recent, 3D exposures. Indeed, most dune bedform cross-stratifications from the dilute PDC record outcrop in 2D sections. The 2006 eruption of Tungurahua has produced well-developed bedforms that are well-exposed on the surface of the deposits with easy access. We performed a survey of these deposits combining ground penetrating radar (GPR) profiling with terrestrial laser scanning of the surface. The GPR survey was carried in dense arrays (from 10 to 25 cm spacing between profiles) over ca. 10 m long bedforms. GPR profiles were corrected for topography from photogrammetry data. An in-house software, RadLab (written in matlab), was used for common processing of individual profiles and 2D & 3D topographic migration. Each topography-corrected profile was then loaded into a seismic interpretation software, OpenDtect, for 3D visualization and interpretation. Most bedforms show high lateral stability that is independent of the cross-stratification pattern (that varies between stoss-aggrading bedsets, stoss-erosive bedsets and stoss-depositional lensoidal layers). Anecdotic bedforms have their profiles that evolve laterally (i.e. in a direction perpendicular to the flow direction). Cannibalization of two dune bedforms into a single one on one end of the profile can evolve into growth of a single bedform at the other lateral end. Also, lateral variation in the migration direction occurs, i.e. a single bedform can show upstream aggradation at one lateral end of the bedform, but show downstream migration at the other end. Some bedforms have great variations in their internal structure. Several episodes of growth and erosion can be

  12. Sniper bullet detection by millimeter-wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Uri; Lefevre, Russell J.; Mann, John; Avent, Randy K.; Deo, Naresh

    1999-01-01

    Law enforcement and military operations would clearly benefit from a capability to locate snipers by backtracking the sniper's bullet trajectory. Achieving sufficient backtracking accuracy for bullets is a demanding radar design, requiring good measurement accuracy, high update rate, and detection of very low cross-section objects. In addition, reasonable cost is a driving requirement for law enforcement use. These divergent design requirements are addressed in an experimental millimeter-wave focal plane array radar that uses integrated millimeter-wave receiver technology. The radar is being built for DARPA by Technology Service Corporation, with assistance from M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory and QuinStar Technology. The key element in the radar is a 35-GHz focal plane array receiver. The receiving antenna lens focuses radar signals from a wide field of view onto an array of receivers, each receiver processing a separate element of the field of view. Receiver detections are then combined in a tracking processor. An FM-CW waveform is used to provide high average power, good range resolution, and stationary clutter rejection. TSC will be testing the sniper detection radar, using radar environment simulator technology developed at Lincoln Laboratory. The simulator will retransmit the received signal with the range delay, Doppler shift, and ERP for various simulated bullet trajectories.

  13. Measurement of interior ballistic performance using FM/FM radio telemetry techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.

    1985-12-01

    The continuous measurement of ballistic performance during the interior ballistic cycle of cannon launched projectiles is important to on-going research programs being conducted at the Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL). These measurements, such as propelling gas pressure, projectile acceleration, and projectile-bore interactions, are necessary to evaluate existing weapon systems and validate newly formulated interior ballistic models. Of particular interest is the resistance to projectile motion and the behavior of the projectile during the engraving process. The measurement of forces on projectiles and projectile-bore interactions requires that transducers be located on-board the projectile. In-bore measurements of ballistic performance are made at the BRL using an FM/FM, S-band telemeter. Standard artillery projectiles are modified and instrumented with telemetry transmitting systems. These projectiles are test fired and data extracted via the real time telemetry link. The projectile systems are expendable free-flight rounds and those modified for recovery in the BRL Large Caliber Soft Recovery System (LCSRS). The instrumentation package for the recoverable rounds is configured so it can be removed from the projectile, recalibrated after exposure to the launch environment, and used on subsequent rounds.

  14. Role of spin polarization in FM/Al/FM trilayer film at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ning; Webb, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of electronic transport in diffusive FM/normal metal/FM trilayer film are performed at temperature ranging from 2K to 300K to determine the behavior of the spin polarized current in normal metal under the influence of quantum phase coherence and spin-orbital interaction. Ten samples of Hall bar with length of 200 micron and width of 20 micron are fabricated through e-beam lithography followed by e-gun evaporation of Ni0.8Fe0.2, aluminum and Ni0.8Fe0.2 with different thickness (5nm to 45nm) in vacuum. At low temperature of 4.2K, coherent backscattering, Rashba spin-orbital interaction and spin flip scattering of conduction electrons contribute to magnetoresistance at low field. Quantitative analysis of magnetoresistance shows transition between weak localization and weak anti-localization for samples with different thickness ratio, which indicates the spin polarization actually affects the phase coherence length and spin-orbital scattering length. However, at temperature between 50K and 300K, only the spin polarization dominates the magnetoresistance.

  15. Surface and liquid-crystalline properties of FmHnFm triblock semifluorinated n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Chachaj-Brekiesz, Anna; Górska, Natalia; Osiecka, Natalia; Makyła-Juzak, Katarzyna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2016-05-01

    A series of triblock semifluorinated n-alkanes of the general formula: F(CF2)m(CH2)n(CF2)mF, (in short FmHnFm), where m=10, 12, and n=6, 8, and 12 have been synthesized and employed for liquid crystalline studies and Langmuir monolayer characterization. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements together with texture observation with polarizing microscope (POM) revealed the presence of liquid crystalline smectic phases for all the investigated homologs. The behavior of the studied molecules spread at the free water surface has also been investigated. Our results show for the first time that these unusual film-forming materials, which are completely hydrophobic in nature and do not possess any polar group in their structure, are surface active and form insoluble (Langmuir) monolayers at the air/water interface. Due to the fact that these molecules are chemically inert and, similar to the semifluorinated diblocks, are not toxic, they may be destined for biomedical uses as gas carriers and contrast agents, as well as in drug delivery systems.

  16. The proposed flatland radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  17. 22. August, 1971. GV fm signals showing old & new ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. August, 1971. GV fm signals showing old & new cutoff in distance-also track car. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Ogden-Lucin Cutoff Trestle, Spanning Great Salt Lake, Brigham City, Box Elder County, UT

  18. 56. Credit FM. East elevation taken from along penstock. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Credit FM. East elevation taken from along penstock. Note additions to the east side and the north side of the building. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  19. The use of FM dyes to analyze plant endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Malínská, Kateřina; Jelínková, Adriana; Petrášek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    FM (Fei-Mao) styryl dyes are compounds of amphiphilic character that are used for the fluorescence tracking of endocytosis and related processes, i.e., the internalization of membrane vesicles from the plasma membrane (PM) and dynamics of endomembranes. Staining with FM dyes and subsequent microscopical observations could be performed both on the tissue and cellular level. Here, we describe simple procedures for the effective FM dye staining and de-staining in root epidermal cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and suspension-cultured tobacco cells. The progression of FM dye uptake, reflected by an increased amount of the dye in the endosomal compartments, is monitored under the fluorescence microscope in a time-lapse manner. The data obtained can be used for the characterization of the rate of endocytosis and the function of components of endosomal recycling machinery.

  20. 72. Credit FM. Overview of powerhouse from gallery. Notice cooling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Credit FM. Overview of powerhouse from gallery. Notice cooling duct on generator (now removed) and spare gate valve in far corner. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  1. 68. Credit FM. Detail showing operators. Note cooling duct (now ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Credit FM. Detail showing operators. Note cooling duct (now removed), governor (now removed), hand-operated needle valve controls (now removed). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  2. 76. Credit FM. Detail showing belts running from water wheel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Credit FM. Detail showing belts running from water wheel to governor and from water wheel to tachometer (foreground). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  3. 59. Credit FM. Flood waters on South Battle Creek next ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Credit FM. Flood waters on South Battle Creek next to powerhouse. Note height of water in relation to tailraces. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  4. Diode-quad bridge for reactive transducers and FM discriminators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Dimeff, J.

    1972-01-01

    Diode-quad bridge circuit was developed for use with pressure-sensitive capacitive transducers, liquid-level measuring devices, proximity deflection sensors, and inductive displacement sensors. It may also be used as FM discriminator and as universal impedance bridge.

  5. Fine structure of the lower atmosphere as seen by high resolution radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, J. H.; Gossard, E. E.; Jensen, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A ground-based vertically pointing FM-CW radar is described that permits remote probing of the refractive index structure in the troposphere. The radar has the characteristics of extremely high sensitivity, ultrahigh range resolution, and close minimum detection range without clutter. The sounder routinely detects layer structures in the lower troposphere. These layers are always associated with gradients in the vertical refractive index profile, and are frequently very thin, approaching the resolution of the radar (1 m). Very often they are perturbed by wave motions. Examples of various wave patterns are presented, and an explanation is given for organized substructures frequently superimposed on larger scale wave motions.

  6. Magnetization Processes During FM Transitions of Supercooled Er Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2000-03-01

    FM transitions are generally accompanied by dimensional changes of the crystal lattice. In magnetic films, the in-plane dimensional changes are inhibited by clamping to the substrate, creating a rich variety of phenomena (e.g. supercooling, dislocation formation and motion, bowing of dislocations, and altered magnetization processes), which can be directly observed with x-rays. Here we characterize the magnetization processes exhibited by unstrained Er films. Below the Curie temperature, the film exhibits supercooling, remaining in a metastable non-FM state and only relaxing to the FM state when a magnetic field is applied. This occurs by two distinct processes. The first process, which broadens the x-ray line shape, is nucleation and growth of FM domains. The second, which produces no line broadening, is isotropic magnetization of the entire film. Once magnetized, the film remains in the FM state until the temperature is raised several degrees above the Curie temperature, at which point the film relaxes to the non-FM state via one of these two paths. This process depends on the temperature when the field is removed.

  7. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent radar technique is reviewed with special emphasis to mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars operating in the VHF band. Some basic introduction to Doppler radar measurements and the radar equation is followed by an outline of the characteristics of atmospheric turbulence, viewed from the scattering and reflection processes of radar signals. Radar signal acquisition and preprocessing, namely coherent detection, digital sampling, pre-integration and coding, is briefly discussed. The data analysis is represented in terms of the correlation and spectrum analysis, yielding the essential parameters: power, signal-to-noise ratio, average and fluctuating velocity and persistency. The techniques to measure wind velocities, viz. the different modes of the Doppler method as well as the space antenna method are surveyed and the feasibilities of the MST radar interferometer technique are elucidated. A general view on the criteria to design phased array antennas is given. An outline of the hardware of a typical MST radar system is presented.

  8. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  9. Radar measurement instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, P.

    1983-02-01

    The radar techniques used for Earth observation are reviewed. Range, direction and speed measuring techniques, and the principles of scatterometers, side-looking radar, altimeters and SAR are discussed. The ERS-1 radar package including the active microwave instrumentation and the radar altimeter are described. The analysis of the calibration problems leads to the conclusion that only the test of the system loop as a whole, besides the individual part tests, can provide a calibration in the absolute sense.

  10. Rain-Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, K. E.; Li, F. K.; Wilson, W. J.; Rosing, D.

    1988-01-01

    Orbiting radar system measures rates of rainfall from 0.5 to 60 mm/h. Radar waves scattered and absorbed by rainfall to extents depending on wavelength, polarization, rate of rainfall, and distribution of sizes and shapes of raindrops. Backscattered radar signal as function of length of path through rain used to infer detailed information about rain. Accumulated radar return signals processed into global maps of monthly average rainfall for use in climatological studies.

  11. 24-GHz frequency modulated/continuous wave automotive radar designed for collision warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosch, Theodore O.; Klimkiewicz, Wojciech; Moosbrugger, Peter; Carpenter, Lynn A.

    1995-01-01

    A frequency modulated/continuous wave (FM/cw) radar developed for automotive applications is described in this paper. The objective of this effort was to design a low-cost automotive collision warning radar that could be operated under Part 15 of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission regulations regarding intentional radiators including proximity sensors. In this paper, we describe a forward looking homodyne FM/cw 24.125 GHz radar with a digital signal processor (DSP). The data is collected while the FM/cw transceiver is modulated with several linear chirps of differing bandwidths and modulation slopes. The processor uses this data to calculate the range and Doppler velocity of multiple targets for the purpose of finding the safe following distance that should be kept between the host vehicle and targets. The system specifications and the effects of power and bandwidth on radar performance are shown. The ambiguity function of the homodyne transceiver and FFT spectral processor are shown along with the method of resolving these ambiguities for multiple targets. Data are presented showing radar measurements of a conducting sphere and test vehicle.

  12. The Provence ST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crochet, M.

    1986-01-01

    Since the Alpex Campaign, when 3 Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar operated in Camarque as a cooperative effort of the Aeronomy Laboratory of NOAA, CO, and LSEET from Toulon, a 50 MHz Very High Frequency (VHF) ST radar was developed, improved, and tested. The operating characteristics, main objectives, preliminary results, and future experiment costs of the VHF ST radar are discussed.

  13. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  14. Controlling radar signature

    SciTech Connect

    Foulke, K.W. )

    1992-08-01

    Low observable technologies for military and tactical aircraft are reviewed including signature-reduction techniques and signal detection/jamming. Among the applications considered are low-signature sensors and the reduction of radar cross section in conjunction with radar-absorbing structures and materials. Technologies for reducing radar cross section are shown to present significant technological challenges, although they afford enhanced aircraft survivability.

  15. Ion-beam sputtering deposition and magnetoelectric properties of layered heterostructures (FM/PZT/FM)n, where FM - Co or Ni78Fe22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stognij, Alexander; Novitskii, Nikolai; Sazanovich, Andrei; Poddubnaya, Nadezhda; Sharko, Sergei; Mikhailov, Vladimir; Nizhankovski, Viktor; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Szymczak, Henryk

    2013-08-01

    Magnetoelectric properties of layered heterostructures (FM/PZT/FM)n (n≤ 3) obtained by ion-beam sputtering deposition of ferromagnetic metal (FM), where FM is the cobalt (Co) or permalloy Ni78Fe22, onto ferroelectric ceramic based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) have been studied. The polished ferroelectric plates in thickness from 400 to 20 μm were subjected to finished treatment by ion-beam sputtering. After plasma activation they were covered by the ferromagnetic films from 1 to 6 μm in thickness. Enhanced characteristics of these structures were reached by means of both the thickness optimization of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic layers and obtaining of ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interfaces being free from defects and foreign impurities. Assuming on the basis of analysis of elastic stresses in the ferromagnetic film that the magnetoelectric effect forms within ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interface, the structures with 2-3 ferromagnetic layers were obtained. In layered heterostructure (Py/PZT/Py)3, the optimal thickness of ferromagnetic film was 2 μm, and outer and inner ferroelectric layers had 20 μm and 80 μm in thickness, respectively. For such structure the maximal magnetoelectric voltage coefficient of 250 mV/(cm Oe) was reached at a frequency 100 Hz in magnetic field of 0.25 T at room temperature. The structures studied can serve as energy-independent elements detecting the change of magnetic or electric fields in electronic devices based on magnetoelectric effect.

  16. Scanning lidar with a coupled radar safety system.

    PubMed

    Kent, G S; Hansen, G M

    1999-10-20

    A small scanning three-wavelength lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, has been used since 1992 to make atmospheric measurements on stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosols and on the evolution of aircraft exhaust plumes. Many of these measurements have been made away from the zenith, and, to reduce the hazard to air traffic produced by the laser beam, a radar safety device has been installed. The radar application is original in that the radar beam is made collinear with the laser beam by use of a dichroic mirror that transmits the laser radiation and reflects the microwaves. This mirror is inserted into the outgoing optical path prior to the radiation from both the radar and the laser passing through the independent scanning unit. Tests of the complete system show that the lidar and radar beams remain collocated as they are scanned and that the radar can be used to inhibit the laser prior to an aircraft passing through the beam. PMID:18324168

  17. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  18. Airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Parks, G. S.; Li, F. K.; Im, K. E.; Howard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne scanning radar system for remote rain mapping is described. The airborne rain mapping radar is composed of two radar frequency channels at 13.8 and 24.1 GHz. The radar is proposed to scan its antenna beam over + or - 20 deg from the antenna boresight; have a swath width of 7 km; a horizontal spatial resolution at nadir of about 500 m; and a range resolution of 120 m. The radar is designed to be applicable for retrieving rainfall rates from 0.1-60 mm/hr at the earth's surface, and for measuring linear polarization signatures and raindrop's fall velocity.

  19. Multidimensional radar picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  20. Detecting Negative Obstacles by Use of Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Lux, James

    2006-01-01

    Robotic land vehicles would be equipped with small radar systems to detect negative obstacles, according to a proposal. The term "negative obstacles" denotes holes, ditches, and any other terrain features characterized by abrupt steep downslopes that could be hazardous for vehicles. Video cameras and other optically based obstacle-avoidance sensors now installed on some robotic vehicles cannot detect obstacles under adverse lighting conditions. Even under favorable lighting conditions, they cannot detect negative obstacles. A radar system according to the proposal would be of the frequency-modulation/ continuous-wave (FM/CW) type. It would be installed on a vehicle, facing forward, possibly with a downward slant of the main lobe(s) of the radar beam(s) (see figure). It would utilize one or more wavelength(s) of the order of centimeters. Because such wavelengths are comparable to the characteristic dimensions of terrain features associated with negative hazards, a significant amount of diffraction would occur at such features. In effect, the diffraction would afford a limited ability to see corners and to see around corners. Hence, the system might utilize diffraction to detect corners associated with negative obstacles. At the time of reporting the information for this article, preliminary analyses of diffraction at simple negative obstacles had been performed, but an explicit description of how the system would utilize diffraction was not available.

  1. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1987-01-01

    The scientific aims, theoretical principles, techniques and instrumentation, and future potential of radar observations of solar-system objects are discussed in a general overview. Topics examined include the history of radar technology, echo detectability, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar observatories, echo time delay and Doppler shift, radar waveforms, albedo and polarization ratio, measurement of dynamical properties, and the dispersion of echo power. Consideration is given to angular scattering laws; the radar signatures of the moon and inner planets, Mars, and asteroids; topographic relief; delay-Doppler radar maps and their physical interpretation; and radar observations of the icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter, comets, and the rings of Saturn. Diagrams, drawings, photographs, and sample maps and images are provided.

  2. Radar stage uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the performance of radars used for stage (or water-level) measurement. This paper presents a comparison of estimated uncertainties and data for radar water-level measurements with float, bubbler, and wire weight water-level measurements. The radar sensor was also temperature-tested in a laboratory. The uncertainty estimates indicate that radar measurements are more accurate than uncorrected pressure sensors at higher water stages, but are less accurate than pressure sensors at low stages. Field data at two sites indicate that radar sensors may have a small negative bias. Comparison of field radar measurements with wire weight measurements found that the radar tends to measure slightly lower values as stage increases. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  3. 47 CFR 73.201 - Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.201 Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels. The FM broadcast band consists of that portion of the radio frequency spectrum between 88 MHz...

  4. 47 CFR 73.201 - Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.201 Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels. The FM broadcast band consists of that portion of the radio frequency spectrum between 88 MHz...

  5. 47 CFR 73.201 - Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.201 Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels. The FM broadcast band consists of that portion of the radio frequency spectrum between 88 MHz...

  6. 47 CFR 73.201 - Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.201 Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels. The FM broadcast band consists of that portion of the radio frequency spectrum between 88 MHz...

  7. 47 CFR 73.201 - Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.201 Numerical designation of FM broadcast channels. The FM broadcast band consists of that portion of the radio frequency spectrum between 88 MHz...

  8. Bazhen Fm matured reservoir evaluation (West Siberia, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnachev, S.; Skripkin, A.; Baranov, V.; Zakharov, S.

    2015-02-01

    The depletion of the traditional sources of hydrocarbons leads to the situation when the biggest players of the oil and gas production market turn to unconventional reserves. Commercial shale oil and gas production levels in the USA have largely determined world prospects for oil and gas industry development. Russia takes one of the leading place in the world in terms of shale oil resources. The main source rock of the West Siberia, the biggest oil and gas basin in Russia under development, the Bazhen Fm and its stratigraphic and lithologic analogs, is located in the territory of over 1,000,000 square kilometers. Provided it has similar key properties (organic carbon content, porosity, permeability) with the deposits of the Bakken Fm and Green River Fm, USA, it is still extremely poorly described with laboratory methods. We have performed the laboratory analysis of core samples from a well drilled in Bazhen Fm deposits with matured organic matter (Tmax>435 °C). It was demonstrated the applicability of the improved steady-state gas flow method to evaluate the permeability of nanopermeable rocks. The role of natural fracturing in forming voids was determided that allows regarding potential Bazhen Fm reservoirs as systems with dual porosity and dual permeability.

  9. CERES ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) in HDF (CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator)

    The ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) product contains a month of space and time averaged Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The ES-9 is also produced for combinations of scanner instruments. All instantaneous shortwave and longwave fluxes at the Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA) from the CERES ES-8 product for a month are sorted by 2.5-degree spatial regions, by day number, and by the local hour of observation. The mean of the instantaneous fluxes for a given region-day-hour bin is determined and recorded on the ES-9 along with other flux statistics and scene information. For each region, the daily average flux is estimated from an algorithm that uses the available hourly data, scene identification data, and diurnal models. This algorithm is 'like' the algorithm used for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The ES-9 also contains hourly average fluxes for the month and an overall monthly average for each region. These average fluxes are given for both clear-sky and total-sky scenes. The following CERES ES9 data sets are currently available: CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition1 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2+FM3+FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1-CV. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2000-03-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost

  10. CERES ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) in HDF (CER_ES9_FM1+FM3_Edition2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator)

    The ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) product contains a month of space and time averaged Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The ES-9 is also produced for combinations of scanner instruments. All instantaneous shortwave and longwave fluxes at the Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA) from the CERES ES-8 product for a month are sorted by 2.5-degree spatial regions, by day number, and by the local hour of observation. The mean of the instantaneous fluxes for a given region-day-hour bin is determined and recorded on the ES-9 along with other flux statistics and scene information. For each region, the daily average flux is estimated from an algorithm that uses the available hourly data, scene identification data, and diurnal models. This algorithm is 'like' the algorithm used for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The ES-9 also contains hourly average fluxes for the month and an overall monthly average for each region. These average fluxes are given for both clear-sky and total-sky scenes. The following CERES ES9 data sets are currently available: CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition1 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2+FM3+FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1-CV. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2005-12-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost

  11. CERES ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) in HDF (CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator)

    The ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) product contains a month of space and time averaged Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The ES-9 is also produced for combinations of scanner instruments. All instantaneous shortwave and longwave fluxes at the Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA) from the CERES ES-8 product for a month are sorted by 2.5-degree spatial regions, by day number, and by the local hour of observation. The mean of the instantaneous fluxes for a given region-day-hour bin is determined and recorded on the ES-9 along with other flux statistics and scene information. For each region, the daily average flux is estimated from an algorithm that uses the available hourly data, scene identification data, and diurnal models. This algorithm is 'like' the algorithm used for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The ES-9 also contains hourly average fluxes for the month and an overall monthly average for each region. These average fluxes are given for both clear-sky and total-sky scenes. The following CERES ES9 data sets are currently available: CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition1 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2+FM3+FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1-CV. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2003-12-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost

  12. CERES ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) in HDF (CER_ES9_FM1+FM4_Edition2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator)

    The ERBE-like Monthly Regional Averages (ES-9) product contains a month of space and time averaged Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The ES-9 is also produced for combinations of scanner instruments. All instantaneous shortwave and longwave fluxes at the Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA) from the CERES ES-8 product for a month are sorted by 2.5-degree spatial regions, by day number, and by the local hour of observation. The mean of the instantaneous fluxes for a given region-day-hour bin is determined and recorded on the ES-9 along with other flux statistics and scene information. For each region, the daily average flux is estimated from an algorithm that uses the available hourly data, scene identification data, and diurnal models. This algorithm is 'like' the algorithm used for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The ES-9 also contains hourly average fluxes for the month and an overall monthly average for each region. These average fluxes are given for both clear-sky and total-sky scenes. The following CERES ES9 data sets are currently available: CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_PFM+FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_PFM+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition1 CER_ES9_TRMM-PFM_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition2 CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_FM1+FM2+FM3+FM4_Edition1 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM3_Edition2 CER_ES9_FM1+FM4_Edition2 CER_ES9_Aqua-FM3_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Aqua-FM4_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM1_Edition1-CV CER_ES9_Terra-FM2_Edition1-CV. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2005-03-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost

  13. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  14. Neutron multiplicity measurements of Cf and Fm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Ford, G.P.; Balagna, J.P.; Veeser, L.R.

    1980-02-01

    Prompt neutrons in coincidence with the fission fragments from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250,252,254/Cf and /sup 257/Fm were measured inside a 75-cm-diameter, Gd-loaded liquid scintillation counter having a neutron-detection efficiency of about 78%. Measurements for /sup 256/Fm were done just outside the counter with an efficiency of 31%. The kinetic energies of both fission fragments and the number of neutrons for each fission event were recorded. From these data, the fragment kinetic energies and masses and the neutron multiplicity distributions were determined for /sup 250,252,254/Cf and /sup 257/Fm. Variances of neutron multiplicity distributions as a function of total fragment kinetic energy and the ratio of fragment masses have been calculated and are presented for all the nuclides studied.

  15. Design of AM/FM mobile telephone triband antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takayuki; Sakitani, Akihide

    1994-04-01

    In vehicles, antennas for AM/FM broadcasting (BC) and cellular mobile telephone (MT) are usually mounted on the car's body. However, a triband antenna which can be used for both AM/FM BC and MT is more desirable to decrease the number of antennas. An outline of the general design for the AM/FM MT triband antenna with coils is described. Next, the design of a new triband antenna with double sleeves instead of coils is presented. The double sleeves consist of two coaxial lines connected in series. It is shown that the triband antenna with double sleeves has good characteristics, including radiation patterns and voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR).

  16. 9-Fluorenylmethyl (Fm) Disulfides: Biomimetic Precursors for Persulfides.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung-Min; Johnson, Brett A; Duan, Jicheng; Park, Jeong-Jin; Day, Jacob J; Gang, David; Qian, Wei-Jun; Xian, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The development of a functional disulfide, FmSSPy-A (Fm = 9-fluorenylmethyl; Py = pyridinyl), is reported. It can effectively convert small molecule and protein thiols (-SH) to form -S-SFm adducts under mild conditions. This method allows for a H2S-free and biomimetic protocol to generate highly reactive persulfides (in their anionic forms). The high nucleophilicity of persulfides toward a number of thiol-blocking reagents is also demonstrated. The method holds promise for further understanding the chemical biology of persulfides and S-sulfhydration. PMID:26870874

  17. Light-charged-particle emission in the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, J.F.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.

    1985-08-01

    We have measured the energy spectra for the emission of long-range ..cap alpha.. particles from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm, and for tritons and protons from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf and /sup 256/Fm. We have determined ..cap alpha.., triton, and proton emission probabilities and estimated total light-particle emission probabilities for these nuclides. We compare these and known emission probabilities for five other spontaneously fissioning nuclides with the deformation energy available at scission and show that there is a possible correlation that is consistent with a one-body dissipation mechanism for transferring release energy to particle clusters.

  18. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  19. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  20. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  1. Thermal Properties of Bazhen fm. Sediments from Thermal Core Logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasennykh, Mikhail; Popov, Evgeny; Popov, Yury; Chekhonin, Evgeny; Romushkevich, Raisa; Zagranovskaya, Dzhuliya; Belenkaya, Irina; Zhukov, Vladislav; Karpov, Igor; Saveliev, Egor; Gabova, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    The Bazhen formation (B. fm.) is the hugest self-contained source-and-reservoir continuous petroleum system covering by more than 1 mln. km2 (West Siberia, Russia). High lithological differentiation in Bazhen deposits dominated by silicic shales and carbonates accompanied by extremely high total organic carbon values (of up to 35%), pyrite content and brittle mineralogical composition deteriorate standard thermal properties assessment for low permeable rocks. Reliable information of unconventional system thermal characteristics is the necessary part of works such as modelling of different processes in reservoir under thermal EOR for accessing their efficiency, developing and optimizing design of the oil recovery methods, interpretation of the well temperature logging data and for the basin petroleum modelling. A unique set of data including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, volumetric heat capacity, thermal anisotropy for the B.fm. rocks was obtained from thermal core logging (high resolution continuous thermal profiling) on more than 4680 core samples (2000 of B.fm. samples are among) along seven wells for four oil fields. Some systematic peculiarities of the relation between thermal properties of the B.fm. rocks and their mineralogical composition, structural and texture properties were obtained. The high-resolution data are processed jointly with the standard petrophysical logging that allowed us to provide better separation of the formation. The research work was done with financial support of the Russian Ministry of Education and Science (unique identification number RFMEFI58114X0008).

  2. Experimental results for the interference between FM television signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groumpos, P. P.; Vernon, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental results based on subjective evaluation of picture quality of FM television systems are presented. Curves indicating the variation in protection ratio with impairment grade are provided. Such an analysis would be useful to the broadcasting satellite system designer. The experimental procedures and test conditions followed are briefly summarized. The need for a theoretical planning method is briefly discussed.

  3. Frequency Response Characteristics of FM Mini-Loop Auditory Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Tasell, Dianne; Landin, Deborah P.

    1980-01-01

    Five commercially available hearing aids were assessed in two settings: using hearing aid test equipment available in most audiology clinics, with the hearing aid on microphone setting; and in a public school classroom, with the hearing aid on telecoil setting and operating with an FM classroom amplification system and a personally sized…

  4. Neutron Multiplicity At Spontaneous Fission Of 246Fm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Izosimov, I. V.; Katrasev, D. E.; Malyshev, O. N.; Minkova, A.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.

    2010-04-01

    For experiments aimed at the study of spontaneous fission of transfermium nuclei improvements in the focal plane detector system of recoil separa tor VASSILISSA have been made. The neutron detector consisting of 54 3He -filled counters has been mounted around the focal plane detector chamber. The multiplicity of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission of 246 Fm was measured.

  5. 47 CFR 73.3573 - Processing FM broadcast station applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sites include those which are offshore, in a national or state park in which tower construction is... case of a Class D or an NCE FM reserved band channel station, a major facility change is any change in... in the non-reserved band will be dismissed as set forth in paragraph (f)(2)(i) of this section....

  6. 47 CFR 73.3573 - Processing FM broadcast station applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... case of a Class D or an NCE FM reserved band channel station, a major facility change is any change in... in the non-reserved band will be dismissed as set forth in paragraph (f)(2)(i) of this section. (2) An amendment to a non-reserved band application which would effect a major change, as defined...

  7. Pocket-sized tone-modulated FM transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couvillon, L. A.

    1969-01-01

    Pressure of a button on a crystal-controlled transmitter causes generation of a tone. The tone modulates the FM transmitter which in turn radiates by way of the enclosed loop antenna, through the radio-frequency-transparent wall of the transmitters case to the receiver.

  8. 75 FR 30756 - FM Table of Allotments, Pacific Junction, Iowa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... added to the FM Table of Allotment in 2000. See 65 FR 41377, published July 5, 2000. However, the allotment was later removed as a result of MB Docket 05-210. See 71 FR 76208, published December 20, 2006... copies. See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1988)....

  9. 75 FR 14359 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Stonewall, Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Stonewall, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Pyeatt, proposing the allotment of Channel 280A at Stonewall, Texas, as the community's first local... Channel 223A at Burnet, Texas. It is Commission policy to protect applications against...

  10. 75 FR 19338 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Milford, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... Group, LLC, authorized assignee of Station KCLS(FM), Channel 269C2, Pioche, Nevada, requesting the substitution of Channel 288C for vacant Channel 285C at Milford, Utah. The reference coordinates for Channel... is available for inspection and copying during normal business hours in the FCC Reference...

  11. 47 CFR 73.3573 - Processing FM broadcast station applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Processing FM broadcast station applications. 73.3573 Section 73.3573 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.3573...

  12. An Inexpensive Group FM Amplification System for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worner, William A.

    1988-01-01

    An inexpensive FM amplification system was developed to enhance auditory learning in classrooms for the hearing impaired. Evaluation indicated that the system equalizes the sound pressure level throughout the room, with the increased sound pressure level falling in the range of 70 to 73 decibels. (Author/DB)

  13. Principles and Limitations of Ultra-Wideband FM Communications Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrits, John F. M.; Kouwenhoven, Michiel H. L.; van der Meer, Paul R.; Farserotu, John R.; Long, John R.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a novel UWB communications system using double FM: a low-modulation index digital FSK followed by a high-modulation index analog FM to create a constant-envelope UWB signal. FDMA techniques at the subcarrier level are exploited to accommodate multiple users. The system is intended for low (1-10 kbps) and medium (100-1000 kbps) bit rate, and short-range WPAN systems. A wideband delay-line FM demodulator that is not preceded by any limiting amplifier constitutes the key component of the UWBFM receiver. This unusual approach permits multiple users to share the same RF bandwidth. Multipath, however, may limit the useful subcarrier bandwidth to one octave. This paper addresses the performance with AWGN and multipath, the resistance to narrowband interference, as well as the simultaneous detection of multiple FM signals at the same carrier frequency. SPICE and Matlab simulation results illustrate the principles and limitations of this new technology. A hardware demonstrator has been realized and has allowed the confirmation of theory with practical results.

  14. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  15. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  16. Effects of noise reduction on AM and FM perception.

    PubMed

    Ives, D Timothy; Calcus, Axelle; Kalluri, Sridhar; Strelcyk, Olaf; Sheft, Stanley; Lorenzi, Christian

    2013-02-01

    The goal of noise reduction (NR) algorithms in digital hearing aid devices is to reduce background noise whilst preserving as much of the original signal as possible. These algorithms may increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an ideal case, but they generally fail to improve speech intelligibility. However, due to the complex nature of speech, it is difficult to disentangle the numerous low- and high-level effects of NR that may underlie the lack of speech perception benefits. The goal of this study was to better understand why NR algorithms do not improve speech intelligibility by investigating the effects of NR on the ability to discriminate two basic acoustic features, namely amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) cues, known to be crucial for speech identification in quiet and in noise. Here, discrimination of complex, non-linguistic AM and FM patterns was measured for normal hearing listeners using a same/different task. The stimuli were generated by modulating 1-kHz pure tones by either a two-component AM or FM modulator with patterns changed by manipulating component phases. Modulation rates were centered on 3 Hz. Discrimination of AM and FM patterns was measured in quiet and in the presence of a white noise that had been passed through a gammatone filter centered on 1 kHz. The noise was presented at SNRs ranging from -6 to +12 dB. Stimuli were left as such or processed via an NR algorithm based on the spectral subtraction method. NR was found to yield small but systematic improvements in discrimination for the AM conditions at favorable SNRs but had little effect, if any, on FM discrimination. A computational model of early auditory processing was developed to quantify the fidelity of AM and FM transmission. The model captured the improvement in discrimination performance for AM stimuli at high SNRs with NR. However, the model also predicted a relatively small detrimental effect of NR for FM stimuli in contrast with the average

  17. Speech Processing Applications Using AN Am-Fm Modulation Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potamianos, Alexandros

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, the AM-FM modulation speech model and multiband demodulation are applied to speech analysis and coding. The AM-FM model represents the speech signal as a sum of amplitude modulated (AM) and frequency modulated (FM) signals, each AM-FM signal models a single speech resonance (formant). The model is able to describe a wide range of nonlinear and time-varying phenomena during speech production. Multiband demodulation is the proposed speech analysis method in the context of the AM-FM model. A bank of Gabor filters is used to filter the speech signal and, then, a demodulation algorithm is applied on each band to obtain the amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequency signals. The energy separation algorithm (ESA) and the Hilbert transform approach are compared for signal and speech resonance demodulation, and the ESA is found to have better time-resolution and to be computationally more efficient. Next, we apply multiband demodulation analysis (MDA) to formant and pitch tracking. Using the amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequency signals short-time estimates are proposed for the formant frequency and the fundamental frequency. The merits of the estimates are evaluated and it is concluded that the amplitude weighted mean instantaneous frequency and the short-time phase slope perform best for formant and pitch estimation respectively. Finally, decision algorithms are provided for the formant and pitch contours. Both speech analysis algorithms provide very smooth and accurate estimates and have attractive time -domain parallel implementations. Next, we use time-varying MDA for a speech coding application. A time-varying Gabor filterbank extracts four formant bands from the signal and, then, each resonance is demodulated to amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequency signals. Efficient modeling and coding schemes are proposed for the information signals that exploit the correlation between the formant bands. Finally, speech is synthesized as the

  18. The development of a non-contact screening system for rapid medical inspection at a quarantine depot using a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, microwave radar and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Suzuki, S; Ujikawa, K; Usui, T; Gotoh, S; Sugamata, M; Abe, S

    2009-01-01

    In order to conduct fast screening of passengers with infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or pandemic influenza at a quarantine depot, we developed a non-contact screening system with self-produced program to conduct a human screening within five seconds, via a linear discriminant function from non-contact derived variables, i.e. palmer pulse derived from a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, respiration rate determined by a 10-GHz microwave radar, and facial temperature measured by thermography. The system evaluation was conducted on seven healthy male subjects (23 +/- 1 years). In order to achieve a pseudo-infection condition, the subjects maintained an ergometer exercise load (100 W, 10 minutes). Before (normal condition) and after (pseudo-infection condition) exercise, a significant linear discriminant function (p < 0.001) was determined to distinguish pseudo-infection condition from normal condition (Mahalanobis D-square = 20.3, classification error rate <5%). The proposed system appears promising for future application in fast screening of infection at a quarantine depot. PMID:19484686

  19. Development of a non-contact screening system for rapid medical inspection at a quarantine depot using a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, microwave radar and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Suzuki, S; Ujikawa, K; Usui, T; Gotoh, S; Sugamata, M; Badarch, Z; Abe, S

    2009-01-01

    In order to conduct fast screening of passengers with infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or pandemic influenza at a quarantine depot, we developed a non-contact screening system with a self-produced program to conduct a human screening within five seconds, via a linear discriminant function from non-contact derived variables, i.e. palmer pulse derived from a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, respiration rate determined by a 10-GHz microwave radar, and facial temperature measured by a thermography. The system evaluation was conducted on seven healthy male subjects (23+1 years). In order to achieve a pseudo-infection condition, the subjects maintained an ergo-meter exercise load (100 W, 10 minutes). Before (normal condition) and after (pseudo-infection condition) exercise, a significant linear discriminant function (p50.001) was determined to distinguish the pseudo-infection condition from the normal condition (Mahalanobis D-square 1/4 20.3, classification error rate55%). The proposed system appears promising for future application in fast screening of infection at a quarantine depot. PMID:19440915

  20. The development of a non-contact screening system for rapid medical inspection at a quarantine depot using a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, microwave radar and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Suzuki, S; Ujikawa, K; Usui, T; Gotoh, S; Sugamata, M; Abe, S

    2009-01-01

    In order to conduct fast screening of passengers with infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or pandemic influenza at a quarantine depot, we developed a non-contact screening system with self-produced program to conduct a human screening within five seconds, via a linear discriminant function from non-contact derived variables, i.e. palmer pulse derived from a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, respiration rate determined by a 10-GHz microwave radar, and facial temperature measured by thermography. The system evaluation was conducted on seven healthy male subjects (23 +/- 1 years). In order to achieve a pseudo-infection condition, the subjects maintained an ergometer exercise load (100 W, 10 minutes). Before (normal condition) and after (pseudo-infection condition) exercise, a significant linear discriminant function (p < 0.001) was determined to distinguish pseudo-infection condition from normal condition (Mahalanobis D-square = 20.3, classification error rate <5%). The proposed system appears promising for future application in fast screening of infection at a quarantine depot.

  1. Solid state transmitters for spaceborne radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turlington, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT-A synthetic aperture radar, the first spaceborne SAR, utilized an all solid state RF signal synthesizer and L-band transmitter to drive a corporately fed flat plate array. The RF signal synthesizer generated a linear FM ""CHIRP'' waveform and provided stable CW reference signals used to upconvert the received signal to a unified S-band downlink channel, and to synchronize satellite control logic. The transmitter generated 1200 watts peak RF power (66 watts average) at a center frequency of 1.275 GHz from 354 watts of DC prime power. Linear FM CHIRP swept symmetrically around the center frequency with a bandwidth of 19.05 MHz and a pulse duration of 33.8 sec. Pulse repetition rate was variable from 1647 to 1944 pps. These transmitter signal parameters combined with the flat plate 34 x 7.5 ft aperture at an orbital altitude of 498 miles and a look angle 20 deg off nadir gave the SAR an 85 foot resolution over a 15.5 mile wide swath.

  2. Spectral selectivity of FM-FM neurons in the auditory cortex of the echolocating bat, Myotis lucifugus.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, M; Wong, D; Paschal, W G

    1992-11-01

    1. Spectral sensitivity was examined in delay-sensitive neurons in the auditory cortex of the awake FM bat, Myotis lucifugus. FM stimuli sweeping 60 kHz downward in 4 ms were used as simulated pulse-echo pairs to measure delay-dependent responses. At each neuron's best delay, the pulse and/or echo were divided into 4 FM quarters (Ist, IInd, IIIrd, and IVth), each sweeping 15 kHz in 1 ms, and quarters essential for delay sensitivity were determined for both pulse and echo. 2. For the pulse, the IVth quarter was essential for delay sensitivity in the majority of neurons. For the echo, the essential quarter for most neurons was the IInd, IIIrd, or IVth. 3. Different quarters of the pulse and echo were essential for delay sensitivity in 68% of the neurons examined. 4. This study provides neurophysiological evidence linking both spectral and temporal processing in delay-sensitive neurons of Myotis. Since spectral cues can provide target-shape information, sensitivity to both spectral and temporal parameters in single neurons may endow these neurons in FM bats with the potential for target analysis other than echo-ranging. PMID:1469667

  3. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  4. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  5. Decoders for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  6. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  7. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  8. Radar Sensing for Intelligent Vehicles in Urban Environments

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Giulio; Johnson, David; Underwood, James

    2015-01-01

    Radar overcomes the shortcomings of laser, stereovision, and sonar because it can operate successfully in dusty, foggy, blizzard-blinding, and poorly lit scenarios. This paper presents a novel method for ground and obstacle segmentation based on radar sensing. The algorithm operates directly in the sensor frame, without the need for a separate synchronised navigation source, calibration parameters describing the location of the radar in the vehicle frame, or the geometric restrictions made in the previous main method in the field. Experimental results are presented in various urban scenarios to validate this approach, showing its potential applicability for advanced driving assistance systems and autonomous vehicle operations. PMID:26102493

  9. Radar Sensing for Intelligent Vehicles in Urban Environments.

    PubMed

    Reina, Giulio; Johnson, David; Underwood, James

    2015-01-01

    Radar overcomes the shortcomings of laser, stereovision, and sonar because it can operate successfully in dusty, foggy, blizzard-blinding, and poorly lit scenarios. This paper presents a novel method for ground and obstacle segmentation based on radar sensing. The algorithm operates directly in the sensor frame, without the need for a separate synchronised navigation source, calibration parameters describing the location of the radar in the vehicle frame, or the geometric restrictions made in the previous main method in the field. Experimental results are presented in various urban scenarios to validate this approach, showing its potential applicability for advanced driving assistance systems and autonomous vehicle operations. PMID:26102493

  10. Radar Sensing for Intelligent Vehicles in Urban Environments.

    PubMed

    Reina, Giulio; Johnson, David; Underwood, James

    2015-06-19

    Radar overcomes the shortcomings of laser, stereovision, and sonar because it can operate successfully in dusty, foggy, blizzard-blinding, and poorly lit scenarios. This paper presents a novel method for ground and obstacle segmentation based on radar sensing. The algorithm operates directly in the sensor frame, without the need for a separate synchronised navigation source, calibration parameters describing the location of the radar in the vehicle frame, or the geometric restrictions made in the previous main method in the field. Experimental results are presented in various urban scenarios to validate this approach, showing its potential applicability for advanced driving assistance systems and autonomous vehicle operations.

  11. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  12. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  13. Doppler-radar wind-speed measurements in tornadoes: A comparison of real and simulated spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B.; LaDue, J.G.; Stein, H.; Speheger, D. ); Unruh, W.P. )

    1993-01-01

    Bluestein and Unruh have discussed the advantages of using a portable doppler radar to map the wind field in tornadoes. during the spring of 1991 a storm-intercept team from the University of Oklahoma (OU) collected data near five supercell tornadoes in Oklahoma and Kansas. Details about the 1-W, 3-cm, 5-deg half-power beamwidth, CW/FM-CW Doppler radar we used and the methods of data collection and analysis are found in Bluestein and Unruh and Bluestein et al. Using the portable radar, we approximately doubled in only one year the number of tornado spectra that had been collected over a period of almost 20 years by NSSL's fixed-site Doppler radar. In this paper we will compare observed tornado wind spectra with simulated wind spectra (Zmic and Doviak 1975) in order to learn more about tornado structure.

  14. Doppler-radar wind-speed measurements in tornadoes: A comparison of real and simulated spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B.; LaDue, J.G.; Stein, H.; Speheger, D.; Unruh, W.P.

    1993-03-01

    Bluestein and Unruh have discussed the advantages of using a portable doppler radar to map the wind field in tornadoes. during the spring of 1991 a storm-intercept team from the University of Oklahoma (OU) collected data near five supercell tornadoes in Oklahoma and Kansas. Details about the 1-W, 3-cm, 5-deg half-power beamwidth, CW/FM-CW Doppler radar we used and the methods of data collection and analysis are found in Bluestein and Unruh and Bluestein et al. Using the portable radar, we approximately doubled in only one year the number of tornado spectra that had been collected over a period of almost 20 years by NSSL`s fixed-site Doppler radar. In this paper we will compare observed tornado wind spectra with simulated wind spectra (Zmic and Doviak 1975) in order to learn more about tornado structure.

  15. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  16. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  17. Perceived pitch of complex FM-AM tones--pitch determination process of vibrato sounds.

    PubMed

    Iwamiya, S; Miyakura, T; Satoh, N; Hayashi, Y

    1994-09-01

    Pitch-matching experiments were conducted to clarify the pitch determination process of complex FM-AM tones which consist of components whose frequency and amplitude are simultaneously modulated. The pitch is higher when FM and AM of each component are in phase than when they are out of phase. The pitch shift induced by the phase difference between FM and AM of each component becomes larger as its relative power increases. These experimental results suggest that the pitch of complex FM-AM tones is determined as follows: A complex FM-AM tone is resolved into each FM-AM component by the auditory filter bank. The spectral pitch of each FM-AM component is determined by a loudness-weighted pitch averaging processes. The central pattern recognizer determines the pitch of complex FM-AM tones by integration of virtual pitches derived from the spectral pitches. PMID:7872986

  18. Trending Technologies for Indoor FM: Looking for "Geo" in Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, M.; Isikdag, U.; Basaraner, M.

    2016-10-01

    Today technological developments in the Architecture Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry provides opportunities to build huge and complex buildings and facilities. In order to operate these facilities and to meet the requirements of the occupants and also to manage energy, waste and to keep all facility services operational, several Facility Management (FM) solutions were developed. This paper starts by presenting a state of art review of research related to Indoor Facility Management Systems. Later, a textual analysis focused to identify the research trends in this field is presented in the paper. The result of the literature review and textual analysis indicates that current research in Indoor FM Systems is underestimating the role of Geoinformation, Geoinformation models and systems.

  19. Simultaneous occupational exposure to FM and UHF transmitters.

    PubMed

    Valič, Blaž; Kos, Bor; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure caused by large broadcasting transmitters exceeds current reference levels. As it is common for different radio and TV transmitters to share the location, we analysed combined exposure on a 40-m high mast. The frequency modulation (FM) transmitter, located between the 10th and 30th metre, had the power of 25 kW, whereas an ultra-high frequency (UHF) transmitter of 5 kW occupied the top 8 m of the mast. Measured and calculated values of the electric field strength exceeded the reference levels up to 10 times; however, the results for the specific absorption rate (SAR) values show that the reference levels are very conservative for FM exposure, i.e., basic restrictions are not exceeded even when the reference levels are exceeded 10 times. However, for UHF exposure the reference levels are not conservative; they give a good prediction of real exposure.

  20. Simultaneous occupational exposure to FM and UHF transmitters.

    PubMed

    Valič, Blaž; Kos, Bor; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure caused by large broadcasting transmitters exceeds current reference levels. As it is common for different radio and TV transmitters to share the location, we analysed combined exposure on a 40-m high mast. The frequency modulation (FM) transmitter, located between the 10th and 30th metre, had the power of 25 kW, whereas an ultra-high frequency (UHF) transmitter of 5 kW occupied the top 8 m of the mast. Measured and calculated values of the electric field strength exceeded the reference levels up to 10 times; however, the results for the specific absorption rate (SAR) values show that the reference levels are very conservative for FM exposure, i.e., basic restrictions are not exceeded even when the reference levels are exceeded 10 times. However, for UHF exposure the reference levels are not conservative; they give a good prediction of real exposure. PMID:22721535

  1. Microscopic description of 258Fm fission dynamic with pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric; Lacroix, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Fission dynamic remains a challenge for nuclear microscopic theories. In order to understand the dynamic of the last stage of the fission process, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with BCS pairing is applied to the describe the fission of the 258Fm. A good agreement is found for the one-body observables: the total kinetic energy and the average mass asymmetry. The non-physical dependence of two-body observables with the initial shape is discussed.

  2. Level structure of sup 256 Fm: Experiment vs theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, M.E.; Starner, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The amount of experimental data on intrinsic states in the even-even isotopes of the transcurium elements is rather limited, providing only a few tests of theoretical models in this region. Thus, it is of interest to determine to what extent the recent results on levels in {sup 256}Fm compare with existing theoretical calculations, such as those of Ivanova et al. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Analytical Approaches to Guide SLS Fault Management (FM) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive analysis is needed to determine the right set of FM capabilities to provide the most coverage without significantly increasing the cost, reliability (FP/FN), and complexity of the overall vehicle systems. Strong collaboration with the stakeholders is required to support the determination of the best triggers and response options. The SLS Fault Management process has been documented in the Space Launch System Program (SLSP) Fault Management Plan (SLS-PLAN-085).

  4. A design of an all digital FM discriminator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garodnick, J.; Greco, J.; Schilling, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an all digital FM discriminator. The system can be easily constructed using ordinary commercially available, digital IC's. In addition, the output SNR above threshold is computed. It is shown that the output noise consists of two terms: the first being the expected output gaussian noise having a parabolic power spectral density and the second being a quantization noise produced by the finite-level detection process used in the receiver.

  5. Goldstone solar system radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, Raymond F.

    1988-01-01

    Planning, direction, experimental design, and coordination of data-acquisition and engineering activities in support of all Goldstone planetary radar astronomy were performed. This work demands familiarity with the various components of a planetary radar telescope (transmitter, receiver, antenna, computer hardware and software) as well as knowledge of how the entire system must function as a cohesive unit to meet the particular scientific objectives at hand in a given observation. Support radar data-processing facilities, currently being used for virtually all Goldstone data reduction includes: a VAX 11/780 computer system, an FPS 5210 array processor, terminals, tape drives, and image-display devices, as well as a large body of data-reduction software to accommodate the variety of data-acquisition formats and strategems. Successful 113-cm radar observation of Callisto and the near-Earth asteroid 1981 Midas and Goldstone/VLA radar observations of Saturn's rings were obtained. Quick-look verification programs from data taken with phase-coded cw (i.e., ranging) waveforms, applicable to Venus, the Moon, and small bodies were completed. Definition of scientific and engineering requirements on instrument performance, radar system configuration, and personnel, for all 1988 Goldstone radar investigations was accomplished.

  6. Ultrafast laser driven spin generation in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gyung-Min

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of spin generation in metallic ferromagnets (FM) driven by ultrafast laser light using a pump-probe technique. The pump light gives a driving force for spin generation by depositing energy or spin angular momentum on FM. The probe light measures spin responses by magneto-optical Kerr effect or temperature responses by time-domain thermoreflectance. I find that ultrafast laser light generates spins in FM in three distinct mechanisms: (i) demagnetization; (ii) spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE); (iii) optical helicity. The demagnetization-driven spin generation is due to energy transport between electrons and magnons of FM and conservation of angular momentum for electron-magnon coupling. Ultrafast laser light deposits its energy in electrons of metallic layers and leads to a sharp increase of the electron temperature. The excited electrons transport energy to magnons of FM by the electron-magnon coupling. The magnon excitation results in ultrafast demagnetization of FM. I find that the spin loss by magnon excitations during the demagnetization process is converted to the spin generation in electrons of FM by the conservation of angular momentum for electron-magnon coupling. The generated spins diffuse to other layers and leads to spin accumulation in nonmagnetic metals (NM) or spin transfer torque on other FMs. I measure the demagnetization-driven spin accumulation in a NM/FM1/NM structure and spin transfer torque in a NM/FM1/NM/FM2 structure. The SDSE-driven spin generation is due to a heat current at FM/NM interfaces and spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of FM. Ultrafast laser light deposits its energy in a heat absorbing layer of a multilayer structure and leads to a heat current from the heat absorbing layer to heat sinking layer. When an FM is incorporated in the multilayer structure, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of FM converts the heat current to spin generation at interfaces between FM and NM. The

  7. New fission valley for /sup 258/Fm and nuclei beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on the fission properties of nuclei close to /sup 264/Fm show sudden and large changes with a change of only one or two neutrons or protons. The nucleus /sup 258/Fm, for instance, undergoes symmetric fission with a half-life of about 0.4 ms and a kinetic energy peaked at about 235 MeV whereas /sup 256/Fm undergoes asymmetric fission with a half-life of about 3 h and a kinetic energy peaked at about 200 MeV. Qualitatively, these sudden changes hve been postulated to be due to the emergence of fragment shells in symmetric fission products close to /sup 132/Sn. A quantitative calculation that shows where high-kinetic-energy symmetric fission occurs and why it is associated with a sudden and large decrease in fission half-lives. The study is based on calculations of potential-energy surfaces in the macroscopic-microscopic model and a semi-empirical model for the nuclear inertia. The implications of the new fission valley on the stability of the heaviest elements is discussed. 33 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Resonant tunneling and the bimodal symmetric fission of sup 258 Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, B.S. )

    1991-02-25

    The concept of resonant tunneling is invoked to explain the sharp drop in the measured spontaneous-fission half-life when going from {sup 256}Fm to {sup 258}Fm. Various consequences of such a suggestion on the other observed characteristics of the bimodal symmetric fission of {sup 258}Fm are briefly discussed.

  9. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  10. 75 FR 1621 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change... ELDON, MO, To ST. THOMAS, MO; COX RADIO, INC., Station WALR-FM, Facility ID 48728, BPH-20091124ABA,...

  11. 75 FR 63402 - FM Table of Allotments, Culebra, PR, Charlotte Amalie, and Christiansted, VI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM Table of Allotments, Culebra, PR, Charlotte Amalie, and Christiansted, VI AGENCY... 237B for vacant Channel 271B at Charlotte Amalie, Virgin Islands to enable Station WNVE-FM to obtain an... license of FM Station WJKC to reflect this change. The ultimate permittee of Channel 237B at...

  12. 47 CFR 73.506 - Classes of noncommercial educational FM stations and channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Classes of noncommercial educational FM...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.506 Classes of noncommercial educational FM stations and channels. (a) Noncommercial educational...

  13. 47 CFR 73.506 - Classes of noncommercial educational FM stations and channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classes of noncommercial educational FM...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.506 Classes of noncommercial educational FM stations and channels. (a) Noncommercial educational...

  14. 75 FR 63475 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change..., From CRAIGSVILLE, WV, To WEBSTER SPRINGS, WV; ENTRAVISION HOLDINGS, LLC, Station KVVA-FM, Facility...

  15. 47 CFR 73.809 - Interference protection to full service FM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference protection to full service FM stations. 73.809 Section 73.809 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.809 Interference protection to full service FM stations. (a)...

  16. 75 FR 9530 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, French Lick, Indiana, and Irvington, Kentucky.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... 261A. See 73 FR 50296, published August 26, 2008. Although Station WFLQ(FM) argued that it should not... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, French Lick, Indiana, and Irvington, Kentucky. AGENCY... accommodate this new allotment, the staff modifies the license of Station WFLQ(FM), French Lick, Indiana,...

  17. Radar Thickness Measurements over the Southern Part of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuah, Teong Sek; Gogineni, Siva Prasad; Allen, Christopher; Wohletz, Brad; Wong, Y. C.; Ng, P. Y.; Ajayi, E.

    1996-01-01

    We performed ice thickness measurements over the southern part of the Greenland ice sheet during June and July 1993. We used an airborne coherent radar depth sounder for these measurements. The radar was operated from a NASA P-3 aircraft equipped with GPS receivers. Radar data were collected in conjunction with laser altimeter and microwave altimeter measurements of ice surface elevation. This report provides radio echograms and thickness profiles from data collected during 1993.

  18. Real-time windowing in imaging radar using FPGA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Escamilla-Hernandez, Enrique

    2005-02-01

    The imaging radar uses the high frequency electromagnetic waves reflected from different objects for estimating of its parameters. Pulse compression is a standard signal processing technique used to minimize the peak transmission power and to maximize SNR, and to get a better resolution. Usually the pulse compression can be achieved using a matched filter. The level of the side-lobes in the imaging radar can be reduced using the special weighting function processing. There are very known different weighting functions: Hamming, Hanning, Blackman, Chebyshev, Blackman-Harris, Kaiser-Bessel, etc., widely used in the signal processing applications. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) offers great benefits like instantaneous implementation, dynamic reconfiguration, design, and field programmability. This reconfiguration makes FPGAs a better solution over custom-made integrated circuits. This work aims at demonstrating a reasonably flexible implementation of FM-linear signal and pulse compression using Matlab, Simulink, and System Generator. Employing FPGA and mentioned software we have proposed the pulse compression design on FPGA using classical and novel windows technique to reduce the side-lobes level. This permits increasing the detection ability of the small or nearly placed targets in imaging radar. The advantage of FPGA that can do parallelism in real time processing permits to realize the proposed algorithms. The paper also presents the experimental results of proposed windowing procedure in the marine radar with such the parameters: signal is linear FM (Chirp); frequency deviation DF is 9.375MHz; the pulse width T is 3.2μs taps number in the matched filter is 800 taps; sampling frequency 253.125*106 MHz. It has been realized the reducing of side-lobes levels in real time permitting better resolution of the small targets.

  19. Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  20. Fragment mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission of the neutron-deficient isotopes, 1. 2-s /sup 246/Fm and 38-s /sup 248/Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.; Lee, D.; Ghiorso, A.; Nurmia, M.; Aleklett, K.

    1980-10-01

    We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions for fragments from the spontaneous fission of 1.2-s /sup 246/Fm and 38-s /sup 248/Fm. The mass distributions are highly asymmetric and the average total kinetic energies of 199 +- 4 MeV and 198 +- 4 MeV, respectively, are consistent with systematics for lower Z actinides. Their properties are in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, whose spontaneous fission results in narrowly symmetric mass distributions accompanied by unusually high total kinetic energies.

  1. Aircraft radar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, Helmut E.

    1987-04-01

    Many changes have taken place in airborne radar antennas since their beginnings over forty years ago. A brief historical review of the advances in technology is presented, from mechanically scanned reflectors to modern multiple function phased arrays. However, emphasis is not on history but on the state-of-the-art technology and trends for future airborne radar systems. The status of rotating surveillance antennas is illustrated by the AN/APY-1 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) slotted waveguide array, which achieved a significant breakthrough in sidelobe suppression. Gimballed flat plate arrays in nose radomes are typified by the AN/APG-66 (F-16) antenna. Multifunction phased arrays are presented by the Electronically Agile Radar (EAR) antenna, which has achieved significant advances in performance versatility and reliability. Trends toward active aperture, adaptive, and digital beamforming arrays are briefly discussed. Antennas for future aircraft radar systems must provide multiple functions in less aperture space, and must perform more reliably.

  2. Multispectral imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcello, L. J.; Rendleman, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A side-looking radar, installed in a C-46 aircraft, was modified to provide it with an initial multispectral imaging capability. The radar is capable of radiating at either of two wavelengths, these being approximately 3 cm and 30 cm, with either horizontal or vertical polarization on each wavelength. Both the horizontally- and vertically-polarized components of the reflected signal can be observed for each wavelength/polarization transmitter configuration. At present, two-wavelength observation of a terrain region can be accomplished within the same day, but not with truly simultaneous observation on both wavelengths. A multiplex circuit to permit this simultaneous observation has been designed. A brief description of the modified radar system and its operating parameters is presented. Emphasis is then placed on initial flight test data and preliminary interpretation. Some considerations pertinent to the calibration of such radars are presented in passing.

  3. Automated target recognition using passive radar and coordinated flight models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrman, Lisa M.; Lanterman, Aaron D.

    2003-09-01

    Rather than emitting pulses, passive radar systems rely on illuminators of opportunity, such as TV and FM radio, to illuminate potential targets. These systems are particularly attractive since they allow receivers to operate without emitting energy, rendering them covert. Many existing passive radar systems estimate the locations and velocities of targets. This paper focuses on adding an automatic target recognition (ATR) component to such systems. Our approach to ATR compares the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of targets detected by a passive radar system to the simulated RCS of known targets. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, the received signal model accounts for aircraft position and orientation, propagation losses, and antenna gain patterns. The estimated positions become inputs for an algorithm that uses a coordinated flight model to compute probable aircraft orientation angles. The Fast Illinois Solver Code (FISC) simulates the RCS of several potential target classes as they execute the estimated maneuvers. The RCS is then scaled by the Advanced Refractive Effects Prediction System (AREPS) code to account for propagation losses that occur as functions of altitude and range. The Numerical Electromagnetic Code (NEC2) computes the antenna gain pattern, so that the RCS can be further scaled. The Rician model compares the RCS of the illuminated aircraft with those of the potential targets. This comparison results in target identification.

  4. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1989-01-01

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole.

  5. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  6. Phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  7. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  8. Monitoring of Refractory wall recession using radar technique

    SciTech Connect

    University of missouri

    2003-12-30

    Furnaces are the most crucial components in the glass and metallurgical industry. Like any other components in an industry, furnaces require periodic maintenance and repair. Today, furnaces are being operated at higher temperatures and for longer periods of time thus increasing the rate of wear and tear on the furnace refractory lining. As a result of the competitive market facing these industries, longer furnace lifetime with shorter maintenance downtime are increasingly required. Higher fuel consumption, low production and safety are issues that accompany delayed maintenance. Consequently, there is a need to know the state of a refractory wall to prevent premature or unnecessary maintenance shutdowns. For many years the observation skills of an experienced operator has been the primary source of evaluating the wear associated with a refractory wall. The rate of regression of a refractory lining depends on the type of the refractory lining, the materials Monitoring of Refractory Wall Recession Using Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave (FM-CW) Radar Techniques: A Proof-of-Concept Study, Final Report, Submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE), September 2003. being melted, seepage, mechanical stresses, and temperature. Moreover, the regression of a refractory lining is also not uniform throughout a furnace and it is more prominent at the metal line along the sidewalls as this region is exposed to hot gaseous byproducts and flowing molten material. Hence, more accurate measurement techniques are required to determine the local residual thickness of a refractory lining so as to utilize the refractory lining to the maximum extent possible. The use of isotope radiators, thermocouples and endoscopes has also been investigated for monitoring regression. These techniques are capable of providing scanned thermal images showing the profile of the refractory wall. However, these techniques can only provide relative profile information and cannot provide absolute thickness

  9. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  10. Environmental measurements with an FM spectroscopic fast chemical sensor. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.E.; Riris, H.; Carr, L.; van der Laan, J.

    1994-12-01

    The fluxes and average levels of trace gases such as ammonia, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur compounds are important inputs to atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer models. A semi-portable fast chemical sensor (FCS) has been developed and tested that uses frequency modulation spectroscopy with mid-infrared lead-salt diode lasers to perform highly sensitive measurements of these gases. The sensor`s design features include an open path, multiple-reflection optical arrangement whose axis is automatically kept normal to the horizontal wind vector. Mounting of mirrors atop two vertical masts avoids any upwind or downwind flow perturbations. Sensitivity depends significantly on the power and beam quality of the laser sources. When used with a sonic anemometer, fast thermometer, and appropriate signal processing and software, the sensor measures vertical fluxes as the covariance of the ambient concentration and the vertical wind velocity. The FCS was tested in California`s Central Valley, where it successfully measured fluxes of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) over a cotton field. Based on these results, the system is considered ready for application to flux characterization studies. Volume 1 of this report describes the development and testing of the FM sensor; Volume 2 is an operator`s manual for the FCS.

  11. Studies relating to FM television and telemetry transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albritton, W. P.; Honnell, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The Auburn University Model S-2 FM television transmitter was examined to determine if the performance and reliability could be improved by application of new techniques and devices developed since completion of the original design work. In particular this study examined the possibility of increased use of integrated circuits. It was determined that improvements in both performance and reliability were possible. In addition a study was conducted to determine the feasibility of converting the transmitter to handle telemetry signals. The study revealed that this conversion was feasible and the modifications were made to the prototype model for verification.

  12. New frequency translation technique for FM-CW reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Luis; Cupido, Luis; Manso, M E

    2010-10-01

    In broadband microwave reflectometry, coherent detection is widely used to obtain the phase information and to improve the systems sensitivity, both in diagnostics measuring the electronic density profile and plasma fluctuations. Coherent detection uses a translated version of the probing signal to guarantee a stable intermediate frequency. Here, a novel technique to generate the frequency translation by double frequency conversion is presented and its advantages over the commonly used single frequency conversion techniques employing image rejection mixers are discussed. The results obtained with the new frequency translator modules developed for the three JET FM-CW reflectometers, operating successfully at JET since mid-2009, are presented. PMID:21061479

  13. A digital IF simulator for FM ranging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, M. C.; Johnson, R. C.

    1980-03-01

    A digital intermediate frequency signal simulator (DIFSS) which is useful for testing many periodically modulated FM ranging systems is described. The DIFSS digitally computes the IF signal angle using angle tables stored in EPROM's and generates the cosine of the angle with a cosine PROM and D/A converter. Target delay time tau and doppler frequency can be varied as desired for static tests or dynamic target trajectories. The simulator is useful for testing real-time hardware or for testing ambiguous ranging system responses in a scaled-time mode.

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-314 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-314 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 314).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-276 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-276 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 276).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-329 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-329 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 329).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-258 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-258 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 258).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-306 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-306 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 306).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-312 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-312 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 312).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-268 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-268 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 268).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-327 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-327 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 327).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-260 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-260 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 260).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-275 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-275 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 275).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-330 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-330 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 330).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-333 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-333 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 333).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-284 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-284 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 284).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-317 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-317 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 317).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-264 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-264 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 264).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-321 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-321 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 321).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-278 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-278 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 278).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-325 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-325 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 325).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-271 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-271 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 271).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-309 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-309 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 309).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-277 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-277 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 277).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-290 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-290 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 290).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-285 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-285 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 285).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-299 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-299 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 299).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-288 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-288 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 288).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-313 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-313 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 313).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-262 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-262 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 262).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-270 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-270 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 270).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-334 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-334 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 334).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-315 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-315 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 315).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-269 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-269 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 269).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-310 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-310 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 310).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-304 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-304 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 304).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-265 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-265 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 265).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-279 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-279 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 279).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-311 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-311 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 311).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-289 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-289 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 289).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-292 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-292 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 292).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-283 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-283 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 283).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-303 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-303 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 303).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-320 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-320 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 320).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-267 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-267 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 267).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-301 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-301 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 301).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-318 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-318 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 318).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-302 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-302 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 302).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-295 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-295 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 295).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-307 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-307 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 307).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-263 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-263 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 263).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-326 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-326 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 326).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-296 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-296 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 296).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-287 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-287 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 287).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-300 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-300 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 300).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-281 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-281 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 281).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-305 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-305 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 305).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-282 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-282 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 282).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-286 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-286 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 286).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-332 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-332 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 332).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-297 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-297 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 297).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-293 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-293 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 293).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-298 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-298 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 298).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-294 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-294 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 294).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-280 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-280 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 280).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-316 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-316 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 316).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-328 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-328 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 328).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-274 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-274 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 274).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-272 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-272 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 272).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-331 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-331 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 331).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-308 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-308 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 308).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-324 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-324 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 324).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-259 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-259 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 259).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-322 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-322 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 322).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-323 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-323 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 323).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-266 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-266 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 266).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-261 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-261 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 261).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-319 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-319 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 319).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-273 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-273 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 273).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-291 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-291 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 291).

  11. Appendix E: FM-DIAL Preliminary Detection Sensitivity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Sheen, David M.; Schultz, John F.

    2002-05-09

    This update briefly reports new measurements and analysis that are used to determine the noise equivalent absorbance for the FM-DIAL (frequency modulation – differential absorption light detection and ranging) system. The modeling work that is performed in parallel with the LIDAR experiments provides a useful benchmark to predict the performance of an experimental setup, and a detection sensitivity to strive to realize. Often, the theoretical performance is difficult to obtain experimentally, but with careful design experiments can come close to being limited by fundamental noise sources.

  12. Multi channel FM reflection profiler for buried pipeline surveying

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, S.G.; LeBlanc, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    A towed multi-channel FM acoustic reflection profiler has been developed for locating and generating images of buried objects. One significant application of this sonar is buried pipeline surveying. The multi-channel reflection profiler uses 16 line arrays mounted in a towed vehicle to determine the position and burial depth of an 18 inch steel pipe filled with concrete buried under 1.5 meters of sand. This sonar will allow a survey vessel to continuously track a buried pipeline providing a continuous record of pipe burial depth and position.

  13. Four Station Interferometric Radar Observations of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, K. W.; Jurgens, R. F.; Arvidson, R. E.; Slade, M. A.; Haldemann, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary targets have been observed with radar since the late 1950s when it was first used for ranging experiments with the Moon. As telescope size and power increased, it became possible to observe more distant targets (Venus, Mars, and the outer satellites). Inherent to radar observations is the uncertainty as to the source of the reflection, there being two points where range and Doppler rings intersect on a sphere. The use of interferometric methods, first used on the moon with two stations and later on Venus and Mars, solved this problem. We extend the method through the addition of a fourth receiving telescope (thus doubling the number of projected baselines) and integration of the newly available Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic datasets.

  14. 33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar operations center (PAROC), contains the tactical command and control group equipment required to control the par site. Showing spacetrack monitor console - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  15. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  16. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  17. Characteristics of Sunset radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Located in a narrow canyon 15 km west of Boulder, Colorado, the Sunset pulsed Doppler radar was the first radar designed and constructed specifically as a VHF ST radar. The antenna system is a phased array of coaxial-colinear dopoles with computer-controlled phase shifters for each line of dipoles. It operates at a frequency of 40.475 MHz and a wavelength of 7.41M. Peak transmitter power is 100 kW. Aperture efficiency is 0.58 and resistive loss is 0.30 for its 3600 sq m area. The practical steering rate is 1 record/minute/position to any arbitrary antenna beam position. The first clear-air turbulence echoes and wind velocity measurements were obtained in 1974. Significant accomplishments are listed.

  18. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  19. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  20. Radar data smoothing filter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the current Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) data smoothing techniques for a variety of radars and payloads is examined. Alternative data reduction techniques are given and recommendations are made for improving radar data processing at WFF. A data adaptive algorithm, based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques, is also developed for estimating payload trajectories above the atmosphere from noisy time varying radar data. This algorithm is tested and verified using radar tracking data from WFF.

  1. Imaging Radar Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Held, Daniel N.; Brown, Walter E.

    1987-01-01

    Radar measures full polarization tensor of each element in scene in one sweep. New system comprises dual-polarized antenna, single transmitter, and four-channel receiver and digital recorder installed in aircraft, plus digital processor on ground. Produces radar-backscatter images corresponding to 10- by 10-km regions on ground. Signals recorded from orthogonal linearly polarized antennas combined in computer after flight to synthesize any desired combination of transmitted and received polarizations. Data recorded on single flight processed to provide multiple images.

  2. Microwave radar oceanographic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) technique was developed and demonstrated for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from air and space platforms. The measurement technique was well demonstrated with data collected in a number of flight experiments involving wave spectral comparisons with wave buoys and the Surface Contour Radar (SCR). Recent missions include the SIR-B underflight experiment (1984), FASINEX (1986), and LEWEX (1987). ROWS related activity is presently concentrating on using the aircraft instrument for wave-processes investigations and obtaining the necessary support (consensus) for a satellite instrument development program. Prospective platforms include EOS and the Canadian RADARSAT.

  3. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  4. Survey of radar ADT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunk, G. V.

    1983-07-01

    The most recent advances in automatic detection and tracking are surveyed. The discussion deals with various noncoherent integrators that provide target enhancement, thresholding techniques for reducing false alarms and target suppression, and algorithms for estimating target position and resolving targets. Attention is also given to track-while-scan systems, and the entire tracking system is surveyed. This is followed by a discussion of the various components of the system, such as the tracking filter, maneuver-following logic, track initiation, and correlation logic. The survey concludes with a discussion of radar netting. It is emphasized that the automatic detector should be considered an integral part of the radar system.

  5. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  6. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  7. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  8. Venus Radar Mapper (VRM): Multimode radar system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William T. K.; Edgerton, Alvin T.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of Venus has remained a relative mystery because of the very dense atmosphere that is opaque to visible radiation and, thus, normal photographic techniques used to explore the other terrestrial objects in the solar system are useless. The atmosphere is, however, almost transparent to radar waves and images of the surface have been produced via Earth-based and orbital radars. The technique of obtaining radar images of a surface is variously called side looking radar, imaging radar, or synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The radar requires a moving platform in which the antenna is side looking. High resolution is obtained in the cross-track or range direction by conventional radar pulse encoding. In the along-track or azimuth direction, the resolution would normally be the antenna beam width, but for the SAR case, a much longer antenna (or much sharper beam) is obtained by moving past a surface target as shown, and then combining the echoes from many pulses, by using the Doppler data, to obtain the images. The radar design of the Venus Radar Mapper (VRM) is discussed. It will acquire global radar imagery and altimetry data of the surface of Venus.

  9. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  10. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  11. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  12. Multiline radar scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, S.

    1977-01-01

    Scanning scheme is more efficient than conventional scanning. Originally designed for optical radar in space vehicles, scheme may also find uses in site-surveillance security systems and in other industrial applications. It should be particularly useful when system must run on battery energy, as would be case in power outages.

  13. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  14. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  15. Radar environment simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utteridge, E. J.

    A radar environment simulator (RES) is described which combines a high degree of signal realism with flexible real-time control. The RES features interactive simulation of IF and RF, aircraft echo simulation, active jamming (including simultaneous jamming, passive jamming, and simulator control. The general design and principal components of the RES are briefly described, and its detailed performance characteristics are presented.

  16. Symmetry-dependent spin-charge transport and thermopower through a ZSiNR-based FM/normal/FM junction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Chen, Xiongwen; Liao, Wenhu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2015-11-25

    We investigate the spin-dependent transport and spin thermopower for a zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR) with two ends covered by ferromagnets (FMs) under the modulation of a perpendicular electric field, where we take the 6- and 7-ZSiNR to exemplify the effect of the even- and odd-N ZSiNRs, respectively. By using the nonequilibrium Green's function approach, it is demonstrated that a ZSiNR-based FM/normal/FM junction still shows an interesting symmetry-dependent property although the σ mirror plane is absent for any ZSiNR due to the buckled structure of silicene. The junction with even- or odd-N ZSiNR has very different transport and thermopower behavior, which is attributed to the different parity of π and [Formula: see text] band wavefunctions under the c 2 symmetry operation with respect to the centre axis between two edges, and is linked to the unique symmetry of the band structure for the ribbon. As a result, the magnetoresistance (MR) for the 6-ZSiNR junction with a 100% plateau around zero electron energy is observed, but the plateau is absent for the 7-ZSiNR one. In addition, the spin thermopower also displays the even-odd behaviour. The 6-ZSiNR junction is found to possess superior thermospin performance compared with the 7-ZSiNR one, and its spin thermopower can be improved by one order of magnitude in the absence of an electric field. As the strength of the field increases, the spin thermopower for the 6-ZSiNR junction dramatically decreases, while it notably enhances for the 7-ZSiNR one. Interestingly, the spin thermopower for both junctions is strongly dependent on the strength of magnetisation in FM, and it can be very pronounced with a maximum absolute value of 200 μV K(-1)by the optimisation of the parameters. However, with the increase in temperature, the spin thermopower for the 6-ZSiNR junction decreases, but the situation for the 7-ZSiNR one is opposite. Finally, the spin figure of merit for the 6-ZSiNR junction is found to be four orders

  17. Symmetry-dependent spin-charge transport and thermopower through a ZSiNR-based FM/normal/FM junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Chen, Xiongwen; Liao, Wenhu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the spin-dependent transport and spin thermopower for a zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR) with two ends covered by ferromagnets (FMs) under the modulation of a perpendicular electric field, where we take the 6- and 7-ZSiNR to exemplify the effect of the even- and odd-N ZSiNRs, respectively. By using the nonequilibrium Green’s function approach, it is demonstrated that a ZSiNR-based FM/normal/FM junction still shows an interesting symmetry-dependent property although the σ mirror plane is absent for any ZSiNR due to the buckled structure of silicene. The junction with even- or odd-N ZSiNR has very different transport and thermopower behavior, which is attributed to the different parity of π and {π*} band wavefunctions under the c 2 symmetry operation with respect to the centre axis between two edges, and is linked to the unique symmetry of the band structure for the ribbon. As a result, the magnetoresistance (MR) for the 6-ZSiNR junction with a 100% plateau around zero electron energy is observed, but the plateau is absent for the 7-ZSiNR one. In addition, the spin thermopower also displays the even-odd behaviour. The 6-ZSiNR junction is found to possess superior thermospin performance compared with the 7-ZSiNR one, and its spin thermopower can be improved by one order of magnitude in the absence of an electric field. As the strength of the field increases, the spin thermopower for the 6-ZSiNR junction dramatically decreases, while it notably enhances for the 7-ZSiNR one. Interestingly, the spin thermopower for both junctions is strongly dependent on the strength of magnetisation in FM, and it can be very pronounced with a maximum absolute value of 200 μV K-1by the optimisation of the parameters. However, with the increase in temperature, the spin thermopower for the 6-ZSiNR junction decreases, but the situation for the 7-ZSiNR one is opposite. Finally, the spin figure of merit for the 6-ZSiNR junction is found to be four orders of magnitude

  18. Symmetry-dependent spin-charge transport and thermopower through a ZSiNR-based FM/normal/FM junction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Chen, Xiongwen; Liao, Wenhu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2015-11-25

    We investigate the spin-dependent transport and spin thermopower for a zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR) with two ends covered by ferromagnets (FMs) under the modulation of a perpendicular electric field, where we take the 6- and 7-ZSiNR to exemplify the effect of the even- and odd-N ZSiNRs, respectively. By using the nonequilibrium Green's function approach, it is demonstrated that a ZSiNR-based FM/normal/FM junction still shows an interesting symmetry-dependent property although the σ mirror plane is absent for any ZSiNR due to the buckled structure of silicene. The junction with even- or odd-N ZSiNR has very different transport and thermopower behavior, which is attributed to the different parity of π and [Formula: see text] band wavefunctions under the c 2 symmetry operation with respect to the centre axis between two edges, and is linked to the unique symmetry of the band structure for the ribbon. As a result, the magnetoresistance (MR) for the 6-ZSiNR junction with a 100% plateau around zero electron energy is observed, but the plateau is absent for the 7-ZSiNR one. In addition, the spin thermopower also displays the even-odd behaviour. The 6-ZSiNR junction is found to possess superior thermospin performance compared with the 7-ZSiNR one, and its spin thermopower can be improved by one order of magnitude in the absence of an electric field. As the strength of the field increases, the spin thermopower for the 6-ZSiNR junction dramatically decreases, while it notably enhances for the 7-ZSiNR one. Interestingly, the spin thermopower for both junctions is strongly dependent on the strength of magnetisation in FM, and it can be very pronounced with a maximum absolute value of 200 μV K(-1)by the optimisation of the parameters. However, with the increase in temperature, the spin thermopower for the 6-ZSiNR junction decreases, but the situation for the 7-ZSiNR one is opposite. Finally, the spin figure of merit for the 6-ZSiNR junction is found to be four orders

  19. Radar Observations of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    2003-05-01

    During the past 25 years, radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of more than 200 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler positional measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Radar astrometry can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. These observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  20. Coherent Laser Instrument Would Measure Range and Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Daniel; Cardell, Greg; San Martin, Alejandro; Spiers, Gary

    2005-01-01

    A proposed instrument would project a narrow laser beam that would be frequency-modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code for simultaneous measurement of range and velocity along the beam. The instrument performs these functions in a low mass, power, and volume package using a novel combination of established techniques. Originally intended as a low resource- footprint guidance sensor for descent and landing of small spacecraft onto Mars or small bodies (e.g., asteroids), the basic instrument concept also lends itself well to a similar application guiding aircraft (especially, small unmanned aircraft), and to such other applications as ranging of topographical features and measuring velocities of airborne light-scattering particles as wind indicators. Several key features of the instrument s design contribute to its favorable performance and resource-consumption characteristics. A laser beam is intrinsically much narrower (for the same exit aperture telescope or antenna) than a radar beam, eliminating the need to correct for the effect of sloping terrain over the beam width, as is the case with radar. Furthermore, the use of continuous-wave (CW), erbium-doped fiber lasers with excellent spectral purity (narrow line width) permits greater velocity resolution, while reducing the laser s power requirement compared to a more typical pulsed solid-state laser. The use of CW also takes proper advantage of the increased sensitivity of coherent detection, necessary in the first place for direct measurement of velocity using the Doppler effect. However, measuring range with a CW beam requires modulation to "tag" portions of it for time-of-flight determination; typically, the modulation consists of a PN code. A novel element of the instrument s design is the use of frequency modulation (FM) to accomplish both the PN-modulation and the Doppler-bias frequency shift necessary for signed velocity measurements. This permits the use of a single low-power waveguide electrooptic